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Sample records for cartilage explants cultures

  1. The metabolic dynamics of cartilage explants over a long-term culture period

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    E.K Moo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although previous studies have been performed on cartilage explant cultures, the generalized dynamics of cartilage metabolism after extraction from the host are still poorly understood due to differences in the experimental setups across studies, which in turn prevent building a complete picture. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the response of cartilage to the trauma sustained during extraction and determined the time needed for the cartilage to stabilize. Explants were extracted aseptically from bovine metacarpal-phalangeal joints and cultured for up to 17 days. RESULTS: The cell viability, cell number, proteoglycan content, and collagen content of the harvested explants were analyzed at 0, 2, 10, and 17 days after explantation. A high percentage of the cartilage explants were found to be viable. The cell density initially increased significantly but stabilized after two days. The proteoglycan content decreased gradually over time, but it did not decrease to a significant level due to leakage through the distorted peripheral collagen network and into the bathing medium. The collagen content remained stable for most of the culture period until it dropped abruptly on day 17. CONCLUSION: Overall, the tested cartilage explants were sustainable over long-term culture. They were most stable from day 2 to day 10. The degradation of the collagen on day 17 did not reach diseased levels, but it indicated the potential of the cultures to develop into degenerated cartilage. These findings have implications for the application of cartilage explants in pathophysiological fields.

  2. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G; Grijpma, Dirk W; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-03-01

    Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Explants of porcine cartilage and human osteoarthritic cartilage were cultured for four weeks and subjected to daily LIPUS or PEMF treatments. At one, two, three and four weeks follow-up explants were prepared for histological assessment or gene expression (porcine only). Non-treated porcine explants showed signs of atrophy of the superficial zone starting at one week. Treated explants did not. In LIPUS-treated explants cell clusters were observed. In PEMF-treated explants more hypertrophic-like changes were observed at later follow up. Newly synthesized tissue was present in treated explants. Gene expression profiles did indicate differences between the two methods. Both methods reduced expression of the aggrecan and collagen type II gene compared to the control. LIPUS treatment of human cartilage samples resulted in a reduction of degeneration according to Mankin scoring. PEMF treatment did not. LIPUS or PEMF prevented degenerative changes in pig knee cartilage explants. LIPUS reduced degeneration in human cartilage samples. LIPUS treatment seems to have more potency in the treatment of osteoarthritis than PEMF treatment.

  3. Structure of newly synthesized (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans and (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycan turnover products of cartilage explant cultures from dogs with experimental osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, S.L.; Billingham, M.E.; Muir, H.; Sandy, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of newly synthesized proteoglycans from explant cultures of cartilage from joints subjected to transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (osteoarthritic) and from normal (non- or sham-operated) joints was examined. The structure of the products of proteoglycan turnover was also examined using explants of normal and osteoarthritic cartilage maintained in culture for a 48 h chase period. The findings were as follows: Newly synthesized (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans extracted from cartilage explants from osteoarthritic joints whether examined 3 weeks, 3 months, or 6 months after surgery were larger than those from corresponding normal cartilage. This can be explained by the synthesis in osteoarthritic cartilage of abnormally long chondroitin sulfate chains on newly synthesised proteoglycans. The extracts also contained a newly formed small proteoglycan species that was unable to interact with hyaluronic acid. The proportion of this species was higher in osteoarthritic cartilage compared with normal, examined 3 weeks after surgery, but was generally absent from cartilage obtained 3 and 6 months after surgery. Compared with controls, a smaller proportion of the (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans released into the maintenance medium of explant cultures of osteoarthritic cartilage during a 48 h chase period was able to interact with hyaluronic acid. However, although furnished with longer (/sup 35/S)-glycosaminoglycan chains, these proteoglycans were smaller than those from control explants.

  4. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roelof

    PURPOSE: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. METHODS: Explants of porcine

  5. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Methods: Explants of porcine

  6. Suppression of MMP activity in bovine cartilage explants cultures has little if any effect on the release of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments

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    Sondergaard Bodil-Cecilie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive loss of articular cartilage is a central hallmark in many joint disease, however, the relative importance of individual proteolytic pathways leading to cartilage erosion is at present unknown. We therefore investigated the time-dependant release ex vivo of MMP- and aggrecanase-derived fragments of aggrecan and type II collagen into the supernatant of bovine cartilage explants cultures using neo-epitope specific immunoassays, and to associate the release of these fragments with the activity of proteolytic enzymes using inhibitors. Findings Bovine cartilage explants were cultured in the presence or absence of the catabolic cytokines oncostatin M (OSM and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα. In parallel, explants were co-cultured with protease inhibitors such as GM6001, TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3. Fragments released into the supernatant were determined using a range of neo-epitope specific immunoassays; (1 sandwich 342FFGVG-G2 ELISA, (2 competition NITEGE373ELISA (3 sandwich G1-NITEGE373 ELISA (4 competition 374ARGSV ELISA, and (5 sandwich 374ARGSV-G2 ELISA all detecting aggrecan fragments, and (6 sandwich CTX-II ELISA, detecting C-telopeptides of type II collagen. We found that (1 aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments are released in the early (day 2-7 and mid phase (day 9-14 into the supernatant from bovine explants cultures stimulated with catabolic cytokines, (2 the release of NITEGE373 neo-epitopes are delayed compared to the corresponding 374ARGSV fragments, (3 the MMP inhibitor GM6001 did not reduce the release of aggrecanase-derived fragment, but induced a further delay in the release of these fragments, and finally (4 the MMP-derived aggrecan and type II collagen fragments were released in the late phase (day 16-21 only. Conclusion Our data support the model, that aggrecanases and MMPs act independently in the processing of the aggrecan molecules, and furthermore that suppression of MMP-activity had little if

  7. Chondrogenic Priming at Reduced Cell Density Enhances Cartilage Adhesion of Equine Allogeneic MSCs - a Loading Sensitive Phenomenon in an Organ Culture Study with 180 Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaas, Jan H; Broeckx, Sarah Y; Chiers, Koen; Ferguson, Stephen J; Casarosa, Marco; Van Bruaene, Nathalie; Forsyth, Ramses; Duchateau, Luc; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Wuertz-Kozak, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical results of regenerative treatments for osteoarthritis are becoming increasingly significant. However, several questions remain UNANSWERED concerning mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) adhesion and incorporation into cartilage. To this end, peripheral blood (PB) MSCs were chondrogenically induced and/or stimulated with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) for a brief period of time just sufficient to prime differentiation. In an organ culture study, PKH26 labelled MSCs were added at two different cell densities (0.5 x106 vs 1.0 x106). In total, 180 explants of six horses (30 per horse) were divided into five groups: no lesion (i), lesion alone (ii), lesion with naïve MSCs (iii), lesion with chondrogenically-induced MSCs (iv) and lesion with chondrogenically-induced and PEMF-stimulated MSCs (v). Half of the explants were mechanically loaded and compared with the unloaded equivalents. Within each circumstance, six explants were histologically evaluated at different time points (day 1, 5 and 14). COMP expression was selectively increased by chondrogenic induction (p = 0.0488). PEMF stimulation (1mT for 10 minutes) further augmented COL II expression over induced values (p = 0.0405). On the other hand, MSC markers remained constant over time after induction, indicating a largely predifferentiated state. In the unloaded group, MSCs adhered to the surface in 92.6% of the explants and penetrated into 40.7% of the lesions. On the other hand, physiological loading significantly reduced surface adherence (1.9%) and lesion filling (3.7%) in all the different conditions (p < 0.0001). Remarkably, homogenous cell distribution was characteristic for chondrogenic induced MSCs (+/- PEMFs), whereas clump formation occurred in 39% of uninduced MSC treated cartilage explants. Finally, unloaded explants seeded with a moderately low density of MSCs exhibited greater lesion filling (p = 0.0022) and surface adherence (p = 0.0161) than explants seeded with higher densities of MSCs. In

  8. Suppression of MMP activity in bovine cartilage explants cultures has little if any effect on the release of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Bijue; Chen, Pingping; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive loss of articular cartilage is a central hallmark in many joint disease, however, the relative importance of individual proteolytic pathways leading to cartilage erosion is at present unknown. We therefore investigated the time-dependant release ex vivo of MMP- and aggreca......BACKGROUND: Progressive loss of articular cartilage is a central hallmark in many joint disease, however, the relative importance of individual proteolytic pathways leading to cartilage erosion is at present unknown. We therefore investigated the time-dependant release ex vivo of MMP...... cultured in the presence or absence of the catabolic cytokines oncostatin M (OSM) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). In parallel, explants were co-cultured with protease inhibitors such as GM6001, TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3. Fragments released into the supernatant were determined using a range of neo......-epitope specific immunoassays; (1) sandwich (342)FFGVG-G2 ELISA, (2) competition NITEGE(373)ELISA (3) sandwich G1-NITEGE(373 )ELISA (4) competition (374)ARGSV ELISA, and (5) sandwich (374)ARGSV-G2 ELISA all detecting aggrecan fragments, and (6) sandwich CTX-II ELISA, detecting C-telopeptides of type II collagen...

  9. Chondrogenic Priming at Reduced Cell Density Enhances Cartilage Adhesion of Equine Allogeneic MSCs - a Loading Sensitive Phenomenon in an Organ Culture Study with 180 Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. Spaas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical results of regenerative treatments for osteoarthritis are becoming increasingly significant. However, several questions remain unanswered concerning mesenchymal stem cell (MSC adhesion and incorporation into cartilage. Methods: To this end, peripheral blood (PB MSCs were chondrogenically induced and/or stimulated with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs for a brief period of time just sufficient to prime differentiation. In an organ culture study, PKH26 labelled MSCs were added at two different cell densities (0.5 x106 vs 1.0 x106. In total, 180 explants of six horses (30 per horse were divided into five groups: no lesion (i, lesion alone (ii, lesion with naïve MSCs (iii, lesion with chondrogenically-induced MSCs (iv and lesion with chondrogenically-induced and PEMF-stimulated MSCs (v. Half of the explants were mechanically loaded and compared with the unloaded equivalents. Within each circumstance, six explants were histologically evaluated at different time points (day 1, 5 and 14. Results: COMP expression was selectively increased by chondrogenic induction (p = 0.0488. PEMF stimulation (1mT for 10 minutes further augmented COL II expression over induced values (p = 0.0405. On the other hand, MSC markers remained constant over time after induction, indicating a largely predifferentiated state. In the unloaded group, MSCs adhered to the surface in 92.6% of the explants and penetrated into 40.7% of the lesions. On the other hand, physiological loading significantly reduced surface adherence (1.9% and lesion filling (3.7% in all the different conditions (p Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that primed chondrogenic induction of MSCs at a lower cell density without loading results in significantly enhanced and homogenous MSC adhesion and incorporation into equine cartilage.

  10. Explant cultures of human colon

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    Autrup, Herman; Barrett, L.A.; Jackson, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    Human colonic epithelium has been cultured as explants in a chemically defined medium for periods of 1 to 20 days. The viability of the explants was shown by the preservation of the ultrastructural features of the colonic epithelial cells and by active incorporation of radioactive precursors...... into cellular DNA and protein. A progressive decrease in the number of goblet cells, decrease in the depth of the crypts, and a change from a columnar to a cuboidal epithelium were observed. After 20 days in culture the colonic mucosa consisted of a single layer of cuboidal epithelial cells and a few glands....... The ability to maintain colonic mucosa in culture was subject to both intra- and interindividual variation. Cultured human colonic mucosa also activated a chemical procarcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene, into metabolites which bound to cellular DNA. A 100-fold interindividual variation in this binding was observed....

  11. Effect of glutaraldehyde fixation on the frictional response of immature bovine articular cartilage explants.

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    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Hehir, Kristin E; Zhu, Kaicen; Willis, Callen E; Marinescu, Anca G; Merali, Natasha; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2014-02-07

    This study examined functional properties and biocompatibility of glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine articular cartilage over several weeks of incubation at body temperature to investigate its potential use as a resurfacing material in joint arthroplasty. In the first experiment, treated cartilage disks were fixed using 0.02, 0.20 and 0.60% glutaraldehyde for 24h then incubated, along with an untreated control group, in saline for up to 28d at 37°C. Both the equilibrium compressive and tensile moduli increased nearly twofold in treated samples compared to day 0 control, and remained at that level from day 1 to 28; the equilibrium friction coefficient against glass rose nearly twofold immediately after fixation (day 1) but returned to control values after day 7. Live explants co-cultured with fixed explants showed no quantitative difference in cell viability over 28d. In general, no significant differences were observed between 0.20 and 0.60% groups, so 0.20% was deemed sufficient for complete fixation. In the second experiment, cartilage-on-cartilage frictional measurements were performed under a migrating contact configuration. In the treated group, one explant was fixed using 0.20% glutaraldehyde while the apposing explant was left untreated; in the control group both explants were left untreated. From day 1 to 28, the treated group exhibited either no significant difference or slightly lower friction coefficient than the untreated group. These results suggest that a properly titrated glutaraldehyde treatment can reproduce the desired functional properties of native articular cartilage and maintain these properties for at least 28d at body temperature. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Chondrogenic priming at reduced cell density enhances cartilage adhesion of equine allogeneic MSCs: a loading sensitive phenomenon in an organ culture study with 180 explants

    OpenAIRE

    Spaas, Jan H; Broeckx, Sarah Y; Chiers, Koen; Ferguson, Stephen J; Casarosa, Marco; Van Bruaene, Nathalie; Forsyth, Ramses; Duchateau, Luc; Franco-Obregon, Alfredo; Wuertz-Kozak, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical results of regenerative treatments for osteoarthritis are becoming increasingly significant. However, several questions remain unanswered concerning mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) adhesion and incorporation into cartilage. Methods: To this end, peripheral blood (PB) MSCs were chondrogenically induced and/or stimulated with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) for a brief period of time just sufficient to prime differentiation. In an organ culture study, PKH26 labelled MSCs ...

  13. Effects of sodium hyaluronate and methylprednisolone acetate on proteoglycan synthesis in equine articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Aimie J; Stewart, Allison A; Constable, Peter D; Eurell, Jo Ann C; Freeman, David E; Griffon, Dominique J

    2005-01-01

    To determine effects of sodium hyaluronate (HA) on corticosteroid-induced cartilage matrix catabolism in equine articular cartilage explants. 30 articular cartilage explants from fetlock joints of 5 adult horses without joint disease. Articular cartilage explants were treated with control medium or medium containing methylprednisolone acetate (MPA; 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 mg/mL), HA (0.1, 1.0, or 1.5 mg/mL), or both. Proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of sulfur 35-labeled sodium sulphate into PGs, and PG degradation was measured by release of radiolabeled PGs into the medium. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in media and explants and total explant DNA were determined. Methylprednisolone acetate caused a decrease in PG synthesis, whereas HA had no effect. Only the combination of MPA at a concentration of 0.05 mg/mL and HA at a concentration of 1.0 mg/mL increased PG synthesis, compared with control explants. Methylprednisolone acetate increased degradation of newly synthesized PGs into the medium, compared with control explants, and HA alone had no effect. Hyaluronate had no effect on MPA-induced PG degradation and release into media. Neither MPA alone nor HA alone had an effect on total cartilage GAG content. Methylprednisolone acetate caused an increase in release of GAG into the medium at 48 and 72 hours after treatment. In combination, HA had no protective effect on MPA-induced GAG release into the medium. Total cartilage DNA content was not affected by treatments. Our results indicate that HA addition has little effect on corticosteroid-induced cartilage matrix PG catabolism in articular cartilage explants.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein-induced cartilage development in tissue culture

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    Sato, K.; Urist, M.R.

    1984-03-01

    Outgrowths of mesenchyme-type cells from explants of allogeneic rat muscle onto a substratum of bone matrix containing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) differentiate into cartilage. When BMP is chemically extracted from the bone matrix, the explanted cells develop only into fibrous tissue. When exogenous bovine BMP is introduced into the culture medium, either as a microsuspension or as a layer of particles between the matrix and the muscle cell tissue, cartilage develops at the interface between the matrix and the mesenchymal cell outgrowth. The chondrogenetic response is induced by as little as 2 micrograms of BMP; the optimum dose is 10 micrograms/40 mg (wet weight) of explant. The endogenous BMP equivalent for a comparable chondrogenetic response is about 0.6 micrograms/mg of allogeneic matrix. The minimum time for transfer of BMP to mesenchymal cell receptors is 1.0 hour, adequate time is 2.5 hours, and optimum time is approximately 5.0 hours. Measured in terms of incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into DNA and of /sup 35/S sulfate into glycosaminoglycan, there is a latent period of one to three days preceeding the differentiation of mesenchyme-type cells into cartilage. During this latent period BMP-modulated mesenchymal cells disaggregate, migrate, reaggregate, and proliferate on new surfaces and constitute the morphogenetic phase of bone development. By the fourth day cells simultaneously undergo mitotic division, synthesize extracellular cartilage matrix, and establish the cytodifferentiation phase of development.

  15. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. - Highlights: • Recycled fin explants outgrow cells bearing stable mesenchymal traits. • Cell production and quality is enhanced in the recycled explant culture system. • Fresh fin primary culture is highly variable and loose epithelial traits over time

  16. An ovine tracheal explant culture model for allergic airway inflammation

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    Abeynaike Latasha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway epithelium is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthmatic disease. However, much of our understanding of airway epithelial cell function in asthma has been derived from in vitro studies that may not accurately reflect the interactive cellular and molecular pathways active between different tissue constituents in vivo. Methods Using a sheep model of allergic asthma, tracheal explants from normal sheep and allergic sheep exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen were established to investigate airway mucosal responses ex vivo. Explants were cultured for up to 48 h and tissues were stained to identify apoptotic cells, goblet cells, mast cells and eosinophils. The release of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α by cultured tracheal explants, was assessed by ELISA. Results The general morphology and epithelial structure of the tracheal explants was well maintained in culture although evidence of advanced apoptosis within the mucosal layer was noted after culture for 48 h. The number of alcian blue/PAS positive mucus-secreting cells within the epithelial layer was reduced in all cultured explants compared with pre-cultured (0 h explants, but the loss of staining was most evident in allergic tissues. Mast cell and eosinophil numbers were elevated in the allergic tracheal tissues compared to naïve controls, and in the allergic tissues there was a significant decline in mast cells after 24 h culture in the presence or absence of HDM allergen. IL-6 was released by allergic tracheal explants in culture but was undetected in cultured control explants. Conclusions Sheep tracheal explants maintain characteristics of the airway mucosa that may not be replicated when studying isolated cell populations in vitro. There were key differences identified in explants from allergic compared to control airways and in their responses in culture for 24 h. Importantly, this study establishes the potential for the

  17. Citrus tissue culture employing vegetative explants.

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    Chaturvedi, H C; Singh, S K; Sharma, A K; Agnihotri, S

    2001-11-01

    Citrus being a number one fruit of the world due to its high nutritional value, huge production of fruits and fruit products, the citrus industry may be considered a major fruit industry. Though citrus orchard area in India is comparable to USA, the produce is far less, while its export is nil. Biotechnology has played an outstanding role in boosting the citrus industry, e.g., in Spain, which is now the biggest exporter of citrus fruit with the application of micrografting. Amongst the fruit trees, perhaps the maximum tissue culture research has been done in citrus during the past four decades, however, the results of practical value are meagre. The shortfalls in citrus tissue culture research and some advancements made in this direction along with bright prospects are highlighted, restricting the review to vegetative explants only. Whilst utilization of nucellar embryogenesis is limited to rootstocks, the other aspects, like, regeneration and proliferation of shoot meristems measuring 200 microm in length--a global breakthrough--of two commercially important scion species, Citrus aurantifolia and C. sinensis and an important rootstock, C. limonia, improvement of micrografting technique, cloning of the same two scion species as well as some Indian rootstock species, employing nodal stem segments of mature trees, of immense practical value have been elaborated. A rare phenomenon of shift in the morphogenetic pattern of differentiation from shoot bud differentiation to embryoid formation occurred during the long-term culture of stem callus of C. grandis. Stem callus-regenerated plants of C. aurantifolia, C. sinensis and C. grandis showed variation in their ploidy levels and a somaclonal variant of C. sinensis, which produced seedless fruits was isolated. Tailoring of rooting in microshoots to a tap root-like system by changing the inorganic salt composition of the rooting medium, resulting in 100% transplant success, and germplasm preservation through normal growth

  18. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) modulates extracellular matrix turnover in cartilage explants ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reker, Ditte; Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie Freja; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18) is in clinical development as a potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). In vitro studies have shown that cartilage regenerative properties of sprifermin involve chondrocyte proliferation and extracellular matrix...... aggrecanase activity. Results: Sprifermin was able to reach the chondrocytes through the extracellular matrix, as it increased cell proliferation and metabolic activity of explants. ProC2 and CS846 was dose-dependently increased (P ... by immuno-histochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. ECM turnover was quantified by biomarker ELISAs; ProC2 reflecting type II collagen formation, CS846 reflecting aggrecan formation, active MMP9, C2M and AGNx2 reflecting matrix metalloproteinase activity, and AGNx1 reflecting...

  19. The effect of protease inhibitors on the induction of osteoarthritis-related biomarkers in bovine full-depth cartilage explants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Jiang, Mengmeng

    2015-01-01

    was detected in either extracts or supernatants; ii) Active ADAMTS-4 was primarily responsible for E373-374A bond cleavage in aggrecan in this setting; and iii) The compensatory mechanism could be triggered following the blockage of the enzyme caused by inhibitors. Conclusions ADAMTS-4 appeared to be the major...... protease for the generation of 374ARGS aggrecan fragment in the TNF-α/OSM stimulated bovine cartilage explants. This study addresses the need to determine the roles of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 in human articular degradation in OA and hence identify the attractive target for slowing down human cartilage...

  20. Effect of storage media and time on fin explants culture in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of storage media and time was investigated on fin explants culture in the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Fin explants under sterile conditions were able to produce cells at different storage media and time. On the outgrowth of cells, fin explants stored for seven days before culturing showed significantly higher growth ...

  1. Cell Migration in Tissues: Explant Culture and Live Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Ralitza; Barbazan, Jorge; Simon, Anthony; Vignjevic, Danijela Matic; Krndija, Denis

    2018-01-01

    Cell migration is a process that ensures correct cell localization and function in development and homeostasis. In disease such as cancer, cells acquire an upregulated migratory capacity that leads to their dissemination throughout the body. Live imaging of cell migration allows for better understanding of cell behaviors in development, adult tissue homeostasis and disease. We have optimized live imaging procedures to track cell migration in adult murine tissue explants derived from: (1) healthy gut; (2) primary intestinal carcinoma; and (3) the liver, a common metastatic site. To track epithelial cell migration in the gut, we generated an inducible fluorescent reporter mouse, enabling us to visualize and track individual cells in unperturbed gut epithelium. To image intratumoral cancer cells, we use a spontaneous intestinal cancer model based on the activation of Notch1 and deletion of p53 in the mouse intestinal epithelium, which gives rise to aggressive carcinoma. Interaction of cancer cells with a metastatic niche, the mouse liver, is addressed using a liver colonization model. In summary, we describe a method for long-term 3D imaging of tissue explants by two-photon excitation microscopy. Explant culturing and imaging can help understand dynamic behavior of cells in homeostasis and disease, and would be applicable to various tissues.

  2. [The effect of Solcoseryl on explant cultures of the hippocampus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, G; Grosse, G; Goworek, K; Franz, C; Liebezeit, K

    1979-01-01

    Explants of hippocampus from fetal rats were cultivated in Maximow chambers in semisynthetic medium up to 12 days in vitro. The cultures were fixed Bouin, slided 15 micron, coloured with Klüver-Barrera and some morphological parameters were tested. 1. The nerve fiber index increased by influence of 1% Solcoseryl in relation to control cultures, which growed in minimal medium. An essential stimulation was observed by application of placentar serum and embryonal extract into the culture medium. 2. Die decrease of the number of neurons and glial cells per unit of area and a small decrease of the area of neuron nuclei was discussed in relation to the effect of the pharmacon Solcoseryl on O2- consumption. 3. Solcoseryl (firm Solco AG, Base) is an extract of calf blood. It can not substitute other tissue extracts.

  3. [Colorectal cancer: tissutal explantation and primary cell culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisni, Roberto; Failli, Alessandra; Orsini, Giulia; Kastsiuchenka, Olga; Natale, Gianfranco; Castagna, Maura; Legitimo, Annalisa; Aghasbabyan, Alekandr; Ambrosini, Carlo Enrico; Consolini, Rita; Miccoli, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Setting of cellular cultures extracted from colorectal cancer tissue represents a valid model for in vitro study of biological and molecular characteristics of each single tumor finalized to obtain a tailored chemiotherapy. The end point of this study is to create primary cellular cultures from "fresh" cancer tissue in different stages of evolution. Cancer tissue samples are obtained by means of surgical excisional biopsy or by means of semi-automatic biopsy instrument (Sprig-Cut). After having compared different approaches, two experimental protocols have been selected to have the highest number or intact cells: enzimatic digestion with trypsin and explantation. Primary cell culture free of microbic contamination, obtained mainly by means of Spring-Cut methods, underwent immunohistochemical analysis to evaluate what kind of cell have been grown in vitro by measuring the expression of CK20 and GFAP both resulted positive. The possibility of setting a primary cell culture which represents the cancer of each patient allows a pharmacologic and biomolecular study which can contribute to the development of a tailored adjuvant therapy with many advantages for the patient in terms of positive answer to the treatment and reduced toxicity.

  4. Explant culture of rat colon: A model system for studying metabolism of chemical carcinogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Stoner, G.D.; Jackson, F.

    1978-01-01

    An explant culture system has been developed for the long-term maintenance of colonic tissue from the rat. Explants of 1 cm2 in size were placed in tissue-culture dishes to which was added 2 ml of CMRL-1066 medium supplemented with glucose, hydrocortisone, beta-retinyl acetate, and either 2.5% bo......,12-dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene, aflatoxin B1, dimethylnitrosamine, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, and methylazoxymethanol acetate into chemical species that bind to cellular DNA and protein....

  5. Cultivar, explant type and culture medium influencing embryogenesis and organogenegenesis in Anthurium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaowaphan Sontikun

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cultivars, culture media, explant type and wounding on culture response of anthurium were studied. Valantino gave the highest callus formation (83.73% significantly different from Sonat (78.73% and Plew Thien Phuket (45.66%. Valantino and Plew Thien Phuket gave meristematic nodular callus (MNC whereas Sonat produced embryogenic-like callus (ELC. Modified Murashige and Skoog (MMS medium gave the highest callus formation from both leaf (86.6% and node (100%. Callus obtained in Nitsch and Nitsch (NN and MMS was MNC while woody plant (WPM medium provided ELC. For explant types, internode gave the highest callus formation (72.63%. Nodal and internodal explant gave ELC while the leaf explant yielded MNC. Wounding leaf blades tended to promote more MNC.

  6. Explant culture of human peripheral lung. I. Metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoner, G.D.; Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    the predominant alveolar epithelial cell type. Lamellar inclusion bodies were released from the type 2 cells and accumulated in the alveolar spaces. The metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP) in human lung explants cultured for up to 7 days was investigated. Human lung explants had measurable aryl hydrocarbon......Human lung explants have been maintained in vitro for a period of 25 days. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the broncholar epithelial cells, type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, and stromal fibroblasts incorporated 3H-thymidine during the culture. After 7 to 10 days, type 2 cells were...... hydroxylase activity and could metabolize BP into forms that were bound to cellular DNA and protein. Peripheral lung had significantly lower aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity than cultured bronchus but both tissues had similar binding levels of BP to DNA. Radioautographic studies indicated that all cell...

  7. Resolving browning during the establishment of explant cultures in Vicia faba L. for genetic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Klenotičová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimisation of in vitro regeneration systems of two explant types for low-tannine cultivars of faba bean based on culturing of shoot apices and cotyledonary nodes were provided by usage of various antioxidants - ascorbic acid, citric acid, glutathione and activated charcoal. In subsequent testing, the combined effects of antioxidants with transformation co-cultivation compounds acetosyringone and L-cysteine was studied. The application of antioxidants lead to decreased callogenesis, citric acids treatments (50 mg.l−1 dramatically decreased necrotic response of explants. However, citric acid, used together with ascorbic acid completely inhibited shoot growth in shoot apex cultures. Glutathion evoked hyperhydricity of explants. Activated charcoal induced rooting on media which are commonly used for shoot proliferation. Combination of acetosyringone with antioxidants influenced shoot proliferation, except of variant with ascorbic acid. Citric acid was the best and universal antioxidant in faba bean in vitro cultures and its use is recommended for faba bean genetic transformation experiments.

  8. Ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent by using the direct explant cell culture technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, Gürkan Raşit; Aydıntuğ, Yavuz Sinan; Günhan, Omer; Oztürk, Kamile; Gülses, Aydın

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation of ex vivo produced oral mucosal equivalents using keratinocytes cultured by direct explant technique. Oral mucosa tissue samples were obtained from the keratinized gingival tissues of 14 healthy human subjects. Human oral mucosa keratinocytes from an oral mucosa biopsy specimen were dissociated by the explant technique. Once a sufficient population of keratinocytes was reached, they were seeded onto the type IV collagen coated "AlloDerm" and taken for histological and immunohistochemical examinations at 11 days postseeding of the keratinocytes on the cadaveric human dermal matrix. Histopathologically and immunohistochemically, 12 out of 14 successful ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalents (EVPOME) that consisted of a stratified epidermis on a dermal matrix have been developed with keratinocytes cultured by the explant technique. The technical handling involved in the direct explant method at the beginning of the process has fewer steps than the enzymatic method and use of the direct explant technique protocol for culturing of human oral mucosa keratinocyte may be more adequate for EVPOME production.

  9. An in vitro model for detecting skin irritants: methyl green-pyronine staining of human skin explant cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J. J. L.; Lehé, C.; Cammans, K. D. A.; Das, P. K.; Elliott, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the potential of human organotypic skin explant cultures (hOSECs) for screening skin irritants. Test chemicals were applied to the epidermis of the skin explants which were incubated for 4, 24 or 48 h in tissue culture medium. A decrease in epidermal RNA staining, visualised in frozen

  10. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients

  11. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. (Univ. of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-10-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

  12. Development of a human stomach explant organ culture system to study the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, D T; Rosenthal, L E; Mobley, H L; Iseri, O; Zhu, S M; Resau, J H

    1990-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to define conditions under which Helicobacter (formerly Campylobacter) pylori and viable human gastric mucosa could coexist in tissue culture with the ultimate goal of developing an in vitro experimental model which could be used to study interactions between H. pylori and gastric epithelium. Antral gastric biopsies obtained at upper endoscopy were placed in culture in either CMRL-1066 or keratinocyte growth media and incubated at 37 degrees C in either an oxygen-enriched environment (45% O2, 50% N2, 5% CO2) or a standard oxygen environment (95% air, 5% CO2). Without selective antibiotics to suppress growth of non-H.-pylori organisms, H. pylori could not be isolated from most initially positive tissue even after only 2 h in tissue culture; however, when selective antibiotics were utilized in the tissue culture media, H. pylori was isolated from 9 of 14 initially positive cases after 24-72 h in tissue culture. There was little difference in the morphology of either surface or glandular epithelium in H.-pylori-negative explants between time zero and 48-hour cultures. However, H.-pylori-positive explants after 48 h in tissue culture showed a significant increase in injury to both surface and glandular epithelium when compared to time zero specimens. These data demonstrate that viable H. pylori and human gastric epithelium can be maintained in explant organ culture and suggest that this gastric mucosal explant culture system may be useful in studying the significance of H. pylori infection of human gastric epithelia.

  13. In vitro maintenance of spermatogenesis in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risley, M.S.; Miller, A.; Bumcrot, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Spermatogenesis has been maintained for extended periods in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media supplemented with bovine serum albumin, insulin, transferrin, follicle-stimulating hormone, dihydrotestosterone, testosterone, retinol, ascorbate, and tocopherol. The organization of the testis fragments was maintained for 28 days, and all stages of development were present throughout the culture period. 3 H-Thymidine-labeled secondary (Type B) spermatogonia developed in 28 days into spermatids at the acrosomal vesicle stage whereas labeled zygotene spermatocytes became mature spermatids in 28 days. Spermatogonial proliferation also continued in vitro for 28 days. Germ cell differentiation was not dependent upon exogenous testosterone, ascorbate, or tocopherol since 3 H-labeled spermatogonia became mature spermatids in testes cultured 35 days in media lacking these supplements. Autoradiography demonstrated that 55% of the luminal sperm present in explants cultured 10 days had differentiated in vitro. Sperm from testes cultured 10-35 days were similar to sperm from freshly dissected testes with regard to motility and fecundity, and eggs fertilized with sperm from explant cultures developed normally into swimming tadpoles. The results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining vertebrate spermatogenesis in culture and suggest that in vitro analysis of Xenopus spermatogenesis using defined media may provide important insights into the evolution of regulatory mechanisms in spermatogenesis

  14. Induction of bulb organogenesis in in vitro cultures of tarda tulip (Tulipa tarda Stapf.) from seed-derived explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, Małgorzata; Bach, Anna

    2014-01-01

    A protocol for obtaining bulbs via in vitro organogenesis was developed for tarda tulip ( Tulipa tarda Stapf). Scale explants were obtained from bulbs formed at the base of seedlings or from adventitious bulbs that developed from callus tissue forming on stolons or on germinating seeds. Some explants were subjected to chilling at 5°C for 12 wk. The culture media contained 3 or 6% sucrose and was supplemented with either no growth regulators, either 0.5 μM 6-benzyl-aminopurine (BAP) or 18.9 or 94.6 μM abscisic acid (ABA). Cultures were maintained in the dark at 20°C. Callus tissue developed mainly on media without growth regulators or with BAP. Callus was formed from up to 96% of explants derived from non-chilled adventitious bulbs that were treated with 3% sucrose and 0.5 μM BAP. Less callus was formed from chilled explants compared with non-chilled explants. Newly formed adventitious bulbs appeared on the explants via direct and indirect organogenesis. The media with BAP promoted the formation of adventitious bulbs at a rate of 56-92% from non-chilled explants, whereas a maximum rate of 36% was observed from chilled explants. ABA inhibited the induction of adventitious bulbs and callus. The adventitious bulbs obtained in these experiments contained a meristem, which was evidence that they had developed properly.

  15. Endogenous cytokinins in Cocos nucifera L. in vitro cultures obtained from plumular explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, L; Azpeitia, A; Oropeza, C; Jones, L H; Fuchsova, K; Spichal, L; Strnad, M

    2010-11-01

    Auxin induces in vitro somatic embryogenesis in coconut plumular explants through callus formation. Embryogenic calli and non-embryogenic calli can be formed from the initial calli. Analysis of endogenous cytokinins showed the occurrence of cytokinins with aromatic and aliphatic side chains. Fourteen aliphatic cytokinins and four aromatic cytokinins were analysed in the three types of calli and all the cytokinins were found in each type, although some in larger proportions than others. The most abundant cytokinins in each type of callus were isopentenyladenine-9-glucoside, zeatin-9-glucoside, zeatin riboside, isopentenyladenine riboside, dihydrozeatin and dihydrozeatin riboside in decreasing order. Total cytokinin content was compared between the three types of calli, and it was found to be lower in embryogenic calli compared to non-embryogenic calli or initial calli. The same pattern was observed for individual cytokinins. When explants were cultured in media containing exogenously added cytokinins, the formation of embryogenic calli in the explants was reduced. When 8-azaadenine (an anticytokinin) was added the formation of embryogenic calli and somatic embryos was increased. These results suggest that the difference in somatic embryo formation capacity observed between embryogenic calli and non-embryogenic calli is related to their endogenous cytokinin contents.

  16. FluoroGold-Labeled Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture for Neurotoxicity Screening Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Smedowski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical toxicity screening of the new retinal compounds is an absolute requirement in the pathway of further drug development. Since retinal neuron cultivation and in vivo studies are relatively expensive and time consuming, we aimed to create a fast and reproducible ex vivo system for retinal toxicity screening. For this purpose, we used rat retinal explant culture that was retrogradely labeled with the FluoroGold before the isolation. Explants were exposed to a toxic concentration of gentamicin and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, a known neuroprotective agent. The measured outcomes showed the cell density in retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the culture medium. Gentamicin-induced oxidative stress resulted in retinal cell damage and rapid LDH release to the culture medium (p0.05. As well as this, the LDH activity was directly correlated with the cell count in GCL (R=−0.84, p<0.00001, making a sensitive marker of retinal neuron damage. The FLOREC protocol could be considered as a fast, reproducible, and sensitive method to detect neurotoxicity in the screening studies of the retinal drugs.

  17. Effect of explant density and medium culture volumes on cassava micropropagation in Temporal Immersion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Basail

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the need of producing high quality planting material available to cassava growers, it has been necessary to look for alternatives in order to increase the efficiancy of in vitro propagation methods and their automation, such as the use of the Temporal Immersion Systems (RITA®. This work was carried out to increase the multiplication coefficient for cassava mass propagation through out Temporal Immersion Systems. The clone ‘CMC-40’ was used. Different medium volumes per explant, and material density per unit at a given Immersion frequency were tested. The highest results were obtained in the 2.8 multiplication coefficient with 20 ml culture medium volume and 3.2 using a density of 40 explants/flask. When the Temporal Immersion System is used with these results, a more efficient method for cassava micropropagation is established and also higher quality vitroplants for the rooting stage and further acclimatization in field conditions are produced. Key Words: Tissue Culture, liquid culture medium, Manihot esculenta Crantz

  18. Glucocorticoids affect 24 h clock genes expression in human adipose tissue explant cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación Gómez-Abellán

    Full Text Available to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V and subcutaneous (S adipose tissue (AT in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX on positive and negative clock genes expression.VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2 (n = 6. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR.CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements in the SAT (situation not present in VAT. A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues.24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements and PER2 (negative element mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure.

  19. Glucocorticoids affect 24 h clock genes expression in human adipose tissue explant cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Díez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Luján, Juan A; Ordovás, José M; Garaulet, Marta

    2012-01-01

    to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V) and subcutaneous (S) adipose tissue (AT) in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX) on positive and negative clock genes expression. VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2)) (n = 6). In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX) and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours) were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR. CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element) was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements) in the SAT (situation not present in VAT). A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues. 24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements) and PER2 (negative element) mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure.

  20. Co-culture systems-based strategies for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Guo, Weimin; Wang, Mingjie; Hao, Chunxiang; Lu, Liang; Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Xu; Chen, Mingxue; Li, Penghao; Jiang, Peng; Lu, Shibi; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2018-03-01

    Cartilage engineering facilitates repair and regeneration of damaged cartilage using engineered tissue that restores the functional properties of the impaired joint. The seed cells used most frequently in tissue engineering, are chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. Seed cells activity plays a key role in the regeneration of functional cartilage tissue. However, seed cells undergo undesirable changes after in vitro processing procedures, such as degeneration of cartilage cells and induced hypertrophy of mesenchymal stem cells, which hinder cartilage tissue engineering. Compared to monoculture, which does not mimic the in vivo cellular environment, co-culture technology provides a more realistic microenvironment in terms of various physical, chemical, and biological factors. Co-culture technology is used in cartilage tissue engineering to overcome obstacles related to the degeneration of seed cells, and shows promise for cartilage regeneration and repair. In this review, we focus first on existing co-culture systems for cartilage tissue engineering and related fields, and discuss the conditions and mechanisms thereof. This is followed by methods for optimizing seed cell co-culture conditions to generate functional neo-cartilage tissue, which will lead to a new era in cartilage tissue engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Neuronal differentiation of hair-follicle-bulge-derived stem cells co-cultured with mouse cochlear modiolus explants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Schomann

    Full Text Available Stem-cell-based repair of auditory neurons may represent an attractive therapeutic option to restore sensorineural hearing loss. Hair-follicle-bulge-derived stem cells (HFBSCs are promising candidates for this type of therapy, because they (1 have migratory properties, enabling migration after transplantation, (2 can differentiate into sensory neurons and glial cells, and (3 can easily be harvested in relatively high numbers. However, HFBSCs have never been used for this purpose. We hypothesized that HFBSCs can be used for cell-based repair of the auditory nerve and we have examined their migration and incorporation into cochlear modiolus explants and their subsequent differentiation. Modiolus explants obtained from adult wild-type mice were cultured in the presence of EF1α-copGFP-transduced HFBSCs, constitutively expressing copepod green fluorescent protein (copGFP. Also, modiolus explants without hair cells were co-cultured with DCX-copGFP-transduced HFBSCs, which demonstrate copGFP upon doublecortin expression during neuronal differentiation. Velocity of HFBSC migration towards modiolus explants was calculated, and after two weeks, co-cultures were fixed and processed for immunohistochemical staining. EF1α-copGFP HFBSC migration velocity was fast: 80.5 ± 6.1 μm/h. After arrival in the explant, the cells formed a fascicular pattern and changed their phenotype into an ATOH1-positive neuronal cell type. DCX-copGFP HFBSCs became green-fluorescent after integration into the explants, confirming neuronal differentiation of the cells. These results show that HFBSC-derived neuronal progenitors are migratory and can integrate into cochlear modiolus explants, while adapting their phenotype depending on this micro-environment. Thus, HFBSCs show potential to be employed in cell-based therapies for auditory nerve repair.

  2. Organotypic Culture of Breast Tumor Explants as a Multicellular System for the Screening of Natural Compounds with Antineoplastic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Edith Carranza-Torres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. The search for novel compounds with antitumor activity, with less adverse effects and higher efficacy, and the development of methods to evaluate their toxicity is an area of ​​intense research. In this study we implemented the preparation and culture of breast tumor explants, which were obtained from precision-cut breast tumor slices. In order to validate the model we are proposing to screen antineoplastic effect of natural compounds, we selected caffeic acid, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Using the Krumdieck tissue slicer, precision-cut tissue slices were prepared from breast cancer samples; from these slices, 4 mm explants were obtained and incubated with the selected compounds. Viability was assessed by Alamar Blue assay, LDH release, and histopathological criteria. Results showed that the viability of the explants cultured in the presence of paclitaxel (positive control decreased significantly (P<0.05; however, tumor samples responded differently to each compound. When the explants were coincubated with paclitaxel and compounds, a synergic effect was observed. This study shows that ex vivo culture of breast cancer explants offers a suitable alternative model for evaluating natural or synthetic compounds with antitumor properties within the complex microenvironment of the tumor.

  3. Culturated rat cerebral cortex explants and their application in the study of SPECT scan radiopharaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, B.M. de.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis mechanics that result in the distinct localization of radiopharmaceuticals within the brain have been investigated. In order to 'get more insight' in uptake and binding of radiopharmaceuticals bu brain tissue, use has been made of the tissue culture technique. Tissue culture privides the opportunity of doing experiments with brain tissue under stable conditions, in the absence of a blood-brain barrier, and without interference by cerebral blood flow. The present thesis is presented in two sections. The first part focusses on longterm culture of 'organotypic' cerebral neocortex tissue, obtained from neonatal rat brain and explanted into a chemically defined medium. Procedures were developed which enabled culturing of this tissue without the occurence of central necrosis and with the preservation of a characteristic histiotypic organization. Morphological characteristics of the cultures were described and measured at various ages in vitro. In the second part, the cultures were used to study mechanisms that might contribute to the tissue uptake of radiopharmaceuticals which are in clinical use for SPECT brain imaging. (author). 369 refs.; 50 figs.; 13 tabs

  4. In vitro cell cultures obtained from different explants of Corylus avellana produce Taxol and taxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalli Francesca

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxol is an effective antineoplastic agent, originally extracted from the bark of Taxus brevifolia with a low yield. Many attempts have been made to produce Taxol by chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis and plant tissue cultures. However, to date, the availability of this compound is not sufficient to satisfy the commercial requirements. The aim of the present work was to produce suspension cell cultures from plants not belonging to Taxus genus and to verify whether they produced Taxol and taxanes. For this purpose different explants of hazel (Corylus avellana species were used to optimize the protocol for inducing in vitro callus, an undifferentiated tissue from which suspension cell cultures were established. Results Calli were successfully induced from stems, leaves and seeds grown in various hormone concentrations and combinations. The most suitable callus to establish suspension cell cultures was obtained from seeds. Media recovered from suspension cell cultures contained taxanes, and showed antiproliferative activity on human tumour cells. Taxol, 10-deacetyltaxol and 10-deacetylbaccatin III were the main taxanes identified. The level of Taxol recovered from the media of hazel cultures was similar to that found in yew cultures. Moreover, the production of taxanes in hazel cell cultures increased when elicitors were used. Conclusion Here we show that hazel cell cultures produce Taxol and taxanes under controlled conditions. This result suggests that hazel possesses the enzymes for Taxol production, which until now was considered to be a pathway particular to Taxus genus. The main benefit of producing taxanes through hazel cell cultures is that hazel is widely available, grows at a much faster rate in vivo, and is easier to cultivate in vitro than yew. In addition, the production of callus directly from hazel seeds shortens the culture time and minimizes the probability of contamination. Therefore, hazel could become a

  5. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  6. Blockade of Toll-like receptor 2 prevents spontaneous cytokine release from rheumatoid arthritis ex vivo synovial explant cultures

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nic An Ultaigh, Sinead

    2011-02-23

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells. Methods RA synovial tissue biopsies, obtained under direct visualization at arthroscopy, were established as synovial explant cultures ex vivo or snap frozen for immunohistology. Mononuclear cell cultures were isolated from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of RA patients. Cultures were incubated with the TLR1\\/2 ligand, Pam3CSK4 (200 ng, 1 and 10 μg\\/ml), an anti-TLR2 antibody (OPN301, 1 μg\\/ml) or an immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1 μg\\/ml) matched control. The comparative effect of OPN301 and adalimumab (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha) on spontaneous release of proinflammatory cytokines from RA synovial explants was determined using quantitative cytokine MSD multiplex assays or ELISA. OPN301 penetration into RA synovial tissue explants cultures was assessed by immunohistology. Results Pam3CSK4 significantly upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in RA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). OPN301 significantly decreased Pam3CSK4-induced cytokine production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 compared to IgG control in RA PBMCs and SFMCs cultures (all P < 0.05). OPN301 penetration of RA synovial tissue cultures was detected in the lining layer and perivascular regions. OPN301 significantly decreased spontaneous cytokine production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-8 from RA synovial tissue explant cultures (all P < 0.05). Importantly, the inhibitory effect of OPN on spontaneous cytokine secretion was comparable to inhibition by anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody adalimumab. Conclusions These findings further support targeting TLR2 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  7. Micropropagation from cultured nodal explants of rose (Rosa hybrida L. cv. ‘Perfume Delight’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamnoon Kanchanapoom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the micropropagation of rose (Rosa hybrida L. cv. ‘Perfume Delight’ was developed. First to fifth nodal explants from young healthy shoots were excised and cultured on basal medium of Murashige and Skoog (1962, MS containing several concentrations of BA and NAA. Multiple shoot formation of up to 3 shoots was obtained on MS medium supplemented with 3 mg/l BA and 0.003 mg/l NAA. Shoot readily rooted on ¼MS medium devoid of growth regulators.Rooted plantlets were hardened and established in pots at 100% survival. In vitro flowering was observed on rose plantscultured on MS medium containing 3 mg/l BA and 0.003 mg/l NAA.

  8. Effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast assessed in cultured cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Seo, Gwy-Suk; Karakida, Osamu; Ueda, Hitoshi; Sone, Shusuke; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa; Moriya, Hiroto.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) in cultured cartilage. In our culture system, only collagen synthesis was increased by the addition of vitamin C, while proteoglycan synthesis and the number of chondrocytes were unaffected. The MTC effect was assessed by using an off-resonance RF pulse (0.3 KHz off-resonance, sinc wave of 18 msec, maximum amplitude 4.61 x 10 -4 T) on a GRASS sequence. The cartilage cultured with vitamin C showed a higher MTC effect than that cultured without vitamin C. The major role of collagen on MTC was confirmed in living cartilage tissue. (author)

  9. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) shoot cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Bates, Rick; Carlson, John

    2014-01-01

    The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2) evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3) assess the effects of adding a pH stabilizer, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) that is commonly used in Douglas-fir micropropagation medium. Vegetative buds were collected in the spring before breaking dormancy from juvenile and mature donor trees for conducting these evaluations. Medium, with or without MES, was pre-adjusted to five pH levels before adding MES, agar and autoclaving. Medium pH changes and explant growth parameters were measured at eight different incubation times. Overall, MES provided a more stable medium pH, relative to starting pH values, under both light and dark storage conditions as well as with presence of explants. A general trend of decreasing medium pH over time was found comparing explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Explant height and weight growth increased over time, but differ among explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Our findings suggest that a 21-day subculture practice may best sustain medium freshness, medium pH level and desirable explant growth.

  10. The Effect of Plant Growth Regulators and Different Explants on the Response of Tissue Culture and Cell Suspension Cultures of German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Koohi,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. is one of the most important medicinal plants that its essential oils used in different medicinal industries. In this study which was carried out in 2013 growing season at the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, the in vitro response of leaf and hypocotyl explants of German Chamomile in B5 medium supplemented with different levels of plant growth regulators including 2,4-D, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA, kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP were investigated in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD.In addition, cell suspension cultures were established and characterized. Hypocotyl and leaf explants exhibited cell proliferation and produced callus within 1-2 weeks. The highest fresh weight of the callus (264.1 mg was produced by leaf explants in the medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l BAP. However, the leaf explants cultured on medium containing 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D showed the lowest cell proliferation and callus yield (40.42 mg. The highest percentage of root induction from leaf explants (58.73% was observed on the medium containing 4 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l Kin, and from hypocotyl explants (48.61% was observed on medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l NAA. The 42.22% of calli derived from hypocotyl explants on B5 medium supplemented with 4 mg/l NAA and 3 mg/l BAP, were friable. Cell suspension cultures of German chamomile were established by transferring of hypocotyl-derived friable calli into the MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l kinetin. The growth curve of cell proliferations started 4 days after culture and continued to grow until day 13th, where the cells entered stationary phase.

  11. In vitro plant regeneration of two cucumber (Cucumis sativum L. genotypes: Effects of explant types and culture medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grozeva Stanislava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different phytohormone concentrations on callusogenesis and organogenesis in two cucumber genotypes were studied. It was established that the rate of plant regeneration depends on genotype, explant type and culture medium. Hypocotyls were found to be more responsive than cotyledons in morphogenesis. In vitro planlet-regenerants have been obtained in hypocotyls explants on culture medium with 1.0 and 2.0 mgL-1 BA for cultivar Gergana and in 1.0 and 3.0 mgL-1K-line 15B. Induction of regeneration in cotyledons were established only in cultivar Gergana on culture medium supplemented with 3.0 mgL-1 BA and in combination of 0.5 mgL-1IAA.

  12. Effects of donor plant age and explants on in vitro culture of Cedrela montana Moritz ex Turcz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Basto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the organogenic potential of Cedrela montana Moritz ex Turcz. Explants from mature (10-20 year-old and juvenile (7-18 month-old trees were collected. The first grouping included buds, leaves, and nodes derived from juvenile basal offshoots and rejuvenated shoots from cuttings. The second, included leaves, petioles, nodes, internodes and nodes of in vitro elongated shoots. The highest organogenic potential was observed in nodes from juvenile trees: 45.8% of explants presented axillary bud elongation, while 56.2% presented rooting in a growth regulator free culture medium. Fifty-one percent of elongated shoots produced adventitious shoots with 0.5 μM NAA and 0.5 μM BA; 30% with 0.5 μM NAA and 1 μM BA; and 30% with 1 μM BA. Twenty percent presented roots with 0.5 μM NAA. Root formation was stimulated in a medium supplemented with activated charcoal (5 gL-1. The acclimatization of eighty percent of plantlets regenerated from nodes, and of 72.5% in vitro generated shoots was successful. On the contrary, mature trees material presented low organogenic response. Axillary bud elongation was recorded just in 10.7% of explants from juvenile shoots and in 6.7% of explants from rejuvenated shoots. The age of donor plant and type of explant affect the organogenic potential of C. montana. This study contributes to the understanding of this species’ response under in vitro conditions.

  13. C2K77 ELISA detects cleavage of type II collagen by cathepsin K in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, B; Poole, A R; Mort, J S; Richard, H; Beauchamp, G; Laverty, S

    2017-12-01

    Develop a species-specific ELISA for a neo-epitope generated by cathepsin K cleavage of equine type II collagen to: (1) measure cartilage type II collagen degradation by cathepsin K in vitro, (2) identify cytokines that upregulate cathepsin K expression and (3) compare cathepsin K with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) collagenase activity in stimulated cartilage explants and freshly isolated normal and osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilages. A new ELISA (C2K77) was developed and tested by measuring the activity of exogenous cathepsin K on equine articular cartilage explants. The ELISA was then employed to measure endogenous cathepsin K activity in cultured cartilage explants with or without stimulation by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumour necrosis-alpha (TNF-α), oncostatin M (OSM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cathepsin K activity in cartilage explants (control and osteoarthritic-OA) and freshly harvested cartilage (control and OA) was compared to that of MMPs employing C2K77 and C1,2C immunoassays. The addition of Cathepsin K to normal cartilage caused a significant increase (P K77 epitope release. Whereas the content of C1,2C, that reflects MMP collagenase activity, was increased in media by the addition to cartilage explants of TNF-α and OSM (P K77 which also unchanged in OA cartilages compared to normal. The ELISA C2K77 measured the activity of cathepsin K in equine cartilage which was unchanged in OA cartilage. Cytokines that upregulate MMP collagenase activity had no effect on endogenous cathepsin K activity, suggesting a different activation mechanism that requires further study. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. THE PHENOLS ACCUMULATION IN TRANSFORMED ROOT CULTURES OF DIFFERENT EXPLANTS SOURCES OF COMMON BUCKWHEAT (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Sytar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth parameters of transformed root cultures, total phenolic content and phenolic acids composition has been studied in root cultures, which were obtained from various explants of buckwheat by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains A4. The methods of obtaining of the transformed root cultures, total phenol estimation, gas-liquid chromatography and polymerase chain reaction has been used. Elevated levels of total phenols in transformed roots of buckwheat from different sources of explants have been found. The high content of chlorogenic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-anisic and caffeic acids has been discovered in the root cultures, which can be used for their industrial production. Maximal root growth was equal 21.2 g/l of dry weight in the roots as source for root culture, 17.7 g/l with leaves and 14.6 g/l with stems at 3 week after placement. Molecular analysis by polymerase chain reaction amplification was confirmed that the rol B gene (652 bp which transferred info hairy roots from Ri-plasmid in Agrobacterium rhizogenes is responsible for induction of root from plant species.

