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Sample records for carrot roots caused

  1. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

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    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  2. Spatial tissue distribution of polyacetylenes in carrot root.

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    Baranska, Malgorzata; Schulz, Hartwig

    2005-06-01

    The presented results show the usefulness of Raman spectroscopy in the investigation of polyacetylenes in carrot root. The components are measured directly in the plant tissue without any preliminary sample preparation. Compared with the strong polyacetylene signals the spectral impact of the surrounding biological matrix is weak, except for carotenoids, and therefore it does not contribute significantly to the obtained results. Three different Raman mapping techniques applied here have revealed essential information about the investigated compounds. Using point acquisition several spectra have been measured to demonstrate the complex composition of the polyacetylene fraction in carrot root. The molecular structures of falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol 3-acetate are similar but their Raman spectra exhibit differences demonstrated by the shift of their -C triple bond C- mode. Line mapping performed along the diameter of transversely cut carrot roots has been used to investigate the relative concentration of polyacetylenes and carotenoids. An area map provides detailed information regarding the distribution of both components. It has been found that high accumulation of polyacetylenes is located in the outer section of the root, namely the pericyclic parenchyma, and in the phloem part close to the secondary cambium. The highest concentration of carotenes is seen in the immediate vicinity to polyacetylene conglomerates.

  3. Is it a biological response or chemical process? Chemical and transcriptional regulation experiments probe the cause for the increased accumulation of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in carrot root slices exposed to UV-B light

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    We recently demonstrated that wounded carrot roots subjected to a brief UV-B light treatment accumulate large quantities of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in the treated tissues. Chlorogenic acid is an intermediate in the phenylpropanoid pathway and a potent anti-oxidant. Chemical analysis and real-time P...

  4. First Report of Postharvest Gray Mold Rot on Carrot Caused by Botrytis cinerea in Korea

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    Md. Aktaruzzaman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In February 2014, gray mold rotting symptoms were observed in carrots in cold storage at Gangneung, Gangwon province, Korea. The typical symptom of gray mold rot showed abundant blackish gray mycelia and conidia was observed on the infected root. The pathogen was isolated from infected root and cultured on PDA for further fungal morphological observation and confirming its pathogenicity according to Koch’s postulates. Results of morphological data, pathogenicity test and rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS 1 and 4 sequence showed that the postharvest gray mold rot of carrot was caused by Botyrtis cinerea. This is the first report of postharvest gray mold rot on carrot in Korea.

  5. Comparison of chemical composition of carrot roots of orange, purple and white colour

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Roszkowska; Beata Piłat; Małgorzata Tańska

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the chemical composition of carrot roots: orange, purple and white. The content of sugars, fibre, pectins, carotenoids, phenolic compounds and vitamin C was analysed. It has been shown that the chemical composition of roots was different for the studied varieties of carrots. The orange carrot root (‘Koral’) contained most of pectins (6.37% d.m.) and carotenoids (149.66 mg per 100 g d.m.), mainly β-carotene (approx. 50% of total carotenoids)...

  6. Screening and Histopathological Characterization of Korean Carrot Lines for Resistance to the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita

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    Yunhee Seo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In total, 170 carrot lines developed in Korea were screened for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita race 1 to select parental genetic resources useful for the development of nematode-resistant carrot cultivars. Using the gall index (GI, gall formation was examined on carrot roots inoculated with approximately 1,000 second-stage juveniles of the nematode 7 weeks after inoculation. Sixty-one carrot lines were resistant (GI ≤ 1.0, while the other 109 were susceptible (GI > 1.0 with coefficient of variance (CV of GI for total carrot lines 0.68, indicating low-variation of GI within the lines examined. The histopathological responses of two carrot plants from resistant and susceptible lines were examined after nematode infection. In susceptible carrots, giant cells formed with no discernible necrosis around the infecting nematodes. In the resistant carrot line, however, no giant cells formed, although modified cells were observed with extensive formation of necrotic layers through their middle lamella and around the infecting nematodes. This suggested that these structural modifications were related to hypersensitive responses governed by the expression of true resistance genes. Therefore, the Korean carrot lines resistant to the nematode infection are potential genetic resources for the development of quality carrot cultivars resistant to M. incognita race 1.

  7. Polyacetylenes in fresh and stored carrots (Daucus carota): relations to root morphology and sugar content.

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    Kjellenberg, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Olsson, Marie E

    2012-06-01

    Carrot roots contain polyacetylenes, reported to be both beneficial and distasteful when consumed by humans. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between polyacetylene contents, root morphology and sugar content in order to increase the opportunities to optimise the composition of polyacetylenes in carrots. The falcarinol/total polyacetylene ratio was positively correlated with root size, the amount of sucrose and the sucrose/total soluble sugar ratio among both fresh and stored samples. Root size was inversely correlated with the amounts of falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate, especially among stored samples. Stored carrots exhibited an inverse correlation between polyacetylenes and the amount of soluble sugar. At a falcarinol content at harvest below approximately 200 mg kg(-1) dry weight the amounts of all polyacetylenes increased during storage, but above that level the amounts of all polyacetylenes instead decreased. The results indicate similarities in the activity of the enzymes transforming sucrose to hexoses and the enzymes transforming falcarinol to falcarindiol-3-acetate and falcarindiol. The negative correlation between root size and polyacetylenes seems to be partly due to dilution but also to a higher synthetisation rate in smaller roots. The results indicate the existence of an equilibrium regulating the level of falcarinol. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Spectroscopic studies on bioactive polyacetylenes and other plant components in wild carrot root.

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    Roman, Maciej; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2011-08-26

    Polyacetylenes and other common plant components, such as starch, pectin, cellulose, and lignin, were studied in roots of the wild carrot (Daucus carota) subspecies D. carota subsp. gummifer and D. carota subsp. maximus by Raman spectroscopy. The components were measured in situ, directly in the plant tissue and without any preliminary sample preparation. The analysis was performed on the basis of the intense and characteristic key bands observed in the Raman spectrum. The two main carrot polyacetylenes falcarinol (1) and falcarindiol (2) have similar molecular structures, but their Raman spectra exhibit a small band shift in the symmetric -C≡C-C≡C- mode from 2258 cm⁻¹ to 2252 cm⁻¹. Quantum chemical calculations confirmed that the differences observed between the samples may be due to conformational and environmental changes. The polyacetylenes were also detected by Raman mapping, which visualized the distribution of the compounds across sections of carrot roots. The mapping technique was also applied to assess the distribution of lignin and polysaccharide compounds. The results showed the tissue-specific accumulation of starch and cell wall components such as lignin, pectin, and cellulose.

  9. Purification and characterization of a wound-inducible cell wall cationic peroxidase from carrot roots.

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    Nair, A R; Showalter, A M

    1996-09-04

    We have isolated a novel cell wall, cationic peroxidase (pI > 9.3) from roots of the carrot plant, Daucus carota. The purified isozyme, referred to as CP > 9.3, has a molecular mass of 45 kilodaltons and an Reinheitzahl value of 2.3. Amino-acid composition analysis and N-terminal sequencing have been performed with CP > 9.3. The N-terminal sequence shows no homology to any sequence in the protein and nucleic acid data banks. CP > 9.3 activity is induced by wounding in carrot leaves and petioles; this activity is also present in carrot roots but is unaltered by wounding. Enhanced CP > 9.3 activity is seen at 12 hr post-wounding and continues for at least 60 hr in leaves and petioles. Based on studies using cycloheximide, early activation of CP > 9.3 is not due to de novo protein synthesis, but rather to enzyme activation. Temperature and pH optima for CP > 9.3 using guaiacol as a substrate have been determined to be 32 degrees C and 4.9.

  10. First Report of Postharvest Gray Mold Rot on Carrot Caused by Botrytis cinerea in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Aktaruzzaman; Joon-Young Kim; Sheng-Jun Xu; Byung-Sup Kim

    2014-01-01

    In February 2014, gray mold rotting symptoms were observed in carrots in cold storage at Gangneung, Gangwon province, Korea. The typical symptom of gray mold rot showed abundant blackish gray mycelia and conidia was observed on the infected root. The pathogen was isolated from infected root and cultured on PDA for further fungal morphological observation and confirming its pathogenicity according to Koch’s postulates. Results of morphological data, pathogenicity test and rDNA internal transcr...

