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Sample records for cartilage explants cultures

  1. The metabolic dynamics of cartilage explants over a long-term culture period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K Moo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although previous studies have been performed on cartilage explant cultures, the generalized dynamics of cartilage metabolism after extraction from the host are still poorly understood due to differences in the experimental setups across studies, which in turn prevent building a complete picture. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the response of cartilage to the trauma sustained during extraction and determined the time needed for the cartilage to stabilize. Explants were extracted aseptically from bovine metacarpal-phalangeal joints and cultured for up to 17 days. RESULTS: The cell viability, cell number, proteoglycan content, and collagen content of the harvested explants were analyzed at 0, 2, 10, and 17 days after explantation. A high percentage of the cartilage explants were found to be viable. The cell density initially increased significantly but stabilized after two days. The proteoglycan content decreased gradually over time, but it did not decrease to a significant level due to leakage through the distorted peripheral collagen network and into the bathing medium. The collagen content remained stable for most of the culture period until it dropped abruptly on day 17. CONCLUSION: Overall, the tested cartilage explants were sustainable over long-term culture. They were most stable from day 2 to day 10. The degradation of the collagen on day 17 did not reach diseased levels, but it indicated the potential of the cultures to develop into degenerated cartilage. These findings have implications for the application of cartilage explants in pathophysiological fields.

  2. Articular cartilage explant culture; an appropriate in vitro system to compare osteoarthritic and normal human cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber, F. P.; Vander Kraan, P. M.; van Roy, J. L.; Huber-Bruning, O.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Proteoglycan metabolism of normal and histologically mild to moderate osteoarthritic cartilage explants were studied. Explants were obtained from the human knee of donors aged over 40 years. Proteoglycan content, synthesis and release were very similar in normal cartilage obtained from donors with

  3. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roelof

    PURPOSE: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. METHODS: Explants of porcine

  4. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Methods: Explants of porcine

  5. Suppression of MMP activity in bovine cartilage explants cultures has little if any effect on the release of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Bijue; Chen, Pingping; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive loss of articular cartilage is a central hallmark in many joint disease, however, the relative importance of individual proteolytic pathways leading to cartilage erosion is at present unknown. We therefore investigated the time-dependant release ex vivo of MMP- and aggreca......BACKGROUND: Progressive loss of articular cartilage is a central hallmark in many joint disease, however, the relative importance of individual proteolytic pathways leading to cartilage erosion is at present unknown. We therefore investigated the time-dependant release ex vivo of MMP......- and aggrecanase-derived fragments of aggrecan and type II collagen into the supernatant of bovine cartilage explants cultures using neo-epitope specific immunoassays, and to associate the release of these fragments with the activity of proteolytic enzymes using inhibitors. FINDINGS: Bovine cartilage explants were...... cultured in the presence or absence of the catabolic cytokines oncostatin M (OSM) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). In parallel, explants were co-cultured with protease inhibitors such as GM6001, TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3. Fragments released into the supernatant were determined using a range of neo...

  6. Suppression of MMP activity in bovine cartilage explants cultures has little if any effect on the release of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondergaard Bodil-Cecilie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive loss of articular cartilage is a central hallmark in many joint disease, however, the relative importance of individual proteolytic pathways leading to cartilage erosion is at present unknown. We therefore investigated the time-dependant release ex vivo of MMP- and aggrecanase-derived fragments of aggrecan and type II collagen into the supernatant of bovine cartilage explants cultures using neo-epitope specific immunoassays, and to associate the release of these fragments with the activity of proteolytic enzymes using inhibitors. Findings Bovine cartilage explants were cultured in the presence or absence of the catabolic cytokines oncostatin M (OSM and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα. In parallel, explants were co-cultured with protease inhibitors such as GM6001, TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3. Fragments released into the supernatant were determined using a range of neo-epitope specific immunoassays; (1 sandwich 342FFGVG-G2 ELISA, (2 competition NITEGE373ELISA (3 sandwich G1-NITEGE373 ELISA (4 competition 374ARGSV ELISA, and (5 sandwich 374ARGSV-G2 ELISA all detecting aggrecan fragments, and (6 sandwich CTX-II ELISA, detecting C-telopeptides of type II collagen. We found that (1 aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments are released in the early (day 2-7 and mid phase (day 9-14 into the supernatant from bovine explants cultures stimulated with catabolic cytokines, (2 the release of NITEGE373 neo-epitopes are delayed compared to the corresponding 374ARGSV fragments, (3 the MMP inhibitor GM6001 did not reduce the release of aggrecanase-derived fragment, but induced a further delay in the release of these fragments, and finally (4 the MMP-derived aggrecan and type II collagen fragments were released in the late phase (day 16-21 only. Conclusion Our data support the model, that aggrecanases and MMPs act independently in the processing of the aggrecan molecules, and furthermore that suppression of MMP-activity had little if

  7. Effect of glutaraldehyde fixation on the frictional response of immature bovine articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Hehir, Kristin E; Zhu, Kaicen; Willis, Callen E; Marinescu, Anca G; Merali, Natasha; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2014-02-07

    This study examined functional properties and biocompatibility of glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine articular cartilage over several weeks of incubation at body temperature to investigate its potential use as a resurfacing material in joint arthroplasty. In the first experiment, treated cartilage disks were fixed using 0.02, 0.20 and 0.60% glutaraldehyde for 24h then incubated, along with an untreated control group, in saline for up to 28d at 37°C. Both the equilibrium compressive and tensile moduli increased nearly twofold in treated samples compared to day 0 control, and remained at that level from day 1 to 28; the equilibrium friction coefficient against glass rose nearly twofold immediately after fixation (day 1) but returned to control values after day 7. Live explants co-cultured with fixed explants showed no quantitative difference in cell viability over 28d. In general, no significant differences were observed between 0.20 and 0.60% groups, so 0.20% was deemed sufficient for complete fixation. In the second experiment, cartilage-on-cartilage frictional measurements were performed under a migrating contact configuration. In the treated group, one explant was fixed using 0.20% glutaraldehyde while the apposing explant was left untreated; in the control group both explants were left untreated. From day 1 to 28, the treated group exhibited either no significant difference or slightly lower friction coefficient than the untreated group. These results suggest that a properly titrated glutaraldehyde treatment can reproduce the desired functional properties of native articular cartilage and maintain these properties for at least 28d at body temperature. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Cytoarchitecture in cultured rat neocortex explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B. M.; Ruijter, J. M.; Romijn, H. J.

    1988-01-01

    Neocortex explants obtained from 6-day-old rat pups and cultured in a serum-free medium from 5 hr to 13 days in vitro (DIV) show preservation of cytoarchitectural characteristics. Major changes in the size of the explants and their layers occur during the first 2 DIV. A radial arrangement of neurons

  9. High throughput proteomic analysis of the secretome in an explant model of articular cartilage inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutterbuck, Abigail L.; Smith, Julia R.; Allaway, David; Harris, Pat; Liddell, Susan; Mobasheri, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This study employed a targeted high-throughput proteomic approach to identify the major proteins present in the secretome of articular cartilage. Explants from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were incubated alone or with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β, 10 ng/ml), with or without carprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, for six days. After tryptic digestion of culture medium supernatants, resulting peptides were separated by HPLC and detected in a Bruker amaZon ion trap instrument. The five most abundant peptides in each MS scan were fragmented and the fragmentation patterns compared to mammalian entries in the Swiss-Prot database, using the Mascot search engine. Tryptic peptides originating from aggrecan core protein, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), fibronectin, fibromodulin, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), clusterin (CLU), cartilage intermediate layer protein-1 (CILP-1), chondroadherin (CHAD) and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1 and MMP-3 were detected. Quantitative western blotting confirmed the presence of CILP-1, CLU, MMP-1, MMP-3 and TSP-1. Treatment with IL-1β increased MMP-1, MMP-3 and TSP-1 and decreased the CLU precursor but did not affect CILP-1 and CLU levels. Many of the proteins identified have well-established extracellular matrix functions and are involved in early repair/stress responses in cartilage. This high throughput approach may be used to study the changes that occur in the early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:21354348

  10. Effects of low molecular weight hyaluronan combined with carprofen on canine osteoarthritis articular chondrocytes and cartilage explants in vitro.

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    Euppayo, Thippaporn; Siengdee, Puntita; Buddhachat, Kittisak; Pradit, Waranee; Viriyakhasem, Nawarat; Chomdej, Siriwadee; Ongchai, Siriwan; Harada, Yasuji; Nganvongpanit, Korakot

    2015-09-01

    Intra-articular injection with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is used to treat inflammatory joint disease, but the side effects of NSAIDs include chondrotoxicity. Hyaluronan has shown positive effects on chondrocytes by reducing apoptosis and increasing proteoglycan synthesis. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of low molecular weight hyaluronan (low MW HA), carprofen 25 mg/ml, carprofen 12.5 mg/ml, and a combination of HA and carprofen on canine osteoarthritis (OA) articular chondrocytes and a cartilage explant model in terms of cell viability, extracellular matrix remaining, and gene expression after exposure. In chondrocyte culture, MTT assay was used to evaluate the chondrotoxicity of IC50 and IC80 of carprofen with HA. In cartilage explant culture, two kinds of extracellular matrix (uronic acid and collagen) remaining in cartilage were used to evaluate cartilage damage for 14 d after treatment. Expression of COL2A1, AGG, and MMP3 was used to evaluate the synthesis and degradation of the matrix for 7 d after treatment. In chondrocyte culture, low MW HA could preserve OA chondrocyte viability but could not reduce the chondrotoxicity level of carprofen (P carprofen caused less destruction of uronic acid and collagen structure when compared with the control (P carprofen resulted in higher COL2A1 and AGG expression levels than carprofen alone.

  11. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) modulates extracellular matrix turnover in cartilage explants ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reker, Ditte; Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie Freja; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie

    2017-01-01

    (ECM) production. To gain further insight into the process of sprifermin in the cartilage tissue, this study aimed at investigating the ECM turnover of articular cartilage explants in a longitudinal manner. Methods: Bovine full-depth articular cartilage explants were stimulated with sprifermin...... by immuno-histochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. ECM turnover was quantified by biomarker ELISAs; ProC2 reflecting type II collagen formation, CS846 reflecting aggrecan formation, active MMP9, C2M and AGNx2 reflecting matrix metalloproteinase activity, and AGNx1 reflecting......, active MMP9 was slightly decreased, and AGNx1 was slightly increased. Over the course of treatment, the temporal order of ECM turnover responses was AGNx1, then ProC2, followed by CS846 and MMP9. Pro-inflammatory activation of the explants diminished the ECM turnover responses otherwise observed under...

  12. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) modulates extracellular matrix turnover in cartilage explants ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reker, Ditte; Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie Freja; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18) is in clinical development as a potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). In vitro studies have shown that cartilage regenerative properties of sprifermin involve chondrocyte proliferation and extracellular matrix...... or placebo at weekly intervals, similar to the dosing regimen used in clinical trials. Pre-culturing with oncostatin M and tumour necrosis factor-a, was also used to induce an inflammatory state before treatment. Metabolic activity was measured using AlamarBlue, and chondrocyte proliferation was visualized...... aggrecanase activity. Results: Sprifermin was able to reach the chondrocytes through the extracellular matrix, as it increased cell proliferation and metabolic activity of explants. ProC2 and CS846 was dose-dependently increased (P

  13. Effect of homologous synovial membrane on adult human articular cartilage in organ culture, and failure to influence it with D-penicillamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, R K

    1980-01-01

    Adult human articular cartilage has been maintained in organ culture for 8 days, and the culture medium, which was changed on alternate days, was pooled. Normal and rheumatoid cartilage was obtained from patients and 4 types of culture were prepared: (1) cartilage alone; (2) cartilage + D-penicillamine; (3) cartilage + homologous synovium; (4) cartilage, synovium, and D-penicillamine. The hexosamines and hexuronic acid were measured in the cartilage explants and in the medium. The quantity re...

  14. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. - Highlights: • Recycled fin explants outgrow cells bearing stable mesenchymal traits. • Cell production and quality is enhanced in the recycled explant culture system. • Fresh fin primary culture is highly variable and loose epithelial traits over time

  15. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish

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    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.labbe@rennes.inra.fr

    2015-07-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. - Highlights: • Recycled fin explants outgrow cells bearing stable mesenchymal traits. • Cell production and quality is enhanced in the recycled explant culture system. • Fresh fin primary culture is highly variable and loose epithelial traits over time.

  16. An ovine tracheal explant culture model for allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeynaike Latasha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway epithelium is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthmatic disease. However, much of our understanding of airway epithelial cell function in asthma has been derived from in vitro studies that may not accurately reflect the interactive cellular and molecular pathways active between different tissue constituents in vivo. Methods Using a sheep model of allergic asthma, tracheal explants from normal sheep and allergic sheep exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen were established to investigate airway mucosal responses ex vivo. Explants were cultured for up to 48 h and tissues were stained to identify apoptotic cells, goblet cells, mast cells and eosinophils. The release of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α by cultured tracheal explants, was assessed by ELISA. Results The general morphology and epithelial structure of the tracheal explants was well maintained in culture although evidence of advanced apoptosis within the mucosal layer was noted after culture for 48 h. The number of alcian blue/PAS positive mucus-secreting cells within the epithelial layer was reduced in all cultured explants compared with pre-cultured (0 h explants, but the loss of staining was most evident in allergic tissues. Mast cell and eosinophil numbers were elevated in the allergic tracheal tissues compared to naïve controls, and in the allergic tissues there was a significant decline in mast cells after 24 h culture in the presence or absence of HDM allergen. IL-6 was released by allergic tracheal explants in culture but was undetected in cultured control explants. Conclusions Sheep tracheal explants maintain characteristics of the airway mucosa that may not be replicated when studying isolated cell populations in vitro. There were key differences identified in explants from allergic compared to control airways and in their responses in culture for 24 h. Importantly, this study establishes the potential for the

  17. Citrus tissue culture employing vegetative explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, H C; Singh, S K; Sharma, A K; Agnihotri, S

    2001-11-01

    Citrus being a number one fruit of the world due to its high nutritional value, huge production of fruits and fruit products, the citrus industry may be considered a major fruit industry. Though citrus orchard area in India is comparable to USA, the produce is far less, while its export is nil. Biotechnology has played an outstanding role in boosting the citrus industry, e.g., in Spain, which is now the biggest exporter of citrus fruit with the application of micrografting. Amongst the fruit trees, perhaps the maximum tissue culture research has been done in citrus during the past four decades, however, the results of practical value are meagre. The shortfalls in citrus tissue culture research and some advancements made in this direction along with bright prospects are highlighted, restricting the review to vegetative explants only. Whilst utilization of nucellar embryogenesis is limited to rootstocks, the other aspects, like, regeneration and proliferation of shoot meristems measuring 200 microm in length--a global breakthrough--of two commercially important scion species, Citrus aurantifolia and C. sinensis and an important rootstock, C. limonia, improvement of micrografting technique, cloning of the same two scion species as well as some Indian rootstock species, employing nodal stem segments of mature trees, of immense practical value have been elaborated. A rare phenomenon of shift in the morphogenetic pattern of differentiation from shoot bud differentiation to embryoid formation occurred during the long-term culture of stem callus of C. grandis. Stem callus-regenerated plants of C. aurantifolia, C. sinensis and C. grandis showed variation in their ploidy levels and a somaclonal variant of C. sinensis, which produced seedless fruits was isolated. Tailoring of rooting in microshoots to a tap root-like system by changing the inorganic salt composition of the rooting medium, resulting in 100% transplant success, and germplasm preservation through normal growth

  18. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of protease inhibitors on the induction of osteoarthritis-related biomarkers in bovine full-depth cartilage explants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Jiang, Mengmeng

    2015-01-01

    contribution of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 to cartilage degradation upon catabolic stimulation; ii) To investigate the effect of regulating the activities of key enzymes by mean of broad-spectrum inhibitors. Methods Bovine full-depth cartilage explants stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF...... protease for the generation of 374ARGS aggrecan fragment in the TNF-α/OSM stimulated bovine cartilage explants. This study addresses the need to determine the roles of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 in human articular degradation in OA and hence identify the attractive target for slowing down human cartilage......Objective The specific degradation of type II collagen and aggrecan by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, -13 and ADAMTS-4 and -5 (aggrecanase-1 and -2) in the cartilage matrix is a critical step in pathology of osteoarthritis (OA). The aims of this study were: i) To investigate the relative...

  20. Immunocytochemical characterization of explant cultures of human prostatic stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kooistra (Anko); A.M.J. Elissen (Arianne ); J.J. Konig (Josee); M. Vermey; Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); J.C. Romijn (Johannes); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe study of stromal-epithelial interactions greatly depends on the ability to culture both cell types separately, in order to permit analysis of their interactions under defined conditions in reconstitution experiments. Here we report the establishment of explant cultures of human

  1. Culturing bovine nucleus pulposus explants by balancing medium osmolarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van B.G.M.; Potier, E.; Ito, K.

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative therapies are promising treatments for early intervertebral disc degeneration. To test their efficacy, an in vitro tissue-level model would be valuable. Nucleus pulposus (NP) explant culture may constitute such a model, as the earliest signs of degeneration are in the NP. However, in NP

  2. Effect of storage media and time on fin explants culture in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of storage media and time was investigated on fin explants culture in the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Fin explants under sterile conditions were able to produce cells at different storage media and time. On the outgrowth of cells, fin explants stored for seven days before culturing showed significantly higher growth ...

  3. Carprofen inhibits the release of matrix metalloproteinases 1, 3, and 13 in the secretome of an explant model of articular cartilage stimulated with interleukin 1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adam; Smith, Julia R; Allaway, David; Harris, Pat; Liddell, Susan; Mobasheri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Arthritic diseases are characterized by the degradation of collagenous and noncollagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) components in articular cartilage. The increased expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is partly responsible for cartilage degradation. This study used proteomics to identify inflammatory proteins and catabolic enzymes released in a serum-free explant model of articular cartilage stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Western blotting was used to quantify the release of selected proteins in the presence or absence of the cyclooxygenase-2 specific nonsteroidal pro-inflammatory drug carprofen. Cartilage explant cultures were established by using metacarpophalangeal joints from horses euthanized for purposes other than research. Samples were treated as follows: no treatment (control), IL-1β (10 ng/ml), carprofen (100 μg/ml), and carprofen (100 μg/ml) + IL-1β (10 ng/ml). Explants were incubated (37°C, 5% CO2) over twelve day time courses. High-throughput nano liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry uncovered candidate proteins for quantitative western blot analysis. Proteoglycan loss was assessed by using the dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay, which measures the release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Mass spectrometry identified MMP-1, -3, -13, and the ECM constituents thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and fibronectin-1 (FN1). IL-1β stimulation increased the release of all three MMPs. IL-1β also stimulated the fragmentation of FN1 and increased chondrocyte cell death (as assessed by β-actin release). Addition of carprofen significantly decreased MMP release and the appearance of a 60 kDa fragment of FN1 without causing any detectable cytotoxicity to chondrocytes. DMMB assays suggested that carprofen initially inhibited IL-1β-induced GAG release, but this effect was transient. Overall, during the two time courses, GAG release was 58.67% ± 10.91% (SD) for IL-1

  4. Co-culture with infrapatellar fat pad differentially stimulates proteoglycan synthesis and accumulation in cartilage and meniscus tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimuta, James F; Bendernagel, Monica F; Levenston, Marc E

    2017-09-01

    Although osteoarthritis is widely viewed as a disease of the whole joint, relatively few studies have focused on interactions among joint tissues in joint homeostasis and degeneration. In particular, few studies have examined the effects of the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) on cartilaginous tissues. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that co-culture with healthy IFP would induce degradation of cartilage and meniscus tissues. Bovine articular cartilage, meniscus, and IFP were cultured isolated or as cartilage-fat or meniscus-fat co-cultures for up to 14 days. Conditioned media were assayed for sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, nitrite content, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and explants were assayed for sGAG and DNA contents. Co-cultures exhibited increased cumulative sGAG release and sGAG release rates for both cartilage and meniscus, and the cartilage (but not meniscus) exhibited a substantial synergistic effect of co-culture (sGAG release in co-culture was significantly greater than the summed release from isolated cartilage and fat). Fat co-culture did not significantly alter the sGAG content of either cartilage or meniscus explants, indicating that IFP co-culture stimulated net sGAG production by cartilage. Nitrite release was increased relative to isolated tissue controls in co-cultured meniscus, but not the cartilage, with no synergistic effect of co-culture. Interestingly, MMP-2 production was decreased by co-culture for both cartilage and meniscus. This study demonstrates that healthy IFP may modulate joint homeostasis by stimulating sGAG production in cartilage. Counter to our hypothesis, healthy IFP did not promote degradation of either cartilage or meniscus tissues.

  5. EXPLANTATION OF MESANGIAL CELL HILLOCKS - A METHOD FOR OBTAINING HUMAN MESANGIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, EW; KIM, Y; MICHAEL, AF; VERNIER, RL; VANDERHEM, GK; VANDERWOUDE, FJ

    A simple method is presented for selective cell culture of human mesangial cells using explanatation of mesangial cell hillocks. Glomeruli which had been incubated with collagenase were explanted on plastic tissue culture flasks. Three to 6 weeks after explantation, a rapidly growing multilayer of

  6. Human osteoarthritic cartilage is synthetically more active but in culture less vital than normal cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber, F. P.; van Roy, H.; Wilbrink, B.; Huber-Bruning, O.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    The proteoglycan turnover of human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage was compared to that of normal (N) cartilage. The cartilage was obtained postmortem from human femoral knee condyles. Short term cultures were compared to longterm cultures, and proteoglycan synthesis rate, content and release

  7. A novel method for coral explant culture and micropropagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizel, Maya; Loya, Yossi; Downs, Craig A; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2011-06-01

    We describe here a method for the micropropagation of coral that creates progeny from tissue explants derived from a single polyp or colonial corals. Coral tissue explants of various sizes (0.5-2.5 mm in diameter) were manually microdissected from the solitary coral Fungia granulosa. Explants could be maintained in an undeveloped state or induced to develop into polyps by manipulating environmental parameters such as light and temperature regimes, as well as substrate type. Fully developed polyps were able to be maintained for a long-term in a closed sea water system. Further, we demonstrate that mature explants are also amenable to this technique with the micropropagation of second-generation explants and their development into mature polyps. We thereby experimentally have established coral clonal lines that maintain their ability to differentiate without the need for chemical induction or genetic manipulation. The versatility of this method is also demonstrated through its application to two other coral species, the colonial corals Oculina patigonica and Favia favus.

  8. Cell number, tissue thickness and protein content as measures for development and variability in cultured neocortex explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B. M.; Ruijter, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of neuronal number, explant thickness and amount of protein was studied in several series of rat neocortex explants, cultured up to 21 days in vitro (DIV). In contrast to the dimensions of the explant, which rapidly stabilized, the amount of protein showed a prolonged increase with

  9. Hypoxia preferentially destroys GABAergic neurons in developing rat neocortex explants in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, H. J.; Ruijter, J. M.; Wolters, P. S.

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that hypoxic ischemia before or during the human birth process preferentially destroys GABAergic nerve cells, particularly in the neocortex, was tested in a tissue culture model system. To that end, rat neocortex explants dissected from 6-day-old rat pups and cultured to a

  10. Immunocytochemical indications for neuronal co-localization of GABA and aspartate in cultured neocortex explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B. M.; Ruijter, J. M.; Buijs, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The application of postembedding immunocytochemistry on serial semithin plastic sections, revealed the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-positive and aspartate-positive neurons in cultured neocortex explants. GABA-positive neurons were found in all layers of the cultured cortex, whereas

  11. Resolving browning during the establishment of explant cultures in Vicia faba L. for genetic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Klenotičová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimisation of in vitro regeneration systems of two explant types for low-tannine cultivars of faba bean based on culturing of shoot apices and cotyledonary nodes were provided by usage of various antioxidants - ascorbic acid, citric acid, glutathione and activated charcoal. In subsequent testing, the combined effects of antioxidants with transformation co-cultivation compounds acetosyringone and L-cysteine was studied. The application of antioxidants lead to decreased callogenesis, citric acids treatments (50 mg.l−1 dramatically decreased necrotic response of explants. However, citric acid, used together with ascorbic acid completely inhibited shoot growth in shoot apex cultures. Glutathion evoked hyperhydricity of explants. Activated charcoal induced rooting on media which are commonly used for shoot proliferation. Combination of acetosyringone with antioxidants influenced shoot proliferation, except of variant with ascorbic acid. Citric acid was the best and universal antioxidant in faba bean in vitro cultures and its use is recommended for faba bean genetic transformation experiments.

  12. Explant culture of human peripheral lung. I. Metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoner, G.D.; Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    the predominant alveolar epithelial cell type. Lamellar inclusion bodies were released from the type 2 cells and accumulated in the alveolar spaces. The metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP) in human lung explants cultured for up to 7 days was investigated. Human lung explants had measurable aryl hydrocarbon......Human lung explants have been maintained in vitro for a period of 25 days. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the broncholar epithelial cells, type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, and stromal fibroblasts incorporated 3H-thymidine during the culture. After 7 to 10 days, type 2 cells were...... hydroxylase activity and could metabolize BP into forms that were bound to cellular DNA and protein. Peripheral lung had significantly lower aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity than cultured bronchus but both tissues had similar binding levels of BP to DNA. Radioautographic studies indicated that all cell...

  13. Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalent by Using the Direct Explant Cell Culture Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamile Öztürk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation of ex vivo produced oral mucosal equivalents using keratinocytes cultured by direct explant technique.Material and Methods: Oral mucosa tissue samples were obtained from the keratinized gingival tissues of 14 healthy human subjects. Human oral mucosa keratinocytes from an oral mucosa biopsy specimen were dissociated by the explant technique. Once a sufficient population of keratinocytes was reached, they were seeded onto the type IV collagen coated “AlloDerm” and taken for histological and immunohistochemical examinations at 11 days postseeding of the keratinocytes on the cadaveric human dermal matrix.Results: Histopathologically and immunohistochemically, 12 out of 14 successful ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalents (EVPOME that consisted of a stratified epidermis on a dermal matrix have been developed with keratinocytes cultured by the explant technique.Conclusion: The technical handling involved in the direct explant method at the beginning of the process has fewer steps than the enzymatic method and use of the direct explant technique protocol for culturing of human oral mucosa keratinocyte may be more adequate for EVPOME production.

  14. Elastic cartilage reconstruction by transplantation of cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M; Takebe, T; Kobayashi, S; Kimura, S; Masutani, M; Lee, S; Jo, Y H; Lee, J I; Taniguchi, H

    2014-05-01

    Current surgical intervention of craniofacial defects caused by injuries or abnormalities uses reconstructive materials, such as autologous cartilage grafts. Transplantation of autologous tissues, however, places a significant invasiveness on patients, and many efforts have been made for establishing an alternative graft. Recently, we and others have shown the potential use of reconstructed elastic cartilage from ear-derived chondrocytes or progenitors with the unique elastic properties. Here, we examined the differentiation potential of canine joint cartilage-derived chondrocytes into elastic cartilage for expanding the cell sources, such as hyaline cartilage. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from canine joint, cultivated, and compared regarding characteristic differences with auricular chondrocytes, including proliferation rates, gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and cartilage reconstruction capability after transplantation. Canine articular chondrocytes proliferated less robustly than auricular chondrocytes, but there was no significant difference in the amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycan produced from redifferentiated chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro expanded and redifferentiated articular chondrocytes have been shown to reconstruct elastic cartilage on transplantation that has histologic characteristics distinct from hyaline cartilage. Taken together, cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes are a possible cell source for elastic cartilage reconstruction. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An in vitro model for detecting skin irritants: methyl green-pyronine staining of human skin explant cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J. J. L.; Lehé, C.; Cammans, K. D. A.; Das, P. K.; Elliott, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the potential of human organotypic skin explant cultures (hOSECs) for screening skin irritants. Test chemicals were applied to the epidermis of the skin explants which were incubated for 4, 24 or 48 h in tissue culture medium. A decrease in epidermal RNA staining, visualised in frozen

  16. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients

  17. A procedure for culturing rat neocortex explants in a serum-free nutrient medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, H. J.; de Jong, B. M.; Ruijter, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure is described for long-term culturing of rat neocortex explants in a serum-free growth medium. Slices spanning the entire cortical depth from pial to ventricular side are prepared from 6-day-old rat pups. After preincubation in Hanks' balanced salt solution with extra glucose, the

  18. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. (Univ. of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-10-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

  19. In vitro maintenance of spermatogenesis in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risley, M.S.; Miller, A.; Bumcrot, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Spermatogenesis has been maintained for extended periods in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media supplemented with bovine serum albumin, insulin, transferrin, follicle-stimulating hormone, dihydrotestosterone, testosterone, retinol, ascorbate, and tocopherol. The organization of the testis fragments was maintained for 28 days, and all stages of development were present throughout the culture period. 3 H-Thymidine-labeled secondary (Type B) spermatogonia developed in 28 days into spermatids at the acrosomal vesicle stage whereas labeled zygotene spermatocytes became mature spermatids in 28 days. Spermatogonial proliferation also continued in vitro for 28 days. Germ cell differentiation was not dependent upon exogenous testosterone, ascorbate, or tocopherol since 3 H-labeled spermatogonia became mature spermatids in testes cultured 35 days in media lacking these supplements. Autoradiography demonstrated that 55% of the luminal sperm present in explants cultured 10 days had differentiated in vitro. Sperm from testes cultured 10-35 days were similar to sperm from freshly dissected testes with regard to motility and fecundity, and eggs fertilized with sperm from explant cultures developed normally into swimming tadpoles. The results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining vertebrate spermatogenesis in culture and suggest that in vitro analysis of Xenopus spermatogenesis using defined media may provide important insights into the evolution of regulatory mechanisms in spermatogenesis

  20. Simple explant culture of the embryonic chicken retina with long-term preservation of photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraj, Gopenath; Greif, Alexander; Layer, Paul G

    2011-10-01

    Structurally stable in vitro-model systems are indispensible to analyse neural development during embryogenesis, follow cellular differentiation and evaluate neurotoxicological or growth factor effects. Here we describe a three-dimensional, long-term in vitro-culture system of the embryonic chick retina which supports photoreceptor development. Retinal tissue was isolated from E6 chick eye, and cultured as explants by continuous orbital rotation to allow free floatation without any supporting materials. Young stage (E6) immature retinas were cultured for various time periods in order to follow the differentiation of cell types and plexiform layers by immunocytochemical methods. These explants could be cultured for at least 2-3 weeks with remarkable retention of retinal architecture. Interestingly, photoreceptors developed in the absence of pigment epithelium. Electron microscopic studies revealed formation of structures resembling photoreceptor outer segments, a feature not reported previously. Thus, the verification of photoreceptors, Müller cells, inner retinal cells and the inner plexiform layer described in our study establishes this explant culture as a valuable in vivo-like model system. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fate of Meckel's cartilage chondrocytes in ocular culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, J.M.; Diewert, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Modulation of the chondrocyte phenotype was observed in an organ culture system using Meckel's cartilage. First branchial arch cartilage was dissected from fetal rats of 16- and 17-day gestation. Perichondrium was mechanically removed, cartilage was split at the rostral process, and each half was grafted into the anterior chamber of an adult rat eye. The observed pattern of development in nonirradiated specimens was the following: hypertrophy of the rostral process and endochondral-type ossification, fibrous atrophy in the midsection, and mineralization of the malleus and incus. A change in matrix composition of the implanted cartilage was demonstrated with immunofluorescence staining for cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG). After 15 days of culture, CSPG was found in the auricular process but not in the midsection or rostral process. In order to mark the implanted cells and follow their fate, cartilage was labeled in vitro with [3H]thymidine [3H]TdR). Immediately after labeling 20% of the chondrocytes contained [3H]TdR. After culturing for 5 days, 20% of the chondrocytes were still labeled and 10% of the osteogenic cells also contained radioactive label. The labeling index decreased in both cell types with increased duration of culture. Multinucleated clast-type cells did not contain label. Additional cartilages not labeled with [3H]TdR were exposed to between 20000 and 6000 rad of gamma irradiation before ocular implantation. Irradiated cartilage did not hypertrophy or form bone but a fibrous region developed in the midsection. Cells of the host animal were not induced to form bone around the irradiated cartilage. Our studies suggest that fully differentiated chondrocytes of Meckel's cartilage have the capacity to become osteocytes, osteoblasts, and fibroblasts

  2. Effects of glucosamine on proteoglycan loss by tendon, ligament and joint capsule explant cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, M Z; Martinac, B; Samiric, T; Handley, C J

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the effect of glucosamine on the loss of newly synthesized radiolabeled large and small proteoglycans by bovine tendon, ligament and joint capsule. The kinetics of loss of (35)S-labeled large and small proteoglycans from explant cultures of tendon, ligament and joint capsule treated with 10mM glucosamine was investigated over a 10-day culture period. The kinetics of loss of (35)S-labeled small proteoglycans and the formation of free [(35)S]sulfate were determined for the last 10 days of a 15-day culture period. The proteoglycan core proteins were analyzed by gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography. The metabolism of tendon, ligament and joint capsule explants exposed to 10mM glucosamine was evaluated by incorporation of [(3)H]serine and [(35)S]sulfate into protein and glycosaminoglycans, respectively. Glucosamine at 10mM stimulated the loss of small proteoglycans from ligament explant cultures. This was due to the increased loss of both macromolecular and free [(35)S]sulfate to the medium indicating that glucosamine affected the release of small proteoglycans as well as their intracellular degradation. The degradation pattern of small proteoglycans in ligament was not affected by glucosamine. In contrast, glucosamine did not have an effect on the loss of large or small proteoglycans from tendon and joint capsule or large proteoglycans from ligament explant cultures. The metabolism of cells in tendon, ligament and joint capsule was not impaired by the presence of 10mM glucosamine. Glucosamine stimulated the loss of small proteoglycans from ligament but did not have an effect on small proteoglycan catabolism in joint capsule and tendon or large proteoglycan catabolism in ligament, tendon or synovial capsule. The consequences of glucosamine therapy at clinically relevant concentrations on proteoglycan catabolism in joint fibrous connective tissues need to be further assessed in an animal model.

  3. Induction of bulb organogenesis in in vitro cultures of tarda tulip (Tulipa tarda Stapf.) from seed-derived explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, Małgorzata; Bach, Anna

    2014-01-01

    A protocol for obtaining bulbs via in vitro organogenesis was developed for tarda tulip ( Tulipa tarda Stapf). Scale explants were obtained from bulbs formed at the base of seedlings or from adventitious bulbs that developed from callus tissue forming on stolons or on germinating seeds. Some explants were subjected to chilling at 5°C for 12 wk. The culture media contained 3 or 6% sucrose and was supplemented with either no growth regulators, either 0.5 μM 6-benzyl-aminopurine (BAP) or 18.9 or 94.6 μM abscisic acid (ABA). Cultures were maintained in the dark at 20°C. Callus tissue developed mainly on media without growth regulators or with BAP. Callus was formed from up to 96% of explants derived from non-chilled adventitious bulbs that were treated with 3% sucrose and 0.5 μM BAP. Less callus was formed from chilled explants compared with non-chilled explants. Newly formed adventitious bulbs appeared on the explants via direct and indirect organogenesis. The media with BAP promoted the formation of adventitious bulbs at a rate of 56-92% from non-chilled explants, whereas a maximum rate of 36% was observed from chilled explants. ABA inhibited the induction of adventitious bulbs and callus. The adventitious bulbs obtained in these experiments contained a meristem, which was evidence that they had developed properly.

  4. E2f1 mediates high glucose-induced neuronal death in cultured mouse retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujiao; Zhou, Yi; Xiao, Lirong; Zheng, Shijie; Yan, Naihong; Chen, Danian

    2017-10-02

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common complication of diabetes and remains one of the major causes of blindness in the world; infants born to diabetic mothers have higher risk of developing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). While hyperglycemia is a major risk factor, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying DR and diabetic ROP are poorly understood. To explore the consequences of retinal cells under high glucose, we cultured wild type or E2f1 -/- mouse retinal explants from postnatal day 8 with normal glucose, high osmotic or high glucose media. Explants were also incubated with cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) to mimic the hypoxic condition. We showed that, at 7 days post exposure to high glucose, retinal explants displayed elevated cell death, ectopic cell division and intact retinal vascular plexus. Cell death mainly occurred in excitatory neurons, such as ganglion and bipolar cells, which were also ectopically dividing. Many Müller glial cells reentered the cell cycle; some had irregular morphology or migrated to other layers. High glucose inhibited the hyperoxia-induced blood vessel regression of retinal explants. Moreover, inactivation of E2f1 rescued high glucose-induced ectopic division and cell death of retinal neurons, but not ectopic cell division of Müller glial cells and vascular phenotypes. This suggests that high glucose has direct but distinct effects on retinal neurons, glial cells and blood vessels, and that E2f1 mediates its effects on retinal neurons. These findings shed new light onto mechanisms of DR and the fetal retinal abnormalities associated with maternal diabetes, and suggest possible new therapeutic strategies.

  5. Effect of explant density and medium culture volumes on cassava micropropagation in Temporal Immersion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Basail

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the need of producing high quality planting material available to cassava growers, it has been necessary to look for alternatives in order to increase the efficiancy of in vitro propagation methods and their automation, such as the use of the Temporal Immersion Systems (RITA®. This work was carried out to increase the multiplication coefficient for cassava mass propagation through out Temporal Immersion Systems. The clone ‘CMC-40’ was used. Different medium volumes per explant, and material density per unit at a given Immersion frequency were tested. The highest results were obtained in the 2.8 multiplication coefficient with 20 ml culture medium volume and 3.2 using a density of 40 explants/flask. When the Temporal Immersion System is used with these results, a more efficient method for cassava micropropagation is established and also higher quality vitroplants for the rooting stage and further acclimatization in field conditions are produced. Key Words: Tissue Culture, liquid culture medium, Manihot esculenta Crantz

  6. Establishing axenic cultures from mature pecan embryo explants on media with low water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidy, A A; Smith, M A

    1990-12-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with mature pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch) nuts prevented successful, contaminant-free in vitro culture of embryo expiants, even after rigorous surface disinfestation of the nuts and careful aseptic shelling. Disinfestation with sodium hypochlorite after shell removal was also unsuccessful, because even dilute concentrations which were ineffective against the fungal contaminants prevented subsequent growth from the embryo. Explanting media with low water availability which would not sustain growth of fungal contaminants, but supported growth from mature pecan embryos, were developed as an alternative disinfestation method. The explanting media were supplemented with 0.9-1.5% agar, and other media components were selectively omitted to test their influence on water availability and fungal growth. Disinfestation of up to 65% of the cultures was accomplished, depending on the medium formulation, compared to 100% loss to contamination on control medium (0.5% agar). A complete medium (containing sucrose, salts, vitamins, 18 μM BAP, and 5 μM IBA) with 1.5% agar provided control of contamination, and encouraged subsequent regeneration from the embryo expiants, which remained free of contaminant growth through subsequent subcultures.

  7. Progenitor cells in auricular cartilage demonstrate cartilage-forming capacity in 3D hydrogel culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IA Otto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Paramount for the generation of auricular structures of clinically-relevant size is the acquisition of a large number of cells maintaining an elastic cartilage phenotype, which is the key in producing a tissue capable of withstanding forces subjected to the auricle. Current regenerative medicine strategies utilize chondrocytes from various locations or mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. However, the quality of neo-tissues resulting from these cell types is inadequate due to inefficient chondrogenic differentiation and endochondral ossification, respectively. Recently, a subpopulation of stem/progenitor cells has been identified within the auricular cartilage tissue, with similarities to MSCs in terms of proliferative capacity and cell surface biomarkers, but their potential for tissue engineering has not yet been explored. This study compared the in vitro cartilage-forming ability of equine auricular cartilage progenitor cells (AuCPCs, bone marrow-derived MSCs and auricular chondrocytes in gelatin methacryloyl (gelMA-based hydrogels over a period of 56 d, by assessing their ability to undergo chondrogenic differentiation. Neocartilage formation was assessed through gene expression profiling, compression testing, biochemical composition and histology. Similar to MSCs and chondrocytes, AuCPCs displayed a marked ability to generate cartilaginous matrix, although, under the applied culture conditions, MSCs outperformed both cartilage-derived cell types in terms of matrix production and mechanical properties. AuCPCs demonstrated upregulated mRNA expression of elastin, low expression of collagen type X and similar levels of proteoglycan production and mechanical properties as compared to chondrocytes. These results underscored the AuCPCs’ tissue-specific differentiation potential, making them an interesting cell source for the next generation of elastic cartilage tissue-engineered constructs.

  8. Glucocorticoids affect 24 h clock genes expression in human adipose tissue explant cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación Gómez-Abellán

    Full Text Available to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V and subcutaneous (S adipose tissue (AT in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX on positive and negative clock genes expression.VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2 (n = 6. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR.CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements in the SAT (situation not present in VAT. A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues.24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements and PER2 (negative element mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure.

  9. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration in Carica papaya L. tissue culture derived from root explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M H; Wang, P J; Maeda, E

    1987-10-01

    The regeneration potential of shoot tip, stem, leaf, cotyledon and root explants of two papaya cultivars (Carica papaya cv. 'Solo' and cv. 'Sunrise') were studed. Callus induction of these two cultivars of papaya showed that the shoot tips and stems are most suitable for forming callus, while leaves, cotyledons and roots are comparatively difficult to induce callus. Callus induction also varied with the varities. Somatic embryogenesis was obtained from 3-month-old root cultures. A medium containing half strength of MS inorganic salts, 160 mg/l adenine sulfate, 1.0 mg/1 NAA, 0.5 mg/1 kinetin and 1.0 mg/1 GA3 was optimal for embryogenesis. The callus maintained high regenerative capacity after two years of culture on this medium. Plants derived from somatic embryos were obtained under green-house conditions.

  10. Selection of valine-resistance in callus culture of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. derived from leaf explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata D. Gaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of valine-resistant mutants was carried out in leaf explant cultures of three Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. ecotypes: C-24, RLD and Columbia. The valine concentration used for in vitro selection, lethal for seed-growing plants, has not affected callus formation and growth. However, strong inhibition of shoot regeneration ability of calli growing under selection pressure was noticed. In total, 1043 explants were cultured on valine medium and 18 shoots were regenerated with an average frequency of 1.7 shoots per 100 calli. Most R1 shoots were sterile and seeds were collected from 3 plants. The transmission of valine-resistance to the sexual progeny of these plants was scored and the increased level of valine-resistance was found in progeny of one line - 61 C. This line originated from the culture of Columbia leaf explant and displayed tetraploid chromosome number.

  11. Neuronal differentiation of hair-follicle-bulge-derived stem cells co-cultured with mouse cochlear modiolus explants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Schomann

    Full Text Available Stem-cell-based repair of auditory neurons may represent an attractive therapeutic option to restore sensorineural hearing loss. Hair-follicle-bulge-derived stem cells (HFBSCs are promising candidates for this type of therapy, because they (1 have migratory properties, enabling migration after transplantation, (2 can differentiate into sensory neurons and glial cells, and (3 can easily be harvested in relatively high numbers. However, HFBSCs have never been used for this purpose. We hypothesized that HFBSCs can be used for cell-based repair of the auditory nerve and we have examined their migration and incorporation into cochlear modiolus explants and their subsequent differentiation. Modiolus explants obtained from adult wild-type mice were cultured in the presence of EF1α-copGFP-transduced HFBSCs, constitutively expressing copepod green fluorescent protein (copGFP. Also, modiolus explants without hair cells were co-cultured with DCX-copGFP-transduced HFBSCs, which demonstrate copGFP upon doublecortin expression during neuronal differentiation. Velocity of HFBSC migration towards modiolus explants was calculated, and after two weeks, co-cultures were fixed and processed for immunohistochemical staining. EF1α-copGFP HFBSC migration velocity was fast: 80.5 ± 6.1 μm/h. After arrival in the explant, the cells formed a fascicular pattern and changed their phenotype into an ATOH1-positive neuronal cell type. DCX-copGFP HFBSCs became green-fluorescent after integration into the explants, confirming neuronal differentiation of the cells. These results show that HFBSC-derived neuronal progenitors are migratory and can integrate into cochlear modiolus explants, while adapting their phenotype depending on this micro-environment. Thus, HFBSCs show potential to be employed in cell-based therapies for auditory nerve repair.

  12. Effect of retinoic acid on proteoglycan turnover in bovine articular cartilage cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, M.A.; Handley, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes proteoglycan catabolism by adult bovine articular cartilage treated with retinoic acid as a means of stimulating the loss of this macromolecule from the extracellular matrix of cartilage. Addition of retinoic acid (10(-12)-10(-6) M) to adult bovine articular cartilage which had been labeled with [ 35 S]sulfate for 6 h after 5 days in culture, resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the rate of loss of 35 S-labeled proteoglycans from the matrix of the tissue. Concomitant with this loss was a decrease in the proteoglycan content of the tissue. Incubation of cultures treated with 1 microM retinoic acid, at 4 degrees C, or with 0.5 mM cycloheximide, resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of retinoic acid-induced loss of proteoglycans and demonstrated cellular involvement in this process. Analysis of the 35 S-labeled proteoglycans remaining in the matrix showed that the percentage of radioactivity associated with the small proteoglycan species extracted from the matrix of articular cartilage explants labeled with [ 35 S]sulfate after 5 days in culture was 15% and this increased to 22% in tissue maintained in medium alone. In tissue treated with 1 microM retinoic acid for 6 days, the percentage of radioactivity associated with the small proteoglycan was 58%. Approximately 93% of the 35 S-labeled proteoglycans released into the medium of control and retinoic acid-treated cultures was recovered in high density fractions after CsCl gradient centrifugation and eluted on Sepharose CL-2B as a broad peak with a Kav of 0.30-0.37. Less than 17% of these proteoglycans was capable of aggregating with hyaluronate. These results indicate that in both control and retinoic acid-treated cultures the larger proteoglycan species is lost to the medium at a greater rate than the small proteoglycan species. The effect of retinoic acid on proteoglycan turnover was shown to be reversible

  13. Organotypic Culture of Breast Tumor Explants as a Multicellular System for the Screening of Natural Compounds with Antineoplastic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Edith Carranza-Torres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. The search for novel compounds with antitumor activity, with less adverse effects and higher efficacy, and the development of methods to evaluate their toxicity is an area of ​​intense research. In this study we implemented the preparation and culture of breast tumor explants, which were obtained from precision-cut breast tumor slices. In order to validate the model we are proposing to screen antineoplastic effect of natural compounds, we selected caffeic acid, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Using the Krumdieck tissue slicer, precision-cut tissue slices were prepared from breast cancer samples; from these slices, 4 mm explants were obtained and incubated with the selected compounds. Viability was assessed by Alamar Blue assay, LDH release, and histopathological criteria. Results showed that the viability of the explants cultured in the presence of paclitaxel (positive control decreased significantly (P<0.05; however, tumor samples responded differently to each compound. When the explants were coincubated with paclitaxel and compounds, a synergic effect was observed. This study shows that ex vivo culture of breast cancer explants offers a suitable alternative model for evaluating natural or synthetic compounds with antitumor properties within the complex microenvironment of the tumor.

  14. Culturated rat cerebral cortex explants and their application in the study of SPECT scan radiopharaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, B.M. de.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis mechanics that result in the distinct localization of radiopharmaceuticals within the brain have been investigated. In order to 'get more insight' in uptake and binding of radiopharmaceuticals bu brain tissue, use has been made of the tissue culture technique. Tissue culture privides the opportunity of doing experiments with brain tissue under stable conditions, in the absence of a blood-brain barrier, and without interference by cerebral blood flow. The present thesis is presented in two sections. The first part focusses on longterm culture of 'organotypic' cerebral neocortex tissue, obtained from neonatal rat brain and explanted into a chemically defined medium. Procedures were developed which enabled culturing of this tissue without the occurence of central necrosis and with the preservation of a characteristic histiotypic organization. Morphological characteristics of the cultures were described and measured at various ages in vitro. In the second part, the cultures were used to study mechanisms that might contribute to the tissue uptake of radiopharmaceuticals which are in clinical use for SPECT brain imaging. (author). 369 refs.; 50 figs.; 13 tabs

  15. Blockade of Toll-like receptor 2 prevents spontaneous cytokine release from rheumatoid arthritis ex vivo synovial explant cultures

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nic An Ultaigh, Sinead

    2011-02-23

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells. Methods RA synovial tissue biopsies, obtained under direct visualization at arthroscopy, were established as synovial explant cultures ex vivo or snap frozen for immunohistology. Mononuclear cell cultures were isolated from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of RA patients. Cultures were incubated with the TLR1\\/2 ligand, Pam3CSK4 (200 ng, 1 and 10 μg\\/ml), an anti-TLR2 antibody (OPN301, 1 μg\\/ml) or an immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1 μg\\/ml) matched control. The comparative effect of OPN301 and adalimumab (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha) on spontaneous release of proinflammatory cytokines from RA synovial explants was determined using quantitative cytokine MSD multiplex assays or ELISA. OPN301 penetration into RA synovial tissue explants cultures was assessed by immunohistology. Results Pam3CSK4 significantly upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in RA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). OPN301 significantly decreased Pam3CSK4-induced cytokine production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 compared to IgG control in RA PBMCs and SFMCs cultures (all P < 0.05). OPN301 penetration of RA synovial tissue cultures was detected in the lining layer and perivascular regions. OPN301 significantly decreased spontaneous cytokine production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-8 from RA synovial tissue explant cultures (all P < 0.05). Importantly, the inhibitory effect of OPN on spontaneous cytokine secretion was comparable to inhibition by anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody adalimumab. Conclusions These findings further support targeting TLR2 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  16. Mapping the spatiotemporal evolution of solute transport in articular cartilage explants reveals how cartilage recovers fluid within the contact area during sliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Brian T; Moore, Axel C; Burris, David L; Price, Christopher

    2018-04-11

    The interstitial fluid within articular cartilage shields the matrix from mechanical stresses, reduces friction and wear, enables biochemical processes, and transports solutes into and out of the avascular extracellular matrix. The balanced competition between fluid exudation and recovery under load is thus critical to the mechanical and biological functions of the tissue. We recently discovered that sliding alone can induce rapid solute transport into buried cartilage contact areas via a phenomenon termed tribological rehydration. In this study, we use in situ confocal microscopy measurements to track the spatiotemporal propagation of a small neutral solute into the buried contact area to clarify the fluid mechanics underlying the tribological rehydration phenomenon. Sliding experiments were interrupted by periodic static loading to enable scanning of the entire contact area. Spatiotemporal patterns of solute transport combined with tribological data suggested pressure driven flow through the extracellular matrix from the contact periphery rather than into the surface via a fluid film. Interestingly, these testing interruptions also revealed dynamic, repeatable and history-independent fluid loss and recovery processes consistent with those observed in vivo. Unlike the migrating contact area, which preserves hydration by moving faster than interstitial fluid can flow, our results demonstrate that the stationary contact area can maintain and actively recover hydration through a dynamic competition between load-induced exudation and sliding-induced recovery. The results demonstrate that sliding contributes to the recovery of fluid and solutes by cartilage within the contact area while clarifying the means by which it occurs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Micropropagation from cultured nodal explants of rose (Rosa hybrida L. cv. ‘Perfume Delight’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamnoon Kanchanapoom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the micropropagation of rose (Rosa hybrida L. cv. ‘Perfume Delight’ was developed. First to fifth nodal explants from young healthy shoots were excised and cultured on basal medium of Murashige and Skoog (1962, MS containing several concentrations of BA and NAA. Multiple shoot formation of up to 3 shoots was obtained on MS medium supplemented with 3 mg/l BA and 0.003 mg/l NAA. Shoot readily rooted on ¼MS medium devoid of growth regulators.Rooted plantlets were hardened and established in pots at 100% survival. In vitro flowering was observed on rose plantscultured on MS medium containing 3 mg/l BA and 0.003 mg/l NAA.

  18. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) shoot cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Bates, Rick; Carlson, John

    2015-01-01

    The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2) evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3) assess the effects of adding a pH stabili...

  19. Dynamic Culturing of Cartilage Tissue: The Significance of Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana L.; Duarte, Ana R.C.; Frias, Ana M.; Pedro, Adriano J.; Oliveira, João T.; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui L.

    2012-01-01

    Human articular cartilage functions under a wide range of mechanical loads in synovial joints, where hydrostatic pressure (HP) is the prevalent actuating force. We hypothesized that the formation of engineered cartilage can be augmented by applying such physiologic stimuli to chondrogenic cells or stem cells, cultured in hydrogels, using custom-designed HP bioreactors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of distinct HP regimens on cartilage formation in vitro by either human nasal chondrocytes (HNCs) or human adipose stem cells (hASCs) encapsulated in gellan gum (GG) hydrogels. To this end, we varied the frequency of low HP, by applying pulsatile hydrostatic pressure or a steady hydrostatic pressure load to HNC-GG constructs over a period of 3 weeks, and evaluated their effects on cartilage tissue-engineering outcomes. HNCs (10×106 cells/mL) were encapsulated in GG hydrogels (1.5%) and cultured in a chondrogenic medium under three regimens for 3 weeks: (1) 0.4 MPa Pulsatile HP; (2) 0.4 MPa Steady HP; and (3) Static. Subsequently, we applied the pulsatile regimen to hASC-GG constructs and varied the amplitude of loading, by generating both low (0.4 MPa) and physiologic (5 MPa) HP levels. hASCs (10×106 cells/mL) were encapsulated in GG hydrogels (1.5%) and cultured in a chondrogenic medium under three regimens for 4 weeks: (1) 0.4 MPa Pulsatile HP; (2) 5 MPa Pulsatile HP; and (3) Static. In the HNC study, the best tissue development was achieved by the pulsatile HP regimen, whereas in the hASC study, greater chondrogenic differentiation and matrix deposition were obtained for physiologic loading, as evidenced by gene expression of aggrecan, collagen type II, and sox-9; metachromatic staining of cartilage extracellular matrix; and immunolocalization of collagens. We thus propose that both HNCs and hASCs detect and respond to physical forces, thus resembling joint loading, by enhancing cartilage tissue development in a frequency- and

  20. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii shoot cultures [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1 determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2 evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3 assess the effects of adding a pH stabilizer, 2-(N-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid (MES that is commonly used in Douglas-fir micropropagation medium. Vegetative buds were collected in the spring before breaking dormancy from juvenile and mature donor trees for conducting these evaluations. Medium, with or without MES, was pre-adjusted to five pH levels before adding MES, agar and autoclaving. Medium pH changes and explant growth parameters were measured at eight different incubation times. Overall, MES provided a more stable medium pH, relative to starting pH values, under both light and dark storage conditions as well as with presence of explants. A general trend of decreasing medium pH over time was found comparing explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Explant height and weight growth increased over time, but differ among explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Our findings suggest that a 21-day subculture practice may best sustain medium freshness, medium pH level and desirable explant growth.