  15. Effect of Pre-culture Irradiation and Explant Types on Efficiency of Brassica napus Genetic Transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, I.M.; Moustafa, H.A.M.; Azzam, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    The irradiated seeds of canola cv. Drakkar ( Brassica napus l. ) were germinated under aspect conditions, cotyledonary petioles and hypocotyl of 6 days old seedlings were used for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens has construct with the selectable marker gene (NPT II) and the desirable gene (HPPD). Direct and indirect shoot organogenesis were obtained from the both explants. Cotyledonary petioles was higher responded than hypocotyl with respective 26% and 14% of the explants producing NPT II-positive shoots after the selection on 50mg/l kanamycin. Calli might develop on and not in the agar medium were un transformation. This explains the higher number of escapes detected in hypocotyl explants than in experiments with cotyledons. The frequency of transformation plants as a function of indirect organogenesis was more than direct shoot regeneration from explants. The pre- irradiation with 75 Gy of gamma rays enhanced the genetic transformation frequencies by about 10 % as compared to that of the un-irradiated material. The obtained shoots were rooted and regenerated mature plants

  16. Effects of plant growth regulators on in vitro cultured nodal explants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... sterilized potting mix of forest soil, well-decomposed coffee husk, and red sand at the respective ratio of 1:1:2 by volume (JARC experience) and the stock plants were established in the main- tenance greenhouse of the biotechnology division at an average temperature of 25 ± 2°C. Explant sterilization and ...

  17. SIS with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages patch tracheoplasty in a rabbit model for tracheal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longfang; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Pengcheng; Zhao, Daqing; Chen, Wenxian

    2007-06-01

    In the rabbit model, small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compounded with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages appeared to be an efficacious method for the patch repair of partial circumferential tracheal defects instead of autologous grafts. SIS appears to be a safe and promising means of facilitating neovascularization and tissue regeneration. The long-term use of SIS and tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages warrants further investigation. Tracheal defect reparation remains a challenging surgical problem that can require reconstruction using autologous grafts or artificial stents. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of SIS, a biocompatible, acellular matrix, compounded with different tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages, in the repair of a critical-size tracheal defect. A full-thickness defect (4 x 8 mm) was created in tracheal rings four to six in adult rabbits. A piece of 8-ply SIS sandwiched in thyroid cartilage, auricular cartilage, or without cartilage, respectively (designated experiment 1, 2, or 3, respectively), was sutured to the edges of the defect with interrupted 4-0 polypropylene sutures. In control animals, the defect was closed with lamina praetrachealis. All animals were followed until signs of dyspnea became apparent or for 4 or 12 weeks. After follow-up and euthanasia, the trachea was harvested and prepared for histologic evaluation using conventional techniques. All animals tolerated the procedure well but two animals in group 1 (n=5), three in group 2 (n=5), and one in group 3 (n=5) had stridor after operation and expired within 1 month. Histologically, neovascularization of the patch was noted with moderate inflammation. The surface of the SIS patch was covered with a lining of ciliated epithelial cells. The tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages degraded to some extent.

  18. Establishment and Characterization of Primary Cultures from Iranian Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients by Enzymatic Method and Explant Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Ganjibakhsh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC is the most frequent oral cancer worldwide. It is known as the eighth most common cancer in men and as the fifth most common cancer in women. Cytogenetic and biochemical studies in recent decades have emphasized the necessity of providing an appropriate tool for such researches. Cancer cell culture is a useful tool for investigations on biochemical, genetic, molecular and immunological characteristics of different cancers, including oral cancer. Here, we explain the establishment process of five primary oral cancer cells derived from an Iranian population.Materials and Methods: The specimens were obtained from five oral cancer patients. Enzymatic, explant culture and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS methods were used for cell isolation. After quality control tests, characterization and authentication of primary oral cancer cells were performed by short tandem repeats (STR profiling, chromosome analysis, species identification, and monitoring the growth, morphology and the expression of CD326 and CD133 markers.Results: Five primary oral cancer cells were established from an Iranian population. The flow cytometry results showed that the isolated cells were positive for CD326 and CD133 markers. Furthermore, the cells were free from mycoplasma, bacterial and fungal contamination. No misidentified or cross-contaminated cells were detected by STR analysis.Conclusions: Human primary oral cancer cells provide an extremely useful platform for studying carcinogenesis pathways of oral cancer in Iranian population. They may be helpful in explaining the ethnic differences in cancer biology and the individuality in anticancer drug response in future studies.

  19. Effect of explant density and medium culture volumes on cassava micropropagation in Temporal Immersion System

    OpenAIRE

    Milagros Basail; Victor Medero; Marilyn Martínez; José de la C. Ventura; Jorge López; Magaly García; Manuel Cabrera; Arletys Santos; Aymé Rayas; Carmen Pons; Maricel Bauta; Miguel Álvarez; Jesús García

    2003-01-01

    Due to the need of producing high quality planting material available to cassava growers, it has been necessary to look for alternatives in order to increase the efficiancy of in vitro propagation methods and their automation, such as the use of the Temporal Immersion Systems (RITA®). This work was carried out to increase the multiplication coefficient for cassava mass propagation through out Temporal Immersion Systems. The clone ‘CMC-40’ was used. Different medium volumes per explant, and ma...

  20. In vitro culture of Cucumis sativus L. VI. Histological analysis of leaf explants cultured on media with 2, 4-D or 2, 4, 5-T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nadolska-Orczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The developmental sequence of callus initiation and somatic embryogenesis in leaf explants of Cucumis sativus cv. Borszczagowski was analysed and compared on media containing two different auxin phenoxy-derivatives (2,4-D and 2,4,5-T and cytokinin (BAP or 2iP. During the first 20 days of culture on media with 2,4,5-T proliferation of parenchymatic tissue occurred mainly and only small meristematic centers were observed. There was an intensive detachment of parenchymatic cells and dissociation of their cell walls near vessels and in the lower part of the explant adjacent to the medium. These cells were strongly plasmolysed. On the 2,4-D containing medium mostly meristematic tissue developed, proliferating around vascular bundles and forming meristematic centers or promeristem-like structures. After 35-50 days of culture, secondary callus was formed by separation of meristematic cells from the meristem surface in explants cultured on the 2,4-D containing medium. On medium supplemented with 2, 4, 5-T the detachment of parenchymatic and meristematic cells occurred, along with formation of a gel-like substance. The gel-like callus contained multi-cellular aggregates, proembryoids and embryoids. This type of callus tissue was initiated more intensively on medium with 2, 4, 5-T, but the frequency of somatic embryogenesis was much lower. The periferial cells of aggregates, proembryoids and embryoids showed the tendency to separate from the surface of the tissue. Many embryoids formed adventitious embryos.

  1. Conditional knockdown of hyaluronidase 2 in articular cartilage stimulates osteoarthritic progression in a mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yoshitoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kozawa, Eiji; Zhuo, Lisheng; Arai, Eisuke; Hamada, Shunsuke; Morita, Daigo; Ikuta, Kunihiro; Kimata, Koji; Ushida, Takahiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    The catabolism of hyaluronan in articular cartilage remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of hyaluronidase 2 (Hyal2) knockdown in articular cartilage on the development of osteoarthritis (OA) using genetic manipulated mice. Destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) model of Col2a promoter specific conditional Hyal2 knockout (Hyal -/- ) mice was established and examined. Age related and DMM induced alterations of articular cartilage of knee joint were evaluated with modified Mankin score and immunohistochemical staining of MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, KIAA11199, and biotinylated- hyaluronan binding protein staining in addition to histomorphometrical analyses. Effects of Hyal2 suppression were also analyzed using explant culture of an IL-1α induced articular cartilage degradation model. The amount and size of hyaluronan in articular cartilage were higher in Hyal2 -/- mice. Hyal2 -/- mice exhibited aggravated cartilage degradation in age-related and DMM induced mice. MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive chondrocytes were significantly higher in Hyal2 -/- mice. Articular cartilage was more degraded in explant cultures obtained from Hyal2 -/- mice. Knockdown of Hyal2 in articular cartilage induced OA development and progression possibly mediated by an imbalance of HA metabolism. This suggests that Hyal2 knockdown exhibits mucopolysaccharidosis-like OA change in articular cartilage similar to Hyal1 knockdown.

  2. Explant culture: a simple, reproducible, efficient and economic technique for isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from human adipose tissue and lipoaspirate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Nancy; Sarcar, Shilpita; Majumdar, Anish Sen; SundarRaj, Swathi

    2014-09-01

    Adipose tissue has emerged as a preferred source of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC), due to its easy accessibility and high MSC content. The conventional method of isolation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASC) involves enzymatic digestion and centrifugation, which is a costly and time-consuming process. Mechanical stress during isolation, use of bacterial-derived products and potential contamination with endotoxins and xenoantigens are other disadvantages of this method. In this study, we propose explant culture as a simple and efficient process to isolate ASC from human adipose tissue. This technique can be used to reproducibly isolate ASC from fat tissue obtained by liposuction as well as surgical resection, and yields an enriched ASC population free from contaminating haematopoietic cells. We show that explanting adipose tissue results in a substantially higher yield of ASC at P0 per gram of initial fat tissue processed, as compared to that obtained by enzymatic digestion. We demonstrate that ASC isolated by explant culture are phenotypically and functionally equivalent to those obtained by enzymatic digestion. Further, the explant-derived ASC share the immune privileged status and immunosuppressive properties implicit to MSC, suggesting that they are competent to be tested and applied in allogeneic clinical settings. As explant culture is a simple, inexpensive and gentle method, it may be preferred over the enzymatic technique for obtaining adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, especially in cases of limited starting material. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Changes in the metabolic footprint of placental explant-conditioned medium cultured in different oxygen tensions from placentas of small for gestational age and normal pregnancies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, R P

    2012-01-31

    Being born small for gestational age (SGA) confers significantly increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Accumulating evidence suggests that an SGA fetus results from a poorly perfused and abnormally developed placenta. Some of the placental features seen in SGA, such as abnormal cell turnover and impaired nutrient transport, can be reproduced by culture of placental explants in hypoxic conditions. Metabolic footprinting offers a hypothesis-generating strategy to investigate factors absorbed by and released from this tissue in vitro. Previously, metabolic footprinting of the conditioned culture media has identified differences in placental explants cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and between normal pregnancies and those complicated by pre-eclampsia. In this study we aimed to examine the differences in the metabolic footprint of placental villous explants cultured at different oxygen (O(2)) tensions between women who deliver an SGA baby (n = 9) and those from normal controls (n = 8). Placental villous explants from cases and controls were cultured for 96 h in 1% (hypoxic), 6% (normoxic) and 20% (hyperoxic) O(2). Metabolic footprints were analysed by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to an electrospray hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-MS). 574 metabolite features showed significant difference between SGA and normal at one or more of the oxygen tensions. SGA explant media cultured under hypoxic conditions was observed, on a univariate level, to exhibit the same metabolic signature as controls cultured under normoxic conditions in 49% of the metabolites of interest, suggesting that SGA tissue is acclimatised to hypoxic conditions in vivo. No such behaviour was observed under hyperoxic culture conditions. Glycerophospholipid and tryptophan metabolism were highlighted as areas of particular interest.

  4. Morphogenic responses of three explants of Lupinus montanus (H.B.K. cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ramírez-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen El necrosamiento y la respuesta morfogénica de explantes de cotiledón, epicótilo e hipocótilo de plántulas de Lupinus montanus (H.B.K. germinadas in vitro se evaluaron para establecer las condiciones básicas de micropropagación. El necrosamiento se evaluó en medio MS con 0.40 mg·litro-1 de tiamina, 100 mg·litro-1 de mioinositol, 3 % de sacarosa y 7 g·litro-1 de agar-agar y distintas dosis de carbón activado (CA y ácido cítrico. Los tratamientos con CA (50 mg·litro-1 y 100 mg·litro-1 fueron los mejores en el control del necrosamiento (P = 0.001; el cotiledón tuvo mayor nivel de necrosamiento ( 70 % a diferencia del cotiledón, cuya respuesta fue primordialmente callogénica (50 %. El epicótilo cultivado en medio MS con 3.0 μM de AIA y 1.0 μM de BA tuvo el mayor número de brotes (10 y altura (11.4 ± 2.6 cm.

  5. Long-term culture of sponge explants: conditions enhancing survival and growth, and assessment of bioactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caralt, de S.; Agell, G.; Uriz, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sponges are an important source of secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical interest. This is the main reason for the increasing interest of sponge culture recent years. The optimal culture system depends on the species to be cultured: while some species easily produce sponge aggregates after

  6. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal-Cell Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan; Doeselaar, Marina van; Meij, Björn; Tryfonidou, M; Ito, Keita

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  7. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal Cell-Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan A H; van Doeselaar, Marina; Meij, Björn P; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Ito, K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  8. Toxic Effects of Lipid-Mediated Gene Transfer in Ventral Mesencephalic Explant Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Matthias; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Meyer, Morten

    2006-01-01

    of propidium iodide and release of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase to the culture medium. Using a liposomal transfection reagent, cell membrane damage was already seen 24 hr after transfection. Nestin-positive target cells, which were used as morphological correlate, were severely diminished in some areas...... of the cultures after liposomal transfection. In contrast, the non-liposomal transfection reagent revealed no signs of toxicity. This approach provides easily accessible information of transfection-associated toxicity and appears suitable for prescreening of transfection reagents....

  9. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal Cell-Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Stefan A H; van Doeselaar, Marina; Meij, Björn P; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Ito, Keita

    2016-01-01

    Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue, in which the NCCM ultimately should exert its effect. The objective of this study is to test whether NCCM stimulates NPCs within their native environment, and whether combined stimulation with NCCM and addition of BMSCs has a synergistic effect on extracellular matrix production. Bovine NP tissue was cultured in an artificial annulus in base medium (BM), porcine NCCM, or BM supplemented with 1 μg/mL Link N. Furthermore, BM and NCCM samples were injected with 10(6) BMSCs per NP sample. Samples were cultured for 4 weeks, and analyzed for biochemical contents (water, glycosaminoglycan [GAG], hydroxyproline, and DNA), gene expression (COL1A1, COL2A1, ACAN, and SOX9), and histology by Safranin O/Fast Green staining. Culture in NCCM resulted in increased proteoglycan content compared to day 0 and BM, similar to Link N. However, only minor differences in gene expression compared to day 0 were observed. Addition of BMSCs did not result in increased GAG content, and surprisingly, DNA content in BMSC-injected groups was not higher than in the other groups after 4 weeks of culture. This study shows that, indeed, NCCM is capable of stimulating NPC matrix production within the NP environment. The lack of increased DNA content in the BMSC-injected groups indicates that BMSCs have died over time. Identification of the bioactive factors in NCCM is crucial for further development of an NCCM-based treatment for intervertebral disc regeneration.

  10. (14C)-glucose metabolism during shoot bud development in cultured cotyledon explants of Pinus radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, L.; Joy, R.W.; Thorpe, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    Excised cotyledons of Pinus radiata D. Don cultured under shoot-forming (plus benzyladenine) and non shoot-forming (minus benzyladenine) conditions for 10 and 21 days were fed U-[ 14 C]-glucose for 3 h in the light followed by a 3 h chase period. The labelling of individual metabolites as well as 14 C incorporation into protein was assessed. It was found that the general metabolic patterns were qualitatively the same in shoot-forming and non shoot-forming conditions, however, metabolism leading to respiration as well as to the synthesis of some amino acids and protein synthesis was enhanced in the shoot-forming cultures. (author)

  11. The Influence of Explant Types and Orientation on in Vitro Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamnoon KANCHANAPOOM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflorescence, apical and lateral buds of Musa balbisiana ‘Kluai Hin’ (BBB group were used to culture on MS medium supplemented with 22 μM BA and 15% (v/v coconut water. Comparison of bud orientation showed that the best response of in vitro shoot tip proliferation was obtained with abaxial surface of buds lying down i.e. one side touching the medium (tilt. Mass propagation of shoot tips was obtained when cultured buds on MS medium containing 44 μM BA. Rooting was achieved by transferring the isolated shoots to MS basal medium without growth regulators. Rooted plantlets were acclimatized and successfully established in soil.

  12. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and insulin-like growth factor on cultured cartilage cells from skate Raja porasa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingjun; Jin, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2003-12-01

    Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) on cartilage cells from proboscis of skate, Raja porasa Günther, were investigated in this study. The cartilage cells were cultured in 20% FBS-supplemented MEM medium at 24°C. Twelve hours after culture initiation, the cartilage cells were treated with bFGF and IGF-II at different concentration combinations. It was found that 20 ng/ml of bFGF or 80 ng/ml of IGF-II was enough to have obvious stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. Test of bFGF and IGF-II together, revealed that 20 ng/ml of bFGF and 80 ng/ml of IGF-II together had the best stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. The cartilage cells cultured could form a monolayer at day 7.

  13. Investigations on the growth and metabolism of cultured explants of Daucus carota : III. The range of responses induced in carrot explants by exogenous growth factors and by trace elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, F C; Rao, K V

    1970-06-01

    The responses of carrot explants to various growth-promoting agents and to certain trace elements with which they interact have been investigated. A great range in the metabolic behavior of the tissue may be brought about in this way. The responses to the exogenously applied substances are described in terms of the growth of the carrot explants in fresh weight and number of cells and also in terms of their metabolism, as shown by the final content and composition of the non-protein N compounds, by the relations between protein and non-protein (alcohol-soluble) N and by the content of nucleic acid in the cultured tissue.The growth-promoting agents employed consisted of (1) the balanced complex of factors found in coconut milk, (2) an active isolate from Aesculus (AFaesc), which is one of a class of growth factors (AF1) that interact with inositol (AF1+inositol) and which in this sense comprise growth-promoting System I, (3) the substance zeatin (Zeat) which is typical of a class of active factors (AF2) that interact with indoleacetic acid (AF2+IAA) and which, therefore, function as a growth promoting complex termed System II in the culture of carrot tissue.The carrot explants stimulated by coconut milk grew better than those stimulated by the other combinations of growth factors and they converted their soluble N more effectively to protein. The growth, whether it was induced by coconut milk or by System I or II, and other specific effects attributable to the growth factors employed were markedly affected also by the elements iron and molybdenum.The carrot explants that had responded to coconut milk emphasized alanine in their soluble, non-protein, nitrogenous pool, whereas those subjected to the active components of System I or of System II as clearly emphasized glutamine as the prominent non-protein, nitrogen-rich compound.The partial effects due to the component parts of System I (AFaesc or inositol) and to the component parts of System II (Zeat. or IAA), as

  14. Tumorigenic risk of human induced pluripotent stem cell explants cultured on mouse SNL76/7 feeder cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Mizuna; Mitsui, Youji, E-mail: y-mitsui8310@hb.tp1.jp; Kumazaki, Tsutomu; Kawahara, Yuta; Matsuo, Taira; Takahashi, Tomoko, E-mail: t-takahashi@kph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • hiPS cell explants formed malignant tumors when SNL76/7 feeder cells were used. • Multi type tumors developed by interaction of SNL76/7 feeder cells with hiPS cells. • Tumorigenic risk occurs by co-culture of hiPS cells with SNL76/7 feeder cells. - Abstract: The potential for tumor formation from transplanted human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives represents a high risk in their application to regenerative medicine. We examined the genetic origin and characteristics of tumors, that were formed when 13 hiPSC lines, established by ourselves, and 201B7 hiPSC from Kyoto University were transplanted into severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice. Though teratomas formed in 58% of mice, five angiosarcomas, one malignant solitary fibrous tumor and one undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma formed in the remaining mice. Three malignant cell lines were established from the tumors, which were derived from mitomycin C (MMC)-treated SNL76/7 (MMC-SNL) feeder cells, as tumor development from fusion cells between MMC-SNL and hiPSCs was negative by genetic analysis. While parent SNL76/7 cells produced malignant tumors, neither MMC-SNL nor MMC-treated mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) produced malignant tumors. When MMC-SNL feeder cells were co-cultured with hiPSCs, growing cell lines were generated, that expressed genes similar to the parent SNL76/7 cells. Thus, hiPSCs grown on MMC-SNL feeder cells have a high risk of generating feeder-derived malignant tumors. The possible mechanism(s) of growth restoration and the formation of multiple tumor types are discussed with respect of the interactions between MMC-SNL and hiPSC.

  15. Induction of somatic embryogenesis in explants of shoot cultures established from adult Eucalyptus globulus and E. saligna × E. maidenii trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredoira, E; Ballester, A; Ibarra, M; Vieitez, A M

    2015-06-01

    A reproducible procedure for induction of somatic embryogenesis (SE) from adult trees of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and the hybrid E. saligna Smith × E. maidenii has been developed for the first time. Somatic embryos were obtained from both shoot apex and leaf explants of all three genotypes evaluated, although embryogenic frequencies were significantly influenced by the species/genotype, auxin and explant type. Picloram was more efficient for somatic embryo induction than naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), with the highest frequency of induction being obtained in Murashige and Skoog medium containing 40 µM picloram and 40 mg l(-1) gum Arabic, in which 64% of the shoot apex explants and 68.8% of the leaf explants yielded somatic embryos. The embryogenic response of the hybrid was higher than that of the E. globulus, especially when NAA was used. The cultures initiated on picloram-containing medium consisted of nodular embryogenic structures surrounded by a mucilaginous coating layer that emerged from a watery callus developed from the initial explants. Cotyledonary somatic embryos were differentiated after subculture of these nodular embryogenic structures on a medium lacking plant growth regulators. Histological analysis confirmed the bipolar organization of the somatic embryos, with shoot and root meristems and closed procambial tissue that bifurcated into small cotyledons. The root pole was more differentiated than the shoot pole, which appeared to be formed by a few meristematic layers. Maintenance of the embryogenic lines by secondary SE was attained by subculturing individual cotyledonary embryos or small clusters of globular and torpedo embryos on medium with 16.11 µM NAA at 4- to 5-week intervals. Somatic embryos converted into plantlets after being transferred to liquid germination medium although plant regeneration remained poor. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  16. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  17. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI. The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo, but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo. hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage.

  18. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Manuel; Milian, Lara; Oliver, Maria; Zurriaga, Javier; Sancho-Tello, Maria; de Llano, Jose Javier Martin; Carda, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo , but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo . hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage.

  19. Cartilage stem/progenitor cells are activated in osteoarthritis via interleukin-1β/nerve growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangzi; Hu, Changchang; Yu, Shuting; Yan, Junwei; Peng, Hsuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-11-17

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are key regulators in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis; specifically, IL-1β is involved in tissue degeneration and NGF is involved in joint pain. However, the cellular and molecular interactions between IL-1β and NGF in articular cartilage are not known. Cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs) have recently been identified in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage on the basis of their migratory properties. Here we hypothesize that IL-1β/NGF signaling is involved in OA cartilage degeneration by targeting CSPCs. NGF and NGF receptor (NGFR: TrkA and p75NTR) expression in healthy and OA human articular cartilage and isolated chondrocytes was determined by immunostaining, qRT-PCR, flow cytometry and western blot. Articular cartilage derived stem/progenitor cells were collected and identified by stem/progenitor cell characteristics. 3D-cultured CSPC pellets and cartilage explants were treated with NGF and NGF neutralizing antibody, and extracellular matrix changes were examined by sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release and MMP expression and activity. Expression of NGF, TrkA and p75NTR was found to be elevated in human OA cartilage. Cellular changes upon IL-1β and/or NGF treatment were then examined. NGF mRNA and NGFR proteins levels were upregulated in cultured chondrocytes exposed to IL-1β. NGF was chemotactic for cells isolated from OA cartilage. Cells isolated on the basis of their chemotactic migration towards NGF demonstrated stem/progenitor cell characteristics, including colony-forming ability, multi-lineage differentiation potential, and stem cell surface markers. The effects of NGF perturbation in cartilage explants and 3D-cultured CSPCs were next analyzed. NGF treatment resulted in extracellular matrix catabolism indicated by increased sGAG release and MMP expression and activity; conversely, treatment with NGF neutralizing antibody inhibited increased MMP levels, and enhanced tissue inhibitor of

  20. Design and validation of a biomechanical bioreactor for cartilage tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, V; Panadero, J A; Ribeiro, C; Sencadas, V; Rocha, J G; Gomez Ribelles, J L; Lanceros-Méndez, S

    2016-04-01

    Specific tissues, such as cartilage, undergo mechanical solicitation under their normal performance in human body. In this sense, it seems necessary that proper tissue engineering strategies of these tissues should incorporate mechanical solicitations during cell culture, in order to properly evaluate the influence of the mechanical stimulus. This work reports on a user-friendly bioreactor suitable for applying controlled mechanical stimulation--amplitude and frequency--to three-dimensional scaffolds. Its design and main components are described, as well as its operation characteristics. The modular design allows easy cleaning and operating under laminar hood. Different protocols for the sterilization of the hermetic enclosure are tested and ensure lack of observable contaminations, complying with the requirements to be used for cell culture. The cell viability study was performed with KUM5 cells.

  1. In vitro and in vivo modulation of cartilage degradation by a standardized Centella asiatica fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Anita; Smit, H Friso; van der Kraan, Peter M; Hoijer, Maarten A; Garssen, Johan

    2009-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease in which focal cartilage destruction is one of the primary features. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of a Centella asiatica fraction on in vitro and in vivo cartilage degradation. Bovine cartilage explants and bovine chondrocytes cultured in alginate were stimulated with IL-1 beta in the presence or absence of different concentrations (2, 5 and 10 microg/ml) of a standardized Centella asiatica triterpenes (CAT) fraction. The CAT fraction inhibited the IL-1 beta-induced proteoglycan (PG) release and nitric oxide (NO) production by cartilage explants in a dose-dependent manner. The IL-1 beta-induced reduction in PG synthesis and proliferation of chondrocytes cultured in alginate were counteracted by the CAT fraction at a concentration of 10 microg/ml. In a zymosan-induced acute arthritis model, the CAT fraction inhibited PG depletion without modulating joint swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that the tested Centella asiatica fraction was able to inhibit the zymosan-induced cartilage degradation in vivo without affecting the zymosan-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and joint swelling. The in vitro data indicate that the cartilage protective activity might at least partially be induced by the inhibition of NO production. The overall results indicate a possible disease modifying osteoarthritic activity of the Centella asiatica fraction.

  2. 35Sulphate incorporation assay as a new tool for measuring early cartilage degradation following blood exposure in vitro and in vivo in f8 ko rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulles, A. E.; Christensen, K. R.; Coeleveld, K.

    2017-01-01

    incorporation assay applied to study cartilage degradation following blood exposure. Methods: A total of 13 factor VIII knock out (F8 KO) rats were bred and housed at Novo Nordisk A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. After euthanasia, the legs were removed and transported to UMC Utrecht, The Netherlands. In vitro: within 24...... hours after euthanasia the cartilage of six healthy F8 KO rats was obtained by shaving off cartilage fragments of the tibia plateau by use of a scalpel. All cartilage explants were then cultured for four days; in addition to culture medium, half of the cartilage samples were cultured with 50% v/v whole...... and in the following four days until euthanasia, the animals received analgesia. At UMC Utrecht, the tibial cartilage was removed and proteoglycan synthesis activity determined according to the previously described method. All animal experiments were performed under anesthesia and analgesia in accordance...

  3. Comparison of spiculogenesis in in vitro ADCP-primmorph and explants culture of marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve with 3-TMOSPU supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xupeng; Yu, Xingju; Zhang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to test the feasibility of introducing functional chemical groups into biogenic silica spicules by examining the effect of supplementing a silican coupler [3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]urea (3-TMOSPU) as silica source in the cultures of archaeocytes-dominant-cell-population (ADCP) primmorphs and explants of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve. Analysis by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed that the organic group in 3-TMOSPU was introduced into silica spicules. By comparing ADCP-primmorph cultures when supplemented with Na2SiO3, 3-TMOSPU supplementation showed no notable effect on the primmorphs development and cell locomotion behaviors. A decline in silicatein expression quantified by real-time RT-PCR was, however, observed during spiculogenesis. The decline was slower for the 3-TMOSPU group whereas significantly fewer spicules were formed. When sponge papillae explants were cultured, 3-TMOSPU supplementation had no negative effect on sponge growth but inhibited the growth biofouling of the diatom Nitzschia closterium. By monitoring the detectable Si concentration, it seemed that 3-TMOSPU was converted by the sponge and its conversion was related to spiculogenesis. Analysis of spicule dimensional changes indicated that the inhibition of spiculogenesis by 3-TMOSPU supplementation was less in ADCP-primmorphs culture due to lower 3-TMOSPU/detectable Si ratio in the media.

  4. Direct regeneration of Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) via node explants culture and different combinations of plant growth regulators

    OpenAIRE

    M. Talebi; F. Etesam; B.E. Sayed-Tabatabaei; Gh. Khaksar

    2012-01-01

    Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus L., Apocynaceae) contains more than 130 different terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), of which two dimeric alkaloids, Vinblastine and Vincristine, have antineoplastic activity and are useful in treatment of various cancers. Specific production of some alkaloids in differentiated tissues such as leaf and stem led to use direct regeneration of explants in order to increase the production of these important alkaloids in the plant. In this research, 30 combinations ...

  5. Storing live embryonic and adult human cartilage grafts for transplantation using a joint simulating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I; Robinson, D; Cohen, N; Nevo, Z

    2000-11-01

    Cartilage transplantation as a means to replace damaged articular surfaces is of interest. A major obstacle is the long-term preservation of cartilage grafts. The commonly used technique of freezing the grafts inevitably leads to cellular death. The current study compares the technique to an innovative approach using a pulsed-pressure perfusion system termed a joint simulating device (JSD), intended to simulate intra-articular mechanical forces. Human articular cartilage explants were harvested from both embryonic epiphyseal tissue and femoral heads of elderly women (over 70 years of age) undergoing a partial joint replacement (hemi-arthroplasty) and were divided in two groups: half of the samples were incubated in the JSD while the remaining half were grown in static culture within tissue culture plates. After 10 days all samples were evaluated for: (a) cell vitality as assessed by image analysis and XTT assay; (b) biosynthetic activity as expressed by radioactive sulfate incorporation into glycosaminoglycans (GAG's); and (c) proteoglycan content as assessed by alcian blue staining intensity. A 10-fold increase in sulfate incorporation in samples held in the JSD compared to the static culture group was observed in embryonic cartilage. In adult cartilage culture in the JSD elevated sulfate incorporation by threefold as compared to static culture. Central necrosis was observed in specimens grown in the static culture plates, while it did not occur in the samples held in the JSD. Cell vitality as assessed by XTT assay was significantly better in the JSD group as compared to static culture. The difference was more pronounced in the embryonic specimens as compared to adult cartilage. The specimens cultured within the JSD retained proteoglycans significantly better than those cultured in static culture. Maintenance of cartilage specimens in a JSD was highly effective in keeping the vitality of cartilage explants in vitro over a 10-day period. A possible future

  6. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on collagen sponges for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Martínez-Sánchez, Adela Helvia; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of human bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs) cultured on collagen biomaterials. hBMSCs were seeded on five different collagen (Col) sponges: C1C2 (types I and II Col), C1C2HS (types I and II Col plus heparan sulphate (HS)), C1C2CHS (types I and II Col plus chondroitin sulphate (CHS)), C1-OLH3 (type I Col plus low molecular weight heparin) and C1CHS (type I Col plus CHS). The resulting constructs were analyzed by histological and immunohistochemical staining, molecular biology and electron microscopy. Col released into culture media was measured by a dye-binding method Results: hBMSCs on biomaterials C1C2, C1C2HS and C1C2CHS had more capacity to attach, proliferate and synthesize Col II and proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM) than on C1-OLH3 and C1CHS. The presence of aggrecan was detected only at the gene level. Total Col liberated by the cells in the supernatants in all scaffold cultures was detected. The level of Col I in the ECM was lower in C1-OLH3 and that of Col II was highest in C1C2 and C1C2HS. Electron microscopy showed differently shaped cells, from rounded to flattened, in all constructs. Col fibers in bundles were observed in C1C2CHS by transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Col I and Col II (C1C2, C1C2HS and C1C2CHS) biomaterials allowed cell proliferation and chondrogenic-like differentiation of hBMSCs at an early stage. Constructs cultured on C1C2HS and C1C2CHS showed better cartilage-like phenotype than the other ones.

  7. Multiplicação in vitro do porta-enxerto de macieira cv. Marubakaido: efeito da orientação do explante no meio de cultura In vitro multiplication of the apple rootstock cv. Marubakaido: effect of the orientation of explant in the medium of culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALAN CRISTIANO ERIG

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da orientação do explante, vertical ou horizontal, no meio de cultura, na multiplicação in vitro, do porta-enxerto de macieira cv. Marubakaido. O meio de cultura utilizado foi o MS com N (nitrogênio reduzido a ¾ da concentração original, 100mg.L-1 de mio-inositol, 40g.L-1 de sacarose e 6g.L-1 de ágar, suplementado com 4,44mM de BAP (6-benzilaminopurina e 0,2ml.L-1 de PPM TM ("Plant Preservative Mixture". Segmentos caulinares com duas gemas e o ápice excisado foram utilizados como explantes. Após a inoculação, os frascos com os explantes foram incubados a 16 horas de fotoperíodo, à temperatura de 25±2ºC, com radiação de 25µmoles.m-2.s-1. O número de brotações, o número de gemas por explante, a taxa de multiplicação e a altura da brotação maior foram avaliados aos quarenta dias de cultivo. O maior número de brotações, o maior número de gemas e a maior taxa de multiplicação foram obtidos com o explante na orientação horizontal no meio de cultura. Não houve diferença significativa quanto à orientação vertical e horizontal do explante no meio de cultura para a altura da brotação maior.The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of the vertical and the horizontal orientation of the explant in the culture medium, in the in vitro multiplication, for the apple rootstock cv. Marubakaido. The culture medium used was the MS with N reduced to ¾ of the original concentration, myo-inositol (100mg.L-1, sucrose (40g.L-1 and agar (6g.L-1, suplemented with BAP (4.44mM and PPM TM (0.2ml.L-1. Stem segments with two buds and the apex excised were used as explants. After the inoculation, the flasks with the explants were incubated at 16 hour of photoperiod, 25±2ºC temperature, with irradiation of 25µmoles.m-2.s-1. The number of shoots and buds, the rate of multiplication and the height of the larger shoot were evaluated after 40 days of cultivation. The highests shoot number, number of buds

  8. Chondrocytes and stem cells in 3D-bioprinted structures create human cartilage in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Apelgren

    Full Text Available Cartilage repair and replacement is a major challenge in plastic reconstructive surgery. The development of a process capable of creating a patient-specific cartilage framework would be a major breakthrough. Here, we described methods for creating human cartilage in vivo and quantitatively assessing the proliferative capacity and cartilage-formation ability in mono- and co-cultures of human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D-bioprinted hydrogel scaffold. The 3D-bioprinted constructs (5 × 5 × 1.2 mm were produced using nanofibrillated cellulose and alginate in combination with human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells using a 3D-extrusion bioprinter. Immediately following bioprinting, the constructs were implanted subcutaneously on the back of 48 nude mice and explanted after 30 and 60 days, respectively, for morphological and immunohistochemical examination. During explantation, the constructs were easy to handle, and the majority had retained their macroscopic grid appearance. Constructs consisting of human nasal chondrocytes showed good proliferation ability, with 17.2% of the surface areas covered with proliferating chondrocytes after 60 days. In constructs comprising a mixture of chondrocytes and stem cells, an additional proliferative effect was observed involving chondrocyte production of glycosaminoglycans and type 2 collagen. This clinically highly relevant study revealed 3D bioprinting as a promising technology for the creation of human cartilage.

  9. Prostaglandin E2 role in inhibition of joint cartilage collagen destruction in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Chetina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 role in inhibition of articular cartilage collagen degradation in patients with osteoarthritis. Objective. To assess prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 role in inhibition of type II collagen digestion in explants of articular cartilage of pts with osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods. Explants of articular cartilage of pts with OA were cultured with PGE2 1pg to 10 ng/ml. Type II collagen digestion was assessed with immuno-enzyme assay. Gene expression was evaluated with PCR in real time. Results. PGE2 10 pg/ml as well as transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2 suppressed type II collagen digestion in explants of articular cartilage of pts with OA. This concentration of PGE2 did not suppress proteoglycan (aggrecan degradation. Gene expression analysis in 5 OA pts showed that PGE2 10 pg/ml suppressed metallomonooxigenase (MMP-13, MMP-1 and marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy type X collagen (COL10A1 as well as proinflammatory cytokines interleukine (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα. Naproxen, nonselective cyclooxygenase(COX-2 and 1 inhibitor concentration from 5 to 30 mcg/ml blocked TGFβ2 induced collagen digestion inhibition proving that PGE2 mediate influence of this growth factor. Naproxen concentration 5 mcg/ml increased collagen degradation. Conclusion. The study showed that PGE2 is a chondroprotector because it is able to suppress selectively OA pts cartilage collagen degradation. Beside that cartilage chondrocyte hypertrophy in OA connected functionally with increased collagen digestion is also regulated by low concentrations of PGE2

  10. Knock-Out Serum Replacement and Melatonin Effects on Germ Cell Differentiation in Murine Testicular Explant Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Reda, Ahmed; Albalushi, Halima; Montalvo, Sheyla Cisneros; Nurmio, Mirja; Sahin, Zeliha; Hou, Mi; Geijsen, Niels; Toppari, Jorma; S?der, Olle; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Finding robust culture conditions for in vitro maturation (IVM) of male germ cells is still a challenge. Recently, a testis organ culture method, using Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR), was suggested as a promising approach. However, the efficiency of that model is still not optimal. Hence, we have tried to establish the culture conditions in two laboratories, and to improve the reliability of the culture system to generate mature germ cells. Male mice at three days of age were sacrificed. Te...

  11. Amino acids supply in culture media is not a limiting factor in the matrix synthesis of engineered cartilage tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K. W.; DeFrancis, J. G.; Kugler, L. E.; Kelly, T.-A. N.; Ho, M. M.; O’Conor, C. J.; Ateshian, G. A.; Hung, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased amino acid supplementation (0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× recommended concentrations or additional proline) was hypothesized to increase the collagen content in engineered cartilage. No significant differences were found between groups in matrix content or dynamic modulus. Control constructs possessed the highest compressive Young’s modulus on day 42. On day 42, compared to controls, decreased type II collagen was found with 0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× supplementation and significantly increased DNA content found in 1.0× and 5.0×. No effects were observed on these measures with added proline. These results lead us to reject our hypothesis and indicate that the low collagen synthesis in engineered cartilage is not due to a limited supply of amino acids in media but may require a further stimulatory signal. The results of this study also highlight the impact that culture environment can play on the development of engineered cartilage. PMID:17713744

  12. Knock-Out Serum Replacement and Melatonin Effects on Germ Cell Differentiation in Murine Testicular Explant Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reda, Ahmed; Albalushi, Halima; Montalvo, Sheyla Cisneros; Nurmio, Mirja; Sahin, Zeliha; Hou, Mi; Geijsen, Niels; Toppari, Jorma; Söder, Olle; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd

    Finding robust culture conditions for in vitro maturation (IVM) of male germ cells is still a challenge. Recently, a testis organ culture method, using Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR), was suggested as a promising approach. However, the efficiency of that model is still not optimal. Hence, we have

  13. An exploration of the ability of tepoxalin to ameliorate the degradation of articular cartilage in a canine in vitro model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clegg Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the ability of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX and lipoxygenase (LOX and its active metabolite to reduce the catabolic response of cartilage to cytokine stimulation in an in vitro model of canine osteoarthritis (OA. Grossly normal cartilage was collected post-mortem from seven dogs that had no evidence of joint disease. Cartilage explants were cultured in media containing the recombinant canine interleukin-1β (IL-1β at 100 ng/ml and recombinant human oncostatin-M (OSM at 50 ng/ml. The effects of tepoxalin and its metabolite were studied at three concentrations (1 × 10-5, 1 × 10-6 and 1 × 10-7 M. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen (hydroxyproline release from cartilage explants were used as outcome measures of proteoglycan and collagen depletion respectively. PGE2 and LTB4 assays were performed to study the effects of the drug on COX and LOX activity. Results Treatment with IL-1β and OSM significantly upregulated both collagen (p = 0.004 and proteoglycan (p = 0.001 release from the explants. Tepoxalin at 10-5 M and 10-6 M caused a decrease in collagen release from the explants (p = 0.047 and p = 0.075. Drug treatment showed no effect on GAG release. PGE2 concentration in culture media at day 7 was significantly increased by IL-1β and OSM and treatment with both tepoxalin and its metabolite showed a trend towards dose-dependent reduction of PGE2 production. LTB4 concentrations were too low to be quantified. Cytotoxicity assays suggested that neither tepoxalin nor its metabolite had a toxic effect on the cartilage chondrocytes at the concentrations and used in this study. Conclusion This study provides evidence that tepoxalin exerts inhibition of COX and can reduce in vitro collagen loss from canine cartilage explants at a concentration of 10-5 M. We can conclude that, in this model, tepoxalin can partially inhibit the development of cartilage degeneration when it is available locally to

  14. Knock-Out Serum Replacement and Melatonin Effects on Germ Cell Differentiation in Murine Testicular Explant Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Ahmed; Albalushi, Halima; Montalvo, Sheyla Cisneros; Nurmio, Mirja; Sahin, Zeliha; Hou, Mi; Geijsen, Niels; Toppari, Jorma; Söder, Olle; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd

    2017-07-01

    Finding robust culture conditions for in vitro maturation (IVM) of male germ cells is still a challenge. Recently, a testis organ culture method, using Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR), was suggested as a promising approach. However, the efficiency of that model is still not optimal. Hence, we have tried to establish the culture conditions in two laboratories, and to improve the reliability of the culture system to generate mature germ cells. Male mice at three days of age were sacrificed. Testes were cut into small pieces which were cultured atop agarose stands, using Minimum Essential Medium alpha supplemented with different supplements; melatonin, Glutamax, and different concentrations of KSR. The results showed that the duration of culture beyond 18 days had an impact on the number of differentiated germ cells. Supplementation with melatonin and Glutamax revealed a positive influence on the efficiency of male germ cell differentiation in vitro. Furthermore, the results confirmed that KSR had a positive effect on germ cell maturation and testosterone production, with a concentration of at least 10%. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the beneficial role of at least 10% KSR in the IVM of germ cells.

  15. Strategies for the selection of uncontaminated Eucalyptus explants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential high yields of Eucalyptus shoot multiplication achieved with a temporary immersion culture system such as RITA® are compromised by losses caused by microbial contamination particularly bacteria, characteristic of the explants used to initiate the cultures. Disinfection of the explants through antibiotic ...

  16. Adipokines induce catabolism of newly synthesized matrix in cartilage and meniscus tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimuta, James F; Levenston, Marc E

    Altered synovial levels of various adipokines (factors secreted by fat as well as other tissues) have been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) onset and progression. However, the metabolic effects of adipokines on joint tissues, in particular the fibrocartilaginous menisci, are not well understood. This study investigated effects of several adipokines on release of recently synthesized extracellular matrix in bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants. After labeling newly synthesized proteins and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) with 3 H-proline and 35 S-sulfate, respectively; bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants were cultured for 6 days in basal medium (control) or media supplemented with adipokines (1 µg/ml of leptin, visfatin, adiponectin, or resistin) or 20 ng/ml interleukin-1 (IL-1). Release of radiolabel and sGAG to the media during culture and the final explant water, DNA, sGAG, and retained radiolabel were measured. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) and MMP-3 activities were assessed using gelatin and casein zymography, respectively. Water and DNA contents were not significantly altered by any treatment. Visfatin, adiponectin, resistin, and IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from meniscus, whereas only IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from cartilage. Release of 3 H and 35 S was stimulated not only by resistin and IL-1 in meniscus but also by IL-1 in cartilage. Retained 3 H was unaltered by any treatment, while retained 35 S was reduced by visfatin, resistin, and IL-1 in meniscus and by only IL-1 in cartilage. Resistin and IL-1 elevated active MMP-2 and total MMP-3 in meniscus, whereas cartilage MMP-3 activity was elevated by only IL-1. Resistin stimulated rapid and extensive catabolism of meniscus tissue, similar to IL-1, whereas adipokines minimally affected cartilage. Release of newly synthesized matrix was similar to overall release in both tissues. These observations provide further indications that meniscal tissue is more sensitive to pro

  17. Pre-metatarsal skeletal development in tissue culture at unit- and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1994-01-01

    Explant organ culture was used to demonstrate that isolated embryonic mouse pre-metatarsal mesenchyme is capable of undergoing a series of differentiative and morphogenetic developmental events. Mesenchyme differentiation into chondrocytes, and concurrent morphogenetic patterning of the cartilage tissue, and terminal chondrocyte differentiation with subsequent matrix mineralization show that cultured tissue closely parallels in vivo development. Whole mount alizarin red staining of the cultured tissue demonstrates that the extracellular matrix around the hypertrophied chondrocytes is competent to support mineralization. Intensely stained mineralized bands are similar to those formed in pre-metatarsals developing in vivo. We have adapted the culture strategy for experimentation in a reduced gravity environment on the Space Shuttle. Spaceflight culture of pre-metatarsals, which have already initiated chondrogenesis and morphogenetic patterning, results in an increase in cartilage rod size and maintenance of rod shape, compared to controls. Older pre-metatarsal tissue, already terminally differentiated to hypertrophied cartilage, maintained rod structure and cartilage phenotype during spaceflight culture.

  18. Effect Of Explant Source And Different Medium Culture On Friable Embryogenic Callus Induction Of Four Cultivars Of Cassava Manihot Esculenta Crantz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simplice Prosper Yandia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain Friable Embryogenic Callus FEC for protoplast isolation we have evaluated in this research the competance for Friable Embryogenic Callus FEC of four cassava cultivars M61033 Rendre Yalipe and Six-mois in media containing MS supplemented with 8mgl 24-D MS supplemented with 10 mgl BAP and GD supplemented with 12mgl picloram using apical bud AB and immature leaves lobes ILL as explants. In general in the medium GD12mgl picloram the highest efficiencies of FEC ranged from 58 to 87 and the highest score of FEC ranged from 4.2 to 5.4 with explants AB however we have observed with explants ILL the efficiencies of somatic embryos ranged form 41 to 75 and the score ranged from 4.1 to 4.4. The mediums MS28 mgl 24-D have induced with explants AB the efficiencies of FEC ranged from 43 to 57 and the score ranged from 3.1 to 3.8 however with ILL explants the efficiencies of FEC ranged from 39 to 49 and the score ranged from 2.9 to 3.7. The least FEC were observed in the medium MS210 mgl BAP with BA explants however the efficiencies ranged from 6 to 11 and the score ranged from 1.1 to 1.8. Whereas the efficiencies of FEC with ILL explants ranged from 4 to 7 and the score ranged from 0.5 to 0.8. All of four cultivars showed capability of producing FEC although their efficiency varied according to gonotype donors explants and medium taking into acount. Abbreviations GD Gressoff and Doy MS Murashige and Skoog 24-dichloro phenoxyacetic acid BAP Benzylamino-purin-Acid AB Apical Bud ILL Immature Leaves lobes

  19. Metabolism of 14C-aspartate during shoot bud formation in cultured cotyledon explants of radiata pine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konschuh, M.N.; Thorpe, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aspartate metabolism was investigated in excised cotyledons of radiata pine (Pinus radiate D. Don). These cotyledons were cultured under shoot-forming (plus N 6 -benzyladenine, SF), non-shoot-forming (minus N 6 -benzyladenine, NSF) and unresponsive (plus N 6 -benzyladenine, OLD) conditions, then incubated with [ 14 C]-aspartate for 3-h pulse treatments followed by 3-h chase treatments with cold aspartate. The majority of label was recovered in the CO 2 , amino acid, organic acid and pellet fractions. Uptake was greatest in all tissue types early in culture. Most (over 80%) of the [ 14 C 9-aspartate taken up by the tissues was converted to CO 2 at day 0 in SF and NSF tissues. CO 2 accounted for less than 50% of the total radioactivity in other tissues. Greater incorporation into fractions was observed in SF tissues during promeristemoid formation, while in NSF tissues the greatest incorporation was observed during a period of rapid elongation. Generally, less incorporation was observed in OLD cotyledons than in SF and NSF cotyledons. Analysis of the amino acid fraction showed that labelled aspartate was converted to other amino acids, mainly glutamate, glutamine, asparagine and 4-aminobutyric acid. (au)

  20. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively

  1. In vitro and in vivo modulation of cartilage degradation by a standardized Centella asiatica fraction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, A.; Smit, H.F.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Hoijer, M.A.; Garssen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease in which focal cartilage destruction is one of the primary features. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of a Centella asiatica fraction on in vitro and in vivo cartilage degradation. Bovine cartilage explants and bovine chondrocytes

  2. Platelet-rich plasma enhances the integration of bioengineered cartilage with native tissue in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermer, Corey; Kandel, Rita; Anderson, Jesse; Hurtig, Mark; Theodoropoulos, John

    2018-02-01

    Current therapies for cartilage repair can be limited by an inability of the repair tissue to integrate with host tissue. Thus, there is interest in developing approaches to enhance integration. We have previously shown that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) improves cartilage tissue formation. This raised the question as to whether PRP could promote cartilage integration. Chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage harvested from bovine joints, seeded on a porous bone substitute and grown in vitro to form an osteochondral-like implant. After 7 days, the biphasic construct was soaked in PRP for 30 min before implantation into the core of a donut-shaped biphasic explant of native cartilage and bone. Controls were not soaked in PRP. The implant-explant construct was cultured for 2-4 weeks. PRP-soaked bioengineered implants integrated with host tissue in 73% of samples, whereas controls only integrated in 19% of samples. The integration strength, as determined by a push-out test, was significantly increased in the PRP-soaked implant group (219 ± 35.4 kPa) compared with controls (72.0 ± 28.5 kPa). This correlated with an increase in glycosaminoglycan and collagen accumulation in the region of integration in the PRP-treated implant group, compared with untreated controls. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the integration zone contained collagen type II and aggrecan. The cells at the zone of integration in the PRP-soaked group had a 3.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-13 gene expression compared with controls. These results suggest that PRP-soaked bioengineered cartilage implants may be a better approach for cartilage repair due to enhanced integration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Efficient regeneration of plants from shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dendrobium densiflorum Lindl. is one of the horticulturally important orchids of Nepal due to its beautiful yellowish flower and medicinal properties. The present study was carried out for plant regeneration from shoot tip explants of D. densiflorum by tissue culture technique. The shoot tip explants of this species, obtained ...

  4. Adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants of the valuable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to develop an efficient protocol for adventitious shoot regeneration for Plectranthus barbatus Andrews using leaf explants. The explants were cultured on MS (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) medium containing various concentration of kinetin (KN), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and thidiazuron ...

  5. Effect of season, explants, growth regulators and sugar level on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of antioxidant treatments, 2,4-D concentrations and sucrose level were examined in order to optimize the induction and long term maintenance of callus cultures of Ficus religiosa L. from different explants including nodal segments, inter-nodal segments and shoot apices. The explants subjected to incubation for ...

  6. Cultura in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke Culture in vitro of rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke embryos´seeds and buds explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Handa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo o estabelecimento in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke livres de contaminações e de oxidação fenólica. As gemas foram obtidas da rebrota de mudas cultivadas em viveiro e os embriões a partir de sementes em diversos estágios de maturação. Para a assepsia dos explantes foram utilizados dois antibiótico (Ampicilina e Agrimicina, etanol (70% e hipoclorito de sódio, em concentrações e tempo de exposição variando em função do tratamento. Para o controle da oxidação foram utilizados imersão em ácido ascórbico (250 mg/l e PVP (Polivinilpirrolidona no meio Murashige & Skoog (MS. O delineamento estatístico empregado foi o inteiramente ao acaso com tratamentos e repetições em função do tipo de explante. Foi observado 71% de sobrevivência e 53% de germinação de embriões tratados com hipoclorito de sódio (50% e 2% de cloro ativo por 10 minutos e inoculados em meio MS contendo 20 mg/l de água de côco após 45 dias. As gemas das rebrotas de mudas tratadas com solução de Sulfato de Estreptomicina (Agrimicina na concentração de 500 mg/l (1h apresentaram 51% de sobrevivência. Quando submetidas ao pré-tratamento com o emprego de bomba a vácuo (180 mmHg contendo a Agrimicina (500 mg/l, apresentaram 25% de sobrevivência.This study deals with the establishment in vitro of Aniba rosaeodora Ducke explants, free from fungical and endogenous contaminations and phenolic oxidation. Bud explants and embryos' seeds from many maturation stages were used in this trial. The explants were disinfected with Ampicilin antibiotic, Streptomicine Sulphate (Agrimicina, etanol (70%, sodium hipoclorite in many concentrations and exposure time acording to the type of explant. For the phenolic oxidation control, the immersion on ascorbic acid and PVP (Polyvinilpirrolidone in culture medium were used. The explants were inoculated in MS medium. The statistical design was the

  7. Culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells attenuate cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat osteoarthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mei

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based cell therapy is a promising avenue for osteoarthritis (OA treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of intra-articular injections of culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT induced rat OA model. The paracrine effects of major histocompatibility complex (MHC-unmatched ADSCs on chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Rats were divided into an OA group that underwent ACLT surgery and a sham-operated group that did not undergo ACLT surgery. Four weeks after surgery mild OA was induced in the OA group. Subsequently, the OA rats were randomly divided into ADSC and control groups. A single dose of 1 × 106 ADSCs suspended in 60 μL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS was intra-articularly injected into the rats of the ADSC group. The control group received only 60 μL PBS. OA progression was evaluated macroscopically and histologically at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. ADSC treatment did not cause any adverse local or systemic reactions. The degeneration of articular cartilage was significantly weaker in the ADSC group compared to that in the control group at both 8 and 12 weeks. Chondrocytes were co-cultured with MHC-unmatched ADSCs in trans-wells to assess the paracrine effects of ADSCs on chondrocytes. Co-culture with ADSCs counteracted the IL-1β-induced mRNA upregulation of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes MMP-3 and MMP-13 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in chondrocytes. Importantly, ADSCs increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in chondrocytes. The results of this study indicated that the intra-articular injection of culture-expanded allogenic ADSCs attenuated cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat OA model without inducing any adverse reactions. MHC-unmatched ADSCs protected chondrocytes from inflammatory factor-induced damage. The paracrine effects

  8. Culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells attenuate cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat osteoarthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Li; Shen, Bojiang; Ling, Peixue; Liu, Shaoying; Xue, Jiajun; Liu, Fuyan; Shao, Huarong; Chen, Jianying; Ma, Aibin; Liu, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based cell therapy is a promising avenue for osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of intra-articular injections of culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) induced rat OA model. The paracrine effects of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unmatched ADSCs on chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Rats were divided into an OA group that underwent ACLT surgery and a sham-operated group that did not undergo ACLT surgery. Four weeks after surgery mild OA was induced in the OA group. Subsequently, the OA rats were randomly divided into ADSC and control groups. A single dose of 1 × 106 ADSCs suspended in 60 μL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was intra-articularly injected into the rats of the ADSC group. The control group received only 60 μL PBS. OA progression was evaluated macroscopically and histologically at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. ADSC treatment did not cause any adverse local or systemic reactions. The degeneration of articular cartilage was significantly weaker in the ADSC group compared to that in the control group at both 8 and 12 weeks. Chondrocytes were co-cultured with MHC-unmatched ADSCs in trans-wells to assess the paracrine effects of ADSCs on chondrocytes. Co-culture with ADSCs counteracted the IL-1β-induced mRNA upregulation of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes MMP-3 and MMP-13 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in chondrocytes. Importantly, ADSCs increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in chondrocytes. The results of this study indicated that the intra-articular injection of culture-expanded allogenic ADSCs attenuated cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat OA model without inducing any adverse reactions. MHC-unmatched ADSCs protected chondrocytes from inflammatory factor-induced damage. The paracrine effects of ADSCs on

  9. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-II on the mitogenic and metabolic activities of equine articular cartilage with and without interleukin 1-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport-Goodall, Celia L M; Boston, Raymond C; Richardson, Dean W

    2004-02-01

    To investigate the effects of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) on DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis and the expression of matrix-related genes in equine articular cartilage explants and chondrocytes, respectively, with and without interleukin 1-beta (IL1-beta). Articular cartilage from 12 adult horses. Articular cartilage was incubated in standard media with and without equine IL1-beta (10 ng/mL) containing various concentrations of IGF-II for 72 hours. Synthesis of DNA and GAG was determined by incorporation of thymidine labeled with radioactive hydrogen (3H) and sulfate labeled with radioactive sulfur (35S), respectively. Total GAG content of the explants and spent media was determined by use of the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay. Northern blots of RNA from cultured equine articular cartilage chondrocytes were hybridized with cDNA of major matrix molecules. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis at concentrations of 25 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. In cartilage explants conditioned with IL1-beta, IGF-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis at concentrations of 500 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. Insulin-like growth factor-II had no effect on total GAG content as determined by the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay. No specific effects on steady-state levels of messenger RNAs were observed. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis in equine adult cartilage and may have potential application in vivo.