  11. Path analysis suggests phytoene accumulation is the key step limiting the carotenoid pathway in white carrot roots

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    Carlos Antonio Fernandes Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Two F2 carrot (Daucus carota L. populations (orange rooted Brasilia x very dark orange rooted High Carotene Mass - HCM cross and the dark orange rooted cultivated variety B493 x white rooted wild carrot Queen Anne's Lace - QAL cross with very unrelated genetic backgrounds were used to investigate intrinsic factors limiting carotenoid accumulation in carrots by applying phenotypic correlation and path analysis to study the relationships between major root carotenes, root color and several other morphological traits. Most of the correlations between traits were close and agreed in sign between the two populations. Root weight had a moderate to highly significant positive correlation with leaf length, root length and top and middle root diameter. Although phenotypic correlations failed to identify the order of the substrates and products in the carotenoid pathway the correct order of substrates and products (phytoene -> zeta-carotene -> lycopene was identified in the causal diagram of beta-carotene for the Brasilia x HCM population. Path analysis of beta-carotene synthesis in the B493 x QAL population suggested that selection for root carotenes had little effect on plant morphological traits. Causal model of beta-carotene and lycopene in the B493 x QAL population suggested that phytoene synthesis is the key step limiting the carotenoid pathway in white carrots. Path analysis, first presented by Sewall Wright to study quantitative traits, appears to be a powerful statistical approach for the identification of key compounds in complex pathways.

  12. Provitamin a activity of Brazilian carrots: leaves and roots, raw and cooked and their chemical composition

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    Ligia Bicudo Almeida-Muradian

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine through carotenoid analysis, the provitamin A value of two carrots (Daucus carota L. cultivars (Brasilia and Beta3, leaves and roots, raw and submitted to two ways of cooking: boiling and microwave. Proximate analysis results are also presented for a better characterization of these vegetables (moisture, ash, lipids, proteins, fiber and total carbohydrates. The main carotenoids sources of provitamin A in this vegetable, both in leaves or roots was β-carotene and α-carotene. α-carotene shows half of the provitamin A value of β-carotene. Samples of the Brasilia cultivar presented the better provitamin A value both for leaves and roots. The results for raw samples of the Brasilia cultivar were 464.48 RE/100g for leaves and 606.42 RE/100g for roots. There were no significant losses of provitamin A with the boiling or microwave cooking methods used.

  13. A novel K+ channel expressed in carrot roots with a low susceptibility toward metal ions.

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    Paganetto, A; Bregante, M; Downey, P; Lo Schiavo, F; Hoth, S; Hedrich, R; Gambale, F

    2001-02-01

    Kdc1 is a novel K+-channel gene cloned from carrot roots, and which is also present in cultured carrot cells. We investigated the characteristics of the ionic current elicited in Xenopus oocytes coinjected with KDC1 (K+-Daucus carota 1) and KAT1 (from Arabidopsis thaliana) RNA. Expressed heteromeric channels displayed inward-rectifying potassium currents whose kinetics, voltage characteristics, and inhibition by metal ions depended on KDC1:KAT1 ratios. At low KDC1:KAT1 ratios, Zn2+ inhibition of heteromeric K+ current was less pronounced compared to homomeric KAT1 channels, while at higher KDC1:KAT1 ratios, the addition of Zn2+ even produced an increase in current. Under the same conditions, the Ni2+ inhibition of the current was also reduced, but no current increase was observed. These effects might be explained by the unusual amino acid composition of the KDC1 protein in terms of histidine residues that are absent in the pore region, but abundant (four per subunit) in the proximity of the pore entrance. Channels like KDC1 could be at least partially responsible for the higher resistance of carrot cells in the presence of metals.

  14. Screening of Seed Treatment Agents against Leaf Blight and Black Root Rot for Carrot Organic Cultivation

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    Jae Eun Lee,

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to control the seed borne pathogens (Alternaria spp. of carrot and to examine the seed germination rate by using 13 environment friendly agricultural materials instead of conventional chemicals for organic cultivation. The growth inhibiting effects on pathogens showed the different responses according to each agricultural material and effective 7 materials against seed borne pathogens were selected. Among 7 materials, the carrot seeds sterilized with plant extracts, Tanger Stop and Land Saver were not germinated at all. The germination rate of seeds sterilized with other materials showed the similar levels with reference chemical (Benlate-T and non-treated seeds. Infection rates of seeds sterilized with seaweed extract, Bellopper for controlling A. radicina and plant extract, Ssial-100 for A. dauci were similar or low infection rate compared with reference chemical. The germination rate and root length of seeds sterilized with Bellopper and Ssial-100 was similar or superior to those of chemical sterilized seeds. The optimal condition seemed to be a little bit different depending on the concentration of materials. As a result, the sterilization of carrot seeds by using the environment friendly materials could be effectively utilized as a technology to inhibit the infection of seed-borne pathogens

  15. Influence of Cultivar and UGmax on Antioxidative Properties of Carrot Roots (Daucus Carota L. and their Stability During Freezing Process

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    Keutgen Anna J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present experiment, the significance of cultivar (convention-al and coloured and of the application of the soil fertility enhancer UGmax on health-promoting properties of carrot roots subjected to the freezing process of carrot cubes after water blanching was investigated. The selection of cultivar turned out to be highly signif-icant with respect to the development of health-promoting properties of carrot roots. The highest antioxidant properties were found in the purple cultivar ‘Deep Purple’. Its mean antioxidant capacity accounted for 5.31 mmol Fe+2 · kg–1 f.m. Essential for health-promoting properties were the contents of anthocyanins (R2 = 0.83, chlorogenic acid (R2 = 0.81 and total polyphenolics (R2 = 0.71. The application of the biological agent UGmax improved the qual-ity of carrot significantly, increasing the content of total carotenoids and reducing the losses of ascorbic acid during processing. The freezing process negatively influenced the antioxidative properties of carrot irrespective of cultivar and applied agro-technique (use of UGmax, especially in the case of water-soluble antioxidants such as anthocyanins and ascorbic acid.

  16. Plastid-expressed betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene in carrot cultured cells, roots, and leaves confers enhanced salt tolerance.

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    Kumar, Shashi; Dhingra, Amit; Daniell, Henry

    2004-09-01

    Salinity is one of the major factors that limits geographical distribution of plants and adversely affects crop productivity and quality. We report here high-level expression of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) in cultured cells, roots, and leaves of carrot (Daucus carota) via plastid genetic engineering. Homoplasmic transgenic plants exhibiting high levels of salt tolerance were regenerated from bombarded cell cultures via somatic embryogenesis. Transformation efficiency of carrot somatic embryos was very high, with one transgenic event per approximately seven bombarded plates under optimal conditions. In vitro transgenic carrot cells transformed with the badh transgene were visually green in color when compared to untransformed carrot cells, and this offered a visual selection for transgenic lines. BADH enzyme activity was enhanced 8-fold in transgenic carrot cell cultures, grew 7-fold more, and accumulated 50- to 54-fold more betaine (93-101 micromol g(-1) dry weight of beta-Ala betaine and Gly betaine) than untransformed cells grown in liquid medium containing 100 mm NaCl. Transgenic carrot plants expressing BADH grew in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl (up to 400 mm), the highest level of salt tolerance reported so far among genetically modified crop plants. BADH expression was 74.8% in non-green edible parts (carrots) containing chromoplasts, and 53% in proplastids of cultured cells when compared to chloroplasts (100%) in leaves. Demonstration of plastid transformation via somatic embryogenesis utilizing non-green tissues as recipients of foreign DNA for the first time overcomes two of the major obstacles in extending this technology to important crop plants.

  17. Foliar-applied ethephon enhances the content of anthocyanin of black carrot roots (Daucus carota ssp. sativus var. atrorubens Alef.)

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    Barba Espin, Gregorio; Glied, Stephan; Crocoll, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Black carrots (Daucus carota ssp. sativus var. atrorubens Alef.) constitute a valuable source of anthocyanins, which are used as natural red, blue and purple food colourants. Anthocyanins and phenolic compounds are specialised metabolites, accumulation of which often requires elicitors......, which act as molecular signals in plant stress responses. In the present study, ethephon, an ethylene-generating compound was explored as enhancer of anthocyanin and phenolic contents during growth of 'Deep Purple' black carrots. The effects of ethephon on several parameters were investigated......, and the expression of biosynthetic anthocyanin genes was studied during growth and anthocyanin accumulation. RESULTS: Roots of ethephon-treated carrot plants exhibited an increase in anthocyanin content of approximately 25%, with values ranging from 2.25 to 3.10 mg g(-1) fresh weight, compared with values ranging...

  18. Determination of polyacetylenes in carrot roots (Daucus carota L.) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection.

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    Christensen, Lars P; Kreutzmann, Stine

    2007-03-01

    A new high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode array detection was developed for the separation and simultaneous determination of the carrot polyacetylenes falcarindiol (FaDOH), falcarindiol 3-acetate (FaDOAc) and falcarinol (FaOH) in carrot root extracts. The optimal chromatographic conditions were achieved on a C18 column with a linear gradient elution of water and acetonitrile as mobile phases, at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. All calibration curves of the three carrot polyacetylenes showed good linear regression (R2 > 0.998) within the test ranges. The developed method showed good precision for quantification of all polyacetylenes with overall intraday and interday variation of less than 3.3% and with average recovery rates of 99.2, 96.8 and 99.7% for FaDOH, FaDOAc and FaOH, respectively. The LOD (S/N = 3) and LOQ (S/N = 10) were less than 0.19 and 0.42 microg/mL, respectively, for all analytes. The established method was successfully used to determine the spatial distribution of FaDOH, FaDOAc and FaOH in six carrot genotypes (Bolero, Independent, Line 1, Mello Yello, Purple Haze and Tornado) by analysing peeled carrots and the corresponding peels for these polyacetylenes.