  1. The Effect of Plant Growth Regulators and Different Explants on the Response of Tissue Culture and Cell Suspension Cultures of German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Koohi,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. is one of the most important medicinal plants that its essential oils used in different medicinal industries. In this study which was carried out in 2013 growing season at the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, the in vitro response of leaf and hypocotyl explants of German Chamomile in B5 medium supplemented with different levels of plant growth regulators including 2,4-D, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA, kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP were investigated in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD.In addition, cell suspension cultures were established and characterized. Hypocotyl and leaf explants exhibited cell proliferation and produced callus within 1-2 weeks. The highest fresh weight of the callus (264.1 mg was produced by leaf explants in the medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l BAP. However, the leaf explants cultured on medium containing 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D showed the lowest cell proliferation and callus yield (40.42 mg. The highest percentage of root induction from leaf explants (58.73% was observed on the medium containing 4 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l Kin, and from hypocotyl explants (48.61% was observed on medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l NAA. The 42.22% of calli derived from hypocotyl explants on B5 medium supplemented with 4 mg/l NAA and 3 mg/l BAP, were friable. Cell suspension cultures of German chamomile were established by transferring of hypocotyl-derived friable calli into the MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l kinetin. The growth curve of cell proliferations started 4 days after culture and continued to grow until day 13th, where the cells entered stationary phase.

  2. In vitro plant regeneration of two cucumber (Cucumis sativum L. genotypes: Effects of explant types and culture medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grozeva Stanislava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different phytohormone concentrations on callusogenesis and organogenesis in two cucumber genotypes were studied. It was established that the rate of plant regeneration depends on genotype, explant type and culture medium. Hypocotyls were found to be more responsive than cotyledons in morphogenesis. In vitro planlet-regenerants have been obtained in hypocotyls explants on culture medium with 1.0 and 2.0 mgL-1 BA for cultivar Gergana and in 1.0 and 3.0 mgL-1K-line 15B. Induction of regeneration in cotyledons were established only in cultivar Gergana on culture medium supplemented with 3.0 mgL-1 BA and in combination of 0.5 mgL-1IAA.

  3. Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arnold I.

    1984-01-01

    Cartilage is a fundamental biological material that helps to shape the body and then helps to support it. Its fundamental properties of strength and resilience are explained in terms of the tissue's molecular structure. (JN)

  4. Development of efficient plant regeneration and transformation system for impatiens using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and multiple bud cultures as explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Yinghui; Baxter, Aaron; Zhang, Song; Pantazis, Christopher J; Veilleux, Richard E

    2010-08-09

    Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) is a top selling floriculture crop. The potential for genetic transformation of Impatiens to introduce novel flower colors or virus resistance has been limited by its general recalcitrance to tissue culture and transformation manipulations. We have established a regeneration and transformation system for Impatiens that provides new alternatives to genetic improvement of this crop. In a first step towards the development of transgenic INSV-resistant Impatiens, we developed an efficient plant regeneration system using hypocotyl segments containing cotyledonary nodes as explants. With this regeneration system, 80% of explants produced an average of 32.3 elongated shoots per initial explant plated, with up to 167 elongated shoots produced per explant. Rooting efficiency was high, and 100% of shoots produced roots within 12 days under optimal conditions, allowing plant regeneration within approximately 8 weeks. Using this regeneration system, we developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated Impatiens transformation method using in vitro multiple bud cultures as explants and a binary plasmid (pHB2892) bearing gfp and nptII genes. Transgenic Impatiens plants, with a frequency up to 58.9%, were obtained within 12 to 16 weeks from inoculation to transfer of transgenic plants to soil. Transgenic plants were confirmed by Southern blot, phenotypic assays and T1 segregation analysis. Transgene expression was observed in leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruit. The transgenic plants were fertile and phenotypically normal. We report the development of a simple and efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for Impatiens. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Impatiens with experimental evidence of stable integration of T-DNA and of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method for plants using in vitro maintained multiple bud cultures as explants. This transformation system

  5. Development of Efficient Plant Regeneration and Transformation System for Impatiens Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Multiple Bud Cultures as Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yinghui

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana is a top selling floriculture crop. The potential for genetic transformation of Impatiens to introduce novel flower colors or virus resistance has been limited by its general recalcitrance to tissue culture and transformation manipulations. We have established a regeneration and transformation system for Impatiens that provides new alternatives to genetic improvement of this crop. Results In a first step towards the development of transgenic INSV-resistant Impatiens, we developed an efficient plant regeneration system using hypocotyl segments containing cotyledonary nodes as explants. With this regeneration system, 80% of explants produced an average of 32.3 elongated shoots per initial explant plated, with up to 167 elongated shoots produced per explant. Rooting efficiency was high, and 100% of shoots produced roots within 12 days under optimal conditions, allowing plant regeneration within approximately 8 weeks. Using this regeneration system, we developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated Impatiens transformation method using in vitro multiple bud cultures as explants and a binary plasmid (pHB2892 bearing gfp and nptII genes. Transgenic Impatiens plants, with a frequency up to 58.9%, were obtained within 12 to 16 weeks from inoculation to transfer of transgenic plants to soil. Transgenic plants were confirmed by Southern blot, phenotypic assays and T1 segregation analysis. Transgene expression was observed in leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruit. The transgenic plants were fertile and phenotypically normal. Conclusion We report the development of a simple and efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for Impatiens. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Impatiens with experimental evidence of stable integration of T-DNA and of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method for plants using in vitro maintained

  6. Co-culture systems-based strategies for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Guo, Weimin; Wang, Mingjie; Hao, Chunxiang; Lu, Liang; Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Xu; Chen, Mingxue; Li, Penghao; Jiang, Peng; Lu, Shibi; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2018-03-01

    Cartilage engineering facilitates repair and regeneration of damaged cartilage using engineered tissue that restores the functional properties of the impaired joint. The seed cells used most frequently in tissue engineering, are chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. Seed cells activity plays a key role in the regeneration of functional cartilage tissue. However, seed cells undergo undesirable changes after in vitro processing procedures, such as degeneration of cartilage cells and induced hypertrophy of mesenchymal stem cells, which hinder cartilage tissue engineering. Compared to monoculture, which does not mimic the in vivo cellular environment, co-culture technology provides a more realistic microenvironment in terms of various physical, chemical, and biological factors. Co-culture technology is used in cartilage tissue engineering to overcome obstacles related to the degeneration of seed cells, and shows promise for cartilage regeneration and repair. In this review, we focus first on existing co-culture systems for cartilage tissue engineering and related fields, and discuss the conditions and mechanisms thereof. This is followed by methods for optimizing seed cell co-culture conditions to generate functional neo-cartilage tissue, which will lead to a new era in cartilage tissue engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of donor plant age and explants on in vitro culture of Cedrela montana Moritz ex Turcz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Basto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the organogenic potential of Cedrela montana Moritz ex Turcz. Explants from mature (10-20 year-old and juvenile (7-18 month-old trees were collected. The first grouping included buds, leaves, and nodes derived from juvenile basal offshoots and rejuvenated shoots from cuttings. The second, included leaves, petioles, nodes, internodes and nodes of in vitro elongated shoots. The highest organogenic potential was observed in nodes from juvenile trees: 45.8% of explants presented axillary bud elongation, while 56.2% presented rooting in a growth regulator free culture medium. Fifty-one percent of elongated shoots produced adventitious shoots with 0.5 μM NAA and 0.5 μM BA; 30% with 0.5 μM NAA and 1 μM BA; and 30% with 1 μM BA. Twenty percent presented roots with 0.5 μM NAA. Root formation was stimulated in a medium supplemented with activated charcoal (5 gL-1. The acclimatization of eighty percent of plantlets regenerated from nodes, and of 72.5% in vitro generated shoots was successful. On the contrary, mature trees material presented low organogenic response. Axillary bud elongation was recorded just in 10.7% of explants from juvenile shoots and in 6.7% of explants from rejuvenated shoots. The age of donor plant and type of explant affect the organogenic potential of C. montana. This study contributes to the understanding of this species’ response under in vitro conditions.

  8. Fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) Induces Lamellar Separation and Alters Sphingolipid Metabolism of In Vitro Cultured Hoof Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Nicole; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schaumberger, Simone; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-03-24

    One of the most important hoof diseases is laminitis. Yet, the pathology of laminitis is not fully understood. Different bacterial toxins, e.g. endotoxins or exotoxins, seem to play an important role. Additionally, ingestion of mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, might contribute to the onset of laminitis. In this respect, fumonsins are of special interest since horses are regarded as species most susceptible to this group of mycotoxins. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) on primary isolated epidermal and dermal hoof cells, as well as on the lamellar tissue integrity and sphingolipid metabolism of hoof explants in vitro. There was no effect of FB₁ at any concentration on dermal or epidermal cells. However, FB₁ significantly reduced the separation force of explants after 24 h of incubation. The Sa/So ratio was significantly increased in supernatants of explants incubated with FB₁ (2.5-10 µg/mL) after 24 h. Observed effects on Sa/So ratio were linked to significantly increased sphinganine concentrations. Our study showed that FB₁ impairs the sphingolipid metabolism of explants and reduces lamellar integrity at non-cytotoxic concentrations. FB₁ might, therefore, affect hoof health. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary to elucidate the effects of FB₁ on the equine hoof in more detail.

  9. Effect of Pre-culture Irradiation and Explant Types on Efficiency of Brassica napus Genetic Transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, I.M.; Moustafa, H.A.M.; Azzam, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    The irradiated seeds of canola cv. Drakkar ( Brassica napus l. ) were germinated under aspect conditions, cotyledonary petioles and hypocotyl of 6 days old seedlings were used for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens has construct with the selectable marker gene (NPT II) and the desirable gene (HPPD). Direct and indirect shoot organogenesis were obtained from the both explants. Cotyledonary petioles was higher responded than hypocotyl with respective 26% and 14% of the explants producing NPT II-positive shoots after the selection on 50mg/l kanamycin. Calli might develop on and not in the agar medium were un transformation. This explains the higher number of escapes detected in hypocotyl explants than in experiments with cotyledons. The frequency of transformation plants as a function of indirect organogenesis was more than direct shoot regeneration from explants. The pre- irradiation with 75 Gy of gamma rays enhanced the genetic transformation frequencies by about 10 % as compared to that of the un-irradiated material. The obtained shoots were rooted and regenerated mature plants

  10. Effects of plant growth regulators on in vitro cultured nodal explants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... sterilized potting mix of forest soil, well-decomposed coffee husk, and red sand at the respective ratio of 1:1:2 by volume (JARC experience) and the stock plants were established in the main- tenance greenhouse of the biotechnology division at an average temperature of 25 ± 2°C. Explant sterilization and ...

  11. Effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast assessed in cultured cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Seo, Gwy-Suk; Karakida, Osamu; Ueda, Hitoshi; Sone, Shusuke; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa; Moriya, Hiroto.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) in cultured cartilage. In our culture system, only collagen synthesis was increased by the addition of vitamin C, while proteoglycan synthesis and the number of chondrocytes were unaffected. The MTC effect was assessed by using an off-resonance RF pulse (0.3 KHz off-resonance, sinc wave of 18 msec, maximum amplitude 4.61 x 10 -4 T) on a GRASS sequence. The cartilage cultured with vitamin C showed a higher MTC effect than that cultured without vitamin C. The major role of collagen on MTC was confirmed in living cartilage tissue. (author)

  12. Establishment and Characterization of Primary Cultures from Iranian Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients by Enzymatic Method and Explant Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Ganjibakhsh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC is the most frequent oral cancer worldwide. It is known as the eighth most common cancer in men and as the fifth most common cancer in women. Cytogenetic and biochemical studies in recent decades have emphasized the necessity of providing an appropriate tool for such researches. Cancer cell culture is a useful tool for investigations on biochemical, genetic, molecular and immunological characteristics of different cancers, including oral cancer. Here, we explain the establishment process of five primary oral cancer cells derived from an Iranian population.Materials and Methods: The specimens were obtained from five oral cancer patients. Enzymatic, explant culture and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS methods were used for cell isolation. After quality control tests, characterization and authentication of primary oral cancer cells were performed by short tandem repeats (STR profiling, chromosome analysis, species identification, and monitoring the growth, morphology and the expression of CD326 and CD133 markers.Results: Five primary oral cancer cells were established from an Iranian population. The flow cytometry results showed that the isolated cells were positive for CD326 and CD133 markers. Furthermore, the cells were free from mycoplasma, bacterial and fungal contamination. No misidentified or cross-contaminated cells were detected by STR analysis.Conclusions: Human primary oral cancer cells provide an extremely useful platform for studying carcinogenesis pathways of oral cancer in Iranian population. They may be helpful in explaining the ethnic differences in cancer biology and the individuality in anticancer drug response in future studies.

  13. 35Sulphate incorporation assay as a new tool for measuring early cartilage degradation following blood exposure in vitro and in vivo in f8 ko rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulles, A. E.; Christensen, K. R.; Coeleveld, K.

    2017-01-01

    hours after euthanasia the cartilage of six healthy F8 KO rats was obtained by shaving off cartilage fragments of the tibia plateau by use of a scalpel. All cartilage explants were then cultured for four days; in addition to culture medium, half of the cartilage samples were cultured with 50% v/v whole...... blood. After four days proteoglycan synthesis rate was determined by adding 35SO42- to the cultures for four hours. The 35SO42- becomes incorporated in new synthesized proteoglycans. After digesting the cartilage pieces, cetylpyridinium chloride was added to the samples to precipitate the proteoglycans...

  14. Inhibition of oncostatin M in osteoarthritic synovial fluid enhances GAG production in osteoarthritic cartilage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Beekhuizen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mediators in the synovial fluid are thought to play a major role in osteoarthritic cartilage turnover. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of oncostatin M (OSM in osteoarthritis (OA by evaluating the presence of the cytokine and its receptors in the OA joint and interfering with its activity in synovial fluid co-cultured with cartilage explants. OSM levels were increased in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritic patients compared to healthy donors. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of both the leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF and OSM receptors for OSM throughout the whole depth of osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial tissue, whereas in healthy cartilage their presence seemed more restricted to the superficial zone. Blocking OSM activity, using an activity inhibiting antibody, in 25 % osteoarthritic synovial fluid added to OA cartilage explant cultures increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG content from 18.6 mg/g to 24.3 mg/g (P < 0.03 and total production from 7.0 mg/g to 11.9 mg/g (P < 0.003. However, OSM exogenously added to cartilage explant cultures reflecting low and high concentrations in the synovial fluid (5 and 50 pg/mL did not affect cartilage matrix turnover, suggesting that factors present in the synovial fluid act in concert with OSM to inhibit GAG production. The current study indicates the potential to enhance cartilage repair in osteoarthritis by modulating the joint environment by interfering with OSM activity.

  15. The effect of radiation in combination with carcinogens on the growth of normal urothelium in explant culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, C.; O'Brien, A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation is known to be carcinogenic to humans but attempts to demonstrate the process using human tissue culture models have met with little success. In the present study explants were established from urothelium and exposed to radiation and a range of chemical carcinogens, suspected promotor or metabolic agents. The resulting outgrowth was monitored for growth rate, proliferating epithelial fraction and development and differentiation of endothelial cells in culture. The results indicate that enhanced growth of epithelial cells can be seen when cultures are irradiated in the presence of various nitrosamines, benzo(a)pyrene or aniline. Radiation alone reduced the overall growth area measured but several proliferative foci developed on the resulting outgrowth. Their ultrastructural appearance reveals that they carry severe mitochondrial damage and exposure of treated cultures to metabolic inhibitors confirms that their respiration is defective. Endothelial cells proliferated over the surface of the epithelial monolayer and both the number and the degree of differentiation of the endothelial cells increased with increasing dose up to 10 Gy. While the cultures are not immortalised by the treatment, it appears that the epithelial cells have an extended lifespan (division capacity) and that a subpopulation has undergone a number of premalignant changes. Changes in endothelial cell proliferation also occur. (orig.)

  16. Changes in the metabolic footprint of placental explant-conditioned medium cultured in different oxygen tensions from placentas of small for gestational age and normal pregnancies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, R P

    2012-01-31

    Being born small for gestational age (SGA) confers significantly increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Accumulating evidence suggests that an SGA fetus results from a poorly perfused and abnormally developed placenta. Some of the placental features seen in SGA, such as abnormal cell turnover and impaired nutrient transport, can be reproduced by culture of placental explants in hypoxic conditions. Metabolic footprinting offers a hypothesis-generating strategy to investigate factors absorbed by and released from this tissue in vitro. Previously, metabolic footprinting of the conditioned culture media has identified differences in placental explants cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and between normal pregnancies and those complicated by pre-eclampsia. In this study we aimed to examine the differences in the metabolic footprint of placental villous explants cultured at different oxygen (O(2)) tensions between women who deliver an SGA baby (n = 9) and those from normal controls (n = 8). Placental villous explants from cases and controls were cultured for 96 h in 1% (hypoxic), 6% (normoxic) and 20% (hyperoxic) O(2). Metabolic footprints were analysed by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to an electrospray hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-MS). 574 metabolite features showed significant difference between SGA and normal at one or more of the oxygen tensions. SGA explant media cultured under hypoxic conditions was observed, on a univariate level, to exhibit the same metabolic signature as controls cultured under normoxic conditions in 49% of the metabolites of interest, suggesting that SGA tissue is acclimatised to hypoxic conditions in vivo. No such behaviour was observed under hyperoxic culture conditions. Glycerophospholipid and tryptophan metabolism were highlighted as areas of particular interest.

  17. Morphogenic responses of three explants of Lupinus montanus (H.B.K. cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ramírez-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen El necrosamiento y la respuesta morfogénica de explantes de cotiledón, epicótilo e hipocótilo de plántulas de Lupinus montanus (H.B.K. germinadas in vitro se evaluaron para establecer las condiciones básicas de micropropagación. El necrosamiento se evaluó en medio MS con 0.40 mg·litro-1 de tiamina, 100 mg·litro-1 de mioinositol, 3 % de sacarosa y 7 g·litro-1 de agar-agar y distintas dosis de carbón activado (CA y ácido cítrico. Los tratamientos con CA (50 mg·litro-1 y 100 mg·litro-1 fueron los mejores en el control del necrosamiento (P = 0.001; el cotiledón tuvo mayor nivel de necrosamiento ( 70 % a diferencia del cotiledón, cuya respuesta fue primordialmente callogénica (50 %. El epicótilo cultivado en medio MS con 3.0 μM de AIA y 1.0 μM de BA tuvo el mayor número de brotes (10 y altura (11.4 ± 2.6 cm.

  18. The release of bystander factor(s) from tissue explant cultures of rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) after exposure to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dowd, Colm; Mothersill, Carmel E; Cairns, Michael T; Austin, Brian; McClean, Brendan; Lyng, Fiona M; Murphy, James E J

    2006-10-01

    The bystander response has been documented in cell lines and cell cultures derived from aquatic species over the past several years. However, little work has been undertaken to identify a similar bystander response in tissue explant cultures from fish. In this study, indirect effects of ionizing gamma radiation on tissue explant cultures of fish were investigated. Tissue explants in culture were exposed to 0.5 Gy and 5 Gy gamma radiation from a 60Co teletherapy unit. A bystander response in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells exposed to gamma-irradiated tissue conditioned medium from rainbow trout explants was investigated, and the effects on cell survival were quantified by the clonogenic survival assay. Dichlorofluorescein and rhodamine 123 fluorescent dyes were used to identify alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), respectively. Results indicate a different response for the three tissue types investigated. Clonogenic assay results vary from a decrease in cell survival (gill) to no effect (skin) to a stimulatory effect (spleen). Results from fluorescence assays of ROS and MMP show similarities to clonogenic assay results. This study identifies a useful model for further studies relating to the bystander effect in aquatic organisms in vivo and ex vivo.

  19. Long-term culture of sponge explants: conditions enhancing survival and growth, and assessment of bioactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caralt, de S.; Agell, G.; Uriz, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sponges are an important source of secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical interest. This is the main reason for the increasing interest of sponge culture recent years. The optimal culture system depends on the species to be cultured: while some species easily produce sponge aggregates after

  20. [Influence of genotype, explant type and component of culture medium on in vitro callus induction and shoot organogenesis of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliluev, M R; Bogoutdinova, L R; Baranova, G B; Baranova, E N; Kharchenko, P N; Dolgov, S V

    2014-01-01

    The influence of explant type as well as of the type of growth regulators and concentration on callus induction processes and somatic organogenesis of shoots was studied in vitro on four tomato genotypes of Russian breeding. Cytological study of callus tissue was conducted. It was established that tomato varieties possess a substantially greater ability to indirect shoot organogenesis compared with the F1 hybrid. The highest frequency of somatic organogenesis of shoots, as well as their number per explant, was observed for most of the genotypes studied during the cultivation of cotyledons on Murashige-Skoog culture medium containing 2 mg/l of zeatin in combination with 0.1 mg/l of 3-indoleacetic acid. An effective protocol of indirect somatic organogenesis of shoots from different explants of tomato varieties with a frequency of more than 80% was developed.

  1. Studies of mineralization in tissue culture: optimal conditions for cartilage calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A. L.; Stiner, D.; Doty, S. B.; Binderman, I.; Leboy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal conditions for obtaining a calcified cartilage matrix approximating that which exists in situ were established in a differentiating chick limb bud mesenchymal cell culture system. Using cells from stage 21-24 embryos in a micro-mass culture, at an optimal density of 0.5 million cells/20 microliters spot, the deposition of small crystals of hydroxyapatite on a collagenous matrix and matrix vesicles was detected by day 21 using X-ray diffraction, FT-IR microscopy, and electron microscopy. Optimal media, containing 1.1 mM Ca, 4 mM P, 25 micrograms/ml vitamin C, 0.3 mg/ml glutamine, no Hepes buffer, and 10% fetal bovine serum, produced matrix resembling the calcifying cartilage matrix of fetal chick long bones. Interestingly, higher concentrations of fetal bovine serum had an inhibitory effect on calcification. The cartilage phenotype was confirmed based on the cellular expression of cartilage collagen and proteoglycan mRNAs, the presence of type II and type X collagen, and cartilage type proteoglycan at the light microscopic level, and the presence of chondrocytes and matrix vesicles at the EM level. The system is proposed as a model for evaluating the events in cell mediated cartilage calcification.

  2. Notochord manipulation does not impact oesophageal and tracheal formation from isolated foregut in 3D explant culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Laughlin, Danielle; Murphy, Paula; Puri, Prem

    2016-01-01

    Tracheo-oesophageal malformations result from disturbed foregut separation during early development. The notochord, a specialised embryonic structure, forms immediately adjacent to the dividing foregut. In the Adriamycin mouse model of oesophageal atresia, foregut and notochord abnormalities co-exist, and the site and severity of foregut malformations closely correlate to the position and extent of the notochord defects. Notochord and foregut abnormalities also co-exist in the Noggin Knockout mouse as well in a small number of human cases. The notochord is a source of powerful molecular signals during early embryogenesis, being particularly important for neural crest development. The influence of notochord signaling on the adjacent foregut is not known. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of notochord manipulation on foregut separation using a robust 3D explant method for culturing isolated foregut which permits oeosphageal and tracheal formation in vitro. Foregut was micro-dissected from embryonic day 9 mice (License B100/4447 Irish Medicines Board), embedded in collagen and cultured for 48 h with native notochord intact (n = 6), notochord removed (n = 10) or additional notochord transplanted from stage matched controls (n = 8). Specimens were analysed for foregut morphology and molecular patterning using immunohistochemistry for Hnf3b (an endoderm marker) and Sox2 (a notochord and oesophageal marker) on cryosections. Foregut separation into distinct oesophagus and trachea was observed in isolated foregut specimens with or without their native notochord. In specimens with additional notochord transplants, foregut morphology and molecular patterning were comparable to controls whether or not the native notochord was maintained. In particular foregut separation was not disrupted by the transplantation of additional notochord at the dorsal foregut endoderm. The relationship between the embryonic foregut and notochord is complex and ill

  3. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal-Cell Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan; Doeselaar, Marina van; Meij, Björn; Tryfonidou, M; Ito, Keita

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  4. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal Cell-Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan A H; van Doeselaar, Marina; Meij, Björn P; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Ito, K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  5. The effects of low-level ionising radiation on primary explant cultures of rainbow trout Pronephros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olwell, P.; Ni Shuilleabhain, S.; Mothersill, C.; Seymour, C.; Cottell, D.C.; Lyng, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been known that the haematopoietic tissue of mammals is one of the most radiosensitive tissues. In vitro studies on prawn have also shown that low doses of radiation has an extremely deleterious effect on cells cultured from this animal's blood forming tissues. This raises the question on the relative effects of radiation between animals from different species. One of the most important aquatic animals, from both an economic and ecologic point of view, is the fish. With this in mind, primary cultures of the blood forming tissues of rainbow trout were exposed to radiation followed by a morphological comparison between control and irradiated cultures. The cultured cells were characterised as macrophages following incubation with non-specific fluorescent beads and human apoptotic PMN. The cells demonstrated both specific and non-specific phagocytosis, by consuming the non-indigenous bodies, and were classified as phagocytic leucocytes. These cells were found in two morphological forms, stretched and rounded. It was shown that there was a commensurate increase in the number of stretched cells following application of radiation. Radiation was also shown to cause a dose-dependent increase in the amounts of apoptosis and necrosis in cells over time. The phagocytic efficacy of the irradiated leucocytes compared to controls was also investigated. (author)

  6. The Influence of Explant Types and Orientation on in Vitro Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamnoon KANCHANAPOOM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflorescence, apical and lateral buds of Musa balbisiana ‘Kluai Hin’ (BBB group were used to culture on MS medium supplemented with 22 μM BA and 15% (v/v coconut water. Comparison of bud orientation showed that the best response of in vitro shoot tip proliferation was obtained with abaxial surface of buds lying down i.e. one side touching the medium (tilt. Mass propagation of shoot tips was obtained when cultured buds on MS medium containing 44 μM BA. Rooting was achieved by transferring the isolated shoots to MS basal medium without growth regulators. Rooted plantlets were acclimatized and successfully established in soil.

  7. Tumorigenic risk of human induced pluripotent stem cell explants cultured on mouse SNL76/7 feeder cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Mizuna; Mitsui, Youji, E-mail: y-mitsui8310@hb.tp1.jp; Kumazaki, Tsutomu; Kawahara, Yuta; Matsuo, Taira; Takahashi, Tomoko, E-mail: t-takahashi@kph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • hiPS cell explants formed malignant tumors when SNL76/7 feeder cells were used. • Multi type tumors developed by interaction of SNL76/7 feeder cells with hiPS cells. • Tumorigenic risk occurs by co-culture of hiPS cells with SNL76/7 feeder cells. - Abstract: The potential for tumor formation from transplanted human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives represents a high risk in their application to regenerative medicine. We examined the genetic origin and characteristics of tumors, that were formed when 13 hiPSC lines, established by ourselves, and 201B7 hiPSC from Kyoto University were transplanted into severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice. Though teratomas formed in 58% of mice, five angiosarcomas, one malignant solitary fibrous tumor and one undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma formed in the remaining mice. Three malignant cell lines were established from the tumors, which were derived from mitomycin C (MMC)-treated SNL76/7 (MMC-SNL) feeder cells, as tumor development from fusion cells between MMC-SNL and hiPSCs was negative by genetic analysis. While parent SNL76/7 cells produced malignant tumors, neither MMC-SNL nor MMC-treated mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) produced malignant tumors. When MMC-SNL feeder cells were co-cultured with hiPSCs, growing cell lines were generated, that expressed genes similar to the parent SNL76/7 cells. Thus, hiPSCs grown on MMC-SNL feeder cells have a high risk of generating feeder-derived malignant tumors. The possible mechanism(s) of growth restoration and the formation of multiple tumor types are discussed with respect of the interactions between MMC-SNL and hiPSC.

  8. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  9. The effects of monosodium urate monohydrate crystals on chondrocyte viability and function: implications for development of cartilage damage in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhana, Ashika; Callon, Karen E; Pool, Bregina; Naot, Dorit; Gamble, Gregory D; Dray, Michael; Pitto, Rocco; Bentley, Jarome; McQueen, Fiona M; Cornish, Jillian; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage damage is frequently observed in advanced destructive gout. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals on chondrocyte viability and function. The alamarBlue assay and flow cytometry were used to assess the viability of primary human chondrocytes and cartilage explants following culture with MSU crystals. The number of dead chondrocytes in cartilage explants cultured with MSU crystals was quantified. Real-time PCR was used to determine changes in the relative mRNA expression levels of chondrocytic genes. The histological appearance of cartilage in joints affected by gout was also examined. MSU crystals rapidly reduced primary human chondrocyte and cartilage explant viability in a dose-dependent manner (p gout, normal cartilage architecture was lost, with empty chondrocyte lacunae observed. MSU crystals have profound inhibitory effects on chondrocyte viability and function. Interactions between MSU crystals and chondrocytes may contribute to cartilage damage in gout through reduction of chondrocyte viability and promotion of a catabolic state.

  10. Hypoxia inhibits hypertrophic differentiation and endochondral ossification in explanted tibiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen C H Leijten

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes induces angiogenesis which alleviates hypoxia normally present in cartilage. In the current study, we aim to determine whether alleviation of hypoxia is merely a downstream effect of hypertrophic differentiation as previously described or whether alleviation of hypoxia and consequent changes in oxygen tension mediated signaling events also plays an active role in regulating the hypertrophic differentiation process itself.Fetal mouse tibiae (E17.5 explants were cultured up to 21 days under normoxic or hypoxic conditions (21% and 2.5% oxygen respectively. Tibiae were analyzed on growth kinetics, histology, gene expression and protein secretion.The oxygen level had a strong influence on the development of explanted fetal tibiae. Compared to hypoxia, normoxia increased the length of the tibiae, length of the hypertrophic zone, calcification of the cartilage and mRNA levels of hypertrophic differentiation-related genes e.g. MMP9, MMP13, RUNX2, COL10A1 and ALPL. Compared to normoxia, hypoxia increased the size of the cartilaginous epiphysis, length of the resting zone, calcification of the bone and mRNA levels of hyaline cartilage-related genes e.g. ACAN, COL2A1 and SOX9. Additionally, hypoxia enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of the secreted articular cartilage markers GREM1, FRZB and DKK1, which are able to inhibit hypertrophic differentiation.Collectively our data suggests that oxygen levels play an active role in the regulation of hypertrophic differentiation of hyaline chondrocytes. Normoxia stimulates hypertrophic differentiation evidenced by the expression of hypertrophic differentiation related genes. In contrast, hypoxia suppresses hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes, which might be at least partially explained by the induction of GREM1, FRZB and DKK1 expression.

  11. Comparison of spiculogenesis in in vitro ADCP-primmorph and explants culture of marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve with 3-TMOSPU supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xupeng; Yu, Xingju; Zhang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to test the feasibility of introducing functional chemical groups into biogenic silica spicules by examining the effect of supplementing a silican coupler [3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]urea (3-TMOSPU) as silica source in the cultures of archaeocytes-dominant-cell-population (ADCP) primmorphs and explants of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve. Analysis by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed that the organic group in 3-TMOSPU was introduced into silica spicules. By comparing ADCP-primmorph cultures when supplemented with Na2SiO3, 3-TMOSPU supplementation showed no notable effect on the primmorphs development and cell locomotion behaviors. A decline in silicatein expression quantified by real-time RT-PCR was, however, observed during spiculogenesis. The decline was slower for the 3-TMOSPU group whereas significantly fewer spicules were formed. When sponge papillae explants were cultured, 3-TMOSPU supplementation had no negative effect on sponge growth but inhibited the growth biofouling of the diatom Nitzschia closterium. By monitoring the detectable Si concentration, it seemed that 3-TMOSPU was converted by the sponge and its conversion was related to spiculogenesis. Analysis of spicule dimensional changes indicated that the inhibition of spiculogenesis by 3-TMOSPU supplementation was less in ADCP-primmorphs culture due to lower 3-TMOSPU/detectable Si ratio in the media.

  12. Local changes in proteoglycan synthesis during culture are different for normal and osteoarthritic cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber, F. P.; van der Kraan, P. M.; van Roy, H. L.; Vitters, E. L.; Huber-Bruning, O.; van den Berg, W. B.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    Proteoglycan synthesis of mild-to-moderate osteoarthritic human knee cartilage was compared with that of normal cartilage of the same donor. Immediately after cartilage was obtained, the synthesis rate of proteoglycans was higher for osteoarthritic cartilage than for normal cartilage. Proteoglycan

  13. The Role of Chronic Mesh Infection in Delayed-Onset Vaginal Mesh Complications or Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections: Results From Explanted Mesh Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellano, Erin M; Nakamura, Leah Y; Choi, Judy M; Kang, Diana C; Grisales, Tamara; Raz, Shlomo; Rodriguez, Larissa V

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal mesh complications necessitating excision are increasingly prevalent. We aim to study whether subclinical chronically infected mesh contributes to the development of delayed-onset mesh complications or recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Women undergoing mesh removal from August 2013 through May 2014 were identified by surgical code for vaginal mesh removal. Only women undergoing removal of anti-incontinence mesh were included. Exclusion criteria included any women undergoing simultaneous prolapse mesh removal. We abstracted preoperative and postoperative information from the medical record and compared mesh culture results from patients with and without mesh extrusion, de novo recurrent UTIs, and delayed-onset pain. One hundred seven women with only anti-incontinence mesh removed were included in the analysis. Onset of complications after mesh placement was within the first 6 months in 70 (65%) of 107 and delayed (≥6 months) in 37 (35%) of 107. A positive culture from the explanted mesh was obtained from 82 (77%) of 107 patients, and 40 (37%) of 107 were positive with potential pathogens. There were no significant differences in culture results when comparing patients with delayed-onset versus immediate pain, extrusion with no extrusion, and de novo recurrent UTIs with no infections. In this large cohort of patients with mesh removed for a diverse array of complications, cultures of the explanted vaginal mesh demonstrate frequent low-density bacterial colonization. We found no differences in culture results from women with delayed-onset pain versus acute pain, vaginal mesh extrusions versus no extrusions, or recurrent UTIs using standard culture methods. Chronic prosthetic infections in other areas of medicine are associated with bacterial biofilms, which are resistant to typical culture techniques. Further studies using culture-independent methods are needed to investigate the potential role of chronic bacterial infections in delayed vaginal mesh

  14. Mycobacterial antigens stimulate rheumatoid mononuclear cells to cartilage proteoglycan depletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, B.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Huber-Bruning, O.; van Roy, J. L.; den Otter, W.; van Eden, W.

    1990-01-01

    In a coculture with porcine articular cartilage explants unstimulated blood mononuclear cells (BMC) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but not from healthy controls, induced proteoglycan depletion of dead cartilage. Specific stimulation of the RA BMC with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT),

  15. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and insulin-like growth factor on cultured cartilage cells from skate Raja porasa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingjun; Jin, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2003-12-01

    Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) on cartilage cells from proboscis of skate, Raja porasa Günther, were investigated in this study. The cartilage cells were cultured in 20% FBS-supplemented MEM medium at 24°C. Twelve hours after culture initiation, the cartilage cells were treated with bFGF and IGF-II at different concentration combinations. It was found that 20 ng/ml of bFGF or 80 ng/ml of IGF-II was enough to have obvious stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. Test of bFGF and IGF-II together, revealed that 20 ng/ml of bFGF and 80 ng/ml of IGF-II together had the best stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. The cartilage cells cultured could form a monolayer at day 7.

  16. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  17. Strategies on process engineering of chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Sarada Prasanna; Rastogi, Amit; Tripathi, Satyavrat; Srivastava, Pradeep

    2017-04-01

    The current work is an attempt to study the strategies for cartilage tissue regeneration using porous scaffold in wavy walled airlift bioreactor (ALBR). Novel chitosan, poly (L-lactide) and hyaluronic acid based composite scaffold were prepared. The scaffolds were cross-linked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide, N-hydroxysuccinimide and chondroitin sulfate to obtain interconnected 3D microstructure showing excellent biocompatibility, higher cellular differentiation and increased stability. The surface morphology and porosity of the scaffolds were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter and optimized for chondrocyte regeneration. The study shows that the scaffolds were highly porous with pore size ranging from 48 to 180 µm and the porosities in the range 80-92%. Swelling and in vitro degradation studies were performed for the composite scaffolds; by increasing the chitosan: HA ratio in the composite scaffolds, the swelling property increases and stabilizes after 24 h. There was controlled degradation of composite scaffolds for 4 weeks. The uniform chondrocyte distribution in the scaffold using various growth modes in the shake flask and ALBR was studied by glycosaminoglycans (GAG) quantification, MTT assay and mixing time evaluation. The cell culture studies demonstrated that efficient designing of ALBR increases the cartilage regeneration as compared to using a shake flask. The free chondrocyte microscopy and cell attachment were performed by inverted microscope and SEM, and from the study it was confirmed that the cells uniformly attached to the scaffold. This study focuses on optimizing strategies for the culture of chondrocyte using suitable scaffold for improved cartilage tissue regeneration.

  18. Curcumin reduces prostaglandin E2, matrix metalloproteinase-3 and proteoglycan release in the secretome of interleukin 1β-treated articular cartilage [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Clutterbuck

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Curcumin (diferuloylmethane is a phytochemical with potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, and has therapeutic potential for the treatment of a range of inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this study was to determine whether non-toxic concentrations of curcumin can reduce interleukin-1beta (IL-1β-stimulated inflammation and catabolism in an explant model of cartilage inflammation. Methods: Articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes were obtained from equine metacarpophalangeal joints. Curcumin was added to monolayer cultured primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants in concentrations ranging from 3μM-100μM. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3 release into the secretome of IL-1β-stimulated explants was measured using a competitive ELISA and western blotting respectively. Proteoglycan (PG release in the secretome was measured using the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assay. Cytotoxicity was assessed with a live/dead assay in monolayer cultures after 24 hours, 48 hours and five days, and in explants after five days. Results: Curcumin induced chondrocyte death in primary cultures (50μM p<0.001 and 100μM p<0.001 after 24 hours. After 48 hours and five days, curcumin (≥25μM significantly increased cell death (p<0.001 both time points. In explants, curcumin toxicity was not observed at concentrations up to and including 25μM after five days. Curcumin (≥3μM significantly reduced IL-1β-stimulated PG (p<0.05 and PGE2 release (p<0.001 from explants, whilst curcumin (≥12μM significantly reduced MMP-3 release (p<0.01. Conclusion: Non-cytotoxic concentrations of curcumin exert anti-catabolic and anti-inflammatory effects in cartilage explants.

  19. Multiplicação in vitro do porta-enxerto de macieira cv. Marubakaido: efeito da orientação do explante no meio de cultura In vitro multiplication of the apple rootstock cv. Marubakaido: effect of the orientation of explant in the medium of culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALAN CRISTIANO ERIG

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da orientação do explante, vertical ou horizontal, no meio de cultura, na multiplicação in vitro, do porta-enxerto de macieira cv. Marubakaido. O meio de cultura utilizado foi o MS com N (nitrogênio reduzido a ¾ da concentração original, 100mg.L-1 de mio-inositol, 40g.L-1 de sacarose e 6g.L-1 de ágar, suplementado com 4,44mM de BAP (6-benzilaminopurina e 0,2ml.L-1 de PPM TM ("Plant Preservative Mixture". Segmentos caulinares com duas gemas e o ápice excisado foram utilizados como explantes. Após a inoculação, os frascos com os explantes foram incubados a 16 horas de fotoperíodo, à temperatura de 25±2ºC, com radiação de 25µmoles.m-2.s-1. O número de brotações, o número de gemas por explante, a taxa de multiplicação e a altura da brotação maior foram avaliados aos quarenta dias de cultivo. O maior número de brotações, o maior número de gemas e a maior taxa de multiplicação foram obtidos com o explante na orientação horizontal no meio de cultura. Não houve diferença significativa quanto à orientação vertical e horizontal do explante no meio de cultura para a altura da brotação maior.The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of the vertical and the horizontal orientation of the explant in the culture medium, in the in vitro multiplication, for the apple rootstock cv. Marubakaido. The culture medium used was the MS with N reduced to ¾ of the original concentration, myo-inositol (100mg.L-1, sucrose (40g.L-1 and agar (6g.L-1, suplemented with BAP (4.44mM and PPM TM (0.2ml.L-1. Stem segments with two buds and the apex excised were used as explants. After the inoculation, the flasks with the explants were incubated at 16 hour of photoperiod, 25±2ºC temperature, with irradiation of 25µmoles.m-2.s-1. The number of shoots and buds, the rate of multiplication and the height of the larger shoot were evaluated after 40 days of cultivation. The highests shoot number, number of buds

  20. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI. The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo, but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo. hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage.

  1. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Manuel; Milian, Lara; Oliver, Maria; Zurriaga, Javier; Sancho-Tello, Maria; de Llano, Jose Javier Martin; Carda, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo , but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo . hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage.

  2. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  3. Prevention of the disrupted enamel phenotype in Slc4a4-null mice using explant organ culture maintained in a living host kidney capsule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wen

    Full Text Available Slc4a4-null mice are a model of proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA. Slc4a4 encodes the electrogenic sodium base transporter NBCe1 that is involved in transcellular base transport and pH regulation during amelogenesis. Patients with mutations in the SLC4A4 gene and Slc4a4-null mice present with dysplastic enamel, amongst other pathologies. Loss of NBCe1 function leads to local abnormalities in enamel matrix pH regulation. Loss of NBCe1 function also results in systemic acidemic blood pH. Whether local changes in enamel pH and/or a decrease in systemic pH are the cause of the abnormal enamel phenotype is currently unknown. In the present study we addressed this question by explanting fetal wild-type and Slc4a4-null mandibles into healthy host kidney capsules to study enamel formation in the absence of systemic acidemia. Mandibular E11.5 explants from NBCe1-/- mice, maintained in host kidney capsules for 70 days, resulted in teeth with enamel and dentin with morphological and mineralization properties similar to cultured NBCe1+/+ mandibles grown under identical conditions. Ameloblasts express a number of proteins involved in dynamic changes in H+/base transport during amelogenesis. Despite the capacity of ameloblasts to dynamically modulate the local pH of the enamel matrix, at least in the NBCe1-/- mice, the systemic pH also appears to contribute to the enamel phenotype. Extrapolating these data to humans, our findings suggest that in patients with NBCe1 mutations, correction of the systemic metabolic acidosis at a sufficiently early time point may lead to amelioration of enamel abnormalities.

  4. Storing live embryonic and adult human cartilage grafts for transplantation using a joint simulating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I; Robinson, D; Cohen, N; Nevo, Z

    2000-11-01

    Cartilage transplantation as a means to replace damaged articular surfaces is of interest. A major obstacle is the long-term preservation of cartilage grafts. The commonly used technique of freezing the grafts inevitably leads to cellular death. The current study compares the technique to an innovative approach using a pulsed-pressure perfusion system termed a joint simulating device (JSD), intended to simulate intra-articular mechanical forces. Human articular cartilage explants were harvested from both embryonic epiphyseal tissue and femoral heads of elderly women (over 70 years of age) undergoing a partial joint replacement (hemi-arthroplasty) and were divided in two groups: half of the samples were incubated in the JSD while the remaining half were grown in static culture within tissue culture plates. After 10 days all samples were evaluated for: (a) cell vitality as assessed by image analysis and XTT assay; (b) biosynthetic activity as expressed by radioactive sulfate incorporation into glycosaminoglycans (GAG's); and (c) proteoglycan content as assessed by alcian blue staining intensity. A 10-fold increase in sulfate incorporation in samples held in the JSD compared to the static culture group was observed in embryonic cartilage. In adult cartilage culture in the JSD elevated sulfate incorporation by threefold as compared to static culture. Central necrosis was observed in specimens grown in the static culture plates, while it did not occur in the samples held in the JSD. Cell vitality as assessed by XTT assay was significantly better in the JSD group as compared to static culture. The difference was more pronounced in the embryonic specimens as compared to adult cartilage. The specimens cultured within the JSD retained proteoglycans significantly better than those cultured in static culture. Maintenance of cartilage specimens in a JSD was highly effective in keeping the vitality of cartilage explants in vitro over a 10-day period. A possible future

  5. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang; Wang, Dong-an; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis

  6. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Dong-an, E-mail: DAWang@ntu.edu.sg [National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis.

  7. Application of stem-cell media to explant culture of human periosteum: An optimal approach for preparing osteogenic cell material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Kohya; Nagata, Masaki; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kenji; Takagi, Ritsuo

    2013-01-01

    As part of our clinical tests on bone regeneration using cultured periosteal sheets, here, we prepared cultured periosteal sheets in two types of stem-cell culture media, STK1 and STK3. Human periosteum was expanded either in 1% human serum-supplemented STK1 for 28 days, in 1% human serum-supplemented STK1 for 14 days followed by 1% human serum-supplemented STK3 for 14 days (1% human serum-supplemented STK1+3), or in 10% fetal bovine serum-supplemented Medium 199 for 28 days (control). Cultured periosteal sheet diameter and DNA content were significantly higher, and the multilayer structure was prominent in 1% human serum-supplemented STK1 and 1% human serum-supplemented STK1+3. The messenger RNA of osteoblastic markers was significantly upregulated in 1% human serum-supplemented STK1+3. Osteopontin-immunopositive staining and mineralization were evident across a wide area of the cultured periosteal sheet in 1% human serum-supplemented STK1+3. Subcutaneous implantation in nude mice following expansion in 1% human serum-supplemented STK1+3 produced the highest cultured periosteal sheet osteogenic activity. Expansion in 1% human serum-supplemented STK1+3 successfully induced cultured periosteal sheet growth while retaining osteogenic potential, and subsequent osteoblastic induction promoted the production of homogeneous cell material.

  8. Differential modulation of growth and phenotypic expression of chondrocytes in sparse and confluent cultures by growth factors in cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Y.; Inoue, H.; Asada, A.; Suzuki, F.

    1990-01-01

    The growth-promoting actions of cartilage extracts (CE) on rabbit cultured chondrocytes were studied to assess the role of local acting growth factors in the generation and expansion of highly differentiated cells. In the present study, DNA synthesis and proteoglycan synthesis in the cultured chondrocytes were monitored by flow cytofluorometry and double-isotope autoradiography by using ( 3 H)thymidine and ( 35 S)sulfate. We report here that actions of the same set of growth factors extracted from cartilage evokes differential cellular responses depending upon cell density. Growth factors in the optimal dose of CE (2 micrograms/ml) or epidermal growth factor (EGF, 40 ng/ml) did not reveal such a cell density-dependent effect on cellular proliferation. However, growth factors in CE induced proteoglycan synthesis selectively in nonproliferating and expressing cells in confluent culture

  9. The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To achieve the best explants and media for spinach tissue culture, the effects of two different plant growth regulators, two explants and cultivars on adventitious shoot regeneration were tested. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) showed that the effects of plant growth regulators on spinach tissue culture were significant; ...

  10. [Regeneration of autologous tissue-engineered cartilage by using basic-fibroblast growth factor in vitro culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-bang; Cheng, Ning-xin; Chen, Bing; Xia, Wan-yao; Cui, Lei; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yi-lin

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) to regenerate an autologous tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro. The Cells were harvested from the elastic auricular cartilage of swine,and were plated at the concentration of 1 x 10(4) cells/cm2 , studied in vitro at two different media enviroments: Group I contained Ham's F-12 with supplements and b-FGF, Group II contained Ham's F-12 only with supplements. The passage 2 cells (after 12.75 +/- 1.26 days) were harvested and mixed with 30% pluronic F-127/Ham's F-12 at the concentration of 50 x 10(6) cells/ml. It was injected subcutaneously at 0.5 ml per implant. The implants were harvested 8 weeks after the vivo culture and examined with the histological stains. The chondrocytes displayed morphologically similar to the fibroblasts in the media containing basic-FGF. The number of cell doublings (after 12.75 +/- 1.26 days) in vitro culture was as the following: Group I, 70; Group II, 5.4. Eight 8 weeks after the vivo autologous implantation, the average weight (g) and volume (cm3) in each group was as the following: Group I, 0.371 g/0.370 cm3 Group II, 0.179 g/0.173 cm3 (P < 0.01). With the b-FGF in vitro culture, the cells were expanded by 70 times after 2 weeks. Histologically, all of the engineered cartilage in the two groups were similar to the native elastic cartilage. These results indicate that the basic-FGF could be used positively to enhance the quality and quantity of the seeding cells for the generation of the well-engineered cartilage.

  11. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on collagen sponges for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Martínez-Sánchez, Adela Helvia; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of human bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs) cultured on collagen biomaterials. hBMSCs were seeded on five different collagen (Col) sponges: C1C2 (types I and II Col), C1C2HS (types I and II Col plus heparan sulphate (HS)), C1C2CHS (types I and II Col plus chondroitin sulphate (CHS)), C1-OLH3 (type I Col plus low molecular weight heparin) and C1CHS (type I Col plus CHS). The resulting constructs were analyzed by histological and immunohistochemical staining, molecular biology and electron microscopy. Col released into culture media was measured by a dye-binding method Results: hBMSCs on biomaterials C1C2, C1C2HS and C1C2CHS had more capacity to attach, proliferate and synthesize Col II and proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM) than on C1-OLH3 and C1CHS. The presence of aggrecan was detected only at the gene level. Total Col liberated by the cells in the supernatants in all scaffold cultures was detected. The level of Col I in the ECM was lower in C1-OLH3 and that of Col II was highest in C1C2 and C1C2HS. Electron microscopy showed differently shaped cells, from rounded to flattened, in all constructs. Col fibers in bundles were observed in C1C2CHS by transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Col I and Col II (C1C2, C1C2HS and C1C2CHS) biomaterials allowed cell proliferation and chondrogenic-like differentiation of hBMSCs at an early stage. Constructs cultured on C1C2HS and C1C2CHS showed better cartilage-like phenotype than the other ones.

  12. Membrane culture and reduced oxygen tension enhances cartilage matrix formation from equine cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, C; Vickaryous, M K; Koch, T G

    2014-03-01

    Ongoing research is aimed at increasing cartilage tissue yield and quality from multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the purpose of treating cartilage damage in horses. Low oxygen culture has been shown to enhance chondrogenesis, and novel membrane culture has been proposed to increase tissue yield and homogeneity. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of reduced oxygen and membrane culture during in vitro chondrogenesis of equine cord blood (CB) MSC. CB-MSC (n = 5 foals) were expanded at 21% oxygen prior to 3-week differentiation in membrane or pellet culture at 5% and 21% oxygen. Assessment included histological examination (H&E, toluidine Blue, immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagen type I and II), protein quantification by hydroxyproline assay and dimethylmethylene assay, and mRNA analysis for collagen IA1, collagen IIA1, collagen XA1, HIF1α and Sox9. Among treatment groups, 5% membrane culture produced neocartilage most closely resembling hyaline cartilage. Membrane culture resulted in increased wet mass, homogenous matrix morphology and an increase in total collagen content, while 5% oxygen culture resulted in higher GAG and type II collagen content. No significant differences were observed for mRNA analysis. Membrane culture at 5% oxygen produces a comparatively larger amount of higher quality neocartilage. Matrix homogeneity is attributed to a uniform diffusion gradient and reduced surface tension. Membrane culture holds promise for scale-up for therapeutic purposes, for cellular preconditioning prior to cytotherapeutic applications, and for modeling system for gas-dependent chondrogenic differentiation studies. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chondrocytes and stem cells in 3D-bioprinted structures create human cartilage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelgren, Peter; Amoroso, Matteo; Lindahl, Anders; Brantsing, Camilla; Rotter, Nicole; Gatenholm, Paul; Kölby, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage repair and replacement is a major challenge in plastic reconstructive surgery. The development of a process capable of creating a patient-specific cartilage framework would be a major breakthrough. Here, we described methods for creating human cartilage in vivo and quantitatively assessing the proliferative capacity and cartilage-formation ability in mono- and co-cultures of human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D)-bioprinted hydrogel scaffold. The 3D-bioprinted constructs (5 × 5 × 1.2 mm) were produced using nanofibrillated cellulose and alginate in combination with human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells using a 3D-extrusion bioprinter. Immediately following bioprinting, the constructs were implanted subcutaneously on the back of 48 nude mice and explanted after 30 and 60 days, respectively, for morphological and immunohistochemical examination. During explantation, the constructs were easy to handle, and the majority had retained their macroscopic grid appearance. Constructs consisting of human nasal chondrocytes showed good proliferation ability, with 17.2% of the surface areas covered with proliferating chondrocytes after 60 days. In constructs comprising a mixture of chondrocytes and stem cells, an additional proliferative effect was observed involving chondrocyte production of glycosaminoglycans and type 2 collagen. This clinically highly relevant study revealed 3D bioprinting as a promising technology for the creation of human cartilage.