  10. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  11. TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants and arrests downstream differentiation at an early stage of hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahoko Shintani

    Full Text Available Synovial explants furnish an in-situ population of mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of articular cartilage. Although bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2 induces the chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, the cartilage formed is neither homogeneously distributed nor of an exclusively hyaline type. Furthermore, the downstream differentiation of chondrocytes proceeds to the stage of terminal hypertrophy, which is inextricably coupled with undesired matrix mineralization. With a view to optimizing BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis, the modulating influences of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-ß1 were investigated.Explants of bovine calf metacarpal synovium were exposed to BMP-2 (200 ng/ml for 4 (or 6 weeks. FGF-2 (10 ng/ml or TGF-ß1 (10 ng/ml was introduced at the onset of incubation and was present either during the first week of culturing alone or throughout its entire course. FGF-2 enhanced the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromatic staining for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs only when it was present during the first week of culturing alone. TGF-ß1 enhanced not only the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromasia (to a greater degree than FGF-2, but also the biochemically-assayed accumulation of GAGs, when it was present throughout the entire culturing period; in addition, it arrested the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. These findings were corroborated by an analysis of the gene- and protein-expression levels of key cartilaginous markers and by an estimation of individual cell volume.TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, improves the hyaline-like properties of the neocartilage, and arrests the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. With the prospect of engineering a mature, truly articular type of cartilage in the context of clinical repair, our findings will be of importance in fine-tuning the

  12. TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants and arrests downstream differentiation at an early stage of hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Nahoko; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2013-01-01

    Synovial explants furnish an in-situ population of mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of articular cartilage. Although bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) induces the chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, the cartilage formed is neither homogeneously distributed nor of an exclusively hyaline type. Furthermore, the downstream differentiation of chondrocytes proceeds to the stage of terminal hypertrophy, which is inextricably coupled with undesired matrix mineralization. With a view to optimizing BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis, the modulating influences of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-ß1) were investigated. Explants of bovine calf metacarpal synovium were exposed to BMP-2 (200 ng/ml) for 4 (or 6) weeks. FGF-2 (10 ng/ml) or TGF-ß1 (10 ng/ml) was introduced at the onset of incubation and was present either during the first week of culturing alone or throughout its entire course. FGF-2 enhanced the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromatic staining for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) only when it was present during the first week of culturing alone. TGF-ß1 enhanced not only the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromasia (to a greater degree than FGF-2), but also the biochemically-assayed accumulation of GAGs, when it was present throughout the entire culturing period; in addition, it arrested the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. These findings were corroborated by an analysis of the gene- and protein-expression levels of key cartilaginous markers and by an estimation of individual cell volume. TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, improves the hyaline-like properties of the neocartilage, and arrests the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. With the prospect of engineering a mature, truly articular type of cartilage in the context of clinical repair, our findings will be of importance in fine-tuning the

  13. Conditioned Medium of Wharton's Jelly Derived Stem Cells Can Enhance the Cartilage Specific Genes Expression by Chondrocytes in Monolayer and Mass Culture Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hassan Famian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been introduced for cell therapy strategies in osteoarthritis (OA. Despite of their capacity for differentiation into chondrocyte, there are some evidences about their life-threatening problem after transplantation. So, some researchers shifted on the application of stem cells conditioned medium. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether Wharton's jelly derived stem cell conditioned medium (WJSCs-CM can enhance the gene expression profile by chondrocytes in monolayer and mass culture systems. Methods: Conditioned medium was obtained from WJSCs at fourth passage. Isolated chondrocytes were plated at density of 1×106 for both monolayer and high density culture. Then cells in both groups were divided into control (received medium and experiment group treated with WJ-CM for 3 and 6 days. Samples were prepared to evaluate gene expression profile of collagen II, aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and sox-9 using real-time RT-PCR. Results: After 3 days, Chondrocytes treated with WJSCs-CM expressed significantly higher level of genes compared to the control group in both culture systems. After 6 days, the expression of genes in monolayer cultivated chondrocytes was decreased but that of the mass culture were up-regulated significantly. Conclusion: WJ-SCs-CM can increase the expression of cartilage-specific genes and can be introduced as a promoting factor for cartilage regeneration.

  14. Regulation of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, Grayson; Neu, Corey P; Chan, Stephanie M T; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; June, Ronald K; Reddi, A Hari

    2009-02-01

    Articular cartilage functions to provide a low-friction surface for joint movement for many decades of life. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a glycoprotein secreted by chondrocytes in the superficial layer of articular cartilage that contributes to effective boundary lubrication. In both cell and explant cultures, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta have been demonstrated to, respectively, upregulate and downregulate SZP protein levels. It was hypothesized that the friction coefficient of articular cartilage could also be modulated by these cytokines through SZP regulation. The friction coefficient between cartilage explants (both untreated and treated with TGF-beta1 or IL-1beta) and a smooth glass surface due to sliding in the boundary lubrication regime was measured with a pin-on-disk tribometer. SZP was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and localized by immunohistochemistry. Both TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatments resulted in the decrease of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage in a location- and time-dependent manner. Changes in the friction coefficient due to the TGF-beta1 treatment corresponded to increased depth of SZP staining within the superficial zone, while friction coefficient changes due to the IL-1beta treatment were independent of SZP depth of staining. However, the changes induced by the IL-1beta treatment corresponded to changes in surface roughness, determined from the analysis of surface images obtained with an atomic force microscope. These findings demonstrate that the low friction of articular cartilage can be modified by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatment and that the friction coefficient depends on multiple factors, including SZP localization and surface roughness.

  15. Shark Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammation of the intestine (enteritis). Some people apply shark cartilage directly to the skin for arthritis and psoriasis. ... ingredients. Additionally, there is no research showing that shark cartilage is absorbed through the skin. Psoriasis. Developing research suggests that a specific shark ...

  16. Electroporation of Embryonic Kidney Explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nicholas; Houle, Daniel; Gupta, Indra R.

    Metanephric kidney development in the mouse begins at embryonic day (E) 10.5, when the ureteric bud (UB), an outgrowth of the epithelial nephric duct, invades the neighboring metanephric mesenchyme (MM). The ureteric bud then undergoes a series of branching events to form the collecting duct network of the adult kidney (Fig. 19.1). As each ureteric bud tip forms, the adjacent undifferentiated mesenchyme is induced to epithelialize and form a nephron, the functional unit of the adult kidney that filters waste. Rodent embryonic kidneys can be dissected and cultured as explants such that branching morphogenesis and nephrogenesis can be observed ex vivo (Rothenpieler and Dressler, 1993; Vega et al., 1996; Piscione et al., 1997; Gupta et al., 2003).

  17. In vitro culture increases mechanical stability of human tissue engineered cartilage constructs by prevention of microscale scaffold buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorf, Jill M; Shortkroff, Sonya; Dugopolski, Caroline; Kennedy, Stephen; Siemiatkoski, Joseph; Bartell, Lena R; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-11-07

    Many studies have measured the global compressive properties of tissue engineered (TE) cartilage grown on porous scaffolds. Such scaffolds are known to exhibit strain softening due to local buckling under loading. As matrix is deposited onto these scaffolds, the global compressive properties increase. However the relationship between the amount and distribution of matrix in the scaffold and local buckling is unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we studied how local strain and construct buckling in human TE constructs changes over culture times and GAG content. Confocal elastography techniques and digital image correlation (DIC) were used to measure and record buckling modes and local strains. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to quantify construct buckling. The results from the ROC analysis were placed into Kaplan-Meier survival function curves to establish the probability that any point in a construct buckled. These analysis techniques revealed the presence of buckling at early time points, but bending at later time points. An inverse correlation was observed between the probability of buckling and the total GAG content of each construct. This data suggests that increased GAG content prevents the onset of construct buckling and improves the microscale compressive tissue properties. This increase in GAG deposition leads to enhanced global compressive properties by prevention of microscale buckling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Pleumeekers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix. This study evaluated the performance of culture-expanded human chondrocytes from ear (EC, nose (NC and articular joint (AC, as well as bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. All cells (≥ 3 donors per source were culture-expanded, encapsulated in alginate and cultured for 5 weeks. Subsequently, constructs were implanted subcutaneously for 8 additional weeks. Before and after implantation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen content were measured using biochemical assays. Mechanical properties were determined using stress-strain-indentation tests. Hypertrophic differentiation was evaluated with qRT-PCR and subsequent endochondral ossification with histology. ACs had higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other cell sources, as assessed by gene expression and GAG content (p < 0.001. However, after implantation, ACs did not further increase their matrix. In contrast, ECs and NCs continued producing matrix in vivo leading to higher GAG content (p < 0.001 and elastic modulus. For NC-constructs, matrix-deposition was associated with the elastic modulus (R2 = 0.477, p = 0.039. Although all cells – except ACs – expressed markers for hypertrophic differentiation in vitro, there was no bone formed in vivo. Our work shows that cartilage formation and functionality depends on the cell source used. ACs possess the highest chondrogenic capacity in vitro, while ECs and NCs are most potent in vivo, making them attractive cell sources for cartilage repair.

  19. Profiling the secretion of soluble mediators by end stage osteoarthritis synovial tissue explants reveals a reduced responsiveness to an inflammatory trigger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierman, Lobke M; van El, Benno; van der Ham, Frits; Koudijs, Angela; Stoop, Reinout; Verheijen, Jan H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Stojanovic-Susulic, Vedrana; Huizinga, Tom W J; Zuurmond, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that synovial tissue plays an active role in osteoarthritis (OA), however, exact understanding of its contribution is lacking. In order to further elucidate its role in the OA process, we aimed to identify the secretion pattern of soluble mediators by synovial tissue and to assess its ability to initiate cartilage degeneration. Synovial tissue explants (STEs) obtained from donors without history of OA (n = 8) or from end stage OA patients (n = 16) were cultured alone or together with bovine cartilage explants in the absence or presence of IL-1α. The secretion of 48 soluble mediators was measured and the effect on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was determined. Normal and OA STEs secreted comparable levels of almost all measured soluble mediators. However, in the presence of IL-1α these mediators were less secreted by OA than by normal STEs of which 15 differed significantly (peffect of normal or OA STEs on GAG release from the cartilage explants was observed, and no differences in MMP activity between OA and normal STEs were detected. Unexpectedly, a comparable secretion profile of soluble mediators was found for OA and normal STEs while the reduced responsiveness of OA STEs to an inflammatory trigger indicates a different state of this tissue in OA patients. The effects could be the result of prolonged exposure to an inflammatory environment in OA development. Further understanding of the pro-inflammatory and inflammation resolving mechanisms during disease progression in synovial tissue may provide valuable targets for therapy in the future.

  20. Profiling the secretion of soluble mediators by end stage osteoarthritis synovial tissue explants reveals a reduced responsiveness to an inflammatory trigger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobke M Gierman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evidence is accumulating that synovial tissue plays an active role in osteoarthritis (OA, however, exact understanding of its contribution is lacking. In order to further elucidate its role in the OA process, we aimed to identify the secretion pattern of soluble mediators by synovial tissue and to assess its ability to initiate cartilage degeneration. METHODS: Synovial tissue explants (STEs obtained from donors without history of OA (n = 8 or from end stage OA patients (n = 16 were cultured alone or together with bovine cartilage explants in the absence or presence of IL-1α. The secretion of 48 soluble mediators was measured and the effect on glycosaminoglycan (GAG release and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity was determined. RESULTS: Normal and OA STEs secreted comparable levels of almost all measured soluble mediators. However, in the presence of IL-1α these mediators were less secreted by OA than by normal STEs of which 15 differed significantly (p<0.01. No effect of normal or OA STEs on GAG release from the cartilage explants was observed, and no differences in MMP activity between OA and normal STEs were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Unexpectedly, a comparable secretion profile of soluble mediators was found for OA and normal STEs while the reduced responsiveness of OA STEs to an inflammatory trigger indicates a different state of this tissue in OA patients. The effects could be the result of prolonged exposure to an inflammatory environment in OA development. Further understanding of the pro-inflammatory and inflammation resolving mechanisms during disease progression in synovial tissue may provide valuable targets for therapy in the future.

  1. Stimulation of the Superficial Zone Protein and Lubrication in the Articular Cartilage by Human Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ryosuke; McNary, Sean M.; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Lee, Cassandra A.; Van den Bogaerde, James M.; Marder, Richard A.; Reddi, A. Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains high concentrations of autologous growth factors that originate from platelets. Intra-articular injections of PRP have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the knee. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a boundary lubricant in articular cartilage and plays an important role in reducing friction and wear and therefore is critical in cartilage homeostasis. Purpose To determine if PRP influences the production of SZP from human joint-derived cells and to evaluate the lubricating properties of PRP on normal bovine articular cartilage. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cells were isolated from articular cartilage, synovium, and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from 12 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. The concentrations of SZP in PRP and culture media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cellular proliferation was quantified by determination of cell numbers. The lubrication properties of PRP from healthy volunteers on bovine articular cartilage were investigated using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Results In general, PRP stimulated proliferation in cells derived from articular cartilage, synovium, and ACL. It also significantly enhanced SZP secretion from synovium- and cartilage-derived cells. An unexpected finding was the presence of SZP in PRP (2.89 ± 1.23 µg/mL before activation and 3.02 ± 1.32 µg/mL after activation). In addition, under boundary mode conditions consisting of high loads and low sliding speeds, nonactivated and thrombin-activated PRP decreased the friction coefficient (μ = 0.012 and μ = 0.015, respectively) compared with saline (μ = 0.047, P lubricates bovine articular cartilage explants. Clinical Relevance These findings provide evidence to explain the biochemical and biomechanical mechanisms underlying the efficacy of PRP treatment for osteoarthritis or damage in the knee joint. PMID:25813869

  2. Cytological events in explants of Arabidopsis thaliana during early callogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fras, A; Juchimiuk, J; Siwinska, D; Maluszynska, J

    2007-11-01

    Leaf explants of diploid (2n = 2x = 10) and autotetraploid (2n = 4x = 20) plants of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia were cytologically and cytogenetically analysed to determine the time and the mechanisms of the process of polyploidization. The first polyploid cells were observed after the third day of culture in both genotypes of explants. Polyploid cells were the result of pre-existing mixoploidy in explants of A. thaliana. Other factors such as endoreduplication, endomitosis, abnormal microtubules arrangement and DNA damage may have induced polyploidization during early stages of callogenesis.

  3. The xenoestrogens, bisphenol A and para-nonylphenol, decrease the expression of the ABCG2 transporter protein in human term placental explant cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieppi, E; Vähäkangas, K; Rautio, A; Ietta, F; Paulesu, L; Myllynen, P

    2016-07-05

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic compounds are substrates and regulators of human placental ABC transporters. ABCG2 is protecting fetus against foreign chemicals. Environmental xenoestrogens, like bisphenol A (BPA) and p-nonylphenol (p-NP), mimic natural estrogens and can affect hormonal systems. Effects of BPA, p-NP, DES (diethylstilbestrol) and estradiol (E2), on ABCG2 expression were studied using human first trimester and term placental explants. Role of estrogen receptors (ER) in the effects of chemicals was studied by ER antagonist. Term placenta expressed less ABCG2 protein. In term placentas BPA (p xenoestrogens downregulate placental ABCG2 protein expression depending on gestational age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mineralization and growth of cultured embryonic skeletal tissue in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1999-01-01

    Microgravity provides a unique environment in which to study normal and pathological phenomenon. Very few studies have been done to examine the effects of microgravity on developing skeletal tissue such as growth plate formation and maintenance, elongation of bone primordia, or the mineralization of growth plate cartilage. Embryonic mouse premetatarsal triads were cultured on three space shuttle flights to study cartilage growth, differentiation, and mineralization, in a microgravity environment. The premetatarsal triads that were cultured in microgravity all formed cartilage rods and grew in length. However, the premetatarsal cartilage rods cultured in microgravity grew less in length than the ground control cartilage rods. Terminal chondrocyte differentiation also occurred during culture in microgravity, as well as in the ground controls, and the matrix around the hypertrophied chondrocytes was capable of mineralizing in both groups. The same percentage of premetatarsals mineralized in the microgravity cultures as mineralized in the ground control cultures. In addition, the sizes of the mineralized areas between the two groups were very similar. However, the amount of 45Ca incorporated into the mineralized areas was significantly lower in the microgravity cultures, suggesting that the composition or density of the mineralized regions was compromised in microgravity. There was no significant difference in the amount of 45Ca liberated from prelabeled explants in microgravity or in the ground controls.

  5. Differential regulation of proteoglycan 4 metabolism in cartilage by IL-1alpha, IGF-I, and TGF-beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T A; Gastelum, N S; Han, E H; Nugent-Derfus, G E; Schumacher, B L; Sah, R L

    2008-01-01

    To determine (1) if interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha), insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) regulate proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) metabolism in articular cartilage, in terms of chondrocytes expressing PRG4 and PRG4 bound at the articular surface, and (2) if these features of cartilage PRG4 metabolism correlate with its secretion. Articular cartilage explants were harvested and cultured for 6 days with or without 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), alone, or with the addition of 10ng/ml IL-1alpha, 300ng/ml IGF-I, or 10ng/ml TGF-beta1. PRG4 expression by chondrocytes in the cartilage disks was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). PRG4 bound to the articular surface of disks was quantified by extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PRG4 secreted into culture medium was quantified by ELISA and characterized by Western Blot. PRG4 expression by chondrocytes near the articular surface was markedly decreased by IL-1alpha, stimulated by TGF-beta1, and not affected by IGF-I. The level of PRG4 accumulation in the culture medium was correlated with the number of chondrocytes expressing PRG4. The amount of PRG4 bound at the articular surface was modulated by incubation in medium including FBS, but did not correlate with levels of PRG4 secretion. Cartilage secretion of PRG4 is highly regulated by certain cytokines and growth factors, in part through alteration of the number of PRG4-secreting chondrocytes near the articular surface. The biochemical milieu may regulate the PRG4 content of synovial fluid during cartilage injury or repair.

  6. Effect of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Human Placental Explants Infected with Toxoplasma gondii Depends on Gestational Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Gomes, Angelica; de Oliveira Silva, Deise Aparecida; Silva, Neide Maria; de Freitas Barbosa, Bellisa; Franco, Priscila Silva; Angeloni, Mariana Bodini; Fermino, Marise Lopes; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Bechi, Nicoletta; Paulesu, Luana Ricci; dos Santos, Maria Célia; Mineo, José Roberto; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Because macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key cytokine in pregnancy and has a role in inflammatory response and pathogen defense, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of MIF in first- and third-trimester human placental explants infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Explants were treated with recombinant MIF, IL-12, interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, or IL-10, followed by infection with T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites. Supernatants of cultured explants were assessed for MIF production. Explants were processed for morphologic analysis, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR analysis. Comparison of infected and stimulated explants versus noninfected control explants demonstrated a significant increase in MIF release in first-trimester but not third-trimester explants. Tissue parasitism was higher in third- than in first-trimester explants. Moreover, T. gondii DNA content was lower in first-trimester explants treated with MIF compared with untreated explants. However, in third-trimester explants, MIF stimulus decreased T. gondii DNA content only at the highest concentration of the cytokine. In addition, high expression of MIF receptor was observed in first-trimester placental explants, whereas MIF receptor expression was low in third-trimester explants. In conclusion, MIF was up-regulated and demonstrated to be important for control of T. gondii infection in first-trimester explants, whereas lack of MIF up-regulation in third-trimester placentas may be involved in higher susceptibility to infection at this gestational age. PMID:21641401

  7. callus induction from epicotyl and hypocotyl explants of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Botany, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. Nigeria. (Submitted: 31 May 2004; Accepted: 31 October 2004). Abstract. Epicotyl and hypocotyl explants of Parkia biglobosa (Locust bean) were cultured in vitro to investigate their callogenic capacity. Established cultures were obtained and maintained on MS ...

  8. Callus induction from epicotyl and hypocotyl explants of Parkia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epicotyl and hypocotyl explants of Parkia biglobosa (Locust bean) were cultured in vitro to investigate their callogenic capacity. Established cultures were obtained and maintained on MS medium supplemented with either 2,4-D or NAA, each of concentration range of 0.4 – 1.0 mg/L. In general, while higher concentrations of ...

  9. Plantlet regeneration potential from seedling explants of vitegnus (Vitex agnus castus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandoosti, F

    2007-11-15

    In this research a simple and repeatable method for regeneration of a important medicinal plant (Vitex agnus castus) described. Different seedling explants such as hypocotyl, cotyledon, root and apical meristem were cultured in MS basal media with different kinds and concentrations of PGRs. Root and apical meristem explants were the only explants that have regeneration whole plantlets potential. It was interesting that regeneration whole plantlets from root and apical meristem explants have different developmental pathways. Whole plantlets from apical meristem explants regenerated by passing phase callusing whereas regeneration whole plantlets from root was direct and without phase callusing. This subject implies that we can have many manipulation possibilities in order to different objects of tissue culture by selecting different explants in vitegnus.

  10. Sour orange bud regeneration and in vitro plant development related to culture medium composition and explant type Regeneração de gemas de laranja-azeda e desenvolvimento in vitro de plantas em função da composição do meio de cultura e tipo de explante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosely Pereira da Silva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the formation of adventitious buds and in vitro regeneration of sour orange plants (Citrus aurantium L. two organogenesis-inducing experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, the induction and in vitro regeneration of adventitious buds were tested on epicotyl and internodal segments under the influence of BAP or KIN associated with NAA. The second experiment evaluated the in vitro regeneration of sour orange plants related to different explant types (epicotyls segments, internodal segments of in vitro germinated plantlets and internodal segments of greenhouse cultivated plants. Data collected on both experiments included the percentage of responsive explants (explants that formed buds, and the number of buds per explant. The addition of BAP showed the best organogenic response. In vitro germinated epicotyl segments and internodal segments are recommended as explants for sour orange in vitro organogenesis. Rooting of regenerated shoots was achieved without the need of auxin in the medium.Com o objetivo de avaliar a formação de gemas adventícias e regeneração in vitro de plantas de laranja-azeda (Citrus aurantium L., foram realizados dois experimentos de indução à organogênese. No primeiro experimento, a indução e a regeneração in vitro de gemas adventícias foram investigadas a partir de segmentos internodais e segmentos de epicótilo sob o efeito de BAP ou CIN associados com ANA. O segundo experimento avaliou a regeneração in vitro de plantas de laranja-azeda em função do tipo de explante (segmentos de epicótilo, segmentos internodais de plantas germinadas in vitro e segmentos internodais de plantas cultivadas em casa de vegetação. Os dados coletados em ambos os experimentos incluíram a porcentagem de explantes responsivos (explantes que formaram gemas e número de gemas por explante. A adição de BAP revelou a melhor resposta organogenética. Segmentos de epicótilo e segmentos internodais s

  11. Integration of Stem Cell to Chondrocyte-Derived Cartilage Matrix in Healthy and Osteoarthritic States in the Presence of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Dua

    Full Text Available We investigated the effectiveness of integrating tissue engineered cartilage derived from human bone marrow derived stem cells (HBMSCs to healthy as well as osteoarthritic cartilage mimics using hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles immersed within a hydrogel substrate. Healthy and diseased engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes (cultured in agar gels were integrated with human bone marrow stem cell (HBMSC-derived cartilaginous engineered matrix with and without HA, and evaluated after 28 days of growth. HBMSCs were seeded within photopolymerizable poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA hydrogels. In addition, we also conducted a preliminary in vivo evaluation of cartilage repair in rabbit knee chondral defects treated with subchondral bone microfracture and cell-free PEGDA with and without HA. Under in vitro conditions, the interfacial shear strength between tissue engineered cartilage derived from HBMSCs and osteoarthritic chondrocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.05 when HA nanoparticles were incorporated within the HBMSC culture system. Histological evidence confirmed a distinct spatial transition zone, rich in calcium phosphate deposits. Assessment of explanted rabbit knees by histology demonstrated that cellularity within the repair tissues that had filled the defects were of significantly higher number (p < 0.05 when HA was used. HA nanoparticles play an important role in treating chondral defects when osteoarthritis is a co-morbidity. We speculate that the calcified layer formation at the interface in the osteoarthritic environment in the presence of HA is likely to have attributed to higher interfacial strength found in vitro. From an in vivo standpoint, the presence of HA promoted cellularity in the tissues that subsequently filled the chondral defects. This higher presence of cells can be considered important in the context of accelerating long-term cartilage remodeling. We conclude that HA nanoparticles play an important role in

  12. Requirement for protein kinase R in interleukin-1alpha-stimulated effects in cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christine L; Hofbauer, Maria; Towle, Christine A

    2007-12-03

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has pleiotropic effects in cartilage. The interferon-induced, double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR that phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) alpha has been implicated in cytokine effects in chondrocytes. A compound was recently identified that potently suppresses PKR autophosphorylation (IC50 approximately 200 etaM) and partially restores PKR-inhibited translation in a cell-free system with significant effect in the nanomolar range. The objectives of this study were to exploit this potent PKR inhibitor to assess whether PKR kinase activity is required for catabolic and proinflammatory effects of IL-1alpha in cartilage and to determine whether IL-1alpha causes an increase in eIF2alpha phosphorylation that is antagonized by the PKR inhibitor. Cartilage explants were incubated with the PKR inhibitor and IL-1alpha. Culture media were assessed for sulfated glycosaminoglycan as an indicator of proteoglycan degradation and for prostaglandin E(2). Cartilage extracts were analyzed by Western blot for cyclooxygenase-2 and phosphorylated signaling molecules. Nanomolar concentrations of the PKR inhibitor suppressed proteoglycan degradation and cyclooxygenase-2 accumulation in IL-1alpha-activated cartilage. The PKR inhibitor stimulated or inhibited PGE(2) production with a biphasic dose response relationship. IL-1alpha increased the phosphorylation of both PKR and eIF2alpha, and nanomolar concentrations of PKR inhibitor suppressed the IL-1alpha-induced changes in phosphorylation. The results strongly support PKR involvement in pathways activated by IL-1alpha in chondrocytes.

  13. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetina, Elena V; Markova, Galina A; Poole, A Robin; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1-50  μ M). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10-50  μ M DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10  μ M DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1 β , and TNF α and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1 α , and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  14. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Tchetina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM. Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA, AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  15. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Sheep: Characterization and Autologous Transplantation in a Model of Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul; Baily, James; Khan, Nusrat; Biant, Leela C; Simpson, A Hamish R; Péault, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has indicated that purified perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have increased chondrogenic potential compared to conventional mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived in culture. This study aimed to develop an autologous large animal model for PSC transplantation and to specifically determine if implanted cells are retained in articular cartilage defects. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to ascertain the reactivity of anti-human and anti-ovine antibodies, which were combined and used to identify and isolate pericytes (CD34 - CD45 - CD146 + ) and adventitial cells (CD34 + CD45 - CD146 - ). The purified cells demonstrated osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential in culture. Autologous ovine PSCs (oPSCs) were isolated, cultured, and efficiently transfected using a green fluorescence protein (GFP) encoding lentivirus. The cells were implanted into articular cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle using hydrogel and collagen membranes. Four weeks following implantation, the condyle was explanted and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the presence of oPSCs in the defect repaired with the hydrogel. These data suggest the testability in a large animal of native MSC autologous grafting, thus avoiding possible biases associated with xenotransplantation. Such a setting will be used in priority for indications in orthopedics, at first to model articular cartilage repair.

  16. Compositional and metabolic changes in damaged cartilage are peak- stress, stress-rate, and loading-duration dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.-T.; Burton-Wurster, N.; Lust, G.; Bank, R.A.; Tekoppele, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to determine if the cumulative effects of impact or smoothly arising compression would damage the matrix of articular cartilage. Canine cartilage explants were subjected to repeated impacts or to smoothly arising compressions of as much as 20 MPa at 0.3 Hz for

  17. In vitro propagation of Alstroemeria using rhizome explants derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... Single in vitro and in vivo rhizome bud were excised (3 -7 mm) using a sharp knife and cultured on MS basal medium with 3 different composition of growth regulators. Culture media. The explants were planted in culture media as M1 (MS + 1 mg l-1. BA + 0.2 mg l-1 NAA) Han et al. (1994), M2 (MS + 1 mg l-1 ...

  18. Effects of limited exposure of rabbit chondrocyte cultures to parathyroid hormone and dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on cartilage-characteristic proteoglycan synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Y.; Koike, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Kinoshita, M.; Sato, K.; Hiraki, Y.; Suzuki, F.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of rabbit chondrocyte cultures with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for 30 h increased by 2- to 3-fold the incorporation of [35S]sulfate and 3H radioactivity with glucosamine as the precursor into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans characteristically found in cartilage matrix. However, PTH and (Bu)2cAMP did not increase either [35S]sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans or the incorporation of 3H radioactivity into hyaluronic acid and other glycosaminoglycans. PTH and (Bu)2cAMP also increased the incorporation of [3H] serine into both proteoglycans and total protein. In all cultures described above, the stimulation of [3H]serine incorporation into proteoglycans exceeded that of [3H]serine incorporation into total protein. These data indicate that PTH and (Bu)2cAMP selectively stimulate cartilage proteoglycan synthesis while they increase total protein synthesis. Since cAMP seems to play a mediatory role in the action of PTH, we elected to examine the effects of a limited exposure of chondrocytes to PTH or (Bu)2cAMP on the synthesis of proteoglycans. Treatment with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for only the initial 2-7 h did not increase the rates of incorporation of [35S]sulfate, the 3H radioactivity with glucosamine, and [3H]serine into proteoglycans, as measured at 30 h, despite the fact that this treatment brought about a rapid and transient rise in the cAMP level. Furthermore, the application of prostaglandin I2 at concentrations that increased cAMP levels in a similar fashion as did PTH did not affect [35S] sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans

  19. Efficient regeneration of plants from shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    samrat1765

    2013-03-20

    . The shoot tip explants of this ... observed on MS+ BAP (2 mg/l) + NAA (0.5 mg/l) (4 shoots/ culture). The shoot multiplication started ... throughout the world ranging from southern Asia to New. Guinea and Australia (Luo et al., ...

  20. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from leaf explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to study the somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from the in vitro leaf explants of Rumex vesicarius L. a renowned medicinal plant, which belongs to polygonaceae family. Effective in vitro regeneration of R. vesicarius was achieved via young leaf derived somatic embryo cultures.

  1. Regeneration of plantlets from nodal and shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anoectochilus elatus Lindley is an endangered terrestrial orchid. A procedure for the regeneration of complete plantlets of A. elatus Lindley through node and shoot tip explants resulted directly in shoots when cultured on a full strength Murashige and Skoog (1962) medium supplemented with cytokinins at different ...

  2. Adventitious shoot regeneration from in vitro stem explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An efficient in vitro plant regeneration system from stem explants was established in Phellodendron amurense. Factors influencing shoot regeneration from stems including culture medium type, combinations of plant growth regulators and carbon source in the medium were investigated. Adventitious shoot regeneration was ...

  3. In vitro response from cotyledon and hypocotyls explants in tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... 1Institute of Tropical Agriculture, University of Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. ... Tissue culture is an important tool of biotechnology, which can be used to improve productivity of crop via rapid availability of superior planting stock ... types of explants viz. cotyledon, hypocotyl, pedicel,.

  4. In vitro performances of hypocotyl and cotyledon explants of tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... 1Institute Tropical of Agriculture, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. 2Faculty of Agriculture ... A plant tissue culture technique is a good method for the evaluation and screening of plant genotypes for salt tolerance. ... The type of explant showed a difference in their response to ...

  5. In vitro performances of hypocotyl and cotyledon explants of tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A plant tissue culture technique is a good method for the evaluation and screening of plant genotypes for salt tolerance. In vitro evaluations of sodium chloride (NaCl) effects on two tomato cultivars (Pearl and Beril) were investigated with four NaCl levels (0, 25, 50 and 75 mM) using hypocotyl and cotyledon explants.

  6. ESTABLISHING A LIVE CARTILAGE-ON-CARTILAGE INTERFACE FOR TRIBOLOGICAL TESTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Robert L; Stoia, Jonathan; Laurent, Michel P; Pacione, Carol A; Chubinskaya, Susan; Wimmer, Markus A

    2017-03-01

    Mechano-biochemical wear encompasses the tribological interplay between biological and mechanical mechanisms responsible for cartilage wear and degradation. The aim of this study was to develop and start validating a novel tribological testing system, which better resembles the natural joint environment through incorporating a live cartilage-on-cartilage articulating interface, joint specific kinematics, and the application of controlled mechanical stimuli for the measurement of biological responses in order to study the mechano-biochemical wear of cartilage. The study entailed two parts. In Part 1, the novel testing rig was used to compare two bearing systems: (a) cartilage articulating against cartilage (CoC) and (b) metal articulating against cartilage (MoC). The clinically relevant MoC, which is also a common tribological interface for evaluating cartilage wear, should produce more wear to agree with clinical observations. In Part II, the novel testing system was used to determine how wear is affected by tissue viability in live and dead CoC articulations. For both parts, bovine cartilage explants were harvested and tribologically tested for three consecutive days. Wear was defined as release of glycosaminoglycans into the media and as evaluation of the tissue structure. For Part I, we found that the live CoC articulation did not cause damage to the cartilage, to the extent of being comparable to the free swelling controls, whereas the MoC articulation caused decreased cell viability, extracellular matrix disruption, and increased wear when compared to CoC, and consistent with clinical data. These results provided confidence that this novel testing system will be adequate to screen new biomaterials for articulation against cartilage, such as in hemiarthroplasty. For Part II, the live and dead cartilage articulation yielded similar wear as determined by the release of proteoglycans and aggrecan fragments, suggesting that keeping the cartilage alive may not be

  7. Production of Gymnemic Acid Depends on Medium, Explants, PGRs, Color Lights, Temperature, Photoperiod, and Sucrose Sources in Batch Culture of Gymnema sylvestre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bakrudeen Ali Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gymnema sylvestre (R.Br. is an important diabetic medicinal plant which yields pharmaceutically active compounds called gymnemic acid (GA. The present study describes callus induction and the subsequent batch culture optimization and GA quantification determined by linearity, precision, accuracy, and recovery. Best callus induction of GA was noticed in MS medium combined with 2,4-D (1.5 mg/L and KN (0.5 mg/L. Evaluation and isolation of GA from the calluses derived from different plant parts, namely, leaf, stem and petioles have been done in the present case for the first time. Factors such as light, temperature, sucrose, and photoperiod were studied to observe their effect on GA production. Temperature conditions completely inhibited GA production. Out of the different sucrose concentrations tested, the highest yield (35.4 mg/g d.w was found at 5% sucrose followed by 12 h photoperiod (26.86 mg/g d.w. Maximum GA production (58.28 mg/g d.w was observed in blue light. The results showed that physical and chemical factors greatly influence the production of GA in callus cultures of G. sylvestre. The factors optimized for in vitro production of GA during the present study can successfully be employed for their large-scale production in bioreactors.

  8. Human rheumatoid arthritis tissue production of IL-17A drives matrix and cartilage degradation: synergy with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, Oncostatin M and response to biologic therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to examine IL-17A in patients, following anti-TNF-alpha therapy and the effect of IL-17A on matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. METHODS: IL-17A expression was examined by ELISA and immunohistology in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. RA whole synovial tissue explant (RA ST), primary synovial fibroblasts (RASFC), human cartilage and chondrocyte cultures were stimulated with IL-17A +\\/- TNF-alpha and Oncostatin M (OSM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1) were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Cartilage proteoglycan release was assessed histologically by Safranin-O staining. Clinical parameters, IL-17A, MMP\\/TIMP were assessed in patients pre\\/post biologic therapy. RESULTS: IL-17A levels were higher in RA vs osteoarthritis (OA)\\/normal joints (P < 0.05). IL-17A up-regulated MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13 in RA ST, RASFC, cartilage and chondrocyte cultures (P < 0.05). In combination with TNF-alpha and OSM, IL-17A shifted the MMP:TIMP-1 ratio in favor of matrix degradation (all P < 0.05). Cartilage proteoglycan depletion in response to IL-17A was mild; however, in combination with TNF-alpha or OSM showed almost complete proteoglycan depletion. Serum IL-17A was detected in 28% of patients commencing biologic therapy. IL-17A negative patients demonstrated reductions post therapy in serum MMP1\\/TIMP4, MMP3\\/TIMP1 and MMP3\\/TIMP4 ratios and an increase in CS846 (all P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in IL-17A positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17A is produced locally in the inflamed RA joint. IL-17A promotes matrix turnover and cartilage destruction, especially in the presence of other cytokines, mimicking the joint environment. IL-17A levels are modulated in vivo, following anti-TNF therapy, and may reflect changes in matrix turnover.

  9. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation and functional cartilage microtissue formation for in vivo cartilage regeneration by cartilage extracellular matrix-derived particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Heyong; Wang, Yu; Sun, Zhen; Sun, Xun; Xu, Yichi; Li, Pan; Meng, Haoye; Yu, Xiaoming; Xiao, Bo; Fan, Tian; Wang, Yiguo; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of preparing a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), designated cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs). Through a series of processes involving pulverization, sieving, and decellularization, fresh cartilage was made into CEDPs with a median diameter of 263 ± 48 μm. Under microgravity culture conditions in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate rapidly on the surface of CEDPs with high viability. Histological evaluation and gene expression analysis indicated that BMSCs were differentiated into mature chondrocytes after 21 days of culture without the use of exogenous growth factors. Functional cartilage microtissue aggregates of BMSC-laden CEDPs formed as time in culture increased. Further, the microtissue aggregates were directly implanted into trochlear cartilage defects in a rat model (CEDP+MSC group). Gait analysis and histological results indicated that the CEDP+MSC group obtained better and more rapid joint function recovery and superior cartilage repair compared to the control groups, in which defects were treated with CEDPs alone or only fibrin glue, at both 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the innovative cell carrier derived from cartilage ECM could promote chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue facilitated cartilage regeneration. This strategy for cell culture, stem cell differentiation and one-step surgery using cartilage microtissue for cartilage repair provides novel prospects for cartilage tissue engineering and may have further broad clinical applications. We proposed a method to prepare a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage ECM, termed cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs), which can support proliferation of MSCs and facilitate their chondrogenic differentiation. Further, the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue of MSC-laden CEDP aggregates for

  10. Articular cartilage response to a sliding load using two different-sized spherical indenters1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schätti, Oliver R; Colombo, Vera; Torzilli, Peter A; Gallo, Luigi M

    2018-01-01

    Cartilage surface contact geometry influences the deformational behavior and stress distribution throughout the extracellular matrix (ECM) under load. To test the correlation between the mechanical and cellular response of articular cartilage when loaded with two different-sized spherical indenters under dynamic reciprocating sliding motion. Articular cartilage explants were subjected to a reciprocating sliding load using a 17.6 mm or 30.2 mm spherical ball for 2000 cycles at 10 mm/s and 4 kg axial load. Deformation of the cartilage was recorded and contact parameters were calculated according to Hertzian theory. After mechanical loading cartilage samples were collected and analyzed for ECM collagen damage, gene regulation and proteoglycan (PG) loss. Significantly higher ECM deformation and strain and lower dynamic effective modulus were found for explants loaded with the smaller diameter indenter whereas contact radius and stress remained unaffected. Also, the 17.6 mm indenter increased PG loss and significantly upregulated genes for ECM proteins and enzymes as compared to the 30.2 mm indenter. Sliding loads that increase ECM deformation/strain were found to induce enzyme-mediated catabolic processes in articular cartilage explants. These observations provide further understanding of how changes in cartilage contact mechanics under dynamic conditions can affect the cellular response.

  11. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piechocki Marie P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1 maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. Methods We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. Results The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. Conclusion This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving

  12. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechocki, Marie P

    2008-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1) maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving strategies that can dually or differentially target the tumor and stromal

  13. [In vitro culture and identification of IL-1beta induced degeneration of cartilage cells in New Zealand white rabbits knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hu; Su, You-Xin; Lin, Xue-Yi

    2014-01-01

    To explore and identify the method for IL-1beta induced New Zealand rabbit knee chondrocyte degeneration, thus providing experimental bases for Chinese medical research on osteoarthritis from in vitro cultured chondrocytes. Under aseptic conditions, bilateral knee joint cartilage was collected from 4-week old New Zealand rabbits. Chondrocytes were separated by type II collagenase digestion and mechanical blowing method. They were randomly divided into two groups when passaged to the 2nd generation, the normal control group (group Z) and the IL-1beta induced model group (group M). No intervention was given to those in group Z. 10% FBS culture media containing 10 ng/mL IL-1beta was added to group M. All cells were passaged to the 3rd generation. They were compared using morphological observation, toluidine blue staining, type II collagen immunohistochemical staining, and flow cytometry. Under inverted microscope, the second and the 3rd generation chondrocytes' phenotype of group Z was stable with good proliferation. Most cells turned into fusiform and slabstone shaped. In group M, most cells turned into long spindle shape or irregular shape. Results of toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemistry showed that the positive expression of chondrocytes after staining in group Z was superior to that in group M. Results of flow cytometry showed that there was statistical difference in the apoptosis rate of the second generation chondrocytes between group M and group Z (P New Zealand rabbit knee chondrocyte model obviously degenerated, which could be used in related experimental researches on osteoarthritis.

  14. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Pleumeekers (Mieke); L. Nimeskern (Luc); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy); N. Kops (Nicole); R.M.L. Poublon (René); K.S. Stok (Kathryn); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix.

  15. An ex vivo porcine nasal mucosa explants model to study MRSA colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Tulinski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the upper respiratory tract and skin surfaces in mammals. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. However, the mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. To study MRSA colonization in pigs, an ex vivo model consisting of porcine nasal mucosa explants cultured at an air-liquid interface was evaluated. In cultured mucosa explants from the surfaces of the ventral turbinates and septum of the pig nose no changes in cell morphology and viability were observed up to 72 h. MRSA colonization on the explants was evaluated followed for three MRSA ST398 isolates for 180 minutes. The explants were incubated with 3×10(8 CFU/ml in PBS for 2 h to allow bacteria to adhere to the explants surface. Next the explants were washed and in the first 30 minutes post adhering time, a decline in the number of CFU was observed for all MRSA. Subsequently, the isolates showed either: bacterial growth, no growth, or a further reduction in bacterial numbers. The MRSA were either localized as clusters between the cilia or as single bacteria on the cilia surface. No morphological changes in the epithelium layer were observed during the incubation with MRSA. We conclude that porcine nasal mucosa explants are a valuable ex vivo model to unravel the interaction of MRSA with nasal tissue.

  16. An ex vivo porcine nasal mucosa explants model to study MRSA colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulinski, Pawel; Fluit, Ad C; van Putten, Jos P M; de Bruin, Alain; Glorieux, Sarah; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Duim, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the upper respiratory tract and skin surfaces in mammals. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. However, the mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. To study MRSA colonization in pigs, an ex vivo model consisting of porcine nasal mucosa explants cultured at an air-liquid interface was evaluated. In cultured mucosa explants from the surfaces of the ventral turbinates and septum of the pig nose no changes in cell morphology and viability were observed up to 72 h. MRSA colonization on the explants was evaluated followed for three MRSA ST398 isolates for 180 minutes. The explants were incubated with 3×10(8) CFU/ml in PBS for 2 h to allow bacteria to adhere to the explants surface. Next the explants were washed and in the first 30 minutes post adhering time, a decline in the number of CFU was observed for all MRSA. Subsequently, the isolates showed either: bacterial growth, no growth, or a further reduction in bacterial numbers. The MRSA were either localized as clusters between the cilia or as single bacteria on the cilia surface. No morphological changes in the epithelium layer were observed during the incubation with MRSA. We conclude that porcine nasal mucosa explants are a valuable ex vivo model to unravel the interaction of MRSA with nasal tissue.

  17. Abnormal Mechanical Loading Induces Cartilage Degeneration by Accelerating Meniscus Hypertrophy and Mineralization After ACL Injuries In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guoqing; Zhan, Hongsheng; Ding, Daofang; Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Bilgen, Bahar; Reginato, Anthony M; Fleming, Braden C; Deng, Jin; Wei, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Although patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury have a high risk of developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), the role of meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization in PTOA after an ACL injury remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if menisci respond to abnormal loading and if an ACL injury results in meniscus hypertrophy and calcification. The hypotheses were that (1) abnormal mechanical loading after an ACL injury induces meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization, which correlates to articular cartilage damage in vivo, and (2) abnormal mechanical loading on bovine meniscus explants induces the overexpression of hypertrophic and mineralization markers in vitro. Controlled laboratory study. In vivo guinea pig study (hypothesis 1): Three-month-old male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 9) underwent ACL transection (ACLT) on the right knee; the left knee served as the control. Calcification in the menisci was evaluated by calcein labeling 1 and 5 days before knee harvesting at 5.5 months. Cartilage and meniscus damage and mineralization were quantified by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International score and meniscus grade, respectively. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), collagen type X (Col X), progressive ankylosis homolog (ANKH), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 (ENPP1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro bovine meniscus explant study (hypothesis 2): Bovine meniscus explants were subjected to 25% strain at 0.3 Hz for 1, 2, and 3 hours. Cell viability was determined using live/dead staining. The levels of mRNA expression and protein levels were measured using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot after 24, 48, and 72 hours in culture. The conditioned medium was collected for sulfated

  18. Callus induction and plant regeneration from different explant types of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted; Petersen, Karen Koefoed

    1996-01-01

    Different explants of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' were tested in order to develop an efficient tissue culture system. Shoot apices, leaf and root sections from in vitro-propagated plants, and leaf and immature inflorescence sections from 6-month-old greenhouse-grown plants were used....... The explants were cultured on urashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 4.5, 13.6, 22.6 or 31.7 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Three types of callus were formed but only one was embryogenic and regenerated plants. Callus induction and formation of embryogenic callus depended on the type and developmental...... stage of the explants. Shoot apices formed the highest percentage of embryogenic callus. There was a difference in the formation of embryogenic callus between leaf explants from in vitro-propagated shoots and greenhouse-grown plants. The best results were obtained from newly formed leaves of in vitro...

  19. Autofluorescence lifetime metrology for label-free detection of cartilage matrix degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickdel, Mohammad B.; Lagarto, João. L.; Kelly, Douglas J.; Manning, Hugh B.; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Talbot, Clifford B.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) by proteolytic enzyme is the hallmark of arthritis that leads to joint destruction. Detection of early biochemical changes in cartilage before irreversible structural damages become apparent is highly desirable. Here we report that the autofluorescence decay profile of cartilage is significantly affected by proteolytic degradation of cartilage ECM and can be characterised by measurements of the autofluorescence lifetime (AFL). A multidimensional fluorometer utilizing ultraviolet excitation at 355 nm or 375 nm coupled to a fibreoptic probe was developed for single point time-resolved AFL measurements of porcine articular cartilage explants treated with different proteinases. Degradation of cartilage matrix components by treating with bacterial collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase 1, or trypsin resulted in significant reduction of AFL of the cartilage in both a dose and time dependent manner. Differences in cartilage AFL were also confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Our data suggest that AFL of cartilage tissue is a potential non-invasive readout to monitor cartilage matrix integrity that may be utilized for diagnosis of arthritis as well as monitoring the efficacy of anti-arthritic therapeutic agents.

  20. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  1. Absorção de macronutrientes por explantes de bananeira in vitro Macronutrient absorption by banana explants in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Diva Nogueira Diniz

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estudar a absorção de macronutrientes (N, P, K, Ca, Mg e S em explantes de bananeira cv. Prata Anã, foram utilizados explantes de plantas estabelecidas in vitro, inoculados em meio básico de Murashige & Skoog (1962 contendo sacarose (30 g/L, e BAP (3,5 mg/L com sete tratamentos, representados pelos períodos de 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 e 60 dias de cultivo e três repetições. As quantidades de macronutrientes totais absorvidas pelos explantes seguiram a ordem: K > N > Ca > ou = P > Mg @ S. O P foi o nutriente absorvido mais rapidamente pelos explantes, com 75% extraído do meio de cultivo nos primeiros 30 dias, cessando sua absorção aos 50 dias, restando ainda 9% no meio de cultivo. A absorção do S cessou também aos 50 dias, quando 66% deste nutriente ainda permanecia no meio de cultivo. Este resultado sugere haver uma relação, quanto à absorção, entre esses dois nutrientes. As maiores taxas de absorção de todos os nutrientes foram verificadas nos primeiros 20 dias. O rizoma, o pseudocaule e as folhas, se diferenciaram quanto à concentração e extração ou acúmulo de nutrientes.The absorption of the nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S by banana (Musa sp. cv. Prata Anã explants on the basic medium of Murashige & Skoog (1962 supplemented with sucrose (30 g/L and BAP (3.5 mg/L were evaluated at 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 days after inoculation. The seven treatments were arranged on a completely randomized design with three replicates. The sequence of nutrient absorption by the explants was K > N > Ca > or = P > Mg @ S. The P was the nutrient with the fastest absorption rate and at the 30th day the explants had already absorbed 75% of the P from the medium. The P absorption stopped by the 50th day. The S absorption stopped at the 50th day with 66% of it remaining in the medium. The results suggested a close relationship between these two nutrients. The highest rates of nutrient absorption were observed during the

  2. Azithromycin is able to control Toxoplasma gondii infection in human villous explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Toxoplasma gondii infection is normally asymptomatic, severe cases of toxoplasmosis may occur in immunosuppressed patients or congenitally infected newborns. When a fetal infection is established, the recommended treatment is a combination of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid (PSA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of azithromycin to control T. gondii infection in human villous explants. Methods Cultures of third trimester human villous explants were infected with T. gondii and simultaneously treated with either PSA or azithromycin. Proliferation of T. gondii, as well as production of cytokines and hormones by chorionic villous explants, was analyzed. Results Treatment with either azithromycin or PSA was able to control T. gondii infection in villous explants. After azithromycin or PSA treatment, TNF-α, IL-17A or TGF-β1 levels secreted by infected villous explants did not present significant differences. However, PSA-treated villous explants had decreased levels of IL-10 and increased IL-12 levels, while treatment with azithromycin increased production of IL-6. Additionally, T. gondii-infected villous explants increased secretion of estradiol, progesterone and HCG + β, while treatments with azithromycin or PSA reduced secretion of these hormones concurrently with decrease of parasite load. Conclusions In conclusion, these results suggest that azithromycin may be defined as an effective alternative drug to control T. gondii infection at the fetal-maternal interface. PMID:24885122

  3. Protection against LPS-induced cartilage inflammation and degradation provided by a biological extract of Mentha spicata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kott Laima S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of mint [Mentha spicata] has been bred which over-expresses Rosmarinic acid (RA by approximately 20-fold. RA has demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in small rodents; thus it was hypothesized that this plant would demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The objectives of this study were: a to develop an in vitro extraction procedure which mimics digestion and hepatic metabolism, b to compare anti-inflammatory properties of High-Rosmarinic-Acid Mentha spicata (HRAM with wild-type control M. spicata (CM, and c to quantify the relative contributions of RA and three of its hepatic metabolites [ferulic acid (FA, caffeic acid (CA, coumaric acid (CO] to anti-inflammatory activity of HRAM. Methods HRAM and CM were incubated in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, liver microsomes (from male rat and NADPH. Concentrations of RA, CA, CO, and FA in simulated digest of HRAM (HRAMsim and CM (CMsim were determined (HPLC and compared with concentrations in aqueous extracts of HRAM and CM. Cartilage explants (porcine were cultured with LPS (0 or 3 μg/mL and test article [HRAMsim (0, 8, 40, 80, 240, or 400 μg/mL, or CMsim (0, 1, 5 or 10 mg/mL, or RA (0.640 μg/mL, or CA (0.384 μg/mL, or CO (0.057 μg/mL or FA (0.038 μg/mL] for 96 h. Media samples were analyzed for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, interleukin 1β (IL-1, glycosaminoglycan (GAG, nitric oxide (NO and cell viability (differential live-dead cell staining. Results RA concentration of HRAMsim and CMsim was 49.3 and 0.4 μg/mL, respectively. CA, FA and CO were identified in HRAMsim but not in aqueous extract of HRAM. HRAMsim (≥ 8 μg/mL inhibited LPS-induced PGE2 and NO; HRAMsim (≥ 80 μg/mL inhibited LPS-induced GAG release. RA inhibited LPS-induced GAG release. No anti-inflammatory or chondroprotective effects of RA metabolites on cartilage explants were identified. Conclusions Our biological extraction procedure produces

  4. Protection against LPS-induced cartilage inflammation and degradation provided by a biological extract of Mentha spicata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Wendy; Fletcher, Ronald S; Kott, Laima S; Hurtig, Mark B

    2010-05-11

    A variety of mint [Mentha spicata] has been bred which over-expresses Rosmarinic acid (RA) by approximately 20-fold. RA has demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in small rodents; thus it was hypothesized that this plant would demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The objectives of this study were: a) to develop an in vitro extraction procedure which mimics digestion and hepatic metabolism, b) to compare anti-inflammatory properties of High-Rosmarinic-Acid Mentha spicata (HRAM) with wild-type control M. spicata (CM), and c) to quantify the relative contributions of RA and three of its hepatic metabolites [ferulic acid (FA), caffeic acid (CA), coumaric acid (CO)] to anti-inflammatory activity of HRAM. HRAM and CM were incubated in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, liver microsomes (from male rat) and NADPH. Concentrations of RA, CA, CO, and FA in simulated digest of HRAM (HRAMsim) and CM (CMsim) were determined (HPLC) and compared with concentrations in aqueous extracts of HRAM and CM. Cartilage explants (porcine) were cultured with LPS (0 or 3 microg/mL) and test article [HRAMsim (0, 8, 40, 80, 240, or 400 microg/mL), or CMsim (0, 1, 5 or 10 mg/mL), or RA (0.640 microg/mL), or CA (0.384 microg/mL), or CO (0.057 microg/mL) or FA (0.038 microg/mL)] for 96 h. Media samples were analyzed for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin 1beta (IL-1), glycosaminoglycan (GAG), nitric oxide (NO) and cell viability (differential live-dead cell staining). RA concentration of HRAMsim and CMsim was 49.3 and 0.4 microg/mL, respectively. CA, FA and CO were identified in HRAMsim but not in aqueous extract of HRAM. HRAMsim (> or = 8 microg/mL) inhibited LPS-induced PGE2 and NO; HRAMsim (> or = 80 microg/mL) inhibited LPS-induced GAG release. RA inhibited LPS-induced GAG release. No anti-inflammatory or chondroprotective effects of RA metabolites on cartilage explants were identified. Our biological extraction procedure produces a

  5. Degeneration of osteoarthritis cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter

    of sensitive biomarkers for monitoring disease progression. This thesis investigates how subregional measures of cartilage thickness can be used to improve upon current imaging biomarkers. The first part of this investigation aims to discover discriminative areas in the cartilage using machine-learning...... techniques specifically developed to take advantage of the spatial nature of the problem. The methods were evaluated on data from a longitudinal study where detailed cartilage thickness maps were quantified from magnetic resonance images. The results showed that focal differences in cartilage thickness may...... spatial cartilage changes that were observed in our study and in recent literature. The cartilage “Activity” marker is shown to have a state-of-the-art performance in separating healthy knees from OA knees and is also shown to predict knee replacement which is a clinically relevant endpoint for OA....