  19. Foliar-applied ethephon enhances the content of anthocyanin of black carrot roots (Daucus carota ssp. sativus var. atrorubens Alef.).

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    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Glied, Stephan; Crocoll, Christoph; Dzhanfezova, Tsaneta; Joernsgaard, Bjarne; Okkels, Finn; Lütken, Henrik; Müller, Renate

    2017-04-04

    Black carrots (Daucus carota ssp. sativus var. atrorubens Alef.) constitute a valuable source of anthocyanins, which are used as natural red, blue and purple food colourants. Anthocyanins and phenolic compounds are specialised metabolites, accumulation of which often requires elicitors, which act as molecular signals in plant stress responses. In the present study, ethephon, an ethylene-generating compound was explored as enhancer of anthocyanin and phenolic contents during growth of 'Deep Purple' black carrots. The effects of ethephon on several parameters were investigated, and the expression of biosynthetic anthocyanin genes was studied during growth and anthocyanin accumulation. Roots of ethephon-treated carrot plants exhibited an increase in anthocyanin content of approximately 25%, with values ranging from 2.25 to 3.10 mg g -1 fresh weight, compared with values ranging from 1.50 to 1.90 mg g -1 fresh weight in untreated roots. The most rapid accumulation rate for anthocyanins, phenolic compounds, soluble solids and dry matter was observed between 10 and 13 weeks after sowing in both untreated and ethephon-treated carrots. The differences in anthocyanin contents between untreated and treated carrots increased for several weeks after the ethephon treatment was terminated. Five cyanidin-based anthocyanin forms were identified, with variable relative abundance values detected during root growth. Overall, the expression of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes analysed (PAL1, PAL3, F3H1, DFR1, LDOX2) increased in response to ethephon treatment, as did the expression of the MYB1 transcription factor, which is associated with activation of the phenylpropanoid pathway under stress conditions. In addition, a correlation was proposed between ethylene and sugar contents and the induction of anthocyanin synthesis. This study presents a novel method for enhancing anthocyanin content in black carrots. This finding is of economic importance as increased pigment

  20. Systemic allergic dermatitis caused by Apiaceae root vegetables.

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    Paulsen, Evy; Petersen, Thomas H; Fretté, Xavier C; Andersen, Klaus E; Christensen, Lars P

    2014-02-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to root vegetables of the Umbelliferae plant family (Apiaceae) is well known. Delayed-type hypersensitivity is rarely reported. To report the first case of systemic contact dermatitis caused by root vegetables and some chemical implications. Prick and patch testing were performed with fresh vegetables and selected allergens, and this was followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis of the falcarinol syringe. The patient was contact-sensitive to celeriac, parsnip, and carrot, but tested negative to falcarinol. Subsequent analysis showed that the syringe contained falcarinol. The non-occupational sensitization resulting from both direct and systemic contact with Apiaceae root vegetables was apparently not caused by falcarinol. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Applications of root cause analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satterwhite, D.G.; Meale, B.M.; Krantz, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The underlying causes for the failure of components, the root causes, can be obtained from operational data sources. This information is of value in focusing attention of the industry on the actual causes of component unavailability and, therefore, on the important contributors to plant risk. An application of this methodology to an actual plant system, and the results of this study, are presented in this paper

  2. Evaluation of Clonostachys rosea for Control of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Soil and in Roots of Carrot and Wheat.

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    Iqbal, Mudassir; Dubey, Mukesh; McEwan, Kerstin; Menzel, Uwe; Franko, Mikael Andersson; Viketoft, Maria; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    Biological control is a promising approach to reduce plant diseases caused by nematodes. We tested the effect of the fungus Clonostachys rosea strain IK726 inoculation on nematode community composition in a naturally nematode infested soil in a pot experiment, and the effect of C. rosea on plant health. The numbers of plant-parasitic nematode genera extracted from soil and plant roots decreased by 40 to 73% when C. rosea was applied, while genera of nonparasitic nematodes were not affected. Soil inoculation of C. rosea increased fresh shoot weight and shoot length of wheat plants by 20 and 24%, respectively, while only shoot dry weight increased by 48% in carrots. Light microscopy of in vitro C. rosea-nematode interactions did not reveal evidence of direct parasitism. However, culture filtrates of C. rosea growing in potato dextrose broth, malt extract broth and synthetic nutrient broth exhibited toxicity toward nematodes and immobilized 57, 62, and 100% of the nematodes, respectively, within 48 h. This study demonstrates that C. rosea can control plant-parasitic nematodes and thereby improve plant growth. The most likely mechanism responsible for the antagonism is antibiosis through production of nematicidal compounds, rather than direct parasitism.

  3. Differential effects of fenpropimorph and fenhexamid, two sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicides, on arbuscular mycorrhizal development and sterol metabolism in carrot roots.

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    Campagnac, Estelle; Fontaine, Joël; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj; Laruelle, Frédéric; Durand, Roger; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne

    2008-12-01

    Sterols composition of transformed carrot roots incubated in presence of increasing concentrations of fenpropimorph (0.02; 0.2; 2mgl(-1)) and fenhexamid (0.02; 0.2; 2; 20mgl(-1)), colonized or not by Glomus intraradices was determined. In mycorrhizal roots treated with fenpropimorph, normal Delta(5)-sterols were replaced by unusual compounds such as 9beta,19-cyclopropylsterols (24-methylpollinastanol), Delta(8,14)-sterols (ergosta-8,14-dienol, stigmasta-8,14-dienol), Delta(8)-sterols (Delta(8) sitosterol) and Delta(7)-sterols (ergosta-7,22-dienol). After application of fenpropimorph, a drastic reduction of the mycorrhizal root growth, root colonization and extraradical fungal development was observed. Application of fenhexamid did not modify sterol profiles and the total colonization of roots. But the arbuscule frequency of the fungal partner was significantly affected. Comparison of the effects caused by the tested fungicides indicates that the usual phytosterols may be involved in symbiosis development. Indeed, observed modifications of root sterols composition could explain the high fenpropimorph toxicity to the AM symbiosis. However, the absence of sterolic modifications in the roots treated with fenhexamid could account for its more limited impact on mycorrhization.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of chlorogenic acid biosynthesis in carrot root slices exposed to UV-B light

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    Orange carrots are well known for their nutritional value as producers of ß-carotene, a Vitamin A precursor. Lesser known, is their ability to accumulate antioxidants such as chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is produced through the same biosynthetic pathway that produces lignins, anthocyanins, f...

  5. A gene-derived SNP-based high resolution linkage map of carrot including the location of QTL conditioning root and leaf anthocyanin pigmentation.

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    Cavagnaro, Pablo F; Iorizzo, Massimo; Yildiz, Mehtap; Senalik, Douglas; Parsons, Joshua; Ellison, Shelby; Simon, Philipp W

    2014-12-16

    Purple carrots accumulate large quantities of anthocyanins in their roots and leaves. These flavonoid pigments possess antioxidant activity and are implicated in providing health benefits. Informative, saturated linkage maps associated with well characterized populations segregating for anthocyanin pigmentation have not been developed. To investigate the genetic architecture conditioning anthocyanin pigmentation we scored root color visually, quantified root anthocyanin pigments by high performance liquid chromatography in segregating F2, F3 and F4 generations of a mapping population, mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) onto a dense gene-derived single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage map, and performed comparative trait mapping with two unrelated populations. Root pigmentation, scored visually as presence or absence of purple coloration, segregated in a pattern consistent with a two gene model in an F2, and progeny testing of F3-F4 families confirmed the proposed genetic model. Purple petiole pigmentation was conditioned by a single dominant gene that co-segregates with one of the genes conditioning root pigmentation. Root total pigment estimate (RTPE) was scored as the percentage of the root with purple color.All five anthocyanin glycosides previously reported in carrot, as well as RTPE, varied quantitatively in the F2 population. For the purpose of QTL analysis, a high resolution gene-derived SNP-based linkage map of carrot was constructed with 894 markers covering 635.1 cM with a 1.3 cM map resolution. A total of 15 significant QTL for all anthocyanin pigments and for RTPE mapped to six chromosomes. Eight QTL with the largest phenotypic effects mapped to two regions of chromosome 3 with co-localized QTL for several anthocyanin glycosides and for RTPE. A single dominant gene conditioning anthocyanin acylation was identified and mapped.Comparative mapping with two other carrot populations segregating for purple color indicated that carrot anthocyanin

  6. Root Cause Analysis: Methods and Mindsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluch, Jacob H.

    This instructional unit is intended for use in training operations personnel and others involved in scram analysis at nuclear power plants in the techniques of root cause analysis. Four lessons are included. The first lesson provides an overview of the goals and benefits of the root cause analysis method. Root cause analysis techniques are covered…

  7. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose extraction in aqueous carrot root extracts prepared at different temperatures by means of direct NMR measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazor, Anne; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Rolin, Dominique; This, Hervé

    2006-06-28

    Solutions obtained by heating carrot roots in water (stocks) are widely used in the food industry, but little information is available regarding the metabolites (intermediates and products of metabolism) found in the stock. The effect of treatment temperature and duration on the sugar composition of stocks was investigated directly by quantitative (1)H NMR spectroscopy, to understand the extraction mechanism when processing at 100 degrees C. Stocks prepared at three different temperatures (50, 75, and 100 degrees C) were investigated for up to 36 h. Three sugars (sucrose, glucose, and fructose) were detected and quantified. The concentrations of these three sugars reached a maximum after 9 h when the temperature of treatment was 50 or 75 degrees C. At 100 degrees C, the sucrose concentration reached a maximum after 3 h, whereas the concentration of glucose and fructose was still increasing at that time. Comparison of the kinetic composition of these carrot stocks with that of model sugar solutions leads to the proposal that the changes in stock composition result from sugar diffusion, sucrose hydrolysis, and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation.