  14. Chondrocytes and stem cells in 3D-bioprinted structures create human cartilage in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Apelgren

    Full Text Available Cartilage repair and replacement is a major challenge in plastic reconstructive surgery. The development of a process capable of creating a patient-specific cartilage framework would be a major breakthrough. Here, we described methods for creating human cartilage in vivo and quantitatively assessing the proliferative capacity and cartilage-formation ability in mono- and co-cultures of human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D-bioprinted hydrogel scaffold. The 3D-bioprinted constructs (5 × 5 × 1.2 mm were produced using nanofibrillated cellulose and alginate in combination with human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells using a 3D-extrusion bioprinter. Immediately following bioprinting, the constructs were implanted subcutaneously on the back of 48 nude mice and explanted after 30 and 60 days, respectively, for morphological and immunohistochemical examination. During explantation, the constructs were easy to handle, and the majority had retained their macroscopic grid appearance. Constructs consisting of human nasal chondrocytes showed good proliferation ability, with 17.2% of the surface areas covered with proliferating chondrocytes after 60 days. In constructs comprising a mixture of chondrocytes and stem cells, an additional proliferative effect was observed involving chondrocyte production of glycosaminoglycans and type 2 collagen. This clinically highly relevant study revealed 3D bioprinting as a promising technology for the creation of human cartilage.

  15. Time-dependent changes in gene expression induced in vitro by interleukin-1β in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Maria; Svala, Emilia; Lindahl, Anders; Skiöldebrand, Eva; Ekman, Stina

    2018-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory and degenerative joint disease commonly affecting horses. To identify genes of relevance for cartilage pathology in osteoarthritis we studied the time-course effects of interleukin (IL)-1β on equine articular cartilage. Articular cartilage explants from the distal third metacarpal bone were collected postmortem from three horses without evidence of joint disease. The explants were stimulated with IL-1β for 27 days and global gene expression was measured by microarray. Gene expression was compared to that of unstimulated explants at days 3, 9, 15, 21 and 27. Release of inflammatory proteins was measured using Proximity Extension Assay. Stimulation with IL-1β led to time-dependent changes in gene expression related to inflammation, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and phenotypic alterations. Gene expression and protein release of cytokines, chemokines, and matrix-degrading enzymes increased in the stimulated explants. Collagen type II was downregulated from day 15, whereas other ECM molecules were downregulated earlier. In contrast molecules involved in ECM signaling (perlecan, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, and syndecan 4) were upregulated. At the late time points, genes related to a chondrogenic phenotype were downregulated, and genes related to a hypertrophic phenotype were upregulated, suggesting a transition towards hypertrophy later in the culturing period. The data suggest that this in vitro model mimics time course events of in vivo inflammation in OA and it may be valuable as an in vitro tool to test treatments and to study disease mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect Of Explant Source And Different Medium Culture On Friable Embryogenic Callus Induction Of Four Cultivars Of Cassava Manihot Esculenta Crantz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simplice Prosper Yandia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain Friable Embryogenic Callus FEC for protoplast isolation we have evaluated in this research the competance for Friable Embryogenic Callus FEC of four cassava cultivars M61033 Rendre Yalipe and Six-mois in media containing MS supplemented with 8mgl 24-D MS supplemented with 10 mgl BAP and GD supplemented with 12mgl picloram using apical bud AB and immature leaves lobes ILL as explants. In general in the medium GD12mgl picloram the highest efficiencies of FEC ranged from 58 to 87 and the highest score of FEC ranged from 4.2 to 5.4 with explants AB however we have observed with explants ILL the efficiencies of somatic embryos ranged form 41 to 75 and the score ranged from 4.1 to 4.4. The mediums MS28 mgl 24-D have induced with explants AB the efficiencies of FEC ranged from 43 to 57 and the score ranged from 3.1 to 3.8 however with ILL explants the efficiencies of FEC ranged from 39 to 49 and the score ranged from 2.9 to 3.7. The least FEC were observed in the medium MS210 mgl BAP with BA explants however the efficiencies ranged from 6 to 11 and the score ranged from 1.1 to 1.8. Whereas the efficiencies of FEC with ILL explants ranged from 4 to 7 and the score ranged from 0.5 to 0.8. All of four cultivars showed capability of producing FEC although their efficiency varied according to gonotype donors explants and medium taking into acount. Abbreviations GD Gressoff and Doy MS Murashige and Skoog 24-dichloro phenoxyacetic acid BAP Benzylamino-purin-Acid AB Apical Bud ILL Immature Leaves lobes

  17. Metabolism of 14C-aspartate during shoot bud formation in cultured cotyledon explants of radiata pine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konschuh, M.N.; Thorpe, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aspartate metabolism was investigated in excised cotyledons of radiata pine (Pinus radiate D. Don). These cotyledons were cultured under shoot-forming (plus N 6 -benzyladenine, SF), non-shoot-forming (minus N 6 -benzyladenine, NSF) and unresponsive (plus N 6 -benzyladenine, OLD) conditions, then incubated with [ 14 C]-aspartate for 3-h pulse treatments followed by 3-h chase treatments with cold aspartate. The majority of label was recovered in the CO 2 , amino acid, organic acid and pellet fractions. Uptake was greatest in all tissue types early in culture. Most (over 80%) of the [ 14 C 9-aspartate taken up by the tissues was converted to CO 2 at day 0 in SF and NSF tissues. CO 2 accounted for less than 50% of the total radioactivity in other tissues. Greater incorporation into fractions was observed in SF tissues during promeristemoid formation, while in NSF tissues the greatest incorporation was observed during a period of rapid elongation. Generally, less incorporation was observed in OLD cotyledons than in SF and NSF cotyledons. Analysis of the amino acid fraction showed that labelled aspartate was converted to other amino acids, mainly glutamate, glutamine, asparagine and 4-aminobutyric acid. (au)

  18. Extracellular matrix components and culture regimen selectively regulate cartilage formation by self-assembling human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Johnathan; Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, Edward; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-12-09

    Cartilage formation from self-assembling mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro recapitulate important cellular events during mesenchymal condensation that precedes native cartilage development. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) components and culture regimen on cartilage formation by self-assembling human MSCs in vitro and in vivo. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hMSCs) were seeded and compacted in 6.5-mm-diameter transwell inserts with coated (type I, type II collagen) or uncoated (vehicle) membranes, at different densities (0.5 × 10 6 , 1.0 × 10 6 , 1.5 × 10 6 per insert). Pellets were formed by aggregating hMSCs (0.25 × 10 6 ) in round-bottomed wells. All tissues were cultured for up to 6 weeks for in vitro analyses. Discs (cultured for 6, 8 or 10 weeks) and pellets (cultured for 10 weeks) were implanted subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice to evaluate the cartilage stability in vivo. Type I and type II collagen coatings enabled cartilage disc formation from self-assembling hMSCs. Without ECM coating, hMSCs formed dome-shaped tissues resembling the pellets. Type I collagen, expressed in the prechondrogenic mesenchyme, improved early chondrogenesis versus type II collagen. High seeding density improved cartilage tissue properties but resulted in a lower yield of disc formation. Discs and pellets exhibited compositional and organizational differences in vitro and in vivo. Prolonged chondrogenic induction of the discs in vitro expedited endochondral ossification in vivo. The outcomes of cartilage tissues formed from self-assembling MSCs in vitro and in vivo can be modulated by the control of culture parameters. These insights could motivate new directions for engineering cartilage and bone via a cartilage template from self-assembling MSCs.

  19. Mechanical properties and structure-function relationships of human chondrocyte-seeded cartilage constructs after in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorf, Jill M; Griffin, Darvin J; Shortkroff, Sonya; Dugopolski, Caroline; Kennedy, Stephen; Siemiatkoski, Joseph; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-10-01

    Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) is a widely recognized method for the repair of focal cartilage defects. Despite the accepted use, problems with this technique still exist, including graft hypertrophy, damage to surrounding tissue by sutures, uneven cell distribution, and delamination. Modified ACI techniques overcome these challenges by seeding autologous chondrocytes onto a 3D scaffold and securing the graft into the defect. Many studies on these tissue engineered grafts have identified the compressive properties, but few have examined frictional and shear properties as suggested by FDA guidance. This study is the first to perform three mechanical tests (compressive, frictional, and shear) on human tissue engineered cartilage. The objective was to understand the complex mechanical behavior, function, and changes that occur with time in these constructs grown in vitro using compression, friction, and shear tests. Safranin-O histology and a DMMB assay both revealed increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in the scaffolds with increased maturity. Similarly, immunohistochemistry revealed increased lubricin localization on the construct surface. Confined compression and friction tests both revealed improved properties with increased construct maturity. Compressive properties correlated with the sGAG content, while improved friction coefficients were attributed to increased lubricin localization on the construct surfaces. In contrast, shear properties did not improve with increased culture time. This study suggests the various mechanical and biological properties of tissue engineered cartilage improve at different rates, indicating thorough mechanical evaluation of tissue engineered cartilage is critical to understanding the performance of repaired cartilage. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2298-2306, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Efficient regeneration of plants from shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dendrobium densiflorum Lindl. is one of the horticulturally important orchids of Nepal due to its beautiful yellowish flower and medicinal properties. The present study was carried out for plant regeneration from shoot tip explants of D. densiflorum by tissue culture technique. The shoot tip explants of this species, obtained ...

  1. Adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants of the valuable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to develop an efficient protocol for adventitious shoot regeneration for Plectranthus barbatus Andrews using leaf explants. The explants were cultured on MS (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) medium containing various concentration of kinetin (KN), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and thidiazuron ...

  2. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering: state-of-the-art in in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Maglio, Melania; Tschon, Matilde; Aldini, Nicolò Nicoli; Fini, Milena

    2014-07-01

    Several therapeutic approaches have been developed to address hyaline cartilage regeneration, but to date, there is no universal procedure to promote the restoration of mechanical and functional properties of native cartilage, which is one of the most important challenges in orthopedic surgery. For cartilage tissue engineering, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as an alternative cell source to chondrocytes. Since little is known about adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) cartilage regeneration potential, the aim of this review was to give an overview of in vivo studies about the chondrogenic potential and regeneration ability of culture-expanded ADSCs when implanted in heterotopic sites or in osteoarthritic and osteochondral defects. The review compares the different studies in terms of number of implanted cells and animals, cell harvesting sites, in vitro expansion and chondrogenic induction conditions, length of experimental time, defect dimensions, used scaffolds and post-explant analyses of the cartilage regeneration. Despite variability of the in vivo protocols, it seems that good cartilage formation and regeneration were obtained with chondrogenically predifferentiated ADSCs (1 × 10(7) cells for heterotopic cartilage formation and 1 × 10(6) cells/scaffold for cartilage defect regeneration) and polymeric scaffolds, even if many other aspects need to be clarified in future studies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cultura in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke Culture in vitro of rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke embryos´seeds and buds explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Handa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo o estabelecimento in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke livres de contaminações e de oxidação fenólica. As gemas foram obtidas da rebrota de mudas cultivadas em viveiro e os embriões a partir de sementes em diversos estágios de maturação. Para a assepsia dos explantes foram utilizados dois antibiótico (Ampicilina e Agrimicina, etanol (70% e hipoclorito de sódio, em concentrações e tempo de exposição variando em função do tratamento. Para o controle da oxidação foram utilizados imersão em ácido ascórbico (250 mg/l e PVP (Polivinilpirrolidona no meio Murashige & Skoog (MS. O delineamento estatístico empregado foi o inteiramente ao acaso com tratamentos e repetições em função do tipo de explante. Foi observado 71% de sobrevivência e 53% de germinação de embriões tratados com hipoclorito de sódio (50% e 2% de cloro ativo por 10 minutos e inoculados em meio MS contendo 20 mg/l de água de côco após 45 dias. As gemas das rebrotas de mudas tratadas com solução de Sulfato de Estreptomicina (Agrimicina na concentração de 500 mg/l (1h apresentaram 51% de sobrevivência. Quando submetidas ao pré-tratamento com o emprego de bomba a vácuo (180 mmHg contendo a Agrimicina (500 mg/l, apresentaram 25% de sobrevivência.This study deals with the establishment in vitro of Aniba rosaeodora Ducke explants, free from fungical and endogenous contaminations and phenolic oxidation. Bud explants and embryos' seeds from many maturation stages were used in this trial. The explants were disinfected with Ampicilin antibiotic, Streptomicine Sulphate (Agrimicina, etanol (70%, sodium hipoclorite in many concentrations and exposure time acording to the type of explant. For the phenolic oxidation control, the immersion on ascorbic acid and PVP (Polyvinilpirrolidone in culture medium were used. The explants were inoculated in MS medium. The statistical design was the

  4. Multiplicação e enraizamento in vitro de amoreira-preta 'Xavante': efeito da concentração de sais, do tipo de explante e de carvão ativado no meio de cultura Blackberry 'Xavante' in vitro multiplication and rooting: salt concentrations effect, explant type, and activated coal on culture medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Nolasco Leitzke

    2009-01-01

    concentrations in culture medium for. The first experiment constituted of nodal segments with 1 cm, originated from of the in vitro cultivation, inoculated at four different MS medium concentrations, supplemented with 7.5 µM BAP, 30 g L-1 sucrose, 100 mg L-1 myo-inositol and 6 g L-1 agar, and with two types of explants, which totaled 8 treatments. The second experiment constituted of apex microcutting, having about 1 to 1.5 cm length, and two leaves were inoculated at three different concentrations of MS medium, added of 30 g L-1 sucrose, 100 mg L-1 myo-inositol and 6 g L-1 agar and supplemented with three different activated coal concentrations, totaling nine treatments. It can be inferred that T1, in other words, explants with leaves, were more efficient at 125% MS salt concentration on culture medium, thereby inducing larger number of leaves, buds, shoots and shoot length, and that the use of 75% salt concentration without activated coal is the most suitable one for the blackberry 'Xavante' in vitro rooting.

  5. Amino acids supply in culture media is not a limiting factor in the matrix synthesis of engineered cartilage tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K. W.; DeFrancis, J. G.; Kugler, L. E.; Kelly, T.-A. N.; Ho, M. M.; O’Conor, C. J.; Ateshian, G. A.; Hung, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased amino acid supplementation (0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× recommended concentrations or additional proline) was hypothesized to increase the collagen content in engineered cartilage. No significant differences were found between groups in matrix content or dynamic modulus. Control constructs possessed the highest compressive Young’s modulus on day 42. On day 42, compared to controls, decreased type II collagen was found with 0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× supplementation and significantly increased DNA content found in 1.0× and 5.0×. No effects were observed on these measures with added proline. These results lead us to reject our hypothesis and indicate that the low collagen synthesis in engineered cartilage is not due to a limited supply of amino acids in media but may require a further stimulatory signal. The results of this study also highlight the impact that culture environment can play on the development of engineered cartilage. PMID:17713744

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, T.I.

    1991-01-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated [35S]sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function

  7. Impact of human platelet lysate on the expansion and chondrogenic capacity of cultured human chondrocytes for cartilage cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J G; Kuiper, J H; Richardson, J B; Roberts, S; Wright, K T; Kuiper, N J

    2018-05-01

    High hopes have been pinned on regenerative medicine strategies in order to prevent the progression of cartilage damage to osteoarthritis, particularly by autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The loss of chondrocyte phenotype during in vitro monolayer expansion, a necessary step to obtain sufficient cell numbers, may be a key limitation in ACI. In this study, it was determined whether a shorter monolayer expansion approach could improve chondrogenic differentiation. The effects of two supplement types, foetal bovine serum (FBS) and Stemulate™ (a commercial source of human platelet lysate), on the expansion and re-differentiation potential of human chondrocytes, isolated from five individuals, were compared. Chondrocytes were expanded with 10 % FBS or 10 % Stemulate™. Pellets were cultured for 28 d in chondrogenic differentiation medium and assessed for the presence of cartilage matrix molecules and genes associated with chondrogenicity. Stemulate™ significantly enhanced the proliferation rate [average population doubling times: FBS, 25.07 ± 6.98 d (standard error of the mean, SEM) vs. Stemulate™, 13.10 ± 2.57 d (SEM)]. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), total collagen and qRT-PCR analyses of cartilage genes showed that FBS-expanded chondrocytes demonstrated significantly better chondrogenic capacity than Stemulate™-expanded chondrocytes. Histologically, FBS-expanded chondrocyte pellets appeared to be more stable, with a more intense staining for toluidine blue, indicating a greater chondrogenic capacity. Although Stemulate™ positively influenced chondrocyte proliferation, it had a negative effect on chondrogenic differentiation potential. This suggested that, in the treatment of cartilage defects, Stemulate™ might not be the ideal supplement for expanding chondrocytes (which maintained a chondrocyte phenotype) and, hence, for cell therapies (including ACI).

  8. Impact of human platelet lysate on the expansion and chondrogenic capacity of cultured human chondrocytes for cartilage cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JG Sykes

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available High hopes have been pinned on regenerative medicine strategies in order to prevent the progression of cartilage damage to osteoarthritis, particularly by autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI. The loss of chondrocyte phenotype during in vitro monolayer expansion, a necessary step to obtain sufficient cell numbers, may be a key limitation in ACI. In this study, it was determined whether a shorter monolayer expansion approach could improve chondrogenic differentiation. The effects of two supplement types, foetal bovine serum (FBS and Stemulate™ (a commercial source of human platelet lysate, on the expansion and re-differentiation potential of human chondrocytes, isolated from five individuals, were compared. Chondrocytes were expanded with 10 % FBS or 10 % Stemulate™. Pellets were cultured for 28 d in chondrogenic differentiation medium and assessed for the presence of cartilage matrix molecules and genes associated with chondrogenicity. Stemulate™ significantly enhanced the proliferation rate [average population doubling times: FBS, 25.07 ± 6.98 d (standard error of the mean, SEM vs. Stemulate™, 13.10 ± 2.57 d (SEM]. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG, total collagen and qRT-PCR analyses of cartilage genes showed that FBS-expanded chondrocytes demonstrated significantly better chondrogenic capacity than Stemulate™-expanded chondrocytes. Histologically, FBS-expanded chondrocyte pellets appeared to be more stable, with a more intense staining for toluidine blue, indicating a greater chondrogenic capacity. Although Stemulate™ positively influenced chondrocyte proliferation, it had a negative effect on chondrogenic differentiation potential. This suggested that, in the treatment of cartilage defects, Stemulate™ might not be the ideal supplement for expanding chondrocytes (which maintained a chondrocyte phenotype and, hence, for cell therapies (including ACI.

  9. Adipokines induce catabolism of newly synthesized matrix in cartilage and meniscus tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimuta, James F; Levenston, Marc E

    Altered synovial levels of various adipokines (factors secreted by fat as well as other tissues) have been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) onset and progression. However, the metabolic effects of adipokines on joint tissues, in particular the fibrocartilaginous menisci, are not well understood. This study investigated effects of several adipokines on release of recently synthesized extracellular matrix in bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants. After labeling newly synthesized proteins and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) with 3 H-proline and 35 S-sulfate, respectively; bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants were cultured for 6 days in basal medium (control) or media supplemented with adipokines (1 µg/ml of leptin, visfatin, adiponectin, or resistin) or 20 ng/ml interleukin-1 (IL-1). Release of radiolabel and sGAG to the media during culture and the final explant water, DNA, sGAG, and retained radiolabel were measured. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) and MMP-3 activities were assessed using gelatin and casein zymography, respectively. Water and DNA contents were not significantly altered by any treatment. Visfatin, adiponectin, resistin, and IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from meniscus, whereas only IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from cartilage. Release of 3 H and 35 S was stimulated not only by resistin and IL-1 in meniscus but also by IL-1 in cartilage. Retained 3 H was unaltered by any treatment, while retained 35 S was reduced by visfatin, resistin, and IL-1 in meniscus and by only IL-1 in cartilage. Resistin and IL-1 elevated active MMP-2 and total MMP-3 in meniscus, whereas cartilage MMP-3 activity was elevated by only IL-1. Resistin stimulated rapid and extensive catabolism of meniscus tissue, similar to IL-1, whereas adipokines minimally affected cartilage. Release of newly synthesized matrix was similar to overall release in both tissues. These observations provide further indications that meniscal tissue is more sensitive to pro

  10. Primary chondrocytes enhance cartilage tissue formation upon co-culture with expanded chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, 3T3 feeder cells and embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.A.A.; Miclea, Razvan L.; Schotel, Roka; de Bruijn, Ewart; Moroni, Lorenzo; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Riesle, J.U.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Co-culture models have been increasingly used in tissue engineering applications to understand cell–cell interactions and consequently improve regenerative medicine strategies. Aiming at further elucidating cartilage tissue formation, we co-cultured bovine primary chondrocytes (BPCs) with human

  11. In vitro regeneration from internodal explants of bitter melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thiru

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... shoots per internodal explant after 80 days of culture. Key words: ... grown in the tropical regions of Asia, Amazon, east Africa and the ... Tamilnadu, India. .... expressed as the mean ± standard error (SE) of three experiments.

  12. Characterization of a cartilage-like engineered biomass using a self-aggregating suspension culture model: molecular composition using FT-IRIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwook; Kraft, Jeffrey J; Volk, Andrew C; Pugarelli, Joan; Pleshko, Nancy; Dodge, George R

    2011-12-01

    Maintenance of chondrocyte phenotype and robust expression and organization of macromolecular components with suitable cartilaginous properties is an ultimate goal in cartilage tissue engineering. We used a self-aggregating suspension culture (SASC) method to produce an engineered cartilage, "cartilage tissue analog" (CTA). With an objective of understanding the stability of phenotype of the CTA over long periods, we cultured chondrocytes up to 4 years and analyzed the matrix. Both early (eCTAs) (6 months) and aged (aCTAs) (4 years) showed type II collagen throughout with higher concentrations near the edge. Using Fourier transform-infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS), proteoglycan/collagen ratio of eCTA was 2.8 times greater than native cartilage at 1 week, but the ratio was balanced to native level (p = 0.017) by 36 weeks. Surprisingly, aCTAs maintained the hyaline characteristics, but there was evidence of calcification within the tissue with a distinct range of intensities. Mineral/matrix ratio of those aCTA with "intensive" calcification was significantly higher (p = 0.017) than the "partial," but when compared to native bone the ratio of "intensive" aCTAs was 2.4 times lower. In this study we utilized the imaging approach of FT-IRIS and have shown that a biomaterial formed is compositionally closely related to natural cartilage for long periods in culture. We show that this culture platform can maintain a CTA for extended periods of time (4 years) and under those conditions signs of mineralization can be found. This method of cartilage tissue engineering is a promising method to generate cartilaginous biomaterial and may have potential to be utilized in both cartilage and boney repairs. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  13. Relaxin's induction of metalloproteinases is associated with the loss of collagen and glycosaminoglycans in synovial joint fibrocartilaginous explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Tabassum; Duong, Trang T; Hashem, Gihan; Shiga, Momotoshi; Zhang, Qin; Kapila, Sunil

    2005-01-01

    Diseases of specific fibrocartilaginous joints are especially common in women of reproductive age, suggesting that female hormones contribute to their etiopathogenesis. Previously, we showed that relaxin dose-dependently induces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in isolated joint fibrocartilaginous cells. Here we determined the effects of relaxin with or without β-estradiol on the modulation of MMPs in joint fibrocartilaginous explants, and assessed the contribution of these proteinases to the loss of collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in this tissue. Fibrocartilaginous discs from temporomandibular joints of female rabbits were cultured in medium alone or in medium containing relaxin (0.1 ng/ml) or β-estradiol (20 ng/ml) or relaxin plus β-estradiol. Additional experiments were done in the presence of the MMP inhibitor GM6001 or its control analog. After 48 hours of culture, the medium was assayed for MMPs and the discs were analyzed for collagen and GAG concentrations. Relaxin and β-estradiol plus relaxin induced the MMPs collagenase-1 and stromelysin-1 in fibrocartilaginous explants – a finding similar to that which we observed in pubic symphysis fibrocartilage, but not in articular cartilage explants. The induction of these proteinases by relaxin or β-estradiol plus relaxin was accompanied by a loss of GAGs and collagen in joint fibrocartilage. None of the hormone treatments altered the synthesis of GAGs, suggesting that the loss of this matrix molecule probably resulted from increased matrix degradation. Indeed, fibrocartilaginous explants cultured in the presence of GM6001 showed an inhibition of relaxin-induced and β-estradiol plus relaxin-induced collagenase and stromelysin activities to control baseline levels that were accompanied by the maintenance of collagen or GAG content at control levels. These findings show for the first time that relaxin has degradative effects on non-reproductive synovial joint fibrocartilaginous tissue and

  14. Platelet lysate activates quiescent cell proliferation and reprogramming in human articular cartilage: Involvement of hypoxia inducible factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Thi; Cancedda, Ranieri; Descalzi, Fiorella

    2018-03-01

    The idea of rescuing the body self-repair capability lost during evolution is progressively gaining ground in regenerative medicine. In particular, growth factors and bioactive molecules derived from activated platelets emerged as promising therapeutic agents acting as trigger for repair of tissue lesions and restoration of tissue functions. Aim of this study was to assess the potential of a platelet lysate (PL) for human articular cartilage repair considering its activity on progenitor cells and differentiated chondrocytes. PL induced the re-entry in the cell cycle of confluent, growth-arrested dedifferentiated/progenitor cartilage cells. In a cartilage permissive culture environment, differentiated cells also resumed proliferation after exposure to PL. These findings correlated with an up-regulation of the proliferation/survival pathways ERKs and Akt and with an induction of cyclin D1. In short- and long-term cultures of articular cartilage explants, we observed a release of proliferating chondroprogenitors able to differentiate and form an "in vitro" tissue with properties of healthy articular cartilage. Moreover, in cultured cartilage cells, PL induced a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) alpha increase, its nuclear relocation and the binding to HIF-1 responsive elements. These events were possibly related to the cell proliferation because the HIF-1 inhibitor acriflavine inhibited HIF-1 binding to HIF-1 responsive elements and cell proliferation. Our study demonstrates that PL induces quiescent cartilage cell activation and proliferation leading to new cartilage formation, identifies PL activated pathways playing a role in these processes, and provides a rationale to the application of PL for therapeutic treatment of damaged articular cartilage. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel/chitosan scaffold hybrid for three-dimensional stem cell culture and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellati, Amir; Kiamahalleh, Meisam Valizadeh; Madani, S Hadi; Dai, Sheng; Bi, Jingxiu; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Hu

    2016-11-01

    Providing a controllable and definable three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment for chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) remains a great challenge for cartilage tissue engineering. In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) polymers with the degrees of polymerization of 100 and 400 (NI100 and NI400) were prepared and the polymer solutions were introduced into the preprepared chitosan porous scaffolds (CS) to form hybrids (CSNI100 and CSNI400, respectively). SEM images indicated that the PNIPAAm gel partially occupied chitosan pores while the interconnected porous structure of chitosan was preserved. MSCs were incorporated within the hybrid and cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation were monitored. After 7-day incubation of the cell-laden constructs in a growth medium, the cell viability in CSNI100 and CSNI400 were 54 and 108% higher than that in CS alone, respectively. Glycosaminoglycan and total collagen contents increased 2.6- and 2.5-fold after 28-day culture of cell-laden CSNI400 in the chondrogenic medium. These results suggest that the hybrid structure composed of the chitosan porous scaffold and the well-defined PNIPAAm hydrogel, in particular CSNI400, is suitable for 3D stem cell culture and cartilage tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2764-2774, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively

  17. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R., E-mail: DRHaudenschild@ucdavis.edu

    2015-05-08

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively.

  18. TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants and arrests downstream differentiation at an early stage of hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Nahoko; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2013-01-01

    Synovial explants furnish an in-situ population of mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of articular cartilage. Although bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) induces the chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, the cartilage formed is neither homogeneously distributed nor of an exclusively hyaline type. Furthermore, the downstream differentiation of chondrocytes proceeds to the stage of terminal hypertrophy, which is inextricably coupled with undesired matrix mineralization. With a view to optimizing BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis, the modulating influences of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-ß1) were investigated. Explants of bovine calf metacarpal synovium were exposed to BMP-2 (200 ng/ml) for 4 (or 6) weeks. FGF-2 (10 ng/ml) or TGF-ß1 (10 ng/ml) was introduced at the onset of incubation and was present either during the first week of culturing alone or throughout its entire course. FGF-2 enhanced the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromatic staining for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) only when it was present during the first week of culturing alone. TGF-ß1 enhanced not only the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromasia (to a greater degree than FGF-2), but also the biochemically-assayed accumulation of GAGs, when it was present throughout the entire culturing period; in addition, it arrested the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. These findings were corroborated by an analysis of the gene- and protein-expression levels of key cartilaginous markers and by an estimation of individual cell volume. TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, improves the hyaline-like properties of the neocartilage, and arrests the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. With the prospect of engineering a mature, truly articular type of cartilage in the context of clinical repair, our findings will be of importance in fine-tuning the

  19. TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants and arrests downstream differentiation at an early stage of hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahoko Shintani

    Full Text Available Synovial explants furnish an in-situ population of mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of articular cartilage. Although bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2 induces the chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, the cartilage formed is neither homogeneously distributed nor of an exclusively hyaline type. Furthermore, the downstream differentiation of chondrocytes proceeds to the stage of terminal hypertrophy, which is inextricably coupled with undesired matrix mineralization. With a view to optimizing BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis, the modulating influences of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-ß1 were investigated.Explants of bovine calf metacarpal synovium were exposed to BMP-2 (200 ng/ml for 4 (or 6 weeks. FGF-2 (10 ng/ml or TGF-ß1 (10 ng/ml was introduced at the onset of incubation and was present either during the first week of culturing alone or throughout its entire course. FGF-2 enhanced the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromatic staining for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs only when it was present during the first week of culturing alone. TGF-ß1 enhanced not only the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromasia (to a greater degree than FGF-2, but also the biochemically-assayed accumulation of GAGs, when it was present throughout the entire culturing period; in addition, it arrested the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. These findings were corroborated by an analysis of the gene- and protein-expression levels of key cartilaginous markers and by an estimation of individual cell volume.TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, improves the hyaline-like properties of the neocartilage, and arrests the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. With the prospect of engineering a mature, truly articular type of cartilage in the context of clinical repair, our findings will be of importance in fine-tuning the

  20. Noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage surface damage using reflected polarized light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ruby N.; Nehmetallah, George; Raub, Christopher B.

    2017-06-01

    Articular surface damage occurs to cartilage during normal aging, osteoarthritis, and in trauma. A noninvasive assessment of cartilage microstructural alterations is useful for studies involving cartilage explants. This study evaluates polarized reflectance microscopy as a tool to assess surface damage to cartilage explants caused by mechanical scraping and enzymatic degradation. Adult bovine articular cartilage explants were scraped, incubated in collagenase, or underwent scrape and collagenase treatments. In an additional experiment, cartilage explants were subject to scrapes at graduated levels of severity. Polarized reflectance parameters were compared with India ink surface staining, features of histological sections, changes in explant wet weight and thickness, and chondrocyte viability. The polarized reflectance signal was sensitive to surface scrape damage and revealed individual scrape features consistent with India ink marks. Following surface treatments, the reflectance contrast parameter was elevated and correlated with image area fraction of India ink. After extensive scraping, polarized reflectance contrast and chondrocyte viability were lower than that from untreated explants. As part of this work, a mathematical model was developed and confirmed the trend in the reflectance signal due to changes in surface scattering and subsurface birefringence. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of polarized reflectance microscopy to sensitively assess surface microstructural alterations in articular cartilage explants.

  1. Platelet-rich plasma enhances the integration of bioengineered cartilage with native tissue in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermer, Corey; Kandel, Rita; Anderson, Jesse; Hurtig, Mark; Theodoropoulos, John

    2018-02-01

    Current therapies for cartilage repair can be limited by an inability of the repair tissue to integrate with host tissue. Thus, there is interest in developing approaches to enhance integration. We have previously shown that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) improves cartilage tissue formation. This raised the question as to whether PRP could promote cartilage integration. Chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage harvested from bovine joints, seeded on a porous bone substitute and grown in vitro to form an osteochondral-like implant. After 7 days, the biphasic construct was soaked in PRP for 30 min before implantation into the core of a donut-shaped biphasic explant of native cartilage and bone. Controls were not soaked in PRP. The implant-explant construct was cultured for 2-4 weeks. PRP-soaked bioengineered implants integrated with host tissue in 73% of samples, whereas controls only integrated in 19% of samples. The integration strength, as determined by a push-out test, was significantly increased in the PRP-soaked implant group (219 ± 35.4 kPa) compared with controls (72.0 ± 28.5 kPa). This correlated with an increase in glycosaminoglycan and collagen accumulation in the region of integration in the PRP-treated implant group, compared with untreated controls. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the integration zone contained collagen type II and aggrecan. The cells at the zone of integration in the PRP-soaked group had a 3.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-13 gene expression compared with controls. These results suggest that PRP-soaked bioengineered cartilage implants may be a better approach for cartilage repair due to enhanced integration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Cell compaction influences the regenerative potential of passaged bovine articular chondrocytes in an ex vivo cartilage defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, Michael; Aszodi, Attila

    2017-04-01

    The loss and degradation of articular cartilage tissue matrix play central roles in the process of osteoarthritis (OA). New models for evaluating cartilage repair/regeneration are thus of great value for transferring various culture systems into clinically relevant situations. The repair process can be better monitored in ex vivo systems than in in vitro cell cultures. I have therefore established an ex vivo defect model prepared from bovine femoral condyles for evaluating cartilage repair by the implantation of cells cultured in various ways, e.g., monolayer-cultured cells or suspension or pellet cultures of articular bovine chondrocytes representing different cell compactions with variable densities of chondrocytes. I report that the integrin subunit α10 was significantly upregulated in suspension-cultured bovine chondrocytes at passage P2 compared with monolayer-cultured cells at P1 (p = 0.0083) and P2 (p innovation of this system over in vitro differentiation (e.g., micromass, pellet) assays is the possibility of examining and evaluating cartilage regeneration in an environment in which implanted cells are embedded within native surrounding tissue at the defect site. Such ex vivo explants might serve as a better model system to mimic clinical situations. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence of a novel aggrecan-degrading activity in cartilage: Studies of mice deficient in both ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Fraser M; Stanton, Heather; East, Charlotte J; Golub, Suzanne B; Tutolo, Leonie; Farmer, Pamela J; Fosang, Amanda J

    2008-06-01

    To characterize aggrecan catabolism and the overall phenotype in mice deficient in both ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 (TS-4/TS-5 Delta-cat) activity. Femoral head cartilage from the joints of TS-4/TS-5 Delta-cat mice and wild-type mice were cultured in vitro, and aggrecan catabolism was stimulated with either interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) or retinoic acid. Total aggrecan release was measured, and aggrecanase activity was examined by Western blotting using neoepitope antibodies for detecting cleavage at EGE 373-374 ALG, SELE 1279-1280 GRG, FREEE 1467-1468 GLG, and AQE 1572-1573 AGEG. Aggrecan catabolism in vivo was examined by Western blotting of cartilage that had been extracted immediately ex vivo. TS-4/TS-5 Delta-cat mice were viable, fertile, and phenotypically normal. TS-4/TS-5 Delta-cat cartilage explants did not release aggrecan in response to IL-1alpha, and there was no detectable increase in aggrecanase neoepitopes. TS-4/TS-5 Delta-cat cartilage explants released aggrecan in response to retinoic acid. There was no retinoic acid-stimulated cleavage at either EGE 373-374 ALG or AQE 1572-1573 AGEG. There was a low level of cleavage at SELE 1279-1280 GRG and major cleavage at FREEE 1467-1468 GLG. Ex vivo, cleavage at FREEE 1467-1468 GLG was substantially reduced, but still present, in TS-4/TS-5 Delta-cat mouse cartilage compared with wild-type mouse cartilage. An aggrecanase other than ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 is expressed in mouse cartilage and is up-regulated by retinoic acid but not IL-1alpha. The novel aggrecanase appears to have different substrate specificity from either ADAMTS-4 or ADAMTS-5, cleaving E-G bonds but not E-A bonds. Neither ADAMTS-4 nor ADAMTS-5 is required for normal skeletal development or aggrecan turnover in cartilage.

  4. Enhanced micropropagation and tiller formation in sugarcane through pretreatment of explants with thidiazuron (TDZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Kavita; Lal, Madan; Saxena, Sangeeta

    2017-10-01

    An efficient, simple and commercially applicable protocol for rapid micropropagation of sugarcane has been designed using variety Co 05011. Pretreatment of shoot tip explants with thidiazuron (TDZ) induced high frequency regeneration of shoot cultures with improved multiplication ratio. The highest frequency (80%) of shoot initiation in explants pretreated with 10 mg/l of TDZ was obtained during the study. Maximum 65% shoot cultures could be established from the explants pretreated with TDZ as compared to minimum 40% establishment in explants without pretreatment. The explants pretreated with 10 mg/l of TDZ required minimum 40 days for the establishment of shoot cultures as compared to untreated explants which required 60 days. The highest average number of shoots per culture (19.1) could be obtained from the explants pretreated with 10 mg/l of TDZ, indicating the highest multiplication ratio (1:6). Highest rooting (over 94%) was obtained in shoots regenerated from pretreated explants on ½ strength MS medium containing 5.0 mg/l of NAA and 50 g/l of sucrose within 15 days. Higher number of tillers/clump (15.3) could be counted in plants regenerated from pretreated explants than untreated ones (10.9 tillers/clump) in field condition, three months after transplantation. Molecular analysis using RAPD and DAMD markers suggested that the pretreatment of explants with TDZ did not adversely affect the genetic stability of regenerated plants and maintained high clonal purity.

  5. Characterization of an Ex vivo Femoral Head Model Assessed by Markers of Bone and Cartilage Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Suzi Hoegh; Goettrup, Anne Sofie; Thomsen, Gedske; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Schultz, Nikolaj; Henriksen, Kim; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves the whole joint and is characterized by cartilage degradation and altered subchondral bone turnover. At present, there is a need for biological models that allow investigation of the interactions between the key cellular players in bone/cartilage: osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and chondrocytes. Methods: Femoral heads from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-week-old female mice were isolated and cultured for 10 days in serum-free media in the absence or presence of IGF-I (100 nM) (anabolic stimulation) or OSM (10 ng/mL) + TNF-α (20 ng/mL) (catabolic stimulation). Histology on femoral heads before and after culture was performed, and the growth plate size was examined to evaluate the effects on cell metabolism. The conditioned medium was examined for biochemical markers of bone and cartilage degradation/formation. Results: Each age group represented a unique system regarding the interest of bone or cartilage metabolism. Stimulation over 10 days with OSM + TNF-α resulted in depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage surface in all ages. Furthermore, OSM + TNF-α decreased growth plate size, whereas IGF-I increased the size. Measurements from the conditioned media showed that OSM + TNF-α increased the number of osteoclasts by approximately 80% and induced bone and cartilage degradation by approximately 1200% and approximately 2600%, respectively. Stimulation with IGF-I decreased the osteoclast number and increased cartilage formation by approximately 30%. Conclusion: Biochemical markers and histology together showed that the catabolic stimulation induced degradation and the anabolic stimulation induced formation in the femoral heads. We propose that we have established an explant whole-tissue model for investigating cell-cell interactions, reflecting parts of the processes in the pathogenesis of joint degenerative diseases. PMID:26069585

  6. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  7. Shark Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shark cartilage (tough elastic tissue that provides support, much as bone does) used for medicine comes primarily from sharks ... Several types of extracts are made from shark cartilage including squalamine lactate, AE-941, and U-995. ...

  8. Biodegradable Thermogel as Culture Matrix of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Potential Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-bo Zhang; Jian-xun Ding; Wei-guo Xu; Jie Wu; Fei Chang; Xiu-li Zhuang; Xue-si Chen

    2014-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) triblock copolymer was synthesized through the ring-opening polymerization of LA and GA with PEG as macroinitiator and stannous octoate as catalyst.The amphiphilic copolymer self-assembled into micelles in aqueous solutions,and formed hydrogels as the increase of temperature at relatively high concentrations (> 15 wt%).The favorable degradability of the hydrogel was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo degradation experiments.The good cellular and tissular compatibilities of the thermogel were demonstrated.The excellent adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells endowed PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogelling hydrogel with fascinating prospect for cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. Effect of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Human Placental Explants Infected with Toxoplasma gondii Depends on Gestational Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Gomes, Angelica; de Oliveira Silva, Deise Aparecida; Silva, Neide Maria; de Freitas Barbosa, Bellisa; Franco, Priscila Silva; Angeloni, Mariana Bodini; Fermino, Marise Lopes; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Bechi, Nicoletta; Paulesu, Luana Ricci; dos Santos, Maria Célia; Mineo, José Roberto; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Because macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key cytokine in pregnancy and has a role in inflammatory response and pathogen defense, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of MIF in first- and third-trimester human placental explants infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Explants were treated with recombinant MIF, IL-12, interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, or IL-10, followed by infection with T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites. Supernatants of cultured explants were assessed for MIF production. Explants were processed for morphologic analysis, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR analysis. Comparison of infected and stimulated explants versus noninfected control explants demonstrated a significant increase in MIF release in first-trimester but not third-trimester explants. Tissue parasitism was higher in third- than in first-trimester explants. Moreover, T. gondii DNA content was lower in first-trimester explants treated with MIF compared with untreated explants. However, in third-trimester explants, MIF stimulus decreased T. gondii DNA content only at the highest concentration of the cytokine. In addition, high expression of MIF receptor was observed in first-trimester placental explants, whereas MIF receptor expression was low in third-trimester explants. In conclusion, MIF was up-regulated and demonstrated to be important for control of T. gondii infection in first-trimester explants, whereas lack of MIF up-regulation in third-trimester placentas may be involved in higher susceptibility to infection at this gestational age. PMID:21641401

  10. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  11. Regulation of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, Grayson; Neu, Corey P; Chan, Stephanie M T; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; June, Ronald K; Reddi, A Hari

    2009-02-01

    Articular cartilage functions to provide a low-friction surface for joint movement for many decades of life. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a glycoprotein secreted by chondrocytes in the superficial layer of articular cartilage that contributes to effective boundary lubrication. In both cell and explant cultures, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta have been demonstrated to, respectively, upregulate and downregulate SZP protein levels. It was hypothesized that the friction coefficient of articular cartilage could also be modulated by these cytokines through SZP regulation. The friction coefficient between cartilage explants (both untreated and treated with TGF-beta1 or IL-1beta) and a smooth glass surface due to sliding in the boundary lubrication regime was measured with a pin-on-disk tribometer. SZP was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and localized by immunohistochemistry. Both TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatments resulted in the decrease of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage in a location- and time-dependent manner. Changes in the friction coefficient due to the TGF-beta1 treatment corresponded to increased depth of SZP staining within the superficial zone, while friction coefficient changes due to the IL-1beta treatment were independent of SZP depth of staining. However, the changes induced by the IL-1beta treatment corresponded to changes in surface roughness, determined from the analysis of surface images obtained with an atomic force microscope. These findings demonstrate that the low friction of articular cartilage can be modified by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatment and that the friction coefficient depends on multiple factors, including SZP localization and surface roughness.

  12. Impressic acid from Acanthopanax koreanum, possesses matrix metalloproteinase-13 down-regulating capacity and protects cartilage destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun; Min, Dong Suk; Yun, Han Eul; Kim, Kil Tae; Sun, Ya Nan; Dat, Le Duc; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2017-09-14

    Acanthopanax koreanum (Araliaceae) has been used in traditional medicine for enhancing vitality, rheumatism, and bone-related pains. But its activity on cartilage protection has not been known yet. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 has an important role in degrading cartilage materials under pathologic conditions such as arthritis. The present study was designed to find the inhibitory activity of impressic acid on MMP-13 expression and cartilage protective action. 70% ethanol extract of Acanthopanax koreanum leaves and impressic acid, a major constituent isolated from the same plant materials, were examined on MMP-13 down-regulating capacity in IL-1β-treated human chondrocyte cell line (SW1353) and rabbit cartilage explants. In IL-1β-treated SW1353 cells, impressic acid significantly and concentration-dependently inhibited MMP-13 expression at 0.5-10μM. Impressic acid was found to be able to inhibit MMP-13 expression by blocking the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1/-2 (STAT-1/-2) and activation of c-Jun and c-Fos among the cellular signaling pathways involved. Further, impressic acid was found to inhibit the expression of MMP-13 mRNA (47.7% inhibition at 10μM), glycosaminoglycan release (42.2% reduction at 10μM) and proteoglycan loss in IL-1-treated rabbit cartilage explants culture. In addition, a total of 21 lupane-type triterpenoids structurally-related to impressic acid were isolated from the same plant materials and their suppressive activities against MMP-13 expression were also examined. Among these derivatives, compounds 2, 3, 16, and 18 clearly down-regulated MMP-13 expression. However, impressic acid was more potent than these derivatives in down-regulating MMP-13 expression. Impressic acid, its related triterpenoids, and A. koreanum extract have potential as therapeutic agents to prevent cartilage degradation by inhibiting matrix protein degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ageing is associated with reduction of mechanically-induced activation of Smad2/3P signaling in articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madej, W.M.; Caam, A.P.M. van; Blaney Davidson, E.N.; Hannink, G.J.; Buma, P.; Kraan, P.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mechanical signals control key cellular processes in articular cartilage. Previously we have shown that mechanical compression is an important ALK5/Smad2/3P activator in cartilage explants. However, age-related changes in the cartilage are known to affect tissue mechanosensitivity and

  14. Callus induction from epicotyl and hypocotyl explants of Parkia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epicotyl and hypocotyl explants of Parkia biglobosa (Locust bean) were cultured in vitro to investigate their callogenic capacity. Established cultures were obtained and maintained on MS medium supplemented with either 2,4-D or NAA, each of concentration range of 0.4 – 1.0 mg/L. In general, while higher concentrations of ...

  15. Rabbit articular cartilage defects treated by allogenic chondrocyte transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Boopalan, P. R. J. V. C.; Sathishkumar, Solomon; Kumar, Senthil; Chittaranjan, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have a poor capacity for repair. Most of the current treatment options result in the formation of fibro-cartilage, which is functionally inferior to normal hyaline articular cartilage. We studied the effectiveness of allogenic chondrocyte transplantation for focal articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Chondrocytes were cultured in vitro from cartilage harvested from the knee joints of a New Zealand White rabbit. A 3 mm defect was created in the articular cartilag...

  16. Plantlet regeneration potential from seedling explants of vitegnus (Vitex agnus castus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandoosti, F

    2007-11-15

    In this research a simple and repeatable method for regeneration of a important medicinal plant (Vitex agnus castus) described. Different seedling explants such as hypocotyl, cotyledon, root and apical meristem were cultured in MS basal media with different kinds and concentrations of PGRs. Root and apical meristem explants were the only explants that have regeneration whole plantlets potential. It was interesting that regeneration whole plantlets from root and apical meristem explants have different developmental pathways. Whole plantlets from apical meristem explants regenerated by passing phase callusing whereas regeneration whole plantlets from root was direct and without phase callusing. This subject implies that we can have many manipulation possibilities in order to different objects of tissue culture by selecting different explants in vitegnus.

  17. Trophic effects of adipose-tissue-derived and bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhance cartilage generation by chondrocytes in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleumeekers, M M; Nimeskern, L; Koevoet, J L M; Karperien, M; Stok, K S; van Osch, G J V M

    2018-01-01

    Combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes has great potential for cell-based cartilage repair. However, there is much debate regarding the mechanisms behind this concept. We aimed to clarify the mechanisms that lead to chondrogenesis (chondrocyte driven MSC-differentiation versus MSC driven chondroinduction) and whether their effect was dependent on MSC-origin. Therefore, chondrogenesis of human adipose-tissue-derived MSCs (hAMSCs) and bone-marrow-derived MSCs (hBMSCs) combined with bovine articular chondrocytes (bACs) was compared. hAMSCs or hBMSCs were combined with bACs in alginate and cultured in vitro or implanted subcutaneously in mice. Cartilage formation was evaluated with biochemical, histological and biomechanical analyses. To further investigate the interactions between bACs and hMSCs, (1) co-culture, (2) pellet, (3) Transwell® and (4) conditioned media studies were conducted. The presence of hMSCs-either hAMSCs or hBMSCs-increased chondrogenesis in culture; deposition of GAG was most evidently enhanced in hBMSC/bACs. This effect was similar when hMSCs and bAC were combined in pellet culture, in alginate culture or when conditioned media of hMSCs were used on bAC. Species-specific gene-expression analyses demonstrated that aggrecan was expressed by bACs only, indicating a predominantly trophic role for hMSCs. Collagen-10-gene expression of bACs was not affected by hBMSCs, but slightly enhanced by hAMSCs. After in-vivo implantation, hAMSC/bACs and hBMSC/bACs had similar cartilage matrix production, both appeared stable and did not calcify. This study demonstrates that replacing 80% of bACs by either hAMSCs or hBMSCs does not influence cartilage matrix production or stability. The remaining chondrocytes produce more matrix due to trophic factors produced by hMSCs.

  18. Enhanced nutrient transport improves the depth-dependent properties of tri-layered engineered cartilage constructs with zonal co-culture of chondrocytes and MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwook; Farrell, Megan J; Steinberg, David R; Burdick, Jason A; Mauck, Robert L

    2017-08-01

    Biomimetic design in cartilage tissue engineering is a challenge given the complexity of the native tissue. While numerous studies have generated constructs with near-native bulk properties, recapitulating the depth-dependent features of native tissue remains a challenge. Furthermore, limitations in nutrient transport and matrix accumulation in engineered constructs hinders maturation within the central core of large constructs. To overcome these limitations, we fabricated tri-layered constructs that recapitulate the depth-dependent cellular organization and functional properties of native tissue using zonally derived chondrocytes co-cultured with MSCs. We also introduced porous hollow fibers (HFs) and HFs/cotton threads to enhance nutrient transport. Our results showed that tri-layered constructs with depth-dependent organization and properties could be fabricated. The addition of HFs or HFs/threads improved matrix accumulation in the central core region. With HF/threads, the local modulus in the deep region of tri-layered constructs nearly matched that of native tissue, though the properties in the central regions remained lower. These constructs reproduced the zonal organization and depth-dependent properties of native tissue, and demonstrate that a layer-by-layer fabrication scheme holds promise for the biomimetic repair of focal cartilage defects. Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue driven by zonal heterogeneity of cells, extracellular matrix proteins and fibril orientations, resulting in depth-dependent mechanical properties. Therefore, the recapitulation of the functional properties of native cartilage in a tissue engineered construct requires such a biomimetic design of the morphological organization, and this has remained a challenge in cartilage tissue engineering. This study demonstrates that a layer-by-layer fabrication scheme, including co-cultures of zone-specific articular CHs and MSCs, can reproduce the depth-dependent characteristics

  19. In vitro cartilage construct generation from silk fibroin- chitosan porous scaffold and umbilical cord blood derived human mesenchymal stem cells in dynamic culture condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parinita; Pramanik, Krishna; Biswas, Amit; Ku Patra, Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    Cartilage construct generation includes a scaffold with appropriate composition to mimic matrix of the damaged tissue on which the stem cells grow and differentiate. In this study, umbilical cord blood (UCB) derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were seeded on freeze dried porous silk-fibroin (SF)/chitosan (CS) scaffolds. Influence of static and dynamic (spinner flask bioreactor) culture conditions on the developing cartilage construct were studied by in-vitro characterization for viability, proliferation, distribution, and chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs over the scaffold. Constructs developed in spinner flask consisted of 62% live cells, and exhibited 543% more cell density at the core than constructs cultured in static system. Quantification of DNA and glycosaminoglycans accumulation after 21 days showed the progression of chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs was higher in dynamic culture compared to static one. In constructs generated under dynamic condition, histology staining for proteoglycan matrix, and fluorescence staining for collagen-II and aggrecan showed positive correlation between early and late stage chondrogenic markers, which was further confirmed by quantitative PCR analysis, showing low collagen-I expression and highly expressed Sox9, collagen-II and aggrecan. The present study demonstrated that construct generated by combining 3D SF/CS scaffold with UCB-hMSCs under dynamic condition using spinner flask bioreactor can be used for cartilage tissue regeneration for future medical treatments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 397-407, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Priming 3D cultures of human mesenchymal stromal cells toward cartilage formation via developmental pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centola, Matteo; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Schären, Stefan; Glaser, Nicolas; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    The field of regenerative medicine has increasingly recognized the importance to be inspired by developmental processes to identify signaling pathways crucial for 3D organogenesis and tissue regeneration. Here, we aimed at recapitulating the first events occurring during limb development (ie, cell condensation and expansion of an undifferentiated mesenchymal cell population) to prime 3D cultures of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hBM-MSC) toward the chondrogenic route. Based on embryonic development studies, we hypothesized that Wnt3a and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induce hBM-MSC to proliferate in 3D culture as an undifferentiated pool of progenitors (defined by clonogenic capacity and expression of typical markers), retaining chondrogenic potential upon induction by suitable morphogens. hBM-MSC were responsive to Wnt signaling in 3D pellet culture, as assessed by significant upregulation of main target genes and increase of unphosphorylated β-catenin levels. Wnt3a was able to induce a five-fold increase in the number of proliferating hBM-MSC (6.4% vs. 1.3% in the vehicle condition), although total DNA content of the 3D construct was decreasing over time. Preconditioning with Wnt3a improved transforming growth factor-β1 mediated chondrogenesis (30% more glycosaminoglycans/cell in average). In contrast to developmental and 2D MSC culture models, FGF2 antagonized the Wnt-mediated effects. Interestingly, the CD146⁺ subpopulation was found to be more responsive to Wnt3a. The presented data indicate a possible strategy to prime 3D cultures of hBM-MSC by invoking a "developmental engineering" approach. The study also identifies some opportunities and challenges to cross-fertilize skeletal development models and 3D hBM-MSC culture systems.