  6. Preoperative imaging of cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage lesions are predisposing to osteoarthritis. The therapeutic approach is chosen according to depth and size of the lesions as well as to stability and quality of the cartilage fragment. Another important factor is the biomechanical environment in the affected joint (menisci, ligaments, joint stability, other compartments). MRI using high resolution and moderately T2w FS TSE sequences is the modality of choice for clinical routine imaging of cartilage. It is important to use a consistent protocol in order to achieve reliable results. Sequence parameters should be adapted to optimize contrast between intact cartilage, joint fluid, the subchondral bone and cartilage lesions. Grading scales mainly are derived from arthroscopy. Subchondral bone marrow edema like signal alterations, effusion and meniscal lesions are very useful secondary signs helping to detect cartilage lesions. (orig.)

  7. Effect of a Herbal-Leucine mix on the IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation and inflammatory gene expression in human chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Conventional treatments for the articular diseases are often effective for symptom relief, but can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favorable influence on the course of the disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective potential of a Herbal and amino acid mixture containing extract of the Uncaria tomentosa, Boswellia spp., Lepidium meyenii and L-Leucine on the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), glycosaminoglycan (GAG), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), aggrecan (ACAN) and type II collagen (COL2A1) in human OA chondrocytes and OA cartilage explants. Methods Primary OA chondrocytes or OA cartilage explants were pretreated with Herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM, 1-10 μg/ml) and then stimulated with IL-1β (5 ng/ml). Effect of HLM on IL-1β-induced gene expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MMP-13, ACAN and COL2A1 was verified by real time-PCR. Estimation of NO and GAG release in culture supernatant was done using commercially available kits. Results HLM tested in these in vitro studies was found to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, as evidenced by strong inhibition of iNOS, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression and NO production in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes (p < 0.05). Supporting these gene expression results, IL-1β-induced cartilage matrix breakdown, as evidenced by GAG release from cartilage explants, was also significantly blocked (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the presence of herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM) up-regulation of ACAN and COL2A1 expression in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes was also noted (p < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of HLM were mediated by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB in human OA chondrocytes in presence of IL-1β. Conclusion Our data

  8. Effects of Low Intensity Continuous Ultrasound (LICU on Mouse Pancreatic Tumor Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Bazou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effects of low intensity continuous ultrasound (LICU on the inflammatory response of mouse pancreatic tumor explants. While there are many reports focusing on the application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS on cell cultures and tissues, the effects of continuous oscillations on biological tissues have never been investigated. Here we present an exploratory study of the effects induced by LICU on mouse pancreatic tumor explants. We show that LICU causes significant upregulation of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α on tumor explants. No detectable effects were observed on tumor vasculature or collagen I deposition, while thermal and mechanical effects were not apparent. Tumor explants responded as a single unit to acoustic waves, with spatial pressure variations smaller than their size.

  9. Callogenesis in stem explants of Eucalyptus grandis (Hill ex Maiden showing resilience in oxide calluses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Paula Willemen Pereira

    Full Text Available Callogenesis was achieved using growth regulators at different concentrations to obtain the best characteristics regarding the calluses texture aspect with the main objective to produce friable calluses from stem explants of Eucalyptus grandis. Stem segments of approximately 1 cm were excised from 30-day seedlings. The treatments were prepared based on the MS medium added with TDZ alone or combined with AIA; 2,4-D; ANA. Each treatment consisted of five repetitions with five explants per plate. After 210 days of in vitro culture, the calluses were evaluated visually and by manipulation for texture. The explants that did not produce calluses were those exposed to treatments with 2,4-D 50.0 µM; TDZ 3.0 µM and in absence of a growth regulator (control.The best protocols for maintenance of friable calluses of stem explants of Eucalyptus grandis under the conditions performed in this work were those using only TDZ.

  10. Degeneration of osteoarthritis cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter

    of sensitive biomarkers for monitoring disease progression. This thesis investigates how subregional measures of cartilage thickness can be used to improve upon current imaging biomarkers. The first part of this investigation aims to discover discriminative areas in the cartilage using machine...... spatial cartilage changes that were observed in our study and in recent literature. The cartilage “Activity” marker is shown to have a state-of-the-art performance in separating healthy knees from OA knees and is also shown to predict knee replacement which is a clinically relevant endpoint for OA....

  11. The impact of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on bone and cartilage in gilts and sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor-Robison, C I; Spencer, J D; Orth, M W

    2014-10-01

    Dietary long-chain PFO including arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are precursors for several inflammatory mediators. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of dietary PFO supplementation on bone, cartilage, and synovial fluid in 2 ages of pigs. Sows and gilts were fed either control corn/soybean meal based diets or the control diet supplemented with PFO from Gromega (PFO; JBS United, Sheridan, IN). Sows were fed their diets for 24.5 mo and slaughtered at 43 mo while gilts were fed their diets from weaning until slaughter at 111 kg. Cartilage was harvested from both humeroulnar joints of 14 sows (7/treatment) and 16 gilts (8/treatment) within 30 h of slaughter for fatty acid analysis and explant cultures. Synovial fluid was collected from the carpal joints of each pig postmortem. The right fused radius/ulna was collected for computed tomography (CT) analysis. Cortical width and density were determined and trabecular density was measured at the distal radius. Cartilage explants were allocated to 24-well culture plates with 2 discs per well and cultured over 72 h at 37°C in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium: nutrient mixture F-12 (Ham) medium. Six wells/pig were treated with 10 ng/mL of recombinant porcine interleukin-1 (rpIL-1). At 24, 48, and 72 h of culture, media were removed and reserved for analysis of proteoglycans, nitric oxide (NO), and PGE2 concentrations. The CT scans of the radius/ulna from gilts revealed no differences for cortical width and bone density. Sows fed PFO had greater cortical width of the proximal ulna (P Gilts fed PFO had increased DHA (P gilts and sows had no effect on the variables tested in vitro. Although the PFO diet increased omega-3 incorporation into chondrocytes, the biological significance is unclear since concentrations of ARA were at least 9-fold higher than EPA or DHA. Therefore, if omega-3 fatty acids can mitigate inflammation in joints, the

  12. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor β1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaodong; Zheng Qixin; Yang Shuhua; Shao Zengwu; Yuan Quan; Pan Zhengqi; Tang Shuo; Liu Kai; Quan Daping

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β 1 ) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-β 1 that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-β 1 gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA 3 -TGF-β 1 gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA 3 gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune responses. The

  13. Influence of genotype and age of explant source on the capacity for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... (baby food jars), and the jars were sealed with plastic film (Kleen-. Pack). The cultures were kept in a growth room at 27 ± 2°C under total darkness and maintained without subculture for four months. The cultures were examined twice a week to record any visible changes in the appearance of the explants ...

  14. Direct Quantification of Solute Diffusivity in Agarose and Articular Cartilage Using Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoga, Janty S; Graham, Brian T; Wang, Liyun; Price, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular tissue; diffusive transport is critical for its homeostasis. While numerous techniques have been used to quantify diffusivity within porous, hydrated tissues and tissue engineered constructs, these techniques have suffered from issues regarding invasiveness and spatial resolution. In the present study, we implemented and compared two separate correlation spectroscopy techniques, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), for the direct, and minimally-invasive quantification of fluorescent solute diffusion in agarose and articular cartilage. Specifically, we quantified the diffusional properties of fluorescein and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated dextrans (3k and 10k) in aqueous solutions, agarose gels of varying concentration (i.e. 1, 3, 5%), and in different zones of juvenile bovine articular cartilage explants (i.e. superficial, middle, and deep). In agarose, properties of solute diffusion obtained via FCS and RICS were inversely related to molecule size, gel concentration, and applied strain. In cartilage, the diffusional properties of solutes were similarly dependent upon solute size, cartilage zone, and compressive strain; findings that agree with work utilizing other quantification techniques. In conclusion, this study established the utility of FCS and RICS as simple and minimally invasive techniques for quantifying microscale solute diffusivity within agarose constructs and articular cartilage explants.

  15. Propofol induces growth cone collapse and neurite retractions in chick explant culture[Le propofol provoque un collapsus des cônes de croissance et des rétractions des neurites de poussin embryonnaire en culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jahdari, Wael S; Saito, Shigeru; Goto, Fumio; Nakano, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Propofol neurotoxicity has been demonstrated in several cell culture systems. This study was undertaken to determine whether propofol has neurotoxic effects on peripheral, retinal, and autonomic neurons, and which neurons are particularly liable to injury by propofol. Dorsal root ganglia, retinal ganglion cell layers, and sympathetic ganglion chains were isolated from day eight chick embryos and cultured for 20 hr. Thereafter, propofol was added at various concentrations [5-300 μM (0.9-53 μg·mL -1 )] to investigate its effects on these three types of neuronal tissue. Morphological changes were examined quantitatively by growth cone collapse assay. Propofol concentrations were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Propofol induced growth cone collapse and neurite destruction. The three types of neurons tested exhibited significantly different dose-response relationships two hours after the application of propofol (P La neurotoxicité du propofol a été démontrée dans plusieurs systèmes de culture cellulaire. Notre étude cherche à déterminer si le propofol a des effets neurotoxiques sur les neurones périphériques, rétiniens et du système autonome, et quels neurones sont particulièrement susceptibles de subir des lésions causées par le propofol. MéTHODE: Des ganglions de la racine dorsale, des couches cellulaires de la rétine et des chaînes sympathiques provenant d'embryons de poussin de huit jours ont été isolés et mis en culture pendant 20 h. Par la suite, différentes concentrations de propofol ont été ajoutées [5-300 μM (0,9-53 μg·mL-1)] pour étudier ses effets sur les trois types de tissu neuronal. Les changements morphologiques ont été évalués quantitativement par l'analyse du collapsus des cônes de croissance. La chromatographie liquide à haute performance a été utilisée pour mesurer les concentrations de propofol. RéSULTATS: Le propofol a provoqué un collapsus des cônes de croissance et la destruction

  16. Full-thickness human skin explants for testing the toxicity of topically applied chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Rikimaru, T.; Yano, T.; Moore, K.G.; Pula, P.J.; Schofield, B.H.; Dannenberg, A.M. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a model organ-culture system for testing the toxicity of chemical substances that are topically applied to human skin. In this system, the viable keratinocytes in the full-thickness skin explants are protected by the same keratinized layer as skin remaining on the donor, and toxicity can be assessed microscopically and/or biochemically. The human skin specimens were discards from a variety of surgical procedures. They were cut into full-thickness 1.0-cm2 explants, and briefly exposed to the military vesicant sulfur mustard (SM), which was used as a model toxicant. The explants were then organ cultured in small Petri dishes for 24 h at 36 degrees C. In the 0.03-1.0% dosage range, a straight-line dose-response relationship occurred between the concentration of SM applied and the number of paranuclear vacuoles seen histologically in the epidermis. Within the same SM dosage range, there was also a proportional decrease in 14C-leucine incorporation by the explants. Thus, the number of paranuclear vacuoles reflected decreases in protein synthesis by the injured epidermal cells. The epidermis of full-thickness untreated (control) human skin explants usually remained viable for 7 d when stored at 4 degrees C in culture medium. During storage, a relatively small number of paranuclear vacuoles developed within the epidermis, but the explants were still quite satisfactory for testing SM toxicity. Incubation (for 4 or 24 h at 36 degrees C) of such control skin explants reduced (often by 50%) the small number of paranuclear vacuoles produced during 4-7 d of storage. This reduction was probably caused by autolysis of many of the vacuolated cells. Two types of paranuclear vacuoles could be identified by both light and electron microscopy: a storage type and a toxicant type. The storage type seemed to be caused by autolysis of cell components

  17. Full-thickness human skin explants for testing the toxicity of topically applied chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M.; Rikimaru, T.; Yano, T.; Moore, K.G.; Pula, P.J.; Schofield, B.H.; Dannenberg, A.M. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a model organ-culture system for testing the toxicity of chemical substances that are topically applied to human skin. In this system, the viable keratinocytes in the full-thickness skin explants are protected by the same keratinized layer as skin remaining on the donor, and toxicity can be assessed microscopically and/or biochemically. The human skin specimens were discards from a variety of surgical procedures. They were cut into full-thickness 1.0-cm2 explants, and briefly exposed to the military vesicant sulfur mustard (SM), which was used as a model toxicant. The explants were then organ cultured in small Petri dishes for 24 h at 36 degrees C. In the 0.03-1.0% dosage range, a straight-line dose-response relationship occurred between the concentration of SM applied and the number of paranuclear vacuoles seen histologically in the epidermis. Within the same SM dosage range, there was also a proportional decrease in 14C-leucine incorporation by the explants. Thus, the number of paranuclear vacuoles reflected decreases in protein synthesis by the injured epidermal cells. The epidermis of full-thickness untreated (control) human skin explants usually remained viable for 7 d when stored at 4 degrees C in culture medium. During storage, a relatively small number of paranuclear vacuoles developed within the epidermis, but the explants were still quite satisfactory for testing SM toxicity. Incubation (for 4 or 24 h at 36{degrees}C) of such control skin explants reduced (often by 50%) the small number of paranuclear vacuoles produced during 4-7 d of storage. This reduction was probably caused by autolysis of many of the vacuolated cells. Two types of paranuclear vacuoles could be identified by both light and electron microscopy: a storage type and a toxicant type. The storage type seemed to be caused by autolysis of cell components.

  18. Effect of Hormones on Direct Shoot Regeneration in Hypocotyl Explants of Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan RASHID

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted for developing a high frequency regeneration system in two genotypes of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., �Punjab Upma� and �IPA-3� for direct shoot regeneration from hypocotyl explants. The explants were excised from in vitro tomato seedlings and cultured on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of hormones. Direct regeneration was significantly influenced by the genotype hormones combination and concentrations. The MS medium supplemented with (Kinetin 0.5 mg/l and (BAP 0.5 mg/l was found optimum for inducing direct shoot regeneration and number of shoots per explant from hypocotyl explants on this medium. Shoot regeneration per cent in �Punjab Upma� and �IPA-3� per cent was recorded to be highest i.e (86.02 and (82.57 respectively. Besides this, average number shoots per explant was also highest i.e (3.16 in case of �Punjab Upma� and (2.93 in case of �IPA-3�. A significant decline was observed in percent shoot regeneration and average number of shoots per explant with increase in the hormonal concentration. Shoots were obtained and transferred to the elongation medium (MS + BAP 0.3 mg/l. Hundred per cent rooting was induced in separated shoots upon culturing on MS and � MS basal media. Hardening on moist cotton showed maximum plantlet survival rate in case of both genotypes. After hardening, plants were transferred to soil. Thus, a tissue culture base line was established in tomato for obtaining direct regeneration using hypocotyl as explants.

  19. The evolution and use of skin explants: potential and limitations for dermatological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Jeanmaire, Christine; Danoux, Louis; Sibille, Pierre; Pauly, Gilles; Misery, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Different models have been developed to understand the biology of skin or to test pharmaceutical/cosmetic products. These models can be in vitro models that possess advantages such as mono and co-culture models in 2D, which are very reproducible, or organotypic models (skin explant and reconstructed skin) that present a 3D organisation. Animal or human in vivo models allow studies that are closer to reality. In virtuo models developed on computers control all known parameters and do not require animals. The major limitations of these models are the lack of 3D structure for in vitro culture, the variability of results from organotypic models, ethical problems inherent to human and animal tests and the presence of numerous unknown parameters in in virtuo systems. Despite their limitations, skin explants seem to be an interesting model for studies. Skin explants may be kept from a few hours to 10-14 days on supports or directly in culture medium. These explants are generally cultivated at 37 °C, 5% CO(2), preferentially in serum-free conditions. Three basic techniques are used to characterise these models: histological stains, proliferation, apoptosis and cytotoxicity tests. Skin explants could be a very convenient model to study wound-healing, inflammation processes, autoimmune diseases, malignant transformation, stress, ageing, and to serve as screening tests.

  20. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with [3H] glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques

  1. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  2. The Application of Sheet Technology in Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Gong, Yi Yi; Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Yanan; Fu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering started to act as a promising, even essential alternative method in the process of cartilage repair and regeneration, considering adult avascular structure has very limited self-renewal capacity of cartilage tissue in adults and a bottle-neck existed in conventional surgical treatment methods. Recent progressions in tissue engineering realized the development of more feasible strategies to treat cartilage disorders. Of these strategies, cell sheet technology has shown great clinical potentials in the regenerative areas such as cornea and esophagus and is increasingly considered as a potential way to reconstruct cartilage tissues for its non-use of scaffolds and no destruction of matrix secreted by cultured cells. Acellular matrix sheet technologies utilized in cartilage tissue engineering, with a sandwich model, can ingeniously overcome the drawbacks that occurred in a conventional acellular block, where cells are often blocked from migrating because of the non-nanoporous structure. Electrospun-based sheets with nanostructures that mimic the natural cartilage matrix offer a level of control as well as manipulation and make them appealing and widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. In this review, we focus on the utilization of these novel and promising sheet technologies to construct cartilage tissues with practical and beneficial functions.

  3. Cultura in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) Culture in vitro of rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) embryos´seeds and buds explants

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Handa; Paulo de Tarso B. Sampaio; Regina Caetano Quisen

    2005-01-01

    Este trabalho teve como objetivo o estabelecimento in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) livres de contaminações e de oxidação fenólica. As gemas foram obtidas da rebrota de mudas cultivadas em viveiro e os embriões a partir de sementes em diversos estágios de maturação. Para a assepsia dos explantes foram utilizados dois antibiótico (Ampicilina e Agrimicina), etanol (70%) e hipoclorito de sódio, em concentrações e tempo de exposição variando em função ...

  4. Proliferation of Female Inflorescences explants of Date Palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, R.A; Eldawyati, M.M

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of Abscisic acid (ABA) and Ancymidol on proliferation of female inflorescences explants of date palm. In the first experiment two lengths of spath at (5-7 cm) or at (7-10 cm) were cultured on nutrient media which consists of half macro and full micro salts of MS medium supplemented with gradual decreasing in concentration of Abscisic acid (ABA) and Ancymidol from 4.5, 3.0, 1.5 to 0.5 mg -1 . In the second experiment two phases of nutrient medium (solid and liquid) and two source of carbon were investigated. Gradual decreasing of ABA concentrations from 4.5 mg -1 to 1.5 mg -1 in culture medium, stimulated the production of direct somatic embryos and accelerated callus initiation, but at last decrement (0.5 mg -1 ) of Ancymidol concentration few embryos were produced. Callus initiation from inflorescences explants gave high production and well development of somatic embryos when cultured on liquid medium supplemented with 40 g -1 sucrose. All direct or indirect somatic embryos obtained in these experiments were converted successfully to healthy normal plantlets which could be transferred to acclimatization stage.

  5. Repair of osteochondral defects with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R E; Ilten-Kirby, B M; Dunkelman, N S; Symons, K T; Rekettye, L M; Willoughby, J; Ratcliffe, A

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants on healing of osteochondral defects. Rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer, then seeded onto biodegradable, three-dimensional polyglycolic acid meshes. Cartilage constructs were cultured hydrodynamically to yield tissue with relatively more (mature) or less (immature) hyalinelike cartilage, as compared with adult rabbit articular cartilage. Osteochondral defects in the patellar grooves of both stifle joints either were left untreated or implanted with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage. Histologic samples from in and around the defect sites were examined 3, 6, 9, and 12, and 24 months after surgery. By 9 months after surgery, defects sites treated with cartilage implants contained significantly greater amounts of hyalinelike cartilage with high levels of proteoglycan, and had a smooth, nonfibrillated articular surface as compared to untreated defects. In contrast, the repair tissue formed in untreated defects had fibrillated articular surfaces, significant amounts of fibrocartilage, and negligible proteoglycan. These differences between treated and untreated defects persisted through 24 months after surgery. The results of this study suggest that the treatment of osteochondral lesions with allogenic tissue engineered cartilage implants may lead to superior repair tissue than that found in untreated osteochondral lesions.

  6. Two dimensional spectral camera development for cartilage monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, A.; Graf, A.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Miller, R.; Mantz, H.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    In the joint project "BioopTiss" between the Ulm University Medical Center and Ulm University of Applied Sciences, a bioreactor is under development to grow facial cartilage by the methods of tissue engineering. In order to ensure a sufficient quality of the cartilage for implantation, the cartilage growth must be monitored continuously. Current monitoring methods destroy the cultured cartilage so that it is no longer suitable for implantation. Alternatively, it is possible to analyze the cartilage using fluorescence spectroscopy with UV light excitation. This allows a non-invasive assessment of cartilage in terms of composition and quality. The cultured cartilage tissue can reach a size of several square centimeters. For recording fluorescence spectra of every point of the cartilage sample, a highly sensitive spectral camera has been developed which allows distinguishing collagen I from collagen II non-invasively by their fluorescence. This spectral camera operates according to the computed tomography imaging spectrometry (CTIS) principle, which allows obtaining many spectra of a small area with only one snapshot.

  7. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Christoph; Meixner, Miriam; Giesemann, Petra; Roël, Giulietta; Bulwin, Grit-Carsta; Smink, Jeske J

    2016-11-15

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don's chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids) that is in clinical use in Germany. Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids before implantation and a higher regeneration potential

  8. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bartz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don’s chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids that is in clinical use in Germany. Methods Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. Results After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids

  9. Production of parthenolide in organ and callus cultures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-04

    Jun 4, 2007 ... Effect of explants types and culture media ingredients: In this trial, the same six types of explants were aseptically excised. Each one of the six explants types were cultured on one of three strengths of MS-media. After two months of culturing, the parame- ters recorded for the in vitro callus formation behavior ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstraete, K.L.; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K.L. E-mail: koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G

    2004-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures.

  12. using immature zygotic embryo explant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... altitude of 5 - 2000 m above sea level, in diffused bush and pine forests, rocky slopes and fields (Tubives, 2008). It flowers during April and May each ..... Establishment of shoot and suspension cultures for proto- plast isolation in Lathyrus sativus L. J. Breed. Genet. 31: 43–50. Murashige T , Skoog F (1962).

  13. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  14. Injectable hydrogels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Zeng, Xin; Ma, Chao; Yi, Huan; Ali, Zeeshan; Mou, Xianbo; Li, Song; Deng, Yan; He, Nongyue

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineering has become a promising strategy for repairing damaged cartilage and bone tissue. Among the scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications, injectable hydrogels have demonstrated great potential for use as three-dimensional cell culture scaffolds in cartilage and bone tissue engineering, owing to their high water content, similarity to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM), porous framework for cell transplantation and proliferation, minimal invasive properties, and ability to match irregular defects. In this review, we describe the selection of appropriate biomaterials and fabrication methods to prepare novel injectable hydrogels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering. In addition, the biology of cartilage and the bony ECM is also summarized. Finally, future perspectives for injectable hydrogels in cartilage and bone tissue engineering are discussed. PMID:28584674

  15. Comparative effects of plant growth regulators on leaf and stem explants of Labisia pumila var. alata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Anna Pick Kiong; Tan, Kinn Poay; Hussein, Sobri

    2013-07-01

    Labisia pumila var. alata, commonly known as 'Kacip Fatimah' or 'Selusuh Fatimah' in Southeast Asia, is traditionally used by members of the Malay community because of its post-partum medicinal properties. Its various pharmaceutical applications cause an excessive harvesting and lead to serious shortage in natural habitat. Thus, this in vitro propagation study investigated the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on in vitro leaf and stem explants of L. pumila. The capabilities of callus, shoot, and root formation were evaluated by culturing both explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with various PGRs at the concentrations of 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 mg/L. Medium supplemented with 3 mg/L indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) showed the optimal callogenesis from both leaf and stem explants with (72.34 ± 19.55)% and (70.40 ± 14.14)% efficacy, respectively. IBA was also found to be the most efficient PGR for root induction. A total of (50.00 ± 7.07)% and (77.78 ± 16.47)% of root formation were obtained from the in vitro stem and leaf explants after being cultured for (26.5 ± 5.0) and (30.0 ± 8.5) d in the medium supplemented with 1 and 3 mg/L of IBA, respectively. Shoot formation was only observed in stem explant, with the maximum percentage of formation ((100.00 ± 0.00)%) that was obtained in 1 mg/L zeatin after (11.0 ± 2.8) d of culture. Callus, roots, and shoots can be induced from in vitro leaf and stem explants of L. pumila through the manipulation of types and concentrations of PGRs.

  16. In vitro chick pre-cardiac explant tissue differentiation during spaceflight on SpaceHab-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Twest, J S; Paulsen, A; Spooner, B S

    1995-01-01

    Chick precardiac tissue explants were cultured on the 8-day mission of STS-60, space shuttle Discovery. Development of in vitro cultures of precardiac chick tissue from embryo stages 5 though 8 (H-H) were initiated during orbit and were terminated after approximately fifteen hours of 37 degree C culture. Transmission electron microscopy and tritiated thymidine studies were performed postflight. No significant differences in cell proliferation were observed between flight and ground controls. Electron-microscopic studies revealed stage 8 explants were capable of differentiation during flight in a pattern which matched ground control tissues. As anticipated, stage 7 explant tissues had differentiated to a lesser extent compared to stage 8 tissues. Interestingly, stage 7 precardiac explant flight tissue differentiation was less than ground control tissue. This difference in differentiation between flight and ground cultures was enhanced in stage 6 tissues, as high levels of myofibril organization were only seen in ground controls. Other cellular components such as Golgi apparatus, junctional complexes, and mitochondria were present and appeared normal and healthy.

  17. The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on spinach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is an important vegetable crop of which dioecy in nature has made cultivar improvement difficult using traditional breeding methods; therefore, production of high amount of disease free spinach is critical. To achieve the best explants and media for spinach tissue culture, the effects of two ...

  18. Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can infect wounds and produce difficult-to- treat biofilms. To determine the extent that MRSA biofilms can deplete oxygen, change pH and damage host tissue, we developed a porcine dermal explant model on which we cultured GFP-labeled MRSA biofilms. ...

  19. Investigating the Skoog-Miller Model for Organogenesis Using Sweet Potato Root Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, William; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which groups of students in a plant tissue culture course worked together to test application of the Skoog-Miller model (developed by Skoog and Miller in regeneration of tobacco experiments to demonstrate organogenesis) to sweet potato root explants. (ZWH)

  20. Sulforaphane represses matrix-degrading proteases and protects cartilage from destruction in vitro and in vivo:Sulforaphane is protective in the articular Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Rose K.; Jupp, Orla; de Ferrars, Rachel; Kay, Colin D; Culley, Kirsty L; Norton, Rosemary; Driscoll, Clare; Vincent, Tonia L; Donell, Simon T; Bao, Yongping; Clark, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Sulforaphane (SFN) has been reported to regulate signaling pathways relevant to chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of SFN treatment on signaling pathways in chondrocytes and to determine whether sulforaphane could block cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis. Methods Gene expression, histone acetylation, and signaling of the transcription factors NF-E2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) and NF-κB were examined in vitro. The bovine nasal cartilage explant mod...

  1. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  2. Optimization of Brassica napus (canola) explant regeneration for genetic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Priti; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-12-15

    Brassica napus (canola) is the second largest oilseed crop in the world. It is among the first crops to be genetically transformed, and genetically modified cultivars are in commercial production at very significant levels. Despite the early lead with respect to transgenesis, there remain cultivars that are recalcitrant to transformation. To address this, we have conducted an elaborate investigation of the conditions for regenerating shoots from hypocotyl explants from four genetic lines: Invigor 5020, Westar and Topas as well as a microspore culture derived line of Topas (Line 4079). We analyzed the effect of hormonal combinations in regeneration medium, donor plant age and explant type on the regeneration capacity of these plants. The analysis showed that hypocotyls of eight-day-old seedlings grown on media supplemented with 1mg/L dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-D) produced the most shoots. Globular somatic embryos emerged following two weeks of 2,4-D treatment. When transferred to the medium containing 5mg/L benzyladenine (BA), approximately 82% of embryos produced shoots within six weeks. Invigor plants were shown to regenerate more efficiently than Topas; the number of plantlets regenerated from Invigor was approximately 40-50% more as compared to Topas or Line 4079. When hypocotyl explants were co-cultivated with the Agrobacterium strain GV3101 harboring a binary vector carrying a firefly luciferase reporter gene (LUC), significant numbers of plantlets were LUC-positive in a luciferase assay. Frequency of such plants were: Invigor 5020 (54.2 ± 2.5%), Westar (53.7 ± 5.3), Topas (16.0 ± 0.24) and Line 4079 (13.4 ± 4). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of plant growth regulators, explants type and efficient plantlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... commercial grade detergent) followed by several rinses in sterile distilled water. The disinfected explants were surface sterilized under aseptic conditions in a laminar flow chamber. The explants were treated with 70% ethanol for 30 s and washed thrice in sterile distilled water. The explants were then ...

  4. [Cartilage degradation in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular joint disease. The inflammatory process is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joints, leading to proliferation of synoviocytes and destruction of cartilage and bone. The Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases. It had been well recognized that MMP play major roles in the cartilage breakdown in RA and OA. Moreover ADAM-TS-1, -4, -5 have aggrecanase activity, and also involve the cartilage degradation in RA and OA. Of course they contribute the cartilage homeostasis in healthy subjects. Failure to regulate the synthesis, activation and inhibition of the proteinases finally leads to cartilage destruction. Aggrecan and type II collagen are major components in cartilage matrix. Cleavage of aggrecan by aggrecanase and that of collagen by collagenase are critical steps for degradation of articular cartilage in RA. To prevent the cartilage damage, inflammatory synovitis should be suppressed in early stage.

  5. Effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants: quantitative measurement using a calmodulin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, B; Rosendal, S; Ruhnke, H L; Plante, C; O'Brien, P J; Miller, R B

    1994-04-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) acts as an intracellular regulator of calcium, an important mediator of many cell processes. We used the CAM assay and electron microscopy to investigate the effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants obtained aseptically from slaughtered cows. A stock suspension of U. diversum (treated specimens) and sterile broth (controls) was added to replicates of cultured explants and incubated at 38 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5.5% CO2 for 48 hours. Explants were examined for ciliary activity, extracellular CAM loss, and for histological and ultrastructural changes. Explants and their culture media were examined for changes in CAM concentration. All experiments were replicated three times. In addition, U. diversum, medium and broth were assayed for CAM content. The concentrations of CAM in explants and media changed significantly (p diversum when compared to controls. The controls and infected specimens did not differ histologically or ultrastructurally, but U. diversum was seen to be closely associated with infected explant tissue. In view of this close affinity it is assumed the loss of CAM from the oviductal cells was causally related, but this was not proven. The failure to show cell membrane injury on light and electron microscopic examination was probably related to the short duration of the experiment and may only point out the sensitivity of the CAM assay in detecting early cell membrane injury. Compromise in characteristics of the medium to support both, the viability of oviductal cells and U. diversum limited the experimental time to 48 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. CALLUS INDUCTION AND PLANT REGENERATION IN PUNICA GRANATUM L. ?NANA' FROM LEAF EXPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bonyanpour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this investigation, leaf explants of a local cultivar of dwarf pomegranate were placed on Murashige and Skoog (1962 (MS medium supplemented with various concentrations of 6-benzyl adenin (BA and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA for callus induction. After 40 days, maximum callus induction was observed on a media containing 1 mg L-1 BA and 0.2 to 0.4 mg L-1 NAA. However, the highest callus growth was obtained on a medium containing 1 mg L-1 BA and 1 mg L-1 NAA. The highest number of shoots (7 shoots per explants was obtained by transferring the calli to the media containing 5 mg L-1 BA with 0.1 mg L-1 NAA. Maximum shoot proliferation was observed when shoots were cultured on woody plant medium (WPM supplemented with 5 mg L-1 kinetin (Kin. In this treatment, after 4 subcultures, 36 shoots were produced from one original explant. Among treatments used in rooting experiments, shoots cultured on WPM medium containing 0.2 mg L-1 indol butyric acid (IBA had the maximum root percentage (100% and good root growth (2.06 cm mean length and 2 roots in each explants. Rooted plantlets were cultured in a soil mixture containing vermiculite (60%, perlite (30% and coco peat (10% v/v. After 2 months, 80% of plants survived and transferred to the greenhouse.

  7. Mast cell-restricted, tetramer-forming tryptases induce aggrecanolysis in articular cartilage by activating matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -13 zymogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarinos, Natalia J; Bryant, Katherine J; Fosang, Amanda J; Adachi, Roberto; Stevens, Richard L; McNeil, H Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-6-null C57BL/6 mice lost less aggrecan proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix of their articular cartilage during inflammatory arthritis than wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that this mast cell (MC)-specific mouse tryptase plays prominent roles in articular cartilage catabolism. We used ex vivo mouse femoral head explants to determine how mMCP-6 and its human ortholog hTryptase-β mediate aggrecanolysis. Exposure of the explants to recombinant hTryptase-β, recombinant mMCP-6, or lysates harvested from WT mouse peritoneal MCs (PMCs) significantly increased the levels of enzymatically active matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in cartilage and significantly induced aggrecan loss into the conditioned media, relative to replicate explants exposed to medium alone or lysates collected from mMCP-6-null PMCs. Treatment of cartilage explants with tetramer-forming tryptases generated aggrecan fragments that contained C-terminal DIPEN and N-terminal FFGVG neoepitopes, consistent with MMP-dependent aggrecanolysis. In support of these data, hTryptase-β was unable to induce aggrecan release from the femoral head explants obtained from Chloe mice that resist MMP cleavage at the DIPEN↓FFGVG site in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. In addition, the abilities of mMCP-6-containing lysates from WT PMCs to induce aggrecanolysis were prevented by inhibitors of MMP-3 and MMP-13. Finally, recombinant hTryptase-β was able to activate latent pro-MMP-3 and pro-MMP-13 in vitro. The accumulated data suggest that human and mouse tetramer-forming tryptases are MMP convertases that mediate cartilage damage and the proteolytic loss of aggrecan proteoglycans in arthritis, in part, by activating the zymogen forms of MMP-3 and MMP-13, which are constitutively present in articular cartilage.

  8. Bovine explant model of degeneration of the intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Sarit

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many new treatments for degeneration of the intervertebral disc are being developed which can be delivered through a needle. These require testing in model systems before being used in human patients. Unfortunately, because of differences in anatomy, there are no ideal animal models of disc degeneration. Bovine explant model systems have many advantages but it is not possible to inject any significant volume into an intact disc. Therefore we have attempted to mimic disc degeneration in an explant bovine model via enzymatic digestion. Methods Bovine coccygeal discs were incubated with different concentrations of the proteolytic enzymes, trypsin and papain, and maintained in culture for up to 3 weeks. A radio-opaque solution was injected to visualise cavities generated. Degenerative features were monitored histologically and biochemically (water and glycosaminoglycan content, via dimethylmethylene blue. Results and Conclusion The central region of both papain and trypsin treated discs was macro- and microscopically fragmented, with severe loss of metachromasia. The integrity of the surrounding tissue was mostly in tact with cells in the outer annulus appearing viable. Biochemical analysis demonstrated greatly reduced glycosaminoglycan content in these compared to untreated discs. We have shown that bovine coccygeal discs, treated with proteolytic enzymes can provide a useful in vitro model system for developing and testing potential new treatments of disc degeneration, such as injectable implants or biological therapies.

  9. Adventitious shoot regeneration from seven commercial strawberry cultivars (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) using a range of explant types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, A J; Barrett, K J; James, D J

    2003-01-01

    The parameters for optimal regeneration of seven commercial strawberry cultivars were tested using a range of explants and culture conditions. Efficient levels of regeneration--those needed to carry out transformation experiments--with the cultivars Calypso, Pegasus, Bolero, Tango and Emily were achieved with leaf discs, petioles, roots and stipules. Regeneration from cv. Elsanta proved to be difficult from all explant material, although unpollinated ovaries proved to be a promising explant source, with 12% of the explants regenerating shoots. In cv. Eros, regeneration occurred only from root tissue. A comparison of the genetic background suggests that there is a strong genetic component amongst the different cultivars determining their regeneration capacity. The development of these regeneration systems provides a means to use almost the whole stock plant for the efficient genetic transformation of commercial strawberry varieties.

  10. Principles of cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Erggelet, Christoph; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2008-01-01

    Cartilage defects affect patients of all age groups. Surgeons, teamdoctors, general practitioners and physiotherapists alike are expected to provide adequate care. Only individual treatment plans combining a well balanced choice of various options will be successful. Background knowledge, operative and non-operative therapies are described in concise chapters: Articular cartilage biology - Diagnostics - Surgical techniques - Symptomatic and alternative medications - Physiotherapy. Diagnostic findings and surgical procedures are generously illustrated by aquarelles and colour photographs. Recommendations for additional reading, description of important clinical scoring systems and a listing of analytic tools are added for further information.

  11. Verapamil protects against cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Takamatsu

    Full Text Available In past years, the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of cartilage development and homeostasis. FRZB, a soluble antagonist of Wnt signaling, has been studied in osteoarthritis (OA animal models and OA patients as a modulator of Wnt signaling. We screened for FDA-approved drugs that induce FRZB expression and suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that verapamil, a widely prescribed L-type calcium channel blocker, elevated FRZB expression and suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human OA chondrocytes. Expression and nuclear translocation of β-catenin was attenuated by verapamil in OA chondrocytes. Lack of the verapamil effects in LiCl-treated and FRZB-downregulated OA chondrocytes also suggested that verpamil suppressed Wnt signaling by inducing FRZB. Verapamil enhanced gene expressions of chondrogenic markers of ACAN encoding aggrecan, COL2A1 encoding collagen type II α1, and SOX9, and suppressed Wnt-responsive AXIN2 and MMP3 in human OA chondrocytes. Verapamil ameliorated Wnt3A-induced proteoglycan loss in chondrogenically differentiated ATDC5 cells. Verapamil inhibited hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes in the explant culture of mouse tibiae. Intraarticular injection of verapamil inhibited OA progression as well as nuclear localizations of β-catenin in a rat OA model. We propose that verapamil holds promise as a potent therapeutic agent for OA by upregulating FRZB and subsequently downregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  12. The distribution of YKL-40 in osteoarthritic and normal human articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Ostergaard, K; Johansen, J S

    1999-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39, is a major secretory protein of human chondrocytes in cell culture. YKL-40 mRNA is expressed by cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but is not detectable in normal human cartilage. The aim was to investigate the distribution of YKL......-40 in osteoarthritic (n=9) and macroscopically normal (n=5) human articular cartilage, collected from 12 pre-selected areas of the femoral head, to discover a potential role for YKL-40 in cartilage remodelling in osteoarthritis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that YKL-40 staining was found...... staining for YKL-40 was in general low in normal cartilage. The present findings, together with previous observations, suggests that YKL-40 may be of importance in cartilage remodelling/degradation of osteoarthritic joints....

  13. Osteoarthritic cartilage is more homogeneous than healthy cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, Arish A; Dam, Erik B; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Cartilage loss as determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or joint space narrowing as determined by x-ray is the result of cartilage erosion. However, metabolic processes within the cartilage that later result in cartilage loss may be a more sensitive assessment...... method for early changes. Recently, it was shown that cartilage homogeneity visualized by MRI representing the biochemical changes undergoing in the cartilage is a potential marker for early detection of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and is also able to significantly separate groups of healthy subjects from...... it evolves as a consequence to disease and thereby can be used as a progression biomarker. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 283 right and left knees from 159 subjects aged 21 to 81 years were scanned using a Turbo 3D T1 sequence on a 0.18-T MRI Esaote scanner. The medial compartment of the tibial cartilage...

  14. Proinflammatory and Anabolic Gene Expression Effects of Platelet-Rich Gel Supernatants on Equine Synovial Membrane Explants Challenged with Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge U. Carmona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP preparations are used in horses with osteoarthritis (OA. However, some controversies remain regarding the ideal concentration of platelets and leukocytes to produce an adequate anti-inflammatory and anabolic response in the synovial membrane. The aims of this study were to study the influence of leukoconcentrated platelet-rich gel (Lc-PRG and leukoreduced platelet-rich gel (Lr-PRG supernatants on the quantitative expression of some proinflammatory and anabolic genes in equine synovial membrane explants (SMEs challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. SMEs from six horses were cultured over 96 h. Then, SMEs were harvested for RNA extraction and quantitative gene expression analysis by RT-qPCR for nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 (ADAMTS-4, collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1, collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. The 25% and 50% Lc-PRG supernatants led to downregulation of NFκB, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, COL1A1, COL2A1, and COMP in SMEs. Lr-PRG supernatants (particularly at the 50% concentration induced downregulation of NFκB, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and COL1A1 and upregulation of COL2A1 and COMP. Lr-PRG supernatants should be used for the treatment of inflammatory arthropathies in horses because they have anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects in the synovial membrane.

  15. INJURED ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Barlič

    2008-02-01

    Surveys show that the most frequently used surgical methods are mosaicplasty and bonemarrow stimulation with microfracturing. The efficacy of the autologous chondrocyte implantationmethod should be superior to microfracturing on a long run. Especially when(regeneration of the hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue (fibrocartilage is concerned.However, it has not been scientifically proved yet

  16. Lubrication and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-02-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH.

  17. Lubrication and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-01-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH. Images Fig. 10 PMID:3490

  18. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  19. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  20. Studies on the effect of genotype and explant type on callogenesis and organogenesis in indica rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, A.; Rashid, H.; Khan, M.H.; Chaudhry, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the research study is to select the best rice explant and variety for Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation studies. In vitro callus induction and regeneration frequency of two explants i.e. immature embryo and media supplemented mature grains of 9 rice varieties (Oryza sativa L.) was investigated by culturing explants source on N/sub 6/ with 2, 4-D at 2 mg/l for callus induction. Results indicated that mature seed explant produced significantly high number of calli as compared to immature embryo. Two types of calli were distinguished, designated as type-I calli and type-II calli. Regarding the quality of callus, type-I calli (produced from scutellum of mature grains) which were embryogenic produced higher plant regeneration frequency than type-II calli which were non-embryogenic. Mature-seed scutella calli and immature embryo-derived calli (after three weeks of culture) of rice varieties were transferred on regeneration medium i.e., MS salts and vitamins, 3% sucrose, 3% sorbitol, 2 g/l casine hydrolysate, NAA 1.0 mg/l, kin 2.5 mg /l and BAP at 0.5mg/l. The highest regeneration capacity was observed in DR-83 from mature seed derived calli followed by Basmati 385. After hardening the plantlets were transferred to soil. (author)

  1. Plant regeneration via direct shoot organogenesis from cotyledon explants of Bambara groundnut, Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koné, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea [L.] Verdc. is mainly grown for human consumption. However, several factors limit a wider adoption of the crop including the presence of antinutritional factors in the seeds that lower product quality and protein availability but also the plant susceptibility to pests and diseases. Tissue culture techniques are very scanty in Bambara groundnut and should be developed before carrying out genetic transformation for the crop improvement. Therefore, here, an efficient system for in vitro shoot induction from cotyledons derived from mature seeds has been established. Different types and concentrations of plant growth regulators were used to induce buds in embryo-free cotyledon explants. Cotyledons were cut transversally or longitudinally into three segments: proximal, middle and distal part. The influence of explant orientation on the medium, the type of segment and landrace has then been studied. Benzylaminopurine (3 mg·l-1 alone or combined with α-naphthaleneacetic acid (0.05 mg·l-1 induced multiple shoot formations. The organogenic potential was restricted to the proximal segment of cotyledons. Frequency of bud induction (30% and average number of buds per explant (12 were higher when the adaxial side of the proximal segment was in contact with the medium. Shoot regeneration from cotyledon explants of ten Bambara landraces revealed that the response is genotype-dependent with varieties Ci6, Ci2, Ci4 and Ci15 exhibiting 20 to 30% shoot regeneration and six to ten buds per explant. Regenerated shoot buds excised from explants were elongated and rooted on MS basal medium devoid of plant growth regulators. All rooted plantlets survived to the transfer on a sand soil mixture, and morphologically normal plants were hardened and transferred to greenhouse for further growth to maturity and seed set.

  2. Sensitivity and specificity of univariate MRI analysis of experimentally degraded cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Reiter, David A; Spencer, Richard G

    2009-11-01

    MRI is increasingly used to evaluate cartilage in tissue constructs, explants, and animal and patient studies. However, while mean values of MR parameters, including T(1), T(2), magnetization transfer rate k(m), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and the dGEMRIC-derived fixed charge density, correlate with tissue status, the ability to classify tissue according to these parameters has not been explored. Therefore, the sensitivity and specificity with which each of these parameters was able to distinguish between normal and trypsin-degraded, and between normal and collagenase-degraded, cartilage explants were determined. Initial analysis was performed using a training set to determine simple group means to which parameters obtained from a validation set were compared. T(1) and apparent diffusion coefficient showed the greatest ability to discriminate between normal and degraded cartilage. Further analysis with k-means clustering, which eliminates the need for a priori identification of sample status, generally performed comparably. Use of fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering to define centroids likewise did not result in improvement in discrimination. Finally, an FCM clustering approach in which validation samples were assigned in a probabilistic fashion to control and degraded groups was implemented, reflecting the range of tissue characteristics seen with cartilage degradation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Incubation under fluid dynamic conditions markedly improves the structural preservation in vitro of explanted skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Carton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Explanted organs and tissues represent suitable experimental systems mimicking the functional and structural complexity of the living organism, with positive ethical and economic impact on research activities. However, their preservation in culture is generally limited, thus hindering their application as experimental models for biomedical research. In the present study, we investigated the potential of an innovative fluid dynamic culture system to improve the structural preservation in vitro of explanted mouse skeletal muscles (soleus. We used light and transmission electron microscopy to compare the morphological features of muscles maintained either in multiwell plates under conventional conditions or in a bioreactor mimicking the flow of physiological fluids. Our results demonstrate that fluid dynamic conditions markedly slowed the progressive structural deterioration of the muscle tissue occurring during the permanence in the culture medium, prolonging the preservation of some organelles such as mitochondria up to 48 h.

  4. Incubation under fluid dynamic conditions markedly improves the structural preservation in vitro of explanted skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Flavia; Calderan, Laura; Malatesta, Manuela

    2017-11-28

    Explanted organs and tissues represent suitable experimental systems mimicking the functional and structural complexity of the living organism, with positive ethical and economic impact on research activities. However, their preservation in culture is generally limited, thus hindering their application as experimental models for biomedical research. In the present study, we investigated the potential of an innovative fluid dynamic culture system to improve the structural preservation in vitro of explanted mouse skeletal muscles (soleus). We used light and transmission electron microscopy to compare the morphological features of muscles maintained either in multiwell plates under conventional conditions or in a bioreactor mimicking the flow of physiological fluids. Our results demonstrate that fluid dynamic conditions markedly slowed the progressive structural deterioration of the muscle tissue occurring during the permanence in the culture medium, prolonging the preservation of some organelles such as mitochondria up to 48 h.

  5. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  6. ORGANOGÊNESE INDIRETA A PARTIR DE EXPLANTES FOLIARES E MULTIPLICAÇÃO IN VITRO DE BROTAÇÕES DE Eucalyptus benthamii X Eucalyptus dunnii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohana de Oliveira-Cauduro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to evaluate different culture media for indirect organogenesis and shoot multiplication of Eucalyptus benthamii x Eucalyptus dunnii . For organogenesis, leaf explants were used to test the following treatments: two culture media (MS N/2 and JADS supplemented with 0.1 μM 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA and thidiazuron (TDZ (0.1 or 0.5 μ M, with or without PVP- 40 (250 mg L -1 . The percentage of oxidized explants, callus forming explants, explants with anthocyanin,buds, shoots and the shoot number per explant were evaluated. In the multiplication experiment, isolated shoots were cultivated in MS, JADS and WPM media, all supplemented with 1.11 μ M BAP. Four subcultures were carried out every 28 days. In every subculture the explant oxidation, partial or total leaf chlorosis, fresh mass and mean number of shoot per explant were evaluated. The MS N/2 medium supplemented with 0.1 μM NAA and 0.5 μM TDZ promoted the highest rate of organogenesis (8.3% and the culture media MS supplemented with 1.11 μ M BAP the multiplication rate was higher than in the other media, in the first and the second subcultures (9.28 and 9.24, respectively, without differences between the three media in the following subcultures.

  7. A Novel 3D Skin Explant Model to Study Anaerobic Bacterial Infection

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    Grazieli Maboni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin infection studies are often limited by financial and ethical constraints, and alternatives, such as monolayer cell culture, do not reflect many cellular processes limiting their application. For a more functional replacement, 3D skin culture models offer many advantages such as the maintenance of the tissue structure and the cell types present in the host environment. A 3D skin culture model can be set up using tissues acquired from surgical procedures or post slaughter, making it a cost effective and attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The majority of 3D culture models have been established for aerobic pathogens, but currently there are no models for anaerobic skin infections. Footrot is an anaerobic bacterial infection which affects the ovine interdigital skin causing a substantial animal welfare and financial impact worldwide. Dichelobacter nodosus is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium and the causative agent of footrot. The mechanism of infection and host immune response to D. nodosus is poorly understood. Here we present a novel 3D skin ex vivo model to study anaerobic bacterial infections using ovine skin explants infected with D. nodosus. Our results demonstrate that D. nodosus can invade the skin explant, and that altered expression of key inflammatory markers could be quantified in the culture media. The viability of explants was assessed by tissue integrity (histopathological features and cell death (DNA fragmentation over 76 h showing the model was stable for 28 h. D. nodosus was quantified in all infected skin explants by qPCR and the bacterium was visualized invading the epidermis by Fluorescent in situ Hybridization. Measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the culture media revealed that the explants released IL1β in response to bacteria. In contrast, levels of CXCL8 production were no different to mock-infected explants. The 3D skin model realistically simulates the interdigital skin and has

  8. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  9. Advances in cartilage tissue engineering : in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Mandl (Erik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWithin the body three subtypes of cartilage can be distinguished: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the predominant subtype and is mainly located in articular joints and in less extent in the nasal septum and cricoid. Elastic cartilage can be

  10. Mechanical confinement regulates cartilage matrix formation by chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Pyo; Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J.; Levenston, Marc E.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2017-12-01

    Cartilage tissue equivalents formed from hydrogels containing chondrocytes could provide a solution for replacing damaged cartilage. Previous approaches have often utilized elastic hydrogels. However, elastic stresses may restrict cartilage matrix formation and alter the chondrocyte phenotype. Here we investigated the use of viscoelastic hydrogels, in which stresses are relaxed over time and which exhibit creep, for three-dimensional (3D) culture of chondrocytes. We found that faster relaxation promoted a striking increase in the volume of interconnected cartilage matrix formed by chondrocytes. In slower relaxing gels, restriction of cell volume expansion by elastic stresses led to increased secretion of IL-1β, which in turn drove strong up-regulation of genes associated with cartilage degradation and cell death. As no cell-adhesion ligands are presented by the hydrogels, these results reveal cell sensing of cell volume confinement as an adhesion-independent mechanism of mechanotransduction in 3D culture, and highlight stress relaxation as a key design parameter for cartilage tissue engineering.