  8. Hybrids between wild and cultivated carrots in Danish carrot fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Thure Pavlo; Bjørn, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that wild carrots may pollute the seed crops of cultivated carrots, but whether cultivated carrots can also disperse pollen and seed, and thereby introduce genes into wild carrot populations, is only little described. In Denmark, there is no commercial seed production of carrots......, and as biennials they should normally not flower before harvest of the roots. Still, flowering individuals can be found in most Danish fields, and sometimes in very high numbers. At least 75% of the flowering plants are male fertile, with ca. 83% of the pollen being viable. More than half of the plants produce...... seeds. Pollen and seed dispersal from fields into wild carrot populations is probably rather frequent in Denmark. A closer inspection of the morphology of flowering plants indicate that some of these (2-60%) are bolters of pure cultivar origin, as indicated primarily by orange root colour. The remainder...

  9. Hybrids between wild and cultivated carrots in Danish carrot fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, T.P.; Bjørn, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    is probably first or advanced generation hybrids between wild and cultivated plants, as indicated by their white roots and combinations of morphological characters from either plant type. Some of these hybrids are imported to Denmark together with the sowing seed, as indicated by significantly different......It is well known that wild carrots may pollute the seed crops of cultivated carrots, but whether cultivated carrots can also disperse pollen and seed, and thereby introduce genes into wild carrot populations, is only little described. In Denmark, there is no commercial seed production of carrots...... seeds. Pollen and seed dispersal from fields into wild carrot populations is probably rather frequent in Denmark. A closer inspection of the morphology of flowering plants indicate that some of these (2-60%) are bolters of pure cultivar origin, as indicated primarily by orange root colour. The remainder...

  10. Carotenoid content and root color of cultivated carrot: a candidate-gene association study using an original broad unstructured population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Jourdan

    Full Text Available Accumulated in large amounts in carrot, carotenoids are an important product quality attribute and therefore a major breeding trait. However, the knowledge of carotenoid accumulation genetic control in this root vegetable is still limited. In order to identify the genetic variants linked to this character, we performed an association mapping study with a candidate gene approach. We developed an original unstructured population with a broad genetic basis to avoid the pitfall of false positive detection due to population stratification. We genotyped 109 SNPs located in 17 candidate genes – mostly carotenoid biosynthesis genes – on 380 individuals, and tested the association with carotenoid contents and color components. Total carotenoids and β-carotene contents were significantly associated with genes zeaxanthin epoxydase (ZEP, phytoene desaturase (PDS and carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO while α-carotene was associated with CRTISO and plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX genes. Color components were associated most significantly with ZEP. Our results suggest the involvement of the couple PDS/PTOX and ZEP in carotenoid accumulation, as the result of the metabolic and catabolic activities respectively. This study brings new insights in the understanding of the carotenoid pathway in non-photosynthetic organs.

  11. Effects of organic and conventional growth systems on the content of carotenoids in carrot roots, and on intake and plasma status of carotenoids in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Malene; Bysted, Anette; Madsen, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for organic food products has increased during the last decades due to their probable health effects, among others. A higher content of secondary metabolites such as carotenoids in organic food products has been claimed, though not documented, to contribute to increased...... health effects of organic foods. The aim was to study the impact of organic and conventional agricultural systems on the content of carotenoids in carrots and human diets. In addition, a human cross-over study was performed, measuring the plasma status of carotenoids in humans consuming diets made from...... crops from these agricultural systems. RESULTS: The content of carotenoids in carrot roots and human diets was not significantly affected by the agricultural production system or year, despite differences in fertilisation strategy and levels. The plasma status of carotenoids increased significantly...

  12. Transcript profiling of structural genes involved in cyanidin-based anthocyanin biosynthesis between purple and non-purple carrot (Daucus carota L.) cultivars reveals distinct patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Song, Xiong; Wang, Guang-Long; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    numerous structural genes are involved in anthocyanin production in the taproots of purple carrot cultivars and in the loss of anthocyanin production in non-purple carrots. Unexpressed or scarcely expressed genes in the taproots of non-purple carrot cultivars may be caused by the inactivation of regulator genes. Our results provide new insights into anthocyanin biosynthesis at the molecular level in carrots and for other root vegetables.

  13. The Root Cause of the Overheating Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2017-01-01

    Previously we identified the receding flow, where two fluid streams recede from each other, as an open numerical problem, because all well-known numerical fluxes give an anomalous temperature rise, thus called the overheating problem. This phenomenon, although presented in several textbooks, and many previous publications, has scarcely been satisfactorily addressed and the root cause of the overheating problem not well understood. We found that this temperature rise was solely connected to entropy rise and proposed to use the method of characteristics to eradicate the problem. However, the root cause of the entropy production was still unclear. In the present study, we identify the cause of this problem: the entropy rise is rooted in the pressure flux in a finite volume formulation and is implanted at the first time step. It is found theoretically inevitable for all existing numerical flux schemes used in the finite volume setting, as confirmed by numerical tests. This difficulty cannot be eliminated by manipulating time step, grid size, spatial accuracy, etc, although the rate of overheating depends on the flux scheme used. Finally, we incorporate the entropy transport equation, in place of the energy equation, to ensure preservation of entropy, thus correcting this temperature anomaly. Its applicability is demonstrated for some relevant 1D and 2D problems. Thus, the present study validates that the entropy generated ab initio is the genesis of the overheating problem.

  14. The influence of the fungal pathogen Mycocentrosporae acerina on the proteome and polyacetylenes and 6-methoxymellein in organic and conventionally cultivated carrots (Daucus carota) during post harvest storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louarn, Sébastien Jean Yves; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Edelenbos, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Many carrots are discarded during post harvest cold storage due to development of fungal infections, caused by, e.g., Mycocentrospora acerina (liquorice rot). We compared the susceptibility of carrots grown under conventional and organic agricultural practices. In one year, organically cultivated...... carrots showed 3× to 7× more symptoms than conventionally cultivated, when studying naturally occurring disease at 4 and 6 months, respectively. On the other hand, we have developed a bioassay for infection studies of M. acerina on carrots and observed that organic roots were more susceptible after one...... as in healthy tissue opposite the infection. The proteomes of carrot and M. acerina were characterized, the intensity of 33 plant protein spots was significantly changed in infected roots including up regulation of defence and stress response proteins but also a decrease of proteins involved in energy...

  15. Qualidade de raízes de cenoura em sistemas consorciados com alface sob diferentes densidades populacionais Quality of carrot roots in intercropped systems with lettuce under different planting densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélio P. Barros Júnior

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi realizado de junho a setembro de 2003, em campo da ESAM, com o objetivo de avaliar a qualidade de raízes de cenoura (Brasília em sistemas consorciados com alface (Tainá sob diferentes densidades populacionais. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi de blocos casualizados, em esquema fatorial 4 x 4, com três repetições. Os tratamentos foram resultantes da combinação de quatro populações de cenoura [(40%, 60%, 80% e 100% da população recomendada no cultivo solteiro (PRCS] com quatro populações de alface (40%, 60%, 80% e 100% da PRCS. As características avaliadas nas raízes da cenoura foram acidez total titulável (ATT, sólidos solúveis totais (SST, açúcares totais (ACT pH, relação sólidos solúveis totais e acidez total titulável, além da produtividade comercial da cenoura e da alface. Ocorreu interação significativa entre as densidades populacionais das culturas componentes na ATT das raízes da cenoura. Houve aumento no conteúdo de SST e no pH à medida que se aumentou a densidade populacional de cenoura. Houve também um aumento na produtividade comercial de raízes de cenoura e na produtividade da alface com o aumento de suas densidades populacionais, respectivamente. A variação na população de cenoura não afetou a produtividade da alface, mas a variação na população da alface afetou negativamente a produtividade comercial da cenoura. Entre as características avaliadas, as que se correlacionaram de maneira significativa com a produtividade comercial de cenoura, foram as concentrações de sólidos solúveis totais e açucares totais, evidenciando assim, que estes atributos podem ser considerados representativos da qualidade de raízes da cenoura.The experiment was carried out from June to September 2003, in Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil, to evaluate the quality of carrot roots (cv. Brasília in intercropped systems with lettuce (cv. Tainá under different planting

  16. Root cause of waterborne diseases in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashml, H.N.; Ghumman, A.R.; Malik, N.E.