  1. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Pleumeekers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix. This study evaluated the performance of culture-expanded human chondrocytes from ear (EC, nose (NC and articular joint (AC, as well as bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. All cells (≥ 3 donors per source were culture-expanded, encapsulated in alginate and cultured for 5 weeks. Subsequently, constructs were implanted subcutaneously for 8 additional weeks. Before and after implantation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen content were measured using biochemical assays. Mechanical properties were determined using stress-strain-indentation tests. Hypertrophic differentiation was evaluated with qRT-PCR and subsequent endochondral ossification with histology. ACs had higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other cell sources, as assessed by gene expression and GAG content (p < 0.001. However, after implantation, ACs did not further increase their matrix. In contrast, ECs and NCs continued producing matrix in vivo leading to higher GAG content (p < 0.001 and elastic modulus. For NC-constructs, matrix-deposition was associated with the elastic modulus (R2 = 0.477, p = 0.039. Although all cells – except ACs – expressed markers for hypertrophic differentiation in vitro, there was no bone formed in vivo. Our work shows that cartilage formation and functionality depends on the cell source used. ACs possess the highest chondrogenic capacity in vitro, while ECs and NCs are most potent in vivo, making them attractive cell sources for cartilage repair.

  2. In vitro propagation of Alstroemeria using rhizome explants derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... Single in vitro and in vivo rhizome bud were excised (3 -7 mm) using a sharp knife and cultured on MS basal medium with 3 different composition of growth regulators. Culture media. The explants were planted in culture media as M1 (MS + 1 mg l-1. BA + 0.2 mg l-1 NAA) Han et al. (1994), M2 (MS + 1 mg l-1 ...

  3. In vitro performances of hypocotyl and cotyledon explants of tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A plant tissue culture technique is a good method for the evaluation and screening of plant genotypes for salt tolerance. In vitro evaluations of sodium chloride (NaCl) effects on two tomato cultivars (Pearl and Beril) were investigated with four NaCl levels (0, 25, 50 and 75 mM) using hypocotyl and cotyledon explants.

  4. The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) tissue culture. Taha Roodbar Shojaei1*, Vahid Salari2, Darioush Ramazan3, Mahdi Ehyaei1, Javad. Gharechahi4 and Roya Motallebi Chaleshtori5. 1Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, College of ...

  5. In vitro response from cotyledon and hypocotyls explants in tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... 1Institute of Tropical Agriculture, University of Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. 2Faculty of Agriculture ... shoot length was significantly different between cotyledon and hypocotyls derived explants. No adventitious shoots ... growth regulator used in culture medium (Bhatia et al.,. 2004a).

  6. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from leaf explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to study the somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from the in vitro leaf explants of Rumex vesicarius L. a renowned medicinal plant, which belongs to polygonaceae family. Effective in vitro regeneration of R. vesicarius was achieved via young leaf derived somatic embryo cultures.

  7. Remodelling of human osteoarthritic cartilage by FGF-2, alone or combined with Sox9 via rAAV gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiarini, Magali; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Kohn, Dieter; Madry, Henning

    2009-08-01

    Compensating for the loss of extracellular cartilage matrix, as well as counteracting the alterations of the chondrocyte phenotype in osteoarthritis are of key importance to develop effective therapeutic strategies against this disorder. In the present study, we analysed the benefits of applying a potent gene combination to remodel human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. We employed the promising recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector to deliver the mitogenic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) factor, alone or simultaneously with the transcription factor Sox9 as a key activator of matrix synthesis, to human normal and OA articular chondrocytes. We evaluated the effects of single (FGF-2) or combined (FGF-2/SOX9) transgene expression upon the regenerative activities of chondrocytes in three dimensional cultures in vitro and in cartilage explants in situ. Single overexpression of FGF-2 enhanced the survival and proliferation of both normal and OA chondrocytes, without stimulating the matrix synthetic processes in the increased pools of cells. The mitogenic properties of FGF-2 were maintained when SOX9 was co-overexpressed and concomitant with an increase in the production of proteoglycans and type-II collagen, suggesting that the transcription factor was capable of counterbalancing the effects of FGF-2 on matrix accumulation. Also important, expression of type-X collagen, a marker of hypertrophy strongly decreased following treatment by the candidate vectors. Most remarkably, the levels of activities achieved in co-treated human OA cartilage were similar to or higher than those observed in normal cartilage. The present findings show that combined expression of candidate factors in OA cartilage can re-establish key features of normal cartilage and prevent the pathological shift of metabolic homeostasis. These data provide further motivation to develop coupled gene transfer approaches via rAAV for the treatment of human OA.

  8. The Effects of Polyphenol Oxidase and Cycloheximide on the Early Stage of Browning in Phalaenopsis Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chuanjun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Explant browning is one of the major problems in the tissue culture process, and polyphenol oxidase (PPO, is the major proteases involved in plant tissue browning. We investigated the effects of polyphenol oxidase on the early stage of browning in explants of the orchid Phalaenopsis. Our results show that PPO activity was significantly higher in explants cultured for 3 d than in the 0 h control. The levels of PPO transcripts and PPO protein were significantly higher in explants cultured for 6 h compared to the 0 h control; these high expression levels were maintained over increasing cultivation time. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment reduced PPO transcript levels, PPO protein levels, and PPO enzyme activity. High levels of PPO mRNA and PPO protein were detected in the cytoplasm and vascular bundles of Phalaenopsis explants cultured for 6 h compared to explants cultured for 0 h, 24 h, and 3 d. CHX treatment did not significantly affect the distribution of PPO mRNA and PPO protein in explant tissues, but their levels were significantly lower than those of the untreated control.

  9. Effect of antibiotics on in vitro and in vivo avian cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, T L; Fulton, R M; Roberson, K D; Orth, M W

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotics are used in the livestock industry not only to treat disease but also to promote growth and increase feed efficiency in less than ideal sanitary conditions. However, certain antibiotic families utilized in the poultry industry have recently been found to adversely affect bone formation and cartilage metabolism in dogs, rats, and humans. Therefore, the first objective of this study was to determine if certain antibiotics used in the poultry industry would inhibit in vitro cartilage degradation. The second objective was to determine if the antibiotics found to inhibit in vitro cartilage degradation also induced tibial dyschondroplasia in growing broilers. Ten antibiotics were studied by an avian explant culture system that is designed to completely degrade tibiae over 16 days. Lincomycin, tylosin tartrate, gentamicin, erythromycin, and neomycin sulfate did not inhibit degradation at any concentration tested. Doxycycline (200 microg/ml), oxytetracycline (200 microg/ml), enrofloxacin (200 and 400 microg/ml), ceftiofur (400 microg/ml), and salinomycin (10 microg/ml) prevented complete cartilage degradation for up to 30 days in culture. Thus, some of the antibiotics did inhibit cartilage degradation in developing bone. Day-old chicks were then administered the five antibiotics at 25%, 100%, or 400% above their recommended dose levels and raised until 21 days of age. Thiram, a fungicide known to induce experimental tibial dyschondroplasia (TD), was given at 20 ppm. Birds were then killed by cervical dislocation, and each proximal tibiotarsus was visually examined for TD lesions. The results showed that none of these antibiotics significantly induced TD in growing boilers at any concentration tested, whereas birds given 20 ppm thiram had a 92% incidence rate.

  10. Production of Gymnemic Acid Depends on Medium, Explants, PGRs, Color Lights, Temperature, Photoperiod, and Sucrose Sources in Batch Culture of Gymnema sylvestre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bakrudeen Ali Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gymnema sylvestre (R.Br. is an important diabetic medicinal plant which yields pharmaceutically active compounds called gymnemic acid (GA. The present study describes callus induction and the subsequent batch culture optimization and GA quantification determined by linearity, precision, accuracy, and recovery. Best callus induction of GA was noticed in MS medium combined with 2,4-D (1.5 mg/L and KN (0.5 mg/L. Evaluation and isolation of GA from the calluses derived from different plant parts, namely, leaf, stem and petioles have been done in the present case for the first time. Factors such as light, temperature, sucrose, and photoperiod were studied to observe their effect on GA production. Temperature conditions completely inhibited GA production. Out of the different sucrose concentrations tested, the highest yield (35.4 mg/g d.w was found at 5% sucrose followed by 12 h photoperiod (26.86 mg/g d.w. Maximum GA production (58.28 mg/g d.w was observed in blue light. The results showed that physical and chemical factors greatly influence the production of GA in callus cultures of G. sylvestre. The factors optimized for in vitro production of GA during the present study can successfully be employed for their large-scale production in bioreactors.

  11. Computer-aided cartilage tissue-engineering : a numerical evaluation of the influence of inhomogeneities, collagen architecture and temporal culture effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyaline articular cartilage has a crucial role in the distribution of joint mechanical loads and smooth movement of bones. Because of its poor healing capacity, cartilage damage is progressive and may lead to osteoarthritis (OA). Replacing damaged cartilage with tissue engineered (TE) cartilage is

  12. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

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    Piechocki Marie P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1 maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. Methods We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. Results The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. Conclusion This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving

  13. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechocki, Marie P

    2008-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1) maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving strategies that can dually or differentially target the tumor and stromal

  14. Integration of Stem Cell to Chondrocyte-Derived Cartilage Matrix in Healthy and Osteoarthritic States in the Presence of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Dua

    Full Text Available We investigated the effectiveness of integrating tissue engineered cartilage derived from human bone marrow derived stem cells (HBMSCs to healthy as well as osteoarthritic cartilage mimics using hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles immersed within a hydrogel substrate. Healthy and diseased engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes (cultured in agar gels were integrated with human bone marrow stem cell (HBMSC-derived cartilaginous engineered matrix with and without HA, and evaluated after 28 days of growth. HBMSCs were seeded within photopolymerizable poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA hydrogels. In addition, we also conducted a preliminary in vivo evaluation of cartilage repair in rabbit knee chondral defects treated with subchondral bone microfracture and cell-free PEGDA with and without HA. Under in vitro conditions, the interfacial shear strength between tissue engineered cartilage derived from HBMSCs and osteoarthritic chondrocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.05 when HA nanoparticles were incorporated within the HBMSC culture system. Histological evidence confirmed a distinct spatial transition zone, rich in calcium phosphate deposits. Assessment of explanted rabbit knees by histology demonstrated that cellularity within the repair tissues that had filled the defects were of significantly higher number (p < 0.05 when HA was used. HA nanoparticles play an important role in treating chondral defects when osteoarthritis is a co-morbidity. We speculate that the calcified layer formation at the interface in the osteoarthritic environment in the presence of HA is likely to have attributed to higher interfacial strength found in vitro. From an in vivo standpoint, the presence of HA promoted cellularity in the tissues that subsequently filled the chondral defects. This higher presence of cells can be considered important in the context of accelerating long-term cartilage remodeling. We conclude that HA nanoparticles play an important role in

  15. Polymer Formulations for Cartilage Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutowska, Anna; Jasionowski, Marek; Morris, J. E.; Chrisler, William B.; An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, V.

    2001-05-15

    Regeneration of destroyed articular cartilage can be induced by transplantation of cartilage cells into a defect. The best results are obtained with the use of autologus cells. However, obtaining large amounts of autologus cartilage cells causes a problem of creating a large cartilage defect in a donor site. Techniques are currently being developed to harvest a small number of cells and propagate them in vitro. It is a challenging task, however, due to the fact that ordinarily, in a cell culture on flat surfaces, chondrocytes do not maintain their in vivo phenotype and irreversibly diminish or cease the synthesis of aggregating proteoglycans. Therefore, the research is continuing to develop culture conditions for chondrocytes with the preserved phenotype.

  16. Solute transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Hooi Chuan; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-07-15

    Solute transport through extracellular matrix (ECM) is important to physiology and contrast agent-based clinical imaging of articular cartilage. Mechanical injury is likely to have important effects on solute transport since it involves alteration of ECM structure. Therefore it is of interest to characterize effects of mechanical injury on solute transport in cartilage. Using cartilage explants injured by an established mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusivities of solutes for transport across the articular surface were measured. A range of fluorescent solutes (fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4 and 40kDa dextrans, insulin, and chondroitin sulfate) and an X-ray contrast agent (sodium iodide) were used. Mechanical injury was associated with a significant increase in effective diffusivity versus uninjured explants for all solutes studied. On the other hand, mechanical injury had no effects on effective partition coefficients for most solutes tested, except for 40kDa dextran and chondroitin sulfate where small but significant changes in effective partition coefficient were observed in injured explants. Findings highlight enhanced diffusive transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage, which may have important implications for injury and repair situations. Results also support development of non-equilibrium methods for identification of focal cartilage lesions by contrast agent-based clinical imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Tchetina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM. Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA, AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  18. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Sheep: Characterization and Autologous Transplantation in a Model of Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul; Baily, James; Khan, Nusrat; Biant, Leela C; Simpson, A Hamish R; Péault, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has indicated that purified perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have increased chondrogenic potential compared to conventional mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived in culture. This study aimed to develop an autologous large animal model for PSC transplantation and to specifically determine if implanted cells are retained in articular cartilage defects. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to ascertain the reactivity of anti-human and anti-ovine antibodies, which were combined and used to identify and isolate pericytes (CD34 - CD45 - CD146 + ) and adventitial cells (CD34 + CD45 - CD146 - ). The purified cells demonstrated osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential in culture. Autologous ovine PSCs (oPSCs) were isolated, cultured, and efficiently transfected using a green fluorescence protein (GFP) encoding lentivirus. The cells were implanted into articular cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle using hydrogel and collagen membranes. Four weeks following implantation, the condyle was explanted and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the presence of oPSCs in the defect repaired with the hydrogel. These data suggest the testability in a large animal of native MSC autologous grafting, thus avoiding possible biases associated with xenotransplantation. Such a setting will be used in priority for indications in orthopedics, at first to model articular cartilage repair.

  19. Characterization and use of Equine Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Equine Cartilage Engineering. Study of their Hyaline Cartilage Forming Potential when Cultured under Hypoxia within a Biomaterial in the Presence of BMP-2 and TGF-ß1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branly, Thomas; Bertoni, Lélia; Contentin, Romain; Rakic, Rodolphe; Gomez-Leduc, Tangni; Desancé, Mélanie; Hervieu, Magalie; Legendre, Florence; Jacquet, Sandrine; Audigié, Fabrice; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Demoor, Magali; Galéra, Philippe

    2017-10-01

    Articular cartilage presents a poor capacity for self-repair. Its structure-function are frequently disrupted or damaged upon physical trauma or osteoarthritis in humans. Similar musculoskeletal disorders also affect horses and are the leading cause of poor performance or early retirement of sport- and racehorses. To develop a therapeutic solution for horses, we tested the autologous chondrocyte implantation technique developed on human bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on horse BM-MSCs. This technique involves BM-MSC chondrogenesis using a combinatory approach based on the association of 3D-culture in collagen sponges, under hypoxia in the presence of chondrogenic factors (BMP-2 + TGF-β 1 ) and siRNA to knockdown collagen I and HtrA1. Horse BM-MSCs were characterized before being cultured in chondrogenic conditions to find the best combination to enhance, stabilize, the chondrocyte phenotype. Our results show a very high proliferation of MSCs and these cells satisfy the criteria defining stem cells (pluripotency-surface markers expression). The combination of BMP-2 + TGF-β 1 strongly induces the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and prevents HtrA1 expression. siRNAs targeting Col1a1 and Htra1 were functionally validated. Ultimately, the combined use of specific culture conditions defined here with specific growth factors and a Col1a1 siRNAs (50 nM) association leads to the in vitro synthesis of a hyaline-type neocartilage whose chondrocytes present an optimal phenotypic index similar to that of healthy, differentiated chondrocytes. Our results lead the way to setting up pre-clinical trials in horses to better understand the reaction of neocartilage substitute and to carry out a proof-of-concept of this therapeutic strategy on a large animal model.

  20. Hyaline cartilage cells outperform mandibular condylar cartilage cells in a TMJ fibrocartilage tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Lazebnik, M; Detamore, M S

    2009-03-01

    To compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage cells in vitro to hyaline cartilage cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) environment for tissue engineering of mandibular condylar cartilage. Mandibular condylar cartilage and hyaline cartilage cells were harvested from pigs and cultured for 6 weeks in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds. Both types of cells were treated with glucosamine sulfate (0.4 mM), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (100 ng/ml) and their combination. At weeks 0 and 6, cell number, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content were determined, types I and II collagen were visualized by immunohistochemistry and GAGs were visualized by histology. Hyaline cartilage cells produced from half an order to a full order of magnitude more GAGs and collagen than mandibular condylar cartilage cells in 3D culture. IGF-I was a highly effective signal for biosynthesis with hyaline cartilage cells, while glucosamine sulfate decreased cell proliferation and biosynthesis with both types of cells. In vitro culture of TMJ condylar cartilage cells produced a fibrous tissue with predominantly type I collagen, while hyaline cartilage cells formed a fibrocartilage-like tissue with types I and II collagen. The combination of IGF and glucosamine had a synergistic effect on maintaining the phenotype of TMJ condylar cells to generate both types I and II collagen. Given the superior biosynthetic activity by hyaline cartilage cells and the practical surgical limitations of harvesting cells from the TMJ of a patient requiring TMJ reconstruction, cartilage cells from elsewhere in the body may be a potentially better alternative to cells harvested from the TMJ for TMJ tissue engineering. This finding may also apply to other fibrocartilages such as the intervertebral disc and knee meniscus in applications where a mature cartilage cell source is desired.

  1. A new pressure chamber to study the biosynthetic response of articular cartilage to mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmeyer, J; Torzilli, P A; Burton-Wurster, N; Lust, G

    1993-01-01

    A prototype chamber was used to apply a precise cyclic or static load on articular cartilage explants under sterile conditions. A variable pressure, pneumatic controller was constructed to power the chamber's air cylinder, capable of applying, with a porous load platen, loads of up to 10 MPa at cycles ranging from 0 to 10 Hz. Pig articular cartilage explants were maintained successfully in this chamber for 2 days under cyclic mechanical loading of 0.5 Hz, 0.5 MPa. Explants remained sterile, viable and metabolically active. Cartilage responded to this load with a decreased synthesis of fibronectin and a small but statistically significant elevation in proteoglycan content. Similar but less extensive effects on fibronectin synthesis were observed with the small static load (0.016 MPa) inherent in the design of the chamber.

  2. Human rheumatoid arthritis tissue production of IL-17A drives matrix and cartilage degradation: synergy with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, Oncostatin M and response to biologic therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to examine IL-17A in patients, following anti-TNF-alpha therapy and the effect of IL-17A on matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. METHODS: IL-17A expression was examined by ELISA and immunohistology in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. RA whole synovial tissue explant (RA ST), primary synovial fibroblasts (RASFC), human cartilage and chondrocyte cultures were stimulated with IL-17A +\\/- TNF-alpha and Oncostatin M (OSM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1) were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Cartilage proteoglycan release was assessed histologically by Safranin-O staining. Clinical parameters, IL-17A, MMP\\/TIMP were assessed in patients pre\\/post biologic therapy. RESULTS: IL-17A levels were higher in RA vs osteoarthritis (OA)\\/normal joints (P < 0.05). IL-17A up-regulated MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13 in RA ST, RASFC, cartilage and chondrocyte cultures (P < 0.05). In combination with TNF-alpha and OSM, IL-17A shifted the MMP:TIMP-1 ratio in favor of matrix degradation (all P < 0.05). Cartilage proteoglycan depletion in response to IL-17A was mild; however, in combination with TNF-alpha or OSM showed almost complete proteoglycan depletion. Serum IL-17A was detected in 28% of patients commencing biologic therapy. IL-17A negative patients demonstrated reductions post therapy in serum MMP1\\/TIMP4, MMP3\\/TIMP1 and MMP3\\/TIMP4 ratios and an increase in CS846 (all P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in IL-17A positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17A is produced locally in the inflamed RA joint. IL-17A promotes matrix turnover and cartilage destruction, especially in the presence of other cytokines, mimicking the joint environment. IL-17A levels are modulated in vivo, following anti-TNF therapy, and may reflect changes in matrix turnover.

  3. Absorção de macronutrientes por explantes de bananeira in vitro Macronutrient absorption by banana explants in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Diva Nogueira Diniz

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estudar a absorção de macronutrientes (N, P, K, Ca, Mg e S em explantes de bananeira cv. Prata Anã, foram utilizados explantes de plantas estabelecidas in vitro, inoculados em meio básico de Murashige & Skoog (1962 contendo sacarose (30 g/L, e BAP (3,5 mg/L com sete tratamentos, representados pelos períodos de 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 e 60 dias de cultivo e três repetições. As quantidades de macronutrientes totais absorvidas pelos explantes seguiram a ordem: K > N > Ca > ou = P > Mg @ S. O P foi o nutriente absorvido mais rapidamente pelos explantes, com 75% extraído do meio de cultivo nos primeiros 30 dias, cessando sua absorção aos 50 dias, restando ainda 9% no meio de cultivo. A absorção do S cessou também aos 50 dias, quando 66% deste nutriente ainda permanecia no meio de cultivo. Este resultado sugere haver uma relação, quanto à absorção, entre esses dois nutrientes. As maiores taxas de absorção de todos os nutrientes foram verificadas nos primeiros 20 dias. O rizoma, o pseudocaule e as folhas, se diferenciaram quanto à concentração e extração ou acúmulo de nutrientes.The absorption of the nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S by banana (Musa sp. cv. Prata Anã explants on the basic medium of Murashige & Skoog (1962 supplemented with sucrose (30 g/L and BAP (3.5 mg/L were evaluated at 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 days after inoculation. The seven treatments were arranged on a completely randomized design with three replicates. The sequence of nutrient absorption by the explants was K > N > Ca > or = P > Mg @ S. The P was the nutrient with the fastest absorption rate and at the 30th day the explants had already absorbed 75% of the P from the medium. The P absorption stopped by the 50th day. The S absorption stopped at the 50th day with 66% of it remaining in the medium. The results suggested a close relationship between these two nutrients. The highest rates of nutrient absorption were observed during the

  4. Chondrogenic properties of collagen type XI, a component of cartilage extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Wei, Yiyong; Hung, Clark; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2018-08-01

    Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) has been used for promoting tissue engineering. However, the exact effects of ECM on chondrogenesis and the acting mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the chondrogenic effects of cartilage ECM on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and identified the contributing molecular components. To this end, a preparation of articular cartilage ECM was supplemented to pellets of chondrogenically differentiating MSCs, pellets of human chondrocytes, and bovine articular cartilage explants to evaluate the effects on cell proliferation and the production of cartilaginous matrix. Selective enzymatic digestion and screening of ECM components were conducted to identify matrix molecules with chondrogenic properties. Cartilage ECM promoted MSC proliferation, production of cartilaginous matrix, and maturity of chondrogenic differentiation, and inhibited the hypertrophic differentiation of MSC-derived chondrocytes. Selective digestion of ECM components revealed a contributory role of collagens in promoting chondrogenesis. The screening of various collagen subtypes revealed strong chondrogenic effect of collagen type XI. Finally, collagen XI was found to promote production and inhibit degradation of cartilage matrix in human articular chondrocyte pellets and bovine articular cartilage explants. Our results indicate that cartilage ECM promotes chondrogenesis and inhibits hypertrophic differentiation in MSCs. Collagen type XI is the ECM component that has the strongest effects on enhancing the production and inhibiting the degradation of cartilage matrix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. FK506 protects against articular cartilage collagenous extra-cellular matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebelt, M; van der Windt, A E; Groen, H C; Sandker, M; Waarsing, J H; Müller, C; de Jong, M; Jahr, H; Weinans, H

    2014-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a non-rheumatologic joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the cartilage extra-cellular matrix (ECM), enhanced subchondral bone remodeling, activation of synovial macrophages and osteophyte growth. Inhibition of calcineurin (Cn) activity through tacrolimus (FK506) in in vitro monolayer chondrocytes exerts positive effects on ECM marker expression. This study therefore investigated the effects of FK506 on anabolic and catabolic markers of osteoarthritic chondrocytes in 2D and 3D in vitro cultures, and its therapeutic effects in an in vivo rat model of OA. Effects of high and low doses of FK506 on anabolic (QPCR/histochemistry) and catabolic (QPCR) markers were evaluated in vitro on isolated (2D) and ECM-embedded chondrocytes (explants, 3D pellets). Severe cartilage damage was induced unilaterally in rat knees using papain injections in combination with a moderate running protocol. Twenty rats were treated with FK506 orally and compared to twenty untreated controls. Subchondral cortical and trabecular bone changes (longitudinal microCT) and macrophage activation (SPECT/CT) were measured. Articular cartilage was analyzed ex vivo using contrast enhanced microCT and histology. FK506 treatment of osteoarthritic chondrocytes in vitro induced anabolic (mainly collagens) and reduced catabolic ECM marker expression. In line with this, FK506 treatment clearly protected ECM integrity in vivo by markedly decreasing subchondral sclerosis, less development of subchondral pores, depletion of synovial macrophage activation and lower osteophyte growth. FK506 protected cartilage matrix integrity in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, FK506 treatment in vivo reduced OA-like responses in different articular joint tissues and thereby makes Cn an interesting target for therapeutic intervention of OA. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation and functional cartilage microtissue formation for in vivo cartilage regeneration by cartilage extracellular matrix-derived particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Heyong; Wang, Yu; Sun, Zhen; Sun, Xun; Xu, Yichi; Li, Pan; Meng, Haoye; Yu, Xiaoming; Xiao, Bo; Fan, Tian; Wang, Yiguo; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of preparing a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), designated cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs). Through a series of processes involving pulverization, sieving, and decellularization, fresh cartilage was made into CEDPs with a median diameter of 263 ± 48 μm. Under microgravity culture conditions in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate rapidly on the surface of CEDPs with high viability. Histological evaluation and gene expression analysis indicated that BMSCs were differentiated into mature chondrocytes after 21 days of culture without the use of exogenous growth factors. Functional cartilage microtissue aggregates of BMSC-laden CEDPs formed as time in culture increased. Further, the microtissue aggregates were directly implanted into trochlear cartilage defects in a rat model (CEDP+MSC group). Gait analysis and histological results indicated that the CEDP+MSC group obtained better and more rapid joint function recovery and superior cartilage repair compared to the control groups, in which defects were treated with CEDPs alone or only fibrin glue, at both 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the innovative cell carrier derived from cartilage ECM could promote chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue facilitated cartilage regeneration. This strategy for cell culture, stem cell differentiation and one-step surgery using cartilage microtissue for cartilage repair provides novel prospects for cartilage tissue engineering and may have further broad clinical applications. We proposed a method to prepare a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage ECM, termed cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs), which can support proliferation of MSCs and facilitate their chondrogenic differentiation. Further, the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue of MSC-laden CEDP aggregates for

  7. Effects of Low Intensity Continuous Ultrasound (LICU on Mouse Pancreatic Tumor Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Bazou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effects of low intensity continuous ultrasound (LICU on the inflammatory response of mouse pancreatic tumor explants. While there are many reports focusing on the application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS on cell cultures and tissues, the effects of continuous oscillations on biological tissues have never been investigated. Here we present an exploratory study of the effects induced by LICU on mouse pancreatic tumor explants. We show that LICU causes significant upregulation of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α on tumor explants. No detectable effects were observed on tumor vasculature or collagen I deposition, while thermal and mechanical effects were not apparent. Tumor explants responded as a single unit to acoustic waves, with spatial pressure variations smaller than their size.

  8. Lichen explants and natural occurrence of lichens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschbaum, A; Klee, R

    1971-01-01

    Studies with lichen explants and with naturally occurring lichens, conducted in the Lower Main region in West Germany within the framework of an air hydgienic and meteorologic model study of that region, are described. Parmelia physodes explants from oak trees growing in nonpolluted areas were exposed in polluted areas, such as in an industrial area, an airport, a petroleum refinery, and near a large chemical plant. The degree of air pollution in the exposure site was evaluated by the degree of the lichen damage in seven grades. The large-scale average distribution of air pollution in the survey area was studied by surveying the natural occurrence of lichen species on 10 apple trees in area units of 6.25 sq km each. The lichen explant and lichen survey methods compared by the study of naturally occurring lichens were near the exposure site of lichen explants.

  9. Electric Field Stimulation Enhances Healing of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    within canine cartilage explants. FY16 Goal – Testing the recovery of mechanical properties, biochemistry, and histology of .canine knee joints which...average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) often follows joint fractures and dislocations, cartilage injuries, chronic ligament

  10. Bipolar and monopolar radiofrequency treatment of osteoarthritic knee articular cartilage: acute and temporal effects on cartilage compressive stiffness, permeability, cell synthesis, and extracellular matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Kuroki, Keiichi; Kenter, Keith; Marberry, Kevin; Brawner, Travis; Geiger, Timothy; Jayabalan, Prakash; Bal, B Sonny

    2004-04-01

    The cellular, biochemical, biomechanical, and histologic effects of radiofrequency-generated heat on osteoarthritic cartilage were assessed. Articular cartilage explants (n=240) from 26 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were divided based on Outerbridge grade (I or II/III) and randomly assigned to receive no treatment (controls) or monopolar or bipolar radiofrequency at 15 or 30 W. Both potentially beneficial and harmful effects of radiofrequency treatment of articular cartilage were noted. It will be vital to correlate data from in vitro and in vivo study of radiofrequency thermal chondroplasty to determine the clinical usefulness of this technique.

  11. Abnormal Mechanical Loading Induces Cartilage Degeneration by Accelerating Meniscus Hypertrophy and Mineralization After ACL Injuries In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guoqing; Zhan, Hongsheng; Ding, Daofang; Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Bilgen, Bahar; Reginato, Anthony M; Fleming, Braden C; Deng, Jin; Wei, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Although patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury have a high risk of developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), the role of meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization in PTOA after an ACL injury remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if menisci respond to abnormal loading and if an ACL injury results in meniscus hypertrophy and calcification. The hypotheses were that (1) abnormal mechanical loading after an ACL injury induces meniscus hypertrophy and mineralization, which correlates to articular cartilage damage in vivo, and (2) abnormal mechanical loading on bovine meniscus explants induces the overexpression of hypertrophic and mineralization markers in vitro. Controlled laboratory study. In vivo guinea pig study (hypothesis 1): Three-month-old male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 9) underwent ACL transection (ACLT) on the right knee; the left knee served as the control. Calcification in the menisci was evaluated by calcein labeling 1 and 5 days before knee harvesting at 5.5 months. Cartilage and meniscus damage and mineralization were quantified by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International score and meniscus grade, respectively. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), collagen type X (Col X), progressive ankylosis homolog (ANKH), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 (ENPP1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro bovine meniscus explant study (hypothesis 2): Bovine meniscus explants were subjected to 25% strain at 0.3 Hz for 1, 2, and 3 hours. Cell viability was determined using live/dead staining. The levels of mRNA expression and protein levels were measured using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot after 24, 48, and 72 hours in culture. The conditioned medium was collected for sulfated

  12. Late graft explants in endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Eric J; Steenberge, Sean P; Lyden, Sean P; Eagleton, Matthew J; Srivastava, Sunita D; Sarac, Timur P; Kelso, Rebecca L; Clair, Daniel G

    2014-04-01

    With more than a decade of use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), we expect to see a rise in the number of failing endografts. We review a single-center experience with EVAR explants to identify patterns of presentation and understand operative outcomes that may alter clinical management. A retrospective analysis of EVARs requiring late explants, >1 month after implant, was performed. Patient demographics, type of graft, duration of implant, reason for removal, operative technique, length of stay, complications, and in-hospital and late mortality were reviewed. During 1999 to 2012, 100 patients (91% men) required EVAR explant, of which 61 were placed at another institution. The average age was 75 years (range, 50-93 years). The median length of time since implantation was 41 months (range, 1-144 months). Explanted grafts included 25 AneuRx (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn), 25 Excluder (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz), 17 Zenith (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), 15 Talent (Medtronic), 10 Ancure (Guidant, Indianapolis, Ind), 4 Powerlink (Endologix, Irvine, Calif), 1 Endurant (Medtronic), 1 Quantum LP (Cordis, Miami Lakes, Fla), 1 Aorta Uni Iliac Rupture Graft (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), and 1 homemade tube graft. Overall 30-day mortality was 17%, with an elective case mortality of 9.9%, nonelective case mortality of 37%, and 56% mortality for ruptures. Endoleak was the most common indication for explant, with one or more endoleaks present in 82% (type I, 40%; II, 30%; III, 22%; endotension, 6%; multiple, 16%). Other reasons for explant included infection (13%), acute thrombosis (4%), and claudication (1%). In the first 12 months, 23 patients required explants, with type I endoleak (48%) and infection (35%) the most frequent indication. Conversely, 22 patients required explants after 5 years, with type I (36%) and type III (32%) endoleak responsible for most indications. The rate of EVAR late explants has increased during the past decade at our

  13. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Pleumeekers (Mieke); L. Nimeskern (Luc); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy); N. Kops (Nicole); R.M.L. Poublon (René); K.S. Stok (Kathryn); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix.

  14. Full-thickness human skin explants for testing the toxicity of topically applied chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Rikimaru, T.; Yano, T.; Moore, K.G.; Pula, P.J.; Schofield, B.H.; Dannenberg, A.M. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a model organ-culture system for testing the toxicity of chemical substances that are topically applied to human skin. In this system, the viable keratinocytes in the full-thickness skin explants are protected by the same keratinized layer as skin remaining on the donor, and toxicity can be assessed microscopically and/or biochemically. The human skin specimens were discards from a variety of surgical procedures. They were cut into full-thickness 1.0-cm2 explants, and briefly exposed to the military vesicant sulfur mustard (SM), which was used as a model toxicant. The explants were then organ cultured in small Petri dishes for 24 h at 36 degrees C. In the 0.03-1.0% dosage range, a straight-line dose-response relationship occurred between the concentration of SM applied and the number of paranuclear vacuoles seen histologically in the epidermis. Within the same SM dosage range, there was also a proportional decrease in 14C-leucine incorporation by the explants. Thus, the number of paranuclear vacuoles reflected decreases in protein synthesis by the injured epidermal cells. The epidermis of full-thickness untreated (control) human skin explants usually remained viable for 7 d when stored at 4 degrees C in culture medium. During storage, a relatively small number of paranuclear vacuoles developed within the epidermis, but the explants were still quite satisfactory for testing SM toxicity. Incubation (for 4 or 24 h at 36 degrees C) of such control skin explants reduced (often by 50%) the small number of paranuclear vacuoles produced during 4-7 d of storage. This reduction was probably caused by autolysis of many of the vacuolated cells. Two types of paranuclear vacuoles could be identified by both light and electron microscopy: a storage type and a toxicant type. The storage type seemed to be caused by autolysis of cell components

  15. Full-thickness human skin explants for testing the toxicity of topically applied chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M.; Rikimaru, T.; Yano, T.; Moore, K.G.; Pula, P.J.; Schofield, B.H.; Dannenberg, A.M. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a model organ-culture system for testing the toxicity of chemical substances that are topically applied to human skin. In this system, the viable keratinocytes in the full-thickness skin explants are protected by the same keratinized layer as skin remaining on the donor, and toxicity can be assessed microscopically and/or biochemically. The human skin specimens were discards from a variety of surgical procedures. They were cut into full-thickness 1.0-cm2 explants, and briefly exposed to the military vesicant sulfur mustard (SM), which was used as a model toxicant. The explants were then organ cultured in small Petri dishes for 24 h at 36 degrees C. In the 0.03-1.0% dosage range, a straight-line dose-response relationship occurred between the concentration of SM applied and the number of paranuclear vacuoles seen histologically in the epidermis. Within the same SM dosage range, there was also a proportional decrease in 14C-leucine incorporation by the explants. Thus, the number of paranuclear vacuoles reflected decreases in protein synthesis by the injured epidermal cells. The epidermis of full-thickness untreated (control) human skin explants usually remained viable for 7 d when stored at 4 degrees C in culture medium. During storage, a relatively small number of paranuclear vacuoles developed within the epidermis, but the explants were still quite satisfactory for testing SM toxicity. Incubation (for 4 or 24 h at 36{degrees}C) of such control skin explants reduced (often by 50%) the small number of paranuclear vacuoles produced during 4-7 d of storage. This reduction was probably caused by autolysis of many of the vacuolated cells. Two types of paranuclear vacuoles could be identified by both light and electron microscopy: a storage type and a toxicant type. The storage type seemed to be caused by autolysis of cell components.

  16. Effect of Hormones on Direct Shoot Regeneration in Hypocotyl Explants of Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan RASHID

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted for developing a high frequency regeneration system in two genotypes of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., �Punjab Upma� and �IPA-3� for direct shoot regeneration from hypocotyl explants. The explants were excised from in vitro tomato seedlings and cultured on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of hormones. Direct regeneration was significantly influenced by the genotype hormones combination and concentrations. The MS medium supplemented with (Kinetin 0.5 mg/l and (BAP 0.5 mg/l was found optimum for inducing direct shoot regeneration and number of shoots per explant from hypocotyl explants on this medium. Shoot regeneration per cent in �Punjab Upma� and �IPA-3� per cent was recorded to be highest i.e (86.02 and (82.57 respectively. Besides this, average number shoots per explant was also highest i.e (3.16 in case of �Punjab Upma� and (2.93 in case of �IPA-3�. A significant decline was observed in percent shoot regeneration and average number of shoots per explant with increase in the hormonal concentration. Shoots were obtained and transferred to the elongation medium (MS + BAP 0.3 mg/l. Hundred per cent rooting was induced in separated shoots upon culturing on MS and � MS basal media. Hardening on moist cotton showed maximum plantlet survival rate in case of both genotypes. After hardening, plants were transferred to soil. Thus, a tissue culture base line was established in tomato for obtaining direct regeneration using hypocotyl as explants.

  17. Effect of Hormones on Direct Shoot Regeneration in Hypocotyl Explants of Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan RASHID

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted for developing a high frequency regeneration system in two genotypes of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., Punjab Upma and IPA-3 for direct shoot regeneration from hypocotyl explants. The explants were excised from in vitro tomato seedlings and cultured on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of hormones. Direct regeneration was significantly influenced by the genotype hormones combination and concentrations. The MS medium supplemented with (Kinetin 0.5 mg/l and (BAP 0.5 mg/l was found optimum for inducing direct shoot regeneration and number of shoots per explant from hypocotyl explants on this medium. Shoot regeneration per cent in Punjab Upma and IPA-3 per cent was recorded to be highest i.e (86.02 and (82.57 respectively. Besides this, average number shoots per explant was also highest i.e (3.16 in case of Punjab Upma and (2.93 in case of IPA-3. A significant decline was observed in percent shoot regeneration and average number of shoots per explant with increase in the hormonal concentration. Shoots were obtained and transferred to the elongation medium (MS + BAP 0.3 mg/l. Hundred per cent rooting was induced in separated shoots upon culturing on MS and MS basal media. Hardening on moist cotton showed maximum plantlet survival rate in case of both genotypes. After hardening, plants were transferred to soil. Thus, a tissue culture base line was established in tomato for obtaining direct regeneration using hypocotyl as explants.

  18. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with [3H] glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques

  19. Cartilage immunoprivilege depends on donor source and lesion location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, B; DuRaine, G D; Lee, C A; Huey, D J; Borjesson, D L; Murphy, B G; Hu, J C Y; Baumgarth, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-09-01

    The ability to repair damaged cartilage is a major goal of musculoskeletal tissue engineering. Allogeneic (same species, different individual) or xenogeneic (different species) sources can provide an attractive source of chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering, since autologous (same individual) cells are scarce. Immune rejection of non-autologous hyaline articular cartilage has seldom been considered due to the popular notion of "cartilage immunoprivilege". The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of allogeneic and xenogeneic engineered neocartilage tissue for cartilage repair. To address this, scaffold-free tissue engineered articular cartilage of syngeneic (same genetic background), allogeneic, and xenogeneic origin were implanted into two different locations of the rabbit knee (n=3 per group/location). Xenogeneic engineered cartilage and control xenogeneic chondral explants provoked profound innate inflammatory and adaptive cellular responses, regardless of transplant location. Cytological quantification of immune cells showed that, while allogeneic neocartilage elicited an immune response in the patella, negligible responses were observed when implanted into the trochlea; instead the responses were comparable to microfracture-treated empty defect controls. Allogeneic neocartilage survived within the trochlea implant site and demonstrated graft integration into the underlying bone. In conclusion, the knee joint cartilage does not represent an immune privileged site, strongly rejecting xenogeneic but not allogeneic chondrocytes in a location-dependent fashion. This difference in location-dependent survival of allogeneic tissue may be associated with proximity to the synovium. Through a series of in vivo studies this research demonstrates that articular cartilage is not fully immunoprivileged. In addition, we now show that anatomical location of the defect, even within the same joint compartment, strongly influences the degree of the

  20. Scaffold-assisted cartilage tissue engineering using infant chondrocytes from human hip cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, P C; Gentili, C; Samans, B; Martinelli, D; Krüger, J P; Mittelmeier, W; Endres, M; Cancedda, R; Kaps, C

    2013-12-01

    Studies about cartilage repair in the hip and infant chondrocytes are rare. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of infant articular hip chondrocytes for tissue engineering of scaffold-assisted cartilage grafts. Hip cartilage was obtained from five human donors (age 1-10 years). Expanded chondrocytes were cultured in polyglycolic acid (PGA)-fibrin scaffolds. De- and re-differentiation of chondrocytes were assessed by histological staining and gene expression analysis of typical chondrocytic marker genes. In vivo, cartilage matrix formation was assessed by histology after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte-seeded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in immunocompromised mice. The donor tissue was heterogenous showing differentiated articular cartilage and non-differentiated tissue and considerable expression of type I and II collagens. Gene expression analysis showed repression of typical chondrocyte and/or mesenchymal marker genes during cell expansion, while markers were re-induced when expanded cells were cultured in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. Cartilage formation after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte loaded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in nude mice was variable, with grafts showing resorption and host cell infiltration or formation of hyaline cartilage rich in type II collagen. Addition of human platelet rich plasma (PRP) to cartilage grafts resulted robustly in formation of hyaline-like cartilage that showed type II collagen and regions with type X collagen. These results suggest that culture of expanded and/or de-differentiated infant hip cartilage cells in PGA-fibrin scaffolds initiates chondrocyte re-differentiation. The heterogenous donor tissue containing immature chondrocytes bears the risk of cartilage repair failure in vivo, which may be possibly overcome by the addition of PRP. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of insulin-like growth factor I on proteoglycan metabolism in immature and adult bovine articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone-Varelas, J.

    1989-01-01

    Explants of articular cartilage from calf (15 weeks old) and steer (18-24 months old) were cultured for up to 19 days in medium containing either insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) or 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Explants cultured in medium alone were controls. 35 S-proteoglycans (PGs) synthesized on day 7 of culture during a 5-hour pulse with 35 S-sulfate were isolated, quantified and characterized. Lower concentrations of IGF-I were required for maximal stimulation of PG synthesis in calf than in steer (10 vs 20 ng/ml). In calf, IGF-I was as effective as 20% FABS in stimulating PG synthesis. In steer, PG synthesis in the presence of IGF-I reached its maximum at a rate that was half that obtained with 20% FBS. The stimulation by IGF-I or FBS was not accompanied at either age by alterations in the size and composition of the aggregating PGs nor by changes in the relative proportions of the CS-rich and CS-poor PG subpopulations. Importantly, the newly synthesized calf and steer PGs retained marked age-related differences in composition regardless of the culture conditions. The effects of exogenously added IGF-I and FBS on the rate of turnover of cartilage PGs was also studied. In calf, IGF-I and FBS did not significantly alter the rate of turnover of either the 35 S-PGs synthesized in vitro or of the unlabeled PGs representing mostly molecules synthesize and organized into the matrix in vivo. In steer, explants cultured in the absence of IGF-I or FBS exhibited very fast rates of turnover which resulted in severe depletion of matrix PG with time. Importantly, IGF-I and FBS were equally effective in reducing the turnover rate of 35 S-PGs and unlabeled PGs and in preventing PG depletion. These results demonstrate age-related differences in the effect of IGF-I on PG synthesis by articular chondrocytes

  2. Imaging of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawan K Paunipagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

  3. Proliferation of Female Inflorescences explants of Date Palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, R.A; Eldawyati, M.M

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of Abscisic acid (ABA) and Ancymidol on proliferation of female inflorescences explants of date palm. In the first experiment two lengths of spath at (5-7 cm) or at (7-10 cm) were cultured on nutrient media which consists of half macro and full micro salts of MS medium supplemented with gradual decreasing in concentration of Abscisic acid (ABA) and Ancymidol from 4.5, 3.0, 1.5 to 0.5 mg -1 . In the second experiment two phases of nutrient medium (solid and liquid) and two source of carbon were investigated. Gradual decreasing of ABA concentrations from 4.5 mg -1 to 1.5 mg -1 in culture medium, stimulated the production of direct somatic embryos and accelerated callus initiation, but at last decrement (0.5 mg -1 ) of Ancymidol concentration few embryos were produced. Callus initiation from inflorescences explants gave high production and well development of somatic embryos when cultured on liquid medium supplemented with 40 g -1 sucrose. All direct or indirect somatic embryos obtained in these experiments were converted successfully to healthy normal plantlets which could be transferred to acclimatization stage.

  4. Cultura in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) Culture in vitro of rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) embryos´seeds and buds explants

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Handa; Paulo de Tarso B. Sampaio; Regina Caetano Quisen

    2005-01-01

    Este trabalho teve como objetivo o estabelecimento in vitro de embriões e de gemas de mudas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) livres de contaminações e de oxidação fenólica. As gemas foram obtidas da rebrota de mudas cultivadas em viveiro e os embriões a partir de sementes em diversos estágios de maturação. Para a assepsia dos explantes foram utilizados dois antibiótico (Ampicilina e Agrimicina), etanol (70%) e hipoclorito de sódio, em concentrações e tempo de exposição variando em função ...

  5. Somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of Australian fan flower, Scaevola aemula R. Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y-H; Bhalla, P L

    2004-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of Scaevola aemula R. Br. was achieved. Somatic embryos were induced from explants cultured on MS medium supplemented with 0.2 mg/ 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.2-0.5 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Various developmental stages of somatic embryos were found on this medium-from globular embryos to germinated embryos. The transfer of globular embryos to MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l BAP resulted in a high frequency of shoot regeneration. Leaf explants cultured on MS medium containing different combinations of BAP and alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid formed adventitious shoots and roots. Histological examination confirmed the process of somatic embryogenesis. Induction of somatic embryogenesis in Scaevola provides a system for studying embryogenesis in Australian native plants and will facilitate the improvement of these plants using genetic transformation techniques.

  6. NAA-Induced Direct Organogenesis from Female Immature Inflorescence Explants of Date Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khierallah, Hussam S M; Bader, Saleh M; Al-Khafaji, Makki A

    2017-01-01

    Micropropagation has great potential for the multiplication of female and male date palms of commercially grown cultivars by using inflorescences. This approach is simple, convenient, and much faster than the conventional method of using shoot-tip explants. We describe here a stepwise micropropagation procedure using inflorescence explants of Iraqi date palm cultivar Maktoom. Cultured explants were derived from 0.5-cm-long spike segments excised from 8 to 10-cm-long spathes. About 70% formed adventitious buds on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2 mg/L naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), 4 mg/L benzylaminopurine (BAP), and 40 g/L sucrose and maintained in the dark for 16 weeks before transferring to normal light conditions. The best multiplication rate was achieved with 3 mg/L 2ip and 2 mg/L; for shoot elongation, the best medium is MS containing 0.5 mg/L BAP, 0.5 mg/L 2ip, and 1 mg/L GA 3 . Well-developed shoots were cultured for rooting in half MS medium amended with 1 mg/L NAA and 45 g/L sucrose. Plantlets with well-developed roots were successfully hardened in the greenhouse. Inflorescence explants proved to be a promising alternative explant source for micropropagation of date palm cultivars.

  7. Autofluorescence lifetime metrology for label-free detection of cartilage matrix degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickdel, Mohammad B.; Lagarto, João. L.; Kelly, Douglas J.; Manning, Hugh B.; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Talbot, Clifford B.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) by proteolytic enzyme is the hallmark of arthritis that leads to joint destruction. Detection of early biochemical changes in cartilage before irreversible structural damages become apparent is highly desirable. Here we report that the autofluorescence decay profile of cartilage is significantly affected by proteolytic degradation of cartilage ECM and can be characterised by measurements of the autofluorescence lifetime (AFL). A multidimensional fluorometer utilizing ultraviolet excitation at 355 nm or 375 nm coupled to a fibreoptic probe was developed for single point time-resolved AFL measurements of porcine articular cartilage explants treated with different proteinases. Degradation of cartilage matrix components by treating with bacterial collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase 1, or trypsin resulted in significant reduction of AFL of the cartilage in both a dose and time dependent manner. Differences in cartilage AFL were also confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Our data suggest that AFL of cartilage tissue is a potential non-invasive readout to monitor cartilage matrix integrity that may be utilized for diagnosis of arthritis as well as monitoring the efficacy of anti-arthritic therapeutic agents.

  8. The inhibitory effect of salmon calcitonin on tri-iodothyronine induction of early hypertrophy in articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Chen-An

    Full Text Available Salmon calcitonin has chondroprotective effect both in vitro and in vivo, and is therefore being tested as a candidate drug for cartilage degenerative diseases. Recent studies have indicated that different chondrocyte phenotypes may express the calcitonin receptor (CTR differentially. We tested for the presence of the CTR in chondrocytes from tri-iodothyronin (T3-induced bovine articular cartilage explants. Moreover, investigated the effects of human and salmon calcitonin on the explants.Early chondrocyte hypertrophy was induced in bovine articular cartilage explants by stimulation over four days with 20 ng/mL T3. The degree of hypertrophy was investigated by molecular markers of hypertrophy (ALP, IHH, COLX and MMP13, by biochemical markers of cartilage turnover (C2M, P2NP and AGNxII and histology. The expression of the CTR was detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. T3-induced explants were treated with salmon or human calcitonin. Calcitonin down-stream signaling was measured by levels of cAMP, and by the molecular markers.Compared with untreated control explants, T3 induction increased expression of the hypertrophic markers (p<0.05, of cartilage turnover (p<0.05, and of CTR (p<0.01. Salmon, but not human, calcitonin induced cAMP release (p<0.001. Salmon calcitonin also inhibited expression of markers of hypertrophy and cartilage turnover (p<0.05.T3 induced early hypertrophy of chondrocytes, which showed an elevated expression of the CTR and was thus a target for salmon calcitonin. Molecular marker levels indicated salmon, but not human, calcitonin protected the cartilage from hypertrophy. These results confirm that salmon calcitonin is able to modulate the CTR and thus have chondroprotective effects.

  9. Protection against LPS-induced cartilage inflammation and degradation provided by a biological extract of Mentha spicata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kott Laima S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of mint [Mentha spicata] has been bred which over-expresses Rosmarinic acid (RA by approximately 20-fold. RA has demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in small rodents; thus it was hypothesized that this plant would demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The objectives of this study were: a to develop an in vitro extraction procedure which mimics digestion and hepatic metabolism, b to compare anti-inflammatory properties of High-Rosmarinic-Acid Mentha spicata (HRAM with wild-type control M. spicata (CM, and c to quantify the relative contributions of RA and three of its hepatic metabolites [ferulic acid (FA, caffeic acid (CA, coumaric acid (CO] to anti-inflammatory activity of HRAM. Methods HRAM and CM were incubated in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, liver microsomes (from male rat and NADPH. Concentrations of RA, CA, CO, and FA in simulated digest of HRAM (HRAMsim and CM (CMsim were determined (HPLC and compared with concentrations in aqueous extracts of HRAM and CM. Cartilage explants (porcine were cultured with LPS (0 or 3 μg/mL and test article [HRAMsim (0, 8, 40, 80, 240, or 400 μg/mL, or CMsim (0, 1, 5 or 10 mg/mL, or RA (0.640 μg/mL, or CA (0.384 μg/mL, or CO (0.057 μg/mL or FA (0.038 μg/mL] for 96 h. Media samples were analyzed for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, interleukin 1β (IL-1, glycosaminoglycan (GAG, nitric oxide (NO and cell viability (differential live-dead cell staining. Results RA concentration of HRAMsim and CMsim was 49.3 and 0.4 μg/mL, respectively. CA, FA and CO were identified in HRAMsim but not in aqueous extract of HRAM. HRAMsim (≥ 8 μg/mL inhibited LPS-induced PGE2 and NO; HRAMsim (≥ 80 μg/mL inhibited LPS-induced GAG release. RA inhibited LPS-induced GAG release. No anti-inflammatory or chondroprotective effects of RA metabolites on cartilage explants were identified. Conclusions Our biological extraction procedure produces

  10. Review on patents for mechanical stimulation of articular cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van C.C.; Schulz, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    To repair articular cartilage defects in osteoarthritic patients with three-dimensional tissue engineered chondrocyte grafts, requires the formation of new cartilage with sufficient mechanical properties. The premise is that mechanical stimulation during the culturing process is necessary to reach

  11. Effect of explant age, hormones on somatic embryogenesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of explant age, hormones on somatic embryogenesis and production of multiple shoot from cotyledonary leaf explants of Solanum trilobatum L. VNC Dhavala, RD Tejeswara, VR Yechuri, K Prabavathi ...

  12. Indução de calos embriogênicos em explantes de cupuaçuzeiro Induction of embryogenics calli in cupuassu explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria das Graças Rodrigues Ferreira

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se a indução de calos embriogênicos em cupuaçuzeiro, em função do tipo de explante e meio de cultura. Foram testados como explantes, segmentos cotiledonares e eixos embrionários divididos em três partes: região da plúmula, radícula e hipocótilo. Os explantes foram cultivados em 2 diferentes meios de cultura: 1 MS suplementado com 2,4-D (1 mg L-1 e Cinetina (0,25 mg L-1; 2 MS acrescido de ANA (5 mg L-1 e Cinetina (0,25 mg L-1. Constatou-se que a região do hipocótilo foi a parte mais responsiva do eixo embrionário, formando calos com aspecto branco e friável. As auxinas testadas nos meios não estimularam o processo embriogênico em calos de cupuaçuzeiro.It was studied the induction of embryogenics calli in cupuassu, in function of kind of explant and culture medium. Cotyledons segments and embryonic axes were tested and divided in three parts: region of plumule, radicule and hypocotile. The explants were cultivated in two different culture medium: 1 MS supplemented with 2,4-D (1 mg L-1 and Kinetin (0,25 mg L-1; 2 MS supplemented with NAA (5 mg L-1 and Kinetin (0,25 mg L-1. The hypocotile region demonstrated to be more responsive segment of the embryonic axe, forming callus with white and friable aspect. No somatic embryogenesis was evidenced in callus of cupuassu with auxines testeds in the medium.