  11. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net 35 SO 4 -labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage

  12. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  13. Plant regeneration from cotyledonary explants of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Regeneração de plantas de Eucalyptus camaldulensis a partir das explantes cotiledonares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberson Dibax

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Breeding methods based on genetic transformation techniques need to be implemented for Eucalyptus camaldulensis to shorten the long breeding cycles and avoid manipulation of adult trees; that requires the development of plant regeneration protocols enabling development of plants from transformed tissues. The present work aimed to optimise the regeneration process already established for the species. Cotyledonary leaves of E. camaldulensis were cultured in MS medium supplemented with naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP combinations. The most efficient treatment for bud indirect regeneration (2.7 µmol L-1 NAA and 4.44 µmol L-1 BAP was used for further experiments. When explants were kept in the dark during the first 30 days, the percentage of explants forming calluses increased and explant necrosis was reduced in comparison with light-cultured explants. Mineral medium modifications were compared and half-strength MS mineral medium turned out to be as efficient as full-strength medium, producing 54% and 47% of explants with buds, respectively. For shoot elongation, MS medium with half-strength nitrate and ammonium salts, and 0.2% activated charcoal yielded rooted shoots 1 to 8 cm high after one month. The procedure is an efficient protocol for E. camadulensis plant regeneration, reducing the stages necessary for the obtention of complete plants.A implementação, para espécies florestais, de técnicas de melhoramento baseadas em métodos de transformação genética, permitirá reduzir os longos ciclos de melhoramento e evitar a manipulação de árvores adultas. Isto implica dispor de um protocolo de regeneração que permita o desenvolvimento de plantas a partir de tecidos transformados. Este trabalho teve como objetivo otimizar este protocolo de regeneração para Eucalyptus camaldulensis. Folhas cotiledonares foram cultivadas em meio de cultura MS suplementado com combinações de ácido naftalenoacético (ANA e 6

  14. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  15. Somatic embryogenesis from bud and leaf explants of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cv. Najda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazri, Mouaad Amine; Belkoura, Ilham; Meziani, Reda; Mokhless, Boutaïna; Nour, Souad

    2017-05-01

    An efficient regeneration system through somatic embryogenesis was developed for date palm cv. Najda. Adventitious bud and proximal leaf segments cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with various combinations of auxins and cytokinins induced embryogenesis after at least 6 months of culture. Somatic embryogenesis induction seemed correlated with the type of the explant, the induction period and the auxin used. The highest rate of somatic embryogenesis (86.0%) was obtained on bud explants cultured on MS medium supplemented with 45.0 µM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and 4.5 µM kinetin or 4.5 µM 6-(dimethylallylamino) purine (2iP). Whereas, low levels of embryogenesis were obtained on media supplemented with 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) or 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (NOA). Proximal leaf segments showed somatic embryogenesis only when cultured on media supplemented with 2,4-D or picloram. Statistical analysis revealed significant effects of explant type and plant growth regulators (PGRs) combination on somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryos were germinated successfully on PGR-free MS medium with or without activated charcoal (50.0-60.0 and 26.6-36.6%, respectively), and 80.0% of plantlets survived after transferring to a glasshouse for 6 months. Our results will be useful for large-scale propagation of date palm cv. Najda, characterized by high fruit quality and bayoud disease resistance.

  16. Mass propagation of Plectranthus bourneae Gamble through indirect organogenesis from leaf and internode explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaniarasu, R; Senthil Kumar, T; Rao, M V

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the plant propagation via indirect organogenesis from in vitro derived leaf and internode explants of Plectranthus bourneae, an endemic plant to south India. Leaf and internodal explants successfully callused on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with different concentrations of auxins [2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), NAA (α-naphthalene acetic acid), IAA (indole-3 acetic acid), IBA (indole-3-butyric acid) and PIC (Picloram); 0.1-2.0 mg/l] in combination with BA (6-benzyladenine) (0.5 mg/l). Maximum callus induction (98 %) was achieved from leaf explant followed by internodal explant (89 %) at 1.0 mg/l NAA, 0.5 mg/l BA. Leaf derived callus showed better shoot regeneration (29.71 shoots) on MS medium containing 1.0 mg/l KN (kinetin), 0.7 mg/l NAA, and 50 mg/l CH (casein hydrolysate) followed by internodal callus (19.71). A maximum of 19.14 roots/shoot was observed at 1.0 mg/l IBA. The rooted plantlets were successfully hardened and transferred to greenhouse condition with 80 % survival. This system could be utilized for large-scale multiplication of P. bourneae by tissue culture.

  17. Somatic Embryogenesis in Peach-Palm (Bactris gasipaes) Using Different Explant Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmacher, Douglas A; Heringer, Angelo Schuabb; Jiménez, Víctor M; Quoirin, Marguerite G G; Guerra, Miguel P

    2016-01-01

    Peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) is a member of the family Arecaceae and is a multipurpose but underutilized species. Nowadays, fruit production for subsistence and local markets, and heart-of-palm production for local, national, and international markets are the most important uses of this plant. Conventional breeding programs in peach palm are long-term efforts due to the prolonged generation time, large plant size, difficulties with controlled pollination and other factors. Although it is a caespitose palm, its propagation is currently based on seeds, as off-shoots are difficult to root. Hence, tissue culture techniques are considered to be the most likely strategy for efficient clonal plantlet regeneration of this species. Among various techniques, somatic embryogenesis offers the advantages of potential automated large-scale production and putative genetic stability of the regenerated plantlets. The induction of somatic embryogenesis in peach palm can be achieved by using different explant sources including zygotic embryos, immature inflorescences and thin cell layers from the young leaves and shoot meristems. The choice of a particular explant depends on whether clonal propagation is desired or not, as well as on the plant conditions and availability of explants. Protocols to induce and express somatic embryogenesis from different peach palm explants, up to acclimatization of plantlets, are described in this chapter.

  18. A RIFAMPICINA NA DESCONTAMINAÇÃO BACTERIANA DE EXPLANTES DE MAMOEIRO PROVENIENTES DO CAMPO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANNI RODRIGUES VIANNA

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Observou-se alta contaminação bacteriana nos explantes de mamoeiro introduzidos in vitro, a partir de plantas matrizes desenvolvidas no campo, independentemente da época do ano em que se realizaram as coletas. O uso de desinfestantes superficiais, como álcool e hipoclorito de sódio, garantiram níveis aceitáveis de controle apenas para fungos, não para bactérias. A rifampicina, por tratamento de imersão ou introdução em meio de cultura, controlou satisfatoriamente as contaminações de caráter endofítico, obtendo-se 70% de explantes sadios, sem sinais de fitotoxicidade.High contamination by bacteria was observed in papaya tissue cuttings introduced in vitro from plants grown in the field, independent of the period of the year that samples were collected. The use of alcohol and sodium hypoclorite did not guarantee good bacteria control. Rifampicin, added as an immersion solution treatment or in the culture media, controlled the internal contamination of explants, without damaging the cuttings. Up to 70% of healthy tissue explants were obtained by the use of rifampicin.

  19. Tribological changes in the articular cartilage of a human femoral head with avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun-Min; Shrestha, Suman K; Duong, Cong-Truyen; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Kim, Tae-Woo; Vijayachandra, Ayyappan; Thompson, Mark S; Cho, Myung Guk; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Kwanghoon; Park, Seonghun; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2015-06-29

    The present study evaluated the tribological properties of the articular cartilage surface of the human femoral head with postcollapse stage avascular necrosis (AVN) using atomic force microscopy. The cartilage surface in the postcollapse stage AVN of the femoral head was reported to resemble those of disuse conditions, which suggests that the damage could be reversible and offers the possibilities of success of head-sparing surgeries. By comparing the tribological properties of articular cartilage in AVN with that of osteoarthritis, the authors intended to understand the cartilage degeneration mechanism and reversibility of AVN. Human femoral heads with AVN were explanted from the hip replacement surgery of four patients (60-83 years old). Nine cylindrical cartilage samples (diameter, 5 mm and height, 0.5 mm) were sectioned from the weight-bearing areas of the femoral head with AVN, and the cartilage surface was classified according to the Outerbridge Classification System (AVN0, normal; AVN1, softening and swelling; and AVN2, partial thickness defect and fissuring). Tribological properties including surface roughness and frictional coefficients and histochemistry including Safranin O and lubricin staining were compared among the three groups. The mean surface roughness Rq values of AVN cartilage increased significantly with increasing Outerbridge stages: Rq = 137 ± 26 nm in AVN0, Rq = 274 ± 49 nm in AVN1, and Rq = 452 ± 77 nm in AVN2. Significant differences in Rq were observed among different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p tribological properties, the cartilage degeneration mechanism in AVN was similar to that of osteoarthritis without reversibility.

  20. Calogênese e rizogênese em explantes de mogno (Swietenia macrophylla king cultivados in vitro

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    Silvana Rocha Cruz da

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate exploitation of tropical trees in a search for economically valuable species leads to the risk of extinction of several species. This is the case of mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King in Brazil. The establishment of a method of direct or indirect bud regeneration could help to produce a great number of plantlets and could constitute an alternative to sexual propagation. The latter is limited by the fact that mahogany seeds lose their germinative power soon after harvest. In this work, two kinds of explants were used: leaf and root fragments from in vitro cultured plants. After disinfection, the explants were cultured in petri dishes containing modified Murashige and Skoog (1962 culture medium, with three-quarters of salt concentration, vitamins, 30 g.L-1 sucrose and 7 g.L-1 agar. The combinations of growth substances were: naphthaleneacetic acid (ANA 0.11 uM and 0.54 uM and one type of cytokinin, kinetin (CIN 1.2 uM, 2.3 uM, 4.7 uM and 9.3 uM, 6-benzylaminopurine (BA 2.2 uM, 4.4 uM and 8.8 uM or 2-isopentenyladenine (2-iP 2.5 uM. The variables were the concentration and combinations of the growth regulators and the explant origin.The cultures were evaluated every 30 days, the number of explants forming calluses or roots was recorded and the callus consistency was observed. Calluses were formed in both kinds of explants. In leaf explants, 90% of explants formed callus when culture medium contained 4.4 uM BA with 0.54 uM ANA and 8.9 uM BA with 0.11 or 0.54 uM ANA. For root explants, the combination that gave the highest number of calluses was 2.2 uM BA and 0.54 uM ANA and 55% of them formed callus. Adventitious roots were regenerated from leaf calluses or directly from leaf lamina cultured in media containing CIN and ANA. However, adventitious buds were not obtained with the growth regulator combinations tested in these experiments.

  1. Exogenous transforming growth factor-β1 enhances smooth muscle differentiation in embryonic mouse jejunal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Riccardo; Roberts, Neil A; Randles, Michael J; Morabito, Antonino; Woolf, Adrian S

    2017-01-13

    An ex vivo experimental strategy that replicates in vivo intestinal development would in theory provide an accessible setting with which to study normal and dysmorphic gut biology. The current authors recently described a system in which mouse embryonic jejunal segments were explanted onto semipermeable platforms and fed with chemically defined serum-free media. Over 3 days in organ culture, explants formed villi and they began to undergo spontaneous peristalsis. As defined in the current study, the wall of the explanted gut failed to form a robust longitudinal smooth muscle (SM) layer as it would do in vivo over the same time period. Given the role of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) in SM differentiation in other organs, it was hypothesized that exogenous TGFβ1 would enhance SM differentiation in these explants. In vivo, TGFβ receptors I and II were both detected in embryonic longitudinal jejunal SM cells and, in organ culture, exogenous TGFβ1 induced robust differentiation of longitudinal SM. Microarray profiling showed that TGFβ1 increased SM specific transcripts in a dose dependent manner. TGFβ1 proteins were detected in amniotic fluid at a time when the intestine was physiologically herniated. By analogy with the requirement for exogenous TGFβ1 for SM differentiation in organ culture, the TGFβ1 protein that was demonstrated to be present in the amniotic fluid may enhance intestinal development when it is physiologically herniated in early gestation. Future studies of embryonic intestinal cultures should include TGFβ1 in the defined media to produce a more faithful model of in vivo muscle differentiation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Unfertilized ovary: a novel explant for coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Prasanthi I P; Hocher, Valerie; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Doulbeau, Sylvie; Yakandawala, Deepthi M D; Weerakoon, L Kaushalya

    2007-01-01

    Unfertilized ovaries isolated from immature female flowers of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) were tested as a source of explants for callogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. The correct developmental stage of ovary explants and suitable in vitro culture conditions for consistent callus production were identified. The concentration of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and activated charcoal was found to be critical for callogenesis. When cultured in a medium containing 100 microM 2,4-D and 0.1% activated charcoal, ovary explants gave rise to 41% callusing. Embryogenic calli were sub-cultured into somatic embryogenesis induction medium containing 5 microM abscisic acid, followed by plant regeneration medium (with 5 microM 6-benzylaminopurine). Many of the somatic embryos formed were complete with shoot and root poles and upon germination they gave rise to normal shoots. However, some abnormal developments were also observed. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that all the calli tested were diploid. Through histological studies, it was possible to study the sequence of the events that take place during somatic embryogenesis including orientation, polarization and elongation of the embryos.

  3. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan K; Das, Anjan K; Chullikana, Anoop; Majumdar, Anish S

    2012-07-09

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the connective tissue and progresses with age in the older population or develops in young athletes following sports-related injury. The articular cartilage is especially vulnerable to damage and has poor potential for regeneration because of the absence of vasculature within the tissue. Normal load-bearing capacity and biomechanical properties of thinning cartilage are severely compromised during the course of disease progression. Although surgical and pharmaceutical interventions are currently available for treating OA, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Since the tissue is composed primarily of chondrocytes distributed in a specialized extracellular matrix bed, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone marrow-derived 'mesenchymal stem cells' or 'mesenchymal stromal cells', with inherent chondrogenic differentiation potential appear to be ideally suited for therapeutic use in cartilage regeneration. BMSCs can be easily isolated and massively expanded in culture in an undifferentiated state for therapeutic use. Owing to their potential to modulate local microenvironment via anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive functions, BMSCs have an additional advantage for allogeneic application. Moreover, by secreting various bioactive soluble factors, BMSCs can protect the cartilage from further tissue destruction and facilitate regeneration of the remaining progenitor cells in situ. This review broadly describes the advances made during the last several years in BMSCs and their therapeutic potential for repairing cartilage damage in OA.

  5. Phospholipid Vesicles in Media for Tribological Studies against Live Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselack, Teresa; Aldebert, Gregoire; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, Ana-Maria; Schmid, Thomas M.; Laurent, Michel P.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Pre-clinical testing of hemiarthroplasty devices requires that the tribological conditions present in vivo with live cartilage be closely duplicated. A current limitation in the tribological testing of live cartilage involves the use of cell-culture media as lubricant. Study Aim to develop and test a new hyaluronan-phospholipid based medium (HA–phospholipid medium) that combines the rheological and frictional properties of synovial fluid with the nourishing properties of culture media to keep cells alive. Materials and Methods The HA–phospholipid medium consisted of culture medium with added phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (0.3 mg/mL), and hyaluronic acid (2.42 mg/mL). A standard cell culture medium was used as the control. The rheology of each medium was determined using a flat plate configuration. Bovine calf cartilage was used to assess cell viability and friction in each medium. For friction measurements, a cobalt-chrome alloy ball was articulated against cartilage disks immersed in medium. Results Lipid vesicles 0.1 to 50 μm in diameter were identified in the HA–phospholipid medium. Cartilage cell viability was significantly higher in the HA–phospholipid medium (62% ± 8%, 95% CI) than in control medium (49.5% ± 5%) (p = 0.009). The HA–phospholipid medium exhibited strong shear-thinning behavior, similar to synovial fluid, with viscosities ~100-fold higher at 10 s−1 and 5-fold higher at 20,000 s−1 than the approximately Newtonian control medium. The HA–phospholipid medium also yielded 20% lower friction values than the control medium after one hour of testing. Conclusions The rheological and friction results indicate that the HA–phospholipid medium is superior to the control cell culture medium in emulating the shear thinning and lubricative properties of natural synovial fluid, making it more clinically relevant for in vitro wear and friction testing with live cartilage. PMID:29527359

  6. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of ...

  7. Optimization of explants surface sterilization condition for field grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to sterilize nodal explants, so as to mitigate microbial contamination in peach micropropagation. The nodal explants were treated with three concentrations levels (0.15, 0.25 and 0.5% (w/v) active ingredient of chlorine) of locally produced bleach, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for varying exposure ...

  8. In vitro REGENERATION OF PIGEON PEA USING LEAF EXPLANTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2016-05-19

    May 19, 2016 ... Embryogenic calli was obtained on MS containing 2, 4-. D; whereas TDZ induced non-embryogenic callus alone or with shoots directly on explants. Indirect shoot regeneration frequency of 6.7 % was achieved using 1 mg l-1 2, 4-D-induced embryogenic callus obtained using. KAT 60/8 explants. Whereas ...

  9. The Impact of Carbon Source, Explants and Growth Regulators on Callogenesis and Organogenesis of Artemisia annua

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    Bita GHASSEMI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia annua L. plant is known for its antimalarial activity. The low content of artemisinin has stimulated researchers to enhance its production through biotechnological approaches such as tissue culture. The present study was initiated to study the effect of some important factors alone and in combination, on the callogenesis and organogenesis of Artemisia annua. The type of carbon source had a significant effect on NAA efficiency to callogenesis of A. annua, whereas the best callogenesis of A. absinthium was observed at 2 mg/L BAP + 30 g/L sucrose and in the absence of NAA, with root explants. Presence of BAP also had an important effect on callogenesis, especially in high concentrations. A suitable suspension culture was obtained in the MS basal medium containing 0.5 mg/L NAA and BAP, with 30 g/L glucose. Artemisinin was naturally production was at least 0.03 mg/g (w.dt at the first day and peaked on the 16th day with 0.31 mg/g (w.dt in the cell culture of A. annua. The maximum number of shoots (2.167 ± 1.484 was induced at 0.5 mg/L BAP + 0.1 mg/L NAA + glucose (30 g/L with leaf explants. However, treatments containing glucose did not show a good shoot induction. Longer shoots were induced in the medium containing either 0.5 mg/l NAA + 0.5 mg/l BAP + sucrose with leaf explants (1.493 cm ± 0.342 or 0.5 mg/l NAA + sucrose with stem explants (0.697 cm ± 0.930. Medium containing 0.5 or 2 mg/l NAA and sucrose (without BAP induced more roots though.

  10. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chang, Wen-Ching; Wei, Li-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Han; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28772498

  11. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-You Shie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering.

  12. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chang, Wen-Ching; Wei, Li-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Han; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-02-08

    Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering.

  13. Simulação da soja geneticamente modificada tolerante ao glyphosate por meio do cultivo de explantes Simulation of the transgenic soybean tolerant to glyphosate through explant cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio C. Siqueira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do experimento consistiu na simulação in vitro da soja transgênica tolerante ao glyphosate, através do cultivo de explantes em meios de cultura contendo aminoácidos aromáticos. As avaliações basearam-se nos efeitos do glyphosate sobre sementes oriundas de explantes de soja (Glycine max (L. Merr. cv. UFV-16. Para tanto, explantes de soja foram cultivados em meios de cultura líquidos com pH em torno de 5,0. Cada explante constou de um legume completamente expandido contendo duas sementes de aproximadamente 100 mg, conectada a um segmento de caule de 45 mm de comprimento. Os tratamentos testados foram: A = glutamina (Gln; B = Gln + fenilalanina (Phe + tirosina (Tyr + triptofano (Trp; C = Gln + glyphosate; D = Gln + Phe + Tyr + Trp + glyphosate. O experimento foi conduzido sob irradiância de 80 mmol-2s-1 a 25oC por 204 horas. Nos tratamentos que receberam aminoácidos aromáticos e glutamina, o herbicida não afetou as massas fresca e seca das sementes, como também, não afetou seus constituintes bioquímicos (proteínas, óleo, ácidos graxos, carboidratos e clorofilas. Portanto, a suplementação exógena de aminoácidos aromáticos suprime os efeitos fitotóxicos do glyphosate sobre explantes de soja, permitindo estudos sobre o seu modo de ação e metabolismo nas sementes, uma vez que os explantes se comportaram analogamente à soja transgênica não suscetível ao herbicida.The objective of this experiment consisted in simulation in vitro of the transgenic soybean tolerant to glyphosate through explant cultivation in culture medium containing aromatic amino acids. The effects of glyphosate on soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill were evaluated in seeds harvested from explants of cv UFV-16. The soybean explants were cultivated in liquid medium culture with pH about 5.0. Each explant consisted of one fruit completely expanded, containing two seeds of 100 mg approximately, and connected to a stem segment of 45 mm length. The

  14. Plant regeneration via direct somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of Tolumnia Louise Elmore 'Elsa'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Ju; Chen, Jen-Tsung; Chung, Hsiao-Hang; Chang, Wei-Chin

    2018-01-22

    Tolumnia genus (equitant Oncidium) is a group of small orchids with vivid flower color. Thousands of hybrids have been registered on Royal Horticulture Society and showed great potential for ornamental plant market. The aim of this study is to establish an efficient method for in vitro propagation. Leaf explants taken from in vitro-grown plants were used to induce direct somatic embryogenesis on a modified 1/2 MS medium supplemented with five kinds of cytokinins, 2iP, BA, kinetin, TDZ and zeatin at 0.3, 1 and 3 mg l -1 in darkness. TDZ at 3 mg l -1 gave the highest percentage of explants with somatic globular embryos after 90 days of culture. It was found that 2,4-D and light regime highly retarded direct somatic embryogenesis and showed 95-100% of explant browning. Histological observations revealed that the leaf cells divided into meristematic cells firstly, followed by somatic proembryos, and then somatic globular embryos. Eventually, somatic embryos developed a bipolar structure with the shoot apical meristem and the root meristem. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed that the direct somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants was asynchronously. The somatic embryos were found on the leaf tip, the adaxial surface and also the mesophyll through a cleft, and it reflected the heterogeneity of the explant. The 90-day-old globular embryos were detached from the parent explants and transferred onto a hormone-free 1/2 MS medium in light condition for about 1 month to obtain 1-cm-height plantlets. After another 3 months for growth, the plantlets were potted with Sphagnum moss and were acclimatized in a shaded greenhouse. After 1 month of culture, the survival rate was 100%. In this report, a protocol for efficient regenerating a Tolumnia orchid, Louise Elmore 'Elsa', was established via direct somatic embryogenesis and might reveal an alternative approach for mass propagation of Tolumnia genus in orchid industry.

  15. Differentiation of presumptive primordial germ cell (pPGC)-like cells in explants into PGCs in experimental tadpoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikenishi, K.; Okuda, T.; Nakazato, S.

    1984-05-01

    A single blastomere containing the ''germ plasm'' of 32-cell stage Xenopus embryos was cultured with (/sup 3/H)thymidine until the control embryos developed to the neurula stage. The explants, showing a spherical mass in which the nuclei of all cells were labeled, were implanted into the prospective place of presumptive primordial germ cells (pPGCs) in the endodermal cell mass of unlabeled host embryos of the neurula stage. Labeled PGCs as well as unlabeled, host PGCs were found in the genital ridges of experimental tadpoles. This indicates that the precursor of germ cells, corresponding to pPGCs in normal embryos of the neurula stage, in the explants migrated to genital ridges just at the right moment to become PGCs, and suggests that the developmental process progressed normally, even in the explants, as far as the differentiation of pPGCs is concerned.

  16. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  17. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  18. Pronounced biomaterial dependency in cartilage regeneration using nonexpanded compared with expanded chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchida, A.I.; Bekkers, J.E.J.; Beekhuizen, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate freshly isolated compared with culture-expanded chondrocytes with respect to early regenerative response, cytokine production and cartilage formation in response to four commonly used biomaterials. Materials & methods: Chondrocytes were both directly and after expansion to

  19. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugé, Catherine; Boumédiene, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  20. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  1. Brother of CDO (BOC) expression in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderman, K S; Tremblay, M; Zhu, W; Shimojo, M; Mienaltowski, M J; Coleman, S J; MacLeod, J N

    2011-04-01

    Brother of CDO (BOC) is a cell surface receptor that derives its name from the structurally related protein, cell adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO, sometimes CDON). High levels of BOC mRNA and protein expression have been described in embryonic tissues with active cell proliferation and ongoing cellular differentiation(1,2). A microarray-based screen of RNA isolated from 11 different adult equine tissues unexpectedly identified BOC as having an expression pattern restricted to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to further investigate BOC expression in adult articular cartilage relative to other tissues. Both RT-qPCR and mRNA sequencing confirmed the microarray data. Steady state BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage were substantially higher than in the other adult tissues tested, neonatal tendon, placenta, and whole embryo. The expression of BOC displayed a pattern of tissue specificity comparable to well established cartilage matrix protein biomarkers. BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage increased with age, but were rapidly down-regulated when chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the cartilage matrix and expanded in monolayer culture. Relative expression patterns of CDO were broadly similar, but displayed lower fold change differences. A functional role in articular cartilage that involves Hedgehog signaling is suggested by the known binding affinity of BOC for all three Hedgehog ligands. These data also extend BOC and CDO biology to a post-mitotic and highly differentiated cell type within a mature tissue. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glycogen storage in tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Jocelyne M T; Khan, Aasma A; Waldman, Stephen D

    2008-08-01

    Recent focus in cartilage tissue engineering has been to develop functional tissue that can survive after implantation. One such determinant is the ability of the engineered tissue to be able to sustain its metabolic activity post-implantation. In vivo, chondrocytes contain stores of intracellular glycogen to support metabolism and it is unknown whether these cells can store glycogen during tissue growth in vitro. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the appropriate nutrient conditions to elicit glycogen storage in tissue-engineered cartilage. Isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were seeded in scaffold-free, 3D culture and grown under different nutrient conditions (glucose concentrations and media volumes) for 4 weeks. Intracellular glycogen storage, glucose utilization and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation of the engineered tissues were then evaluated. Glucose concentration (5-10 mM) and media volume (1-4 ml) had no apparent effect on cartilaginous tissue formation. However, glucose consumption by the cells increased in proportion to the volume of medium provided. Lactate production was similarly affected but in direct proportion to the glucose consumed, indicating a change in glucose utilization. Similarly, under elevated medium volume, engineered tissues stained positive for intracellular glycogen, which was also confirmed biochemically (1 ml, 1 +/- 2; 2 ml, 13 +/- 4; 4 ml, 13 +/- 3 microg/construct). The storage of intracellular glycogen in engineered cartilage can be elicited by culturing the constructs in elevated volumes of medium (>or=1 ml medium/million cells), which might help to ensure appropriate metabolic function after implantation. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effects of γ irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijweide, P.J.; Burger, E.H.; van Delft, J.L.; Kawilarange-de Haas, E.W.M.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Mellink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of γ irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification was studied in vitro. Metatarsal bones of 14- to 17-day-old embryonic mice were dissected and cultured under various conditions. Prior to culture, half of the metatarsal bones received absorbed doses of 1.0 to 30.0 Gy γ radiation. Their paired counterparts served as controls. Irradiation inhibited longitudinal growth and calcification of the cartilage matrix during culture. In addition, a number of histological changes were noted. The inhibition of matrix calcification appeared to be due to an inhibition of the intracellular calcium accumulation. The formation of extracellular calcification foci and the growth of the calcified area already present at the moment of explanation were not inhibited during culture

  4. Somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of hermaphrodite Carica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of hermaphrodite Carica papaya: A new approach for clonal propagation. Andréa Dias Koehler, Carlos Roberto Carvalho, Isabella Santiago Abreu, Wellington Ronildo Clarindo ...

  5. callus culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    steve

    capacity in comparison to those of grown on 75%. NH4NO3 depleted media under the same light regime. Light dependent secondary metabolite production. Initially, we have cultured wounded grape leaf explants in the dark for callus induction and monitoring possible pigmentation and phenolics accumulation. Supplemen-.

  6. Enamel formation in vitro in mouse molar explants exposed to amelogenin polypeptides ATMP and LRAP on enamel development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Rajeswari M H; Devarajan, Asokan; Bringas, Pablo

    2007-12-01

    The enamel matrix contains amelogenin, leucine-rich amelogenin-polypeptide (LRAP), resulting from alternative splicing of the primary amelogenin-RNA transcript and tyrosine-rich amelogenin-polypeptide (TRAP), a proteolytic product of amelogenin. Presence of amelogenin-trityrosyl-motif peptide (ATMP) distinguishes TRAP from LRAP. The roles of these polypeptides in the formation of enamel remain to be elucidated. The mouse in vitro molar tooth-organ developed from bud stage (E16) was exposed to LRAP, ATMP, and mutated ATMP (T-ATMP, third proline replaced by threonine). The histology and morphometry of the explants on day-12 in culture was examined using Mallory's stain. Guanidine-HCl soluble protein concentrations of explants were compared. The enamel width and protein solubility indicate that the explant on day-12 is comparable to postnatal molar on day-3 in vivo. The enamel of both untreated explants as well as that in vivo is fuchinophilic (acid fuchsin, AF+). ATMP reduced the ameloblast-height, accumulated AF+ spherules at the apical end of ameloblasts, and disrupted enamel-dentin bonding. T-ATMP abrogated deposition of AF+ material on the aniline blue positive (AB+) enamel matrix. LRAP reduced ameloblast-height, increased the enamel-width without disruption (at 17.25 nmol) and increased the density of AF+ dentinal tubules. AF+ substance from the tubules is released onto the surface of the dentin. The Guanidine-HCl-soluble protein is elevated in ATMP-treated explants but decreased in LRAP-treated explants. Exogenous ATMP, T-ATMP and LRAP have divergent effects on developing enamel. Exogenous ATMP, but not LRAP, abrogates enamel-dentin bonding at 17.25 nmol. LRAP may play a role in the differentiation of ameloblasts, growth of enamel and formation of dentinal tubules.

  7. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P

    2011-01-01

    and interaction partners are still likely to be discovered. Our focus in this study was to characterize a novel cartilage specific gene that was identified in mouse limb cartilage during embryonic development. METHODS: Open access bioinformatics tools were used to characterize the gene, predicted protein...... subgroups. Cartilage specific expression was highest in proliferating and prehypertrophic zones during development, and in adult articular cartilage, expression was restricted to the uncalcified zone, including chondrocyte clusters in human osteoarthritic cartilage. Studies with experimental chondrogenesis...... and orthologs in vertebrate species. Immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression methodology were used to study tissue specific expression. Fracture callus and limb bud micromass culture were utilized to study the effects of BMP-2 during experimental chondrogenesis. Fusion protein with C-terminal HA...

  8. Carboxylesterase-dependent cytotoxicity of dibasic esters (DBE) in rat nasal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trela, B A; Bogdanffy, M S

    1991-02-01

    Dibasic esters (DBE) are a solvent mixture of dimethyl adipate (DMA), dimethyl glutarate (DMG), and dimethyl succinate (DMS) used in the paint and coating industry. Subchronic inhalation toxicity studies have demonstrated that DBE induce a mild degeneration of the olfactory, but not the respiratory, epithelium of the rat nasal cavity. Carboxylesterase-mediated hydrolysis of the individual dibasic esters is more efficient in olfactory than in respiratory mucosal homogenates. In the present study, an in vitro system of cultured rat nasal explants was utilized to determine if DBE toxicity is dependent on a metabolic activation by nonspecific carboxylesterase. Explants from both the olfactory and the respiratory regions of the female rat nasal cavity were incubated for 2 hr in Williams' medium E containing 10-100 mM DMA, DMG, or DMS. DBE caused a dose-related increase in nasal explant acid phosphatase release, a biochemical index of cytotoxicity. HPLC analysis demonstrated parallel increases in the carboxylesterase-mediated formation of monomethyl ester metabolites. Diacid metabolite production in the nasal explant system was not entirely concentration-dependent. Metabolite concentrations and acid phosphatase release were generally greater in olfactory than respiratory tissues. DBE-induced cytotoxicity and acid metabolite production were markedly attenuated in nasal tissue excised from rats which were pretreated with bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate, a carboxylesterase inhibitor. This study presents a viable in vitro method for assessing organic ester cytotoxicity in the rat nasal cavity. It was shown that DBE are weak nasal toxicants under the conditions of this system. It was further demonstrated that DBE toxicity is dependent on a carboxylesterase-mediated activation. A similar mechanism was proposed for the nasal toxicity induced by other organic esters following inhalation exposure.

  9. Pine somatic embryogenesis using zygotic embryos as explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Gerald S; Bucalo, Kylie

    2011-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) has the potential to be the lowest-cost method to rapidly produce large numbers of high-value somatic seedlings with desired characteristics for plantation forestry. At least 24 of the 115-120 known Pinus species can undergo SE. Initiation for most species works best with immature megagametophytes as starting material, although a few pines can initiate SE cultures from isolated mature seed embryos. Successful initiation depends heavily on explant type, embryo developmental stage, and medium salt base. Most first reports of initiation used 2,4-D and BAP or a combination of cytokinins. More recent reports have optimized initiation for many Pinus spp., but still use mostly the combinations of auxin and cytokinins. Initiation can be stimulated with medium supplements including abscisic acid (ABA), brassinosteroids, ethylene inhibitors, gibberellin inhibitors, organic acids, putrescine, specific sugar types (maltose, galactose, D-chiro-inositol, and D-xylose), triacontanol, vitamins (B12, biotin, vitamin E, and folic acid), or manipulation of environmental factors including pH, water potential, cone cold storage, gelling agent concentration, and liquid medium. Embryo development and maturation usually occur best on medium containing ABA along with water potential reduction (with sugars and polyethylene glycol) or water availability reduction (with raised gelling agent increasing gel-strength). Activated carbon and maltose may also improve embryo maturation. The main issues holding SE technology back are related to the high cost of producing a somatic seedling, incurred from low initiation percentages for recalcitrant species, culture loss, and decline after initiation and poor embryo maturation resulting in no or poor germination. Although vast progress has been made in pine SE technology over the past 24 years, fundamental studies on seed and embryo physiology, biochemistry, and gene expression are still needed to help improve the technology

  10. Microvesicle-mediated release of soluble LH/hCG receptor (LHCGR from transfected cells and placenta explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randeva Harpal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Placental hCG and pitutary LH transduce signals in target tissues through a common receptor (LHCGR. We demonstrate that recombinant LHCGR proteins which include the hormone-binding domain are secreted from transfected cells and that natural LHCGR is also secreted from human placental explants. LHCGR recombinant proteins representing varying lengths of the N-terminal extracellular domain were expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells in suspension culture. Secretion was minimal up to 72h but by 96h 24-37% of the LHCGR had been released into the culture medium. The secreted proteins were folded and sensitive to glycosidases suggesting N-linked glycosylation. Secretion was independent of recombinant size and was mediated via structurally defined membrane vesicles (50-150nm. Similarly cultured human early pregnancy placental explants also released LHCGR via microvesicles. These studies provide the first experimental evidence of the possible mechanistic basis of the secretion of LHCGR.

  11. Advances in Application of Mechanical Stimuli in Bioreactors for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Chunqiu; Qiu, Lulu; Gao, Lilan; Zhang, Xizheng

    2017-08-01

    often ignore the importance of biochemical factors to the growth and development of engineered cartilage. In our point of view, only by fully considering synergistic effects of mechanical and biochemical factors can we find appropriate culture conditions for functional cartilage constructs. Once again, rolling-sliding-compression load under appropriate biochemical conditions may be conductive to realize the adaptive development between the structure and function of engineered cartilage in vitro.

  12. [Research progress of mechanism of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling pathway in condylar cartilage growth and remodeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaoli, Xu; Lili, Wu; Zhiwu, Wu; Zhiyuan, Gu

    2016-12-01

    The condylar cartilage was adapted to hypoxic conditions in vivo. However, condylar cartilage cells exposed in normoxia in vitro affect the chondrocyte phenotype and cartilage matrix formation. This condition also resulted in great difficulty in chondrocyte research. Culturing chondrocyte should be simulated in in vivo hypoxia environment as much as possible. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) demonstrates an important transcription factor of adaptive response to hypoxic conditions. HIF-1α also plays an active role in maintaining homeostasis and function of chondrocytes. This review summarized current knowledge of the HIF-1α structure, signaling pathway, and mechanism of HIF-1α in the condylar cartilage repair.

  13. High frequency organogenesis in hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf and petiole explants of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica), an important vegetable crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, D K

    2015-04-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) is an important, nutritionally rich vegetable crop, but severely affected by environmental stresses, pests and diseases which cause massive yield and quality losses. Genetic manipulation is becoming an important method for broccoli improvement. In the present study, a reproducible and highly efficient protocol for obtaining organogenesis from hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf and petiole explants of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica cv. Solan green head) has been developed. Hypocotyl and cotyledon explants were used from 10 to 12 days old aseptically grown seedlings whereas leaf and petiole explants were excised from 18 to 20 days old green house grown seedlings and surface sterilized. These explants were cultured on shoot induction medium containing different concentration and combination of BAP and NAA. High efficiency shoot regeneration has been achieved in hypocotyl (83.33 %), cotyledon (90.11 %), leaf (62.96 %) and petiole (91.10 %) explants on MS medium supplemented with 3.5 mg/l BAP + 0.019 mg/l NAA 2.5 mg/l BAP + 0.5 mg/l NAA, 4.0 mg/l BAP + 0.5 mg/l NAA and 4.5 mg/l BAP + 0.019 mg/l NAA respectively. Petiole explants showed maximum shoot regeneration response as compared to other explants. MS medium supplemented with 0.10 mg/l NAA was found best for root regeneration (100 %) from in vitro developed shoots. The regenerated complete plantlets were transferred to the pots containing cocopeat and successfully acclimatized. This optimized regeneration protocol can be efficiently used for genetic transformation in broccoli. This is the first comparative report on multiple shoot induction using four different types of explants viz. hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf and petiole.

  14. The correlation between the chromosome variation in callus and genotype of explants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fras, Alicja; Maluszynska, Jolanta

    2004-06-01

    Twelve callus lines of Arabidopsis thaliana were derived from four types of explants excised from diploid plants of two ecotypes (Columbia and Wilna) and autotetraploid plants of the Wilna ecotype. Cytogenetic analysis of the chromosome variation in particular callus lines was carried out for primary culture and callus during 5 months of culture. Ploidy levels of interphase nuclei were estimated by counting the number and size of chromocentres and nuclei of interphase cells. The first polyploid cells in all callus lines were observed during callogenesis. In primary culture the ploidy level ranged between 2 and 15x (10-75 chromosomes). The frequency of polyploid cells was higher in the 5-month old callus culture, but the ploidy level was the same. In the callus lines derived from autotetraploid plants, cells with reduced chromosome number appeared quite frequently along with diploid and polyploid cells.

  15. An investigation on callogenesis and antioxidant capacity of different explants of Teucrium polium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Javidi Moghadam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Kalpoureh (Teucrium polium L. as a medicinal plant belongs to family Lamiaceae. This plant has short growth period and endangered, so it seems the method of plant tissue culture is efficient for that. On the other hand Teucrium polium with high antioxidant properties has many health benefits. In this study, the effect of culture medium, different concentrations of 2, 4-D and the type of explants on callus induction were evaluated. It was found that effective treatment for more fresh weight of callus was the leaf explants on B5 culture with concentrations 1 and 0.5 mg L-1 of 2,4-D. In no hormone treatments, the percentage of callus induction was lower than others and the highest percentage of callus induction was on medium containing higher levels of the hormone. Analysis of biochemical properties (total phenolic content, antioxidant capacity based on two tests; DPPH and PPM was also concluded that callus of terminal bud on B5 medium with no hormones had the highest total phenol (82.66 mgGAE/100 g FW. Based on DPPH test, the most free radicals scavenging potential was seen for the leaves collected from the habitat and the callus of terminal bud explants on B5 medium with concentration of 0.5 mg L-1 2, 4-D. Investigation on total antioxidant capacity also revealed that callus of terminal bud on MS medium, 2 mg L-1 2,4-D, leaves and stems of plants collected from habitats showed more activities. These conditions can provide the suggestion for the use of these media to produce more secondary metabolites with antioxidant properties.

  16. Effect of a Herbal-Leucine mix on the IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation and inflammatory gene expression in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqi Tariq M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional treatments for the articular diseases are often effective for symptom relief, but can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA, and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favorable influence on the course of the disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective potential of a Herbal and amino acid mixture containing extract of the Uncaria tomentosa, Boswellia spp., Lepidium meyenii and L-Leucine on the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, glycosaminoglycan (GAG, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecan (ACAN and type II collagen (COL2A1 in human OA chondrocytes and OA cartilage explants. Methods Primary OA chondrocytes or OA cartilage explants were pretreated with Herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM, 1-10 μg/ml and then stimulated with IL-1β (5 ng/ml. Effect of HLM on IL-1β-induced gene expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MMP-13, ACAN and COL2A1 was verified by real time-PCR. Estimation of NO and GAG release in culture supernatant was done using commercially available kits. Results HLM tested in these in vitro studies was found to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, as evidenced by strong inhibition of iNOS, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression and NO production in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes (p Leucine mixture (HLM up-regulation of ACAN and COL2A1 expression in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes was also noted (p Conclusion Our data suggests that HLM could be chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent in arthritis, switching chondrocyte gene expression from catabolic direction towards anabolic and regenerative, and consequently this approach may be potentially useful as a new adjunct therapeutic/preventive agent for OA or injury recovery.

  17. Articular cartilage tissue engineering with plasma-rich in growth factors and stem cells with nano scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Abbassy, Hadeer A.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to heal soft tissue injuries and regenerate cartilage is the Holy Grail of musculoskeletal medicine. Articular cartilage repair and regeneration is considered to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or continue hypertrophic cartilage. The lack of efficient modalities of treatment has prompted research into tissue engineering combining stem cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving cartilage therapy. Plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) and/or stem cells may be effective for tissue repair as well as cartilage regenerative processes. There is a great promise to advance current cartilage therapies toward achieving a consistently successful approach for addressing cartilage afflictions. Tissue engineering may be the best way to reach this objective via the use of stem cells, novel biologically inspired scaffolds and, emerging nanotechnology. In this paper, current and emergent approach in the field of cartilage tissue engineering is presented for specific application. In the next years, the development of new strategies using stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium could improve the quality of new formed cartilage.

  18. Cartilage formation measured by a novel PIINP assay suggests that IGF-I does not stimulate but maintains cartilage formation ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, S H; Sondergaard, B C; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2009-01-01

    explants were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM):F12 in the presence of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 ng/mL of IGF-I. The viability of the chondrocytes was measured by the colorimetric Alamar blue assay. Collagen formation was assessed from the conditioned medium by the PIINP assay...

  19. High frequency plant regeneration from leaf explants derived callus of evening primrose (oenothera biennis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghauri, E.G.; Shafi, N.; Ghani, S.; Fatima, A.

    2008-01-01

    The seeds of Evening primrose were aseptically grown and leaf explants were used for establishment of callus culture. The Excellent growth in callus biomass was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 2, 4, -D and TDZ. For optimal growth of bud and shoot regeneration, fortification of IAA along with TDZ, or BAP was found to be essential. Rooting (70%) could be inducted on hormone free MS-medium. This percentage improved to 98 when NAA was added to the medium. The plantlets thus obtained were transferred to the field successfully after passing through the process of hardening. (author)

  20. The application of autologous platelet‑rich plasma gel in cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Aiguo; Nie, Lanjun; Shen, Gan; Cui, Ziwei; Xu, Peng; Ge, Huaqiang; Tan, Qian

    2014-09-01

    Cartilage defect caused by disease or trauma remains a challenge for surgeons, owning to the limited healing capacity of cartilage tissues. Cartilage tissue engineering provides a novel approach to address this issue, and appears promising for patients with cartilage defects. The cell scaffold, as one of the three key elements of tissue engineering, plays an important role in cartilage tissue engineering. Platelet‑rich plasma (PRP), which is a fraction of the plasma containing multiple growth factors, has become a major research focus in the context of its use as a bioactive scaffold for tissue engineering. Therefore, we investigated the value of using PRP scaffolds combined with chondrocytes in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we examined the levels of growth factors in PRP, and the effects of PRP on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in rabbit chondrocytes cultured in PRP. Short-term in vitro culture followed by long‑term in vivo implantation was performed to evaluate the chondrogenesis of neocartilage in vivo. The results show that PRP may provide a suitable environment for the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes, and can be used as a promising bioactive scaffold for cartilage regeneration.

  1. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  2. Effect of ZnO nanoparticles on Brassica nigra seedlings and stem explants: growth dynamics and antioxidative response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hira eZafar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs have diverse properties in comparison to respective chemicals due to structure, surface area ratio, morphology, and reactivity. Toxicological effects of metallic NPs to organisms including plants have been reported. However, to the authors’ knowledge there is no report on the effect of NPs on in vitro culture of plant explants. In this study, ZnO NPs at 500-1500 mg/L badly affected Brassica nigra seed germination and seedling growth and raised antioxidative activities and antioxidants concentrations. On the other hand, culturing the stem explants of B. nigra on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium in presence of low concentration of ZnO NPs (1-20 mg/L produced white thin roots with thick root hairs. At 10 mg/L ZnO NPs shoots emergence was also observed. The developed calli/roots showed 79% DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging activity at 10 mg/L. While total antioxidant and reducing power potential were also significantly different in presence of ZnO NPs. Non enzymatic antioxidative molecules, phenolics (up to 0.15 µg GAE/mg FW and flavonoids (up to 0.22 µg QE/mg FW, also raised and found NPs concentration dependent. We state that ZnO NPs may induce roots from explants cultured on appropriate medium and can be cultured for production of valuable secondary metabolites.

  3. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic

  4. Microwave treatment of xenogeneic cartilage transplants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C. E.; Boon, M. E.; Visser, P. E.; Kok, L. P.

    1989-01-01

    Human rib cartilage was irradiated with microwaves according to six different methods and transplanted into rabbits. Untreated rib cartilage preserved in Cialit served as a control. After 12 and 40 wk of implantation, the microscopic appearance of these xenogeneic cartilage transplants was given a

  5. Candidate polyanion microbicides inhibit HIV-1 infection and dissemination pathways in human cervical explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesquita Pedro MM

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterosexual intercourse remains the major route of HIV-1 transmission worldwide, with almost 5 million new infections occurring each year. Women increasingly bear a disproportionate burden of the pandemic, thus there is an urgent need to develop new strategies to reduce HIV-1 transmission that could be controlled by women themselves. The potential of topical microbicides to reduce HIV transmission across mucosal surfaces has been clearly identified, and some agents are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Many of these "first generation" microbicides consist of polyanionic compounds designed to interfere with viral attachment. Here we have evaluated two candidate polyanion compounds in clinical trials, PRO 2000 and dextrin sulphate (DxS to determine their safety and efficacy against in vitro HIV-1 and HSV-2 infection using cellular and tissue explant models. Results PRO 2000 and DxS potently inhibited infection by HIV-1 X4 and R5 isolates when present during viral exposure. However PRO 2000 required 10-fold and DxS 2000-fold more compound to block infection with R5 virus than X4. While both compounds were virucidal for X4 HIV-1, neither was virucidal for R5 virus. PRO 2000 efficiently inhibited infection of cervical explants and dissemination of virus by migratory DC. DxS was less active, able to completely inhibit cervical explant infection, but providing only partial reduction of virus dissemination by DC. PRO 2000, but not DxS, also inhibited HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN+ cells and trans infection of co-cultured target cells. The inflammatory potential of both compounds was screened by measurement of cytokine production from cervical explants, and statistically significant increases were only observed for IL-1β and RANTES following treatment with PRO 2000. Both compounds also demonstrated potent activity against HSV-2 infection of cervical epithelial cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that PRO 2000 is a

  6. Different Patterns of Cartilage Mineralization Analyzed by Comparison of Human, Porcine, and Bovine Laryngeal Cartilages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Horst; Schicht, Martin; Fleiner, Bernd; Hillmann, Ralf; Hoogeboom, Sebastian; Tillmann, Bernhard; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2017-06-01

    Laryngeal cartilages undergo a slow ossification process during aging, making them an excellent model for studying cartilage mineralization and ossification processes. Pig laryngeal cartilages are similar to their human counterparts in shape and size, also undergo mineralization, facilitating the study of cartilage mineralization. We investigated the processes of cartilage mineralization and ossification and compared these with the known processes in growth plates. Thyroid cartilages from glutaraldehyde-perfused male minipigs and from domestic pigs were used for X-ray, light microscopic, and transmission electron microscopic analyses. We applied different fixation and postfixation solutions to preserve cell shape, proteoglycans, and membranes. In contrast to the ossifying human thyroid cartilage, predominantly cartilage mineralization was observed in minipig and domestic pig thyroid cartilages. The same subset of chondrocytes responsible for growth plate mineralization is also present in thyroid cartilage mineralization. Besides mineralization mediated by matrix vesicles, a second pattern of cartilage mineralization was observed in thyroid cartilage only. Here, the formation and growth of crystals were closely related to collagen fibrils, which served as guide rails for the expansion of mineralization. It is hypothesized that the second pattern of cartilage mineralization may be similar to a maturation of mineralized cartilage after initial matrix vesicles-mediated cartilage mineralization.

  7. Molecular mechanism of hypoxia-induced chondrogenesis and its application in in vivo cartilage tissue engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Duval , Elise; Baugé , Catherine; Andriamanalijaona , Rina; Bénateau , Hervé; Leclercq , Sylvain; Dutoit , Soizic; Poulain , Laurent; Galéra , Philippe; Boumédiene , Karim

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Cartilage engineering is one of the most challenging issue in regenerative medicine, due to its limited self-ability to repair. Here, we assessed engineering of cartilage tissue starting from human bone marrow (hBM) stem cells under hypoxic environment and delineated the mechanism whereby chondrogenesis could be conducted without addition of exogenous growth factors. hBM stem cells were cultured in alginate beads and chondrogenesis was monitored by chondrocyte phenotyp...

  8. The formation of human auricular cartilage from microtic tissue: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Mohamad Fikeri bin; See, Goh Bee; Hui, Chua Kien; Abdullah, Asma bt; Saim, Lokman bin; Saim, Aminuddin bin; Idrus, Ruszymah bt Haji

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to isolate, culture-expand and characterize the chondrocytes isolated from microtic cartilage and evaluate its potential as a cell source for ear cartilage reconstruction. Specific attention was to construct the auricular cartilage tissue by using fibrin as scaffold. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. After ear reconstructive surgery at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, chondrocytes were isolated from microtic cartilage. Chondrocytes isolated from the tissue were cultured expanded until passage 4 (P4). Upon confluency at P4, chondrocytes were harvested and tissue engineered constructs were made with human plasma polymerized to fibrin. Constructs formed later is implanted at the dorsal part of nude mice for 8 weeks, followed by post-implantation evaluation with histology staining (Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and Safranin O), immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for chondrogenic associated genes expression level. Under gross assessment, the construct after 8 weeks of implantation showed similar physical characteristics that of cartilage. Histological staining showed abundant lacunae cells embedded in extracellular matrix similar to that of native cartilage. Safranin O staining showed positive staining which indicates the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the strong positive staining for collagen type II, the specific collagen type in the cartilage. Gene expression quantification showed no significant differences in the expression of chondrogenic gene used which is collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan core protein (ACP), elastin and sox9 genes when compared to construct formed from normal auricular tissue. Chondrocytes isolated from microtia cartilage has the potential to be used as an alternative cell source for external ear reconstruction in future clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  9. A protocol for sonication-assisted Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of haploid and diploid sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek-Chodacka, Magdalena; Baranski, Rafal

    2014-01-01

    Hairy root cultures obtained after Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated genetic transformation can serve as a model system for studying plant metabolism and physiology, or can be utilized for the production of secondary metabolites. So far no efficient protocol of hairy root development in sugar beet has been publically released. In this work, two A. rhizogenes strains (A4T and LBA1334) carrying a binary vector pBIN-m-gfp5-ER or pCAMBIA1301 possessing gfp and uidA reporter genes were used to transform petiole explants of haploid and diploid sugar beet genotypes. Five treatment combinations of sonicated-assisted Agrobacterium-mediated transformation were compared. Hairy roots appeared on 0% to 54% of explants depending on the treatment combination used. The highest frequency was achieved when explants of a diploid genotype were sonicated for 15 s in the inoculum containing A. rhizogenes of OD600=0.5 and then co-cultured for three days. Using the same treatment combinations the explants of haploid genotypes developed hairy roots with the frequency ranging from 10% to 36%. Transformation efficiency was independent on the bacterial strain used. The results indicate that haploid sugar beet explants are amenable to transformation using A. rhizogenes, and that the efficiency of that process can be increased by applying short ultrasound treatment.

  10. Effect of gamma radiation on different explants of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam)) to induce NaCl tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Rosati, A.

    1997-01-01

    Clonal lines tolerant to NaCl were obtained by combining in vitro culture and gamma radiation in two Peruvian varieties 'Amarillo de Quillabamba' and 'Nemanete'. The most suitable explants were pedicel sections and leaf blades. Embryogenic callus was induced on basal MS basal medium containing 0.5 ppm 2,4-D. The embryogenic calli were irradiated with 5 Gy from a 137 Cs source. Several putative mutants appeared to be stable. (author). 9 refs, 3 tabs

  11. Correlated response of in vitro regeneration capacity from different source of explants inCucumis melo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, R V; Nuez, F

    1995-01-01

    The variation among and within different populations of the regeneration ability from leaf, cotyledon and hypocotyl explants has been studied. A control population and two lines selected by their regeneration capacity from leaf explants were used. Significant differences among the plants of the control population,for the organogenic response, were detected. The regeneration capacity varies depending on the type of explant. Selection in order to improve the regeneration frequency from leaf explants also raises the organogenic response in the other explant types. This result suggests the presence of a partial common genetic system controlling the regeneration frequency of the diverse types of explants.