    2005-01-01

    The waterborne diseases are increasing rapidly at an alarming rate in Pakistan due to poor sanitation and unsafe drinking water supplies. This study shows that about 25 percent of all the illnesses in Lahore are due to severe cases of waterborne diseases. Unhygienic sanitation system is the root cause for this scenario. Drinking water, samples were collected from different zones of the city to find out the root cause of waterborne diseases. The samples from the distribution system serving 'Kachi Abbadies' (Underdeveloped areas) were much more contaminated, may be due to non-chlorination as compared to the water which is regularly chlorinated in posh areas of the city. Contribution of soakage pits in groundwater contamination is more significant at shallow depths. From the laboratory results it is clear that water distribution in underdeveloped areas of the city is highly contaminated and ground water available at shallow depth is also infected by microbial activities. Data collected from the different hospitals to investigate the problem shows that waterborne diseases vary their trend seasonally. Here in Pakistan, rainy season (July-August) reveals maximum number of cases of waterborne diseases. Proper sanitation and water supply systems are more essential to control the influence of waterborne diseases within the country. It is strongly recommended that reputable ways of communications are urgently required to highlight the diseases related to unsafe drinking water. (author)

  17. Effect of Genetic Conditions, Foliar Fertilisation with Magnesium and Storage on the Content of Nitrates (V and (III in the Storage Roots in Carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wszelaczyńska Elżbieta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During 2007-2009, studies were undertaken to determine the effect of genetic factors, magnesium fertilisation and storage on the content of nitrates (V and (III in carrot roots. After harvest as well as after storage, the cultivar ‘Perfekcja’ was characterised by the lowest content of NO3− and NO2−, while the greatest amounts were found in cultivar ‘Flacoro’. Magnesium was applied in doses of 0, 45 and 90 kg MgO ha-1 - in the form of 3% spraying during the vegetation season. The research items were cultivars: ‘Berjo’, Flacoro’, ‘Karotan’, ‘Koral’ and ‘Perfekcja’.

  18. Effect of UV-C on phytoalexin accumulation and resistance to Botrytis cinerea in stored carrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, J.; Arul, J.; Julien, C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of UV-C (220-280 nm) on the accumulation of phytoalexin and resistance to Botrytis cinerea was studied in cold-stored carrots. Carrots were surface-wounded, treated with a range of UV doses and stored at 1 degree C for 25 days in lots of 22 roots. The level of the phytoalexin, 6-methoxymellein, in each lot was then assayed in the peel of eight roots. Twelve of the remaining roots were subsequently inoculated with mycelial plugs to evaluate their level of disease resistance. The elicitation of 6-methoxymellein by UV increased significantly the resistance of the roots to B. cinerea. The effect of UV in freshly harvested carrots was curvilinear, showing an optimum between 0.44 and 0.88 Merg/cm(2). However, only a linear relationship was observed with aged (stored for 4 months at 1 degree C) carrots for the same doses, suggesting a modification in the response to UV with age. Wounding was necessary for carrots kept at 1 degree C to respond to UV treatment. Neither UV nor wounding alone caused any elicitation at this temperature. Since unwounded roots could respond to UV at 20 degrees C, it is hypothesized that the level of physiological activity of the roots determines their response to UV. An increase in the physiological activity by higher temperatures or wounding would allow the elicitation process to take place. Since UV irradiation can increase the level of disease resistance in treated tissues, this treatment has potential as an alternative method for the control of post-harvest diseases in carrots

  19. Dental root periapical resorption caused by orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental root resorption especially in maxillary incisive region almost always happens simultaneously with orthodontic treatment, and it gained researchers attention, in particular after the use of periapical radiography. However, the fundamental etiology of dental root resorption is still dubious. Multifactoral causes are mentioned, among others are hormonal, nutritition, trauma, dental root form and dental root structure anomalies, genetic, while from treatment side are duration, types, strength scale and dental movement types. Based on these findings, orthodontic treatment was proven to cause dental root resorption in maxillary incisive teeth.

  20. Root Causes of Component Failures Program: Methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satterwhite, D.G.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Vesely, W.E.; Meale, B.M.

    1986-12-01

    This report contains information pertaining to definitions, methodologies, and applications of root cause analysis. Of specific interest, and highlighted throughout the discussion, are applications pertaining to current and future Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) light water reactor safety programs. These applications are discussed in view of addressing specific program issues under NRC consideration and reflect current root cause analysis capabilities

  1. Socioeconomic Root Causes of Biodiversity Loss in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitry N. Ratsifandrihamanana; Dawn Montanye; Sarah Christiansen; Sheila O' Connor

    2006-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001 a root cause analysis was conducted for the Spiny Forest Ecoregion in Madagascar, identifying the local level root causes of biodiversity loss in the ecoregion as well as the policy and institutional issues at the national and international levels that contribute to them. Most of the research was conducted in and around Tulear and Fort Dauphin....

  2. Development of a heat exchanger root-cause analysis methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrel, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine a generic methodology for approaching the accurate identification of the root cause of component failure. Root-cause determinations are an everyday challenge to plant personnel, but they are handled with widely differing degrees of success due to the approaches, levels of diagnostic expertise, and documentation. The criterion for success is simple: If the root cause of the failure has truly been determined and corrected, the same causal failure relationship will not be demonstrated again in the future. The approach to root-cause analysis (RCA) element definition was to first selectively choose and constrain a functionally significant component (in this case a component cooling water to service water heat exchanger) that has demonstrated prevalent failures. Then a root cause of failure analysis was performed by a systems engineer on a large number of actual failure scenarios. The analytical process used by the engineer was documented and evaluated to abstract the logic model used to arrive at the root cause. For the case of the heat exchanger, the actual root-cause diagnostic approach is described. A generic methodology for the solution of the root cause of component failure is demonstrable for this general heat exchanger sample

  3. Development and implementation of custom root-cause systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.

    1990-01-01

    Almost anyone investigating an operating problem can expect their management and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to ask them if they have really uncovered the root cause of the event. This paper outlines a proven method to develop a custom system to identify and analyze the root causes of events. The method has led to the successful implementation of root-cause analysis systems at the Savannah River Plant and at Philadelphia Electric's Peach Bottom and Limerick nuclear generating stations. The methods are currently being used by System Improvements to develop a root-cause system to be used by the NRC to identify human performance problems at utilities. This paper also outlines the common problems that may be encountered when implementing a root-cause program

  4. A new perspective into root-cause analysis and diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Inn Seock; Kim, Tae Kwon; Kim, Min Chull

    1998-01-01

    A critical review of diagnostic and root-cause analysis methods, developed in nuclear, chemical process, aviation industries, was made. Based on this review, the insights into both off-line and on-line diagnostics, and also root-cause analysis are preseted from a new perspective. This perspective may be applied for various purposes, including real-time on-line process diagnosis, root-cause analysis of reactor scrams, diagnosis of severe accidents, or situation identification of an on-going emergency at a nuclear site

  5. A root cause analysis project in a medication safety course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Jason J

    2012-08-10

    To develop, implement, and evaluate team-based root cause analysis projects as part of a required medication safety course for second-year pharmacy students. Lectures, in-class activities, and out-of-class reading assignments were used to develop students' medication safety skills and introduce them to the culture of medication safety. Students applied these skills within teams by evaluating cases of medication errors using root cause analyses. Teams also developed error prevention strategies and formally presented their findings. Student performance was assessed using a medication errors evaluation rubric. Of the 211 students who completed the course, the majority performed well on root cause analysis assignments and rated them favorably on course evaluations. Medication error evaluation and prevention was successfully introduced in a medication safety course using team-based root cause analysis projects.