  13. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  14. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xiaodong [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng Qixin [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yang Shuhua [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Shao Zengwu [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yuan Quan [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Pan Zhengqi [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Tang Shuo [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Liu Kai [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Quan Daping [Institute of Polymer Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2006-12-15

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3}-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3} gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of

  15. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor β1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaodong; Zheng Qixin; Yang Shuhua; Shao Zengwu; Yuan Quan; Pan Zhengqi; Tang Shuo; Liu Kai; Quan Daping

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β 1 ) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-β 1 that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-β 1 gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA 3 -TGF-β 1 gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA 3 gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune responses. The

  16. Degeneration of osteoarthritis cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter

    of sensitive biomarkers for monitoring disease progression. This thesis investigates how subregional measures of cartilage thickness can be used to improve upon current imaging biomarkers. The first part of this investigation aims to discover discriminative areas in the cartilage using machine......-learning techniques specifically developed to take advantage of the spatial nature of the problem. The methods were evaluated on data from a longitudinal study where detailed cartilage thickness maps were quantified from magnetic resonance images. The results showed that focal differences in cartilage thickness may...... be relevant for both OA diagnosis and for prediction of future cartilage loss. The second part of the thesis investigates spatial patterns of longitudinal cartilage thickness changes in healthy and OA knees. Based on our findings, we propose a new, conceptually simple biomarker that embraces the heterogeneous...

  17. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-10-19

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. PMID:26416680

  19. Trophic effects of adipose-tissue-derived and bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhance cartilage generation by chondrocytes in co-culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pleumeekers, M.M.; Nimeskern, L.M.; Koevoet, J. L.M.; Karperien, M.; Stok, K.S.; van Osch, G.J.V.M.

    2018-01-01

    Aims Combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes has great potential for cell-based cartilage repair. However, there is much debate regarding the mechanisms behind this concept. We aimed to clarify the mechanisms that lead to chondrogenesis (chondrocyte driven MSC-differentiation versus

  20. Adult Mouse DRG Explant and Dissociated Cell Models to Investigate Neuroplasticity and Responses to Environmental Insults Including Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Sharthiya, Harsh; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2018-03-09

    This protocol describes an ex vivo model of mouse-derived dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explant and in vitro DRG-derived co-culture of dissociated sensory neurons and glial satellite cells. These are useful and versatile models to investigate a variety of biological responses associated with physiological and pathological conditions of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) ranging from neuron-glial interaction, neuroplasticity, neuroinflammation, and viral infection. The usage of DRG explant is scientifically advantageous compared to simplistic single cells models for multiple reasons. For instance, as an organotypic culture, the DRG explant allows ex vivo transfer of an entire neuronal network including the extracellular microenvironment that play a significant role in all the neuronal and glial functions. Further, DRG explants can also be maintained ex vivo for several days and the culture conditions can be perturbed as desired. In addition, the harvested DRG can be further dissociated into an in vitro co-culture of primary sensory neurons and satellite glial cells to investigate neuronal-glial interaction, neuritogenesis, axonal cone interaction with the extracellular microenvironment, and more general, any aspect associated with the neuronal metabolism. Therefore, the DRG-explant system offers a great deal of flexibility to study a wide array of events related to biological, physiological, and pathological conditions in a cost-effective manner.

  1. Studies on the effect of genotype and explant type on callogenesis and organogenesis in indica rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, A.; Rashid, H.; Khan, M.H.; Chaudhry, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the research study is to select the best rice explant and variety for Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation studies. In vitro callus induction and regeneration frequency of two explants i.e. immature embryo and media supplemented mature grains of 9 rice varieties (Oryza sativa L.) was investigated by culturing explants source on N/sub 6/ with 2, 4-D at 2 mg/l for callus induction. Results indicated that mature seed explant produced significantly high number of calli as compared to immature embryo. Two types of calli were distinguished, designated as type-I calli and type-II calli. Regarding the quality of callus, type-I calli (produced from scutellum of mature grains) which were embryogenic produced higher plant regeneration frequency than type-II calli which were non-embryogenic. Mature-seed scutella calli and immature embryo-derived calli (after three weeks of culture) of rice varieties were transferred on regeneration medium i.e., MS salts and vitamins, 3% sucrose, 3% sorbitol, 2 g/l casine hydrolysate, NAA 1.0 mg/l, kin 2.5 mg /l and BAP at 0.5mg/l. The highest regeneration capacity was observed in DR-83 from mature seed derived calli followed by Basmati 385. After hardening the plantlets were transferred to soil. (author)

  2. Chondrocytes and stem cells in 3D-bioprinted structures create human cartilage in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Apelgren, Peter; Amoroso, Matteo; Lindahl, Anders; Brantsing, Camilla; Rotter, Nicole; Gatenholm, Paul; Kölby, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage repair and replacement is a major challenge in plastic reconstructive surgery. The development of a process capable of creating a patient-specific cartilage framework would be a major breakthrough. Here, we described methods for creating human cartilage in vivo and quantitatively assessing the proliferative capacity and cartilage-formation ability in mono- and co-cultures of human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D)-bioprinted hydrogel scaffold....

  3. Recapitulation of physiological spatiotemporal signals promotes in vitro formation of phenotypically stable human articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Bernhard, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, X. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Standard isotropic culture fails to recapitulate the spatiotemporal gradients present during native development. Cartilage grown from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is poorly organized and unstable in vivo. We report that human cartilage with physiologic organization and in vivo stability can be grown in vitro from self-assembling hMSCs by implementing spatiotemporal regulation during induction. Self-assembling hMSCs formed cartilage discs in Transwell inserts following isotropic chondrogenic induction with transforming growth factor β to set up a dual-compartment culture. Following a switch in the basal compartment to a hypertrophic regimen with thyroxine, the cartilage discs underwent progressive deep-zone hypertrophy and mineralization. Concurrent chondrogenic induction in the apical compartment enabled the maintenance of functional and hyaline cartilage. Cartilage homeostasis, chondrocyte maturation, and terminal differentiation markers were all up-regulated versus isotropic control groups. We assessed the in vivo stability of the cartilage formed under different induction regimens. Cartilage formed under spatiotemporal regulation in vitro resisted endochondral ossification, retained the expression of cartilage markers, and remained organized following s.c. implantation in immunocompromised mice. In contrast, the isotropic control groups underwent endochondral ossification. Cartilage formed from hMSCs remained stable and organized in vivo. Spatiotemporal regulation during induction in vitro recapitulated some aspects of native cartilage development, and potentiated the maturation of self-assembling hMSCs into stable and organized cartilage resembling the native articular cartilage. PMID:28228529

  4. Preparation and characterization of a decellularized cartilage scaffold for ear cartilage reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utomo, Lizette; Pleumeekers, Mieke M; Van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Nimeskern, Luc; Stok, Kathryn S; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Hildner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds are widely used to reconstruct cartilage. Yet, the fabrication of a scaffold with a highly organized microenvironment that closely resembles native cartilage remains a major challenge. Scaffolds derived from acellular extracellular matrices are able to provide such a microenvironment. Currently, no report specifically on decellularization of full thickness ear cartilage has been published. In this study, decellularized ear cartilage scaffolds were prepared and extensively characterized. Cartilage decellularization was optimized to remove cells and cell remnants from elastic cartilage. Following removal of nuclear material, the obtained scaffolds retained their native collagen and elastin contents as well as their architecture and shape. High magnification scanning electron microscopy showed no obvious difference in matrix density after decellularization. However, glycosaminoglycan content was significantly reduced, resulting in a loss of viscoelastic properties. Additionally, in contact with the scaffolds, human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable and are able to differentiate toward the chondrogenic lineage when cultured in vitro. These results, including the ability to decellularize whole human ears, highlight the clinical potential of decellularization as an improved cartilage reconstruction strategy. (paper)

  5. Induction of hairy roots by various strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes in different types of Capsicum species explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Setamam, Nursuria; Jaafar Sidik, Norrizah; Abdul Rahman, Zainon; Che Mohd Zain, Che Radziah

    2014-06-30

    Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens, also known as "chilies", belong to the Solanaceae family and have tremendous beneficial properties. The application of hairy root culture may become an alternative method for future development of these species by adding value, such as by increasing secondary metabolites and improving genetic and biochemical stability compared with normal Capsicum plants. Therefore, in this research, different types of explants of both species were infected with various Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains to provide more information about the morphology and induction efficiency of hairy roots. After 2 weeks of in vitro seed germination, young seedling explants were cut into three segments; the cotyledon, hypocotyl, and radical. Then, the explants were co-cultured with four isolated A. rhizogenes strains in Murashige & Skoog culture media (MS) containing decreasing carbenicillin disodium concentrations for one month. In this experiment, thick and short hairy roots were induced at all induction sites of C. annuum while thin, elongated hairy roots appeared mostly at wound sites of C. frutescens. Overall, the hairy root induction percentages of C. frutescens were higher compared with C. annuum. Hairy root initiation was observed earliest using radicles (1st week), followed by cotyledons (2nd week), and hypocotyls (3rd week). Cotyledon explants of both species had the highest induction frequency with all strains compared with the other explants types. Strains ATCC 13333 and ATCC 15834 were the most favourable for C. frutescens while ATCC 43056 and ATCC 43057 were the most favourable for C. annuum. The interactions between the different explants and strains showed significant differences with p-values Capsicum species. Both Capsicum species were amenable to A. rhizogenes infection and hairy root induction is recommended for use as an alternative explants in future plant-based studies.

  6. A Novel 3D Skin Explant Model to Study Anaerobic Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazieli Maboni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin infection studies are often limited by financial and ethical constraints, and alternatives, such as monolayer cell culture, do not reflect many cellular processes limiting their application. For a more functional replacement, 3D skin culture models offer many advantages such as the maintenance of the tissue structure and the cell types present in the host environment. A 3D skin culture model can be set up using tissues acquired from surgical procedures or post slaughter, making it a cost effective and attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The majority of 3D culture models have been established for aerobic pathogens, but currently there are no models for anaerobic skin infections. Footrot is an anaerobic bacterial infection which affects the ovine interdigital skin causing a substantial animal welfare and financial impact worldwide. Dichelobacter nodosus is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium and the causative agent of footrot. The mechanism of infection and host immune response to D. nodosus is poorly understood. Here we present a novel 3D skin ex vivo model to study anaerobic bacterial infections using ovine skin explants infected with D. nodosus. Our results demonstrate that D. nodosus can invade the skin explant, and that altered expression of key inflammatory markers could be quantified in the culture media. The viability of explants was assessed by tissue integrity (histopathological features and cell death (DNA fragmentation over 76 h showing the model was stable for 28 h. D. nodosus was quantified in all infected skin explants by qPCR and the bacterium was visualized invading the epidermis by Fluorescent in situ Hybridization. Measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the culture media revealed that the explants released IL1β in response to bacteria. In contrast, levels of CXCL8 production were no different to mock-infected explants. The 3D skin model realistically simulates the interdigital skin and has

  7. Indian hedgehog contributes to human cartilage endplate degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Yang, Kun; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Du, Guoqing; Fan, Shunwu; Wei, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To determine the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in human cartilage endplate (CEP) degeneration. CEP-degenerated tissues from patients with Modic I or II changes (n = 9 and 45, respectively) and normal tissues from vertebral burst fracture patients (n = 17) were collected. Specimens were either cut into slices for organ culture ex vivo or digested to isolate chondrocytes for cell culture in vitro. Ihh expression and the effect of Ihh on cartilage degeneration were determined by investigating degeneration markers in this study. Ihh expression and cartilage degeneration markers significantly increased in the Modic I and II groups. The expression of cartilage degeneration markers was positively correlated with degeneration severity. Gain-of-function for Ihh promoted expression of cartilage degeneration markers in vitro, while loss-of-function for Ihh inhibited their expression both in vitro and ex vivo. These findings demonstrated that Ihh promotes CEP degeneration. Blocking Ihh pathway has potential clinical usage for attenuating CEP degeneration.

  8. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Ichimaru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA, but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α. These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses.

  9. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-06-25

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses.

  10. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Both matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity and cathepsin K (CK) activity have been implicated in cartilage turnover. We investigated the relative contribution of MMP activity and CK activity in cartilage degradation using ex vivo and in vivo models. METHODS: Bovine articular cartilage...... explants were stimulated with oncostatin M (OSM) 10 ng/ml and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) 20 ng/ml in the presence or absence of the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 and the cysteine protease inhibitor, E64. Cartilage degradation was evaluated in the conditioned medium by glycosaminoglycans...... was measured from CK-deficient mice. RESULTS: OSM and TNF-alpha combined induced significant (Pcartilage degradation products measured by hydroxyproline and CTX-II compared to vehicle control. The cytokines potently induced MMP expression, assessed by zymography, and CK expression...

  11. Plant regeneration from cotyledonary explants of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Regeneração de plantas de Eucalyptus camaldulensis a partir das explantes cotiledonares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberson Dibax

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Breeding methods based on genetic transformation techniques need to be implemented for Eucalyptus camaldulensis to shorten the long breeding cycles and avoid manipulation of adult trees; that requires the development of plant regeneration protocols enabling development of plants from transformed tissues. The present work aimed to optimise the regeneration process already established for the species. Cotyledonary leaves of E. camaldulensis were cultured in MS medium supplemented with naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP combinations. The most efficient treatment for bud indirect regeneration (2.7 µmol L-1 NAA and 4.44 µmol L-1 BAP was used for further experiments. When explants were kept in the dark during the first 30 days, the percentage of explants forming calluses increased and explant necrosis was reduced in comparison with light-cultured explants. Mineral medium modifications were compared and half-strength MS mineral medium turned out to be as efficient as full-strength medium, producing 54% and 47% of explants with buds, respectively. For shoot elongation, MS medium with half-strength nitrate and ammonium salts, and 0.2% activated charcoal yielded rooted shoots 1 to 8 cm high after one month. The procedure is an efficient protocol for E. camadulensis plant regeneration, reducing the stages necessary for the obtention of complete plants.A implementação, para espécies florestais, de técnicas de melhoramento baseadas em métodos de transformação genética, permitirá reduzir os longos ciclos de melhoramento e evitar a manipulação de árvores adultas. Isto implica dispor de um protocolo de regeneração que permita o desenvolvimento de plantas a partir de tecidos transformados. Este trabalho teve como objetivo otimizar este protocolo de regeneração para Eucalyptus camaldulensis. Folhas cotiledonares foram cultivadas em meio de cultura MS suplementado com combinações de ácido naftalenoacético (ANA e 6

  12. Enhanced hyaline cartilage matrix synthesis in collagen sponge scaffolds by using siRNA to stabilize chondrocytes phenotype cultured with bone morphogenetic protein-2 under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Florence; Ollitrault, David; Hervieu, Magalie; Baugé, Catherine; Maneix, Laure; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe; Demoor, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage healing by tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to reconstitute functional tissue after trauma or age-related degeneration. However, chondrocytes, the major player in cartilage homeostasis, do not self-regenerate efficiently and lose their phenotype during osteoarthritis. This process is called dedifferentiation and also occurs during the first expansion step of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). To ensure successful ACI therapy, chondrocytes must be differentiated and capable of synthesizing hyaline cartilage matrix molecules. We therefore developed a safe procedure for redifferentiating human chondrocytes by combining appropriate physicochemical factors: hypoxic conditions, collagen scaffolds, chondrogenic factors (bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2], and insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I]) and RNA interference targeting the COL1A1 gene. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes was evaluated using gene/protein analyses to identify the chondrocyte phenotypic profile. In our conditions, under BMP-2 treatment, redifferentiated and metabolically active chondrocytes synthesized a hyaline-like cartilage matrix characterized by type IIB collagen and aggrecan molecules without any sign of hypertrophy or osteogenesis. In contrast, IGF-I increased both specific and noncharacteristic markers (collagens I and X) of chondrocytes. The specific increase in COL2A1 gene expression observed in the BMP-2 treatment was shown to involve the specific enhancer region of COL2A1 that binds the trans-activators Sox9/L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sp1, which are associated with a decrease in the trans-inhibitors of COL2A1, c-Krox, and p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Our procedure in which BMP-2 treatment under hypoxia is associated with a COL1A1 siRNA, significantly increased the differentiation index of chondrocytes, and should offer the opportunity to develop new ACI-based therapies in humans.

  13. A High Throughput Model of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis using Engineered Cartilage Tissue Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Meloni, Gregory R.; Mauck, Robert L.; Dodge, George R.

    2014-01-01

    (1) Objective A number of in vitro models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) have been developed to study the effect of mechanical overload on the processes that regulate cartilage degeneration. While such frameworks are critical for the identification therapeutic targets, existing technologies are limited in their throughput capacity. Here, we validate a test platform for high-throughput mechanical injury incorporating engineered cartilage. (2) Method We utilized a high throughput mechanical testing platform to apply injurious compression to engineered cartilage and determined their strain and strain rate dependent responses to injury. Next, we validated this response by applying the same injury conditions to cartilage explants. Finally, we conducted a pilot screen of putative PTOA therapeutic compounds. (3) Results Engineered cartilage response to injury was strain dependent, with a 2-fold increase in GAG loss at 75% compared to 50% strain. Extensive cell death was observed adjacent to fissures, with membrane rupture corroborated by marked increases in LDH release. Testing of established PTOA therapeutics showed that pan-caspase inhibitor (ZVF) was effective at reducing cell death, while the amphiphilic polymer (P188) and the free-radical scavenger (NAC) reduced GAG loss as compared to injury alone. (4) Conclusions The injury response in this engineered cartilage model replicated key features of the response from cartilage explants, validating this system for application of physiologically relevant injurious compression. This study establishes a novel tool for the discovery of mechanisms governing cartilage injury, as well as a screening platform for the identification of new molecules for the treatment of PTOA. PMID:24999113

  14. Somatic Embryogenesis in Peach-Palm (Bactris gasipaes) Using Different Explant Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmacher, Douglas A; Heringer, Angelo Schuabb; Jiménez, Víctor M; Quoirin, Marguerite G G; Guerra, Miguel P

    2016-01-01

    Peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) is a member of the family Arecaceae and is a multipurpose but underutilized species. Nowadays, fruit production for subsistence and local markets, and heart-of-palm production for local, national, and international markets are the most important uses of this plant. Conventional breeding programs in peach palm are long-term efforts due to the prolonged generation time, large plant size, difficulties with controlled pollination and other factors. Although it is a caespitose palm, its propagation is currently based on seeds, as off-shoots are difficult to root. Hence, tissue culture techniques are considered to be the most likely strategy for efficient clonal plantlet regeneration of this species. Among various techniques, somatic embryogenesis offers the advantages of potential automated large-scale production and putative genetic stability of the regenerated plantlets. The induction of somatic embryogenesis in peach palm can be achieved by using different explant sources including zygotic embryos, immature inflorescences and thin cell layers from the young leaves and shoot meristems. The choice of a particular explant depends on whether clonal propagation is desired or not, as well as on the plant conditions and availability of explants. Protocols to induce and express somatic embryogenesis from different peach palm explants, up to acclimatization of plantlets, are described in this chapter.

  15. Studies on Callus Induction and Regeneration of Medicinal Plant Chicory (Cichorium intybus L. from Leaf and Petiole Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hadizadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chicory (Cichorium intybus L. belongs to Asteraceae family is commonly known as witloof chicory. The leaves and the roots of this medicinal plant are edible and commonly used as salad. Some varieties are also cultivated as coffee substitute after roasting the roots. All parts of the plant contain these volatile oils, with the majority of the toxic components concentrated in the plant's root. In folk medicine, the plant is used for the treatment of diarrhea, spleen enlargement, fever, and vomiting. Antihepatotoxic activity on damaged rat’s liver sections and anti-bacterial activity of this crop has been recently reported. In vitro regeneration from leaf explants with various hormonal combinations has been reported previously. Moreover, in vitro regeneration of Chicory from cotyledon explants using different combinations of plant growth regulators has been studied. Also, a protocol for the regeneration of plantlets from leaf and petiole explants of witloof chicory has been developed. The aim of the present investigation was optimization of callus induction and shoot regeneration from leaf and petiole tissues of Chicory (Esfahan genotype. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, Esfahan genotype was used for callus induction and direct shoot regeneration. Seeds were first washed with running tap water for 30 min then seeds were surface sterilized by dipping in 70% ethanol for 90 s and rinsed with sterile distilled water, followed by immersing in 5% sodium hypochlorite solution for 25 min and thereafter rinsed for 30 min with sterile distilled water. The basal medium used in this investigation was MS. For shoot regeneration, leaf and petiole explants (5 mm segments were excised from 4-week-old sterile seedlings and cultured on MS medium containing different combinations of NAA / BA and KIN / BA in two separate experiments. Experiments were performed factorial based on completely randomized design. Cultures were incubated at 25

  16. Effects of growth factors and glucosamine on porcine mandibular condylar cartilage cells and hyaline cartilage cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Detamore, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage is a distinct cartilage that has both fibrocartilaginous and hyaline-like character, with a thin proliferative zone that separates the fibrocartilaginous fibrous zone at the surface from the hyaline-like mature and hypertrophic zones below. In this study, we compared the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), and glucosamine sulphate on porcine TMJ condylar cartilage and ankle cartilage cells in monolayer culture. In general, TMJ condylar cartilage cells proliferated faster than ankle cartilage cells, while ankle cells produced significantly greater amounts of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen than TMJ condylar cartilage cells. IGF-I and bFGF were potent stimulators of TMJ cell proliferation, while no signals statistically outperformed controls for ankle cell proliferation. IGF-I was the most effective signal for GAG production with ankle cells, and the most potent upregulator of collagen synthesis for both cell types. Glucosamine sulphate promoted cell proliferation and biosynthesis at specific concentrations and outperformed growth factors in certain instances. In conclusion, hyaline cartilage cells had lower cell numbers and superior biosynthesis compared to TMJ condylar cartilage cells, and we have found IGF-I at 100 ng/mL and glucosamine sulphate at 100 microg/mL to be the most effective signals for these cells under the prescribed conditions.

  17. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Christoph; Meixner, Miriam; Giesemann, Petra; Roël, Giulietta; Bulwin, Grit-Carsta; Smink, Jeske J

    2016-11-15

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don's chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids) that is in clinical use in Germany. Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids before implantation and a higher regeneration potential

  18. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bartz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don’s chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids that is in clinical use in Germany. Methods Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. Results After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids

  19. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  20. Exogenous transforming growth factor-β1 enhances smooth muscle differentiation in embryonic mouse jejunal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Riccardo; Roberts, Neil A; Randles, Michael J; Morabito, Antonino; Woolf, Adrian S

    2017-01-13

    An ex vivo experimental strategy that replicates in vivo intestinal development would in theory provide an accessible setting with which to study normal and dysmorphic gut biology. The current authors recently described a system in which mouse embryonic jejunal segments were explanted onto semipermeable platforms and fed with chemically defined serum-free media. Over 3 days in organ culture, explants formed villi and they began to undergo spontaneous peristalsis. As defined in the current study, the wall of the explanted gut failed to form a robust longitudinal smooth muscle (SM) layer as it would do in vivo over the same time period. Given the role of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) in SM differentiation in other organs, it was hypothesized that exogenous TGFβ1 would enhance SM differentiation in these explants. In vivo, TGFβ receptors I and II were both detected in embryonic longitudinal jejunal SM cells and, in organ culture, exogenous TGFβ1 induced robust differentiation of longitudinal SM. Microarray profiling showed that TGFβ1 increased SM specific transcripts in a dose dependent manner. TGFβ1 proteins were detected in amniotic fluid at a time when the intestine was physiologically herniated. By analogy with the requirement for exogenous TGFβ1 for SM differentiation in organ culture, the TGFβ1 protein that was demonstrated to be present in the amniotic fluid may enhance intestinal development when it is physiologically herniated in early gestation. Future studies of embryonic intestinal cultures should include TGFβ1 in the defined media to produce a more faithful model of in vivo muscle differentiation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Mast cell-restricted, tetramer-forming tryptases induce aggrecanolysis in articular cartilage by activating matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -13 zymogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarinos, Natalia J; Bryant, Katherine J; Fosang, Amanda J; Adachi, Roberto; Stevens, Richard L; McNeil, H Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-6-null C57BL/6 mice lost less aggrecan proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix of their articular cartilage during inflammatory arthritis than wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that this mast cell (MC)-specific mouse tryptase plays prominent roles in articular cartilage catabolism. We used ex vivo mouse femoral head explants to determine how mMCP-6 and its human ortholog hTryptase-β mediate aggrecanolysis. Exposure of the explants to recombinant hTryptase-β, recombinant mMCP-6, or lysates harvested from WT mouse peritoneal MCs (PMCs) significantly increased the levels of enzymatically active matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in cartilage and significantly induced aggrecan loss into the conditioned media, relative to replicate explants exposed to medium alone or lysates collected from mMCP-6-null PMCs. Treatment of cartilage explants with tetramer-forming tryptases generated aggrecan fragments that contained C-terminal DIPEN and N-terminal FFGVG neoepitopes, consistent with MMP-dependent aggrecanolysis. In support of these data, hTryptase-β was unable to induce aggrecan release from the femoral head explants obtained from Chloe mice that resist MMP cleavage at the DIPEN↓FFGVG site in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. In addition, the abilities of mMCP-6-containing lysates from WT PMCs to induce aggrecanolysis were prevented by inhibitors of MMP-3 and MMP-13. Finally, recombinant hTryptase-β was able to activate latent pro-MMP-3 and pro-MMP-13 in vitro. The accumulated data suggest that human and mouse tetramer-forming tryptases are MMP convertases that mediate cartilage damage and the proteolytic loss of aggrecan proteoglycans in arthritis, in part, by activating the zymogen forms of MMP-3 and MMP-13, which are constitutively present in articular cartilage.

  2. The distribution of YKL-40 in osteoarthritic and normal human articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Ostergaard, K; Johansen, J S

    1999-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39, is a major secretory protein of human chondrocytes in cell culture. YKL-40 mRNA is expressed by cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but is not detectable in normal human cartilage. The aim was to investigate the distribution of YKL...... in chondrocytes of osteoarthritic cartilage mainly in the superficial and middle zone of the cartilage rather than the deep zone. There was a tendency for high number of YKL-40 positive chondrocytes in areas of the femoral head with a considerable biomechanical load. The number of chondrocytes with a positive...

  3. Direct organogenesis of seaside heliotrope (Heliotropium crassavicum) using stem explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyavani, K; Dheepak, V; Gurudeeban, S; Ramanathan, T

    2013-10-15

    Heliotropium crassavicum L. is a sand binder salt marsh herb with enormous traditional value and widely found in South Asia America and Europe. In the direct method of regeneration from stem explants, we observed the maximum number of shoot regeneration after four weeks culture of MS elongation medium with 2.0 mg L(-1) of 2, 4-D (17.27 +/- 0.51). It was clear that MS medium with 2.0 mg mL(-1) 2, 4-D alone suitable for shoot multiplication as well as shoot elongation then compared to other combination of auxin and cytokinin. In vitro shoots were excised from shoot clumps and transferred to rooting medium containing 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (0.5-3.0 mg L(-1)). The maximum number of root regeneration (6.4 +/- 0.416) and root length (6.08 +/- 0.07) were observed in MS rooting medium fortified with 2.5 mg L(-1) of 2, 4-D after 2 weeks of culture. 85% of in vitro raised plantlets with well-developed shoots and roots were transferred to ex vivo conditions into polythene bag containing sterile compost with ratio (v/v/v) of organic fertilizer: sand: peat (1:2:2; 3:1:0 or 2:2:1). Sixty five percent of acclimated plants were transferred to the pots under full sun where they grew well without any detectable phenotypic variations.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstraete, K.L.; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K.L. E-mail: koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G

    2004-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures.

  6. Participation of intracellular cysteine proteinases, in particular cathepsin B, in degradation of collagen in periosteal tissue explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, L. B.; Hoeben, K. A.; Jansen, D. C.; Buttle, D. J.; Beertsen, W.; Everts, V.

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of cysteine proteinases in the degradation of soft connective tissue collagen was studied in cultured periosteal explants. Using cysteine proteinase inhibitors that were active intracellularly or extracellularly (Ep453 and Ep475, respectively), it was shown that over-all collagen

  7. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  8. Tissue engineering in the treatment of cartilage lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Naranđa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage lesions with the inherent limited healing potential are difficult to treat and thus remain a challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. Regenerative treatment techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI, are promising as a treatment option to restore hyaline-like cartilage tissue in damaged articular surfaces, as opposed to the traditional reparative procedures (e.g. bone marrow stimulation – microfracture, which promote a fibrocartilage formation with lower tissue biomechanical properties and poorer clinical results. ACI technique has undergone several advances and is constantly improving. The new concept of cartilage tissue preservation uses tissue-engineering technologies, combining new biomaterials as a scaffold, application of growth factors, use of stem cells, and mechanical stimulation. The recent development of new generations of ACI uses a cartilage-like tissue in a 3-dimensional culture system that is based on the use of biodegradable material which serves as a temporary scaffold for the in vitro growth and subsequent implantation into the cartilage defect. For clinical practice, single stage procedures appear attractive to reduce cost and patient morbidity. Finally, modern concept of tissue engineering facilitates hyaline-like cartilage formation and a permanent treatment of cartilage lesions.Conclusion: The review focuses on innovations in the treatment of cartilage lesions and covers modern concepts of tissue engineering with the use of biomaterials, growth factors, stem cells and bioreactors, and presents options for clinical use.

  9. Plant regeneration via direct somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of Tolumnia Louise Elmore 'Elsa'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Ju; Chen, Jen-Tsung; Chung, Hsiao-Hang; Chang, Wei-Chin

    2018-01-22

    Tolumnia genus (equitant Oncidium) is a group of small orchids with vivid flower color. Thousands of hybrids have been registered on Royal Horticulture Society and showed great potential for ornamental plant market. The aim of this study is to establish an efficient method for in vitro propagation. Leaf explants taken from in vitro-grown plants were used to induce direct somatic embryogenesis on a modified 1/2 MS medium supplemented with five kinds of cytokinins, 2iP, BA, kinetin, TDZ and zeatin at 0.3, 1 and 3 mg l -1 in darkness. TDZ at 3 mg l -1 gave the highest percentage of explants with somatic globular embryos after 90 days of culture. It was found that 2,4-D and light regime highly retarded direct somatic embryogenesis and showed 95-100% of explant browning. Histological observations revealed that the leaf cells divided into meristematic cells firstly, followed by somatic proembryos, and then somatic globular embryos. Eventually, somatic embryos developed a bipolar structure with the shoot apical meristem and the root meristem. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed that the direct somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants was asynchronously. The somatic embryos were found on the leaf tip, the adaxial surface and also the mesophyll through a cleft, and it reflected the heterogeneity of the explant. The 90-day-old globular embryos were detached from the parent explants and transferred onto a hormone-free 1/2 MS medium in light condition for about 1 month to obtain 1-cm-height plantlets. After another 3 months for growth, the plantlets were potted with Sphagnum moss and were acclimatized in a shaded greenhouse. After 1 month of culture, the survival rate was 100%. In this report, a protocol for efficient regenerating a Tolumnia orchid, Louise Elmore 'Elsa', was established via direct somatic embryogenesis and might reveal an alternative approach for mass propagation of Tolumnia genus in orchid industry.

  10. Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil reduces oxidative stress in human skin explants caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedir, S; Moalla, D; Jardak, N; Mzid, M; Sahnoun, Z; Rebai, T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil (PLFO) for protecting human skin from damage due to oxidative stress. PLFO contains natural antioxidants including polyphenols, sterols and tocopherols. We compared the antioxidant potential of PLFO with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Explants of healthy adult human skin were grown in culture with either PLFO or EVOO before adding hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). We also used cultured skin explants to investigate the effects of PLFO on lipid oxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) one day after 2 h exposure to H 2 O 2 . We found that PLFO scavenged radicals and protected skin against oxidative injury. PLFO exhibited greater antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity than EVOO. Skin explants treated with PLFO inhibited H 2 O 2 induced MDA formation by inhibition of lipid oxidation. In addition, the oil inhibited H 2 O 2 induced depletion of antioxidant defense enzymes including GPx, SOD and CAT. We found that treatment with PLFO repaired skin damage owing to its antioxidant properties.

  11. [Explantation method of isolating a persistent tick-borne encephalitis virus from the organs of infected monkeys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, L S; Pogodina, V V

    1981-01-01

    The method of explantation was used to examine 63 organs from M. rhesus monkeys 92-783 days after intracerebral and subcutaneous inoculation with the Vasilchenko, Aina/1448 and 41/65 strains of tick-borne encephalitis virus. The optimal time for examination of the explants by tests of the hemagglutinating, cytopathogenic activity of the virus and its pathogenicity for mice was found to be the 15th day of cultivation. A comparative study of the properties of 3 isolates obtained from explants of the spleen, liver and subcortical cerebral ganglia 202 and 307 days after inoculation of monkeys was carried out. The isolates differed from the parental TBE virus strains by their capacity to form small plaques in PEKV cell cultures (pig embryo kidney cells in versen medium).

  12. Acetylcholine causes rooting in leaf explants of in vitro raised tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Shrish Chandra; Gupta, Rajendra

    2007-05-30

    The animal neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) induces rooting and promotes secondary root formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby), cultured in vitro on Murashige and Skoog's medium. The roots originate from the midrib of leaf explants and resemble taproot. ACh at 10(-5) M was found to be the optimum over a wide range of effective concentrations between 10(-7) and 10(-3) M. The breakdown products, choline and acetate were ineffective even at 10(-3) M concentration. ACh appears to have a natural role in tomato rhizogenesis because exogenous application of neostigmine, an inhibitor of ACh hydrolysis, could mimic the effect of ACh. Neostigmine, if applied in combination with ACh, potentiated the ACh effect.

  13. Making post-mortem implantable cardioverter defibrillator explantation safe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räder, Sune B E W; Zeijlemaker, Volkert; Pehrson, Steen

    2009-01-01

    that the resting voltage over the operating person would not exceed 50 V. CONCLUSION: The use of intact medical gloves made of latex, neoprene, or plastic eliminates the potential electrical risk during explantation of an ICD. Two gloves on each hand offer sufficient protection. We will recommend the use......AIMS: The aim of this study is to investigate whether protection with rubber or plastic gloves during post-mortem explantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) offers enough protection for the explanting operator during a worst-case scenario (i.e. ICD shock). METHODS AND RESULTS...

  14. The distribution of YKL-40 in osteoarthritic and normal human articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Ostergaard, K; Johansen, J S

    1999-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39, is a major secretory protein of human chondrocytes in cell culture. YKL-40 mRNA is expressed by cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but is not detectable in normal human cartilage. The aim was to investigate the distribution of YKL......-40 in osteoarthritic (n=9) and macroscopically normal (n=5) human articular cartilage, collected from 12 pre-selected areas of the femoral head, to discover a potential role for YKL-40 in cartilage remodelling in osteoarthritis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that YKL-40 staining was found...... in chondrocytes of osteoarthritic cartilage mainly in the superficial and middle zone of the cartilage rather than the deep zone. There was a tendency for high number of YKL-40 positive chondrocytes in areas of the femoral head with a considerable biomechanical load. The number of chondrocytes with a positive...

  15. Refining the application of direct embryogenesis in sugarcane: Effect of the developmental phase of leaf disc explants and the timing of DNA transfer on transformation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, S J; Meyer, G M; Richards, J M; Haricharan, N; Ramgareeb, S; Huckett, B I

    2006-10-01

    A rapid in vitro protocol using direct somatic embryogenesis and microprojectile bombardment was investigated to establish the developmental phases most suitable for efficient sugarcane transformation. Immature leaf roll disc explants with and without pre-emergent inflorescence tissue were compared. It was shown that for effective transformation to occur, explants should be cultured for several days to allow initiation of embryo development prior to bombardment. Leaf roll discs with pre-emergent inflorescences showed a higher degree of embryogenic competence than non-flowering explants, and transformation efficiency was higher when explants containing floral initials were bombarded. Despite the occurrence of high numbers of phenotypically negative plants, combining the use of inflorescent leaf roll discs with direct embryogenic regeneration has the potential to improve the speed and efficiency of transgenesis in sugarcane.

  16. In Vitro Analysis of Cartilage Regeneration Using a Collagen Type I Hydrogel (CaReS) in the Bovine Cartilage Punch Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbert, Victoria; Xin, Long; Foehr, Peter; Brinkmann, Olaf; Bungartz, Matthias; Burgkart, Rainer H; Graeve, T; Kinne, Raimund W

    2018-02-01

    Objective Limitations of matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation to regenerate functional hyaline cartilage demand a better understanding of the underlying cellular/molecular processes. Thus, the regenerative capacity of a clinically approved hydrogel collagen type I implant was tested in a standardized bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Cartilage rings (outer diameter 6 mm; inner defect diameter 2 mm) were prepared from the bovine trochlear groove. Collagen implants (± bovine chondrocytes) were placed inside the cartilage rings and cultured up to 12 weeks. Cartilage-implant constructs were analyzed by histology (hematoxylin/eosin; safranin O), immunohistology (aggrecan, collagens 1 and 2), and for protein content, RNA expression, and implant push-out force. Results Cartilage-implant constructs revealed vital morphology, preserved matrix integrity throughout culture, progressive, but slight proteoglycan loss from the "host" cartilage or its surface and decreasing proteoglycan release into the culture supernatant. In contrast, collagen 2 and 1 content of cartilage and cartilage-implant interface was approximately constant over time. Cell-free and cell-loaded implants showed (1) cell migration onto/into the implant, (2) progressive deposition of aggrecan and constant levels of collagens 1 and 2, (3) progressively increased mRNA levels for aggrecan and collagen 2, and (4) significantly augmented push-out forces over time. Cell-loaded implants displayed a significantly earlier and more long-lasting deposition of aggrecan, as well as tendentially higher push-out forces. Conclusion Preserved tissue integrity and progressively increasing cartilage differentiation and push-out forces for up to 12 weeks of cultivation suggest initial cartilage regeneration and lateral bonding of the implant in this in vitro model for cartilage replacement materials.

  17. Tribological changes in the articular cartilage of a human femoral head with avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun-Min; Shrestha, Suman K; Duong, Cong-Truyen; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Kim, Tae-Woo; Vijayachandra, Ayyappan; Thompson, Mark S; Cho, Myung Guk; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Kwanghoon; Park, Seonghun; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2015-06-29

    The present study evaluated the tribological properties of the articular cartilage surface of the human femoral head with postcollapse stage avascular necrosis (AVN) using atomic force microscopy. The cartilage surface in the postcollapse stage AVN of the femoral head was reported to resemble those of disuse conditions, which suggests that the damage could be reversible and offers the possibilities of success of head-sparing surgeries. By comparing the tribological properties of articular cartilage in AVN with that of osteoarthritis, the authors intended to understand the cartilage degeneration mechanism and reversibility of AVN. Human femoral heads with AVN were explanted from the hip replacement surgery of four patients (60-83 years old). Nine cylindrical cartilage samples (diameter, 5 mm and height, 0.5 mm) were sectioned from the weight-bearing areas of the femoral head with AVN, and the cartilage surface was classified according to the Outerbridge Classification System (AVN0, normal; AVN1, softening and swelling; and AVN2, partial thickness defect and fissuring). Tribological properties including surface roughness and frictional coefficients and histochemistry including Safranin O and lubricin staining were compared among the three groups. The mean surface roughness Rq values of AVN cartilage increased significantly with increasing Outerbridge stages: Rq = 137 ± 26 nm in AVN0, Rq = 274 ± 49 nm in AVN1, and Rq = 452 ± 77 nm in AVN2. Significant differences in Rq were observed among different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p AVN0, μ = 0.143 ± 0.025 in AVN1, and μ = 0.171 ± 0.039 in AVN2. Similarly to the statistical analysis of surface roughness, significant statistical differences were detected between different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p AVN. The underlying mechanism of these results can be related to proteoglycan loss within the articular cartilage that is also observed in osteoarthritis. With regard to the tribological properties, the

  18. A survey of the effect of explants type, plant growth regulators and activated charcoal on callus induction in Papaver bracteatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Callus culture is necessary for production of suspension cell culture in plant breeding programs. Regarding to the application of Papaver bracteatum as an important medicinal plant in production of benzophenantridine alkaloids, this study was performed to find the most suitable hormone combination and explant type for achieving to high percentage of callus induction fresh weight and somatic embryogenesis in this plant. For this purpose, hypocotyl explants were cultured in ½MS media containing active charcoal (2 and 4 mgL-1 in combination of different concentrations of NAA, 2,4-D (0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 mgL-1 and BA (0, 0.1 and 0.5 mgL-1. The seed explants were cultured in same treatments without active charcoal. Also, somatic embryogesis induction using seed explants in ½MS media containing different concentrations of NAA and 2,4-D (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 mgL-1 with BA 0.5 mgL-1 were investigated. The results showed that the highest percentage of callus induction (43.6%, 54% in hypocotyls explants were obtained in the ½MS media containing 2 mgL-1 active charcoal and 2 mgL-1 2,4-D and 5 mgL-1 NAA in companion with BA 0.5 mgL-1 respectively. The maximum callus induction (84% was obtained in ½MS medium with 1 mgL-1 2,4-D without active charcoal. The highest callus fresh weight (0.35% was obtained in MS media with 0.5 mgL-1 2,4-D andthe maximum rate of somatic embryogenesis induction (77% was observed in ½MS media containing 1 mgL-1 2,4-D with 0.5 mgL-1 BA.

  19. Dedifferentiation of leaf explants and antileukemia activity of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... known as drumstick tree or horseradish tree (Little and. Wadsworth, 1964; Morton ... Leaves explants (Figure 1a) obtained from 21 day-old seedlings were sterilized by sodium ... Sweden), according to Harbeck et al. (1982).

  20. Simple, effective and economical explant-surface sterilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... recommend this technique due to its simplicity and economy. Key words: Explant ... mercuric chloride, hydrogen peroxide, silver nitrate and bromine water (Rai ... actually within the structure that is being surface steri- lized.

  1. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  2. Degenerated human articular cartilage at autopsy represents preclinical osteoarthritic cartilage: comparison with clinically defined osteoarthritic cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valburg, A. A.; Wenting, M. J.; Beekman, B.; te Koppele, J. M.; Lafeber, F. P.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate whether macroscopically fibrillated human articular knee cartilage observed at autopsy can be considered an early, preclinical phase of osteoarthritis (OA). Histological and biochemical characteristics of 3 types of articular knee cartilage were compared: macroscopically degenerated

  3. Principles of cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Erggelet, Christoph; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2008-01-01

    Cartilage defects affect patients of all age groups. Surgeons, teamdoctors, general practitioners and physiotherapists alike are expected to provide adequate care. Only individual treatment plans combining a well balanced choice of various options will be successful. Background knowledge, operative and non-operative therapies are described in concise chapters: Articular cartilage biology - Diagnostics - Surgical techniques - Symptomatic and alternative medications - Physiotherapy. Diagnostic findings and surgical procedures are generously illustrated by aquarelles and colour photographs. Recommendations for additional reading, description of important clinical scoring systems and a listing of analytic tools are added for further information.

  4. Tissue-engineered cartilage: the crossroads of biomaterials, cells and stimulating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Nandana; Devi, Dipali; Mandal, Biman B

    2015-02-01

    Damage to cartilage represents one of the most challenging tasks of musculoskeletal therapeutics due to its limited propensity for healing and regenerative capabilities. Lack of current treatments to restore cartilage tissue function has prompted research in this rapidly emerging field of tissue regeneration of functional cartilage tissue substitutes. The development of cartilaginous tissue largely depends on the combination of appropriate biomaterials, cell source, and stimulating factors. Over the years, various biomaterials have been utilized for cartilage repair, but outcomes are far from achieving native cartilage architecture and function. This highlights the need for exploration of suitable biomaterials and stimulating factors for cartilage regeneration. With these perspectives, we aim to present an overview of cartilage tissue engineering with recent progress, development, and major steps taken toward the generation of functional cartilage tissue. In this review, we have discussed the advances and problems in tissue engineering of cartilage with strong emphasis on the utilization of natural polymeric biomaterials, various cell sources, and stimulating factors such as biophysical stimuli, mechanical stimuli, dynamic culture, and growth factors used so far in cartilage regeneration. Finally, we have focused on clinical trials, recent innovations, and future prospects related to cartilage engineering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The junction between hyaline cartilage and engineered cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Otani, Yushi; Kanamori, Yutaka; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Tsuyoshi, Takato; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Tracheoplasty using costal cartilage grafts to enlarge the tracheal lumen was performed to treat congenital tracheal stenosis. Fibrotic granulomatous tissue was observed at the edge of grafted costal cartilage. We investigated the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the engineered cartilage plates that were generated by auricular chondrocytes for fabricating the airway. Controlled, prospecive study. In group 1, costal cartilage from New Zealand white rabbits was collected and implanted into a space created in the cervical trachea. In group 2, chondrocytes from auricular cartilages were seeded on absorbable scaffolds. These constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous space. Engineered cartilage plates were then implanted into the trachea after 3 weeks of implantation of the constructs. The grafts in group 1 and 2 were retrieved after 4 weeks. In group 1, histological studies of the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the implanted costal cartilage demonstrated chondrogenic tissue in four anastomoses sides out of the 10 examined. In group 2, the junction between the native trachea and the engineered cartilage showed neocartilage tissue in nine anastomoses sides out of 10. Engineered cartilage may be beneficial for engineered airways, based on the findings of the junction between the native and engineered grafts. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlovits, Stefan; Zeller, Philip; Singer, Philipp; Resinger, Christoph; Vecsei, Vilmos

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation

  7. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  8. „IN VITRO” EFFECT OF SOME INDUSTRIAL BY-PRODUCTS ON LAVANDULA ANGUSTIFOLIA MILL. EXPLANT GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Tanase

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available After many studies, it was observed that lavender has many therapeutic effects, such as sedation, activities spasmolytic, antiviral, antibacterial. Thus, given the importance of lavender in different areas of human life, in the present study, we studied the influence of natural products bioregulatoars separated from industrial by-products on some lavender stems explants. These explants were inoculated in vitro on MS nutrient media. In these culture media were added polyphenolic extracts obtained from spruce bark and hemp shives, and evaluated their influence on lavender stems explants. The results obtained were compared with those obtained for the control variant, where MS culture medium was used as standard. It was found that the addition of aqueous extract from spruce bark of concentration of 130 mg GAE / L, in the growth of explants of Lavandula angustifolia Mill, an increase in the elongation of the main stem, number of leaves formed, the amount of photoassimilating pigments synthesized and causes the phenomenon of shoots formation. At a higher concentration of the extract (26 mgGAE/100g values are lower.

  9. Effect of medium composition and explant size on embryogenic calli formation of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz local genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENNY SUDARMONOWATI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz is an important tropical crop species used for human consumption, feed and raw material for various industries. Genetic transformation through embryogenic tissues is known as an effective method for cassava genetic improvements. Objective of this study was to obtain a suitable medium and length of explants to induce embryogenic callus on friable embryogenic callus (FEC as a target for genetic transformation. Immature leaf lobes (1-3 mm, 3-5 mm and larger than 5 mm in length of local genotypes of cassava (Adira 4. Menti, Iding, Gebang, Rawi and Timtim-29 cultured in vitro were used as explants. The explants were incubated for 2 and 4 weeks on MS (Murashige-Skoog or GD (Greshooff & Doy semi solid medium containing 10 mg/L picloram, 6 mg/L NAA supplemented with 4% sucrose and 4 µM CuSO4. Results showed that the highest percentage (100% of embryogenic calli formation for 4 weeks obtained by culturing Iding of 3-5 mm length on GD semi solid medium, whereas the lowest (33% one obtained by incubation 5 mm leaf lobe of Timtim-29 on the same medium. The most suitable medium for callus induction was GD, whereas the optimum length of explants was 5 mm or larger. Further study needs to be done to obtain friable embryogenic calli (FEC by employing different concentration of picloram and varying other critical factors.

  10. Enamel formation in vitro in mouse molar explants exposed to amelogenin polypeptides ATMP and LRAP on enamel development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Rajeswari M H; Devarajan, Asokan; Bringas, Pablo

    2007-12-01

    The enamel matrix contains amelogenin, leucine-rich amelogenin-polypeptide (LRAP), resulting from alternative splicing of the primary amelogenin-RNA transcript and tyrosine-rich amelogenin-polypeptide (TRAP), a proteolytic product of amelogenin. Presence of amelogenin-trityrosyl-motif peptide (ATMP) distinguishes TRAP from LRAP. The roles of these polypeptides in the formation of enamel remain to be elucidated. The mouse in vitro molar tooth-organ developed from bud stage (E16) was exposed to LRAP, ATMP, and mutated ATMP (T-ATMP, third proline replaced by threonine). The histology and morphometry of the explants on day-12 in culture was examined using Mallory's stain. Guanidine-HCl soluble protein concentrations of explants were compared. The enamel width and protein solubility indicate that the explant on day-12 is comparable to postnatal molar on day-3 in vivo. The enamel of both untreated explants as well as that in vivo is fuchinophilic (acid fuchsin, AF+). ATMP reduced the ameloblast-height, accumulated AF+ spherules at the apical end of ameloblasts, and disrupted enamel-dentin bonding. T-ATMP abrogated deposition of AF+ material on the aniline blue positive (AB+) enamel matrix. LRAP reduced ameloblast-height, increased the enamel-width without disruption (at 17.25 nmol) and increased the density of AF+ dentinal tubules. AF+ substance from the tubules is released onto the surface of the dentin. The Guanidine-HCl-soluble protein is elevated in ATMP-treated explants but decreased in LRAP-treated explants. Exogenous ATMP, T-ATMP and LRAP have divergent effects on developing enamel. Exogenous ATMP, but not LRAP, abrogates enamel-dentin bonding at 17.25 nmol. LRAP may play a role in the differentiation of ameloblasts, growth of enamel and formation of dentinal tubules.

  11. Carboxylesterase-dependent cytotoxicity of dibasic esters (DBE) in rat nasal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trela, B A; Bogdanffy, M S

    1991-02-01

    Dibasic esters (DBE) are a solvent mixture of dimethyl adipate (DMA), dimethyl glutarate (DMG), and dimethyl succinate (DMS) used in the paint and coating industry. Subchronic inhalation toxicity studies have demonstrated that DBE induce a mild degeneration of the olfactory, but not the respiratory, epithelium of the rat nasal cavity. Carboxylesterase-mediated hydrolysis of the individual dibasic esters is more efficient in olfactory than in respiratory mucosal homogenates. In the present study, an in vitro system of cultured rat nasal explants was utilized to determine if DBE toxicity is dependent on a metabolic activation by nonspecific carboxylesterase. Explants from both the olfactory and the respiratory regions of the female rat nasal cavity were incubated for 2 hr in Williams' medium E containing 10-100 mM DMA, DMG, or DMS. DBE caused a dose-related increase in nasal explant acid phosphatase release, a biochemical index of cytotoxicity. HPLC analysis demonstrated parallel increases in the carboxylesterase-mediated formation of monomethyl ester metabolites. Diacid metabolite production in the nasal explant system was not entirely concentration-dependent. Metabolite concentrations and acid phosphatase release were generally greater in olfactory than respiratory tissues. DBE-induced cytotoxicity and acid metabolite production were markedly attenuated in nasal tissue excised from rats which were pretreated with bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate, a carboxylesterase inhibitor. This study presents a viable in vitro method for assessing organic ester cytotoxicity in the rat nasal cavity. It was shown that DBE are weak nasal toxicants under the conditions of this system. It was further demonstrated that DBE toxicity is dependent on a carboxylesterase-mediated activation. A similar mechanism was proposed for the nasal toxicity induced by other organic esters following inhalation exposure.

  12. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  13. When is cartilage repair successful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raudner, M.; Roehrich, S.; Zalaudek, M.; Trattnig, S.; Schreiner, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Focal cartilage lesions are a cause of long-term disability and morbidity. After cartilage repair, it is crucial to evaluate long-term progression or failure in a reproducible, standardized manner. This article provides an overview of the different cartilage repair procedures and important characteristics to look for in cartilage repair imaging. Specifics and pitfalls are pointed out alongside general aspects. After successful cartilage repair, a complete, but not hypertrophic filling of the defect is the primary criterion of treatment success. The repair tissue should also be completely integrated to the surrounding native cartilage. After some months, the transplants signal should be isointense compared to native cartilage. Complications like osteophytes, subchondral defects, cysts, adhesion and chronic bone marrow edema or joint effusion are common and have to be observed via follow-up. Radiological evaluation and interpretation of postoperative changes should always take the repair method into account. (orig.) [de

  14. MR imaging of articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Muhle, C.; Heller, M.; Brossmann, J.

    2001-01-01

    MR imaging has evolved to the best non-invasive method for the evaluation of articular cartilage. MR imaging helps to understand the structure and physiology of cartilage, and to diagnose cartilage lesions. Numerous studies have shown high accuracy and reliability concerning detection of cartilage lesions and early changes in both structure and biochemistry. High contrast-to-noise ratio and high spatial resolution are essential for analysis of articular cartilage. Fat-suppressed 3D-T 1 weighted gradient echo and T 2 -weighted fast spin echo sequences with or without fat suppression are recommended for clinical routine. In this article the anatomy and pathology of hyaline articular cartilage and the complex imaging characteristics of hyaline cartilage will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Tribology approach to the engineering and study of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Markus A; Grad, Sibylle; Kaup, Thomas; Hänni, Markus; Schneider, Erich; Gogolewski, Sylwester; Alini, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    This study has been based on the assumption that articular motion is an important aspect of mechanotransduction in synovial joints. For this reason a new bioreactor concept, able to reproduce joint kinematics more closely, has been designed. The prototype consists of a rotating scaffold and/or cartilage pin, which is pressed onto an orthogonally rotating ball. By oscillating pin and ball in phase difference, elliptical displacement trajectories are generated that are similar to the motion paths occurring in vivo. Simultaneously, dynamic compression may be applied with a linear actuator, while two-step-motors generate the rotation of pin and ball. The whole apparatus is placed in an incubator. The control station is located outside. Preliminary investigations at the gene expression level demonstrated promising results. Compared with free-swelling control and/or simply compression-loaded samples, chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds as well as nasal cartilage explants exposed to interface motion both showed elevated levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA. The final design of the bioreactor will include four individual stations in line, which will facilitate the investigation of motion-initiated effects at the contacting surfaces in more detail.