  12. Assessment of fixed charge density in regenerated cartilage by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Shogo; Homma, Kazuhiro; Numano, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Katsuko; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Ushida, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Applying regenerated cartilage in a clinical setting requires noninvasive evaluation to detect the maturity of cartilage tissue. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage is well accepted and has been applied clinically in recent years. We attempt to establish a noninvasive method to evaluate the maturity of regenerated cartilage tissue using gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. To reconstruct cartilaginous tissue, we embedded articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine humeral head in agarose gel and cultured the cells in vitro up to 4 weeks. The fixed charge density (FCD) of the cartilage was determined using MRI gadolinium exclusion method. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content was determined by dimethylmethylene blue dye-binding assay. The sGAG content and FCD of the regenerated cartilage increased with duration of culture. In the T 1 Gd maps, the [Gd-DTPA 2- ] in the specimen decreased, and the boundary between the sample disk and the bath solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) became clearer as time in culture increased. In the linear regression analysis, FCD and sGAG content correlated significantly. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging measurements can be useful predictors of the degree of cartilaginous tissue formation. (author)

  13. Chondroma of the cricoid cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo, Giulianno Molina de

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The larynx cartilaginous tumors are uncommon and comprise 1% of all cartilaginous tumors. The chondroma is the most common benign tumor affecting the larynx cricoid cartilage (75%, and manifests normally in the male gender with dysphonia, progressive dyspnea and dysphagy in some cases. Objective: The objective of this study is to report a case of cricoid cartilage chondroma, in a patient with the symptom of a nodular lesion in the frontal cervical region of slow and progressive growth. Case Report: The treatment was the modified partial laryngectomy with resection of the lower hemisegment of the thyroid cartilage, cricoid hemicartilage and the first tracheal ring with free margins and reconstruction with a pericondrium and muscular prethyroidean piece. The anatomopathological exam showed a chondroma of 1.1 cm, of atypical low cellularity and low figures of mitosis in the frontal region of the cricoid cartilage. Conclusion: In this report we agreed with the literature for the primarily extensive surgical treatment depending on the location and the size of the cricoid chondroma; however, other modalities of treatment may be adopted in cases where the tumor extension appoints a total laryngectomy or when this is not possible to carry out, aiming at the preservation of the larynx. For the suitable treatment of cricoid chondromas, the understanding of the disease natural evolution and more case reports are still necessary.

  14. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a

  15. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on ...

  16. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis

  17. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  18. Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signy Bendiksen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of viruses in osteoarthritis remains controversial because the prevalence of viral nucleic acid sequences in peripheral blood or synovial fluid from osteoarthritis patients and that in healthy control subjects are similar. Until now the presence of virus has not been analyzed in cartilage. We screened cartilage and chondrocytes from advanced and non-/early osteoarthritis patients for parvovirus B19, herpes simplex virus-1, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, hepatitis C virus, and human endogenous retroviruses transcripts. Endogenous retroviruses transcripts, but none of the other viruses, were detected in 15 out the 17 patients. Sequencing identified the virus as HERV-WE1 and E2. HERV-W activity was confirmed by high expression levels of syncytin, dsRNA, virus budding, and the presence of virus-like particles in all advanced osteoarthritis cartilages examined. Low levels of HERV-WE1, but not E2 envelope RNA, were observed in 3 out of 8 non-/early osteoarthritis patients, while only 3 out of 7 chondrocytes cultures displayed low levels of syncytin, and just one was positive for virus-like particles. This study demonstrates for the first time activation of HERV-W in cartilage of osteoarthritis patients; however, a causative role for HERV-W in development or deterioration of the disease remains to be proven.

  19. Current perspectives in stem cell research for knee cartilage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth P

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Orth,1 Ana Rey-Rico,2 Jagadeesh K Venkatesan,2 Henning Madry,1,2 Magali Cucchiarini2 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 2Center of Experimental Orthopaedics, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg, Germany Abstract: Protocols based on the delivery of stem cells are currently applied in patients, showing encouraging results for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions (focal defects, osteoarthritis. Yet, restoration of a fully functional cartilage surface (native structural organization and mechanical functions especially in the knee joint has not been reported to date, showing the need for improved designs of clinical trials. Various sources of progenitor cells are now available, originating from adult tissues but also from embryonic or reprogrammed tissues, most of which have already been evaluated for their chondrogenic potential in culture and for their reparative properties in vivo upon implantation in relevant animal models of cartilage lesions. Nevertheless, particular attention will be needed regarding their safe clinical use and their potential to form a cartilaginous repair tissue of proper quality and functionality in the patient. Possible improvements may reside in the use of biological supplements in accordance with regulations, while some challenges remain in establishing standardized, effective procedures in the clinics. Keywords: cartilage repair, knee, focal defects, osteoarthritis, stem cells, clinical trials

  20. Study on fungous contaminants in the formation of callus starting from leaf explants of Coffea sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esther González

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The coffee is a crop of economic importance for several developing countries and the application of the biotechnology offers advantages in its propagation. Nevertheless, the microbial contamination continues being one of the problems that affects the in vitro cultuture. This paper had as objectives to identify fungal contaminants during the phase of callogenesis of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora, as well as to evaluate the effect of the RIZOBAC in the control of the same ones. Samplings to obtained callus of leaf explants were carried out, discarded by microbial contamination and they were isolated and identified fungal contaminants, considering cultural and morphological characteristic. The antagonistic effect of RIZOBAC against the strains of fungal contaminants was determined, being inoculated 100 μl of RIZOBAC in badges with medium Potato Dextrose Agar on those that suspensions of spores of the isolated strains were placed. The incubation was carried out at 28 °C for 7 days. The diameter of the colonies of the fungi was measured and the inhibition percentage was determined. The percentages of fungous contamination in the explantes oscillated between 51.2 and 73.7 %. The filamentous fungi of more appearance frequency were Fusarium and Cladosporium. The antagonistic effect of the RIZOBAC was demonstrated, obtaining between 71.5 and 43.3 % inhibition of the fungi growth, respectively, constituting a viable alternative the use of this product in order to diminish the indexes of fungous contamination in the in vitro culture. Key words: coffee, microbial contamination, fungi, RIZOBAC

  1. A comparative study of candidal invasion in rabbit tongue mucosal explants and reconstituted human oral epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilake, J A M S; Samaranayake, Y H; Samaranayake, L P

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) features of tissue invasion by three Candida species (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. dubliniensis) in two different tissue culture models: rabbit tongue mucosal explants (RTME) and reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHOE). Tongue mucosal biopsies of healthy New Zealand rabbits were maintained in explant culture using a transwell system. RHOE was obtained from Skinethic Laboratory (Nice, France). RTME and RHOE were inoculated with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. dubliniensis separately and incubated at 37 degrees C, 5% CO(2), and 100% humidity up to 48 h. Light microscopic and SEM examinations of uninfected (controls) and infected tissues were performed at 24 and 48 h. C. albicans produced characteristic hallmarks of pathological tissue invasion in both tissue models over a period of 48 h. Hyphae penetrated through epithelial cells and intercellular gaps latter resembling thigmotropism. SEM showed cavitations on the epithelial cell surfaces particularly pronounced at sites of hyphal invasion. Some hyphae on RTME showed several clusters of blastospores attached in regular arrangements resembling "appareil sporifere". C. tropicalis and C. dubliniensis produced few hyphae mainly on RTME but they did not penetrate either model. Our findings indicate that multiple host-fungal interactions such as cavitations, thigmotropism, and morphogenesis take place during candidal tissue invasion. RTME described here appears to be useful in investigations of such pathogenic processes of Candida active at the epithelial front.

  2. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  3. Long-term organ culture of adult rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamsuddin, A.K.M.; Barrett, L.A.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    Colon explants from adult rats were maintained in culture for over 3 months in our laboratories with good epithelial preservation and cellular differentiation. The light and transmission electron microscopic features of rat colon mucosa during the culture period are described. In all the explants...

  4. Stable genetic transformation of Jatropha curcas via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer using leaf explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2010-07-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel crop. A simple and reproducible protocol was developed for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of J. curcas using leaf explains. Agrobacterium strain LBA 4404 harbouring the binary vector pCAMBIA 1304 having sense-dehydration responsive element binding (S-DREB2A), beta-glucuronidase (gus), and hygromycin-phosphotransferase (hpt) genes were used for gene transfer. A number of parameters such as preculture of explains, wounding of leaf explants, Agrobacterium growth phase (OD), infection duration, co-cultivation period, co-cultivation medium pH, and acetosyringone, were studied to optimized transformation efficiency. The highest transformation efficiency was achieved using 4-day precultured, non-wounded leaf explants infected with Agrobacterium culture corresponding to OD(600)=0.6 for 20 min, followed by co-cultivation for 4 days in a co-cultivation medium containing 100 mu M acetosyringone, pH 5.7. Co-cultivated leaf explants were initially cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.27 mu M thidiazuron (TDZ) for regeneration of shoot buds, followed by selection on same medium with 5 mu g ml(-1) hygromycin. Selected shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 mu M kinetin (Kn), 4.5 mu M 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA), and 5.5 mu M alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for proliferation. The proliferated shoots were elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 mu M BA and 8.5 mu M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The elongated shoots were rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 15 mu M indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 5.7 mu M IAA, 5.5 mu M NAA, and 0.25 mg l(-1) activated charcoal. GUS histochemical analysis of the transgenic tissues further confirmed the transformation event. PCR and DNA gel blot hybridization were performed to confirm the presence of transgene. A transformation efficiency of 29% was

  5. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Bautista

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods.

  6. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  7. The Impact of Carbon Source, Explants and Growth Regulators on Callogenesis and Organogenesis of Artemisia annua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita GHASSEMI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia annua L. plant is known for its antimalarial activity. The low content of artemisinin has stimulated researchers to enhance its production through biotechnological approaches such as tissue culture. The present study was initiated to study the effect of some important factors alone and in combination, on the callogenesis and organogenesis of Artemisia annua. The type of carbon source had a significant effect on NAA efficiency to callogenesis of A. annua, whereas the best callogenesis of A. absinthium was observed at 2 mg/L BAP + 30 g/L sucrose and in the absence of NAA, with root explants. Presence of BAP also had an important effect on callogenesis, especially in high concentrations. A suitable suspension culture was obtained in the MS basal medium containing 0.5 mg/L NAA and BAP, with 30 g/L glucose. Artemisinin was naturally production was at least 0.03 mg/g (w.dt at the first day and peaked on the 16th day with 0.31 mg/g (w.dt in the cell culture of A. annua. The maximum number of shoots (2.167 ± 1.484 was induced at 0.5 mg/L BAP + 0.1 mg/L NAA + glucose (30 g/L with leaf explants. However, treatments containing glucose did not show a good shoot induction. Longer shoots were induced in the medium containing either 0.5 mg/l NAA + 0.5 mg/l BAP + sucrose with leaf explants (1.493 cm ± 0.342 or 0.5 mg/l NAA + sucrose with stem explants (0.697 cm ± 0.930. Medium containing 0.5 or 2 mg/l NAA and sucrose (without BAP induced more roots though.

  8. Functional gametes derived from explants of single blastomeres containing the “germ plasm” in Xenopus laevis: A genetic marker study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikenishi, K.

    Single blastomeres containing the “germ plasm” were isolated from 32-cell embryos of Xenopus albino (ap/ap) or wild type and cultured in vitro until the corresponding normal control embryos reached the neurula stage. The resulting explants from albinos were implanted into wild-type host neurulae and

  9. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, S; Manjunath, S; Senthilkumar, R; Rajendiran, S; Yoshioka, H; Mori, Y; Abraham, S

    2011-01-01

    The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP) is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury. Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain) and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining). The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any adverse reactions and upon confirmation of safety following completion of the

  10. A novel therapeutic strategy for cartilage diseases based on lipid nanoparticle-RNAi delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaowei Wang,1 Xiaochun Wei,1 Xiaojuan Sun,1 Chongwei Chen,1 Jingming Zhou,2 Ge Zhang,3 Heng Wu,3 Baosheng Guo,3 Lei Wei1,2 1Department of Orthopaedics, The 2nd Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 2Department of Orthopaedics, Rhode Island Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong Background: Cartilage degeneration affects millions of people but preventing its degeneration is a big challenge. Although RNA interference (RNAi has been used in human trials via silencing specific genes, the cartilage RNAi has not been possible to date because the cartilage is an avascular and very dense tissue with very low permeability. Purpose: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a novel lipid nanoparticle (LNP-siRNA delivery system that can prevent cartilage degeneration by knocking down specific genes. Methods: LNP transfection efficiency was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh has been correlated with cartilage degeneration. The in vivo effects of LNP-Ihh siRNA complexes on cartilage degeneration were evaluated in a rat model of surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA. Results: In vitro, 100% of chondrocytes were transfected with siRNA in the LNP-siRNA group. In accordance with the cell culture results, red positive signals could be detected even in the deep layer of cartilage tissue cultures treated by LNP-beacon. In vivo data showed that LNP is specific for cartilage, since positive signals were detected by fluorescence molecular tomography and confocal microscopy in joint cartilage injected with LNP-beacon, but not on the surface of the synovium. In the rat model of OA, intraarticular injection of LNP-Ihh siRNA attenuated OA progression, and PCR results showed LNP-Ihh siRNA exerted a positive impact on anabolic metabolism and negative

  11. Effects of genotype, explant type and nutrient medium components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to develop an efficient method for shoot regeneration of canola (Brassica napus L.) and to compare the regeneration capacity of different explants on MS medium with several combinations of plant growth regulators. The experiments showed that the morphogenetical potential of canola ...

  12. Efficient plant regeneration from leaf explants of Solanum americanum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... A very efficient system for direct plant regeneration from in vitro–derived leaf explants of Solanum americanum was developed. S. americanum is a tropical plant with important medical properties. The in vitro procedure that was established consists of (i) induction of shoots from leaf tissue, (ii) elongation of.

  13. Effect of explant plant source and acetosyringone concentration on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... Agrobacterium-mediated transformation offers precise integration of genes into the genome with enhanced transgene stability. There are a number of factors which influence the rate of genetic transformation. The theme of this study is to exploit the explant source and acetosyringone concentration for the ...

  14. Explant age, auxin concentrations and media type affect callus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of explant age of oil palm (Elaeis huineensis) embryo axes, 15 and 18 weeks after anthesis (WAA), media type (Eeuwens and Murashige and Skoog) supplemented with various concentrations of 2,4-D on callus production employing standard in vitro techniques were investigated. The results of the study showed ...

  15. In vitro regeneration from internodal explants of bitter melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thiru

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... 350H, Sanyo, Tokyo, Japan) at 27°C day/22°C night under 16 h light and 8 h dark photoperiod. The plants were fertilized and watered at weekly intervals. Internodal explants were excised from highly proliferating (30 day old) plants in growth chamber and rinsed thoroughly in running tap water for 2 h.

  16. callus induction and proliferation from cotyledon explants in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2013-07-19

    Jul 19, 2013 ... between the tested cytokinins and the 2,4-D in callus induction and growth index. Similar results have also been obtained in soybean (Glycine max L.) (Sairam et al., 2003). In contrast to this finding, calli were reportedly induced from cotyledon explants on MS basal medium containing 2,4-D in combination ...

  17. Adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants of the valuable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-10

    Aug 10, 2011 ... 2Department of Plant Biology and Plant Biotechnology, St. Joseph's College, Tiruchirappalli – 620 002, South India. Accepted 28 March, 2011 .... Effect of cytokinins (KN and BAP) alone or in combination with NAA on direct shoot bud regeneration from leaf explants of P. barbatus. Plant growth regulator ...

  18. [Reasons for exchange and explantation of intraocular lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhann, I; Fleischer, F; Neuhann, T

    2012-08-01

    This study was performed to analyse the reasons for explantation/exchange of intraocular lenses (IOL), which had originally been implanted for the correction of aphakia during cataract extraction. All cases with IOL explantation, which had been performed at one institution between 1/2008 and 12/2009 were analysed retrospectively. A total of 105 eyes of 100 patients were analysed. The median time interval between implantation and explantation of the IOL was 5.9 years (min. 0, max. 29.6). The most frequent cause for the intervention was subluxation/dislocation of the implant in 55.2% of cases. This group comprised 21% of cases with subluxation within the capsular bag in pseudoexfoliation syndrome. Other reasons were optical problems/incorrect IOL power (21%), calcification of hydrophilic acrylic IOL (7.6%), corneal decompensation associated with an anterior chamber lens (4.8%), and single cases with varying problems. The reasons for IOL exchange presented in this study are comparable to those of other series in the literature. Explantations due to optical problems may gain weight in the future due to a rise in refractive procedures and demands. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Effect of explant age, hormones on somatic embryogenesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... The present study examines the effect of explant age and various concentrations of kinetin and BAP on somatic embryogenesis and organogenesis in Solanum trilobatum L. MS medium fortified with 11.1 µM. BAP + 13.95 µM KN produced highest frequency of embryogenesis (97.3%) and average number ...

  20. Plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis from root explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A system for induction of callus and plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis from root explants of Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg. clone Reyan 87-6-62 was evaluated. The influence of plant growth regulators (PGRs) including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) and kinetin (KT) on ...

  1. Regeneration potential of seedling explants of chilli ( Capsicum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted with hypocotyl, cotyledon and shoot tip of chilli as explants for regeneration on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of auxins and cytokinins. Regeneration potential was determined by two ways. One is regeneration of shoot via callus formation from hypocotyls ...

  2. Use of petal explants for successful transformation of Dendranthema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 1.0 mg·L-1 6-benzylaminopurine (BA), and 0.1 mg·L-1 kinetin (SIM, shoot induction medium). Then, the explants were transformed by co-cultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA-4404 harboring a binary vector pCAMBIA 2301 carrying the reporter gene β-glucuronidase (GUS), and the marker gene neomycin ...

  3. In Vivo Tibial Cartilage Strains in Regions of Cartilage-to-Cartilage Contact and Cartilage-to-Meniscus Contact in Response to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Lad, Nimit K; Collins, Amber T; Ganapathy, Pramodh K; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; McNulty, Amy L; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, Claude T; Sutter, E Grant; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2017-10-01

    There are currently limited human in vivo data characterizing the role of the meniscus in load distribution within the tibiofemoral joint. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the strains experienced in regions of articular cartilage covered by the meniscus to regions of cartilage not covered by the meniscus. It was hypothesized that in response to walking, tibial cartilage covered by the meniscus would experience lower strains than uncovered tibial cartilage. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knees of 8 healthy volunteers was performed before and after walking on a treadmill. Using MRI-generated 3-dimensional models of the tibia, cartilage, and menisci, cartilage thickness was measured in 4 different regions based on meniscal coverage and compartment: covered medial, uncovered medial, covered lateral, and uncovered lateral. Strain was defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity. Within each compartment, covered cartilage before activity was significantly thinner than uncovered cartilage before activity ( P meniscus experiences lower strains than uncovered cartilage in the medial compartment. These findings provide important baseline information on the relationship between in vivo tibial compressive strain responses and meniscal coverage, which is critical to understanding normal meniscal function.

  4. An Axisymmetric Boundary Element Model for Determination of Articular Cartilage Pericellular Matrix Properties In situ via Inverse Analysis of Chondron Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Guilak, Farshid; Haider, Mansoor A.

    2013-01-01

    The pericellular matrix (PCM) is the narrow tissue region surrounding all chondrocytes in articular cartilage and, together, the chondrocyte(s) and surrounding PCM have been termed the chondron. Previous theoretical and experimental studies suggest that the structure and properties of the PCM significantly influence the biomechanical environment at the microscopic scale of the chondrocytes within cartilage. In the present study, an axisymmetric boundary element method (BEM) was developed for linear elastic domains with internal interfaces. The new BEM was employed in a multiscale continuum model to determine linear elastic properties of the PCM in situ, via inverse analysis of previously reported experimental data for the three-dimensional morphological changes of chondrons within a cartilage explant in equilibrium unconfined compression (Choi et al., J Biomech, 40:2596–603, 2007). The microscale geometry of the chondron (cell and PCM) within the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) was represented as a three-zone equilibrated biphasic region comprised of an ellipsoidal chondrocyte with encapsulating PCM that was embedded within a spherical ECM subjected to boundary conditions for unconfined compression at its outer boundary. Accuracy of the three-zone BEM model was evaluated and compared to analytical finite element solutions. The model was then integrated with a nonlinear optimization technique (Nelder-Mead) to determine PCM elastic properties within the cartilage explant by solving an inverse problem associated with the in situ experimental data for chondron deformation. Depending on the assumed material properties of the ECM and the choice of cost function in the optimization, estimates of the PCM Young’s modulus ranged from ~24 to 59 kPa, consistent with previous measurements of PCM properties on extracted chondrons using micropipette aspiration. Taken together with previous experimental and theoretical studies of cell-matrix interactions in cartilage

  5. The effect of adipose-derived stem cells on the increased survival of crushed cartilage graft in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ebadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years the use of diced cartilage grafts in reconstructive surgery particulary rhinoplasty have been considered by most plastic surgeons. However, long-term resorption usually occurs. Stem cells are a powerful tool for reconstructive surgery to rebuild and maintain tissue with reduced complications. Since the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs can rebuild a wide variety of tissues such as skin, fat, bone and cartilage are used, this is a very good chance for cosmetic surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of adipose-derived stem cells on the viability of diced cartilage grafts. Methods: This interventional study was performed on May 2014 in animal laboratory of Hazrat Fatima Hospital on 10 New Zealand white male rabbits, weighing 2000-2500 grams, approximately 12 to 16 weeks of age. Stem cells was harvested from inguinal adipose tissue of each rabbits. After completely removing the skin and perichondrium, cartilage became divided into two equal pieces using a scalpel. Then place the ear amputation was restored by nylon 4 zero. After weighing cartilages, on either side of the center line on the back of each rabbits, left and right, subcutaneous pocket created equal weight and each piece of cartilage was placed in an envelope. Stem cells were injected in one side and the other side was control. The cartilage weights were recorded both before implantation and after explantation. Evaluation of living chondrocytes was conducted 12 weeks after implantation. Results: The mean difference of cartilage weights was varied between two groups (intervention and control sides, So that the average was significantly higher in stem cell side than that in the control side (P= 0.021. The average number of live chondrocytes was significantly higher in the intervention side than the control side (P< 0.001. Conclusion: Despite the unclear mechanism, these results suggest that adipose-derived stem cells can maintain the

  6. The callugenic effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) on leaf explants of Sabah snake grass (Clinacanthus nutans)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phua, Q.; Chin, C.; Asri, Z. R.; Lam, D. U.

    2016-01-01

    Clinacanthus nutans (Burm. f.) Lindau is a medicinal plant that is widely used in traditional treatments for skin inflammation, skin lesions, viral infection and snake bites. This study investigates the effects of different concentrations of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on the induction of callus from Clinacanthus nutans leaves. Young and mature leaves of Clinacanthus nutans were placed on MS media supplemented with ten concentrations of 2,4-D (0 to 10mg/L). The percentage of callus formation, callus fresh weight and callus morphology were recorded followed by histological analysis on callus from young leaves and mature leaves. The highest mean of fresh weight of callus was obtained from young leaf explants in MS media supplemented with 0.5 mg/L 2,4-D whereas the highest mean of callus fresh weight from mature leaf explants was achieved in MS media supplemented with 0.25 mg/L 2,4-D. Histological analysis indicated potential formation of somatic embryos from callus of young leaf explants. This study reports the potential of callus from young leaf explants of Clinacanthus nutans forming somatic embryos and mature leaf explants producing friable callus for the establishment of cell suspension cultures in future bioactive compounds studies. (author)

  7. A Novel Model for the Mass Transfer of Articular Cartilage: Rolling Depression Load Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Zhang, Chunqiu; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Baoshan; Li, Jiang; Gao, Lilan

    The mass transfer is one of important aspects to maintain the physiological activity proper of tissue, specially, cartilage cannot run without mechanical environment. The mechanical condition drives nutrition in and waste out in the cartilage tissue, the change of this process plays a key role for biological activity. Researchers used to adopt compression to study the mass transfer in cartilage, here we firstly establish a new rolling depression load (RDL) device, and also put this device into practice. The device divided into rolling control system and the compression adjusting mechanism. The rolling control system makes sure the pure rolling and uniform speed of roller applying towards cultured tissue. The compression adjusting mechanism can realize different compressive magnitudes and uniform compression. Preliminary test showed that rolling depression load indeed enhances the process of mass transfer articular cartilage.

  8. Human sclera maintains common characteristics with cartilage throughout evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sclera maintains and protects the eye ball, which receives visual inputs. Although the sclera does not contribute significantly to visual perception, scleral diseases such as refractory scleritis, scleral perforation and pathological myopia are considered incurable or difficult to cure. The aim of this study is to identify characteristics of the human sclera as one of the connective tissues derived from the neural crest and mesoderm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated microarray data of cultured human infant scleral cells. Hierarchical clustering was performed to group scleral cells and other mesenchymal cells into subcategories. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed similarity between scleral cells and auricular cartilage-derived cells. Cultured micromasses of scleral cells exposed to TGF-betas and BMP2 produced an abundant matrix. The expression of cartilage-associated genes, such as Indian hedge hog, type X collagen, and MMP13, was up-regulated within 3 weeks in vitro. These results suggest that human 'sclera'-derived cells can be considered chondrocytes when cultured ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study shows a chondrogenic potential of human sclera. Interestingly, the sclera of certain vertebrates, such as birds and fish, is composed of hyaline cartilage. Although the human sclera is not a cartilaginous tissue, the human sclera maintains chondrogenic potential throughout evolution. In addition, our findings directly explain an enigma that the sclera and the joint cartilage are common targets of inflammatory cells in rheumatic arthritis. The present global gene expression database will contribute to the clarification of the pathogenesis of developmental diseases such as high myopia.

  9. Study on Effect of Type of Explant and Hormone on Callus Induction and Regeneration in Saffron (Crocus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sajjadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Saffron (Crocus sativus L. is one of the medicinal plants that contain active components and medicinal materials. Tissue culture of saffron can improve the quality and quantity of the saffron product, increase its export and the farmers’ income. In this study, 36 different types of hormone combinations in the dark and 9 different treatments of hormone combinations in cold (4°C, using different saffron explants (bulb, leaf, scales around leaf and distal parts of the leaf were studied in tissue culture. To investigate the growth of corms, the callus formation and the regeneration rate, three replications for each treatment were used and the length of shoot (cm, the callus formation percentage and the regeneration percentage were measured and statistical analysis was performed. Among the types of explants, only explants from bulbs produced the callus on MS medium containing 2 mg.l-1 BAP and 1 mg.l-1 IBA in both the dark and cold conditions. The highest percentage of regeneration was obtained in MS medium with hormonal composition of 0.3 mg.l-1 TDZ, 1 mg.l-1 BAP, 2 mg.l-1 IBA and 0.01 mg.l-1 GA3 in the cold conditions.

  10. Effect of 2,4-D, explants type and cultivar on the callogenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally, there were no significant differences in callogenesis of the different explants at the three different 2,4-D concentrations (p < 0.05) producing 75% callus for explants. The stem petiole or stem bark produced the least percentage of callus per cultivar at all the auxin concentrations. However, the leaf explants were ...

  11. Regional Differential Genetic Response of Human Articular Cartilage to Impact Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Lauren L; Vance, Danica D; Wang, Liyong; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Huang, C-Y Charles; Kaplan, Lee D

    2016-04-01

    Normal physiological movement creates different weightbearing zones within a human knee: the medial condyle bearing the highest and the trochlea bearing the lowest weight. Adaptation to different physiological loading conditions results in different tissue and cellular properties within a knee. The objective of this study was to use microarray analysis to examine gene expression differences among three anatomical regions of human knee articular cartilage at baseline and following induction of an acute impact injury. Cartilage explants were harvested from 7 cadaveric knees (12 plugs per knee). A drop tower was utilized to introduce injury. Plugs were examined 24 hours after impact for gene expression using microarray. The primary analysis is the comparison of baseline versus impacted samples within each region separately. In addition, pairwise comparisons among the three regions were performed at baseline and after impact. False discovery rate (FDR) was used to evaluate significance of differential gene expression. In the comparison of before and after injury, the trochlear had 130 differentially expressed genes (FDR ≤ 0.05) while the condyles had none. In the comparison among regions, smaller sets of differentially expressed genes (n ≤ 21) were found, with trochlea being more different than the condyles. Most of more frequently expressed genes in trochlea are developmental genes. Within the experimental setup of this study, only the trochlea was displaying an acute genetic response on injury. Our data demonstrated the regional-specific response to injury in human articular cartilage.

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal/stem Cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles Promote Human Cartilage RegenerationIn Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Lucienne A; van Dooremalen, Sanne F J; Liv, Nalan; Klumperman, Judith; Coffer, Paul J; Saris, Daniël B F; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a rheumatic disease leading to chronic pain and disability with no effective treatment available. Recently, allogeneic human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) entered clinical trials as a novel therapy for OA. Increasing evidence suggests that therapeutic efficacy of MSC depends on paracrine signalling. Here we investigated the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by human bone marrow derived MSC (BMMSC) in human OA cartilage repair. To test the effect of BMMSC-EVs on OA cartilage inflammation, TNF-alpha-stimulated OA chondrocyte monolayer cultures were treated with BMMSC-EVs and pro-inflammatory gene expression was measured by qRT-PCR after 48 h. To assess the impact of BMMSC-EVs on cartilage regeneration, BMMSC-EVs were added to the regeneration cultures of human OA chondrocytes, which were analyzed after 4 weeks for glycosaminoglycan content by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay. Furthermore, paraffin sections of the regenerated tissue were stained for proteoglycans (safranin-O) and type II collagen (immunostaining). We show that BMMSC-EVs inhibit the adverse effects of inflammatory mediators on cartilage homeostasis. When co-cultured with OA chondrocytes, BMMSC-EVs abrogated the TNF-alpha-mediated upregulation of COX2 and pro-inflammatory interleukins and inhibited TNF-alpha-induced collagenase activity. BMMSC-EVs also promoted cartilage regeneration in vitro . Addition of BMMSC-EVs to cultures of chondrocytes isolated from OA patients stimulated production of proteoglycans and type II collagen by these cells. Our data demonstrate that BMMSC-EVs can be important mediators of cartilage repair and hold great promise as a novel therapeutic for cartilage regeneration and osteoarthritis.

  13. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Chinedu C; Sulaiman, Shamsul B; Min-Hwei, Ng; Hui-Cheng, Chen; Ahmad, Johan; Yahaya, Norhamdan M; Saim, Aminuddin B; Idrus, Ruszymah B H

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC), multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7) autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008). Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan) compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013). Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001). Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26) in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  14. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinedu C Ude

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC, multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. METHODS: Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7 autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. RESULTS: The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008. Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013. Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001. Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26 in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. CONCLUSION: Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  15. Role of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium in Auricular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Engineered Cartilage Formation in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine the effects of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium (ITS on proliferation of auricular chondrocytes and formation of engineered cartilage in vitro. Pig auricular monolayer chondrocytes and chondrocyte pellets were cultured in media containing 1% ITS at different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 10%, 6%, 2%, 0%, or 10% FBS alone as a control for four weeks. Parameters including cell proliferation in monolayer, wet weight, collagen type I/II/X (Col I, II, X and glycosaminoglycan (GAG expression, GAG content of pellets and gene expression associated with cartilage formation/dedifferentiation (lost cartilage phenotype/hypertrophy within the chondrocyte pellets were assessed. The results showed that chondrocytes proliferation rates increased when FBS concentrations increased (2%, 6%, 10% FBS in ITS supplemented groups. In addition, 1% ITS plus 10% FBS significantly promoted cell proliferation than 10% FBS alone. No chondrocytes grew in ITS alone medium. 1% ITS plus 10% FBS enhanced cartilage formation in terms of size, wet weight, cartilage specific matrices, and homogeneity, compared to 10% FBS alone group. Furthermore, ITS prevented engineered cartilage from dedifferentiation (i.e., higher index of Col II/Col I mRNA expression and expression of aggrecan and hypertrophy (i.e., lower mRNA expression of Col X and MMP13. In conclusion, our results indicated that ITS efficiently enhanced auricular chondrocytes proliferation, retained chondrogenic phenotypes, and promoted engineered cartilage formation when combined with FBS, which is potentially used as key supplementation in auricular chondrocytes and engineered cartilage culture.

  16. Validation of a diffusion chamber as in vitro system for the analysis of compound diffusibility through cartilage tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiselmeier, Alexander; Ulmer, Wolfgang; Stöve, Johannes; Wieland, Heike A; Gerwin, Nicole; Bartnik, Eckart; Schudok, Manfred; Heute, Steffen; Breitenfelder, Michael; Scharf, Hanns-Peter; Schwarz, Markus L R

    2005-08-01

    The validation of a diffusion chamber comprising a donor and a receptor side separated by a cartilage membrane was undertaken according to the basic principles described by Peng et al. (1998). The study had three targets: first to evaluate the chamber as in vitro system by the examination of the diffusibility of compound through bovine cartilage samples; second the analysis of the affinity of compound (RS-130830) to cartilage; third to test the influence of two pre-incubation periods (one or three nights) of the cartilage samples. The validation of the chamber as in vitro system for the analysis of compound diffusibility and affinity to cartilage was performed using membrane slices of fresh bovine cartilage and a hydroxamic acid derivative (RS-130830) known as matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI). The influence of the pre-incubation of cartilage was also examined. Compound concentrations in donor, receptor and membrane were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Diffusion could be demonstrated after 6 h and finally 24 h incubation: the compound concentration in the receptor increased from 0 to 35 microM (mean) while it decreased in the donor from 200 to 144 microM (mean). We also found compound in the cartilage membrane (approximately 1.2 nmol (mean)). Pre-incubation of cartilage samples in culture buffer is suitable as a storage procedure, since the results on the donor side only were influenced significantly but not for the receptor and the cartilage affinity. Thus, the system could clearly reflect relevant properties of the tested compound with regard to its diffusibility and affinity to cartilage tissue.

  17. Cartilage-Specific and Cre-Dependent Nkx3.2 Overexpression In Vivo Causes Skeletal Dwarfism by Delaying Cartilage Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da-Un; Choi, Je-Yong; Kim, Dae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Nkx3.2, the vertebrate homologue of Drosophila bagpipe, has been implicated as playing a role in chondrogenic differentiation. In brief, Nkx3.2 is initially expressed in chondrocyte precursor cells and later during cartilage maturation, its expression is diminished in hypertrophic chondrocytes. In addition to Nkx3.2 expression analyses, previous studies using ex vivo chick embryo cultures and in vitro cell cultures have suggested that Nkx3.2 can suppress chondrocyte hypertrophy. However, it has never been demonstrated that Nkx3.2 functions in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development in vivo. Here, we show that cartilage-specific and Cre-dependent Nkx3.2 overexpression in mice results in significant postnatal dwarfism in endochondral skeletons, while intramembranous bones remain unaltered. Further, we observed significant delays in cartilage hypertrophy in conditional transgenic ciTg-Nkx3.2 mice. Together, these findings confirm that Nkx3.2 is capable of controlling hypertrophic maturation of cartilage in vivo, and this regulation plays a significant role in endochondral ossification and longitudinal bone growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 78-90, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cartilage Turnover Reflected by Metabolic Processing of Type II Collagen: A Novel Marker of Anabolic Function in Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasja Stæhr Gudmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP. This is expected to originate primarily from remodeling of hyaline cartilage. A mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab was raised in mouse, targeting specifically PIIBNP (QDVRQPG and used in development of the assay. The specificity, sensitivity, 4-parameter fit and stability of the assay were tested. Levels of PIIBNP were quantified in human serum (0.6–2.2 nM, human amniotic fluid (163–188 nM and sera from different animal species, e.g., fetal bovine serum (851–901 nM with general good linearity (100% (SD 7.6 recovery and good intra- and inter-assay variation (CV% < 10. Dose (0.1 to 100 ng/mL and time (7, 14 and 21 days dependent release of PIIBNP were evaluated in the conditioned medium from bovine cartilage explants (BEX and human cartilage explants (HEX upon stimulation with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and fibroblastic growth factor-2 (FGF-2. TGF-β1 and IGF-1 in concentrations of 10–100 ng/mL significantly (p < 0.05 induced release of PIIBNP in BEX compared to conditions without treatment (WO. In HEX, IGF-1 100 ng/mL was able to induce a significant increase of PIIBNP after one week compared to WO. FGF-2 did not induce a PIIBNP release in our models. To our knowledge this is the first assay, which is able to specifically evaluate PIIBNP excretion. The Pro-C2 assay seems to provide a promising and novel marker of type II collagen formation.

  19. Increased proliferation of explanted vascular smooth muscle cells: a marker presaging atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, P M; Schneider, D J; Baldor, L C; Russell, J C; Sobel, B E

    1997-06-01

    The JCR:LA-cp homozygous cp/cp corpulent rat is genetically predisposed to develop atherosclerosis evident after 9 and 18 months of age in males and females and to manifest metabolic derangements resembling those seen in type II diabetes in humans (hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia). The present study was undertaken to determine whether vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) explanted from vessels destined to become atherosclerotic later in life exhibit intrinsic properties ex vivo that presage atherogenesis to provide a means for evaluating promptly intervention designed to modify it. SMCs were cultured from aortic explants of JCR:LA-cp corpulent (cp/cp) and lean control (+/+) rats of 4, 5, 6, and 9 months of age. Compared with SMCs from controls, SMCs from cp/cp rats exhibited increased proliferation, higher saturation density, increased augmentation of proliferation in response to selected mitogens and greater adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. The increased proliferative activity ex vivo anteceded by several months the development of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Thus, it is a promising marker in assessments of the efficacy of interventions designed to retard or prevent atherosclerosis.

  20. Automated Image Analysis of Lung Branching Morphogenesis from Microscopic Images of Fetal Rat Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L. Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regulating mechanisms of branching morphogenesis of fetal lung rat explants have been an essential tool for molecular research. This work presents a new methodology to accurately quantify the epithelial, outer contour, and peripheral airway buds of lung explants during cellular development from microscopic images. Methods. The outer contour was defined using an adaptive and multiscale threshold algorithm whose level was automatically calculated based on an entropy maximization criterion. The inner lung epithelium was defined by a clustering procedure that groups small image regions according to the minimum description length principle and local statistical properties. Finally, the number of peripheral buds was counted as the skeleton branched ends from a skeletonized image of the lung inner epithelia. Results. The time for lung branching morphometric analysis was reduced in 98% in contrast to the manual method. Best results were obtained in the first two days of cellular development, with lesser standard deviations. Nonsignificant differences were found between the automatic and manual results in all culture days. Conclusions. The proposed method introduces a series of advantages related to its intuitive use and accuracy, making the technique suitable to images with different lighting characteristics and allowing a reliable comparison between different researchers.

  1. Predicting knee cartilage loss using adaptive partitioning of cartilage thickness maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter; Dam, Erik Bjørnager; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether measures of knee cartilage thickness can predict future loss of knee cartilage. A slow and a rapid progressor group was determined using longitudinal data, and anatomically aligned cartilage thickness maps were extracted from MRI at baseline. A novel machine learning...

  2. Advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-cheng LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a kind of terminally differentiated tissue devoid of vessel or nerve, and it is difficult to repair by itself after damage. Many studies for the treatment of cartilage injuries were performed in recent years aiming at repair of the structure and restoration of its function for injured joint. This article reviews the traditional methods of treatment for cartilage injuries, such as joint lavage with the aid of arthroscope, abrasion chondroplasty, laser abrasion and chondroplasty, and drilling of the subchondral bone-marrow space. The research advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries with tissue engineering were summarized.

  3. Mechanobiological implications of articular cartilage crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Alyssa K; McCutchen, Carley N; June, Ronald K

    2017-03-01

    Calcium crystals exist in both pathological and normal articular cartilage. The prevalence of these crystals dramatically increases with age, and crystals are typically found in osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial fluid. Relatively few studies have examined the effects of crystals on cartilage biomechanics or chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The purpose of this review is to describe how crystals could influence cartilage biomechanics and mechanotransduction in osteoarthritis. Crystals are found in both loaded and unloaded regions of articular cartilage. Exogenous crystals, in combination with joint motion, result in substantial joint inflammation. Articular cartilage vesicles promote crystal formation, and these vesicles are found near the periphery of chondrocytes. Crystallographic studies report monoclinic symmetry for synthetic crystals, suggesting that crystals will have a large stiffness compared with the cartilage extracellular matrix, the pericellular matrix, or the chondrocyte. This stiffness imbalance may cause crystal-induced dysregulation of chondrocyte mechanotransduction promoting both aging and osteoarthritis chondrocyte phenotypes. Because of their high stiffness compared with cartilage matrix, crystals likely alter chondrocyte mechanotransduction, and high concentrations of crystals within cartilage may alter macroscale biomechanics. Future studies should focus on understanding the mechanical properties of joint crystals and developing methods to understand how crystals affect chondrocyte mechanotransduction.

  4. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy......-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The IOLs were explanted in the centers of the research group from 2006 to 2012. The primary procedure was phacoemulsification in all cases. Results The study evaluated 40 IOLs. The main causes for explantation were IOL dislocation, refractive error, and IOL opacification. Those...

  5. In vivo construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using adipose-derived stem cells and bioreactor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjun; Lu, Shibi; Peng, Jiang; Yang, Qiang; Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Sui, Xiang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Aiyuan; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi; Song, Qing

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate the feasibility of tissue-engineered cartilage constructed in vivo and in vitro by dynamically culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) with an articular cartilage acellular matrix in a bioreactor and subsequently implanting the cartilage in nude mice. ADSCs were proliferated, combined with three dimensional scaffolds (cell density: 5 × 10(7)/mL) and subsequently placed in a bioreactor and culture plate for 3 weeks. In the in vivo study, complexes cultured for 1 week under dynamic or static states were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice and collected after 3 weeks. Indicators such as gross morphology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were examined. In the in vitro study, histological observation showed that most scaffolds in the dynamic group were absorbed, and cell proliferation and matrix secretion were significant. Positive staining of safranin-O and alcian blue II collagen stain in the dynamic group was significantly stronger than that in the static culture group. In the in vivo study, cartilage-like tissues formed in the specimens of the two groups. Histological examination showed that cell distribution in the dynamic group was relatively more uniform than in the static group, and matrix secretion was relatively stronger. Bioreactor culturing can promote ADSC proliferation and cartilage differentiation and is thus a suitable method for constructing tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  6. Reinforcement of articular cartilage with a tissue-interpenetrating polymer network reduces friction and modulates interstitial fluid load support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B G; Lawson, T B; Snyder, B D; Grinstaff, M W

    2017-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased articular cartilage hydraulic permeability and decreased maintenance of high interstitial fluid load support (IFLS) during articulation, resulting in increased friction on the cartilage solid matrix. This study assesses frictional response following in situ synthesis of an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) designed to mimic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) depleted during OA. Cylindrical osteochondral explants containing various interpenetrating polymer concentrations were subjected to a torsional friction test under unconfined creep compression. Time-varying coefficient of friction, compressive engineering strain, and normalized strain values (ε/ε eq ) were calculated and analyzed. The polymer network reduced friction coefficient over the duration of the friction test, with statistically significantly reduced friction coefficients (95% confidence interval 14-34% reduced) at equilibrium compressive strain upon completion of the test (P = 0.015). A positive trend was observed relating polymer network concentration with magnitude of friction reduction compared to non-treated tissue. The cartilage-interpenetrating polymer treatment improves lubrication by augmenting the biphasic tissue's interstitial fluid phase, and additionally improves the friction dissipation of the tissue's solid matrix. This technique demonstrates potential as a therapy to augment tribological function of articular cartilage. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of carbon ion beam irradiation on the shoot regeneration from in vitro axillary bud explants of the Impatiens hawkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Libin; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Li, Ping; Dong, Xicun; Qu, Ying; Ma, Shuang; Li, Qiang

    Accelerated ion beams is an excellent mutagen in plant breeding which can induce higher mutation frequencies and wider mutation spectrum than those of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiations, such as X-rays (Okamura et al. 2003, Yamaguchi et al. 2003). Mutation breeding operation of two Saintpaulia ionahta cultivars using the method combining plant tissue culture technique and carbon ion beam irradiations were set out at Institute of Modern Physics from 2005 (Zhou et al. 2006). The effects of 960 MeV carbon ion beam and 8 MeV X-ray irradiations on regenerated shoots of Impatiens hawkeri from another kind of explants named in vitro axillary buds explants were studied recently. The biology endpoints in this study included relative number of roots (RNR), relative length of roots (RLR), relative height of shoots (RHS), relative number of nodes (RNN), survival fraction (SF) and morphology changes in the regenerated shoots. The experimental results showed that carbon ion beams inhibited the root and stem developments of axillary bud explants more severely than X-rays did. And the 50% lethal dose (LD50 ) is about 23.3 Gy for the carbon ion beam and 49.1 Gy for the X-rays, respectively. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of Impatiens hawkeri with respect to X-rays according to 50% SF was about two. Secondly, the percentage of shoots regenerated with malformed shoots including curliness, carnification, nicks in all Impatiens hawkeri axillary bud explants irradiated with carbon ion beam at 20 Gy accounted for 55.6%, while the highest number for the 40 Gy X-ray irradiation was 40%. Last, many regenerated shoots whose vascular bundle fused together were obtained only from explants irradiated with carbon ion beams. Based on the results above, it can be concluded that the effect of mutation induction by carbon ion beam irradiation on the axillary explants of Impatiens hawkeri is better than that by X-ray irradiation; and the optimal mutagenic dose varies from 20 Gy

  8. Laboratory analyses of two explanted hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two three-piece hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs were explanted from two patients at 7 and 9 years, respectively, after implantation, because of poor fundus visualisation and/or a clinically significant decrease in visual acuity related to their opacified IOLs. In addition to light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used for the first time to observe the explanted IOLs. The clinical aspect seemed to correspond to the phenomenon of surface light scattering, while laboratory analyses showed dense glistenings in the central layer of the IOL optic, which had no change next to the surface. Further studies on these phenomena are needed.

  9. Making post-mortem implantable cardioverter defibrillator explantation safe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räder, Sune B E W; Zeijlemaker, Volkert; Pehrson, Steen

    2009-01-01

    : We investigated the insulating properties of rubber and plastic gloves (double layer) within the first 60 min exposure (mimicking the maximum time of an explantation procedure) to saline (simulating the effects of body fluids on the gloves). For latex gloves, we measured an increase in voltage up...... to 68.1 V (P double pair of intact gloves made of latex, neoprene, or plastic constituted such a large resistance...... that the resting voltage over the operating person would not exceed 50 V. CONCLUSION: The use of intact medical gloves made of latex, neoprene, or plastic eliminates the potential electrical risk during explantation of an ICD. Two gloves on each hand offer sufficient protection. We will recommend the use...

  10. An efficient plant regeneration protocol from petiole explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest percentage of shoot buds induction (64.0%) was observed on MS medium supplemented with 0.52 mgL-1 TDZ with organic additives; adenine sulphate (50 mgL-1) + glutamine (100 mgL-1) + L-arginine (25 mgL-1) + citric acid (0.0025%) + ascorbic acid (0.005%). A maximum of six shoots per explant were ...

  11. In vitro regeneration from internodal explants of bitter melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adventitious shoots were produced from organogenic callus when it was transferred to MS medium supplemented with 4.0 μM TDZ, 1.5 μM 2,4-D and 0.07 mM L-glutamine with shoot induction frequency of 96.5% and regeneration of adventitious shoots from callus (48 shoots per explant). Shoot proliferation occurred when ...

  12. Shoot Regeneration from Leaf Explants of Withania somnifera (L. Dunal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Girish JOSHI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration from leaf explants of Withania somnifera (L. for mass propagation was studied on Murashige and Skoog�s medium supplemented with Kinetin (Kn and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP alone or in combination. Shoot buds were induced from the midrib on the abaxial side in presence of Kn and BAP (4 �M. These shoot buds developed into shoots on the same medium. Rooting of these shoots was achieved in 0.5 �M of IBA.

  13. Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene hernia mesh: Patient factor correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah E; Cozad, Matthew J; Grant, David A; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Grant, Sheila A

    2016-02-01

    This study quantitatively assessed polypropylene (PP) hernia mesh degradation and its correlation with patient factors including body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status with the goal of improving hernia repair outcomes through patient-matched mesh. Thirty PP hernia mesh explants were subjected to a tissue removal process followed by assessment of their in vivo degradation using Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis analyses. Results were then analyzed with respect to patient factors (body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status) to determine their influence on in vivo hernia mesh oxidation and degradation. Twenty of the explants show significant surface oxidation. Tobacco use exhibits a positive correlation with modulated differential scanning calorimetry melt temperature and exhibits significantly lower TGA decomposition temperatures than non-/past users. Chemical and thermal characterization of the explanted meshes indicate measurable degradation while in vivo regardless of the patient population; however, tobacco use is correlated with less oxidation and degradation of the polymeric mesh possibly due to a reduced inflammatory response. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Acute mastoiditis in children with cochlear implants: is explantation required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Faisal; Cardona, Isabel; Akinpelu, Olubunmi V; Daniel, Sam J

    2014-09-01

    Acute mastoiditis is an uncommon but challenging condition when it occurs in children with cochlear implant. The literature is scarce as to the management of this condition with regards to explantation. The objective of the study is to determine the need for explantation in patients with cochlear implants who suffer from acute mastoiditis. Online medical databases-PubMed, Ovid Medline, Ovid Medline in process, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Biosis, Google Scholar, and Scopus. A systematic review of all publications addressing the treatment of mastoiditis in cochlear implant children prior to November 2013 was conducted. Data were collected from online medical databases-PubMed, Ovid Medline, Ovid Medline in process, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Biosis, Google Scholar, and Scopus. The review was performed in 3 phases; an initial screening review of abstracts was performed, followed by a detailed review of full articles based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, and lastly a final review to extract data from selected articles. Twelve articles were found eligible for this systematic review including a total of 43 patients. Subperiosteal abscess was present in 14.3%. All patients received intravenous antibiotics as an initial treatment, and if needed, surgical intervention was performed. Only 1 patient required explantation (2.3%). Prompt, aggressive medical and if needed surgical therapy can help in saving the implant and result in a favorable outcome. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  15. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals.

  16. ORGANOGÊNESE IN VITRO DE Citrus EM FUNÇÃO DE CONCENTRAÇÕES DE BAP E SECCIONAMENTO DO EXPLANTE CITRUS IN VITRO ORGANOGENESIS RELATED TO BAP CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPLANT SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THAÍS LACAVA DE MOURA

    2001-08-01

    'Valencia' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck. For Rangpur lime, internodal explants were cultured in MT medium, with 25g.L-1 sucrose and supplemented with different concentrations of BAP (0; 2.5; 5; 7.5; 10 mg.L-1. Epicotyl explants were used for 'Pera' and 'Valencia' sweet oranges. For 'Pera' sweet orange, the explants were cultured in MT medium, with 25g.L-1 sucrose and supplemented with different concentrations of BAP (0; 1; 2; 3; 4 mg.L-1. For 'Valencia' sweet orange, the epicotyl explants were cut in half and cultured on MT medium, with 25 g.L-1 of sucrose and 1 mg.L-1 of BAP. Shoot elongation was accomplished on MT + 25 g.L-1 sucrose + 1 mg.L-1 gibberelic acid (GA3 and rooted on MT + 25 g.L-1 of sucrose + 0,5 g.L-1 of activated charcoal + 1 mg.L-1 NAA. The best results for number of buds was 2.5 mg.L-1 of BAP in Rangpur lime and 1 and 2 mg.L-1 in 'Pera' sweet orange. The cut of the explant in half was favorable to the in vitro organogenesis in 'Valencia' sweet orange, but it was not for rooting.

  17. Flower-bud formation in explants of photoperiodic and day-neutral Nicotiana biotypes and its bearing on the regulation of flower formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeevan, M.S.; Lang, A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1993-05-15

    The capacity to form flower buds in thin-layer explants was studied in Nicotiana of several species, cultivars, and lines of differing in their response to photoperiod. This capacity was found in all biotypes examined and could extend into sepals and corolla. It varied depending on genotype, source tissue and its developmental state, and composition of the culture medium, particularly the levels of glucose, auxin, and cytokinin. It was greatest in the two day-neutral plants examined, Samsun tobacco and Nicotiana rustica, where it extended from the inflorescence region down the vegetative stem, in a basipetally decreasing gradient; it was least in the two qualitative photoperiodic plants studied, the long-day plant Nicotiana silvestris and the short-day plant Maryland Mammoth tobacco, the quantitative long-day plant Nicotiana alata and the quantitative short-day plant Nicotiana otophora line 38-G-81, where it was limited to the pedicels (and, in some cases, the sepals). Regardless of the photoperiodic response of the source plants, the response was the same in explants cultured under long and short days. The capacity to form flow buds in explants is present in all Nicotiana biotypes studied supports the idea that it is regulated by the same mechanism(s), regardless of the plant's photoperiodic character. However, flower formation in the explants is not identical with de novo flower formation in a hitherto vegetative plant: it is rather the expression of a floral state already established in the plant, although it can vary widely in extent and spatial distribution. Culture conditions that permit flower-bud formation in an explant are conditions that maintain the floral state and encourage its expression; conditions under which no flower buds are formed reduce this state and/or prevent its expression. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. The effect of auxin 2,4-D and cytokinin 2-ip on direct somatic embryogenesis formation of Coffea arabica L. leaf explant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Arimarsetiowati

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the propagation technique for coffee plant production is tissue culture. Tissue culture technique for Coffea arabica L. faces some problems, mainly in the planlet formation regenerated from explants. The objective of this experiment was to examine the effect 2,4-D and 2-ip combination on the formation of direct somatic embryogenesis of Coffea arabica L. in leaves explant. Auxin (2,4-D and cytokinin (2-ip concentrations of, respectively, 1; 5 µM and 5; 10; 15; 20 were used as treatments. This research was conducted using completely randomized design with 10 replications. Observation to induce somatic embryos was done by quantitatively on number of callus from explant and number of embryogenic callus. Beside that, observation by qualitative descriptive was also done on deve lopment of embryogenesis. The results showed that Arabica coffee leaves explant of AS 2K clones could be induced in all medium combination except 5µM 2,4-D and 20µM 2-ip combination. Arabica coffee leaves explant of S 795, Sigararutang and AS 1 varieties could be induced in all medium combination. The highest frequency of callus formation was found in AS 2K, Sigararutang and AS 1 varieties on medium containing 1µM 2,4-D in combination with 10µM 2-ip, whereas for the S 795 variety on medium containing 5µM 2,4-D in combination with 10µM 2-ip. The highest frequency of embriogenic callus in all Arabica coffee variety could be reached on medium containing 5µM 2,4-D in combination with 15µM 2-ip. Key words : Coffea arabica L., somatic embryogenesis, 2,4-D, 2-ip, tissue culture, leaves, callus embryogenic.

  19. Intestinal surfactant permeation enhancers and their interaction with enterocyte cell membranes in a mucosal explant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal permeation enhancers (PEs) are agents aimed to improve oral delivery of therapeutic drugs with poor bioavailability. The main permeability barrier for oral delivery is the intestinal epithelium, and PEs act to increase the paracellular and/or transcellular passage of drugs. Transcellular....... In the present work, the interaction of the surfactants lauroyl-L-carnitine, 1-decanoyl-rac-glycerol, and nonaethylene glycol monododecyl ether with the intestinal epithelium was studied in organ cultured pig jejunal mucosal explants. As expected, at 2 mM, these agents rapidly permeabilized the enterocytes...... for the fluorescent polar tracer lucifer yellow, but surprisingly, they all also blocked both constitutive -and receptor-mediated pathways of endocytosis from the brush border, indicating a complete arrest of apical membrane trafficking. At the ultrastructural level, the PEs caused longitudinal fusion of brush border...