  6. Root cause of failure analysis and the system engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppock, M.S.; Hartwig, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    In an industry where ever-increasing emphasis is being placed on root cause of failure determination, it is imperative that a successful nuclear utility have an effective means of identifying failures and performing the necessary analyses. The current Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practice, OE-907, root-cause analysis, gives references to methodology that will help determine breakdowns in procedures, programs, or design but gives very little guidance on how or when to perform component root cause of failure analyses. The system engineers of nuclear utilities are considered the focal point for their respective systems and are required by most programs to investigate component failures. The problem that the system engineer faces in determining a component root cause of failures lies in acquisition of the necessary data to identify the need to perform the analysis and in having the techniques and equipment available to perform it. The system engineers at the Palo Verde nuclear generating station routinely perform detailed component root cause of failure analyses. The Palo Verde program provides the system engineers with the information necessary to identify when a component root cause of failure is required. Palo Verde also has the necessary equipment on-site to perform the analyses

  7. Identification of measures for prevention of black spots in organically produced stored carrots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhl, J.; Kastelein, P.; Elderson, J.; Blok, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the Netherlands winter carrot for the fresh market is a cash crop for many organic growers of field vegetables. In the last few years blackish spots have been observed during storage of carrot roots. An inventory was carried out in 2001/2002 and 2002/2003 including in total 42 carrot lots from 22

  8. User's guide for Reactor Incident Root Cause Coding Tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, D.A.; Paradies, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Reactor Incident (RI) Cause Coding Tree is designed to allow identification of root causes of RI's, thereby leading to trending of useful information and developing of corrective actions to prevent recurrence. This guide explains the terminology of the RI Cause Coding Tree and how to use the tree. Using this guide for cause coding is stressed to allow consistency of coding among all RI investigators. 8 figs

  9. Nematicides control rice root-knot, caused by Meloidogyne graminicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujeebur Rahman KHAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies were conducted to determine damage potential of Meloidogyne graminicola on the commonly grown rice cv. Sugandh-5 and to devise an effective management strategy. The nematicides were applied through root-dip (200 ppm solution and soil application of 2 kg ha-1 phorate 10G (25 mg a.i./pot, carbofuran 3G (83.3 mg a.i./pot and 1 L ha-1, carbosulfan 20EC (5µL/pot and chlorpyriphos 20 EC (6.25 µL/pot in both nematode infested and non-infested soil with five modes of application viz., root-dip, single soil application (15 days after transplanting, root-dip + one soil application, two soil applications, and root-dip + two soil applications (15 and 30 days. Application of nematicides did not cause any toxicity symptoms on rice plants. In nematode infested soil, terminal and spiral galls developed on the rice roots, and plants suffered 20−31% decrease in the plant growth parameters. Carbofuran and phorate through root-dip plus single soil application provided greatest suppression in galling (16−20%, egg mass production (18−22% and soil population (27.5−58.2% of M. graminicola, and subsequently increased all the plant growth variables by 9−19%. Root-dip + two soil applications increased plant growth and suppressed nematodes, but was equal to root dip + one soil application. Root-dip treatment alone with carbosulfan also significantly suppressed root galling (10−12% and improved the dry weight of roots and shoots (7−10%.

  10. Natural genetic transformation by agrobacterium rhizogenes . Annual flowering in two biennials, belgian endive and carrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limami; Sun; Douat; Helgeson; Tepfer

    1998-10-01

    Genetic transformation of Belgian endive (Cichorium intybus) and carrot (Daucus carota) by Agrobacterium rhizogenes resulted in a transformed phenotype, including annual flowering. Back-crossing of transformed (R1) endive plants produced a line that retained annual flowering in the absence of the other traits associated with A. rhizogenes transformation. Annualism was correlated with the segregation of a truncated transferred DNA (T-DNA) insertion. During vegetative growth, carbohydrate reserves accumulated normally in these annuals, and they were properly mobilized prior to anthesis. The effects of individual root-inducing left-hand T-DNA genes on flowering were tested in carrot, in which rolC (root locus) was the primary promoter of annualism and rolD caused extreme dwarfism. We discuss the possible adaptive significance of this attenuation of the phenotypic effects of root-inducing left-hand T-DNA.

  11. Hypertrophic Synovitis of the Facet Joint Causing Root Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Iwatsuki M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritic changes in the facet joints are common in the presence of degenerative disc disease. Changes in the joint capsule accompany changes in the articular surfaces. Intraspinal synovial cysts that cause radicular pain, cauda equina syndrome, and myelopathy have been reported; however, there have been few reports in orthopedic or neurosurgical literature regarding hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint presenting as an incidental para-articular mass. Here, we report a case of hypertrophic synovitis causing root pain. We describe the case of a 65-year-old man suffering from right sciatica and right leg pain in the L5 nerve-root dermatome for 1 year; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed an enhanced mass around the L4–5 facet joint. We investigated this mass pathologically. After right medial facetectomy, the symptoms resolved. Pathological investigation revealed this mass was hypertrophic synovitis. Hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint might cause root pain.

  12. Soil solarization for weed control in carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARENCO RICARDO ANTONIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil solarization is a technique used for weed and plant disease control in regions with high levels of solar radiation. The effect of solarization (0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks upon weed populations, carrot (Daucus carota L. cv. Brasília yield and nematode infestation in carrot roots was studied in São Luís (2º35' S; 44º10' W, MA, Brazil, using transparent polyethylene films (100 and 150 mm of thickness. The maximum temperature at 5 cm of depth was about 10ºC warmer in solarized soil than in control plots. In the study 20 weed types were recorded. Solarization reduced weed biomass and density in about 50% of weed species, including Cyperus spp., Chamaecrista nictans var. paraguariensis (Chod & Hassl. Irwin & Barneby, Marsypianthes chamaedrys (Vahl O. Kuntze, Mitracarpus sp., Mollugo verticillata L., Sebastiania corniculata M. Arg., and Spigelia anthelmia L. Approximately 40% of species in the weed flora were not affected by soil mulching. Furthermore, seed germination of Commelina benghalensis L. was increased by soil solarization. Marketable yield of carrots was greater in solarized soil than in the unsolarized one. It was concluded that solarization for nine weeks increases carrot yield and is effective for controlling more than half of the weed species recorded. Mulching was not effective for controlling root-knot nematodes in carrot.

  13. Proliferation of cyber insecurity in Nigeria: a root cause analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With increasing access to internet and online resources in Nigeria, an exponential increase is observed in the rate of cybercrimes in Nigeria. Cybercrime rates increase geometrically, hence, giving Nigeria notoriety as a nation with a highly insecure cyberspace, the study aimed at identifying the root cause of the increase in ...

  14. Electrical failure analysis for root-cause determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riddle, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines a practical failure analysis sequence. Several technical definitions are required. A failure is defined as a component that was operating in a system where the system malfunctioned and the replacement of the device restored system functionality. The failure mode is the malfunctioning behavior of the device. The failure mechanism is the underlying cause or source of the failure mode. The failure mechanism is the root cause of the failure mode. The failure analysis procedure needs to be adequately refined to result in the determination of the cause of failure to the degree that corrective action or design changes will prevent recurrence of the failure mode or mechanism. An example of a root-cause determination analysis performed for a nuclear power industry customer serves to illustrate the analysis methodology

  15. Carrot arabinogalactan proteins are interlinked with pectins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immerzeel, P.; Eppink, M.M.; Vries, de S.C.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall extracts from a carrot cell culture and tap roots were obtained by sequential extraction with water, EDTA buffer solution and cold sodium hydroxide solution. Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) were isolated from the extracts and from the medium of the cell culture and analysed for their

  16. The influence of the fungal pathogen Mycocentrospora acerina on the proteome and polyacetylenes and 6-methoxymellein in organic and conventionally cultivated carrots (Daucus carota) during post harvest storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louarn, Sébastien; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Edelenbos, Merete; Jensen, Dan F; Jensen, Ole N; Collinge, David B; Jensen, Birgit

    2012-01-04

    Many carrots are discarded during post harvest cold storage due to development of fungal infections, caused by, e.g., Mycocentrospora acerina (liquorice rot). We compared the susceptibility of carrots grown under conventional and organic agricultural practices. In one year, organically cultivated carrots showed 3× to 7× more symptoms than conventionally cultivated, when studying naturally occurring disease at 4 and 6 months, respectively. On the other hand, we have developed a bioassay for infection studies of M. acerina on carrots and observed that organic roots were more susceptible after one month of storage than conventional ones, but no differences were apparent after four or six months storage. Levels of polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate) did not change, whereas the isocoumarin phytoalexin (6-methoxymellein) accumulated in infected tissue as well as in healthy tissue opposite the infection. The proteomes of carrot and M. acerina were characterized, the intensity of 33 plant protein spots was significantly changed in infected roots including up regulation of defence and stress response proteins but also a decrease of proteins involved in energy metabolism. This combined metabolic and proteomic study indicates that roots respond to fungal infection through altered metabolism: simultaneous induction of 6-methoxymellein and synthesis of defence related proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. nfluences of ammonium-nitrate, food waste compost and bacterial fertilizer on soluble soil nitrogen forms and on the growth of carrot (Daucus Carota L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Balla Kovács

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a greenhouse study to compare the effects of food waste compost, bacterial fertilizer and their combination with the effect of mineral fertilizer on yield of carrot and the available nutrient content of soils. The study was conducted on calcareous chernozem and acidic sandy soils and consisted of 8 treatments in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The NH4NO3 resulted in reduced growing of carrot plant in sandy soil, and the treatment effect of mineral fertilizer was not observed significantly in chernozem soil. Sandy soil showed higher response of growth of carrot to food waste compost fertilization than chernozem soil. Sole application of EM-1 bacterial fertilizer did not have marked effect on yield parameters and sizes of roots. When EM-1 bacterial fertilizer was applied together with ammonium-nitrate or with compost in chernozem soil, the weights of roots and the sizes of roots in some cases became higher compared to the values of appropriate treatments without inoculation. In sandy soil the diameter of roots slightly increased when EM-1 bacterial fertilizer was applied with ammonium-nitrate and with ammonium-nitrate+compost combination compared to appropriate treatment without inoculation. In chernozem soil the maximum weights and sizes of roots were achieved with the combined treatment of ammonium-nitrate+compost+EM-1 bacterial fertilizer and in sandy soil with compost treatment. Our results of soluble nitrogen content of soils are in good agreement with yield parameters of carrot. Results suggest that food waste compost could be a good substitute for mineral fertilizer application in carrot production mainly in sandy soil. EM-1 bacterial fertilizer did not cause marked effect on yield and yield parameters of carrot plant, but its combination with other fertilizers promises a little bit higher yield or plant available nutrient in the soil. These effects do not clear exactly, so further studies are

  18. Marginality: Addressing the Root Causes of Extreme Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Gatzweiler, Franz W.; Baumuller, Heike; Husmann, Christine Ladenburger; von Braun, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The need to address extreme poverty from the perspective of marginality arises from the frustration that the number of the poorest and hungry remains unacceptably high. This triggered the call for an innovative approach from the side of science and action. The conceptual and analytical framework developed here views marginality as a root cause of extreme poverty. We define marginality as an involuntary position and condition of an individual or group at the edge of social, economic, and ecolo...