  16. Lubrication and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-02-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH.

  17. Chondroptosis in Alkaptonuric Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millucci, Lia; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Viti, Cecilia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Gambassi, Silvia; Braconi, Daniela; Marzocchi, Barbara; Paffetti, Alessandro; Lupetti, Pietro; Bernardini, Giulia; Orlandini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease that affects the entire joint. Current standard of treatment is palliative and little is known about AKU physiopathology. Chondroptosis, a peculiar type of cell death in cartilage, has been so far reported to occur in osteoarthritis, a rheumatic disease that shares some features with AKU. In the present work, we wanted to assess if chondroptosis might also occur in AKU. Electron microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes of chondrocytes in damaged cartilage distinguishing apoptosis from its variant termed chondroptosis. We adopted histological observation together with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy to evaluate morphological cell changes in AKU chondrocytes. Lipid peroxidation in AKU cartilage was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Using the above‐mentioned techniques, we performed a morphological analysis and assessed that AKU chondrocytes undergo phenotypic changes and lipid oxidation, resulting in a progressive loss of articular cartilage structure and function, showing typical features of chondroptosis. To the best of our knowledge, AKU is the second chronic pathology, following osteoarthritis, where chondroptosis has been documented. Our results indicate that Golgi complex plays an important role in the apoptotic process of AKU chondrocytes and suggest a contribution of chondroptosis in AKU pathogenesis. These findings also confirm a similarity between osteoarthritis and AKU. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 1148–1157, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25336110

  18. INJURED ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Barlič

    2008-02-01

    Surveys show that the most frequently used surgical methods are mosaicplasty and bonemarrow stimulation with microfracturing. The efficacy of the autologous chondrocyte implantationmethod should be superior to microfracturing on a long run. Especially when(regeneration of the hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue (fibrocartilage is concerned.However, it has not been scientifically proved yet

  19. In vitro plant regeneration from leaf explants of Solanum pimpinellifolium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Valderrama-Alfaro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomato is a species of agricultural importance. Besides, it is a source of vitamins, minerals and antioxidant compounds. Therefore it is essential to obtain varieties resistant to diseases. Solanum pimpinellifolium L. ‘Tomatillo wild’, one of the wild relatives of tomato, is considered multipurpose reservoir of genes. This characteristic must be exploited. In vitro plantlets from leaves of ‘wild tomatillo’ were regenerated with this objective. A system for in vitro germination of seeds obtained from ex vitro sources was created. The use of seed allowed obtaining adequate seedlings in a short time to start regeneration. Thein vitro response of explants was evaluated in four treatments. The Murashige and Skoog (MS basal culture medium supplemented with a-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA and 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP was used in different combinations. The higher percentage (30% of shoot induction was achieved with 0.1 mg l1 NAA / 1 mg l1 BAP. The presence of callus and roots was observed after seven days of culture in the combination treatment with 1 mg l1 NAA / 0.1 mg l1 BAP. Callus showed 1 or 2 adventitious shoots per explant after 30 days of culture and 3 to 6 shoots after seventy days. Furthermore, the presence of fully formed adventitious plantlets (shoot and root was observed after the fifth week of culture. Therefore, the best combination for in vitro regeneration is NAA 0.1 mg l1 / 1 mg l1 BAP. Keywords: auxin, cytokinins, indirect organogenesis

  20. Cartilage extracellular matrix as a biomaterial for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyotake, Emi A; Beck, Emily C; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of various tissues possesses the model characteristics that biomaterials for tissue engineering strive to mimic; however, owing to the intricate hierarchical nature of the ECM, it has yet to be fully characterized and synthetically fabricated. Cartilage repair remains a challenge because the intrinsic properties that enable its durability and long-lasting function also impede regeneration. In the last decade, cartilage ECM has emerged as a promising biomaterial for regenerating cartilage, partly because of its potentially chondroinductive nature. As this research area of cartilage matrix-based biomaterials emerged, investigators facing similar challenges consequently developed convergent solutions in constructing robust and bioactive scaffolds. This review discusses the challenges, emerging trends, and future directions of cartilage ECM scaffolds, including a comparison between two different forms of cartilage matrix: decellularized cartilage (DCC) and devitalized cartilage (DVC). To overcome the low permeability of cartilage matrix, physical fragmentation greatly enhances decellularization, although the process itself may reduce the chondroinductivity of fabricated scaffolds. The less complex processing of a scaffold composed of DVC, which has not been decellularized, appears to have translational advantages and potential chondroinductive and mechanical advantages over DCC, without detrimental immunogenicity, to ultimately enhance cartilage repair in a clinically relevant way. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net 35 SO 4 -labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage

  2. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  3. Mechanical confinement regulates cartilage matrix formation by chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Pyo; Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J.; Levenston, Marc E.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2017-12-01

    Cartilage tissue equivalents formed from hydrogels containing chondrocytes could provide a solution for replacing damaged cartilage. Previous approaches have often utilized elastic hydrogels. However, elastic stresses may restrict cartilage matrix formation and alter the chondrocyte phenotype. Here we investigated the use of viscoelastic hydrogels, in which stresses are relaxed over time and which exhibit creep, for three-dimensional (3D) culture of chondrocytes. We found that faster relaxation promoted a striking increase in the volume of interconnected cartilage matrix formed by chondrocytes. In slower relaxing gels, restriction of cell volume expansion by elastic stresses led to increased secretion of IL-1β, which in turn drove strong up-regulation of genes associated with cartilage degradation and cell death. As no cell-adhesion ligands are presented by the hydrogels, these results reveal cell sensing of cell volume confinement as an adhesion-independent mechanism of mechanotransduction in 3D culture, and highlight stress relaxation as a key design parameter for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  5. High frequency organogenesis in hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf and petiole explants of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica), an important vegetable crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, D K

    2015-04-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) is an important, nutritionally rich vegetable crop, but severely affected by environmental stresses, pests and diseases which cause massive yield and quality losses. Genetic manipulation is becoming an important method for broccoli improvement. In the present study, a reproducible and highly efficient protocol for obtaining organogenesis from hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf and petiole explants of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica cv. Solan green head) has been developed. Hypocotyl and cotyledon explants were used from 10 to 12 days old aseptically grown seedlings whereas leaf and petiole explants were excised from 18 to 20 days old green house grown seedlings and surface sterilized. These explants were cultured on shoot induction medium containing different concentration and combination of BAP and NAA. High efficiency shoot regeneration has been achieved in hypocotyl (83.33 %), cotyledon (90.11 %), leaf (62.96 %) and petiole (91.10 %) explants on MS medium supplemented with 3.5 mg/l BAP + 0.019 mg/l NAA 2.5 mg/l BAP + 0.5 mg/l NAA, 4.0 mg/l BAP + 0.5 mg/l NAA and 4.5 mg/l BAP + 0.019 mg/l NAA respectively. Petiole explants showed maximum shoot regeneration response as compared to other explants. MS medium supplemented with 0.10 mg/l NAA was found best for root regeneration (100 %) from in vitro developed shoots. The regenerated complete plantlets were transferred to the pots containing cocopeat and successfully acclimatized. This optimized regeneration protocol can be efficiently used for genetic transformation in broccoli. This is the first comparative report on multiple shoot induction using four different types of explants viz. hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf and petiole.

  6. A novel 3D skin explant model to study anaerobic bacterial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maboni, Grazieli; Davenport, Rebecca; Sessford, Kate

    2017-01-01

    of the tissue structure and the cell types present in the host environment. A 3D skin culture model can be set up using tissues acquired from surgical procedures or post slaughter, making it a cost effective and attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The majority of 3D culture models have been......Skin infection studies are often limited by financial and ethical constraints, and alternatives, such as monolayer cell culture, do not reflect many cellular processes limiting their application. For a more functional replacement, 3D skin culture models offer many advantages such as the maintenance...... bacterium and the causative agent of footrot. The mechanism of infection and host immune response to D. nodosus is poorly understood. Here we present a novel 3D skin ex vivo model to study anaerobic bacterial infections using ovine skin explants infected with D. nodosus. Our results demonstrate that D...

  7. Effects of Hydrostatic Loading on a Self-Aggregating, Suspension Culture–Derived Cartilage Tissue Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Jeffrey J.; Jeong, Changhoon; Novotny, John E.; Seacrist, Thomas; Chan, Gilbert; Domzalski, Marcin; Turka, Christina M.; Richardson, Dean W.; Dodge, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Many approaches are being taken to generate cartilage replacement materials. The goal of this study was to use a self-aggregating suspension culture model of chondrocytes with mechanical preconditioning. Design: Our model differs from others in that it is based on a scaffold-less, self-aggregating culture model that produces a cartilage tissue analog that has been shown to share many similarities with the natural cartilage phenotype. Owing to the known loaded environment under which chondrocytes function in vivo, we hypothesized that applying force to the suspension culture–derived chondrocyte biomass would improve its cartilage-like characteristics and provide a new model for engineering cartilage tissue analogs. Results: In this study, we used a specialized hydrostatic pressure bioreactor system to apply mechanical forces during the growth phase to improve biochemical and biophysical properties of the biomaterial formed. We demonstrated that using this high-density suspension culture, a biomaterial more consistent with the hyaline cartilage phenotype was produced without any foreign material added. Unpassaged chondrocytes responded to a physiologically relevant hydrostatic load by significantly increasing gene expression of critical cartilage molecule collagen and aggrecan along with other cartilage relevant genes, CD44, perlecan, decorin, COMP, and iNOS. Conclusions: This study describes a self-aggregating bioreactor model without foreign material or scaffold in which chondrocytes form a cartilage tissue analog with many features similar to native cartilage. This study represents a promising scaffold-less, methodological advancement in cartilage tissue engineering with potential translational applications to cartilage repair. PMID:26069584

  8. The bio in the ink: cartilage regeneration with bioprintable hydrogels and articular cartilage-derived progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levato, Riccardo; Webb, William R; Otto, Iris A; Mensinga, Anneloes; Zhang, Yadan; van Rijen, Mattie; van Weeren, René; Khan, Ilyas M; Malda, Jos

    2017-10-01

    Cell-laden hydrogels are the primary building blocks for bioprinting, and, also termed bioinks, are the foundations for creating structures that can potentially recapitulate the architecture of articular cartilage. To be functional, hydrogel constructs need to unlock the regenerative capacity of encapsulated cells. The recent identification of multipotent articular cartilage-resident chondroprogenitor cells (ACPCs), which share important traits with adult stem cells, represents a new opportunity for cartilage regeneration. However, little is known about the suitability of ACPCs for tissue engineering, especially in combination with biomaterials. This study aimed to investigate the potential of ACPCs in hydrogels for cartilage regeneration and biofabrication, and to evaluate their ability for zone-specific matrix production. Gelatin methacryloyl (gelMA)-based hydrogels were used to culture ACPCs, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes, and as bioinks for printing. Our data shows ACPCs outperformed chondrocytes in terms of neo-cartilage production and unlike MSCs, ACPCs had the lowest gene expression levels of hypertrophy marker collagen type X, and the highest expression of PRG4, a key factor in joint lubrication. Co-cultures of the cell types in multi-compartment hydrogels allowed generating constructs with a layered distribution of collagens and glycosaminoglycans. By combining ACPC- and MSC-laden bioinks, a bioprinted model of articular cartilage was generated, consisting of defined superficial and deep regions, each with distinct cellular and extracellular matrix composition. Taken together, these results provide important information for the use of ACPC-laden hydrogels in regenerative medicine, and pave the way to the biofabrication of 3D constructs with multiple cell types for cartilage regeneration or in vitro tissue models. Despite its limited ability to repair, articular cartilage harbors an endogenous population of progenitor cells

  9. Toward understanding the role of cartilage particulates in synovial inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, A M; Stefani, R M; Sobczak, E; Tong, E L; Attur, M G; Shah, R P; Bulinski, J C; Ateshian, G A; Hung, C T

    2017-08-01

    Arthroscopy with lavage and synovectomy can remove tissue debris from the joint space and the synovial lining to provide pain relief to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we developed an in vitro model to study the interaction of cartilage wear particles with fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) to better understand the interplay of cartilage particulates with cytokines on cells of the synovium. In this study sub-10 μm cartilage particles or 1 μm latex particles were co-cultured with FLS ±10 ng/mL interleukin-1α (IL-1α) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Samples were analyzed for DNA, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and collagen, and media samples were analyzed for media GAG, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2). The nature of the physical interaction between the particles and FLS was determined by microscopy. Both latex and cartilage particles could be phagocytosed by FLS. Cartilage particles were internalized and attached to the surface of both dense monolayers and individual cells. Co-culture of FLS with cartilage particulates resulted in a significant increase in cell sheet DNA and collagen content as well as NO and PGE2 synthesis compared to control and latex treated groups. The proliferative response of FLS to cartilage wear particles resulted in an overall increase in extracellular matrix (ECM) content, analogous to the thickening of the synovial lining observed in OA patients. Understanding how cartilage particles interface with the synovium may provide insight into how this interaction contributes to OA progression and may guide the role of lavage and synovectomy for degenerative disease. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in cartilage tissue engineering : in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Mandl (Erik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWithin the body three subtypes of cartilage can be distinguished: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the predominant subtype and is mainly located in articular joints and in less extent in the nasal septum and cricoid. Elastic cartilage can be

  11. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freemont, Anthony J.; Hoyland, Judith

    2006-01-01

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed

  12. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemont, Anthony J. [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Tony.freemont@man.ac.uk; Hoyland, Judith [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed.

  13. High frequency plant regeneration from leaf explants derived callus of evening primrose (oenothera biennis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghauri, E.G.; Shafi, N.; Ghani, S.; Fatima, A.

    2008-01-01

    The seeds of Evening primrose were aseptically grown and leaf explants were used for establishment of callus culture. The Excellent growth in callus biomass was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 2, 4, -D and TDZ. For optimal growth of bud and shoot regeneration, fortification of IAA along with TDZ, or BAP was found to be essential. Rooting (70%) could be inducted on hormone free MS-medium. This percentage improved to 98 when NAA was added to the medium. The plantlets thus obtained were transferred to the field successfully after passing through the process of hardening. (author)

  14. Effect of ZnO nanoparticles on Brassica nigra seedlings and stem explants: growth dynamics and antioxidative response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hira eZafar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs have diverse properties in comparison to respective chemicals due to structure, surface area ratio, morphology, and reactivity. Toxicological effects of metallic NPs to organisms including plants have been reported. However, to the authors’ knowledge there is no report on the effect of NPs on in vitro culture of plant explants. In this study, ZnO NPs at 500-1500 mg/L badly affected Brassica nigra seed germination and seedling growth and raised antioxidative activities and antioxidants concentrations. On the other hand, culturing the stem explants of B. nigra on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium in presence of low concentration of ZnO NPs (1-20 mg/L produced white thin roots with thick root hairs. At 10 mg/L ZnO NPs shoots emergence was also observed. The developed calli/roots showed 79% DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging activity at 10 mg/L. While total antioxidant and reducing power potential were also significantly different in presence of ZnO NPs. Non enzymatic antioxidative molecules, phenolics (up to 0.15 µg GAE/mg FW and flavonoids (up to 0.22 µg QE/mg FW, also raised and found NPs concentration dependent. We state that ZnO NPs may induce roots from explants cultured on appropriate medium and can be cultured for production of valuable secondary metabolites.

  15. Engineering Cartilage Tissue by Pellet Coculture of Chondrocytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2015-01-01

    Coculture of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in pellets has been shown to be beneficial in engineering cartilage tissue in vitro. In these cultures trophic effects of MSCs increase the proliferation and matrix deposition of chondrocytes. Thus, large cartilage constructs can be made

  16. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  17. Peculiarities in Ankle Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Kaenkumchorn, Tanyaporn; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Wimmer, Markus A; Chubinskaya, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is the most common form of osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint. PTOA occurs as a result of several factors, including the poor regenerative capacity of hyaline articular cartilage as well as increased contact stresses following trauma. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and potential targets for treatment of PTOA in the ankle joint. Previous reviews primarily addressed clinical approaches to ankle PTOA, while the focus of the current article will be specifically on the newly acquired knowledge of the cellular mechanisms that drive PTOA in the ankle joint and means for potential targeted therapeutics that might halt the progression of cartilage degeneration and/or improve the outcome of surgical interventions. Three experimental treatment strategies are discussed in this review: (1) increasing the anabolic potential of chondrocytes through treatment with growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-7; (2) limiting chondrocyte cell death either through the protection of cell membrane with poloxamer 188 or inhibiting activity of intracellular proteases, caspases, which are responsible for cell death by apoptosis; and (3) inhibiting catabolic/inflammatory responses of chondrocytes by treating them with anti-inflammatory agents such as tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists. Future studies should focus on identifying the appropriate timing for treatment and an appropriate combination of anti-inflammatory, chondro- and matrix-protective biologics to limit the progression of trauma-induced cartilage degeneration and prevent the development of PTOA in the ankle joint.

  18. Efficient regeneration of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, from shoot-tip explant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamala, D; Devi, Prathibha

    2003-12-01

    Novel protocols for production of multiple shoot-tip clumps and somatic embryos of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench were developed with long-term goal of crop improvement through genetic transformation. Multiple shoot-tip clumps were developed in vitro from shoot-tip explant of one-week old seedling, cultured on MS medium containing only BA (0.5, 1 or 2 mg/l) or both BA (1 or 2 mg/l) and 2,4-D (0.5 mg/l) with bi-weekly subculture. Somatic embryos were directly produced on the enlarged dome shaped growing structures that developed from the shoot-tips of one-week old seedling explants (without any callus formation) when cultured on MS medium supplemented with both 2,4-D (0.5 mg/l) and BA (0.5 mg/l). However, the supplementation of MS medium with only 2,4-D (0.5 mg/l) induced compact callus without any plantlet regeneration. Each multiple shoot-clump was capable of regenerating more than 80 shoots via an intensive differentiation of both axillary and adventitious shoot buds, the somatic embryos were capable of 90% germination, plant conversion and regeneration. The regenerated shoots could be efficiently rooted on MS medium containing indole-3-butyric acid (IBA 1 mg/l). The plants were successfully transplanted to glasshouse and grown to maturity with a survival rate of 98%. Morphogenetic response of the explants was found to be genotypically independent.

  19. Identification and clonal characterisation of a progenitor cell sub-population in normal human articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Articular cartilage displays a poor repair capacity. The aim of cell-based therapies for cartilage defects is to repair damaged joint surfaces with a functional replacement tissue. Currently, chondrocytes removed from a healthy region of the cartilage are used but they are unable to retain their phenotype in expanded culture. The resulting repair tissue is fibrocartilaginous rather than hyaline, potentially compromising long-term repair. Mesenchymal stem cells, particularly bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC, are of interest for cartilage repair due to their inherent replicative potential. However, chondrocyte differentiated BMSCs display an endochondral phenotype, that is, can terminally differentiate and form a calcified matrix, leading to failure in long-term defect repair. Here, we investigate the isolation and characterisation of a human cartilage progenitor population that is resident within permanent adult articular cartilage. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Human articular cartilage samples were digested and clonal populations isolated using a differential adhesion assay to fibronectin. Clonal cell lines were expanded in growth media to high population doublings and karyotype analysis performed. We present data to show that this cell population demonstrates a restricted differential potential during chondrogenic induction in a 3D pellet culture system. Furthermore, evidence of high telomerase activity and maintenance of telomere length, characteristic of a mesenchymal stem cell population, were observed in this clonal cell population. Lastly, as proof of principle, we carried out a pilot repair study in a goat in vivo model demonstrating the ability of goat cartilage progenitors to form a cartilage-like repair tissue in a chondral defect. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we propose that we have identified and characterised a novel cartilage progenitor population resident in human articular cartilage which will greatly benefit future cell

  20. Cartilage grafting in nasal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Sara; White, W Matthew; Constantinides, Minas

    2011-02-01

    Nasal reconstruction after resection for cutaneous malignancies poses a unique challenge to facial plastic surgeons. The nose, a unique 3-D structure, not only must remain functional but also be aesthetically pleasing to patients. A complete understanding of all the layers of the nose and knowledge of available cartilage grafting material is necessary. Autogenous material, namely septal, auricular, and costal cartilage, is the most favored material in a free cartilage graft or a composite cartilage graft. All types of material have advantages and disadvantages that should guide the most appropriate selection to maximize the functional and cosmetic outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Micropropagation of Origanum acutidens (HAND.-MAZZ.) IETSWAART using stem node explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Mehmet Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Origanum acutidens (HAND.-MAZZ.) IETSWAART is a promising ornamental plant that can be widely used in landscape management. It is endemic to Eastern Anatolian region of Turkey. Tissue culture has not been used to micropropagate it. The study reports stem node explants from one-week-old seedlings of the plant for successful micropropagation. The stem nodes were cultured on MS medium containing 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, and 2.4 mg/L BAP with 0.2 mg/L NAA. Visible effects of culture media on shoot proliferation were recorded. Shoot regeneration rate was maximum on MS medium containing 1.80 mg/L BAP-0.2 mg/L NAA. The micropropagated shoots were rooted on MS medium containing 0.2 mg/L NAA. All microrooted plantlets survived during acclimatisation on peat moss. It was concluded that O. acutidens can be successfully micropropagated under in vitro conditions.

  2. Effect of gamma radiation on different explants of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam)) to induce NaCl tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Rosati, A.

    1997-01-01

    Clonal lines tolerant to NaCl were obtained by combining in vitro culture and gamma radiation in two Peruvian varieties 'Amarillo de Quillabamba' and 'Nemanete'. The most suitable explants were pedicel sections and leaf blades. Embryogenic callus was induced on basal MS basal medium containing 0.5 ppm 2,4-D. The embryogenic calli were irradiated with 5 Gy from a 137 Cs source. Several putative mutants appeared to be stable. (author). 9 refs, 3 tabs

  3. Effect of gamma radiation on different explants of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam)) to induce NaCl tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Rosati, A [Biology Dept., National Agriculture Univ., La Molina, Lima (Peru)

    1997-07-01

    Clonal lines tolerant to NaCl were obtained by combining in vitro culture and gamma radiation in two Peruvian varieties `Amarillo de Quillabamba` and `Nemanete`. The most suitable explants were pedicel sections and leaf blades. Embryogenic callus was induced on basal MS basal medium containing 0.5 ppm 2,4-D. The embryogenic calli were irradiated with 5 Gy from a {sup 137}Cs source. Several putative mutants appeared to be stable. (author). 9 refs, 3 tabs.

  4. Long-term organ culture of adult rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamsuddin, A.K.M.; Barrett, L.A.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    . The effect of in vivo carcinogen pretreatment was also studied. The explant culture from control untreated animals showed good epithelial differentiation with crypts until 6 weeks. In contrast, the explants from animals pretreated with 4 weekly doses of azoxymethane consistently showed epithelial......Colon explants from adult rats were maintained in culture for over 3 months in our laboratories with good epithelial preservation and cellular differentiation. The light and transmission electron microscopic features of rat colon mucosa during the culture period are described. In all the explants...

  5. Enhanced regeneration in explants of tomato (Lycopersicon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... The development of a cost effective and efficient protocol for mass propagation of high quality tomato seedlings via tissue culture could help to reduce the price per seedling. A good in vitro plant regeneration system may also assist in further improvement of the commercially important cultivars for disease.

  6. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chang, Wen-Ching; Wei, Li-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Han; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28772498

  7. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-You Shie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering.

  8. All-trans retinoic acid inhibits craniopharyngioma cell growth: study on an explant cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; You, Chao; Zhou, Liangxue; Sima, Xiutian; Liu, Zhiyong; Liu, Hao; Xu, Jianguo

    2013-05-01

    The ratio between FABP5 and CRABPII determines cellular response to physiological level of retinoic acid; tumor cells undergo proliferation with high level of FABP5 and apoptosis with high level of CRABPII. We intended to study FABP5 and CRABPII expression in craniopharyngiomas, to establish craniopharyngioma cell model using explants method, and to study the effect of pharmacological dose of retinoic acid on craniopharyngioma cells. Expression of FABP5 and CRABPII in craniopharyngioma tissue from 20 patients was studied using immunohistochemistry. Primary craniopharyngioma cell cultures were established using tissue explants method. Craniopharyngioma cells were treated using various concentrations of all-trans retinoic acid, and cell growth curve, apoptosis, expression of FABP5, CRABPII and NF-κB were assayed in different groups. FABP5/CRABPII ratio was significantly higher in adamatinomatous group than that in papillary group. Cell cultures were established in 19 cases (95 %). Pharmacological level retinoic acid inhibited cell growth and induced cellular apoptosis in dose dependent manner, and apoptosis rate cells treated with 30 μM retinoic acid for 24 h was 43 %. Also, retinoic acid increased CRABPII, and decreased FABP5 and NF-κB expression in craniopharyngioma cells. High FABP5/CRABPII ratio is observed in adamatinomatous craniopharyngioma. Retinoic acid at pharmacological level induced craniopharyngioma cell apoptosis via increasing FABP5/CRABPII ratio and inhibiting NF-κB signaling pathway. Our study demonstrated that all-trans retinoic acid might be a candidate for craniopharyngioma adjuvant chemotherapy in future.

  9. An efficient regeneration and rapid micropropagation protocol for Almond using dormant axillary buds as explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Ravish; Chaudhury, Rekha; Malik, Surendra Kumar; Sharma, Kailash Chandra

    2015-07-01

    An efficient in vitro protocol was standardized for Almond (Prunus dulcis) propagation using dormant axillary buds as explants. Explants were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) and woody plant medium (WPM) supplemented with different concentration/combination(s) of phytohormones. MS basal medium showed lowest shoot induction and took longest duration for shoot initiation. Multiple shoots were induced in MS medium supplemented with the combination of BAP (0.5 mgL(-1)). Cultures showed poor response for rooting in all combinations of plant growth regulators (PGRs) and took 90 days for initiation. Rooting was higher in half strength of MS than in full-strength. The highest root induction (33.33%) was recorded in half MS medium supplemented with 0.1 mgL(-1) IBA (indole-3-butyric acid) followed by full strength of MS medium (20%) supplemented with IBA (0.1 mgL(-1)). α-Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was less effective for rooting than IBA. The highest root induction (25%) was found in half strength of MS medium supplemented with 0.1 mgL(-1) NAA followed by full strength of MS medium (20%). The protocol developed would be of use in mass propagation of almond and also support in vitro conservation.

  10. Utilization of Aseptic Seedling Explants for In vitro Propagation of Indian Red Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar CHIRUVELLA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Micropropagation has been advocated as one of the most viable biotechnological tool for ex situ conservation of rare, endangered endemic medicinal plants germplasm. Rapid clonal micropropagation protocol for large-scale multiplication of an endemic medicinal plant Soymida febrifuga (Meliaceae was established from 15-day aseptic seedling cotyledonary node and shoot tip explants. High frequency of sprouting and shoot differentiation was observed from cotyledonary node explants compared to shoot tip, on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium fortified with BA, KN, 2-iP and CM. Of the cytokinins used, BA (3.0 mgl-1 supported highest average number and maximum multiple shoot differentiation (16.6. In vitro proliferated shoots were multiplied rapidly by culturing nodal segments as microcuttings, further subcultured on the same media for elongation. Elongated shoots upon transfer to MS medium fortified with IBA showed rooting within two weeks of culture. Rooted plantlets were successfully hardened and 75% of rooted shoots successfully survived on establishment to the soil. Plants looked healthy with no visually detectable phenotypic variations. This protocol provides a successful and rapid technique that can be used for ex situ conservation minimizing the pressure on wild populations and contributes to the conservation of this endemic medicinally potent flora.

  11. Generation and characterisation of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells by explant method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Z; Maqbool, M; George, E; Hassan, R; Ramasamy, R

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human umbilical cord (UC) have been considered as an important tool for treating various malignancies, tissue repair and organ regeneration. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) are better alternative to MSCs that derived from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) as they are regarded as medical waste with little ethical concern for research and easily culture-expanded. In this present study, the foetal distal end of human UC was utilised to generate MSC by explant method. Upon in vitro culture, adherent cells with fibroblastic morphology were generated with rapid growth kinetics. Under the respective inductive conditions, these cells were capable of differentiating into adipocytes and osteocytes; express an array of standard MSC's surface markers CD29, CD73, CD90, CD106 and MHC-class I. Further assessment of immunosuppression activity revealed that MSCs generated from UC had profoundly inhibited the proliferation of mitogen-activated T lymphocytes in a dosedependent manner. The current laboratory findings have reinforced the application of explant method to generate UCMSCs thus, exploring an ideal platform to fulfil the increasing demand of MSCs for research and potential clinical use.

  12. Stable genetic transformation of Jatropha curcas via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer using leaf explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish; Vijay Anand, K.G.; Pamidimarri, D.V.N. Sudheer; Sarkar, Tanmoy; Reddy, Muppala P.; Radhakrishnan, T.; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, M.K.; Sopori, Sudhir K.

    2010-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel crop. A simple and reproducible protocol was developed for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of J. curcas using leaf explains. Agrobacterium strain LBA 4404 harbouring the binary vector pCAMBIA 1304 having sense-dehydration responsive element binding (S-DREB2A), beta-glucuronidase (gus), and hygromycin-phosphotransferase (hpt) genes were used for gene transfer. A number of parameters such as preculture of explains, wounding of leaf explants, Agrobacterium growth phase (OD), infection duration, co-cultivation period, co-cultivation medium pH, and acetosyringone, were studied to optimized transformation efficiency. The highest transformation efficiency was achieved using 4-day precultured, non-wounded leaf explants infected with Agrobacterium culture corresponding to OD(600)=0.6 for 20 min, followed by co-cultivation for 4 days in a co-cultivation medium containing 100 mu M acetosyringone, pH 5.7. Co-cultivated leaf explants were initially cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.27 mu M thidiazuron (TDZ) for regeneration of shoot buds, followed by selection on same medium with 5 mu g ml(-1) hygromycin. Selected shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 mu M kinetin (Kn), 4.5 mu M 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA), and 5.5 mu M alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for proliferation. The proliferated shoots were elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 mu M BA and 8.5 mu M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The elongated shoots were rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 15 mu M indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 5.7 mu M IAA, 5.5 mu M NAA, and 0.25 mg l(-1) activated charcoal. GUS histochemical analysis of the transgenic tissues further confirmed the transformation event. PCR and DNA gel blot hybridization were performed to confirm the presence of transgene. A transformation efficiency of 29% was

  13. Stable genetic transformation of Jatropha curcas via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer using leaf explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2010-07-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel crop. A simple and reproducible protocol was developed for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of J. curcas using leaf explains. Agrobacterium strain LBA 4404 harbouring the binary vector pCAMBIA 1304 having sense-dehydration responsive element binding (S-DREB2A), beta-glucuronidase (gus), and hygromycin-phosphotransferase (hpt) genes were used for gene transfer. A number of parameters such as preculture of explains, wounding of leaf explants, Agrobacterium growth phase (OD), infection duration, co-cultivation period, co-cultivation medium pH, and acetosyringone, were studied to optimized transformation efficiency. The highest transformation efficiency was achieved using 4-day precultured, non-wounded leaf explants infected with Agrobacterium culture corresponding to OD(600)=0.6 for 20 min, followed by co-cultivation for 4 days in a co-cultivation medium containing 100 mu M acetosyringone, pH 5.7. Co-cultivated leaf explants were initially cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.27 mu M thidiazuron (TDZ) for regeneration of shoot buds, followed by selection on same medium with 5 mu g ml(-1) hygromycin. Selected shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 mu M kinetin (Kn), 4.5 mu M 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA), and 5.5 mu M alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for proliferation. The proliferated shoots were elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 mu M BA and 8.5 mu M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The elongated shoots were rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 15 mu M indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 5.7 mu M IAA, 5.5 mu M NAA, and 0.25 mg l(-1) activated charcoal. GUS histochemical analysis of the transgenic tissues further confirmed the transformation event. PCR and DNA gel blot hybridization were performed to confirm the presence of transgene. A transformation efficiency of 29% was

  14. High frequency plant regeneration from shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... 16/8-h (light/dark) photoperiod provided by cool white fluorescent light. Multiple .... formation from shoot tip explant of C. colocynthis on MS-medium. S. No. .... micropropagation of Musa sapientum L. (Cavendish Dwarf). Afr. J.

  15. Effect of season, explants, growth regulators and sugar level on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... swabbed with an alcohol (50% v/v) soaked muslin cloth followed by washing in ... water. The explants were trimmed to a final size of 0.5 to 2 cm and were placed .... microbial contaminants so that a specific treatment may be formulated for ... of 2,4-D causing significantly delayed response, for all the three ...

  16. callus induction and proliferation from cotyledon explants in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2013-07-19

    Jul 19, 2013 ... between the tested cytokinins and the 2,4-D in callus induction and growth index. Similar results have also been obtained in soybean (Glycine max L.) (Sairam et al., 2003). In contrast to this finding, calli were reportedly induced from cotyledon explants on MS basal medium containing 2,4-D in combination ...

  17. Explant age, auxin concentrations and media type affect callus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of explant age of oil palm (Elaeis huineensis) embryo axes, 15 and 18 weeks after anthesis (WAA), media type (Eeuwens and Murashige and Skoog) supplemented with various concentrations of 2,4-D on callus production employing standard in vitro techniques were investigated. The results of the study showed ...

  18. 143 GROWTH RESPONSE OF EXPLANTS OF Irvingia gabonensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1&5 Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, University of Port Harcourt. 2&3Department of Botany, University of Calabar. 4Department of Biological Sciences, Cross River State University of Technology. ABSTRACT. Growth response of explants of Irvingia gabonensis to in vitro treatment was investigated using full ...

  19. Adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants of the valuable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-10

    Aug 10, 2011 ... 2Department of Plant Biology and Plant Biotechnology, St. Joseph's College, Tiruchirappalli – 620 002, South India. Accepted 28 March, 2011 .... Effect of cytokinins (KN and BAP) alone or in combination with NAA on direct shoot bud regeneration from leaf explants of P. barbatus. Plant growth regulator ...

  20. [Reasons for exchange and explantation of intraocular lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhann, I; Fleischer, F; Neuhann, T

    2012-08-01

    This study was performed to analyse the reasons for explantation/exchange of intraocular lenses (IOL), which had originally been implanted for the correction of aphakia during cataract extraction. All cases with IOL explantation, which had been performed at one institution between 1/2008 and 12/2009 were analysed retrospectively. A total of 105 eyes of 100 patients were analysed. The median time interval between implantation and explantation of the IOL was 5.9 years (min. 0, max. 29.6). The most frequent cause for the intervention was subluxation/dislocation of the implant in 55.2% of cases. This group comprised 21% of cases with subluxation within the capsular bag in pseudoexfoliation syndrome. Other reasons were optical problems/incorrect IOL power (21%), calcification of hydrophilic acrylic IOL (7.6%), corneal decompensation associated with an anterior chamber lens (4.8%), and single cases with varying problems. The reasons for IOL exchange presented in this study are comparable to those of other series in the literature. Explantations due to optical problems may gain weight in the future due to a rise in refractive procedures and demands. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis from root explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A system for induction of callus and plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis from root explants of Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg. clone Reyan 87-6-62 was evaluated. The influence of plant growth regulators (PGRs) including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) and kinetin (KT) on ...

  2. Overview of existing cartilage repair technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNickle, Allison G; Provencher, Matthew T; Cole, Brian J

    2008-12-01

    Currently, autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral grafting bridge the gap between palliation of cartilage injury and resurfacing via arthroplasty. Emerging technologies seek to advance first generation techniques and accomplish several goals including predictable outcomes, cost-effective technology, single-stage procedures, and creation of durable repair tissue. The biologic pipeline represents a variety of technologies including synthetics, scaffolds, cell therapy, and cell-infused matrices. Synthetic constructs, an alternative to biologic repair, resurface a focal chondral defect rather than the entire joint surface. Scaffolds are cell-free constructs designed as a biologic "net" to augment marrow stimulation techniques. Minced cartilage technology uses stabilized autologous or allogeneic fragments in 1-stage transplantation. Second and third generation cell-based methods include alternative membranes, chondrocyte seeding, and culturing onto scaffolds. Despite the promising early results of these products, significant technical obstacles remain along with unknown long-term durability. The vast array of developing technologies has exceptional promise and the potential to revolutionize the cartilage treatment algorithm within the next decade.

  3. Regulators of articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of hypertrophic differentiation is essential for successful cartilage repair strategies. Although this process is essential for longitudinal growth, it also is part of degenerative cartilage diseases such as osteoarthiritis. Moreover, it limits the use of cell types prone to this process

  4. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ota Naoshi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration.

  5. Development of a Spring-Loaded Impact Device to Deliver Injurious Mechanical Impacts to the Articular Cartilage Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Peter G.; Song, Yingjie; Taboas, Juan M.; Chen, Faye H.; Melvin, Gary M.; Manner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Traumatic impacts on the articular joint surface in vitro are known to lead to degeneration of the cartilage. The main objective of this study was to develop a spring-loaded impact device that can be used to deliver traumatic impacts of consistent magnitude and rate and to find whether impacts cause catabolic activities in articular cartilage consistent with other previously reported impact models and correlated with the development of osteoarthritic lesions. In developing the spring-loaded impactor, the operating hypothesis is that a single supraphysiologic impact to articular cartilage in vitro can affect cartilage integrity, cell viability, sulfated glycosaminoglycan and inflammatory mediator release in a dose-dependent manner. Design: Impacts of increasing force are delivered to adult bovine articular cartilage explants in confined compression. Impact parameters are correlated with tissue damage, cell viability, matrix and inflammatory mediator release, and gene expression 24 hours postimpact. Results: Nitric oxide release is first detected after 7.7 MPa impacts, whereas cell death, glycosaminoglycan release, and prostaglandin E2 release are first detected at 17 MPa. Catabolic markers increase linearly to maximal levels after ≥36 MPa impacts. Conclusions: A single supraphysiologic impact negatively affects cartilage integrity, cell viability, and GAG release in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings showed that 7 to 17 MPa impacts can induce cell death and catabolism without compromising the articular surface, whereas a 17 MPa impact is sufficient to induce increases in most common catabolic markers of osteoarthritic degeneration. PMID:26069650

  6. Isolation and culture of neural crest cells from embryonic murine neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R; Mundell, Nathan A; Labosky, Patricia A

    2012-06-02

    The embryonic neural crest (NC) is a multipotent progenitor population that originates at the dorsal aspect of the neural tube, undergoes an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migrates throughout the embryo, giving rise to diverse cell types. NC also has the unique ability to influence the differentiation and maturation of target organs. When explanted in vitro, NC progenitors undergo self-renewal, migrate and differentiate into a variety of tissue types including neurons, glia, smooth muscle cells, cartilage and bone. NC multipotency was first described from explants of the avian neural tube. In vitro isolation of NC cells facilitates the study of NC dynamics including proliferation, migration, and multipotency. Further work in the avian and rat systems demonstrated that explanted NC cells retain their NC potential when transplanted back into the embryo. Because these inherent cellular properties are preserved in explanted NC progenitors, the neural tube explant assay provides an attractive option for studying the NC in vitro. To attain a better understanding of the mammalian NC, many methods have been employed to isolate NC populations. NC-derived progenitors can be cultured from post-migratory locations in both the embryo and adult to study the dynamics of post-migratory NC progenitors, however isolation of NC progenitors as they emigrate from the neural tube provides optimal preservation of NC cell potential and migratory properties. Some protocols employ fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to isolate a NC population enriched for particular progenitors. However, when starting with early stage embryos, cell numbers adequate for analyses are difficult to obtain with FACS, complicating the isolation of early NC populations from individual embryos. Here, we describe an approach that does not rely on FACS and results in an approximately 96% pure NC population based on a Wnt1-Cre activated lineage reporter. The method presented here is adapted from

  7. Pronounced biomaterial dependency in cartilage regeneration using nonexpanded compared with expanded chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchida, A.I.; Bekkers, J.E.J.; Beekhuizen, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate freshly isolated compared with culture-expanded chondrocytes with respect to early regenerative response, cytokine production and cartilage formation in response to four commonly used biomaterials. Materials & methods: Chondrocytes were both directly and after expansion to

  8. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice H; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-19

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  9. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  10. A novel therapeutic strategy for cartilage diseases based on lipid nanoparticle-RNAi delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Sun, Xiaojuan; Chen, Chongwei; Zhou, Jingming; Zhang, Ge; Wu, Heng; Guo, Baosheng

    2018-01-01

    Background Cartilage degeneration affects millions of people but preventing its degeneration is a big challenge. Although RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in human trials via silencing specific genes, the cartilage RNAi has not been possible to date because the cartilage is an avascular and very dense tissue with very low permeability. Purpose The objective of this study was to develop and validate a novel lipid nanoparticle (LNP)-siRNA delivery system that can prevent cartilage degeneration by knocking down specific genes. Methods LNP transfection efficiency was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) has been correlated with cartilage degeneration. The in vivo effects of LNP-Ihh siRNA complexes on cartilage degeneration were evaluated in a rat model of surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA). Results In vitro, 100% of chondrocytes were transfected with siRNA in the LNP-siRNA group. In accordance with the cell culture results, red positive signals could be detected even in the deep layer of cartilage tissue cultures treated by LNP-beacon. In vivo data showed that LNP is specific for cartilage, since positive signals were detected by fluorescence molecular tomography and confocal microscopy in joint cartilage injected with LNP-beacon, but not on the surface of the synovium. In the rat model of OA, intraarticular injection of LNP-Ihh siRNA attenuated OA progression, and PCR results showed LNP-Ihh siRNA exerted a positive impact on anabolic metabolism and negative impact on catabolic metabolism. Conclusion This study demonstrates that our LNP-RNAi delivery system has a significantly chondroprotective effect that attenuates cartilage degeneration and holds great promise as a powerful tool for treatment of cartilage diseases by knocking down specific genes. PMID:29440889

  11. A novel therapeutic strategy for cartilage diseases based on lipid nanoparticle-RNAi delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Sun, Xiaojuan; Chen, Chongwei; Zhou, Jingming; Zhang, Ge; Wu, Heng; Guo, Baosheng; Wei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Cartilage degeneration affects millions of people but preventing its degeneration is a big challenge. Although RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in human trials via silencing specific genes, the cartilage RNAi has not been possible to date because the cartilage is an avascular and very dense tissue with very low permeability. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a novel lipid nanoparticle (LNP)-siRNA delivery system that can prevent cartilage degeneration by knocking down specific genes. LNP transfection efficiency was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Indian Hedgehog ( Ihh ) has been correlated with cartilage degeneration. The in vivo effects of LNP-Ihh siRNA complexes on cartilage degeneration were evaluated in a rat model of surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA). In vitro, 100% of chondrocytes were transfected with siRNA in the LNP-siRNA group. In accordance with the cell culture results, red positive signals could be detected even in the deep layer of cartilage tissue cultures treated by LNP-beacon. In vivo data showed that LNP is specific for cartilage, since positive signals were detected by fluorescence molecular tomography and confocal microscopy in joint cartilage injected with LNP-beacon, but not on the surface of the synovium. In the rat model of OA, intraarticular injection of LNP-Ihh siRNA attenuated OA progression, and PCR results showed LNP-Ihh siRNA exerted a positive impact on anabolic metabolism and negative impact on catabolic metabolism. This study demonstrates that our LNP-RNAi delivery system has a significantly chondroprotective effect that attenuates cartilage degeneration and holds great promise as a powerful tool for treatment of cartilage diseases by knocking down specific genes.

  12. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  13. A study of crystalline biomaterials for articular cartilage bioengineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Aviv, Talia [Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: taliag@bgu.ac.il; DiCarlo, Bryan B. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77003 (United States)], E-mail: bdicarlo@rice.edu; French, Margaret M. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77003 (United States)], E-mail: mmfrench@rice.edu; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77003 (United States)], E-mail: athanasiou@rice.edu; Vago, Razi [Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: rvago@bgu.ac.il

    2008-12-01

    This study examines the suitability of marine origin coral species, Porites lutea (POR) and the hydrozoan Millepora dichotoma (MIL), for use as novel three dimensional growth matrices in the field of articular cartilage tissue engineering. Therefore, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes were grown on the skeletal material obtained from each of these two organisms to investigate their potential use as three dimensional scaffolding for cartilage tissue growth. Chondrogenic induction of MSCs was achieved by addition of transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I). Cell adherence, proliferation, differentiation and tissue development were investigated through six weeks of culture. Cartilage tissue growth and chondrocytic phenotype maintenance of each cell type were examined by cell morphology, histochemical analyses, expression of collagen type II and quantitative measures of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. The MSCs and the chondrocytes were shown good adherence to the scaffolds and maintenance of the chondrocytic phenotype in the initial stages of culture. However after two weeks of culture on MIL and three weeks on POR these cultures began to exhibit signs of further differentiation and phenotypic loss. The shown results indicated that POR was a better substrate for chondrocytes phenotype maintenance than MIL. We believe that surface modification of POR combined with mechanical stimuli will provide a suitable environment for chondrogenic phenotype maintenance. Further investigation of POR and other novel coralline biomatrices is indicated and warranted in the field of cartilage tissue engineering applications.

  14. Passaged adult chondrocytes can form engineered cartilage with functional mechanical properties: a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenneth W; Lima, Eric G; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J; Jayabalan, Prakash S; Stoker, Aaron M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Ateshian, Gerard A; Cook, James L; Hung, Clark T

    2010-03-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-beta3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects.

  15. Effects of gamma-rays irradiation in seed of mungbean (vigna radiata (L.) wilczek) composition of media on shoot regeneration of explants from node of cotyledon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutabarat, Dameria; H, Soeranto

    1998-01-01

    Study the effects of gamma-rays irradiation and composition and media on shoot regeneration of explants from node of cotyledon of mungbean. Wallet variety have been conducted. The explants derived of irradiated seeds of 10-20 Gy of gamma rays were planted in the 0.7% agar solution. One day after planting in the agar media the embryo axis of germinate seed were removed and the node of cotyledon were cultured in the regeneration media as examples. The results shown that shoot regeneration was influenced by media composition and the doses of gamma rays irradiation in seed. In the MURASHIGE and SKOOG medium which contain of BAP or 2-iP or Kinetin with 3 ppm concentrate respectively the explants could produced 100% of shoots. However, the highest. number of produced shoot (3 shoots) was showed in the medium which contained of BAP. The medium with I ppm concentrate od BAP could produced 100% shoot regeneration and the maximum number of shoots (4 shoots) per explant was showed in with 5 ppm. concentrate of BAP. The effectivity off BAP for shoot regeneration by enrichment of 12 ppm Ag 2 SO 4 in the media. Irradiation of 10-20 Gy gamma rays on seeds of mungbean walet variety could improved shoot regeneration of explants from node cotyledon. (author)

  16. Study on Effect of Type of Explant and Hormone on Callus Induction and Regeneration in Saffron (Crocus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sajjadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Saffron (Crocus sativus L. is one of the medicinal plants that contain active components and medicinal materials. Tissue culture of saffron can improve the quality and quantity of the saffron product, increase its export and the farmers’ income. In this study, 36 different types of hormone combinations in the dark and 9 different treatments of hormone combinations in cold (4°C, using different saffron explants (bulb, leaf, scales around leaf and distal parts of the leaf were studied in tissue culture. To investigate the growth of corms, the callus formation and the regeneration rate, three replications for each treatment were used and the length of shoot (cm, the callus formation percentage and the regeneration percentage were measured and statistical analysis was performed. Among the types of explants, only explants from bulbs produced the callus on MS medium containing 2 mg.l-1 BAP and 1 mg.l-1 IBA in both the dark and cold conditions. The highest percentage of regeneration was obtained in MS medium with hormonal composition of 0.3 mg.l-1 TDZ, 1 mg.l-1 BAP, 2 mg.l-1 IBA and 0.01 mg.l-1 GA3 in the cold conditions.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells can survive on the extracellular matrix-derived decellularized bovine articular cartilage scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Tavassoli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective (s: The scarcity of articular cartilage defect to repair due to absence of blood vessels and tissue engineering is one of the promising approaches for cartilage regeneration. The objective of this study was to prepare an extracellular matrix derived decellularized bovine articular cartilage scaffold and investigate its interactions with seeded rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. Materials and Methods: Bovine articular cartilage that was cut into pieces with 2 mm thickness, were decellularized by combination of physical and chemical methods including snap freeze-thaw and treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. The scaffolds were then seeded with 1, 1’-dioctadecyl-3, 3, 3’, 3’-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI labeled BM-MSCs and cultured for up to two weeks. Results: Histological studies of decellularized bovine articular cartilage showed that using 5 cycles of snap freeze-thaw in liquid nitrogen and treatment with 2.5% SDS for 4 hr led to the best decellularization, while preserving the articular cartilage structure. Adherence and penetration of seeded BM-MSCs on to the scaffold were displayed by histological and florescence examinations and also confirmed by electron microscopy. Conclusion: ECM-derived decellularized articular cartilage scaffold provides a suitable environment to support adhesion and maintenance of cultured BM-MSCs and could be applied to investigate cellular behaviors in this system and may also be useful for studies of cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  19. Changes of free, soluble conjugated and bound polyamine titers of jojoba explants under sodium chloride salinity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, Peter A; Pontikis, Constantine A

    2007-07-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis L.) single node explants were cultured in a basal medium supplemented with 17.8 microM 6-benzyladenine and four levels of sodium chloride concentration (0, 56.41, 112.82 and 169.23 mM). The free, the soluble conjugated and the insoluble bound forms of polyamines (PAs) (putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm)) were determined monthly during a 3-month proliferation stage. Free Put and Spd were found in higher levels in the control treatment, while Spm content was higher in the salt treatments. All soluble conjugated PAs were found to be in lower concentrations in explants growing on medium supplemented with salt, while the opposite was true for the insoluble bound PAs. It appeared that certain PAs and PAs forms could play a significant role in the adaptation mechanism of jojoba under saline conditions.

  20. Magnetically targeted delivery through cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Sahar; Mair, Lamar O.; Chowdhury, Sagar; Nacev, Alek; Hilaman, Ryan; Stepanov, Pavel; Baker-McKee, James; Ijanaten, Said; Koudelka, Christian; English, Bradley; Malik, Pulkit; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we have invented a method of delivering drugs deep into articular cartilage with shaped dynamic magnetic fields acting on small metallic magnetic nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol coating and average diameter of 30 nm. It was shown that transport of magnetic nanoparticles through the entire thickness of bovine articular cartilage can be controlled by a combined alternating magnetic field at 100 Hz frequency and static magnetic field of 0.8 tesla (T) generated by 1" dia. x 2" thick permanent magnet. Magnetic nanoparticles transport through bovine articular cartilage samples was investigated at various settings of magnetic field and time durations. Combined application of an alternating magnetic field and the static field gradient resulted in a nearly 50 times increase in magnetic nanoparticles transport in bovine articular cartilage tissue as compared with static field conditions. This method can be applied to locally deliver therapeutic-loaded magnetic nanoparticles deep into articular cartilage to prevent cartilage degeneration and promote cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

  1. Magnetically targeted delivery through cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Jafari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have invented a method of delivering drugs deep into articular cartilage with shaped dynamic magnetic fields acting on small metallic magnetic nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol coating and average diameter of 30 nm. It was shown that transport of magnetic nanoparticles through the entire thickness of bovine articular cartilage can be controlled by a combined alternating magnetic field at 100 Hz frequency and static magnetic field of 0.8 tesla (T generated by 1" dia. x 2" thick permanent magnet. Magnetic nanoparticles transport through bovine articular cartilage samples was investigated at various settings of magnetic field and time durations. Combined application of an alternating magnetic field and the static field gradient resulted in a nearly 50 times increase in magnetic nanoparticles transport in bovine articular cartilage tissue as compared with static field conditions. This method can be applied to locally deliver therapeutic-loaded magnetic nanoparticles deep into articular cartilage to prevent cartilage degeneration and promote cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

  2. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies. © AlphaMed Press.

  3. Cartilage formation measured by a novel PIINP assay suggests that IGF-I does not stimulate but maintains cartilage formation ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, S H; Sondergaard, B C; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2009-01-01

    explants were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM):F12 in the presence of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 ng/mL of IGF-I. The viability of the chondrocytes was measured by the colorimetric Alamar blue assay. Collagen formation was assessed from the conditioned medium by the PIINP assay...

  4. Effect of a Herbal-Leucine mix on the IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation and inflammatory gene expression in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqi Tariq M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional treatments for the articular diseases are often effective for symptom relief, but can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA, and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favorable influence on the course of the disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective potential of a Herbal and amino acid mixture containing extract of the Uncaria tomentosa, Boswellia spp., Lepidium meyenii and L-Leucine on the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, glycosaminoglycan (GAG, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecan (ACAN and type II collagen (COL2A1 in human OA chondrocytes and OA cartilage explants. Methods Primary OA chondrocytes or OA cartilage explants were pretreated with Herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM, 1-10 μg/ml and then stimulated with IL-1β (5 ng/ml. Effect of HLM on IL-1β-induced gene expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MMP-13, ACAN and COL2A1 was verified by real time-PCR. Estimation of NO and GAG release in culture supernatant was done using commercially available kits. Results HLM tested in these in vitro studies was found to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, as evidenced by strong inhibition of iNOS, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression and NO production in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes (p Leucine mixture (HLM up-regulation of ACAN and COL2A1 expression in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes was also noted (p Conclusion Our data suggests that HLM could be chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent in arthritis, switching chondrocyte gene expression from catabolic direction towards anabolic and regenerative, and consequently this approach may be potentially useful as a new adjunct therapeutic/preventive agent for OA or injury recovery.