  20. Acetylcholine suppresses shoot formation and callusing in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shirish C

    2016-06-02

    We present experimental evidence to show that acetylcholine (ACh) causes decrease in shoot formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var Pusa Ruby) when cultured on shoot regeneration medium. The optimum response was obtained at 10(-4) M ACh-enriched medium. ACh also causes decrease in percentage of cultures forming callus and reduces the callus mass. Inhibitors of enzymatic hydrolysis of ACh, neostigmine and physostigmine, also suppresses callogenesis and caulogenesis. On the other hand, the breakdown products of Ach, choline and acetate, do not alter the morphogenic response induced on the shoot regeneration medium. Neostigmine showed optimal reduction in shoot formation at 10(-5) M. The explants cultured on neostigmine augmented medium showed decline in the activity of ACh hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase. ACh and neostigmine added together showed marked reduction in callus mass. These results strongly support the role of ACh as a natural regulator of morphogenesis in tomato plants.

  1. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  2. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Defined Equine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood for Use in Cartilage Repair Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Desancé

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage engineering is a new strategy for the treatment of cartilage damage due to osteoarthritis or trauma in humans. Racehorses are exposed to the same type of cartilage damage and the anatomical, cellular, and biochemical properties of their cartilage are comparable to those of human cartilage, making the horse an excellent model for the development of cartilage engineering. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiated into chondrocytes with chondrogenic factors in a biomaterial appears to be a promising therapeutic approach for direct implantation and cartilage repair. Here, we characterized equine umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (eUCB-MSCs and evaluated their potential for chondrocyte differentiation for use in cartilage repair therapy. Our results show that isolated eUCB-MSCs had high proliferative capacity and differentiated easily into osteoblasts and chondrocytes, but not into adipocytes. A three-dimensional (3D culture approach with the chondrogenic factors BMP-2 and TGF-β1 potentiated chondrogenic differentiation with a significant increase in cartilage-specific markers at the mRNA level (Col2a1, Acan, Snorc and the protein level (type II and IIB collagen without an increase in hypertrophic chondrocyte markers (Col10a1 and Mmp13 in normoxia and in hypoxia. However, these chondrogenic factors caused an increase in type I collagen, which can be reduced using small interfering RNA targeting Col1a2. This study provides robust data on MSCs characterization and demonstrates that eUCB-MSCs have a great potential for cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. Plant Explants Grown on Medium Supplemented with Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Have a Significant Increase in Embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inese Kokina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of nanotechnology leads to the increasing release of nanoparticles in the environment that results in accumulation of different NPs in living organisms including plants. This can lead to serious changes in plant cultures which leads to genotoxicity. The aims of the present study were to detect if iron oxide NPs pass through the flax cell wall, to compare callus morphology, and to estimate the genotoxicity in Linum usitatissimum L. callus cultures induced by different concentrations of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Two parallel experiments were performed: experiment A, where flax explants were grown on medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l, 1 mg/l, and 1.5 mg/l Fe3O4 NPs for callus culture obtaining, and experiment B, where calluses obtained from basal MS medium were transported into medium supplemented with concentrations of NPs identical to experiment A. Obtained results demonstrate similarly in both experiments that 25 nm Fe3O4 NPs pass into callus cells and induce low toxicity level in the callus cultures. Nevertheless, calluses from experiment A showed 100% embryogenesis in comparison with experiment B where 100% rhizogenesis was noticed. It could be associated with different stress levels and adaptation time for explants and calluses that were transported into medium with Fe3O4 NPs supplementation.

  4. Callus induction and biomass accumulation in vitro in explants from chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa (Michx. Elliot fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I. Calalb

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the following features were determined: biological (the optimal histogen as explant and the optimal age of donor fruit, biotechnological (type, dosage and combination of growth regulators supplements in culture medium Murashige and Skoog as well as sucrose dosage, and physical (light regime, to induce callusing and biomass accumulation in vitro from the succulent chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa (Michx. Elliot fruit. It turned out that it was much easier to induce callus from explants composed of the epicarp and hypoderm cut from fruits at 50–60 days after flowering. The role of light regime and varied supplementation of the basic MS medium with different doses of growth regulators was established; they resulted in four pigmented carpomass: violet, cream-pink, cream-white and green. The best combinations for the proliferation of fruit callus were culture media with 0.2–2.5 mg × dm-3 2,4-D+0.5 mg × dm-3 KIN +60 g × dm-3sucrose, while for fruit biomass accumulation enriched with phenolic substances – 2.5–3.5 mg × dm-3 NAA+0.5 mg × dm-3 KIN+60 g × dm-3sucrose. The chemical study of phenolic compounds by HPLC coupled with the mass spectrometry method identified chlorogenic acid, hiperozide, quercetrin, isoquercitrin and rutozide quantitatively and qualitatively in all pigmented carpomass and fruits; an exception is p-coumaric present only qualitatively in green carpomass and absent in fruit and quercetol absent in green carpomass.

  5. Efecto del tipo de explante y la concentración de ácido 2,4-diclorofenoxiacético en la formación de callos en Morus alba L. Effect of explant type and concentration of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on callus formation in Morus alba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Espinosa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar el efecto del tipo de explante y la concentración de 2,4-D en la formación de callos, en Morus alba L. Como fuentes de explantes se utilizaron limbos foliares, tallos y pecíolos, obtenidos a partir de estacas que brotaron en condiciones de laboratorio. El medio de cultivo basal estuvo constituido por las sales y vitaminas MS (1962, con diferentes concentraciones de 2,4-D (0; 0,5; 1,0 y 2,0 mg.L-1. Se utilizó un diseño experimental completamente aleatorizado. La formación de callos en todos los tipos de explantes se inició en los primeros 15 días posteriores al establecimiento in vitro. La callogénesis solo ocurrió en los medios de cultivo con 2,4-D. La zona de formación del callo, su color y textura dependieron del tipo de explante utilizado. El aumento de la concentración de 2,4-D en el medio de cultivo incrementó el tamaño de los callos, con los mejores resultados en las concentraciones de 1,0 y 2,0 mg.L-1The objective of the work was to evaluate the effect of explant type and concentration of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on callus formation, in Morus alba L. As explant sources leaf blades, stems and petioles were used , obtained from cuttings which produced growths under laboratory conditions. The basal culture medium was constituted by MS salts and vitamins (1962, with different concentrations of 2,4-D (0; 0,5; 1,0 and 2,0 mg.L-1. A completely randomized experimental design was used. Callus formation in all explant types started in the first 15 days after the in vitro establishment. Callogenesis only occurred in the culture media with 2,4-D. The callus formation zone, callus color and texture depended on the explant type used. The increase of 2,4-D concentration in the culture medium increased callus size, with the best results in the concentrations 1,0 and 2,0 mg.L-1.

  6. Cysts of the semilunar cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruessermann, M.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of the studies listed in the bibliography, this dissertation reports on the pathology, clinical symptoms and radiology of cysts of the semilunar cartilage. The author analyses 118 cases of his own, with special regard to the results of pneumo-arthrographic investigations carried through according to a special technique by Schaefer. In the course of this work, measurements of the meniscal base are for the first time used as radiological criteria indicating the presence of a cyst of the semilunar cartilage. Furthermore the well-known radiological signs of cysts, such as bone defects according to Albert and Keller, light central spot in the meniscal body, as well as Rauber's sign and horizontal rupture, are investigated as to the frequency of their incidence. For that purpose all the X-ray pictures were subjected to a further dose scrutiny. A list of all the 118 cases with their clinical and radiological data is found in the annex, together with the results of the operations and patho-anatomical investigations. (orig.) [de

  7. High Throughput and Mechano-Active Platforms to Promote Cartilage Regeneration and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana

    Traumatic joint injuries initiate acute degenerative changes in articular cartilage that can lead to progressive loss of load-bearing function. As a result, patients often develop post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), a condition for which there currently exists no biologic interventions. To address this need, tissue engineering aims to mimic the structure and function of healthy, native counterparts. These constructs can be used to not only replace degenerated tissue, but also build in vitro, pre-clinical models of disease. Towards this latter goal, this thesis focuses on the design of a high throughput system to screen new therapeutics in a micro-engineered model of PTOA, and the development of a mechanically-responsive drug delivery system to augment tissue-engineered approaches for cartilage repair. High throughput screening is a powerful tool for drug discovery that can be adapted to include 3D tissue constructs. To facilitate this process for cartilage repair, we built a high throughput mechanical injury platform to create an engineered cartilage model of PTOA. Compressive injury of functionally mature constructs increased cell death and proteoglycan loss, two hallmarks of injury observed in vivo. Comparison of this response to that of native cartilage explants, and evaluation of putative therapeutics, validated this model for subsequent use in small molecule screens. A primary screen of 118 compounds identified a number of 'hits' and relevant pathways that may modulate pathologic signaling post-injury. To complement this process of therapeutic discovery, a stimuli-responsive delivery system was designed that used mechanical inputs as the 'trigger' mechanism for controlled release. The failure thresholds of these mechanically-activated microcapsules (MAMCs) were influenced by physical properties and composition, as well as matrix mechanical properties in 3D environments. TGF-beta released from the system upon mechano-activation stimulated stem cell

  8. Induction of shoot regeneration in cotyledon explants of the oilseed crop Sesamum indicum L.

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    Masochon Zimik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sesamum indicum is an ancient oilseed crop known for its high quality edible oil and its medicinally important lignans. The crop is said to be recalcitrant to plant tissue culture thus limiting the use of modern biotechnology for its genetic improvement. We present here a protocol describing plant regeneration through adventitious shoot formation from cotyledons dissected from sesame seeds soaked for four hours in water. Subculturing of the cotyledons after two weeks of culture on to a fresh Murashige and Skoog medium leads to differentiation of adventitious shoots from the proximal cut end of the explant. Culture of cotyledons on a medium containing 9% sucrose for a couple of weeks prior to transfer to MS medium supplemented with 3% sucrose induced a higher frequency of shoot regeneration. The highest frequency of 25% adventitious shoot regeneration was observed for S. indicum variety UMA. This variety also turned out to be the best among the ten genotypes tested for shoot regeneration through tissue culture. While addition of IAA marginally improved regeneration, silver nitrate was found essential for enhancing the frequency of shoot regeneration. The regenerated shoots formed roots on full strength MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l IBA and the rooted plants were established in soil.

  9. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible.

  10. Current concepts of articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2011-12-01

    Articular cartilage provides a vital function in the homeostasis of the joint environment. It possesses unique mechanical properties, allowing for the maintenance of almost frictionless motion over a lifetime. However, cartilage is vulnerable to traumatic injury and due to its poor vascularity and inability to access mesenchymal stem cells, unable to facilitate a satisfactory healing response. Untreated chondral defects are thus likely to predispose patients to the development of osteoarthritis. Reconstitution and repair of articular cartilage is dependent on the neosynthesis or implantation of cartilage matrix elements, a goal which can be achieved through a variety of surgical means. Commonly used repair techniques include marrow stimulation, structural osteo-articular autografts or chondrocyte implantation. Despite substantial differences in the complexity and technical application of each method, all are united in the endeavour to restore joint function and prevent joint degeneration. Anyone attempting to treat cartilage defects must possess a basic understanding of the physiology of cartilage growth, and relevant factors affecting cartilage healing and repair. Furthermore, knowledge of the biomechanics and kinematics of the knee are essential in order to appreciate the forces acting on joint surfaces and repair tissues. Although clinical success is dependent on appropriate patient selection, accurate clinical assessment, definition of root causes and application of the right choice of treatment modality, the ultimate outcome of any intervention remains heavily reliant on the surgeon's proficiency in the technical aspects of the chosen surgical procedure.

  11. Allogenic lyophilized cartilage grafts for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pill Hoon Choung

    1999-01-01

    Allogenic lyophilized cartilages were made in our clinic after Sailer methods and some modification. In our clinic, we have used allogenic cartilage grafts on 102 defects of craniomaxillofacial area; 1) for defects from cyst or ameloblastoma, 2) for lack of continuity of the mandible, 3) for rhinoplasty, 4) for paranasal augmentation, 5) for augmentation genioplasty, 6) for reconstruction of orbital floor, 7) for oroantral fistula, 8) for temporal augmentation, 9) for TMJ surgery 10) for condyle defect as a costochondral graft, 11) for filling of tooth socket and alveolus augmentation,12) for correction or orbital height and 13) for guided bone regeneration in peripheral implant. The types of lyophilized cartilage used were chip, sheet and block types developed by freeze-dried methods. Some grafts showed change of ossification, in which case we could perform implant on it. We have good results on reconstruction of craniomaxillofacial defects. Allogenic cartilage have advantages such as 1) it has no immune reaction clinically, 2) it is more tolerable to infection than that of autogenous cartilage, 3) it has character of less resorption which require no over correction, 4) it is easy to manipulate contouring, and 5) it has possibility of undergoing ossification. Allogenic cartilage has been considered as good substitutes for bone. The author would like to report the results on 102 allogenic cartilage have

  12. Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene composites: spectral and thermal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozad, Matthew J; Grant, David A; Bachman, Sharon L; Grant, Daniel N; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Grant, Sheila A

    2010-08-01

    This study utilized spectral and thermal analysis of explanted hernia mesh materials to determine material inertness and elucidate reasons for hernia mesh explantation. Composite mesh materials, comprised of polypropylene (PP) and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh surrounded by a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ring, were explanted from humans. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was conducted to visually observe material defects while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to find chemical signs of surface degradation. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) gave thermal stability profiles that showed changes in heat of fusion and rate of percent weight loss, respectively. ATR-FTIR scans showed higher carbonyl peak areas as compared to pristine for 91% and 55% of ePTFE and PP explants, respectively. Ninety-one percent of ePTFE explants also exhibited higher C--H stretch peak areas. Seventy-three percent of ePTFE explants had higher heats of fusion while 64% of PP explants had lower heats of fusion with respect to their corresponding pristines. Only 9% of PET explants exhibited a lower heat of fusion than pristine. Seventy-three percent of ePTFE explants, 73% of PP explants, and only 18% of PET explants showed a decreased rate of percent weight loss as compared to pristine. The majority of the PP and ePTFE mesh explants demonstrated oxidation and crosslinking, respectively, while the PET ring exhibited breakdown at the sites of high stress. The results showed that all three materials exhibited varied degrees of chemical degradation suggesting that a lack of inertness in vivo contributes to hernia mesh failure.

  13. An equine joint friction test model using a cartilage-on-cartilage arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Prisca; Collin, Bernard; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline; Magnée, Adrien; Denoix, Jean M; Serteyn, Didier

    2010-02-01

    This study describes an equine joint friction test using a cartilage-on-cartilage arrangement and investigates the influence of age and load on the frictional response. Osteochondral plugs were extracted from equine shoulder joints (2-5 years, n=12; 10-14 years, n=15), and mounted in a pin-on-disc tribometer. The frictional response was then measured under constant conditions (2N; 20 degrees C; 5 mm/s), and with increasing load (2N, 5N, 10N). In all experiments, the friction coefficient of young cartilage was significantly (Plubrication remained stable, cartilage ageing may have been responsible for lubrication regime change. The cartilage-on-cartilage model could be used to better understand lubrication regime disturbances in healthy and diseased equine joints, and to test the efficacy of various bio-lubricant treatments. Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Temperature changes and chondrocyte death during drilling in a bovine cartilage model and chondroprotection by modified irrigation solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan-Alanie, Muhamed M H; Hall, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Drilling into cartilage/bone is often required for orthopaedic surgery. While drilling into bone has been studied, the response of cartilage has received little attention. We have measured cartilage and drill bit temperatures during drilling and quantified the zone of chondrocyte death (ZCD) around the hole in the presence/absence of irrigation solutions. Drilling was performed using a 1.5-mm orthopaedic drill bit applied to bovine metatarsophalangeal joints and temperatures recorded by infrared camera. Osteochondral explants were then incubated with 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) and propidium iodide (PI) to label living/dead chondrocytes respectively. The width of the ZCD was quantified by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and image analysis. Without irrigation, the ZCD following drilling for two seconds was 135 ± 15 μm and this increased (>fourfold, P Irrigation reduced the ZCD following drilling for both two and five seconds (P irrigation, drill bit and cartilage temperature increased rapidly to >265 and 119 °C respectively, whereas the camera saturated at >282 °C during drilling for five seconds. With irrigation, the drill bit temperature was significantly reduced during drilling for two and five seconds (approx. 90 °C) with negligible change in cartilage temperature. Drilling while irrigating with hyperosmotic saline (600 mOsm) reduced (P irrigation markedly suppressed, but did not abolish chondrocyte death. Optimising the irrigation solution by raising osmolarity and reducing Ca(2+) content significantly reduced chondrocyte death during drilling and may be clinically beneficial.

  15. [Surgical therapeutic possibilities of cartilage damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, A C; Schoettle, P B; Imhoff, A B

    2001-09-01

    Therapy of cartilage damage is a frequent problem, especially in the young and active patient. For the treatment of a cartilage damage we have to consider the size of the defect, age and weight of the patient, meniscal tears, ligament instabilities and varus-/valgus-malalignment. Lavage, shaving and debridement are only sufficient for a short time and have no long term effect. Abrasio and drilling could be useful in eldery people. Microfracturing seems to be an effective alternative for small defects. The restoration of the cartilage surface with the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, osteochondral autograft transplantation and posterior condyle transfer seems to be an adequate treatment for younger patients.

  16. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Succar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biological therapeutics such as adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy are gaining acceptance for knee-osteoarthritis (OA treatment. Reports of OA-patients show reductions in cartilage defects and regeneration of hyaline-like-cartilage with MSC-therapy. Suspending MSCs in hyaluronan commonly occurs in animals and humans, usually without supporting data. Objective. To elucidate the effects of different concentrations of hyaluronan on MSC growth kinetics. Methods. Using a range of hyaluronan concentrations, we measured MSC adherence and proliferation on culture plastic surfaces and a novel cartilage-adhesion assay. We employed time-course and dispersion imaging to assess MSC binding to cartilage. Cytokine profiling was also conducted on the MSC-secretome. Results. Hyaluronan had dose-dependent effects on growth kinetics of MSCs at concentrations of entanglement point (1 mg/mL. At higher concentrations, viscosity effects outweighed benefits of additional hyaluronan. The cartilage-adhesion assay highlighted for the first time that hyaluronan-primed MSCs increased cell attachment to cartilage whilst the presence of hyaluronan did not. Our time-course suggested patients undergoing MSC-therapy for OA could benefit from joint-immobilisation for up to 8 hours. Hyaluronan also greatly affected dispersion of MSCs on cartilage. Conclusion. Our results should be considered in future trials with MSC-therapy using hyaluronan as a vehicle, for the treatment of OA.

  17. Spermatozoa with high mitochondrial membrane potential and low tyrosine phosphorylation preferentially bind to oviduct explants in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Kaustubh Kishor; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Chhillar, Shivani; Nayak, Samiksha; Lathika, Sreela; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; Gahlot, Subhash Chand; Karan, Prabha; Verma, Kiran; Mohanty, Tushar Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Although it is understood that spermatozoa are subjected to selection processes to form a functional sperm reservoir in the oviduct, the mechanism remains obscure. With the aim to understand the sperm selection process in the oviduct, in the present in vitro study, we analyzed mitochondrial membrane potential and tyrosine phosphorylation status in oviduct-explants bound and unbound spermatozoa. Frozen semen from Murrah buffalo bulls (n=10) used under progeny testing programme were utilized for the study. Oviduct explants were prepared by overnight culture of epithelial cells in TCM- 199 and washed spermatozoa were added to the oviduct explants and incubated for 4h. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and tyrosine phosphorylation status of bound and unbound spermatozoa were assessed at 1h and 4h of incubation. The proportion of spermatozoa with high MMP was significantly higher (Pspermatozoa (range 84.67-96.56%) compared to unbound (range 8.70-21.03%) spermatozoa. The proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated spermatozoa was significantly higher (Pspermatozoa displaying tyrosine phosphorylation at acrosomal area was significantly (Pspermatozoa with high MMP and low tyrosine phosphorylation were preferred for oviduct-explants binding in the buffalo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  19. The effects of Brazilian propolis on etiological agents of mastitis and the viability of bovine mammary gland explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiordalisi, Samira A L; Honorato, Luciana A; Loiko, Márcia R; Avancini, César A M; Veleirinho, Maria B R; Filho, Luiz C P Machado; Kuhnen, Shirley

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of Brazilian propolis from Urupema, São Joaquim, and Agua Doce (Santa Catarina State) and green propolis from Minas Gerais State, and the effects of propolis on bovine mammary gland explant viability. The propolis samples differed in flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. Green propolis showed the highest content of flavonoids, followed by the sample from São Joaquim. The propolis from Urupema showed the lowest flavonoid content along with the lowest antioxidant activity. The total phenolics were similar across all studied samples. Despite phytochemical differences, the propolis samples from Minas Gerais, São Joaquim, and Urupema presented the same level of antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains. The reduction in S. aureus growth was, on average, 1.5 and 4 log10 times at 200 and 500 μg/mL, respectively. At concentrations of 1,000 μg/mL, all propolis reduced bacterial growth to zero. On the other hand, when the propolis were tested against strains of Escherichia coli, the samples presented weak antimicrobial activity. Mammary explants were maintained in culture for 96h without a loss in viability, demonstrating the applicability of the model in evaluating the toxicity of propolis. The origin and chemical composition of the propolis had an effect on mammary explant viability. We encountered inhibitory concentrations of 272.4, 171.8, 63.85, and 13.26 μg/mL for the propolis from Água Doce, Urupema, São Joaquim, and Mina Gerais, respectively. A clear association between greater antimicrobial activity and toxicity for mammary explants was observed. Of all propolis tested, the Urupema sample was noteworthy, as it showed antimicrobial activity at less toxic concentrations than the other samples, reducing bacterial growth to an average of 9.3 × 10(2) cfu/mL after 6h of contact using 200 μg/mL of extract. The results demonstrate the potential for Brazilian

  20. Replication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauwynck Hans J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely "mixing vessel" for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs. However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia

  1. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies

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    Arumugam S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury Materials & Methods: Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining.Results: The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Conclusion: Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any

  2. Fenolization effect on sugar cane explants Saccharum spp. híbrido var. Sp 70-1284 in the formation of callus

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    Apolonio Valdez Balero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid is the crop were more work has been done on biotechnological aspects because of its economical importance among the comercial crops. When the explants from the field of the hibrid SP 70-1284 are used and manipuled, the lesions produced by the incicion become oxidable. With the objetive to reduce the phenolization that is present in the develoment of callogenesis, a protocol was tested, which showed good results when the spindles were submerged and sectioned in a solution with 200 mg.l-1 at citric acid, as well as the adition of the antioxidant at 50 mg.l-1 to the in vitro culture medium. The section of the explants that generated the greated amount of fresh biomass of callus and the best quality of them were the more young leaves situated above the meristen in the first 5 cm. Key words: contamination, tissue culture, callus

  3. Production of transgenic soybean by the half-seed explant

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    Ahmad Abdolzadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max, one of the most important agronomic crops in the world, is considered as a rich source of oil and protein production and much effort has been directed towards its genetic improvements using conventional breeding techniques, as well as molecular genetic approaches. Meanwhile, optimization of transformation of soybean requires an efficient system for production of stable transgenic lines. In this study, we reported the first attempt to use the cotyledonary node derived from mature seed for Agrobacterium mediate plant transformation in Iran. Surface-sterilized soybean seeds of DPX and Gorgan3 cultivars were soaked in distilled water overnight and used for explant production. The explants were inoculated in Agrobacterium tumefaciense (LBA4404 containing pBI121 solution. Positive transgenic plants which remained green in the presence of kanamycin, as a selectable marker, were used for the GUS assay. PCR, sequencing and the GUS assay showed successful expression of the GUS gene in the regenerated plants in both cultivars. Simplicity and efficiency were the main advantages of using the half-seed method which can be used to introduce useful and/or novel gene(s into soybean.

  4. Inactivation of Bacteria on Explanted Dialysis Catheter Lumens with Fiber Optically Delivered Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Roger C; Prologo, J David

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the germicidal effect of fiber optically delivered ultraviolet (UV) light on colonized explanted dialysis catheters. Explanted dialysis catheters were screened for intraluminal colonization by culturing 1 mL of a saline flush. Catheters growing >10 colony-forming units were treated with doses of fiber optically delivered UV light (range, 40-1,300 mJ/cm2). For each UV-treated catheter, an unexposed segment was first cut and set aside as a control sample. A sterile optical fiber was inserted into the catheter hub and advanced to the catheter tip. The fiber was slowly withdrawn at a constant rate while exposing the inner lumen to UV light. A second UV-exposed segment was then removed. The UV-exposed and control segments were split and sonicated to remove the adherent bacteria. The bacteria were counted and identified. There were 14 colonized catheters treated with UV light. The catheters were primarily colonized with coagulase-negative staphylococci (60%) and Staphylococcus aureus (33%). There was a significant reduction in viable bacteria between the UV-treated versus untreated segments of each infected catheter (P = .04). In the seven treated catheters with >100,000 colony-forming units per cm2 of luminal surface area, there was a >99.5% reduction of viable bacteria in all UV-exposed samples, with no residual viable bacteria in four of seven (57%) of the samples. This study demonstrates the technical feasibility and benchtop efficacy of using fiber optics to deliver UV light into the lumen of a colonized dialysis catheter and inactivating bacteria on the intraluminal surface. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fractional calculus model of articular cartilage based on experimental stress-relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, P. A.; Green, I.

    2015-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a unique substance that protects joints from damage and wear. Many decades of research have led to detailed biphasic and triphasic models for the intricate structure and behavior of cartilage. However, the models contain many assumptions on boundary conditions, permeability, viscosity, model size, loading, etc., that complicate the description of cartilage. For impact studies or biomimetic applications, cartilage can be studied phenomenologically to reduce modeling complexity. This work reports experimental results on the stress-relaxation of equine articular cartilage in unconfined loading. The response is described by a fractional calculus viscoelastic model, which gives storage and loss moduli as functions of frequency, rendering multiple advantages: (1) the fractional calculus model is robust, meaning that fewer constants are needed to accurately capture a wide spectrum of viscoelastic behavior compared to other viscoelastic models (e.g., Prony series), (2) in the special case where the fractional derivative is 1/2, it is shown that there is a straightforward time-domain representation, (3) the eigenvalue problem is simplified in subsequent dynamic studies, and (4) cartilage stress-relaxation can be described with as few as three constants, giving an advantage for large-scale dynamic studies that account for joint motion or impact. Moreover, the resulting storage and loss moduli can quantify healthy, damaged, or cultured cartilage, as well as artificial joints. The proposed characterization is suited for high-level analysis of multiphase materials, where the separate contribution of each phase is not desired. Potential uses of this analysis include biomimetic dampers and bearings, or artificial joints where the effective stiffness and damping are fundamental parameters.

  6. Effect of Explant Source and Growth Regulators on in vitro Callus Growth of Taxus baccata L. Washingtonii

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    Ivana Bjedov

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of explant source, medium composition and growth regulators were examined in order to optimize the induction and selection of fast growing callus lines of European yew (Taxus baccata L. Washingtonii. Callus cultures were induced from isolated mature zygotic embryos or from segments of juvenile branches. Following two months of growth on induction medium (MS + 3.0 mg/L NAA, 0.5 mg/L kinetin, 100 mg/L arginine, 2.5 % sucrose and 0.8 % agar, callus proliferation was induced in 86.4 % of embryo explants and 100 % of branch-cutting explants. The growth potential of established callus lines was found to vary in response to genetic potential and culture medium composition. The growth rate of stem-derived callus obtained on induction medium was superior to that obtained using all other tested media modifications (duplication time 9.6 days. However, the growth of embryo-derived callus lines was enhanced by increasing the iron content from 27.8 to 55.6 mg/L FeSO4 ∙7H2O in the maintaining MS medium (duplication time for line E2 was 8.5 days. In two out of three embryo-derived lines, tissue growth was further improved by transferring onto modified B5 medium (duplication time for lines E2 end E5 was 4 and 5.7 days, respectively. HPLC analysis confirmed the presence of the anticancer agent cephalomannine in calli grown on B5 medium and a taxane-like substance in calli grown on MS medium.

  7. Evaluation of novel biodegradable three-armed- and hyper-branched tissue adhesives in a meniscus explant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, A I; Hannink, G; Verhoeven, R; Grijpma, D W; Buma, P

    2017-05-01

    Current treatment methods to repair meniscal tears do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are considered promising alternatives, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. The first aim of this study was to analyze the adhesive properties of and tissue response to two recently developed biodegradable block copolymeric three-armed- and hyper-branched tissue adhesives. The second aim was to investigate if tissue surface modification with collagenase improves the attachment of the adhesives and increases the healing potential of the tissue. Cylindrical explants were harvested from bovine menisci. The central core of the explants was removed and glued back into the defect, with or without incubation in collagenase solution prior to gluing, using one of the novel glues, Dermabond® or fibrin glue. The repair constructs were cultured in vitro for 1 and 28 days. Adhesion tests and histology were performed to analyze the effects of the glue in combination with the additional treatment. The adhesive strength of the novel glues was 40-50 kPa, which was significantly higher than that of fibrin glue (15 kPa). Cells were present in direct contact with the glues, and the tissue remained vital during the whole culture period. Increased cellularity around the tear in the collagenase treated explants was observed after 1 day. The two newly developed tissue adhesives are attractive materials to be used for repair of meniscal tears. The beneficial influence of collagenase treatment in treating meniscal tears with glues still needs to be confirmed in more clinical relevant studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1405-1411, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  9. Chondrogenic potential of canine articular cartilage derived cells (cACCs

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    Nowak Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the potential of canine articular cartilage-derived cells (cACCs for chondrogenic differentiation was evaluated. The effectiveness of cACCs’ lineage commitment was analyzed after 14 days of culture in chondorgenic and non-chondrogenic conditions. Formation of proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix was assessed using histochemical staining – Alcian Blue and Safranin-O, while elemental composition was determined by means of SEM-EDX. Additionally, ultrastructure of cACCs was evaluated using TEM. The expression of genes involved in chondrogenesis was monitored with quantitative Real Time PCR. Results obtained indicate that the potential of cACCs for cartilagous extracellular matrix formation may be maintained only in chondrogenic cultures. The formation of specific chondro-nodules was not observed in a non-chondrogenic culture environment. The analysis of cACCs’ ultrastructure, both in non-chondrogenic and chondrogenic cultures, revealed well-developed rough endoplasmatic reticulum and presence of mitochondria. The cACCs in chondrogenic medium shed an increased number of microvesicles. Furthermore, it was shown that the extracellular matrix of cACCs in chondrogenic cultures is rich in potassium and molybdenum. Additionally, it was determined that gene expression of collagen type II, aggrecan and SOX-9 was significantly increased during chondrogenic differentiation of cACCs. Results obtained indicate that the culture environment may significantly influence the cartilage phenotype of cACCs during long term culture.

  10. Current strategies for articular cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Redman S. N.; Oldfield S. F.; Archer C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Defects of articular cartilage that do not penetrate to the subchondral bone fail to heal spontaneously. Defects that penetrate to the subchondral bone elicit an intrinsic repair response that yields a fibrocartilaginous repair tissue which is a poor substitute for hyaline articular cartilage. Many arthroscopic repair strategies employed utilise this intrinsic repair response to induce the formation of a repair tissue within the defect. The goal, however, is to produce a repair tissue that ha...

  11. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  12. Modern cartilage imaging of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Wuennemann, Felix; Rehnitz, Christoph; Jungmann, Pia M.; Kuni, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions are an important risk factor for the development of talar osteoarthritis. Furthermore, osteochondral lesions might explain persistent ankle pain. Early diagnosis of accompanying chondral defects is important to establish the optimal therapy strategy and thereby delaying or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to explain modern cartilage imaging with emphasis of MR imaging as well as the discussion of more sophisticated imaging studies like CT-arthrography or functional MR imaging. Pubmed literature search concerning: osteochondral lesions, cartilage damage, ankle joint, talus, 2 D MR imaging, 3 D MR imaging, cartilage MR imaging, CT-arthrography, cartilage repair, microfracture, OATS, MACT. Dedicated MR imaging protocols to delineate talar cartilage and the appearance of acute and chronic osteochondral lesions were discussed. Recent developments of MR imaging, such as isotropic 3 D imaging that has a higher signal-to noise ratio when compared to 2 D imaging, and specialized imaging methods such as CT-arthrography as well as functional MR imaging were introduced. Several classifications schemes and imaging findings of osteochondral lesions that influence the conservative or surgical therapy strategy were discussed. MRI enables after surgery the non-invasive assessment of the repair tissue and the success of implantation. Key points: Modern MRI allows for highly resolved visualization of the articular cartilage of the ankle joint and of subchondral pathologies. Recent advances in MRI include 3 D isotropic ankle joint imaging, which deliver higher signal-to-noise ratios of the cartilage and less partial volume artifacts when compared with standard 2 D sequences. In case of osteochondral lesions MRI is beneficial for assessing the stability of the osteochondral fragment and for this discontinuity of the cartilage layer is an important factor. CT-arthrography can be used in case of contraindications of MRI and

  13. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Shigeru; Lotz, Martin K

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles carry bioactive molecules that can be transferred between cells and tissues. The purpose of this review is to describe how extracellular vesicles regulate functions of cells in cartilage and other joint tissues. The potential application of extracellular vesicles in the treatment of osteoarthritis and as biomarkers will also be discussed. Extracellular vesicles are found in synovial fluid, in articular cartilage and in the supernatants of synoviocytes and chondrocytes. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage have been proposed to be involved in cross talk between cells in joint tissues and to affect extracellular matrix turnover and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles from arthritic joints can promote abnormal gene expression and changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, including abnormal mineralization. Promising results were obtained in the therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles for cartilage repair and experimental osteoarthritis. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as vehicles for the exchange of bioactive signaling molecules within cartilage and between joint tissues to promote joint homeostasis and arthritis pathogenesis. As the molecular content of extracellular vesicles can be customized, they offer utility in therapeutic applications.

  14. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber-hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber-hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013.

  15. Endogenous MMP-9 and not MMP-2 promotes rheumatoid synovial fibroblast survival, inflammation and cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Meilang; McKelvey, Kelly; Shen, Kaitlin; Minhas, Nikita; March, Lyn; Park, Sang-Youel; Jackson, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9) on the invasive characteristics of RA synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with RA or OA were treated with MMP small interfering RNA (siRNA), inhibitors and recombinant proteins or TNF-α, with or without cartilage explants. Cell viability and proliferation were measured by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation assays, respectively; apoptosis by an in situ cell death detection kit; migration and invasion by CytoSelect invasion assay, scratch migration and collagen gel assays; cartilage degradation by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay; and inflammatory mediators and MMPs by ELISA, western blot and zymography. MMP-2 was expressed by both OA and RA synovial fibroblasts, whereas only RA synovial fibroblasts expressed MMP-9. Suppressing MMP-2 or MMP-9 reduced RA synovial fibroblast proliferation equally. However, MMP-9 siRNA had greater effects compared with MMP-2 siRNA on promoting apoptosis and suppressing RA synovial fibroblast viability, migration and invasion. Suppression/inhibition of MMP-9 also decreased the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α, inactivated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and suppressed RA synovial fibroblast-mediated cartilage degradation. In contrast, suppression/inhibition of MMP-2 stimulated TNF-α and IL-17 secretion and activated NF-κB, while recombinant MMP-2 (rMMP-2) inactivated NF-κB and suppressed RA synovial fibroblast-mediated cartilage degradation. Results using specific inhibitors and rMMPs provided supportive evidence for the siRNA results. Endogenous MMP-2 or MMP-9 contribute to RA synovial fibroblast survival, proliferation, migration and invasion, with MMP-9 having more potent effects. Additionally, MMP-9 stimulates RA synovial

  16. Articular cartilage tissue engineering: the role of signaling molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heenam; Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2017-01-01

    Effective early disease modifying options for osteoarthritis remain lacking. Tissue engineering approach to generate cartilage in vitro has emerged as a promising option for articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Signaling molecules and matrix modifying agents, derived from knowledge of cartilage development and homeostasis, have been used as biochemical stimuli toward cartilage tissue engineering and have led to improvements in the functionality of engineered cartilage. Clinical translation of neocartilage faces challenges, such as phenotypic instability of the engineered cartilage, poor integration, inflammation, and catabolic factors in the arthritic environment; these can all contribute to failure of implanted neocartilage. A comprehensive understanding of signaling molecules involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis and their actions on engineered cartilage will be crucial. Thus, while it is important to continue deriving inspiration from cartilage development and homeostasis, it has become increasing necessary to incorporate knowledge from osteoarthritis pathogenesis into cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26811234

  17. Respiratory explants as a model to investigate early events of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Teodoro, Giovanni; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Di Provvido, Andrea; Orsini, Gianluca; Ronchi, Gaetano Federico; D'Angelo, Anna Rita; D'Alterio, Nicola; Sacchini, Flavio; Scacchia, Massimo

    2018-01-12

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a severe disease caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). Knowledge on CBPP pathogenesis is fragmented and hampered by the limited availability of laboratory animal and in vitro models of investigation. The purpose of the present study is to assess respiratory explants as useful tools to study the early stages of CBPP. Explants were obtained from trachea, bronchi and lungs of slaughtered cattle, tested negative for Mycoplasma spp. and for the major bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens. The interaction of Mmm with explant cells was studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC), double-labelling indirect immunofluorescence (DLIIF) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). Mmm capability to survive and proliferate within the explants was evaluated by standard microbiological procedures. Finally, the putative cellular internalization of Mmm was further investigated by the gentamicin invasion assay. IHC and DLIIF indicated that Mmm can colonize explants, showing a marked tropism for lower airways. Specifically, Mmm was detected on/inside the bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, the alveolar macrophages and the endothelial cells. The interaction between Mmm and explant cells was abolished by the pre-incubation of the pathogen with bovine anti-Mmm immune sera. Mmm was able to survive and proliferate in all tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, during the entire time course of the experiments. LSCM and gentamicin invasion assay both confirmed that Mmm can enter non-phagocytic host cells. Taken together, our data supports bovine respiratory explants as a promising tool to investigate CBPP, alternative to cattle experimental infection.

  18. Dedifferentiation of intrinsic response properties of motoneurons in organotypic cultures of the spinal cord of the adult turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, J F; Noraberg, J; Simon, M

    2000-01-01

    Explant cultures from the spinal cord of adult turtles were established and used to study the sensitivity of the intrinsic response properties of motoneurons to the changes in connectivity and milieu imposed by isolation in culture. Transverse sections 700 microm thick were explanted on cover sli...

  19. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  20. Intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and hyaluronic acid promote regeneration of massive cartilage defects in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Ogay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SD MSCs with low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA could promote regeneration of massive cartilage in rabbits. Material and methods: The SD MSCs were harvested from the knees of 10 Flemish giant rabbits, expanded in culture, and characterized. A reproducible 4-mm cylindrical defect was created in the intercondylar groove area using a kit for the mosaic chondroplasty of femoral condyle COR (De Puy, Mitek. The defect was made within the cartilage layer without destruction of subchondral bone. Two weeks after the cartilage defect, SD MSCs (2 × 106 cell/0.15 ml were suspended in 0.5% low molecular weight HA (0.15 ml and injected into the left knee, and HA solution (0.30 ml alone was placed into the right knee. Cartilage regeneration in the experimental and control groups were evaluated by macroscopically and histologically at 10, 30, and 60 days. Results: On day 10, after intra-articular injection of SD MSCs, we observed an early process of cartilage regeneration in the defect area. Histological studies revealed that cartilage defect was covered by a thin layer of spindle-shaped undifferentiated cells and proliferated chodroblasts. In contrast, an injection of HA did not induce reparation of cartilage in the defect area. At 30 days, macroscopic observation showed that the size of cartilage defect after SD MSC injection was significantly smaller than after HA injection. Histological score was also better in the MSC- treated intercondylar defect. At 60 days after MSC treatment, cartilage defect was nearly nonexistent and looked similar to an intact cartilage. Conclusion: Thus, intra-articular injection of SD MSCs can adhere to the defect in the intercondylar area, and promote cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

  1. Influence of cartilage extracellular matrix molecules on cell phenotype and neocartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Shawn P; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Taniguchi, Noboru; Colwell, Clifford W; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for maintaining the cartilage's role as a low-friction and load-bearing tissue. In this study, we examined the influence of cartilage zone-specific ECM on human articular chondrocytes (HAC) in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two culture systems were used. SYSTEM 1: HAC were cultured on cell-culture plates that had been precoated with the following ECM molecules for 7 days: decorin, biglycan, tenascin C (superficial zone), collagen type II, hyaluronan (HA) (middle and deep zones), and osteopontin (deep zone). Uncoated standard culture plates were used as controls. Expanded cells were examined for phenotypic changes using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, expanded cells were placed into high-density pellet cultures for 14 days. Neocartilage formation was assessed via gene expression and histology evaluations. SYSTEM 2: HAC that were cultured on untreated plates and encapsulated in a 3D alginate scaffold were mixed with one of the zone-specific ECM molecules. Cell viability, gene expression, and histology assessments were conducted on 14-day-old tissues. In HAC monolayer culture, exposure to decorin, HA, and osteopontin increased COL2A1 and aggrecan messenger RNA (mRNA) levels compared with controls. Biglycan up-regulated aggrecan without a significant impact on COL2A1 expression; Tenascin C reduced COL2A1 expression. Neocartilage formed after preculture on tenascin C and collagen type II expressed higher COL2A1 mRNA compared with control pellets. Preculture of HAC on HA decreased both COL2A1 and aggrecan expression levels compared with controls, which was consistent with histology. Reduced proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) mRNA levels were observed in HAC pellets that had been precultured with biglycan and collagen type II. Exposing HAC to HA directly in 3D-alginate culture most effectively induced neocartilage formation, showing increased COL2A1

  2. A simple technique of intraocular lenses explantation for single-piece foldable lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup Bhaumik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Foldable intraocular lenses (IOLs are most commonly used in modern-day cataract surgery. Explantation of these IOLs is not frequently encountered, but sometimes extreme situations may demand the same. Commonly explantation is achieved by bisecting the IOL inside the anterior chamber with a cutter and delivering the pieces out one by one. This may require corneal wound extension with associated damage and endothelial loss leading to visual deterioration. We devised a simple, innovative IOL explantation technique utilizing a modified Alcon A cartridge and snare. This can successfully refold the IOL to be explanted inside the eye and deliver it out through the same wound. The device has limitations with very thick optic lenses, multipiece, and silicon IOLs. In conclusion, we describe a simple, innovative, and reproducible technique to explant almost any single piece IOL without compromising the original surgery and yielding very satisfactory outcomes.

  3. Surgical technique for explantation of cosmetic anterior chamber iris implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Parnian; Gooi, Patrick; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2015-01-01

    The Newcoloriris is a silicone implant for cosmetic alteration of iris color. Implantation is associated with significant ocular complications of decreased vision, glaucoma, and corneal edema. Although removal of the implant also entails risks, it is ultimately necessary to preserve vision. We describe a technique for removing the implant that may also reduce intraoperative complications. The implant is explanted using a bimanual technique with small incisions in 3 sections via a "slicing-the-pie" technique using iris microforceps, microscissors, and microinstrumentation. Our patient required removal 5 years after implantation, which is the longest reported interval in the literature. This suggests that as long as these implants are present, ocular structures are at risk. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aggrecan structure in amphibian cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covizi D.Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the large proteoglycan present in the bullfrog epiphyseal cartilage was studied by immunochemical and biochemical methods. The isolated monomer showed a polydisperse behavior on Sepharose CL2B, with a peak at Kav = 0.14. Chondroitin sulfate chains were identified by HPLC analysis of the products formed by chondroitinase digestion and mercuric acetate treatment. These chains have approximately 38 disaccharides, a Di45:Di68 ratio of 1.6 and GalNAc4S + GalNAc4,6S are the main non-reducing terminals. Keratan sulfate was identified by the use of two monoclonal antibodies in Western blots after chondroitinase ABC treatment. A keratan sulfate-rich region (~110 kDa was isolated by sequential treatment with chondroitinase ABC and proteases. We also employed antibodies in Western blotting experiments and showed that the full length deglycosylated core protein is about 300 kDa after SDS-PAGE. Domain-specific antibodies revealed the presence of immunoreactive sites corresponding to G1/G2 and G3 globular domains and the characterization of this large proteoglycan as aggrecan. The results indicate the high conservation of the aggrecan domain structure in this lower vertebrate.

  5. ESTABELECIMENTO E DESENVOLVIMENTO IN VITRO DE Eugenia involucrata DC.: INFLUÊNCIA DO TIPO DE EXPLANTE E DO MEIO NUTRITIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Pascoal Golle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia involucrata DC. (Myrtaceae is a native forest species to several Brazilian states which has several features of interest in the sectors of forestry, fruit faming, environment and medicine. Considering the difficulty of propagation by seeds, which are recalcitrant and lose viability rapidly after harvest, this study evaluated the influence of the use of apical and nodal segments cultured in different nutrient media on the in vitro establishment and development of this species. Apical and nodal segments collected from three- year- old plants kept in the greenhouse were inoculated in the nutrient media MS, ½ MS and WPM. First, 1 ¿M of NAA and 5 ¿M of TDZ were added to the culture media. After that, the explants were transferred to flasks containing the respective fresh nutrient media in absence of growth regulators, but with addition of 1 g L-1 activated charcoal, and then cultured for 30 additional days. Medium ½ MS is most suitable for the in vitro establishment and development of apical segments while media ½ MS and WPM are appropriate for nodal segments. Medium ½ MS enabled the best results of rooting in explants, along with WPM; the in vitro establishment and rooting were made possible by the use of apical and nodal segments of E. involucrata DC. Nutritional media ½ MS and WPM are most suitable for in vitro culture of nodal segments of Eugenia involucrata DC; however, medium ½ MS is recommended due to economical and practical features. For apical segments of this species, the use of culture medium ½ MS is more appropriate than media MS and WPM.

  6. Stable subcutaneous cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells directed by chondrocyte sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Zhu, Lian; Liu, Yu; Yin, Zongqi; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangjun; He, Aijuan; Feng, Shaoqing; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-05-01

    high-density culture of chondrocytes in vitro could cearte a chondrogenic niche in subcutaneous environment and efficiently retain the chondrogenic phenotype of in vitro BMSC engineered cartilage (vitro-BEC). Furthermore, cell tracing results revealed that the regenerated cartilage mainly derived from the implanted vitro-BEC. The current study not only proposes a novel research model for microenvironment simulation but also provides a useful strategy for stable ectopic cartilage regeneration of stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. POSSIBILITIES OF CURRENT CELLULAR TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR (ANALYTICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Bozhokin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a wide variety of surgical procedures utilized in clinical practice for treatment of articular cartilage lesions, the search for other options of articular reconstruction remains a relevant and open issue at the current stage of medicine and biotechnologies development. The recent years demonstrated a strong belief in cellular methods of hyaline cartilage repair such as implantation of autologous chondrocytes (ACI or cultures of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC including techniques for genetic modification of cells.The purpose of presented review is to summarize the published scientific data on up to date results of perspective cellular technologies for articular cartilage repair that are being developed. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation originally performed by Swedish researchers in 1987 is considered the first clinically applied technique for restoration of hyaline cartilage using cellular technologies. However, the transplanted cell culture featured low proliferative capacity and inability to form a regenerate resistant to high physical activity. Another generation of methods originated at the turn of the century utilized mesenchymal stem cells instead of autologous chondrocytes. Preparation of MSCs is a less invasive procedure compared to chondrocytes harvesting and the culture is featured by a higher proliferative ability. Researchers use various biodegradable carriers (matrices to secure cell fixation. Despite good clinical mid-term outcomes the transplanted tissue-engineering structures deteriorate with time due to cellular de-differentiation. Next generation of techniques being currently under pre-clinical studies is featured by the preliminary chondrogenic modification of transplanted cell culture. Usage of various growth factors, modified cell product and gene-activated matrices allow to gain a stable regulatory and key proteins synthesis and achieve a focused influence on regenerate's chondrogenic proliferation and in result

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix enhances chondrogenic phenotype of and cartilage formation by encapsulated chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanheng; Lin, Hang; Shen, He; Wang, Bing; Lei, Guanghua; Tuan, Rocky S

    2018-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular matrix (MSC-ECM) is a natural biomaterial with robust bioactivity and good biocompatibility, and has been studied as a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this investigation, we tested the applicability of using decellularized human bone marrow derived MSC-ECM (hBMSC-ECM) as a culture substrate for chondrocyte expansion in vitro, as well as a scaffold for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. hBMSC-ECM deposited by hBMSCs cultured on tissue culture plastic (TCP) was harvested, and then subjected to a decellularization process to remove hBMSCs. Compared with chondrocytes grown on TCP, chondrocytes seeded onto hBMSC-ECM exhibited significantly increased proliferation rate, and maintained better chondrocytic phenotype than TCP group. After being expanded to the same cell number and placed in high-density micromass cultures, chondrocytes from the ECM group showed better chondrogenic differentiation profile than those from the TCP group. To test cartilage formation ability, composites of hBMSC-ECM impregnated with chondrocytes were subjected to brief trypsin treatment to allow cell-mediated contraction, and folded to form 3-dimensional chondrocyte-impregnated hBMSC-ECM (Cell/ECM constructs). Upon culture in vitro in chondrogenic medium for 21 days, robust cartilage formation was observed in the Cell/ECM constructs. Similarly prepared Cell/ECM constructs were tested in vivo by subcutaneous implantation into SCID mice. Prominent cartilage formation was observed in the implanted Cell/ECM constructs 14 days post-implantation, with higher sGAG deposition compared to controls consisting of chondrocyte cell sheets. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hBMSC-ECM is a superior culture substrate for chondrocyte expansion and a bioactive matrix potentially applicable for cartilage regeneration in vivo. Current cell-based treatments for focal cartilage defects face challenges, including chondrocyte dedifferentiation, need for

  9. Assessment of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype Tropism in Human Retinal Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; Kaalberg, Emily E; Jiao, Chunhua; Riker, Megan J; Halder, Jennifer A; Luse, Meagan A; Han, Ian C; Russell, Stephen R; Sohn, Elliott H; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2018-02-23

    Advances in the discovery of the causes of monogenic retinal disorders, combined with technologies for the delivery of DNA to the retina, offer enormous opportunities for the treatment of previously untreatable blinding diseases. However, for gene augmentation to be most effective, vectors that have the correct cell-type specificity are needed. While animal models are very useful, they often exhibit differences in retinal cell surface receptors compared to the human retina. This study evaluated the use of an ex vivo organotypic explant system to test the transduction efficiency and tropism of seven different adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) serotypes in the human retina and retinal pigment epithelium-choroid-AAV2/1, AAV2/2, AAV2/4, AAV2/5, AAV2/6, AAV2/8, and AAV2/9-all driving expression of GFP under control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. After 7 days in culture, it was found that AAV2/4 and AAV2/5 were particularly efficient at transducing photoreceptor cells and that AAV2/5 was highly specific to the outer nuclear layer, whereas AAV2/8 displayed consistently low transduction of photoreceptors. To validate the authenticity of the organotypic culture system, the transduction of the same set of AAVs was also compared in a pig model, in which sub-retinal injections in vivo were compared to cultured and transduced organotypic cultures ex vivo. This study shows how different AAV serotypes behave in the human retina and provides insight for further investigation of each of these serotypes for gene augmentation-based treatment of inherited retinal degeneration.

  10. Repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits with ectopically produced cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, PJ; Hulsbosch, M; Wetzels, GMR; Bulstra, SK; Kuijer, R

    2005-01-01

    Cartilage has poor regenerative capacity. Donor site morbidity and interference with joint homeostasis should be considered when applying the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique. The use of ectopically produced cartilage, derived from periosteum, might be a novel method to heal

  11. Regeneration of articular cartilage by adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells: perspectives from stem cell biology and molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Shu; Karperien, Marcel; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been discovered for more than a decade. Due to the large numbers of cells that can be harvested with relatively little donor morbidity, they are considered to be an attractive alternative to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. Consequently, isolation and differentiation of ASCs draw great attention in the research of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Cartilage defects cause big therapeutic problems because of their low self-repair capacity. Application of ASCs in cartilage regeneration gives hope to treat cartilage defects with autologous stem cells. In recent years, a lot of studies have been performed to test the possibility of using ASCs to re-construct damaged cartilage tissue. In this article, we have reviewed the most up-to-date articles utilizing ASCs for cartilage regeneration in basic and translational research. Our topic covers differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, increased cartilage formation by co-culture of ASCs with chondrocytes and enhancing chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs by gene manipulation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  13. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanth Akkiraju

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage (AC covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA. OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration.

  14. Biomimetically Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol-Based Hybrid Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan D. Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a very limited regeneration capacity. Therefore, injury or degeneration of articular cartilage results in an inferior mechanical stability, load-bearing capacity, and lubrication capability. Here, we developed a biomimetic scaffold consisting of macroporous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA sponges as a platform material for the incorporation of cell-embedded photocrosslinkable poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA, PEGDA-methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (PEGDA-MeCS; PCS, or PEGDA-methacrylated hyaluronic acid (PEGDA-MeHA; PHA within its pores to improve in vitro chondrocyte functions and subsequent in vivo ectopic cartilage tissue formation. Our findings demonstrated that chondrocytes encapsulated in PCS or PHA and loaded into macroporous PVA hybrid scaffolds maintained their physiological phenotypes during in vitro culture, as shown by the upregulation of various chondrogenic genes. Further, the cell-secreted extracellular matrix (ECM improved the mechanical properties of the PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds by 83.30% and 73.76%, respectively, compared to their acellular counterparts. After subcutaneous transplantation in vivo, chondrocytes on both PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds significantly promoted ectopic cartilage tissue formation, which was confirmed by detecting cells positively stained with Safranin-O and for type II collagen. Consequently, the mechanical properties of the hybrid scaffolds were biomimetically reinforced by 80.53% and 210.74%, respectively, compared to their acellular counterparts. By enabling the recapitulation of biomimetically relevant structural and functional properties of articular cartilage and the regulation of in vivo mechanical reinforcement mediated by cell–matrix interactions, this biomimetic material offers an opportunity to control the desired mechanical properties of cell-laden scaffolds for cartilage tissue regeneration.