  19. Root Cause Assessment for a Manufacturing Industry: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kalantri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Root-cause identification for quality related problems are key issues for manufacturing processes. It has been a very challenging engineering problem particularly in a multistage manufacturing, where maximum number of processes and activities are performed. However, it may also be implemented with ease in each and every individual set up and activities in any manufacturing process. Kaizen is aimed towards reduction in different types of losses i.e. Failure Loss/ Breakdown Loss, Minor stoppage, idling loss, Setup and adjustment loss etc. So as to improve quality and productivity.In this report, root-cause identification methodology has been adopted to eliminate the rejection of product manufactured by the enterprise and improving the life of product. Brainstorming and other Root Cause Assesmenttools have been used to find out the reasons of tube failure and vibration in tubular strander. Solutions of these problems have also given in this report. Kaizen activities have reduced the time consumed in daily activities of cleaning, lubricating, inspection etc. A detailed study has illustrated the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  20. Pré-enraizamento de mudas de mandioquinha-salsa em diferentes bandejas e substratos com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares Pre-rooting of rhizomes of peruvian carrot in different trays and substrates with arbuscular micorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Andréia da Cunha Martins

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se este trabalho com o objetivo de estudar a colonização radicular por fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs no período de pré-enraizamento da mandioquinha-salsa (Arracacia xanthorrhiza Bancroft. Os tratamentos constaram de dois substratos e dois tamanhos de bandeja de isopor. Utilizou-se um substrato comum constituído de 30% de composto orgânico, 30% de solo argiloso e 30% de areia e um substrato comercial Plantmax® Hortaliças; os tamanhos de bandejas de isopor foram: 128 células/bandeja (38 cm³ por célula e 200 células/bandeja (18 cm³ por célula. Efetuou-se uma inoculação mista de FMAs com solo inóculo composto pelas espécies Gigaspora margarita e Glomus clarum. Houve em ambos os substratos restrita resposta à inoculação dos FMAs, pela baixa colonização radicular, variando de 0,63 a 2,14% no substrato comercial e 7,93 a 15,09% no substrato comum. O substrato comum não apresentou características físicas desejáveis (aeração e drenagem para um bom desenvolvimento das raízes de mandioquinha-salsa durante a fase de pré-enraizamento. O substrato comercial apresentou maiores médias para a variável área e comprimento radicular em todas as coletas. A área radicular variou de 21,50 cm² com 30 DAP a 68,22 cm² com 60 DAP, enquanto o comprimento radicular variou de 2,64 m com 30 DAP a 12,64 m com 60 DAP. A bandeja de 200 células (18 cm³ célula/bandeja não foi adequada para a produção de mudas de mandioquinha-salsa.The objective of the work was to study the root colonization by arbuscular micorrhizal fungi (AMF during the development of Peruvian carrot rhizomes (Arracacia xanthorrhiza Bancroft. The treatments consisted of two substrates and two polystyrene trays sizes. A common substrate constituted of 30% of organic compost, 30% of loamy soil and 30% of sand, and a commercial substrate "Plantmax® Hortaliças"; and polystyrene trays sizes of 128 cells/tray (38 cm³ per cell and 200 cells/tray (18 cm

  1. Chemical composition, functional properties and processing of carrot-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishan Datt; Karki, Swati; Thakur, Narayan Singh; Attri, Surekha

    2012-02-01

    Carrot is one of the important root vegetables rich in bioactive compounds like carotenoids and dietary fibers with appreciable levels of several other functional components having significant health-promoting properties. The consumption of carrot and its products is increasing steadily due to its recognition as an important source of natural antioxidants having anticancer activity. Apart from carrot roots being traditionally used in salad and preparation of curries in India, these could commercially be converted into nutritionally rich processed products like juice, concentrate, dried powder, canned, preserve, candy, pickle, and gazrailla. Carrot pomace containing about 50% of β-carotene could profitably be utilized for the supplementation of products like cake, bread, biscuits and preparation of several types of functional products. The present review highlights the nutritional composition, health promoting phytonutrients, functional properties, products development and by-products utilization of carrot and carrot pomace along with their potential application.

  2. Discoloration of Roots Caused by Residual Endodontic Intracanal Medicaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Kuan-Jung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This study examined the extent to which intervisit corticosteroid-based antibiotic pastes (CAP medicaments contribute to staining of tooth structure after attempted removal by irrigation techniques. Methods. A total of 140 roots were prepared and the canals were filled with Ledermix paste (demeclocycline, Odontopaste (clindamycin, and Doxypaste (doxycycline. The pastes were removed after 2 or 4 weeks of storage in the dark using EDTA and NaOCl with either a 27-gauge-slotted needle or an EndoActivator (Dentsply. The roots were then exposed to an intense light source for 30 minutes each week and photographed after a further 1, 3, or 6 months. Digital images were standardized and data for changes in luminosity were analysed using repeated measures ANOVA and a post hoc test. Results. Removal of the medicament did not prevent later discolouration. There was no significant difference between the paste removal methods. Ledermix paste caused the greatest darkening compared to the untreated controls, for both application periods and both methods of removal. Doxypaste and Odontopaste caused less darkening than Ledermix. Conclusion. Medicaments that stain teeth may continue to discolour teeth despite best attempts to remove them. This study stresses the importance of material selection and minimising contact of Ledermix within the coronal aspects of teeth.

  3. Impacts of irrigation regimes with saline water on carrot productivity and soil salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Nagaz

    2012-01-01

    salts from the root zone. Highest carrot yields for the three years were obtained with SWB scheduling technique FI-100, (29.5, 28.7 and 26.8 t/ha although we didn’t find significant differences with the regulated deficit irrigation regime (FI-DI60. Compared to FI-100, significant reductions in carrot yields were observed under DI-80 and DI-60 deficit irrigation treatments resulting from a reduction in roots number/m2 and average root weight. The farmer’s method not only caused significant reductions in yield but also resulted in using 43–57% more water and increased soil salinity. For all irrigation treatments, carrot yields were higher in the first year compared to the two following years. Water productivity (WP values reflected this difference and varied between 3.2 and 9.7 kg/m3. The lowest WP values were observed for the farmer’s method, while the highest values were obtained under DI-60 deficit irrigation treatment. The scheduling technique using SWB with variable doses is more efficient than the traditional technique used by farmers in carrot production. The FI-100 irrigation scheduling seems to optimize the use of saline water in carrot production and to control soil salinity. Under situations of water shortage, adopting deficit irrigation strategies (FI-DI60 and DI-80 could be an alternative for irrigation scheduling of carrot crop under the conditions of Mediterranean arid in southern Tunisia.

  4. Disaster forensics understanding root cause and complex causality

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to uncover the root causes of natural and man-made disasters by going beyond the typical reports and case studies conducted post-disaster. It opens the black box of disasters by presenting ‘forensic analysis approaches’ to disasters, thereby revealing the complex causality that characterizes them and explaining how and why hazards do, or do not, become disasters. This yields ‘systemic’ strategies for managing disasters. Recently the global threat landscape has seen the emergence of high impact, low probability events. Events like Hurricane Katrina, the Great Japan Earthquake and tsunami, Hurricane Sandy, Super Typhoon Haiyan, global terrorist activities have become the new norm. Extreme events challenge our understanding regarding the interdependencies and complexity of the disaster aetiology and are often referred to as Black Swans. Between 2002 and 2011, there were 4130 disasters recorded that resulted from natural hazards around the world. In these, 1,117,527 people perished and a mi...