  5. Automated Image Analysis of Lung Branching Morphogenesis from Microscopic Images of Fetal Rat Explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Duque, Duarte; Granja, Sara; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Vilaça, João L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Regulating mechanisms of branching morphogenesis of fetal lung rat explants have been an essential tool for molecular research. This work presents a new methodology to accurately quantify the epithelial, outer contour, and peripheral airway buds of lung explants during cellular development from microscopic images. Methods. The outer contour was defined using an adaptive and multiscale threshold algorithm whose level was automatically calculated based on an entropy maximization criterion. The inner lung epithelium was defined by a clustering procedure that groups small image regions according to the minimum description length principle and local statistical properties. Finally, the number of peripheral buds was counted as the skeleton branched ends from a skeletonized image of the lung inner epithelia. Results. The time for lung branching morphometric analysis was reduced in 98% in contrast to the manual method. Best results were obtained in the first two days of cellular development, with lesser standard deviations. Nonsignificant differences were found between the automatic and manual results in all culture days. Conclusions. The proposed method introduces a series of advantages related to its intuitive use and accuracy, making the technique suitable to images with different lighting characteristics and allowing a reliable comparison between different researchers. PMID:25250057

  6. Automated Image Analysis of Lung Branching Morphogenesis from Microscopic Images of Fetal Rat Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L. Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regulating mechanisms of branching morphogenesis of fetal lung rat explants have been an essential tool for molecular research. This work presents a new methodology to accurately quantify the epithelial, outer contour, and peripheral airway buds of lung explants during cellular development from microscopic images. Methods. The outer contour was defined using an adaptive and multiscale threshold algorithm whose level was automatically calculated based on an entropy maximization criterion. The inner lung epithelium was defined by a clustering procedure that groups small image regions according to the minimum description length principle and local statistical properties. Finally, the number of peripheral buds was counted as the skeleton branched ends from a skeletonized image of the lung inner epithelia. Results. The time for lung branching morphometric analysis was reduced in 98% in contrast to the manual method. Best results were obtained in the first two days of cellular development, with lesser standard deviations. Nonsignificant differences were found between the automatic and manual results in all culture days. Conclusions. The proposed method introduces a series of advantages related to its intuitive use and accuracy, making the technique suitable to images with different lighting characteristics and allowing a reliable comparison between different researchers.

  7. Behavioural properties of chick somitic mesoderm and lateral plate when explanted in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellairs, R; Sanders, E J; Portch, P A

    1980-04-01

    Tissue culture, time-lapse cinematographic and electron microscopic techniques have been used to study the properties of chick mesoderm at several stages of differentiation. Lateral plate, unsegmented mesoderm (segmental plate), and newly formed somites were dissected from stage-12 embryos, whilst dermo-myotomes and sclerotomes were dissected from stage-18 embryos. Each type of mesoderm was found to exhibit a characteristic pattern of behaviour. The explants from the unsegmented mesoderm from the newly formed somites and from the older embryos could be placed in a developmental sequence; with increasing differentiation they settled and spread on the substrate more readily, whether explanted as pieces of tissue or as individual cells, and it was concluded that this implied an increased adhesion to the substrate. Similarly, with increasing differentiation, the cells segmented at a faster rate. No significant differences could be discerned in the internal structure of the different types of cells, although differences in the general shape were apparent. The lateral plate mesoderm cells, which bear some resemblances to the unsegmented mesoderm cells in the embryo, also show some morphological resemblances to them in vitro. However, the lateral plate cells had a much greater success in attaching to glass or platic substrates. They were also found to have the highest speed of locomotion of all the tissues studied, whereas the unsegmented had the lowest. It is concluded therefore, that although cells may look similar to one another morphologically, their behaviour may differ greatly, probably because they are already partially determined.

  8. An efficient plant regeneration protocol from petiole explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest percentage of shoot buds induction (64.0%) was observed on MS medium supplemented with 0.52 mgL-1 TDZ with organic additives; adenine sulphate (50 mgL-1) + glutamine (100 mgL-1) + L-arginine (25 mgL-1) + citric acid (0.0025%) + ascorbic acid (0.005%). A maximum of six shoots per explant were ...

  9. [Research progress of mechanism of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling pathway in condylar cartilage growth and remodeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaoli, Xu; Lili, Wu; Zhiwu, Wu; Zhiyuan, Gu

    2016-12-01

    The condylar cartilage was adapted to hypoxic conditions in vivo. However, condylar cartilage cells exposed in normoxia in vitro affect the chondrocyte phenotype and cartilage matrix formation. This condition also resulted in great difficulty in chondrocyte research. Culturing chondrocyte should be simulated in in vivo hypoxia environment as much as possible. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) demonstrates an important transcription factor of adaptive response to hypoxic conditions. HIF-1α also plays an active role in maintaining homeostasis and function of chondrocytes. This review summarized current knowledge of the HIF-1α structure, signaling pathway, and mechanism of HIF-1α in the condylar cartilage repair.

  10. Advances in Application of Mechanical Stimuli in Bioreactors for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Chunqiu; Qiu, Lulu; Gao, Lilan; Zhang, Xizheng

    2017-08-01

    often ignore the importance of biochemical factors to the growth and development of engineered cartilage. In our point of view, only by fully considering synergistic effects of mechanical and biochemical factors can we find appropriate culture conditions for functional cartilage constructs. Once again, rolling-sliding-compression load under appropriate biochemical conditions may be conductive to realize the adaptive development between the structure and function of engineered cartilage in vitro.

  11. ORGANOGÊNESE IN VITRO DE Citrus EM FUNÇÃO DE CONCENTRAÇÕES DE BAP E SECCIONAMENTO DO EXPLANTE CITRUS IN VITRO ORGANOGENESIS RELATED TO BAP CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPLANT SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THAÍS LACAVA DE MOURA

    2001-08-01

    'Valencia' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck. For Rangpur lime, internodal explants were cultured in MT medium, with 25g.L-1 sucrose and supplemented with different concentrations of BAP (0; 2.5; 5; 7.5; 10 mg.L-1. Epicotyl explants were used for 'Pera' and 'Valencia' sweet oranges. For 'Pera' sweet orange, the explants were cultured in MT medium, with 25g.L-1 sucrose and supplemented with different concentrations of BAP (0; 1; 2; 3; 4 mg.L-1. For 'Valencia' sweet orange, the epicotyl explants were cut in half and cultured on MT medium, with 25 g.L-1 of sucrose and 1 mg.L-1 of BAP. Shoot elongation was accomplished on MT + 25 g.L-1 sucrose + 1 mg.L-1 gibberelic acid (GA3 and rooted on MT + 25 g.L-1 of sucrose + 0,5 g.L-1 of activated charcoal + 1 mg.L-1 NAA. The best results for number of buds was 2.5 mg.L-1 of BAP in Rangpur lime and 1 and 2 mg.L-1 in 'Pera' sweet orange. The cut of the explant in half was favorable to the in vitro organogenesis in 'Valencia' sweet orange, but it was not for rooting.

  12. Feasibility of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Xu, Yan; Jin, Chengzhe; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Li, Zhiyong; Pei, Xuan; Wang, Liming

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) materials are widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. However, the current ECM materials are unsatisfactory for clinical practice as most of them are derived from allogenous or xenogenous tissue. This study was designed to develop a novel autologous ECM scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. The autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived ECM (aBMSC-dECM) membrane was collected and fabricated into a three-dimensional porous scaffold via cross-linking and freeze-drying techniques. Articular chondrocytes were seeded into the aBMSC-dECM scaffold and atelocollagen scaffold, respectively. An in vitro culture and an in vivo implantation in nude mice model were performed to evaluate the influence on engineered cartilage. The current results showed that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold had a good microstructure and biocompatibility. After 4 weeks in vitro culture, the engineered cartilage in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group formed thicker cartilage tissue with more homogeneous structure and higher expressions of cartilaginous gene and protein compared with the atelocollagen scaffold group. Furthermore, the engineered cartilage based on the aBMSC-dECM scaffold showed better cartilage formation in terms of volume and homogeneity, cartilage matrix content, and compressive modulus after 3 weeks in vivo implantation. These results indicated that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold could be a successful novel candidate scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  13. Callus induction and plant regeneration from different explant types of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted; Petersen, Karen Koefoed

    1996-01-01

    . The explants were cultured on urashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 4.5, 13.6, 22.6 or 31.7 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Three types of callus were formed but only one was embryogenic and regenerated plants. Callus induction and formation of embryogenic callus depended on the type and developmental......-propagated shoots and older leaves of greenhouse-grown plants. Immature inflorescences smaller than 2.5 cm produced a higher percentage of embryogenic callus than larger more mature inflorescences. Embryogenic callus derived from immature inflorescences had the highest regeneration capacity. Differences in 2......,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid concentrations had no significant effect on callus induction, embryogenic callus formation and plant regeneration....

  14. Tissue engineering of cartilages using biomatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melrose, J.; Chuang, C.; Whitelock, J.

    2008-01-01

    and age-related degenerative diseases can all lead to cartilage loss; however, the low cell density and very limited self-renewal capacity of cartilage necessitate the development of effective therapeutic repair strategies for this tissue. The ontogeny of the chondrocyte, which is the cell that provides...... the biosynthetic machinery for all the component parts of cartilage, is discussed, since an understanding of cartilage development is central to the maintenance of a chondrocytic phenotype in any strategy aiming to produce a replacement cartilage. A plethora of matrices have been developed for cartilage...

  15. Articular cartilage tissue engineering with plasma-rich in growth factors and stem cells with nano scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Abbassy, Hadeer A.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to heal soft tissue injuries and regenerate cartilage is the Holy Grail of musculoskeletal medicine. Articular cartilage repair and regeneration is considered to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or continue hypertrophic cartilage. The lack of efficient modalities of treatment has prompted research into tissue engineering combining stem cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving cartilage therapy. Plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) and/or stem cells may be effective for tissue repair as well as cartilage regenerative processes. There is a great promise to advance current cartilage therapies toward achieving a consistently successful approach for addressing cartilage afflictions. Tissue engineering may be the best way to reach this objective via the use of stem cells, novel biologically inspired scaffolds and, emerging nanotechnology. In this paper, current and emergent approach in the field of cartilage tissue engineering is presented for specific application. In the next years, the development of new strategies using stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium could improve the quality of new formed cartilage.

  16. Acetylcholine suppresses shoot formation and callusing in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shirish C

    2016-06-02

    We present experimental evidence to show that acetylcholine (ACh) causes decrease in shoot formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var Pusa Ruby) when cultured on shoot regeneration medium. The optimum response was obtained at 10(-4) M ACh-enriched medium. ACh also causes decrease in percentage of cultures forming callus and reduces the callus mass. Inhibitors of enzymatic hydrolysis of ACh, neostigmine and physostigmine, also suppresses callogenesis and caulogenesis. On the other hand, the breakdown products of Ach, choline and acetate, do not alter the morphogenic response induced on the shoot regeneration medium. Neostigmine showed optimal reduction in shoot formation at 10(-5) M. The explants cultured on neostigmine augmented medium showed decline in the activity of ACh hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase. ACh and neostigmine added together showed marked reduction in callus mass. These results strongly support the role of ACh as a natural regulator of morphogenesis in tomato plants.

  17. Acetylcholine suppresses shoot formation and callusing in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shirish C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present experimental evidence to show that acetylcholine (ACh) causes decrease in shoot formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var Pusa Ruby) when cultured on shoot regeneration medium. The optimum response was obtained at 10−4 M ACh-enriched medium. ACh also causes decrease in percentage of cultures forming callus and reduces the callus mass. Inhibitors of enzymatic hydrolysis of ACh, neostigmine and physostigmine, also suppresses callogenesis and caulogenesis. On the other hand, the breakdown products of Ach, choline and acetate, do not alter the morphogenic response induced on the shoot regeneration medium. Neostigmine showed optimal reduction in shoot formation at 10−5 M. The explants cultured on neostigmine augmented medium showed decline in the activity of ACh hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase. ACh and neostigmine added together showed marked reduction in callus mass. These results strongly support the role of ACh as a natural regulator of morphogenesis in tomato plants. PMID:27348536

  18. Callus induction and biomass accumulation in vitro in explants from chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa (Michx. Elliot fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I. Calalb

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the following features were determined: biological (the optimal histogen as explant and the optimal age of donor fruit, biotechnological (type, dosage and combination of growth regulators supplements in culture medium Murashige and Skoog as well as sucrose dosage, and physical (light regime, to induce callusing and biomass accumulation in vitro from the succulent chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa (Michx. Elliot fruit. It turned out that it was much easier to induce callus from explants composed of the epicarp and hypoderm cut from fruits at 50–60 days after flowering. The role of light regime and varied supplementation of the basic MS medium with different doses of growth regulators was established; they resulted in four pigmented carpomass: violet, cream-pink, cream-white and green. The best combinations for the proliferation of fruit callus were culture media with 0.2–2.5 mg × dm-3 2,4-D+0.5 mg × dm-3 KIN +60 g × dm-3sucrose, while for fruit biomass accumulation enriched with phenolic substances – 2.5–3.5 mg × dm-3 NAA+0.5 mg × dm-3 KIN+60 g × dm-3sucrose. The chemical study of phenolic compounds by HPLC coupled with the mass spectrometry method identified chlorogenic acid, hiperozide, quercetrin, isoquercitrin and rutozide quantitatively and qualitatively in all pigmented carpomass and fruits; an exception is p-coumaric present only qualitatively in green carpomass and absent in fruit and quercetol absent in green carpomass.

  19. Plant Explants Grown on Medium Supplemented with Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Have a Significant Increase in Embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inese Kokina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of nanotechnology leads to the increasing release of nanoparticles in the environment that results in accumulation of different NPs in living organisms including plants. This can lead to serious changes in plant cultures which leads to genotoxicity. The aims of the present study were to detect if iron oxide NPs pass through the flax cell wall, to compare callus morphology, and to estimate the genotoxicity in Linum usitatissimum L. callus cultures induced by different concentrations of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Two parallel experiments were performed: experiment A, where flax explants were grown on medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l, 1 mg/l, and 1.5 mg/l Fe3O4 NPs for callus culture obtaining, and experiment B, where calluses obtained from basal MS medium were transported into medium supplemented with concentrations of NPs identical to experiment A. Obtained results demonstrate similarly in both experiments that 25 nm Fe3O4 NPs pass into callus cells and induce low toxicity level in the callus cultures. Nevertheless, calluses from experiment A showed 100% embryogenesis in comparison with experiment B where 100% rhizogenesis was noticed. It could be associated with different stress levels and adaptation time for explants and calluses that were transported into medium with Fe3O4 NPs supplementation.

  20. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  1. Co-culture in cartilage tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.A.A.; Riesle, J.U.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2007-01-01

    For biotechnological research in vitro in general and tissue engineering specifically, it is essential to mimic the natural conditions of the cellular environment as much as possible. In choosing a model system for in vitro experiments, the investigator always has to balance between being able to

  2. Induction of shoot regeneration in cotyledon explants of the oilseed crop Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masochon Zimik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sesamum indicum is an ancient oilseed crop known for its high quality edible oil and its medicinally important lignans. The crop is said to be recalcitrant to plant tissue culture thus limiting the use of modern biotechnology for its genetic improvement. We present here a protocol describing plant regeneration through adventitious shoot formation from cotyledons dissected from sesame seeds soaked for four hours in water. Subculturing of the cotyledons after two weeks of culture on to a fresh Murashige and Skoog medium leads to differentiation of adventitious shoots from the proximal cut end of the explant. Culture of cotyledons on a medium containing 9% sucrose for a couple of weeks prior to transfer to MS medium supplemented with 3% sucrose induced a higher frequency of shoot regeneration. The highest frequency of 25% adventitious shoot regeneration was observed for S. indicum variety UMA. This variety also turned out to be the best among the ten genotypes tested for shoot regeneration through tissue culture. While addition of IAA marginally improved regeneration, silver nitrate was found essential for enhancing the frequency of shoot regeneration. The regenerated shoots formed roots on full strength MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l IBA and the rooted plants were established in soil.

  3. Propagation of jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) by organ and tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M.J.; McComb, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Micropropagation methods are described for the production of clonal lines from Eucalyptus marginata (jarrah) seedlings. Nodal explants from mature trees can also yield shoot cultures, but a high frequency of contamination occurs among such explants. Uncontaminated callus cultures can be produced from mature trees by culturing stamen filaments and shoots can subsequently be regenerated from this callus. The rooting percentage of shoot cultures from either nodes or stamen callus of mature trees is low compared with that from seedling explants. Considerable variation was observed between trees in the ability of stamen callus to regenerate shoots and in the frequency of rooting. (Refs. 27)

  4. Osteoarthritic cartilage is more homogeneous than healthy cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, Arish A; Dam, Erik B; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    it evolves as a consequence to disease and thereby can be used as a progression biomarker. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 283 right and left knees from 159 subjects aged 21 to 81 years were scanned using a Turbo 3D T1 sequence on a 0.18-T MRI Esaote scanner. The medial compartment of the tibial cartilage...... sheet was segmented using a fully automatic voxel classification scheme based on supervised learning. From the segmented cartilage sheet, homogeneity was quantified by measuring entropy from the distribution of signal intensities inside the compartment. Each knee was examined by radiography...... of the region was evaluated by testing for overfitting. Three different regularization techniques were evaluated for reducing overfitting errors. RESULTS: The P values for separating the different groups based on cartilage homogeneity were 2 x 10(-5) (KL 0 versus KL 1) and 1 x 10(-7) (KL 0 versus KL >0). Using...

  5. Transcriptomic signatures in cartilage ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Age is an important factor in the development of osteoarthritis. Microarray studies provide insight into cartilage aging but do not reveal the full transcriptomic phenotype of chondrocytes such as small noncoding RNAs, pseudogenes, and microRNAs. RNA-Seq is a powerful technique for the interrogation of large numbers of transcripts including nonprotein coding RNAs. The aim of the study was to characterise molecular mechanisms associated with age-related changes in gene signatures. Methods RNA for gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq and real-time PCR analysis was isolated from macroscopically normal cartilage of the metacarpophalangeal joints of eight horses; four young donors (4 years old) and four old donors (>15 years old). RNA sequence libraries were prepared following ribosomal RNA depletion and sequencing was undertaken using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Differentially expressed genes were defined using Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate correction with a generalised linear model likelihood ratio test (P ageing cartilage. Conclusion There was an age-related dysregulation of matrix, anabolic and catabolic cartilage factors. This study has increased our knowledge of transcriptional networks in cartilage ageing by providing a global view of the transcriptome. PMID:23971731

  6. Imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Pardiwala, Dinshaw

    2014-01-01

    The rationale for cartilage repair is to prevent precocious osteoarthritis in untreated focal cartilage injuries in the young and middle-aged population. The gamut of surgical techniques, normal postoperative radiological appearances, and possible complications have been described. An objective method of recording the quality of repair tissue is with the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. This scoring system evaluates nine parameters that include the extent of defect filling, border zone integration, signal intensity, quality of structure and surface, subchondral bone, subchondral lamina, and records presence or absence of synovitis and adhesions. The five common techniques of cartilage repair currently offered include bone marrow stimulation (microfracture or drilling), mosaicplasty, synthetic resorbable scaffold grafts, osteochondral allograft transplants, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Complications of cartilage repair procedures that may be demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include plug loosening, graft protuberance, graft depression, and collapse in mosaicplasty, graft hypertrophy in ACI, and immune response leading to graft rejection, which is more common with synthetic grafts and cadaveric allografts

  7. The formation of human auricular cartilage from microtic tissue: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Mohamad Fikeri bin; See, Goh Bee; Hui, Chua Kien; Abdullah, Asma bt; Saim, Lokman bin; Saim, Aminuddin bin; Idrus, Ruszymah bt Haji

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to isolate, culture-expand and characterize the chondrocytes isolated from microtic cartilage and evaluate its potential as a cell source for ear cartilage reconstruction. Specific attention was to construct the auricular cartilage tissue by using fibrin as scaffold. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. After ear reconstructive surgery at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, chondrocytes were isolated from microtic cartilage. Chondrocytes isolated from the tissue were cultured expanded until passage 4 (P4). Upon confluency at P4, chondrocytes were harvested and tissue engineered constructs were made with human plasma polymerized to fibrin. Constructs formed later is implanted at the dorsal part of nude mice for 8 weeks, followed by post-implantation evaluation with histology staining (Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and Safranin O), immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for chondrogenic associated genes expression level. Under gross assessment, the construct after 8 weeks of implantation showed similar physical characteristics that of cartilage. Histological staining showed abundant lacunae cells embedded in extracellular matrix similar to that of native cartilage. Safranin O staining showed positive staining which indicates the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the strong positive staining for collagen type II, the specific collagen type in the cartilage. Gene expression quantification showed no significant differences in the expression of chondrogenic gene used which is collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan core protein (ACP), elastin and sox9 genes when compared to construct formed from normal auricular tissue. Chondrocytes isolated from microtia cartilage has the potential to be used as an alternative cell source for external ear reconstruction in future clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  8. Molecular mechanism of hypoxia-induced chondrogenesis and its application in in vivo cartilage tissue engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Duval , Elise; Baugé , Catherine; Andriamanalijaona , Rina; Bénateau , Hervé; Leclercq , Sylvain; Dutoit , Soizic; Poulain , Laurent; Galéra , Philippe; Boumédiene , Karim

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Cartilage engineering is one of the most challenging issue in regenerative medicine, due to its limited self-ability to repair. Here, we assessed engineering of cartilage tissue starting from human bone marrow (hBM) stem cells under hypoxic environment and delineated the mechanism whereby chondrogenesis could be conducted without addition of exogenous growth factors. hBM stem cells were cultured in alginate beads and chondrogenesis was monitored by chondrocyte phenotyp...

  9. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Rapid expression of cytoskeletal components in microvilli of pig small intestinal mucosal explants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Danielsen, E M

    1984-01-01

    Using alkaline extraction to separate cytoskeletal and membrane proteins of intestinal microvilli, the kinetics of assembly of these two microvillar protein compartments was studied by pulse-chase labelling of pig small intestinal mucosal explants, kept in organ culture. Following a 10 min pulse...... of [35S]methionine, the membrane proteins did not appear in the microvillar fraction until after 40-60 min of chase. In contrast, the cytoskeletal components, of which the 110-kDa protein and villin were immunologically identified, were expressed in the microvillar fraction immediately after the 10 min...

  10. In vitro plant regeneration of Albizia lebbeck (L. from seed explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Perveen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: An efficient and reproducible regeneration protocol for rapid multiplication of Albizia lebbeck (L. was developed by using intact seed explants.Methods: Murashige and Skoog's (MS medium supplemented with different hormones (BA, Kn, GA3 and TDZ was used for the induction of multiple shoots from the seed explants. Ex-vitro rooting was performed by using pulse treatment method in auxins (IBA and NAA and the complete plantlets were transferred to the field.Results: High frequency direct shoot induction was found in aseptic seed cultures of A. lebbeck on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 5.0 µM TDZ (Thiadiazuron. Seeds were germinated after 7 days of culture and induced maximum 8 shoots from the region adjacent to the apex of the primary shoot of the seedling upto 25 days of incubation. Proliferating shoot cultures with increased shoot length was established by sub-culture of excised sprouting epicotyls on MS medium supplied with reduced concentrations of TDZ. Maximum shoot regeneration frequency (76 % with  highest number of shoots (21 and shoot length (5.1 cm per sprouting epicotyl was observed in the MS medium supplemented with 0.5 µM TDZ after 8 weeks of culture. Different concentrations of Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA were tested to determine the optimal conditions for ex-vitro rooting of the microshoots. The best treatment for maximum ex-vitro root induction frequency (81 % was accomplished with IBA (250 µM pulse treatment given to the basal end of the microshoots for 30 min followed by their transfer in plastic cups containing soilrite and eventually established in normal garden soil + soilrite (1:1 with 78 % survival rate. In addition, histological study was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the regenerated shoots from the epicotyl region.Conclusion: The findings will be fruitful in getting a time saving and cost effective protocol for the in vitro propagation of Albizia

  11. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage for orbital reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linberg, J.V.; Anderson, R.L.; Edwards, J.J.; Panje, W.R.; Bardach, J.

    1980-01-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is convenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption

  12. MR Imaging of Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Uetani, Masataka

    2005-01-01

    MR imaging is still an evolving technique for the diagnosis of joint cartilage lesions. Early morphologic changes in the degenerative cartilage are not reliably diagnosed even with use of tailored MR imaging techniques. The detection of the biochemical changes of cartilage or high-resolution MRI will serve as an important tool for the early diagnosis of cartilage degeneration in near future. Further prospective studies are needed to establish the role of MR imaging in clinical use.

  13. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic

  14. Modeling the development of tissue engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengers, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    The limited healing capacity of articular cartilage forms a major clinical problem. In general, current treatments of cartilage damage temporarily reliefs symptoms, but fail in the long term. Tissue engineering (TE) has been proposed as a more permanent repair strategy. Cartilage TE aims at

  15. Assessment of fixed charge density in regenerated cartilage by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Shogo; Homma, Kazuhiro; Numano, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Katsuko; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Ushida, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Applying regenerated cartilage in a clinical setting requires noninvasive evaluation to detect the maturity of cartilage tissue. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage is well accepted and has been applied clinically in recent years. We attempt to establish a noninvasive method to evaluate the maturity of regenerated cartilage tissue using gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. To reconstruct cartilaginous tissue, we embedded articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine humeral head in agarose gel and cultured the cells in vitro up to 4 weeks. The fixed charge density (FCD) of the cartilage was determined using MRI gadolinium exclusion method. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content was determined by dimethylmethylene blue dye-binding assay. The sGAG content and FCD of the regenerated cartilage increased with duration of culture. In the T 1 Gd maps, the [Gd-DTPA 2- ] in the specimen decreased, and the boundary between the sample disk and the bath solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) became clearer as time in culture increased. In the linear regression analysis, FCD and sGAG content correlated significantly. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging measurements can be useful predictors of the degree of cartilaginous tissue formation. (author)

  16. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  17. Replication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauwynck Hans J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely "mixing vessel" for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs. However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia

  18. Transfection of the IHH gene into rabbit BMSCs in a simulated microgravity environment promotes chondrogenic differentiation and inhibits cartilage aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Kuan; Liu, Jun-Feng; Xia, Kuo; Chen, Li-Yang; Wu, Xing

    2016-09-27

    The effect of overexpressing the Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene on the chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was investigated in a simulated microgravity environment. An adenovirus plasmid encoding the rabbit IHH gene was constructed in vitro and transfected into rabbit BMSCs. Two large groups were used: conventional cell culture and induction model group and simulated microgravity environment group. Each large group was further divided into blank control group, GFP transfection group, and IHH transfection group. During differentiation induction, the expression levels of cartilage-related and cartilage hypertrophy-related genes and proteins in each group were determined. In the conventional model, the IHH transfection group expressed high levels of cartilage-related factors (Coll2 and ANCN) at the early stage of differentiation induction and expressed high levels of cartilage hypertrophy-related factors (Coll10, annexin 5, and ALP) at the late stage. Under the simulated microgravity environment, the IHH transfection group expressed high levels of cartilage-related factors and low levels of cartilage hypertrophy-related factors at all stages of differentiation induction. Under the simulated microgravity environment, transfection of the IHH gene into BMSCs effectively promoted the generation of cartilage and inhibited cartilage aging and osteogenesis. Therefore, this technique is suitable for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis

  20. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  1. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigation of an explanted opacified intraocular lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, V., E-mail: viosimon@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Radu, T.; Vulpoi, A. [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rosca, C. [Optilens Clinic of Ophthalmology, 400604 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Eniu, D. [Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Molecular Sciences, 400349 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Changes on intraocular lens (IOL) surface after implantation. • Partial opacification of IOL central area. • Elemental composition on IOL surface prior to and after implantation. • First XPS depth profiling examination of the opacifying deposits. • Cell-mediated hydroxyapatite structuring. - Abstract: The investigated polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens explanted an year after implantation presented a fine granularity consisting of ring-like grains of about 15 μm in diameter. In order to evidence the changes occurred on intraocular lens relative to morphology, elemental composition and atomic environments, microscopic and spectroscopic analyses were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDS), and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies. The results revealed that the grains contain hydroxyapatite mineral phase. A protein layer covers the lens both in opacified and transparent zones. The amide II band is like in basal epithelial cells. The shape and size of the grains, and the XPS depth profiling results indicate the possibility of a cell-mediated process involving lens epithelial cells which fagocitated apoptotic epithelial cells, and in which the debris derived from cell necrosis were calcified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on explanted intraocular lenses using XPS depth profiling in order to examine the inside of the opacifying deposits.

  2. Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signy Bendiksen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of viruses in osteoarthritis remains controversial because the prevalence of viral nucleic acid sequences in peripheral blood or synovial fluid from osteoarthritis patients and that in healthy control subjects are similar. Until now the presence of virus has not been analyzed in cartilage. We screened cartilage and chondrocytes from advanced and non-/early osteoarthritis patients for parvovirus B19, herpes simplex virus-1, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, hepatitis C virus, and human endogenous retroviruses transcripts. Endogenous retroviruses transcripts, but none of the other viruses, were detected in 15 out the 17 patients. Sequencing identified the virus as HERV-WE1 and E2. HERV-W activity was confirmed by high expression levels of syncytin, dsRNA, virus budding, and the presence of virus-like particles in all advanced osteoarthritis cartilages examined. Low levels of HERV-WE1, but not E2 envelope RNA, were observed in 3 out of 8 non-/early osteoarthritis patients, while only 3 out of 7 chondrocytes cultures displayed low levels of syncytin, and just one was positive for virus-like particles. This study demonstrates for the first time activation of HERV-W in cartilage of osteoarthritis patients; however, a causative role for HERV-W in development or deterioration of the disease remains to be proven.

  3. Effects of Bone Morphogenic Proteins on Engineered Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Keith, J.; Blunk, Torsten; Courter, Donald L.; Sieminski, Alisha; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freed, Lisa E.

    2007-01-01

    A report describes experiments on the effects of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) on engineered cartilage grown in vitro. In the experiments, bovine calf articular chondrocytes were seeded onto biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds and cultured in, variously, a control medium or a medium supplemented with BMP-2, BMP-12, or BMP-13 in various concentrations. Under all conditions investigated, cell-polymer constructs cultivated for 4 weeks macroscopically and histologically resembled native cartilage. At a concentration of 100 ng/mL, BMP-2, BMP-12, or BMP-13 caused (1) total masses of the constructs to exceed those of the controls by 121, 80, or 62 percent, respectively; (2) weight percentages of glycosaminoglycans in the constructs to increase by 27, 18, or 15, respectively; and (3) total collagen contents of the constructs to decrease to 63, 89, or 83 percent of the control values, respectively. BMP-2, but not BMP-12 or BMP-13, promoted chondrocyte hypertrophy. These observations were interpreted as suggesting that the three BMPs increase the growth rates and modulate the compositions of engineered cartilage. It was also concluded that in vitro engineered cartilage is a suitable system for studying effects of BMPs on chondrogenesis in a well-defined environment.

  4. Evaluation of novel biodegradable three-armed- and hyper-branched tissue adhesives in a meniscus explant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, A I; Hannink, G; Verhoeven, R; Grijpma, D W; Buma, P

    2017-05-01

    Current treatment methods to repair meniscal tears do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are considered promising alternatives, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. The first aim of this study was to analyze the adhesive properties of and tissue response to two recently developed biodegradable block copolymeric three-armed- and hyper-branched tissue adhesives. The second aim was to investigate if tissue surface modification with collagenase improves the attachment of the adhesives and increases the healing potential of the tissue. Cylindrical explants were harvested from bovine menisci. The central core of the explants was removed and glued back into the defect, with or without incubation in collagenase solution prior to gluing, using one of the novel glues, Dermabond® or fibrin glue. The repair constructs were cultured in vitro for 1 and 28 days. Adhesion tests and histology were performed to analyze the effects of the glue in combination with the additional treatment. The adhesive strength of the novel glues was 40-50 kPa, which was significantly higher than that of fibrin glue (15 kPa). Cells were present in direct contact with the glues, and the tissue remained vital during the whole culture period. Increased cellularity around the tear in the collagenase treated explants was observed after 1 day. The two newly developed tissue adhesives are attractive materials to be used for repair of meniscal tears. The beneficial influence of collagenase treatment in treating meniscal tears with glues still needs to be confirmed in more clinical relevant studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1405-1411, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Bautista

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods.

  6. Can one generate stable hyaline cartilage from adult mesenchymal stem cells? A developmental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellingman, Catharine A; Koevoet, Wendy; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2012-11-01

    Chondrogenically differentiating bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) display signs of chondrocyte hypertrophy, such as production of collagen type X, MMP13 and alkaline phosphatase (ALPL). For cartilage reconstructions this is undesirable, as terminally differentiated cartilage produced by BMSCs mineralizes when implanted in vivo. Terminal differentiation is not restricted to BMSCs but is also encountered in chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as well as embryonic stem cells, which by definition should be able to generate all types of tissues, including stable cartilage. Therefore, we propose that the currently used culture conditions may drive the cells towards terminal differentiation. In this manuscript we aim to review the literature, supplemented by our own data to answer the question, is it possible to generate stable hyaline cartilage from adult MSCs? We demonstrate that recently published methods for inhibiting terminal differentiation (through PTHrP, MMP13 or blocking phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8) result in cartilage formation with reduction of hypertrophic markers, although this does not reach the low level of stable chondrocytes. A set of hypertrophy markers should be included in future studies to characterize the phenotype more precisely. Finally, we used what is currently known in developmental biology about the differential development of hyaline and terminally differentiated cartilage to provide thought and insights to change current culture models for creating hyaline cartilage. Inhibiting terminal differentiation may not result in stable hyaline cartilage if the right balance of signals has not been created from the start of culture onwards. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  8. Current status of imaging of articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.; Resnick, D.

    1996-01-01

    Various imaging methods have been applied to assessment of articular cartilage. These include standard radiography, arthrography, CT, CT arthrography, ultrasonography, and MR imaging. Radiography remains the initial musculoskeletal imaging method. However, it is insensitive to early stages of cartilage abnormalities. MR imaging has great potential in the assessment of articular cartilage, although high-quality scans are required because imaging signs of cartilage abnormalities may be subtle. The potential and limitations of various sequences and techniques are discussed, including MR arthrography. The role of the other imaging methods in assessment of articular cartilage appears to be limited. (orig.). With 8 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Cartilage Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expresses Lubricin In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yusuke; Muneta, Takeshi; Otabe, Koji; Ozeki, Nobutake; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Udo, Mio; Saito, Ryusuke; Yanagisawa, Katsuaki; Ichinose, Shizuko; Koga, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lubricin expression in the superficial cartilage will be a crucial factor in the success of cartilage regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source and the use of aggregates of MSCs has some advantages in terms of chondrogenic potential and efficiency of cell adhesion. Lubricin expression in transplanted MSCs has not been fully elucidated so far. Our goals were to determine (1) whether cartilage pellets of human MSCs expressed lubricin in vitro chondrogenesis, (2) whether aggregates of human MSCs promoted lubricin expression, and (3) whether aggregates of MSCs expressed lubricin in the superficial cartilage after transplantation into osteochondral defects in rats. Methods For in vitro analysis, human bone marrow (BM) MSCs were differentiated into cartilage by pellet culture, and also aggregated using the hanging drop technique. For an animal study, aggregates of BM MSCs derived from GFP transgenic rats were transplanted to the osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of wild type rat knee joints. Lubricin expression was mainly evaluated in differentiated and regenerated cartilages. Results In in vitro analysis, lubricin was detected in the superficial zone of the pellets and conditioned medium. mRNA expression of Proteoglycan4 (Prg4), which encodes lubricin, in pellets was significantly higher than that of undifferentiated MSCs. Aggregates showed different morphological features between the superficial and deep zone, and the Prg4 mRNA expression increased after aggregate formation. Lubricin was also found in the aggregate. In a rat study, articular cartilage regeneration was significantly better in the MSC group than in the control group as shown by macroscopical and histological analysis. The transmission electron microscope showed that morphology of the superficial cartilage in the MSC group was closer to that of the intact cartilage than in the control group. GFP positive cells remained in the repaired tissue and

  10. A novel therapeutic strategy for cartilage diseases based on lipid nanoparticle-RNAi delivery system

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    Wang S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaowei Wang,1 Xiaochun Wei,1 Xiaojuan Sun,1 Chongwei Chen,1 Jingming Zhou,2 Ge Zhang,3 Heng Wu,3 Baosheng Guo,3 Lei Wei1,2 1Department of Orthopaedics, The 2nd Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 2Department of Orthopaedics, Rhode Island Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong Background: Cartilage degeneration affects millions of people but preventing its degeneration is a big challenge. Although RNA interference (RNAi has been used in human trials via silencing specific genes, the cartilage RNAi has not been possible to date because the cartilage is an avascular and very dense tissue with very low permeability. Purpose: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a novel lipid nanoparticle (LNP-siRNA delivery system that can prevent cartilage degeneration by knocking down specific genes. Methods: LNP transfection efficiency was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh has been correlated with cartilage degeneration. The in vivo effects of LNP-Ihh siRNA complexes on cartilage degeneration were evaluated in a rat model of surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA. Results: In vitro, 100% of chondrocytes were transfected with siRNA in the LNP-siRNA group. In accordance with the cell culture results, red positive signals could be detected even in the deep layer of cartilage tissue cultures treated by LNP-beacon. In vivo data showed that LNP is specific for cartilage, since positive signals were detected by fluorescence molecular tomography and confocal microscopy in joint cartilage injected with LNP-beacon, but not on the surface of the synovium. In the rat model of OA, intraarticular injection of LNP-Ihh siRNA attenuated OA progression, and PCR results showed LNP-Ihh siRNA exerted a positive impact on anabolic metabolism and negative

  11. [Current overview of cartilage regeneration procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, H; Wild, M; Rath, B; Tingart, M; Driessen, A; Quack, V; Betsch, M

    2017-11-01

    Cartilage is an avascular, alymphatic and non-innervated tissue with limited intrinsic repair potential. The high prevalence of cartilage defects and their tremendous clinical importance are a challenge for all treating physicians. This article provides the reader with an overview about current cartilage treatment options and their clinical outcome. Microfracture is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of small cartilage lesions. Small osteochondral defects can be effectively treated with the autologous osteochondral transplantation system. Larger cartilage defects are successfully treated by autologous membrane-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) or by membrane-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI). Despite limitations of current cartilage repair strategies, such procedures can result in short- and mid-term clinical improvement of the patients. Further developments and clinical studies are necessary to improve the long-term outcome following cartilage repair.

  12. Biostable scaffolds of polyacrylate polymers implanted in the articular cartilage induce hyaline-like cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Tello, María; Forriol, Francisco; Martín de Llano, José J; Antolinos-Turpin, Carmen; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Gómez Ribelles, José L; Carda, Carmen

    2017-07-05

    To study the influence of scaffold properties on the organization of in vivo cartilage regeneration. Our hypothesis was that stress transmission to the cells seeded inside the pores of the scaffold or surrounding it, which is highly dependent on the scaffold properties, determines the differentiation of both mesenchymal cells and dedifferentiated autologous chondrocytes. 4 series of porous scaffolds made of different polyacrylate polymers, previously seeded with cultured rabbit chondrocytes or without cells, were implanted in cartilage defects in rabbits. Subchondral bone was injured during the surgery to allow blood to reach the implantation site and fill the scaffold pores. At 3 months after implantation, excellent tissue regeneration was obtained, with a well-organized layer of hyaline-like cartilage at the condylar surface in most cases of the hydrophobic or slightly hydrophilic series. The most hydrophilic material induced the poorest regeneration. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds. All of the materials used were biocompatible, biostable polymers, so, in contrast to some other studies, our results were not perturbed by possible effects attributable to material degradation products or to the loss of scaffold mechanical properties over time due to degradation. Cartilage regeneration depends mainly on the properties of the scaffold, such as stiffness and hydrophilicity, whereas little difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds.

  13. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, S; Manjunath, S; Senthilkumar, R; Rajendiran, S; Yoshioka, H; Mori, Y; Abraham, S

    2011-01-01

    The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP) is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury. Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain) and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining). The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any adverse reactions and upon confirmation of safety following completion of the

  14. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on ...

  15. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a

  16. Strategies for Stratified Cartilage Bioprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313939322

    2012-01-01

    Multiple materials, cells and growth factors can be combined into one construct by the use of a state–of-the-art bioprinter. This technique may in the future make the fabrication of complete tissues or organs possible. In this thesis the feasibility of the bioprinting of cartilage and the

  17. Chondroma of the cricoid cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo, Giulianno Molina de

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The larynx cartilaginous tumors are uncommon and comprise 1% of all cartilaginous tumors. The chondroma is the most common benign tumor affecting the larynx cricoid cartilage (75%, and manifests normally in the male gender with dysphonia, progressive dyspnea and dysphagy in some cases. Objective: The objective of this study is to report a case of cricoid cartilage chondroma, in a patient with the symptom of a nodular lesion in the frontal cervical region of slow and progressive growth. Case Report: The treatment was the modified partial laryngectomy with resection of the lower hemisegment of the thyroid cartilage, cricoid hemicartilage and the first tracheal ring with free margins and reconstruction with a pericondrium and muscular prethyroidean piece. The anatomopathological exam showed a chondroma of 1.1 cm, of atypical low cellularity and low figures of mitosis in the frontal region of the cricoid cartilage. Conclusion: In this report we agreed with the literature for the primarily extensive surgical treatment depending on the location and the size of the cricoid chondroma; however, other modalities of treatment may be adopted in cases where the tumor extension appoints a total laryngectomy or when this is not possible to carry out, aiming at the preservation of the larynx. For the suitable treatment of cricoid chondromas, the understanding of the disease natural evolution and more case reports are still necessary.

  18. Utility of a mouse model of osteoarthritis to demonstrate cartilage protection by IFNγ-primed equine mesenchymal stem cells

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    Marie Maumus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from adipose tissue (ASC have been shown to influence the course of osteoarthritis (OA in different animal models and are promising in veterinary medicine for horses involved in competitive sport. The aim of this study was to characterize equine ASCs (eASC and investigate the role of interferon-gamma (IFNγ-priming on their therapeutic effect in a murine model of OA, which could be relevant to equine OA.Methods. ASC were isolated from subcutaneous fat. Expression of specific markers was tested by cytometry and RT-qPCR. Differentiation potential was evaluated by histology and RT-qPCR. For functional assays, naïve or IFNγ-primed eASCs were cocultured with PBMC or articular cartilage explants. Finally, the therapeutic effect of eASCs was tested in the model of collagenase-induced OA in mice (CIOA.Results. The immunosuppressive function of eASCs on equine T cell proliferation and their chondroprotective effect on equine cartilage explants were demonstrated in vitro. Both cartilage degradation and T cell activation were reduced by naïve and IFNγ-primed eASCs but IFNγ-priming enhanced these functions. In CIOA, intra-articular injection of eASCs prevented articular cartilage from degradation and IFNγ-primed eASCs were more potent than naïve cells. This effect was related to the modulation of eASC secretome by IFNγ-priming.Conclusion. IFNγ-priming of eASCs potentiated their antiproliferative and chondroprotective functions. We demonstrated that the immunocompetent mouse model of CIOA was relevant to test the therapeutic efficacy of xenogeneic eASCs for OA and confirmed that IFNγ-primed eASCs may have a therapeutic value for musculoskeletal diseases in veterinary medicine.

  19. Cartilage Turnover Reflected by Metabolic Processing of Type II Collagen: A Novel Marker of Anabolic Function in Chondrocytes

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    Natasja Stæhr Gudmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP. This is expected to originate primarily from remodeling of hyaline cartilage. A mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab was raised in mouse, targeting specifically PIIBNP (QDVRQPG and used in development of the assay. The specificity, sensitivity, 4-parameter fit and stability of the assay were tested. Levels of PIIBNP were quantified in human serum (0.6–2.2 nM, human amniotic fluid (163–188 nM and sera from different animal species, e.g., fetal bovine serum (851–901 nM with general good linearity (100% (SD 7.6 recovery and good intra- and inter-assay variation (CV% < 10. Dose (0.1 to 100 ng/mL and time (7, 14 and 21 days dependent release of PIIBNP were evaluated in the conditioned medium from bovine cartilage explants (BEX and human cartilage explants (HEX upon stimulation with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and fibroblastic growth factor-2 (FGF-2. TGF-β1 and IGF-1 in concentrations of 10–100 ng/mL significantly (p < 0.05 induced release of PIIBNP in BEX compared to conditions without treatment (WO. In HEX, IGF-1 100 ng/mL was able to induce a significant increase of PIIBNP after one week compared to WO. FGF-2 did not induce a PIIBNP release in our models. To our knowledge this is the first assay, which is able to specifically evaluate PIIBNP excretion. The Pro-C2 assay seems to provide a promising and novel marker of type II collagen formation.

  20. Effect of explant density and volume of cultivation medium on in-vitro multiplication of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. varieties "Brigitta" and "Legacy"

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    Mario Rodríguez Beraud

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the investigation was to evaluate the in-vitro multiplication of two varieties of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L., “Brigitta” and “Legacy” in response to five explants densities (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 and four flask volumes (10, 20, 30 and 40 mL for cultivation. For both varieties the cultivation medium WPM (Woody Plant Medium was used. The experiment was completely randomized with 20 treatments and 12 repetitions per treatment. After 45 days of cultivation we evaluated the height of shoots, number of shoots/explant, number of nodes/shoot and number of shoots/flask. Variety “Brigitta” had highest shoots at higher densities and flask volumes, while variety “Legacy” had the highest average shoot height with intermediate densities and high volumes. Regarding the number of shoots/explant, the volume of the medium had no influence on “Brigitta”, however, higher plant densities affected this parameter. With variety “Legacy” the maximum number of shoots was achieved with lower plant densities and intermediate culture volumes per flask. In relation to the number of nodes per explant "Brigitta had lower numbers as compared to “Legacy”, but with both varieties the number of nodes decresed with smaller volumes of medium in the flasks. For the number of shoots per flask, “Brigitta” responsed best at higher densities exceeding 40 shoots per flask. In contrast, “Legacy” produced maximum results at density of 25 explants in 30 mL of medium. It is concluded that for the optimum multiplication of both varieties the correct selection of both, the planting density and the volume of multiplication medium are important.

  1. Decellularized cartilage may be a chondroinductive material for osteochondral tissue engineering.

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    Amanda J Sutherland

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM-based materials are attractive for regenerative medicine in their ability to potentially aid in stem cell recruitment, infiltration, and differentiation without added biological factors. In musculoskeletal tissue engineering, demineralized bone matrix is widely used, but recently cartilage matrix has been attracting attention as a potentially chondroinductive material. The aim of this study was thus to establish a chemical decellularization method for use with articular cartilage to quantify removal of cells and analyze the cartilage biochemical content at various stages during the decellularization process, which included a physically devitalization step. To study the cellular response to the cartilage matrix, rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs were cultured in cell pellets containing cells only (control, chondrogenic differentiation medium (TGF-β, chemically decellularized cartilage particles (DCC, or physically devitalized cartilage particles (DVC. The chemical decellularization process removed the vast majority of DNA and about half of the glycosaminoglycans (GAG within the matrix, but had no significant effect on the amount of hydroxyproline. Most notably, the DCC group significantly outperformed TGF-β in chondroinduction of rBMSCs, with collagen II gene expression an order of magnitude or more higher. While DVC did not exhibit a chondrogenic response to the extent that DCC did, DVC had a greater down regulation of collagen I, collagen X and Runx2. A new protocol has been introduced for cartilage devitalization and decellularization in the current study, with evidence of chondroinductivity. Such bioactivity along with providing the 'raw material' building blocks of regenerating cartilage may suggest a promising role for DCC in biomaterials that rely on recruiting endogenous cell recruitment and differentiation for cartilage regeneration.

  2. Hyaline Articular Matrix Formed by Dynamic Self-Regenerating Cartilage and Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meppelink, Amanda M; Zhao, Xing; Griffin, Darvin J; Erali, Richard; Gill, Thomas J; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Redmond, Robert W; Randolph, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Injuries to the articular cartilage surface are challenging to repair because cartilage possesses a limited capacity for self-repair. The outcomes of current clinical procedures aimed to address these injuries are inconsistent and unsatisfactory. We have developed a novel method for generating hyaline articular cartilage to improve the outcome of joint surface repair. A suspension of 10(7) swine chondrocytes was cultured under reciprocating motion for 14 days. The resulting dynamic self-regenerating cartilage (dSRC) was placed in a cartilage ring and capped with fibrin and collagen gel. A control group consisted of chondrocytes encapsulated in fibrin gel. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and harvested after 6 weeks. Gross, histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses were performed. In swine patellar groove, dSRC was implanted into osteochondral defects capped with collagen gel and compared to defects filled with osteochondral plugs, collagen gel, or left empty after 6 weeks. In mice, the fibrin- and collagen-capped dSRC constructs showed enhanced contiguous cartilage matrix formation over the control of cells encapsulated in fibrin gel. Biochemically, the fibrin and collagen gel dSRC groups were statistically improved in glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline content compared to the control. There was no statistical difference in the biomechanical data between the dSRC groups and the control. The swine model also showed contiguous cartilage matrix in the dSRC group but not in the collagen gel and empty defects. These data demonstrate the survivability and successful matrix formation of dSRC under the mechanical forces experienced by normal hyaline cartilage in the knee joint. The results from this study demonstrate that dSRC capped with hydrogels successfully engineers contiguous articular cartilage matrix in both nonload-bearing and load-bearing environments.

  3. Utilization of Aseptic Seedling Explants for In vitro Propagation of Indian Red Wood

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    Kishore Kumar CHIRUVELLA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Micropropagation has been advocated as one of the most viable biotechnological tool for ex situ conservation of rare, endangered endemic medicinal plants germplasm. Rapid clonal micropropagation protocol for large-scale multiplication of an endemic medicinal plant Soymida febrifuga (Meliaceae was established from 15-day aseptic seedling cotyledonary node and shoot tip explants. High frequency of sprouting and shoot differentiation was observed from cotyledonary node explants compared to shoot tip, on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium fortified with BA, KN, 2-iP and CM. Of the cytokinins used, BA (3.0 mgl-1 supported highest average number and maximum multiple shoot differentiation (16.6. In vitro proliferated shoots were multiplied rapidly by culturing nodal segments as microcuttings, further subcultured on the same media for elongation. Elongated shoots upon transfer to MS medium fortified with IBA showed rooting within two weeks of culture. Rooted plantlets were successfully hardened and 75% of rooted shoots successfully survived on establishment to the soil. Plants looked healthy with no visually detectable phenotypic variations. This protocol provides a successful and rapid technique that can be used for ex situ conservation minimizing the pressure on wild populations and contributes to the conservation of this endemic medicinally potent flora.

  4. Cellular, pharmacological, and biophysical evaluation of explanted lungs from a patient with sickle cell disease and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Natasha M; Yao, Mingyi; Sembrat, John; George, M Patricia; Knupp, Heather; Ross, Mark; Sharifi-Sanjani, Maryam; Milosevic, Jadranka; St Croix, Claudette; Rajkumar, Revathi; Frid, Maria G; Hunter, Kendall S; Mazzaro, Luciano; Novelli, Enrico M; Stenmark, Kurt R; Gladwin, Mark T; Ahmad, Ferhaan; Champion, Hunter C; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is recognized as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We now report benchtop phenotyping from the explanted lungs of the first successful lung transplant in SCD. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) cultured from the explanted lungs were analyzed for proliferate capacity, superoxide (O2 (•-)) production, and changes in key pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-associated molecules and compared with non-PAH PASMCs. Upregulation of several pathologic processes persisted in culture in SCD lung PASMCs in spite of cell passage. SCD lung PASMCs showed growth factor- and serum-independent proliferation, upregulation of matrix genes, and increased O2 (•-) production compared with control cells. Histologic analysis of SCD-associated PAH arteries demonstrated increased and ectopically located extracellular matrix deposition and degradation of elastin fibers. Biomechanical analysis of these vessels confirmed increased arterial stiffening and loss of elasticity. Functional analysis of distal fifth-order pulmonary arteries from these lungs demonstrated increased vasoconstriction to an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist and concurrent loss of both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasodilation compared with normal pulmonary arteries. This is the first study to evaluate the molecular, cellular, functional, and mechanical changes in end-stage SCD-associated PAH.

  5. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

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    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  6. Human sclera maintains common characteristics with cartilage throughout evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sclera maintains and protects the eye ball, which receives visual inputs. Although the sclera does not contribute significantly to visual perception, scleral diseases such as refractory scleritis, scleral perforation and pathological myopia are considered incurable or difficult to cure. The aim of this study is to identify characteristics of the human sclera as one of the connective tissues derived from the neural crest and mesoderm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated microarray data of cultured human infant scleral cells. Hierarchical clustering was performed to group scleral cells and other mesenchymal cells into subcategories. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed similarity between scleral cells and auricular cartilage-derived cells. Cultured micromasses of scleral cells exposed to TGF-betas and BMP2 produced an abundant matrix. The expression of cartilage-associated genes, such as Indian hedge hog, type X collagen, and MMP13, was up-regulated within 3 weeks in vitro. These results suggest that human 'sclera'-derived cells can be considered chondrocytes when cultured ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study shows a chondrogenic potential of human sclera. Interestingly, the sclera of certain vertebrates, such as birds and fish, is composed of hyaline cartilage. Although the human sclera is not a cartilaginous tissue, the human sclera maintains chondrogenic potential throughout evolution. In addition, our findings directly explain an enigma that the sclera and the joint cartilage are common targets of inflammatory cells in rheumatic arthritis. The present global gene expression database will contribute to the clarification of the pathogenesis of developmental diseases such as high myopia.