  15. Projection Stereolithographic Fabrication of Human Adipose Stem Cell-incorporated Biodegradable Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron X Sun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor self-healing ability of cartilage necessitates the development of methods for cartilage regeneration. Scaffold construction with live stem cell incorporation and subsequent differentiation presents a promising route. Projection stereolithography (PSL offers high resolution and processing speed as well as the ability to fabricate scaffolds that precisely fit the anatomy of cartilage defects using medical imaging as the design template. We report here the use of a visible-light based PSL (VL-PSL system to encapsulate human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs into a biodegradable polymer (poly-D,L-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol/ poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA-PEG/hyaluronic acid (HA matrix to produce live cell constructs with customized architectures. After fabrication, hASCs showed high viability (84% and were uniformly distributed throughout the constructs, which possessed high mechanical property with a compressive modulus of 780 kPa. The hASC-seeded constructs were then cultured in Control or TGF-β3-containing chondrogenic medium for up to 28 days. In chondrogenic medium treated group (TGF-β3 group hASCs maintained 77% viability and expressed chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, and aggrecan at 11, 232, and 2.29 x 10(5 fold increases, respectively, compared to levels at day 0 in non-chondrogenic medium. The TGF-β3 group also produced a collagen type II and glycosaminoglycan (GAG-rich extracellular matrix, detected by immunohistochemistry, and Alcian blue and Safranin O staining suggesting robust chondrogenesis within the scaffold. Without chondroinductive addition (Control group, cell viability decreased with time (65% at 28 days and showed poor cartilage matrix deposition. After 28 days, mechanical strength of the TGF-β3 group remained high at 240 kPa. Thus, the PSL- and PLLA-PEG/HA based fabrication method using adult stem cells is a promising approach in producing mechanically competent engineered cartilage for joint cartilage

  16. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits tissue engineering cartilage absorption via inducing the generation of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chichi; Bi, Wei; Gong, Yiming; Ding, Xiaojun; Guo, Xuehua; Sun, Jian; Cui, Lei; Yu, Youcheng

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the mechanisms of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 inhibiting the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. We transfected TGF-β1 gene into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and co-cultured with interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes. We then characterized the morphological changes, apoptosis and characterization of chondrogenic-committed cells from TGF-β1(+) BMMSCs and explored their mechanisms. Results showed that BMMSCs apoptosis and tissue engineering cartilage absorption in the group with added IFN-γ and TNF-α were greater than in the control group. In contrast, there was little BMMSC apoptosis and absorption by tissue engineering cartilage in the group with added CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes; Foxp3(+) T cells and CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells were found. In contrast, no type II collagen or Foxp3(+) T cells or CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells was found in the TGF-β1(-) BMMSC group. The data suggest that IFN-γ and TNF-α induced BMMSCs apoptosis and absorption of tissue engineering cartilage, but the newborn regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibited the function of IFN-γ and TNF-α and protected BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage. TGF-β1not only played a cartilage inductive role, but also inhibited the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. The pathway proposed in our study may simulate the actual reaction procedure after implantation of BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage in vivo. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Tissue engineering techniques to regenerate articular cartilage using polymeric scaffolds.

    OpenAIRE

    PÉREZ OLMEDILLA, MARCOS

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Articular cartilage is a tissue that consists of chondrocytes surrounded by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is mainly composed of type II collagen and proteoglycans. The main function of articular cartilage is to provide a lubricated surface for articulation. Articular cartilage damage is common and may lead to osteoarthritis. Articular cartilage does not have blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic vessels and therefore has limited capacity for intrinsic healing and repair. ...

  19. Cultivation and phenotypic characterization of rabbit epithelial cells expanded ex vivo from fresh and cryopreserved limbal and oral mucosal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promprasit, Daranee; Bumroongkit, Kanokkan; Tocharus, Chainarong; Mevatee, Umnat; Tananuvat, Napaporn

    2015-03-01

    To compare the morphology of cultured rabbit epithelial sheets and the expression of stem cells with differentiated cell markers of cultivated epithelial cells from fresh and cryopreserved limbal and oral mucosal biopsies. Six New Zealand white rabbits were divided into two groups of three, from which limbal and oral mucosal biopsies were taken. Harvested tissues from each rabbit were brought to immediate cultivation, while another set of tissues was cryopreserved. Cultivation was performed by the explant culture technique using human amniotic membrane as a culture substrate, co-culturing with 3T3 fibroblasts and using the air-lifting method. Cells were cultured for three weeks; then cultured epithelial sheets were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and examined for expression patterns of p63, keratin 3 (K3) and connexin 43 (Cx43). Cryopreservation was carried out using the vitrification method. Tissues were preserved in liquid nitrogen using 25% dimethyl sulfoxide combined with 25% propylene glycol in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium containing 20% fetal bovine serum. After two months, the tissues were warmed, cultured and stained using the same processes as for fresh tissue cultures. Cultivation of fresh limbal and fresh oral mucosal tissues showed epithelial stratification, with two to five cell layers. Immunohistochemical staining showed p63-positive cells in basal and intermediate cell layers. K3 staining was observed in cells in the suprabasal layer, while expression of Cx43 was scattered throughout all layers of the epithelia. All culture sheets expressed p63, K3 and Cx43 with the exception of one sheet from the oral mucosal culture that was p63-negative. Cultured epithelial sheets from cryopreserved tissues showed results similar to those from fresh tissue culture. This study found that cells in cultivated fresh limbal and oral mucosal tissues had similar morphology to cells in cultivated cryopreserved limbal and oral mucosal tissues, both containing a

  20. Reproducible simulation of respiratory motion in porcine lung explants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederer, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Plathow, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P. [Dept. of Medical and Biological Informatics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Tetzlaff, R.; Puderbach, M.; Zaporozhan, J.; Kauczor, H.U. [Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bolte, H.; Heller, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a model for exactly reproducible respiration motion simulations of animal lung explants inside an MR-compatible chest phantom. Materials and Methods: The materials included a piston pump and a flexible silicone reconstruction of a porcine diaphragm and were used in combination with an established MR-compatible chest phantom for porcine heart-lung preparations. The rhythmic inflation and deflation of the diaphragm at the bottom of the artificial thorax with water (1-1.5 L) induced lung tissue displacement resembling diaphragmatic breathing. This system was tested on five porcine heart-lung preparations using 1.5T MRI with transverse and coronal 3D-GRE (TR/TE=3.63/1.58, 256 x 256 matrix, 350 mm FOV, 4 mm slices) and half Fourier T2-FSE (TR/TE=545/29, 256 x 192, 350 mm, 6 mm) as well as multiple row detector CT (16 x 1 mm collimation, pitch 1.5, FOV 400 mm, 120 mAs) acquired at five fixed inspiration levels. Dynamic CT scans and coronal MRI with dynamic 2D-GRE and 2D-SS-GRE sequences (image frequencies of 10/sec and 3/sec, respectively) were acquired during continuous 'breathing' (7/minute). The position of the piston pump was visually correlated with the respiratory motion visible through the transparent wall of the phantom and with dynamic displays of CT and MR images. An elastic body splines analysis of the respiratory motion was performed using CT data. Results: Visual evaluation of MRI and CT showed three-dimensional movement of the lung tissue throughout the respiration cycle. Local tissue displacement inside the lung explants was documented with motion maps calculated from CT. The maximum displacement at the top of the diaphragm (mean 26.26 [SD 1.9] mm on CT and 27.16 [SD 1.5] mm on MRI, respectively [p=0.25; Wilcoxon test]) was in the range of tidal breathing in human patients. Conclusion: The chest phantom with a diaphragmatic pump is a promising platform for multi-modality imaging studies of the effects of respiratory lung

  1. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  2. Partial reversal by beta-D-xyloside of salicylate-induced inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis in articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmoski, M.J.; Brandt, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    While net 35 S-glycosaminoglycan synthesis in normal canine articular cartilage was suppressed by 10(-3)M sodium salicylate to about 70% of the control value, addition of xyloside (10(-6)M-10(-3)M) to the salicylate-treated cultures led to a concentration-dependent increase in glycosaminoglycan synthesis, which rose to 120-237% of controls. Similar results were obtained when 3 H-glucosamine was used to measure glycosaminoglycan synthesis, confirming that salicylate suppresses and xyloside stimulates net glycosaminoglycan synthesis, and not merely sulfation. Salicylate (10-3)M) did not affect the activity of xylosyl or galactosyl transferase prepared from canine knee cartilage, and net protein synthesis was unaltered by either salicylate or xyloside. The proportion of newly synthesized proteoglycans existing as aggregates when cartilage was cultured with xyloside was similar to that in controls, although the average hydrodynamic size of disaggregated proteoglycans and of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was diminished

  3. Surface crystalline phases and nanoindentation hardness of explanted zirconia femoral heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catledge, Shane A; Cook, Monique; Vohra, Yogesh K; Santos, Erick M; McClenny, Michelle D; David Moore, K

    2003-10-01

    One new and nine explanted zirconia femoral heads were studied using glancing angle X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and nanoindentation hardness techniques. All starting zirconia implants consisted only of tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (TZP). For comparison, one explanted alumina femoral head was also studied. Evidence for a surface tetragonal-to-monoclinic zirconia phase transformation was observed in some implants, the extent of which was varied for different in-service conditions. A strong correlation was found between increasing transformation to the monoclinic phase and decreasing surface hardness. Microscopic investigations of some of the explanted femoral heads revealed ultra high molecular weight polyethylene and metallic transfer wear debris.

  4. Patient-specific three-dimensional explant spheroids derived from human nasal airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Stevens, Elizabeth Munkebjerg; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation is an ex vivo technique previously used in studies of airway epithelial ion and water transport. Explanted cells and sheets of nasal epithelium form fully differentiated spheroids enclosing a partly fluid-filled lumen with the ciliated apical...... in a single healthy person. CONCLUSION: Patient-specific three-dimensional explant spheroid formation from a minimal invasive nasal brush biopsy is a feasible, fast and valid ex vivo method to assess ciliary function with potential of aiding the diagnosis of PCD. In addition, it may be a useful model...

  5. Indirect organogenesis in milkweed ( Calotropis procera from mature zygotic embryo explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojatollah Abbasi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Milkweed ( Calotropis procera is a valuable medicinal plant which grows in many regions of Iran. Its significant medicinal properties have made it an important crop which is cultivated commercially. This plant is propagated from seeds as well as root and shoot cuttings. Due to problems in the usage of these reproduction methods, new propagation methods such as tissue culturing should be developed. This study was aimed at obtaining appropriate concentrations of plant hormones for indirect organogenesis of milkweed. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD with 3 replications. The effects of various concentrations of (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid 2,4-D (0.1, 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l were studied in terms of callus induction and shoot regeneration on an MS based medium supplemented with BA (benzyl amino purine and NAA (naphthalene acetic acid at the same concentration. Mature embryos were used as explants and morphological traits such as embryo size, callus size, number and size of shoots and roots were recorded. The results showed that 2,4-D significantly increased the size of cultured embryos (P < 0.05. The largest embryo volume was observed in cultures treated with 3 mg/l 2,4-D. The highest callusing was recorded in 2 mg/l 2,4-D. The effects of BA and NAA concentrations on shoot regeneration were significant and the highest values were observed for a combination of 1 mg/l BA and 2 mg/l NAA. 1 mg/l IBA (Indole 3-butyric acid was able to induce the highest number of better quality roots and shoots.

  6. Augmented cartilage regeneration by implantation of cellular versus acellular implants after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel W. Pot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stimulation may be applied to regenerate focal cartilage defects, but generally results in transient clinical improvement and formation of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strive to develop new solutions to regenerate hyaline cartilage tissue. This systematic review and meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview of current literature and assesses the efficacy of articular cartilage regeneration by implantation of cell-laden versus cell-free biomaterials in the knee and ankle joint in animals after bone marrow stimulation. PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP were systematically searched using tissue engineering, cartilage and animals search strategies. Included were primary studies in which cellular and acellular biomaterials were implanted after applying bone marrow stimulation in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals. Study characteristics were tabulated and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis for studies applying semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure (117 studies. Cartilage regeneration was expressed on an absolute 0–100% scale and random effects meta-analyses were performed. Implantation of cellular biomaterials significantly improved cartilage regeneration by 18.6% compared to acellular biomaterials. No significant differences were found between biomaterials loaded with stem cells and those loaded with somatic cells. Culture conditions of cells did not affect cartilage regeneration. Cartilage formation was reduced with adipose-derived stem cells compared to other cell types, but still improved compared to acellular scaffolds. Assessment of the risk of bias was impaired due to incomplete reporting for most studies. Implantation of cellular biomaterials improves cartilage regeneration compared to acellular biomaterials.

  7. Influence of dynamic load on friction behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as artificial cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Su, Yonglin; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Wang, Chengtao

    2010-01-01

    Many biomaterials are being developed to be used for cartilage substitution and hemiarthroplasty implants. The lubrication property is a key feature of the artificial cartilage. The frictional behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel were investigated under cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact, cartilage-on-cartilage contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact using pin-on-plate method. Tests under static load, cyclic load and 1 min load change were used to evaluate friction variations in reciprocating motion. The results showed that the lubrication property of cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact were restored in both 1 min load change and cyclic load tests. The friction coefficient of PVA hydrogel decreased from 0.178 to 0.076 in 60 min, which was almost one-third of the value under static load in continuous sliding tests. In each test, the friction coefficient of cartilage-on-cartilage contact maintained far lower value than other contacts. It is indicated that a key feature of artificial cartilage is the biphasic lubrication properties.

  8. Latent Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 Functionalised Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Human Cartilage Differentiation: Towards an Engineered Cartilage Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erh-Hsuin Lim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo overcome the potential drawbacks of a short half-life and dose-related adverse effects of using active transforming growth factor-beta 1 for cartilage engineering, a cell-mediated latent growth factor activation strategy was developed incorporating latent transforming growth factor-β1 (LTGF into an electrospun poly(L-lactide scaffold.MethodsThe electrospun scaffold was surface modified with NH3 plasma and biofunctionalised with LTGF to produce both random and orientated biofunctionalised electrospun scaffolds. Scaffold surface chemical analysis and growth factor bioavailability assays were performed. In vitro biocompatibility and human nasal chondrocyte gene expression with these biofunctionalised electrospun scaffold templates were assessed. In vivo chondrogenic activity and chondrocyte gene expression were evaluated in athymic rats.ResultsChemical analysis demonstrated that LTGF anchored to the scaffolds was available for enzymatic, chemical and cell activation. The biofunctionalised scaffolds were non-toxic. Gene expression suggested chondrocyte re-differentiation after 14 days in culture. By 6 weeks, the implanted biofunctionalised scaffolds had induced highly passaged chondrocytes to re-express Col2A1 and produce type II collagen.ConclusionsWe have demonstrated a proof of concept for cell-mediated activation of anchored growth factors using a novel biofunctionalised scaffold in cartilage engineering. This presents a platform for development of protein delivery systems and for tissue engineering.

  9. Insulin, a key regulator of hormone responsive milk protein synthesis during lactogenesis in murine mammary explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Karensa K; Lee, Heather J; Lefèvre, Christophe; Ormandy, Christopher J; Macmillan, Keith L; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2010-03-01

    Murine milk protein gene expression requires insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin; however, the role of insulin is not well understood. This study, therefore, examined the requirement of insulin for milk protein synthesis. Mammary explants were cultured in various combinations of the lactogenic hormones and global changes in gene expression analysed using Affymetrix microarray. The expression of 164 genes was responsive to insulin, and 18 were involved in protein synthesis at the level of transcription and posttranscription, as well as amino acid uptake and metabolism. The folate receptor gene was increased by fivefold, highlighting a potentially important role for the hormone in folate metabolism, a process that is emerging to be central for protein synthesis. Interestingly, gene expression of two milk protein transcription factors, Stat5a and Elf5, previously identified as key components of prolactin signalling, both showed an essential requirement for insulin. Subsequent experiments in HCll cells confirmed that Stat5a and Elf5 gene expression could be induced in the absence of prolactin but in the presence of insulin. Whereas prolactin plays an essential role in phosphorylating and activating Stat5a, gene expression is only induced when insulin is present. This indicates insulin plays a crucial role in the transcription of the milk protein genes.

  10. Effect of prolactin on enzymes of lipid biosynthesis in mammary gland explants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, S.B.; Rillema, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of [ 14 C]acetate and [ 3 H]glucose into lipids in cultured mammary gland explants from 10-to 14-day-pregnant mice. This response is biphasic with an early increase occurring from 6 through 12 h, and an additional increase from 16 to 24 h. Enzymes likely to be rate limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase. Of these enzymes only pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was elevated at 6 h, suggesting that this enzymatic activity is important in stimulating early increases in lipogenesis after PRL treatment. In addition, the PRL stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase may also indirectly stimulate acetyl CoA carboxylase through the generation of citrate; this may explain the early (6-12 h) effect of PRL on [ 14 C]acetate incorporation. After 16 h of PRL treatment, the activities of all the lipogenic enzymes were enhanced. The second phase of PRLs stimulation of lipogenesis thus likely involves the enhanced activities of more than one of the lipogenic enzymes

  11. Cultural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage

    1971-01-01

    A critical look at outdoor recreation research and some underlying premises. The author focuses on the concept of culture as communication and how it influences our perception of problems and our search for solutions. Both outdoor recreation and science are viewed as subcultures that have their own bodies of mythology, making recreation problems more difficult to...

  12. Growth factor stimulation improves the structure and properties of scaffold-free engineered auricular cartilage constructs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata G Rosa

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the external ear to correct congenital deformities or repair following trauma remains a significant challenge in reconstructive surgery. Previously, we have developed a novel approach to create scaffold-free, tissue engineering elastic cartilage constructs directly from a small population of donor cells. Although the developed constructs appeared to adopt the structural appearance of native auricular cartilage, the constructs displayed limited expression and poor localization of elastin. In the present study, the effect of growth factor supplementation (insulin, IGF-1, or TGF-β1 was investigated to stimulate elastogenesis as well as to improve overall tissue formation. Using rabbit auricular chondrocytes, bioreactor-cultivated constructs supplemented with either insulin or IGF-1 displayed increased deposition of cartilaginous ECM, improved mechanical properties, and thicknesses comparable to native auricular cartilage after 4 weeks of growth. Similarly, growth factor supplementation resulted in increased expression and improved localization of elastin, primarily restricted within the cartilaginous region of the tissue construct. Additional studies were conducted to determine whether scaffold-free engineered auricular cartilage constructs could be developed in the 3D shape of the external ear. Isolated auricular chondrocytes were grown in rapid-prototyped tissue culture molds with additional insulin or IGF-1 supplementation during bioreactor cultivation. Using this approach, the developed tissue constructs were flexible and had a 3D shape in very good agreement to the culture mold (average error <400 µm. While scaffold-free, engineered auricular cartilage constructs can be created with both the appropriate tissue structure and 3D shape of the external ear, future studies will be aimed assessing potential changes in construct shape and properties after subcutaneous implantation.

  13. Comparative assessment of intrinsic mechanical stimuli on knee cartilage and compressed agarose constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Completo, A; Bandeiras, C; Fonseca, F

    2017-06-01

    A well-established cue for improving the properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is mechanical stimulation. However, the explicit ranges of mechanical stimuli that correspond to favorable metabolic outcomes are elusive. Usually, these outcomes have only been associated with the applied strain and frequency, an oversimplification that can hide the fundamental relationship between the intrinsic mechanical stimuli and the metabolic outcomes. This highlights two important key issues: the firstly is related to the evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical stimuli of native cartilage; the second, assuming that the intrinsic mechanical stimuli will be important, deals with the ability to replicate them on the tissue-engineered constructs. This study quantifies and compares the volume of cartilage and agarose subjected to a given magnitude range of each intrinsic mechanical stimulus, through a numerical simulation of a patient-specific knee model coupled with experimental data of contact during the stance phase of gait, and agarose constructs under direct-dynamic compression. The results suggest that direct compression loading needs to be parameterized with time-dependence during the initial culture period in order to better reproduce each one of the intrinsic mechanical stimuli developed in the patient-specific cartilage. A loading regime which combines time periods of low compressive strain (5%) and frequency (0.5Hz), in order to approach the maximal principal strain and fluid velocity stimulus of the patient-specific cartilage, with time periods of high compressive strain (20%) and frequency (3Hz), in order to approach the pore pressure values, may be advantageous relatively to a single loading regime throughout the full culture period. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined effect of gamma irradiation methods and in vitro explant sources on mutation induction of flower color in Chrysanthemum morifoliun Ramat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki; Miyahira, Eiken; Degi, Konosuke

    1997-01-01

    Effective radiation breeding method was searched by establishing an effective exposure method to induce a mutation involved in flower color of chrysanthemum and clarifying the effects of its combined use with cultured explants. A chrysanthemum 'Taihei', a variety suitable for cut-flower use was used as the subject, which was irradiated at a dose ranging from 0.25-1.5 Gy/day for 20 days. The floral petals, buds and leaves were used as the explants for callus induction culture. The flower color was evaluated using Japanese Standard Color chart for Horticultural Plants. The color spectrum of the adaxial surface of a petal was recorded by spectro-photometer TC-1800 MK-2. Thus, six mutants of flower color were registered as new varieties. Either of these mutants was derived from chronic irradiation. Three varieties from petal culture, two from bud one and one from cutting culture were obtained, showing that the combined method of chronic irradiation and organ culture is useful in practice for mutation breeding of flower species. Further, this method is applicable for production of non-chimeric mutants, enhancement of the mutation rate and widening the mutation spectra in vegetatively propagated plants. (M.N.)

  15. Proteomic Profile of Brucella abortus-Infected Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana P S Mol

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes significant economic losses worldwide. The differential proteomic profile of bovine chorioallantoic membrane (CAM explants at early stages of infection with B. abortus (0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h was determined. Analysis of CAM explants at 0.5 and 4 h showed the highest differences between uninfected and infected CAM explants, and therefore were used for the Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE. A total of 103 spots were present in only one experimental group and were selected for identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI/ToF-ToF. Proteins only identified in extracts of CAM explants infected with B. abortus were related to recognition of PAMPs by TLR, production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular trafficking, and inflammation.

  16. Distribution and utilization of nitrogenated compounds explanted by the soybean nodules by plants during seeds developing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, Severino Matias de

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was carried out, using radioisotopes, for evaluation of the leaf, schuck and seeds areas and, examination of the pattern which is used by the nitrogenated compounds explanted by the soybean nodules

  17. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  18. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  19. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  20. Single-Center Experience With HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device Explantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Cheyne, Christina; Sherazi, Saadia; Melvin, Amber L; Hallinan, William; Chen, Leway; Todd Massey, Howard

    2016-12-01

    In patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) myocardial recovery is uncommon. Given the heterogeneity of the population implanted and low incidence of recovery, the discovery of native left ventricular (LV) recovery and criteria for explantation of CF-LVAD system is not clearly determined. We sought to analyze the characteristics of the patients who underwent CF-LVAD explantation at our institution. Prospectively collected data on patients supported with CF-LVADs were reviewed retrospectively. Patients who underwent CF-LVAD explants were identified and their characteristics were analyzed with a focus on patient presentation and determinants of explantability. From November 2006 to June 2014, 223 patients (181 male, 42 female) underwent implantation of HeartMate II LVAD. Seven female (16.7%) and one male (0.6%) patients were explanted (P < 0.001). Mean age was 43 ± 9 years and etiology for cardiomyopathy was ischemic in three (37.5%) patients, nonischemic in four (50%) patients, and mixed in the one (12.5%) male patient of the cohort. Five (62.5%) patients presented acutely with significant hemolysis, and were found to have LV improvement as well as reduced, absent, or reversed diastolic flow velocities on echocardiography. Overall, mean lactate dehydrogenase level before explantation was 1709 ± 1168 U/L compared to the mean baseline level of 601 ± 316 U/L (P = 0.048). Mean LV ejection fraction (LVEF) improved from 17 ± 7% preimplant to 56 ± 11% pre-explantation (P < 0.001). Median number of days on CF-LVAD support was 870 (interquartile range, 209-975) while mean duration of follow-up after the CF-LVAD explantation was 276 ± 240 days. Mean LVEF dropped from 46 ± 19% postexplantation to 34 ± 10% during the most recent follow-up (P = 0.015). At our institution, patients who underwent LVAD explants were predominantly women with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Clinical evidence of

  1. Androgen-induced Differentiation of the Fibrocartilage of Os Penis Cultured in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ryutaro, Murakami; Kazushige, Miyake; Ikuo, Yamaoka; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University

    1994-01-01

    Primordia of the fibrocartilage of os penis of the rat were cultured in vitro in the presence of testosterone, and the effects of testosterone on the expression of type I collagen, type II collagen, vimentin, the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and Alcian blue-stainable extracellular matrix (ECM) were examined histochemically. Explants cultured in the presence of testosterone formed fibrocartilage while control explants cultured without testosterone formed fibroblastic tissue. Type II...

  2. Recent developments in scaffold-guided cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shi, Kun; Ding, Qiuxia; Qu, Ying; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage repair is one of the most challenging problems in biomedical engineering because the regenerative capacity of cartilage is intrinsically poor. The lack of efficient treatment modalities motivates researches into cartilage tissue engineering such as combing cells, scaffolds and growth factors. In this review we summarize the current developments on scaffold systems available for cartilage tissue engineering. The factors that are critical to successfully design an ideal scaffold for cartilage regeneration were discussed. Then we present examples of selected material types (natural polymers and synthetic polymers) and fabricated forms of the scaffolds (three-dimensional scaffolds, micro- or nanoparticles, and their composites). In the end of review, we conclude with an overview of the ways in which biomedical nanotechnology is widely applied in cartilage tissue engineering, especially in the design of composite scaffolds. This review attempts to provide recommendations on the combination of qualities that would produce the ideal scaffold system for cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. Native joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonagle, Dennis; Baboolal, Thomas G; Jones, Elena

    2017-12-01

    The role of native (not culture-expanded) joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the repair of joint damage in osteoarthritis (OA) is poorly understood. MSCs differ from bone marrow-residing haematopoietic stem cells in that they are present in multiple niches in the joint, including subchondral bone, cartilage, synovial fluid, synovium and adipose tissue. Research in experimental models suggests that the migration of MSCs adjacent to the joint cavity is crucial for chonodrogenesis during embryogenesis, and also shows that synovium-derived MSCs might be the primary drivers of cartilage repair in adulthood. In this Review, the available data is synthesized to produce a proposed model in which joint-resident MSCs with access to superficial cartilage are key cells in adult cartilage repair and represent important targets for manipulation in 'chondrogenic' OA, especially in the context of biomechanical correction of joints in early disease. Growing evidence links the expression of CD271, a nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor by native bone marrow-resident MSCs to a wider role for neurotrophins in OA pathobiology, the implications of which require exploration since anti-NGF therapy might worsen OA. Recognizing that joint-resident MSCs are comparatively abundant in vivo and occupy multiple niches will enable the optimization of single-stage therapeutic interventions for OA.

  4. Efficient in vitro direct shoot organogenesis and regeneration of fertile plants from embryo explants of Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, B; Assoumou, Y; Sangwan, R S

    2003-08-01

    An efficient protocol has been developed for direct shoot organogenesis from embryo axes derived from mature seeds of two different landraces of Bambara groundnut. Multiple shoots were initiated on several media containing different concentrations and combinations of benzylaminopurine (BAP) or thidiazuron (TDZ). Efficient regeneration occurred when the embryo axes were first plated for 6 days on a medium containing high concentrations of BAP (1 mg/l) and alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, 1 mg/l) and then cut transversely and transferred onto a medium containing 1.5 mg/l BAP. Shoot regeneration frequency was 100% and from five to eight shoots per explant were obtained. The importance of using embryo explants and cytokinins in the culture media, with respect to controlling the development of a highly organogenic system, was demonstrated. Histological studies revealed that proliferating buds originated directly from the superficial layers of the explants without an intermediate callus phase. The regenerated shoots were rooted on a medium containing 1 mg/l NAA and then transferred to the greenhouse. Flow cytometric analyses and chloroplast counts of guard cells suggested that the regenerants were diploid. All were morphologically normal and fertile. The short duration, high efficiency and low frequency of somaclonal variation of this system make it well suited for wider biotechnological applications of Bambara groundnut-a neglected and under-utilized crop.

  5. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  6. Heteroarylimino-4-thiazolidinones as inhibitors of cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Anna Maria; Vicini, Paola; Geronikaki, Athina; Incerti, Matteo; Cardile, Venera; Crascì, Lucia; Messina, Rossella; Ronsisvalle, Simone

    2011-02-01

    2-Benzo[d]thiazolyl- and 2-benzo[d]isothiazolyl-imino-5-benzylidene-4-thiazolidinone derivatives were investigated as potential metalloproteinases (MMPs) inhibitors and evaluated for their antidegenerative activity on human chondrocyte cultures stimulated by IL-1β, using an experimental model that reproduces the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritic (OA) diseases. Cell viability, the amount of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and the production of nitric oxide (NO) were measured. The most potent compound, 5-(4-methoxy-benzylidene)-2-(benzo[d]isothiazol-3-ylimino)-thiazolidin-4-one (4b), a MMP-13 inhibitor at nanomolar concentration (IC(50)=0.036 μM), could be considered as a lead compound for the development of novel clinical agents, inhibitors of cartilage degradation, for the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Uncommon Plant Growth Regulator, Diethyl Aminoethyl Hexanoate, Is Highly Effective in Tissue Cultures of the Important Medicinal Plant Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Lu Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of various concentrations of diethyl aminoethyl hexanoate (DA-6 on the regeneration and growth of adventitious buds in in vitro purple coneflower cultures. Among the 3 types of explants tested, leaf explants required higher concentrations of DA-6 than petiole and root explants in order to obtain high regeneration rates, while root explants required the lowest concentration of DA-6. Additionally, explants with higher ploidy levels were more sensitive to the addition of DA-6, while explants with lower ploidy levels required higher concentrations of DA-6 to achieve its maximal regeneration rate. Interestingly, the application of a concentration that was conducive to the regeneration of explants with lower ploidy levels was inhibitory to the regeneration of explants with higher ploidy levels. Moreover, during the growth of regenerated buds, DA-6 application significantly improved plant height and weight, root weight, root thickness, root number, primary root length, total root length, and root/top ratio. Differences in the responses of explants to supplementation with DA-6 were also observed among explants with different ploidy levels, with buds having lower ploidy levels responding to lower concentrations of DA-6. Taken together, the results of the present experiments showed that proper application of DA-6 could increase in vitro culture efficiency in purple coneflower.

  8. Abdominal reoperation and mesh explantation following open ventral hernia repair with mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mike K; Li, Linda T; Nguyen, Mylan T; Berger, Rachel L; Hicks, Stephanie C; Kao, Lillian S

    2014-10-01

    This study sought to identify the incidence, indications, and predictors of abdominal reoperation and mesh explantation following open ventral hernia repair with mesh (OVHR). A retrospective cohort study of all patients at a single institution who underwent an OVHR from 2000 to 2010 was performed. Patients who required subsequent abdominal reoperation or mesh explantation were compared with those who did not. Reasons for reoperation were recorded. The 2 groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis (MVA). A total of 407 patients were followed for a median (range) of 57 (1 to 143) months. Subsequent abdominal reoperation was required in 69 (17%) patients. The most common reasons for reoperation were recurrence and surgical site infection. Only the number of prior abdominal surgeries was associated with abdominal reoperation on MVA. Twenty-eight patients (6.9%) underwent subsequent mesh explantation. Only the Ventral Hernia Working Group grade was associated with mesh explantation on MVA. Abdominal reoperation and mesh explantation following OVHR are common. Overwhelmingly, surgical complications are themost common causes for reoperation and mesh explantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetization transfer analysis of cartilage repair tissue: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, F. [University ' Federico II' , Department of Radiology, Naples (Italy); Keyzer, F. de [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Maes, F. [Catholic University Leuven, Department of Electrotechnics, Faculty of Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Breuseghem, I. van [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gent (Belgium)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) after two different cartilage repair procedures, and to compare these data with the MTR of normal cartilage. Twenty-seven patients with a proven cartilage defect were recruited: 13 were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and 14 were treated with the microfracture technique (MFR). All patients underwent MRI examinations with MT-sequences before the surgical treatment, after 12 months (26 patients) and after 24 months (11 patients). Eleven patients received a complete follow-up study at all three time points (five of the ACI group and six of the MFR group). All images were transferred to a workstation to calculate MTR images. For every MT image set, different ROIs were delineated by two radiologists. Means were calculated per ROI type in the different time frames and in both groups of cartilage repair. The data were analyzed with unpaired t- and ANOVA tests, and by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient. No significant differences were found in the MTR of fatty bone marrow, muscle and normal cartilage in the different time frames. There was a significant but small difference between the MTR of normal cartilage and the cartilage repair area after 12 months for both procedures. After 24 months, the MTR of ACI repaired cartilage (0.31{+-}0.07) was not significantly different from normal cartilage MTR (0.34{+-}0.05). The MTR of MFR repaired cartilage (0.28{+-}0.02), still showed a significant difference from normal cartilage. The differences between damaged and repaired cartilage MTR are too small to enable MT-imaging to be a useful tool for postoperative follow-up of cartilage repair procedures. There is, however, an evolution towards normal MTR-values in the cartilage repair tissue (especially after ACI repair). (orig.)

  10. Magnetization transfer analysis of cartilage repair tissue: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, F.; Keyzer, F. de; Maes, F.; Breuseghem, I. van

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) after two different cartilage repair procedures, and to compare these data with the MTR of normal cartilage. Twenty-seven patients with a proven cartilage defect were recruited: 13 were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and 14 were treated with the microfracture technique (MFR). All patients underwent MRI examinations with MT-sequences before the surgical treatment, after 12 months (26 patients) and after 24 months (11 patients). Eleven patients received a complete follow-up study at all three time points (five of the ACI group and six of the MFR group). All images were transferred to a workstation to calculate MTR images. For every MT image set, different ROIs were delineated by two radiologists. Means were calculated per ROI type in the different time frames and in both groups of cartilage repair. The data were analyzed with unpaired t- and ANOVA tests, and by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient. No significant differences were found in the MTR of fatty bone marrow, muscle and normal cartilage in the different time frames. There was a significant but small difference between the MTR of normal cartilage and the cartilage repair area after 12 months for both procedures. After 24 months, the MTR of ACI repaired cartilage (0.31±0.07) was not significantly different from normal cartilage MTR (0.34±0.05). The MTR of MFR repaired cartilage (0.28±0.02), still showed a significant difference from normal cartilage. The differences between damaged and repaired cartilage MTR are too small to enable MT-imaging to be a useful tool for postoperative follow-up of cartilage repair procedures. There is, however, an evolution towards normal MTR-values in the cartilage repair tissue (especially after ACI repair). (orig.)

  11. Microfluidic-based screening of resveratrol and drug-loading PLA/Gelatine nano-scaffold for the repair of cartilage defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Li; Zhipeng, Yuan; Fei, Yu; Feng, Rao; Jian, Weng; Baoguo, Jiang; Yongqiang, Wen; Peixun, Zhang

    2018-03-26

    Cartilage defect is common in clinical but notoriously difficult to treat for low regenerative and migratory capacity of chondrocytes. Biodegradable tissue engineering nano-scaffold with a lot of advantages has been the direction of material to repair cartilage defect in recent years. The objective of our study is to establish a biodegradable drug-loading synthetic polymer (PLA) and biopolymer (Gelatine) composite 3D nano-scaffold to support the treatment of cartilage defect. We designed a microfluidic chip-based drug-screening device to select the optimum concentration of resveratrol, which has strong protective capability for chondrocyte. Then biodegradable resveratrol-loading PLA/Gelatine 3D nano-scaffolds were fabricated and used to repair the cartilage defects. As a result, we successfully cultured primary chondrocytes and screened the appropriate concentrations of resveratrol by the microfluidic device. We also smoothly obtained superior biodegradable resveratrol-loading PLA/Gelatine 3D nano-scaffolds and compared the properties and therapeutic effects of cartilage defect in rats. In summary, our microfluidic device is a simple but efficient platform for drug screening and resveratrol-loading PLA/Gelatine 3D nano-scaffolds could greatly promote the cartilage formation. It would be possible for materials and medical researchers to explore individualized pharmacotherapy and drug-loading synthetic polymer and biopolymer composite tissue engineering scaffolds for the repair of cartilage defect in future.

  12. The effect of 60Co γ irradiation on culture in vitro of Pogostemon cablin (blanco) benth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lirong; He Hong; Zhang Yanling; Liu Xing; Lin Xiaohua

    2008-01-01

    The 60 Co γ-irradiation on culture in vitro of Pogostemon cablin is studied to breed new variety. The explants used for 60 Co γ-irradiation were the leaf segments, nodular stem segments, stem segments and root tips from Pogostemon cablin. The media for culture in vitro were MT basal media containing 0.05mg/L BA. As irradiation dosage increased, the mortality of different explants from Pogostemon cablin increased. The irradiation dosage of LD50 for leaf segments, nodular stem segments and stem segments were 72, 64 and 66Gy, respectively, which were deduced from the regression equation. As the irradiation dosage increased, the ability of the plant regeneration of the explants decreased. 60 Co γ-irradiation could make the explants damage or die. Irradiation could inhibit the regeneration of explants from Pogostemon cablin obviously. The changes in the appearance of the regenerated plants were also observed. (authors)

  13. RESEARCH ON BEHAVIOUR OF GINKGO BILOBA IN THE INITIATION STAGE OF IN VITRO CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Radomir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the realizations of the tehnology of producing biological material with rapidly clonal multiplication with reference at the phase of in vitro initiation. The growth of Ginkgo biloba explants was influenced by the period of explants sampling and by the composition of culture medium. The explants sampled from the herbaceous shoots a year old cropping at the end of the summer have the best behavior. They have registered 80% explants growth on culture medium MS with 20 mg/l benzyladenine. As one goes along the concentration of benzyladenine decreased, has been found a diminution of the number of explants growth until 25% and a progresive growth of the length of the shoots obtained.

  14. Effect of intra-articular administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs for MRI assessment of the cartilage barrier in a large animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Labens

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of cartilage disease at a time when changes are limited to depletion of extracellular matrix components represents an important diagnostic target to reduce patient morbidity. This report is to present proof of concept for nanoparticle dependent cartilage barrier imaging in a large animal model including the use of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Conditioned (following matrix depletion and unconditioned porcine metacarpophalangeal cartilage was evaluated on the basis of fluorophore conjugated 30 nm and 80 nm spherical gold nanoparticle permeation and multiphoton laser scanning and bright field microscopy after autometallographic particle enhancement. Consequently, conditioned and unconditioned joints underwent MRI pre- and post-injection with 12 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs to evaluate particle permeation in the context of matrix depletion and use of a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. To gauge the potential pro-inflammatory effect of intra-articular nanoparticle delivery co-cultures of equine synovium and cartilage tissue were exposed to an escalating dose of SPIONs and IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2 were assessed in culture media. The chemotactic potential of growth media samples was subsequently assessed in transwell migration assays on isolated equine neutrophils. Results demonstrate an increase in MRI signal following conditioning of porcine joints which suggests that nanoparticle dependent compositional cartilage imaging is feasible. Tissue culture and neutrophil migration assays highlight a dose dependent inflammatory response following SPION exposure which at the imaging dose investigated was not different from controls. The preliminary safety and imaging data support the continued investigation of nanoparticle dependent compositional cartilage imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report in using SPIONs as intra-articular MRI contrast agent for studying cartilage barrier function

  15. Direct adventitious shoot bud formation on hypocotyls explants in Millettia pinnata (L.) Panigrahi- a biodiesel producing medicinal tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Durga Singh; Jha, Suman Kumar; Jani, Jigar

    2015-04-01

    A reproducible protocol developed for in vitro regeneration of Milletia pinnata using hypocotyl segments. Multiple shoots were induced from hypocotyl explants through direct adventitious shoot bud regeneration. The proximal end of hypocotyls was responsive for shoot bud induction. Silver nitrate and adenine sulphate had a positive effect on shoot bud induction and elongation. The maximum response and number of shoot bud produced in media supplemented with 8.88 μM BAP with 108.6 μM adenine sulphate and 11.84 μM silver nitrate. Elongated shoots were harvested and successful rooting of microshoots achieved on MS media supplemented with 9.84 μM IBA, with 81.1 % rooting. Remaining shoot buds sub-cultured for further multiplication and elongation. Each subculture produced eight to nine elongated microshoots up to four subcultures. The rooted microshoots were successfully hardened and transferred to field.

  16. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP, have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA.

  17. Chondroprotective effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in conjunction with hypoxia on bovine cartilage-matrix synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Eraj Humayun; Pan-Pan, Chong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Mohd Azhar Bin; Djordjevic, Ivan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a tissue specifically adapted to a specific niche with a low oxygen tension (hypoxia), and the presence of such conditions is a key factor in regulating growth and survival of chondrocytes. Zinc deficiency has been linked to cartilage-related disease, and presence of Zinc is known to provide antibacterial benefits, which makes its inclusion attractive in an in vitro system to reduce infection. Inclusion of 1% zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) in poly octanediol citrate (POC) polymer cultured in hypoxia has not been well determined. In this study we investigated the effects of ZnONP on chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis cultured under normoxia (21% O2 ) and hypoxia (5% O2 ). We report an upregulation of chondrocyte proliferation and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (S-GAG) in hypoxic culture. Results demonstrate a synergistic effect of oxygen concentration and 1% ZnONP in up-regulation of anabolic gene expression (Type II collagen and aggrecan), and a down regulation of catabolic (MMP-13) gene expression. Furthermore, production of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1A (HIF-1A) in response to hypoxic condition to regulate chondrocyte survival under hypoxia is not affected by the presence of 1% ZnONP. Presence of 1% ZnONP appears to act to preserve homeostasis of cartilage in its hypoxic environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of Basal Medium, Explants Size and Density on the In Vitro Proliferation and Growth of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. Cultivar ‘16-bis’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouaad Amine MAZRI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of basal medium, explant size and density on shoot multiplication, growth, rooting and acclimatization of date palm cv. ‘16-bis’ was evaluated. Bud clusters of different sizes (2, 3, 4 and 5 buds per cluster were cultured at density of 1, 2, 3 and 4 clusters on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS, woody plant medium (WPM and Nitsch medium (NM supplemented with 0.5 mg/L 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and 0.5 mg/L kinetin for three months (multiplication phase. Separated shoots of different sizes (<3 cm; 3 to 4.5 cm and 4.5 to 6 cm were cultured at density of 1, 2, 3 and 4 shoots on hormone free MS medium, WPM or NM for three months (Elongation-rooting phase. The proliferation and development of shoots were affected by the basal medium, explant size and density. The optimal shoot proliferation (18.1 was observed when 4 buds clusters were cultured at the density of 2 clusters per jar in MS medium. Separated shoots of 4.5 to 6 cm length exhibited the optimal in vitro development in terms of leaf length and greening, and root number and length when cultured on MS medium. In addition, these shoots reached the highest acclimation frequency with 80%. Our results would be utilized for an efficient propagation of plantlets of cv. ‘16-bis’, a selected date palm cultivar resistant to the bayoud disease.

  19. The impact of patient co-morbidities on the regenerative capacity of cardiac explant-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Audrey E; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Latham, Nicholas; Tilokee, Everad L; Villanueva, Melanie; Mount, Seth; Lam, Bu-Khanh; Ruel, Marc; Stewart, Duncan J; Davis, Darryl R

    2016-05-26

    Although patient-sourced cardiac stem cells repair damaged myocardium, the extent to which medical co-morbidities influence cardiac-derived cell products is uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the influence of atherosclerotic risk factors on the regenerative performance of human cardiac explant-derived cells (EDCs). In this study, the Long Term Stratification for survivors of acute coronary syndromes model was used to quantify the burden of cardiovascular risk factors within a group of patients with established atherosclerosis. EDCs were cultured from human atrial appendages and injected into immunodeficient mice 7 days post-left coronary ligation. Cytokine arrays and enzyme linked immunoassays were used to determine the release of cytokines by EDCs in vitro, and echocardiography was used to determine regenerative capabilities in vivo. EDCs sourced from patients with more cardiovascular risk factors demonstrated a negative correlation with production of pro-healing cytokines (such as stromal cell derived factor 1α) and exosomes which had negative effects on the promotion of angiogenesis and chemotaxis. Reductions in exosomes and pro-healing cytokines with accumulating medical co-morbidities were associated with increases in production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) by EDCs. Increased patient co-morbidities were also correlated with significant attenuation in improvements of left ventricular ejection fraction. The regenerative performance of the earliest precursor cell population cultured from human explant tissue declines with accumulating medical co-morbidities. This effect is associated with diminished production of pro-cardiogenic cytokines and exosomes while IL-6 is markedly increased. Predictors of cardiac events demonstrated a lower capacity to support angiogenesis and repair injured myocardium in a mouse model of myocardial infarction.

  20. EVALUATION OF DESCONTAMINATION PRODUCTS, IN EXPLANTS OF BANANA (Musa AAB cv. MAÇÃ AVALIAÇÃO DE PRODUTOS NA DESCONTAMINAÇÃO DE EXPLANTES DE BANANA (Musa AAB cv. MAÇÃ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurízia de Fátima Carneiro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    This experiment was accomplished in the tissue culture laboratory at Setor de Horticultura, Escola de Agronomia, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO, Brazil, from May to August 1999. Some products were evaluated concerning their potential control of endogenous fungi and bacteria on banana explants of Musa AAB cv. Maçã in vitro culture. The following products and respective concentrations were evaluated. NaOCl at 103, 3´103 and 5´103 mg L-1; benomyl at 100, 200 and 300 mg L-1; cefotaxim at 100, 200 and 300 mg L-1 and rifampicin at 100, 200 and 300 mg L-1. The results showed that cefotaxim at 300 mg L-1 retarded the contamination of explants in the initial phase of implantation and reduced of bacteria and fungi infestation.

    KEY-WORDS: Tissue culture; contamination agents; fungicides; bactericides.

    Este experimento foi realizado no Laboratório de Cultura de Tecidos do Setor de Horticultura da Escola de Agronomia da Universidade Federal de Goiás, em Goiânia, (GO, no período de maio a agosto de 1999. Alguns produtos foram avaliados quanto ao controle potencial de bactérias e fungos endógenos em explantes de banana

  1. Molecular analysis of chondrocytes cultured in agarose in response to dynamic compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallein-Gerin Frédéric

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is exposed to high mechanical loads under normal physiological conditions and articular chondrocytes regulate the composition of cartilaginous matrix, in response to mechanical signals. However, the intracellular pathways involved in mechanotransduction are still being defined. Using the well-characterized chondrocyte/agarose model system and dynamic compression, we report protocols for preparing and characterizing constructs of murine chondrocytes and agarose, and analyzing the effect of compression on steady-state level of mRNA by RT-PCR, gene transcription by gene reporter assay, and phosphorylation state of signalling molecules by Western-blotting. The mouse model is of particular interest because of the availability of a large choice of bio-molecular tools suitable to study it, as well as genetically modified mice. Results Chondrocytes cultured in agarose for one week were surrounded by a newly synthesized pericellular matrix, as revealed by immunohistochemistry prior to compression experiments. This observation indicates that this model system is suitable to study the role of matrix molecules and trans-membrane receptors in cellular responsiveness to mechanical stress. The chondrocyte/agarose constructs were then submitted to dynamic compression with FX-4000C™ Flexercell® Compression Plus™ System (Flexcell. After clearing proteins off agarose, Western-blotting analysis showed transient activation of Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK in response to dynamic compression. After assessment by capillary electrophoresis of the quality of RNA extracted from agarose, steady-state levels of mRNA expression was measured by real time PCR. We observed an up-regulation of cFos and cJun mRNA levels as a response to compression, in accordance with the mechanosensitive character observed for these two genes in other studies using cartilage explants submitted to compression. To explore further the

  2. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

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    Amilton M Fernandes

    Full Text Available Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin, ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  3. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Amilton M; Herlofsen, Sarah R; Karlsen, Tommy A; Küchler, Axel M; Fløisand, Yngvar; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin), ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  4. An efficient protocol for in vitro direct shoot organogenesis ofSesamum indicumL. using cotyledon as explant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, A J; Gangopadhyay, G; Basu, D; Sikdar, S R

    2018-03-01

    Establishment of a suitable regeneration protocol is a pre-requisite to carry out transformation study in Sesamum indicum L. (sesame). In this paper, different parameters of regeneration were standardised to develop an efficient protocol for in vitro plant regeneration via direct adventitious shoot organogenesis using de-embryonated cotyledons of sesame as explants. Among the various treatments of MS medium supplemented with 6-benzylaminopurine, thidiazuron and indole-3-acetic acid, maximum regeneration frequency (25.93  ±  2.21%) was obtained in BTI 4 medium (MS supplemented with 33.33 µM BAP with 2.85 µM IAA) within 6 weeks of culture. Regeneration frequency increased further (50.37 ± 2.49%) by fortifying BTI 4 with 29.43 µM silver nitrate (AG 3 medium). Pre-culture of cotyledon explants in AB 3 medium (AG 3 supplemented with 3.78 µM abscisic acid) for 14 days followed by sub-culture in AG 3 medium further improved the regeneration frequency (68.15 ± 2.68%). The highest rate of shoot regeneration (94.82 ± 1.34%) was obtained by pre-culturing 4-day-old cotyledon in a vertical position in AB 3 medium for 14 days and sub-culturing in AG 3 medium for 4 weeks. Regenerated shoots proliferated in MS medium supplemented with 4.44 μM BAP and 1.44 μM gibberelic acid (GA 3 ). The highest frequency (65.33 ± 3.78%) of root induction was achieved by culturing the elongated shoots in MS medium supplemented with 2.69 μM α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) for 6 weeks. Rooted plants were acclimatised in soilrite and transferred to soil after 6-8 weeks. The rate of acclimatisation of plants was 76%.

  5. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

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    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  6. Knee cartilage segmentation and thickness computation from ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Amir; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Goh, Siew-Li; Lai, Khin Wee

    2018-04-01

    Quantitative thickness computation of knee cartilage in ultrasound images requires segmentation of a monotonous hypoechoic band between the soft tissue-cartilage interface and the cartilage-bone interface. Speckle noise and intensity bias captured in the ultrasound images often complicates the segmentation task. This paper presents knee cartilage segmentation using locally statistical level set method (LSLSM) and thickness computation using normal distance. Comparison on several level set methods in the attempt of segmenting the knee cartilage shows that LSLSM yields a more satisfactory result. When LSLSM was applied to 80 datasets, the qualitative segmentation assessment indicates a substantial agreement with Cohen's κ coefficient of 0.73. The quantitative validation metrics of Dice similarity coefficient and Hausdorff distance have average values of 0.91 ± 0.01 and 6.21 ± 0.59 pixels, respectively. These satisfactory segmentation results are making the true thickness between two interfaces of the cartilage possible to be computed based on the segmented images. The measured cartilage thickness ranged from 1.35 to 2.42 mm with an average value of 1.97 ± 0.11 mm, reflecting the robustness of the segmentation algorithm to various cartilage thickness. These results indicate a potential application of the methods described for assessment of cartilage degeneration where changes in the cartilage thickness can be quantified over time by comparing the true thickness at a certain time interval.

  7. Mechanical Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Using Microscopic Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ziying; Schmid, Thomas M.; Yasar, Temel K.; Liu, Yifei; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is essential for the optimization of cartilage tissue engineering strategies. Microscopic magnetic resonance elastography (μMRE) is a recently developed MR-based technique that can nondestructively visualize shear wave motion. From the observed wave pattern in MR phase images the tissue mechanical properties (e.g., shear modulus or stiffness) can be extracted. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of small and stiff tissue-engineered cartilage, μMRE needs to be performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. However, at frequencies greater than 1 kHz shear waves are rapidly attenuated in soft tissues. In this study μMRE, with geometric focusing, was used to overcome the rapid wave attenuation at high frequencies, enabling the measurement of the shear modulus of tissue-engineered cartilage. This methodology was first tested at a frequency of 5 kHz using a model system composed of alginate beads embedded in agarose, and then applied to evaluate extracellular matrix development in a chondrocyte pellet over a 3-week culture period. The shear stiffness in the pellet was found to increase over time (from 6.4 to 16.4 kPa), and the increase was correlated with both the proteoglycan content and the collagen content of the chondrocyte pellets (R2=0.776 and 0.724, respectively). Our study demonstrates that μMRE when performed with geometric focusing can be used to calculate and map the shear properties within tissue-engineered cartilage during its development. PMID:24266395

  8. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds

  9. Repair of rabbit cartilage defect based on the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and Nano-HA/PLLA composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weimin; Guo, Daiqi; Peng, Liangquan; Chen, Yun Fang; Cui, Jiaming; Xiong, Jianyi; Lu, Wei; Duan, Li; Chen, Kang; Zeng, Yanjun; Wang, Daping

    2017-02-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and Nano-hydroxyapatite/poly (l-lactic acid) (Nano-HA/PLLA) in repairing the rabbit knee joint with full-thickness cartilage defect. Method The rBMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and the third generation of rBMSCs was co-cultured with the Nano-HA/PLLA to construct the tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC). Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits were selected and randomly divided into three groups, namely, TEC group, Nano-HA/PLLA group, and control group. A cartilage defect model with the diameter of 4.5 mm and depth of 5 mm was constructed on the articular surface of medial malleolus of rabbit femur. General observation, histological observation, and Wakitani's histological scoring were conducted in the 12th and 24th week postoperatively. Results The results of TEC group indicated that new cartilage tissue was formed on the defect site and subchondral bone achieved physiological integration basically. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses indicated the generation of massive extracellular matrix. In contrast, limited regeneration and reconstruction of cartilage was achieved in the Nano-HA/PLLA group and control group, with a significant difference from the TEC group (p Nano-HA/PLLA combined with BMSCs promoted the repair of weight-bearing bone of adult rabbit's knee joint with cartilage defect.

  10. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo

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    LS Moreira Teixeira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  11. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira Teixeira, L S; Leijten, J C H; Sobral, J; Jin, R; van Apeldoorn, A A; Feijen, J; van Blitterswijk, C; Dijkstra, P J; Karperien, M

    2012-06-05

    Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA) hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  12. Direct and indirect plant regeneration from various explants of ...

    Afr