  7. A Novel Biodegradable Polyurethane Matrix for Auricular Cartilage Repair: An In Vitro and In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Kartik; Dearman, Bronwyn L; Wagstaff, Marcus J D; Greenwood, John E

    2016-01-01

    Auricular reconstruction poses a challenge for reconstructive and burns surgeons. Techniques involving cartilage tissue engineering have shown potential in recent years. A biodegradable polyurethane matrix developed for dermal reconstruction offers an alternative to autologous, allogeneic, or xenogeneic biologicals for cartilage reconstruction. This study assesses such a polyurethane matrix for this indication in vivo and in vitro. To evaluate intrinsic cartilage repair, three pigs underwent auricular surgery to create excisional cartilage ± perichondrial defects, measuring 2 × 3 cm in each ear, into which acellular polyurethane matrices were implanted. Biopsies were taken at day 28 for histological assessment. Porcine chondrocytes ± perichondrocytes were cultured and seeded in vitro onto 1 × 1 cm polyurethane scaffolds. The total culture period was 42 days; confocal, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses of scaffold cultures were performed on days 14, 28, and 42. In vivo, the polyurethane matrices integrated with granulation tissue filling all biopsy samples. Minimal neocartilage invasion was observed marginally on some samples. Tissue composition was identical between ears whether perichondrium was left intact, or not. In vitro, the polyurethane matrix was biocompatible with chondrocytes ± perichondrocytes and supported production of extracellular matrix and Type II collagen. No difference was observed between chondrocyte culture alone and chondrocyte/perichondrocyte scaffold coculture. The polyurethane matrix successfully integrated into the auricular defect and was a suitable scaffold in vitro for cartilage tissue engineering, demonstrating its potential application in auricular reconstruction.

  8. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy...... explanted due to dislocation demonstrated calcifications in 8 lenses (50%), salt precipitates in 6 cases (37.5%), and erythrocytes and fibrosis/fibroblasts in 2 cases (12.5%). In the refractive error cases, the SEM showed proteins in 5 cases (45.5%) and salt precipitates in 4 lenses (36.4%). In IOL...... opacification, the findings were calcifications in 2 of the 3 lenses (66.6%) and proteins in 2 lenses (66.6%). Conclusions A marked variation in surface changes was observed by SEM. Findings did not correlate with cause for explantation. Scanning electron microscopy is a useful tool that provides exclusive...

  9. A simple technique of intraocular lenses explantation for single-piece foldable lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup Bhaumik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Foldable intraocular lenses (IOLs are most commonly used in modern-day cataract surgery. Explantation of these IOLs is not frequently encountered, but sometimes extreme situations may demand the same. Commonly explantation is achieved by bisecting the IOL inside the anterior chamber with a cutter and delivering the pieces out one by one. This may require corneal wound extension with associated damage and endothelial loss leading to visual deterioration. We devised a simple, innovative IOL explantation technique utilizing a modified Alcon A cartridge and snare. This can successfully refold the IOL to be explanted inside the eye and deliver it out through the same wound. The device has limitations with very thick optic lenses, multipiece, and silicon IOLs. In conclusion, we describe a simple, innovative, and reproducible technique to explant almost any single piece IOL without compromising the original surgery and yielding very satisfactory outcomes.

  10. Up-regulated expression of cartilage intermediate-layer protein and ANK in articular hyaline cartilage from patients with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Jun; Ryan, Lawrence M; Masuda, Ikuko

    2002-12-01

    Excess accumulation of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) in aged human cartilage is crucial in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal formation in cartilage matrix. Two sources of ePPi are ePPi-generating ectoenzymes (NTPPPH) and extracellular transport of intracellular PPi by ANK. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of NTPPPH and ANK in ePPi elaboration, by investigating expression of NTPPPH enzymes (cartilage intermediate-layer protein [CILP] and plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1 [PC-1]) and ANK in human chondrocytes from osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage containing CPPD crystals and without crystals. Chondrocytes were harvested from knee cartilage at the time of arthroplasty (OA with CPPD crystals [CPPD], n = 8; OA without crystals [OA], n = 10). Normal adult human chondrocytes (n = 1) were used as a control. Chondrocytes were cultured with transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), which stimulates ePPi elaboration, and/or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which inhibits ePPi elaboration. NTPPPH and ePPi were measured in the media at 48 hours. Media CILP, PC-1, and ANK were determined by dot-immunoblot analysis. Chondrocyte messenger RNA (mRNA) was extracted for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to study expression of mRNA for CILP, PC-1, and ANK. NTPPPH and ANK mRNA and protein were also studied in fresh frozen cartilage. Basal ePPi elaboration and NTPPPH activity in conditioned media from CPPD chondrocytes were elevated compared with normal chondrocytes, and tended to be higher compared with OA chondrocytes. Basal expression of mRNA for CILP (chondrocytes) and ANK (cartilage) was higher in both CPPD chondrocytes and CPPD cartilage extract than in OA or normal samples. PC-1 mRNA was less abundant in CPPD chondrocytes and cartilage extract than in OA chondrocytes and extract, although the difference was not significant. CILP, PC-1, and ANK protein levels were similar in CPPD, OA, and normal chondrocytes

  11. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Chinedu C; Sulaiman, Shamsul B; Min-Hwei, Ng; Hui-Cheng, Chen; Ahmad, Johan; Yahaya, Norhamdan M; Saim, Aminuddin B; Idrus, Ruszymah B H

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC), multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7) autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008). Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan) compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013). Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001). Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26) in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  12. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinedu C Ude

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC, multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. METHODS: Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7 autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. RESULTS: The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008. Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013. Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001. Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26 in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. CONCLUSION: Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  13. Role of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium in Auricular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Engineered Cartilage Formation in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine the effects of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium (ITS on proliferation of auricular chondrocytes and formation of engineered cartilage in vitro. Pig auricular monolayer chondrocytes and chondrocyte pellets were cultured in media containing 1% ITS at different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 10%, 6%, 2%, 0%, or 10% FBS alone as a control for four weeks. Parameters including cell proliferation in monolayer, wet weight, collagen type I/II/X (Col I, II, X and glycosaminoglycan (GAG expression, GAG content of pellets and gene expression associated with cartilage formation/dedifferentiation (lost cartilage phenotype/hypertrophy within the chondrocyte pellets were assessed. The results showed that chondrocytes proliferation rates increased when FBS concentrations increased (2%, 6%, 10% FBS in ITS supplemented groups. In addition, 1% ITS plus 10% FBS significantly promoted cell proliferation than 10% FBS alone. No chondrocytes grew in ITS alone medium. 1% ITS plus 10% FBS enhanced cartilage formation in terms of size, wet weight, cartilage specific matrices, and homogeneity, compared to 10% FBS alone group. Furthermore, ITS prevented engineered cartilage from dedifferentiation (i.e., higher index of Col II/Col I mRNA expression and expression of aggrecan and hypertrophy (i.e., lower mRNA expression of Col X and MMP13. In conclusion, our results indicated that ITS efficiently enhanced auricular chondrocytes proliferation, retained chondrogenic phenotypes, and promoted engineered cartilage formation when combined with FBS, which is potentially used as key supplementation in auricular chondrocytes and engineered cartilage culture.

  14. In Vivo Tibial Cartilage Strains in Regions of Cartilage-to-Cartilage Contact and Cartilage-to-Meniscus Contact in Response to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Lad, Nimit K; Collins, Amber T; Ganapathy, Pramodh K; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; McNulty, Amy L; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, Claude T; Sutter, E Grant; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2017-10-01

    There are currently limited human in vivo data characterizing the role of the meniscus in load distribution within the tibiofemoral joint. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the strains experienced in regions of articular cartilage covered by the meniscus to regions of cartilage not covered by the meniscus. It was hypothesized that in response to walking, tibial cartilage covered by the meniscus would experience lower strains than uncovered tibial cartilage. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knees of 8 healthy volunteers was performed before and after walking on a treadmill. Using MRI-generated 3-dimensional models of the tibia, cartilage, and menisci, cartilage thickness was measured in 4 different regions based on meniscal coverage and compartment: covered medial, uncovered medial, covered lateral, and uncovered lateral. Strain was defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity. Within each compartment, covered cartilage before activity was significantly thinner than uncovered cartilage before activity ( P meniscus experiences lower strains than uncovered cartilage in the medial compartment. These findings provide important baseline information on the relationship between in vivo tibial compressive strain responses and meniscal coverage, which is critical to understanding normal meniscal function.

  15. Cartilage-Specific and Cre-Dependent Nkx3.2 Overexpression In Vivo Causes Skeletal Dwarfism by Delaying Cartilage Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da-Un; Choi, Je-Yong; Kim, Dae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Nkx3.2, the vertebrate homologue of Drosophila bagpipe, has been implicated as playing a role in chondrogenic differentiation. In brief, Nkx3.2 is initially expressed in chondrocyte precursor cells and later during cartilage maturation, its expression is diminished in hypertrophic chondrocytes. In addition to Nkx3.2 expression analyses, previous studies using ex vivo chick embryo cultures and in vitro cell cultures have suggested that Nkx3.2 can suppress chondrocyte hypertrophy. However, it has never been demonstrated that Nkx3.2 functions in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development in vivo. Here, we show that cartilage-specific and Cre-dependent Nkx3.2 overexpression in mice results in significant postnatal dwarfism in endochondral skeletons, while intramembranous bones remain unaltered. Further, we observed significant delays in cartilage hypertrophy in conditional transgenic ciTg-Nkx3.2 mice. Together, these findings confirm that Nkx3.2 is capable of controlling hypertrophic maturation of cartilage in vivo, and this regulation plays a significant role in endochondral ossification and longitudinal bone growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 78-90, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Laser biostimulation of articular cartilage: in vitro evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Xiaohong; Zeng, Chang-Chun

    2004-07-01

    In the orthopaedic field, the repair of ariticular cartilage is still a difficult problem, because of the physiological characters of cartilaginous tissues and chondrocytes. To find an effective method of stimulating their regeneration, this in vitro study focuses on the biostimulation of rabbit articular chondrocytes by low-power He-Ne laser. The articular chondrocytes isolated from the cartilage of the medial condyle of the femur of the rabbit were incubated in HamF12 medium. The second passage culture were spread on 24 petri dishes and were irradiated with laser at power density of 2 - 12 mW/cm2 for 6.5 minutes, corresponding to the energy density of 1-6 J/cm2. Laser treatment was performed three times at a 24-hour interval. After lasering, incubation was continued for 24 hours. Non-irradiated cells were kept under the same conditions as the irradiated ones. The cell proliferation activity was evaluated with a XTT colorimetric method. Irradiation of 4 - 6 J/cm2 revealed a considerably higher cell proliferation activity comparing to control cultures. Thereinto, the energy density of 4 and 5 J/cm2 remarkably increased cell growth (P<0.01). The present study showed that a particular laser irradiation stimulates articular chondrocytes proliferation. These findings might be clinically relevant, indicating that low-power laser irradiation treatment is likely to achieve the repair of articular cartilage in clinic.

  17. Devitalisation of human cartilage by high hydrostatic pressure treatment: Subsequent cultivation of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells on the devitalised tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemer, B.; Genz, B.; Jonitz-Heincke, A.; Pasold, J.; Wree, A.; Dommerich, S.; Bader, R.

    2016-01-01

    The regeneration of cartilage lesions still represents a major challenge. Cartilage has a tissue-specific architecture, complicating recreation by synthetic biomaterials. A novel approach for reconstruction is the use of devitalised cartilage. Treatment with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) achieves devitalisation while biomechanical properties are remained. Therefore, in the present study, cartilage was devitalised using HHP treatment and the potential for revitalisation with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated. The devitalisation of cartilage was performed by application of 480 MPa over 10 minutes. Effective cellular inactivation was demonstrated by the trypan blue exclusion test and DNA quantification. Histology and electron microscopy examinations showed undamaged cartilage structure after HHP treatment. For revitalisation chondrocytes and MSCs were cultured on devitalised cartilage without supplementation of chondrogenic growth factors. Both chondrocytes and MSCs significantly increased expression of cartilage-specific genes. ECM stainings showed neocartilage-like structure with positive AZAN staining as well as collagen type II and aggrecan deposition after three weeks of cultivation. Our results showed that HHP treatment caused devitalisation of cartilage tissue. ECM proteins were not influenced, thus, providing a scaffold for chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and chondrocytes. Therefore, using HHP-treated tissue might be a promising approach for cartilage repair. PMID:27671122

  18. Engineering cartilage substitute with a specific size and shape using porous high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as internal support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yujia; Zhu, Lie; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Wei; Liu, Yu; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2010-04-01

    Despite the great advances in cartilage engineering, constructing cartilage of large sizes and appropriate shapes remains a great challenge, owing to limits in thickness of regenerated cartilage and to inferior mechanical properties of scaffolds. This study introduces a pre-shaped polyglycolic acid (PGA)-coated porous high-density polyethylene (HDPE) scaffold to overcome these challenges. HDPE was carved into cylindrical rods and wrapped around by PGA fibres to form PGA-HDPE scaffolds. Porcine chondrocytes were seeded into the scaffolds and the constructs were cultured in vitro for 2 weeks before subcutaneous implantation into nude mice. Scaffolds made purely of PGA with the same size and shape were used as a control. After 8 weeks of implantation, the construct formed cartilage-like tissue and retained its pre-designed shape and size. In addition, the regenerated cartilage grew and completely surrounded the HDPE core, which made the entire cartilage substitute biocompatible to its implanted environment as native cartilage similarly does. By contrast, the shape and size of the constructs in the control group seriously deformed and obvious hollow cavity and necrotic tissue were observed in the inner region. These results demonstrate that the use of HDPE as the internal support of a biodegradable scaffold has the potential to circumvent the problems of limitations in size and shape, with promising implications for the development of engineered cartilage appropriate for clinical applications. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Nonparenchymal cells cultivated from explants of fibrotic liver resemble endothelial and smooth muscle cells from blood vessel walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, B.; Rauterberg, J.; Pott, G.; Brehmer, U.; Allam, S.; Lehmann, R.; von Bassewitz, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Tissue specimens from human fibrotic liver obtained by needle biopsy were cultured. Two cell types emerged from the tissue explants. From their morphology and biosynthetic products they resembled smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells from blood vessel walls. In the endothelial cells, factor VIII-associated protein was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. Synthesis of collagen types I and III, basement membrane collagen types IV and V, and fibronectin by both cell types was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Homogeneous cultures of smooth muscle cells were observed in subcultures. After incubation with [ 14 C]glycine, collagen was isolated and characterized by CM cellulose chromatography, and consisted mainly of types I and III. These data suggest involvement of mesenchymal cells in hepatic fibrosis; they presumably originate from blood vessel or sinusoidal walls

  1. Provision of low cost media options for in vitro culture of Celosia sp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... culture medium on the number of shoots produced for eight weeks in culture. Explants from stem ... Various factors should be considered in developing plant ..... Chandler. Proceedings of the VII International Symposium.

  2. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  3. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  4. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtig, Mark B.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Fortier, Lisa A.; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral defects in immature laboratory species, particularly the rabbit, was considered adequate; however, if successful and timely translation from animal models to regulatory approval and clinical use is the goal, a step-wise development using laboratory animals for screening and early development work followed by larger species such as the goat, sheep and horse for late development and pivotal studies is recommended. Such animals must have fully organized and mature cartilage. Both acute and chronic chondral defects can be used but the later are more like the lesions found in patients and may be more predictive. Quantitative and qualitative outcome measures such as macroscopic appearance, histology, biochemistry, functional imaging, and biomechanical testing of cartilage, provide reliable data to support investment decisions and subsequent applications to regulatory bodies for clinical trials. No one model or species can be considered ideal for pivotal studies, but the larger animal species are recommended for pivotal studies. Larger species such as the horse, goat and pig also allow arthroscopic delivery, and press-fit or sutured implant fixation in thick cartilage as well as second look arthroscopies and biopsy procedures. PMID:26069576

  5. Optic nerve compression as a late complication of a hydrogel explant with silicone encircling band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Crama

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present a complication of compressive optic neuropathy caused by a swollen hydrogel explant and posteriorly displaced silicone encircling band. Observations: A 72-year-old female patient presented with progressive visual loss and a tilted optic disc. Her medical history included a retinal detachment in 1993 that was treated with a hydrogel explant under a solid silicone encircling band. Visual acuity had decreased from 6/10 to 6/20 and perimetry showed a scotoma in the temporal superior quadrant. On Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, compression of the optic nerve by a displaced silicone encircling band inferior nasally in combination with a swollen episcleral hydrogel explant was observed. Surgical removal of the hydrogel explant and silicone encircling band was uneventful and resulted in improvement of visual acuity and visual field loss. Conclusions and importance: This is the first report on compressive optic neuropathy caused by swelling of a hydrogel explant resulting in a dislocated silicone encircling band. The loss of visual function resolved upon removal of the explant and encircling band. Keywords: Retinal detachment, Tilted disc, Optic neuropathy, Miragel, Explant, Encircling band

  6. HIF-2α-induced chemokines stimulate motility of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and chondrocytes into the cartilage-pannus interface in experimental rheumatoid arthritis mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yun Hyun; Lee, Gyuseok; Lee, Keun-Bae; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Chun, Jang-Soo; Ryu, Je-Hwang

    2015-10-29

    Pannus formation and resulting cartilage destruction during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) depends on the migration of synoviocytes to cartilage tissue. Here, we focused on the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α-induced chemokines by chondrocytes in the regulation of fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) migration into the cartilage-pannus interface and cartilage erosion. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), K/BxN serum transfer, and tumor necrosis factor-α transgenic mice were used as experimental RA models. Expression patterns of HIF-2α and chemokines were determined via immunostaining, Western blotting and RT-PCR. FLS motility was evaluated using transwell migration and invasion assays. The specific role of HIF-2α was determined via local deletion of HIF-2α in joint tissues or using conditional knockout (KO) mice. Cartilage destruction, synovitis and pannus formation were assessed via histological analysis. HIF-2α and various chemokines were markedly upregulated in degenerating cartilage and pannus of RA joints. HIF-2α induced chemokine expression by chondrocytes in both primary culture and cartilage tissue. HIF-2α -induced chemokines by chondrocytes regulated the migration and invasion of FLS. Local deletion of HIF-2α in joint tissues inhibited pannus formation adjacent to cartilage tissue and cartilage destruction caused by K/BxN serum transfer. Furthermore, conditional knockout of HIF-2α in cartilage blocked pannus formation in adjacent cartilage but not bone tissue, along with inhibition of cartilage erosion caused by K/BxN serum transfer. Our findings suggest that chemokines induced by IL-1β or HIF-2α in chondrocytes regulate pannus expansion by stimulating FLS migration and invasion, leading to cartilage erosion during RA pathogenesis.

  7. Cellular and Acellular Approaches for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are several choices of cells to use for cartilage repair. Cells are used as internal or external sources and sometimes in combination. In this article, an analysis of the different cell choices and their use and potential is provided. Embryonic cartilage formation is of importance when finding more about how to be able to perfect cartilage repair. Some suggestions for near future research based on up-to-date knowledge on chondrogenic cells are given to hopefully stimulate more studies on the final goal of cartilage regeneration. PMID:27340516

  8. Optical properties of nasal septum cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagratashvili, Nodar V.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Kitai, Moishe S.

    1998-05-01

    Optical parameters (scattering coefficient s, absorption coefficient k and scattering anisotropy coefficient g) of hyaline cartilage were studied for the first time. Optical properties of human and pig nasal septum cartilage, and of bovine ear cartilage were examined using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere, and an Optical Multi-Channel Analyser. We measured total transmission Tt, total reflection Rt, and on-axis transmission Ta for light propagating through cartilage sample, over the visible spectral range (14000 - 28000 cm-1). It is shown that transmission and reflection spectra of human, pig and bovine cartilage are rather similar. It allows us to conclude that the pig cartilage can be used for in-vivo studies instead of human cartilage. The data obtained were treated by means of the one-dimensional diffusion approximation solution of the optical transport equation. We have found scattering coefficient s, absorption coefficient k and scattering anisotropy coefficient g by the iterative comparison of measured and calculated Tt, Rt and Ta values for human and pig cartilage. We found, in particular, that for 500 nm irradiation s equals 37,6 plus or minus 3.5 cm-1, g equals 0,56 plus or minus 0.05, k approximately equals 0,5 plus or minus 0.3 cm-1. The above data were used in Monte Carlo simulation for spatial intensity profile of light scattered by a cartilage sample. The computed profile was very similar to the profile measured using an Optical Multi-Channel Analyzer (OMA).

  9. Reproducible simulation of respiratory motion in porcine lung explants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederer, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Plathow, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P. [Dept. of Medical and Biological Informatics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Tetzlaff, R.; Puderbach, M.; Zaporozhan, J.; Kauczor, H.U. [Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bolte, H.; Heller, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a model for exactly reproducible respiration motion simulations of animal lung explants inside an MR-compatible chest phantom. Materials and Methods: The materials included a piston pump and a flexible silicone reconstruction of a porcine diaphragm and were used in combination with an established MR-compatible chest phantom for porcine heart-lung preparations. The rhythmic inflation and deflation of the diaphragm at the bottom of the artificial thorax with water (1-1.5 L) induced lung tissue displacement resembling diaphragmatic breathing. This system was tested on five porcine heart-lung preparations using 1.5T MRI with transverse and coronal 3D-GRE (TR/TE=3.63/1.58, 256 x 256 matrix, 350 mm FOV, 4 mm slices) and half Fourier T2-FSE (TR/TE=545/29, 256 x 192, 350 mm, 6 mm) as well as multiple row detector CT (16 x 1 mm collimation, pitch 1.5, FOV 400 mm, 120 mAs) acquired at five fixed inspiration levels. Dynamic CT scans and coronal MRI with dynamic 2D-GRE and 2D-SS-GRE sequences (image frequencies of 10/sec and 3/sec, respectively) were acquired during continuous 'breathing' (7/minute). The position of the piston pump was visually correlated with the respiratory motion visible through the transparent wall of the phantom and with dynamic displays of CT and MR images. An elastic body splines analysis of the respiratory motion was performed using CT data. Results: Visual evaluation of MRI and CT showed three-dimensional movement of the lung tissue throughout the respiration cycle. Local tissue displacement inside the lung explants was documented with motion maps calculated from CT. The maximum displacement at the top of the diaphragm (mean 26.26 [SD 1.9] mm on CT and 27.16 [SD 1.5] mm on MRI, respectively [p=0.25; Wilcoxon test]) was in the range of tidal breathing in human patients. Conclusion: The chest phantom with a diaphragmatic pump is a promising platform for multi-modality imaging studies of the effects of respiratory lung

  10. Reproducible simulation of respiratory motion in porcine lung explants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Plathow, C.; Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P.; Tetzlaff, R.; Puderbach, M.; Zaporozhan, J.; Kauczor, H.U.; Bolte, H.; Heller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for exactly reproducible respiration motion simulations of animal lung explants inside an MR-compatible chest phantom. Materials and Methods: The materials included a piston pump and a flexible silicone reconstruction of a porcine diaphragm and were used in combination with an established MR-compatible chest phantom for porcine heart-lung preparations. The rhythmic inflation and deflation of the diaphragm at the bottom of the artificial thorax with water (1-1.5 L) induced lung tissue displacement resembling diaphragmatic breathing. This system was tested on five porcine heart-lung preparations using 1.5T MRI with transverse and coronal 3D-GRE (TR/TE=3.63/1.58, 256 x 256 matrix, 350 mm FOV, 4 mm slices) and half Fourier T2-FSE (TR/TE=545/29, 256 x 192, 350 mm, 6 mm) as well as multiple row detector CT (16 x 1 mm collimation, pitch 1.5, FOV 400 mm, 120 mAs) acquired at five fixed inspiration levels. Dynamic CT scans and coronal MRI with dynamic 2D-GRE and 2D-SS-GRE sequences (image frequencies of 10/sec and 3/sec, respectively) were acquired during continuous 'breathing' (7/minute). The position of the piston pump was visually correlated with the respiratory motion visible through the transparent wall of the phantom and with dynamic displays of CT and MR images. An elastic body splines analysis of the respiratory motion was performed using CT data. Results: Visual evaluation of MRI and CT showed three-dimensional movement of the lung tissue throughout the respiration cycle. Local tissue displacement inside the lung explants was documented with motion maps calculated from CT. The maximum displacement at the top of the diaphragm (mean 26.26 [SD 1.9] mm on CT and 27.16 [SD 1.5] mm on MRI, respectively [p=0.25; Wilcoxon test]) was in the range of tidal breathing in human patients. Conclusion: The chest phantom with a diaphragmatic pump is a promising platform for multi-modality imaging studies of the effects of respiratory lung motion. (orig.)

  11. Uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chondroitin sulfate by chondrocytes and cartilage: a promising agent for imaging of cartilage degeneration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobal, Grazyna [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)], E-mail: grazyna.sobal@meduniwien.ac.at; Menzel, Johannes [Institute of Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Sinzinger, Helmut [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2009-01-15

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is used in the treatment of human osteoarthritis as a slow-acting symptomatic drug. For this reason, we performed uptake studies with {sup 99m}TcCS using different chondrocyte cultures, as well as cartilage tissue in vitro. For uptake studies, adherent monolayer cultures of human chondrocytes (2.7x10{sup 4} cells/well) and {sup 99m}TcCS (1 {mu}Ci) were used. In parallel, we also performed uptake studies with cell suspensions of human chondrocytes at 1x10{sup 6} cells/well incubated with {sup 99m}TcCS (5 {mu}Ci) under identical conditions. Uptake was studied also in cartilage tissue samples and frozen tissue sections for autoradiography. The uptake was monitored for 10-240 min, every 10-30 min for cell cultures and for cartilage tissue up to 72 h. As the commercially available drug Condrosulf (IBSA, Lugano, Switzerland) contains magnesium (Mg) stearate as additive, we investigated the uptake with and without this additive. The washout of the tracer was assessed after the uptake experiments with PBS buffer for different time intervals (10 min-3 h). Tracer uptake in monolayer{+-}additives with low number of cells was low. With the use of chondrocytes in culture suspensions with higher number of cells, a higher uptake of 5.9{+-}0.65% and 1.0{+-}0.1% (n=6) was found, with and without additive, respectively. The saturation was achieved after 100 min. With the use of human rib cartilage, the uptake of {sup 99m}TcCS was continuously increasing with time and was very high with additive amounting to 101.8{+-}5.2% vs. 53.0{+-}8.3% (n=6) without after 72 h and showing delayed saturation up to 30 h. Thus, not only the resorption of the drug is enhanced by Mg-stearate, but also the uptake. The washout of the tracer from cartilage after 3 h of uptake amounted to 3.75{+-}1.5% with additive vs. 13.1{+-}2.1% without. After 24 h, washout was lower amounting to 1.75{+-}0.15% vs. 3.25{+-}0.25%, respectively. The autoradiographic studies paralleled the results

  12. Molecular characterization and chromosomal assignment of equine cartilage derived retinoic acid sensitive protein (CD-RAP)/melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Lise Charlotte; Mata, Xavier; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl

    2008-01-01

    Cartilage-derived retinoic acid sensitive protein (CD-RAP) also known as melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) has already been established as a marker for chondrocyte differentiation and a number of cancerous condition sin humans. Studies have also shown that CD-RAP/MIA is a potential marker of joint......RNA in articular cartilage and chondrocytes from horses with no signs of joint disease. The expression decreased as the cells dedifferentiated in monolayer culture. We also identified an equine CD-RAP/MIA splioce variant similar to that reported in humans. The CD_RAP/MIA protein was detected in equine synovial...... fluid, serum and culture medium from chondrocyte cultures. In conclusion, CD-RAP/MIA is expressed in equine cartilage and chondrocytes, and the protein can be detected in equine serum, synovial fluid and in culture medium from chondrocyte cultures. The equine gene and resulting protein share great...

  13. Indirect organogenesis in milkweed ( Calotropis procera from mature zygotic embryo explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojatollah Abbasi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Milkweed ( Calotropis procera is a valuable medicinal plant which grows in many regions of Iran. Its significant medicinal properties have made it an important crop which is cultivated commercially. This plant is propagated from seeds as well as root and shoot cuttings. Due to problems in the usage of these reproduction methods, new propagation methods such as tissue culturing should be developed. This study was aimed at obtaining appropriate concentrations of plant hormones for indirect organogenesis of milkweed. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD with 3 replications. The effects of various concentrations of (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid 2,4-D (0.1, 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l were studied in terms of callus induction and shoot regeneration on an MS based medium supplemented with BA (benzyl amino purine and NAA (naphthalene acetic acid at the same concentration. Mature embryos were used as explants and morphological traits such as embryo size, callus size, number and size of shoots and roots were recorded. The results showed that 2,4-D significantly increased the size of cultured embryos (P < 0.05. The largest embryo volume was observed in cultures treated with 3 mg/l 2,4-D. The highest callusing was recorded in 2 mg/l 2,4-D. The effects of BA and NAA concentrations on shoot regeneration were significant and the highest values were observed for a combination of 1 mg/l BA and 2 mg/l NAA. 1 mg/l IBA (Indole 3-butyric acid was able to induce the highest number of better quality roots and shoots.

  14. * Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Favorable Source for Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiños-López, Emma; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro-Santos, Javier; Blanco, Francisco Javier; Díaz-Prado, Silvia María

    2017-09-01

    Localized trauma-derived breakdown of the hyaline articular cartilage may progress toward osteoarthritis, a degenerative condition characterized by total loss of articular cartilage and joint function. Tissue engineering technologies encompass several promising approaches with high therapeutic potential for the treatment of these focal defects. However, most of the research in tissue engineering is focused on potential materials and structural cues, while little attention is directed to the most appropriate source of cells endowing these materials. In this study, using human amniotic membrane (HAM) as scaffold, we defined a novel static in vitro model for cartilage repair. In combination with HAM, four different cell types, human chondrocytes, human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs), human amniotic epithelial cells, and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) were assessed determining their therapeutic potential. A chondral lesion was drilled in human cartilage biopsies simulating a focal defect. A pellet of different cell types was implanted inside the lesion and covered with HAM. The biopsies were maintained for 8 weeks in culture. Chondrogenic differentiation in the defect was analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry. HAM scaffold showed good integration and adhesion to the native cartilage in all groups. Although all cell types showed the capacity of filling the focal defect, hBMSCs and hAMSCs demonstrated higher levels of new matrix synthesis. However, only the hAMSCs-containing group presented a significant cytoplasmic content of type II collagen when compared with chondrocytes. More collagen type I was identified in the new synthesized tissue of hBMSCs. In accordance, hBMSCs and hAMSCs showed better International Cartilage Research Society scoring although without statistical significance. HAM is a useful material for articular cartilage repair in vitro when used as scaffold. In combination with hAMSCs, HAM showed better

  15. Predicting knee cartilage loss using adaptive partitioning of cartilage thickness maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter; Dam, Erik Bjørnager; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether measures of knee cartilage thickness can predict future loss of knee cartilage. A slow and a rapid progressor group was determined using longitudinal data, and anatomically aligned cartilage thickness maps were extracted from MRI at baseline. A novel machine learning...... framework was then trained using these maps. Compared to measures of mean cartilage plate thickness, group separation was increased by focusing on local cartilage differences. This result is central for clinical trials where inclusion of rapid progressors may help reduce the period needed to study effects...

  16. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  17. High Throughput and Mechano-Active Platforms to Promote Cartilage Regeneration and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana

    Traumatic joint injuries initiate acute degenerative changes in articular cartilage that can lead to progressive loss of load-bearing function. As a result, patients often develop post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), a condition for which there currently exists no biologic interventions. To address this need, tissue engineering aims to mimic the structure and function of healthy, native counterparts. These constructs can be used to not only replace degenerated tissue, but also build in vitro, pre-clinical models of disease. Towards this latter goal, this thesis focuses on the design of a high throughput system to screen new therapeutics in a micro-engineered model of PTOA, and the development of a mechanically-responsive drug delivery system to augment tissue-engineered approaches for cartilage repair. High throughput screening is a powerful tool for drug discovery that can be adapted to include 3D tissue constructs. To facilitate this process for cartilage repair, we built a high throughput mechanical injury platform to create an engineered cartilage model of PTOA. Compressive injury of functionally mature constructs increased cell death and proteoglycan loss, two hallmarks of injury observed in vivo. Comparison of this response to that of native cartilage explants, and evaluation of putative therapeutics, validated this model for subsequent use in small molecule screens. A primary screen of 118 compounds identified a number of 'hits' and relevant pathways that may modulate pathologic signaling post-injury. To complement this process of therapeutic discovery, a stimuli-responsive delivery system was designed that used mechanical inputs as the 'trigger' mechanism for controlled release. The failure thresholds of these mechanically-activated microcapsules (MAMCs) were influenced by physical properties and composition, as well as matrix mechanical properties in 3D environments. TGF-beta released from the system upon mechano-activation stimulated stem cell

  18. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Defined Equine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood for Use in Cartilage Repair Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Desancé

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage engineering is a new strategy for the treatment of cartilage damage due to osteoarthritis or trauma in humans. Racehorses are exposed to the same type of cartilage damage and the anatomical, cellular, and biochemical properties of their cartilage are comparable to those of human cartilage, making the horse an excellent model for the development of cartilage engineering. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiated into chondrocytes with chondrogenic factors in a biomaterial appears to be a promising therapeutic approach for direct implantation and cartilage repair. Here, we characterized equine umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (eUCB-MSCs and evaluated their potential for chondrocyte differentiation for use in cartilage repair therapy. Our results show that isolated eUCB-MSCs had high proliferative capacity and differentiated easily into osteoblasts and chondrocytes, but not into adipocytes. A three-dimensional (3D culture approach with the chondrogenic factors BMP-2 and TGF-β1 potentiated chondrogenic differentiation with a significant increase in cartilage-specific markers at the mRNA level (Col2a1, Acan, Snorc and the protein level (type II and IIB collagen without an increase in hypertrophic chondrocyte markers (Col10a1 and Mmp13 in normoxia and in hypoxia. However, these chondrogenic factors caused an increase in type I collagen, which can be reduced using small interfering RNA targeting Col1a2. This study provides robust data on MSCs characterization and demonstrates that eUCB-MSCs have a great potential for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. In vitro response from cotyledon and hypocotyls explants in tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... randomized design (CRD) with four replications. .... culture, transformation and molecular markers for crops improvement. Science ... applications. Trends Genet. ... Culture Concepts and Laboratory Exercises. New York, USA: ...

  20. Effect of explant plant source and acetosyringone concentration on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... a number of factors including tissue culture conditions, acetosyringone .... immature embryo culture, callus induction and in vitro salt stress. Plant Cell ... phenotypical characterization of transgenic tomato plants: Solanum.

  1. Efficient Computational Design of a Scaffold for Cartilage Cell Regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tajsoleiman, Tannaz; Jafar Abdekhodaie, Mohammad; Gernaey, Krist V.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the sensitivity of mammalian cell cultures, understanding the influence of operating conditions during a tissue generation procedure is crucial. In this regard, a detailed study of scaffold based cell culture under a perfusion flow is presented with the aid of mathematical modelling...... and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). With respect to the complexity of the case study, this work focuses solely on the effect of nutrient and metabolite concentrations, and the possible influence of fluid-induced shear stress on a targeted cell (cartilage) culture. The simulation set up gives the possibility...... of predicting the cell culture behavior under various operating conditions and scaffold designs. Thereby, the exploitation of the predictive simulation into a newly developed stochastic routine provides the opportunity of exploring improved scaffold geometry designs. This approach was applied on a common type...

  2. In vitro direct regeneration in mint from different explants on half ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... of medical practice in all countries of the world (Aftab and. Sial, 1999). ... mentha, have anti-feeding, insecticidal (Hori, 1999) anti- viral, antibacterial .... Internode explants were non responsive on all con- centrations of BAP.

  3. Distribution and utilization of nitrogenated compounds explanted by the soybean nodules by plants during seeds developing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, Severino Matias de

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was carried out, using radioisotopes, for evaluation of the leaf, schuck and seeds areas and, examination of the pattern which is used by the nitrogenated compounds explanted by the soybean nodules

  4. Combined effect of gamma irradiation methods and in vitro explant sources on mutation induction of flower color in Chrysanthemum morifoliun Ramat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki; Miyahira, Eiken; Degi, Konosuke

    1997-01-01

    Effective radiation breeding method was searched by establishing an effective exposure method to induce a mutation involved in flower color of chrysanthemum and clarifying the effects of its combined use with cultured explants. A chrysanthemum 'Taihei', a variety suitable for cut-flower use was used as the subject, which was irradiated at a dose ranging from 0.25-1.5 Gy/day for 20 days. The floral petals, buds and leaves were used as the explants for callus induction culture. The flower color was evaluated using Japanese Standard Color chart for Horticultural Plants. The color spectrum of the adaxial surface of a petal was recorded by spectro-photometer TC-1800 MK-2. Thus, six mutants of flower color were registered as new varieties. Either of these mutants was derived from chronic irradiation. Three varieties from petal culture, two from bud one and one from cutting culture were obtained, showing that the combined method of chronic irradiation and organ culture is useful in practice for mutation breeding of flower species. Further, this method is applicable for production of non-chimeric mutants, enhancement of the mutation rate and widening the mutation spectra in vegetatively propagated plants. (M.N.)

  5. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  6. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Sequestration Enhances In Vivo Cartilage Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina M. Medeiros Da Cunha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autologous chondrocyte transplantation for cartilage repair still has unsatisfactory clinical outcomes because of inter-donor variability and poor cartilage quality formation. Re-differentiation of monolayer-expanded human chondrocytes is not easy in the absence of potent morphogens. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF plays a master role in angiogenesis and in negatively regulating cartilage growth by stimulating vascular invasion and ossification. Therefore, we hypothesized that its sole microenvironmental blockade by either VEGF sequestration by soluble VEGF receptor-2 (Flk-1 or by antiangiogenic hyperbranched peptides could improve chondrogenesis of expanded human nasal chondrocytes (NC freshly seeded on collagen scaffolds. Chondrogenesis of several NC donors was assessed either in vitro or ectopically in nude mice. VEGF blockade appeared not to affect NC in vitro differentiation, whereas it efficiently inhibited blood vessel ingrowth in vivo. After 8 weeks, in vivo glycosaminoglycan deposition was approximately two-fold higher when antiangiogenic approaches were used, as compared to the control group. Our data indicates that the inhibition of VEGF signaling, independently of the specific implementation mode, has profound effects on in vivo NC chondrogenesis, even in the absence of chondroinductive signals during prior culture or at the implantation site.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  8. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  9. Bioreactors for Tissue Engineering of Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concaro, S.; Gustavson, F.; Gatenholm, P.

    The cartilage regenerative medicine field has evolved during the last decades. The first-generation technology, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) involved the transplantation of in vitro expanded chondrocytes to cartilage defects. The second generation involves the seeding of chondrocytes in a three-dimensional scaffold. The technique has several potential advantages such as the ability of arthroscopic implantation, in vitro pre-differentiation of cells and implant stability among others (Brittberg M, Lindahl A, Nilsson A, Ohlsson C, Isaksson O, Peterson L, N Engl J Med 331(14):889-895, 1994; Henderson I, Francisco R, Oakes B, Cameron J, Knee 12(3):209-216, 2005; Peterson L, Minas T, Brittberg M, Nilsson A, Sjogren-Jansson E, Lindahl A, Clin Orthop (374):212-234, 2000; Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Feyerabend F, Petersen JP, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, et al. Bioprocess Biosyst Eng 27(4):273-280, 2005; Portner R, Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, J Biosci Bioeng 100(3):235-245, 2005; Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, Portner R, J Biotechnol 121(4):486-497, 2006; Heyland J, Wiegandt K, Goepfert C, Nagel-Heyer S, Ilinich E, Schumacher U, et al. Biotechnol Lett 28(20):1641-1648, 2006). The nutritional requirements of cells that are synthesizing extra-cellular matrix increase along the differentiation process. The mass transfer must be increased according to the tissue properties. Bioreactors represent an attractive tool to accelerate the biochemical and mechanical properties of the engineered tissues providing adequate mass transfer and physical stimuli. Different reactor systems have been [5] developed during the last decades based on different physical stimulation concepts. Static and dynamic compression, confined and nonconfined compression-based reactors have been described in this review. Perfusion systems represent an attractive way of culturing constructs under dynamic conditions. Several groups showed increased matrix

  10. Hyaluronan supplementation as a mechanical regulator of cartilage tissue development under joint-kinematic-mimicking loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yabin; Stoddart, Martin J; Wuertz-Kozak, Karin; Grad, Sibylle; Alini, Mauro; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Articular cartilage plays an essential role in joint lubrication and impact absorption. Through this, the mechanical signals are coupled to the tissue's physiological response. Healthy synovial fluid has been shown to reduce and homogenize the shear stress acting on the cartilage surfaces due to its unique shear-thinning viscosity. As cartilage tissues are sensitive to mechanical changes in articulation, it was hypothesized that replacing the traditional culture medium with a healthy non-Newtonian lubricant could enhance tissue development in a cartilage engineering model, where joint-kinematic-mimicking mechanical loading is applied. Different amounts of hyaluronic acid were added to the culture medium to replicate the viscosities of synovial fluid at different health states. Hyaluronic acid supplementation, especially at a physiologically healthy concentration (2.0 mg ml -1 ), promoted a better preservation of chondrocyte phenotype. The ratio of collagen II to collagen I mRNA was 4.5 times that of the control group, implying better tissue development (however, with no significant difference of measured collagen II content), with a good retention of collagen II and proteoglycan in the mechanically active region. Simulating synovial fluid properties by hyaluronic acid supplementation created a favourable mechanical environment for mechanically loaded constructs. These findings may help in understanding the influence of joint articulation on tissue homeostasis, and moreover, improve methods for functional cartilage tissue engineering. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Uninduced adipose-derived stem cells repair the defect of full-thickness hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ning; Li, Lei; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Lv, Cheng-Yu

    2009-04-01

    To testify the effect of the stem cells derived from the widely distributed fat tissue on repairing full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were derived from adipose tissue and cultured in vitro. Twenty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups randomly. The cultured ADSCs mixed with calcium alginate gel were used to fill the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects created at the patellafemoral joint, and the defects repaired with gel or without treatment served as control groups. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the reconstructed tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Histological analysis and qualitative scoring were also performed to detect the outcome. Full thickness hyaline cartilage defects were repaired completely with ADSCs-derived tissue. The result was better in ADSCs group than the control ones. The microstructure of reconstructed tissue with ADSCs was similar to that of hyaline cartilage and contained more cells and regular matrix fibers, being better than other groups. Plenty of collagen fibers around cells could be seen under transmission electron microscopy. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in comparison with other groups at each time point (t equal to 4.360, P less than 0.01). These results indicate that stem cells derived from mature adipose without induction possess the ability to repair cartilage defects.

  12. One-stage explant-implant procedure of exposed porous orbital implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Peter B; Rasmussen, Marie L Roed; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Purpose:  To investigate the risks of implant exposure after a combined explant-implant procedure in patients with an exposed porous orbital implant. Methods:  Twenty-four consecutive patients who had a combined explant-implant procedure of an exposed hydroxyapatite (21) or porous polyethylene (3...... at the same procedure in sockets without profound signs of infection. The procedure carries a possible risk of poor motility....

  13. An early look at the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network explant pathology form data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ann M; Edwards, Erick; Washburn, W Kenneth; Heimbach, Julie

    2016-06-01

    In April 2012, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) implemented an online explant pathology form for recipients of liver transplantation who received additional wait-list priority for their diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The purpose of the form was to standardize the data being reported to the OPTN, which had been required since 2002 but were submitted to the OPTN in a variety of formats via facsimile. From April 2012 to December 2014, over 4500 explant forms were submitted, allowing for detailed analysis of the characteristics of the explanted livers. Data from the explant pathology forms were used to assess agreement with pretransplant imaging. Explant data were also used to assess the risk of recurrence. Of those with T2 priority, 55.7% were found to be stage T2 on explant. Extrahepatic spread (odds ratio [OR] = 6.8; P based on the number and size of tumors on the explant form was T4 (OR = 2.4; P < 0.01) were the strongest predictors of recurrence. In conclusion, this analysis confirms earlier findings that showed an incomplete agreement between pretransplant imaging and posttransplant pathology in terms of HCC staging, though the number of patients with both no pretransplant treatment and no tumor in the explant was reduced from 20% to <1%. In addition, several factors were identified (eg, tumor burden, age, sex, region, ablative therapy, alpha-fetoprotein, Milan stage, vascular invasion, satellite lesions, etc.) that were predictive of HCC recurrence, allowing for more targeted surveillance of high-risk recipients. Continued evaluation of these data will help shape future guidelines or policy recommendations. Liver Transplantation 22 757-764 2016 AASLD. © 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Photoactivated methods for enabling cartilage-to-cartilage tissue fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitterle, Valerie B.; Roberts, David W.

    2003-06-01

    The present study investigates whether photoactivated attachment of cartilage can provide a viable method for more effective repair of damaged articular surfaces by providing an alternative to sutures, barbs, or fibrin glues for initial fixation. Unlike artificial materials, biological constructs do not possess the initial strength for press-fitting and are instead sutured or pinned in place, typically inducing even more tissue trauma. A possible alternative involves the application of a photosensitive material, which is then photoactivated with a laser source to attach the implant and host tissues together in either a photothermal or photochemical process. The photothermal version of this method shows potential, but has been almost entirely applied to vascularized tissues. Cartilage, however, exhibits several characteristics that produce appreciable differences between applying and refining these techniques when compared to previous efforts involving vascularized tissues. Preliminary investigations involving photochemical photosensitizers based on singlet oxygen and electron transfer mechanisms are discussed, and characterization of the photodynamic effects on bulk collagen gels as a simplified model system using FTIR is performed. Previous efforts using photothermal welding applied to cartilaginous tissues are reviewed.

  15. Biological aspects of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Kazuto; Fujihara, Yuko; Yamawaki, Takanori; Harai, Motohiro; Asawa, Yukiyo; Hikita, Atsuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Cartilage regenerative medicine has been progressed well, and it reaches the stage of clinical application. Among various techniques, tissue engineering, which incorporates elements of materials science, is investigated earnestly, driven by high clinical needs. The cartilage tissue engineering using a poly lactide scaffold has been exploratorily used in the treatment of cleft lip-nose patients, disclosing good clinical results during 3-year observation. However, to increase the reliability of this treatment, not only accumulation of clinical evidence on safety and usefulness of the tissue-engineered products, but also establishment of scientific background on biological mechanisms, are regarded essential. In this paper, we reviewed recent trends of cartilage tissue engineering in clinical practice, summarized experimental findings on cellular and matrix changes during the cartilage regeneration, and discussed the importance of further studies on biological aspects of tissue-engineered cartilage, especially by the histological and the morphological methods.

  16. Optic nerve compression as a late complication of a hydrogel explant with silicone encircling band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crama, Niels; Kluijtmans, Leo; Klevering, B Jeroen

    2018-06-01

    To present a complication of compressive optic neuropathy caused by a swollen hydrogel explant and posteriorly displaced silicone encircling band. A 72-year-old female patient presented with progressive visual loss and a tilted optic disc. Her medical history included a retinal detachment in 1993 that was treated with a hydrogel explant under a solid silicone encircling band. Visual acuity had decreased from 6/10 to 6/20 and perimetry showed a scotoma in the temporal superior quadrant. On Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), compression of the optic nerve by a displaced silicone encircling band inferior nasally in combination with a swollen episcleral hydrogel explant was observed. Surgical removal of the hydrogel explant and silicone encircling band was uneventful and resulted in improvement of visual acuity and visual field loss. This is the first report on compressive optic neuropathy caused by swelling of a hydrogel explant resulting in a dislocated silicone encircling band. The loss of visual function resolved upon removal of the explant and encircling band.

  17. Cartilage repair in the degenerative ageing knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittberg, Mats; Gomoll, Andreas H; Canseco, José A; Far, Jack; Lind, Martin; Hui, James

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Cartilage damage can develop due to trauma, resulting in focal chondral or osteochondral defects, or as more diffuse loss of cartilage in a generalized organ disease such as osteoarthritis. A loss of cartilage function and quality is also seen with increasing age. There is a spectrum of diseases ranging from focal cartilage defects with healthy surrounding cartilage to focal lesions in degenerative cartilage, to multiple and diffuse lesions in osteoarthritic cartilage. At the recent Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015, regenerative challenges in an ageing population were discussed by clinicians and basic scientists. A group of clinicians was given the task of discussing the role of tissue engineering in the treatment of degenerative cartilage lesions in ageing patients. We present the outcomes of our discussions on current treatment options for such lesions, with particular emphasis on different biological repair techniques and their supporting level of evidence. Results and interpretation Based on the studies on treatment of degenerative lesions and early OA, there is low-level evidence to suggest that cartilage repair is a possible treatment for such lesions, but there are conflicting results regarding the effect of advanced age on the outcome. We concluded that further improvements are needed for direct repair of focal, purely traumatic defects before we can routinely use such repair techniques for the more challenging degenerative lesions. Furthermore, we need to identify trigger mechanisms that start generalized loss of cartilage matrix, and induce subchondral bone changes and concomitant synovial pathology, to maximize our treatment methods for biological repair in degenerative ageing joints. PMID:27910738

  18. In vitro of quantitative MR imaging of early degenerative changes in human articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Wha; Lee, Young Jun; Cha, Sung Suk; Hwa, Ryu Ji

    2004-01-01

    To assess the applicability of quantitative MR microscopy for the detection of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) depletion as an early sign of degeneration in the articular cartilage of humans treated by trypsin. Four cartilage-bone blocks were obtained from the patient who had suffered from osteoarthritis of the knee and underwent a total knee replacement arthroscopy. Each articular cartilage segment was resected as to a round disk shape (8 mm in diameter) with a remnant of subchondral bone 1 mm in thickness. Four different culture solutions were prepared, and these solutions were 0.2 mg/ml of trypsin solution (group 1), 1 mM of Gd (DTPA) 2-mixed trypsin solution (group 2), phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (group 3), and 1 mM of Gd (DTPA) 2-mixed PBS (group 4). The cartilages were cultured and then MR imagings were performed every hour for 5 hrs, and we continued the additional cultures of 24 hrs, 36 hrs and 48 hrs. Three imaging sequences were used: T1-weighted spin echo (TR/TE, 450/22), proton density turbo spin echo with fat suppression (TR/TE, 3000/25), and CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) (TR/TE/TI, 760/21-168, 360). MR imaging data were analyzed with pixel-by-pixel comparisons in all groups. The GAG loss in the articular cartilage was increased proportionately to the culture duration. Mean changes of T1 relaxation time were 1.2% for group 1, -1.9% for group 3, -54.7% for group 2 and -64.2% for group 4 (p< 0.05). When comparing by linear profile on the T1-weighted images, SNR increased and T1 relaxation time decreased for group 2 and 4, as the culture duration increased (p< 0.05). On the correlation analysis, there is significant correlation between GAG loss and Gd (DTPA) 2-enhancement for group 2 (p=0.0431), but there was no significant difference for group 4 (p=0.0918). More enhancement with Gd (DTPA) 2-was noted for group 2 than for group 4. Group 2 showed a diffuse enhancement in all the layers of cartilage, but for group 4, prominent enhancement was noted only in

  19. Tuning the differentiation of periosteum-derived cartilage using biochemical and mechanical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, L.M.; Ravetto, A.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Foolen, J.; Emans, P.J.; Ito, K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aim at tuning the differentiation of periosteum in an organ culture model towards cartilage, rich in collagen type II, using combinations of biochemical and mechanical stimuli. We hypothesize that addition of TGF-ß will stimulate chondrogenesis, whereas sliding

  20. Direct adventitious shoot bud formation on hypocotyls explants in Millettia pinnata (L.) Panigrahi- a biodiesel producing medicinal tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Durga Singh; Jha, Suman Kumar; Jani, Jigar

    2015-04-01

    A reproducible protocol developed for in vitro regeneration of Milletia pinnata using hypocotyl segments. Multiple shoots were induced from hypocotyl explants through direct adventitious shoot bud regeneration. The proximal end of hypocotyls was responsive for shoot bud induction. Silver nitrate and adenine sulphate had a positive effect on shoot bud induction and elongation. The maximum response and number of shoot bud produced in media supplemented with 8.88 μM BAP with 108.6 μM adenine sulphate and 11.84 μM silver nitrate. Elongated shoots were harvested and successful rooting of microshoots achieved on MS media supplemented with 9.84 μM IBA, with 81.1 % rooting. Remaining shoot buds sub-cultured for further multiplication and elongation. Each subculture produced eight to nine elongated microshoots up to four subcultures. The rooted microshoots were successfully hardened and transferred to field.

  1. Enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated human skin explants treated with T4N5 liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarosh, D.B.; Kibitel, J.T.; Green, L.A.; Spinowitz, A.

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes cultured from explants of skin cancer patients, including biopsies from xeroderma pigmentosum patients, were ultraviolet light-irradiated and DNA repair synthesis was measured. Repair capacity was much lower in xeroderma pigmentosum patients than in normal patients. The extent of DNA repair replication did not decline with the age of the normal patient. Treatment with T4N5 liposomes containing a DNA repair enzyme enhanced repair synthesis in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum keratinocytes in an irradiation- and liposome-dose dependent manner. These results provide no evidence that aging people or skin cancer patients are predisposed to cutaneous malignancy by a DNA repair deficiency, but do demonstrate that T4N5 liposomes enhance DNA repair in the keratinocytes of the susceptible xeroderma pigmentosum and skin cancer population

  2. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm 2 ) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  3. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  4. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Carti