  5. Root cause analysis for fire events at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    Fire hazard has been identified as a major contributor to a plant' operational safety risk. The International nuclear power community (regulators, operators, designers) has been studying and developing tools for defending against this hazed. Considerable advances have been achieved during past two decades in design and regulatory requirements for fire safety, fire protection technology and related analytical techniques. The IAEA endeavours to provide assistance to Member States in improving fire safety in nuclear power plants. A task was launched by IAEA in 1993 with the purpose to develop guidelines and good practices, to promote advanced fire safety assessment techniques, to exchange state of the art information, and to provide engineering safety advisory services and training in the implementation of internationally accepted practices. This TECDOC addresses a systematic assessment of fire events using the root cause analysis methodology, which is recognized as an important element of fire safety assessment

  6. Fuel defect root cause investigation at Wolsong-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H-T.; Jun, H-S.; Manzer, A.M.; Palleck, S.J.; Love, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Wolsong Unit 1 had experienced a number of fuel failures from September 1995 until August 1996. There was a rapid increase in the primary heat transport system (PHTS) activity during that period. I-131 and Xe-133 levels of up to 290 and 80,000 μCi/kg respectively, were recorded. The investigation concluded that the root cause was high hydrogen content within the fuel elements resulting from insufficient baking of the CANLUB graphite coatings. After the manufacturing process and hydrogen analyses procedures were improved, the total amount of hydrogen within a fuel element now remains below 0.6 mg. Fuel manufactured with the improved process is performing well and the coolant activity levels have slowly returned to normal as the defects were discharged from the core. (author)

  7. FIRST REPORT OF Phytophthora nicotianae CAUSING ROOT ROT OF SOURSOP IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAQUELINE FIGUEREDO DE OLIVEIRA COSTA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In 2013, soursop trees showing symptoms of root rot were observed in a field in Maceió, state of Alagoas, Brazil. It was isolated Phytophthora sp. which pathogenicity was confirmed in the host seedlings. Morphological and physiological characteristics in carrot-agar modified medium were consistent with Phytophthora nicotianae description. The PCR sequences products obtained with ITS1/ITS4 primers were compared to sequences of ribosomal DNA of Phytophthora species from the GenBank database observing high identity with other P. nicotianae isolates. A phylogenetic tree was performed to compare the isolate with other sequences of P. nicotianae, which clustering has been verified with 99% of bootstrap, confirming the morphophysiological studies. This is the first report of this pathogen on annonaceous plants in the Northeastern Brazil.

  8. Hybrids between cultivated and wild carrots in natural populations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, L.S.; Hauser, Thure Pavlo

    2007-01-01

    Many cultivated plant species are able to hybridize with related wild plants. However, it is not clear whether their hybrids are able to survive and reproduce outside managed fields, and if cultivar genes introgress into wild populations. In areas where wild carrots co-occur with carrot root-crop...

  9. Root causes of the Fukushima accident and its countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima accident forced people to recognize significance of 'radioactivity risk' of nuclear power, which had been developed as energy sources for people using nuclear reaction producing enormous energy. 'Radioactivity risk' of nuclear power was fully investigated and this risk avoidance, namely, 'nuclear safety' had been established by multiple barriers or defense-in-depth philosophy. Among all stakeholders such as government, local government, academia, electric utilities, fabricators and others, all the people concerned with nuclear power had not been fully aware of the responsibility in their role and not taken an intrinsic action to establish 'nuclear safety', which would be the primary cause of Fukushima accident. Root causes were thought as (1) lack of comprehensive view on 'nuclear safety' assurance for operating plant, (2) lack of common consciousness to ensure nuclear safety in collaboration with society and (3) sticking to infallibility of regulatory standards and lack of leadership for their improvement. Respective countermeasures should be (1) regulatory reform from hardware overemphasis to system safety, (2) holding target in common and observation reinforcement and (3) clarification of role allotment and responsibility. Establishment of appropriate regime or system to restore from Fukushima accident and assure 'nuclear safety' of nuclear power should be proceeded in collaboration with international community. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Exploring the preventable causes of unplanned readmissions using root cause analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluitman, K. S.; van Galen, L. S.; Merten, H

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Unplanned readmissions within 30 days are a common phenomenon in everyday practice and lead to increasing costs. Although many studies aiming to analyze the probable causes leading to unplanned readmissions have been performed, an in depth-study analyzing the human (healthcare worker......)-, organizational-, technical-, disease-and patient-related causes leading to readmission is still missing. Objective: The primary objective of this study was to identify human-, organizational-, technical-, disease-and patient-related causes which contribute to acute readmission within 30 days after discharge...... using a Root-Cause Analysis Tool called PRISMA-medical. The secondary objective was to evaluate how many of these readmissions were deemed potentially preventable, and to assess which factors contributed to these preventable readmissions in comparison to non-preventable readmissions. Design: Cross...

  11. Susceptibility of wild carrot (Daucus carota ssp. carota) to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brita Dahl; Finckh, M.R.; Munk, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    differed significantly in the ability to produce lesions and sclerotia on roots of both wild carrots and cv. Bolero. Flowering stems of wild carrots produced dry, pale lesions after inoculation with the pathogen, and above-ground plant weight was significantly reduced 4 weeks after inoculation...... inoculated on leaves. Wild carrots may thus serve as a host of S. sclerotiorum and thus eventually benefit from any uptake of resistance genes, among them transgenes, via introgression from cultivated carrots....

  12. Resurrecting deadly carrots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzel, Corinna; Rønsted, Nina; Spalik, Krysztof

    2014-01-01

    carrot because of the poisonous effects. The resin from species of Thapsia has been used in traditional medicine and included in European pharmacopoeias, and several species contain biologically important sesquiterpene lactones such as thapsigargin. Accordingly, Thapsia has for decades been subject...

  13. Implementing root cause analysis in Iranian hospitals: challenges and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Zhaleh; Ravaghi, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    Root cause analysis (RCA) has been widely used for retrospective investigations of patient safety incidents. To increase patient safety competencies, RCA has recently been introduced in Iranian hospitals. The aims of the current study were to explore team members' experiences and perceptions of RCA and to identify the challenges and benefits of using it in Iranian hospitals from their perspective. A qualitative study was conducted consisting of 32 semi-structured interviews with health professionals who participated in the national training programme and were involved in RCA investigations. Data were analysed using the thematic analysis method. The participants encountered a range of obstacles while conducting RCA, including time constraints, a lack of resources, the blame culture and unsupportive colleagues. They stressed the need for further leadership support and cultural change within the Iranian healthcare system to facilitate the application of RCA. RCA was perceived as a beneficial analytical tool that improved patient care, fostered teamwork and communication among staff and promoted safety culture. This study concluded that applying RCA in the Iranian healthcare setting has had a significant impact on improving commitment to safety. However, the general adoption of this method is hindered by the lack of workplace and system supports. To maximize profits from RCA, clinical leaders must assign a high priority to RCA investigations and support RCA team efforts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Root cause analysis to support infection control in healthcare premises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venier, A-G

    2015-04-01

    Infection control teams (ICTs) seek to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). They undertake surveillance and prevention, promote safety and quality of care, and evaluate and manage risk. Root cause analysis (RCA) can support this work but is not widely used by ICTs. This paper describes how ICTs can use RCA to enhance their day-to-day work. Many different tools and methods exist for RCA. Its primary aim is to identify the factors that have led to HCAI, but RCA can also be used for near-misses. A team effort and multidisciplinary work are usually required. Published accounts and personal experience in the field indicate that an ICT that correctly uses RCA implements more effective prevention measures, improves practice and collaborative working, enhances teamwork, and reduces the risk of HCAI. RCA should be promoted among ICTs because it adds value to their work and helps to develop a hospital culture that anticipates and pre-empts problems. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Root Cause Analysis of Gastroduodenal Ulceration After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Banerjee, Subhas [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Louie, John D.; Abdelmaksoud, Mohamed H. K. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (United States); Ennen, Rebecca E.; Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionA root cause analysis was performed on the occurrence of gastroduodenal ulceration after hepatic radioembolization (RE). We aimed to identify the risk factors in the treated population and to determine the specific mechanism of nontarget RE in individual cases. Methods: The records of 247 consecutive patients treated with yttrium-90 RE for primary (n = 90) or metastatic (n = 157) liver cancer using either resin (n = 181) or glass (n = 66) microspheres were reviewed. All patients who developed a biopsy-proven microsphere-induced gastroduodenal ulcer were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on baseline parameters and procedural data to determine possible risk factors in the total population. Individual cases were analyzed to ascertain the specific cause, including identification of the culprit vessel(s) leading to extrahepatic deposition of the microspheres. Results: Eight patients (3.2 %) developed a gastroduodenal ulcer. Stasis during injection was the strongest independent risk factor (p = 0.004), followed by distal origin of the gastroduodenal artery (p = 0.004), young age (p = 0.040), and proximal injection of the microspheres (p = 0.043). Prolonged administrations, pain during administration, whole liver treatment, and use of resin microspheres also showed interrelated trends in multivariate analysis. Retrospective review of intraprocedural and postprocedural imaging showed a probable or possible culprit vessel, each a tiny complex collateral vessel, in seven patients. Conclusion: Proximal administrations and those resulting in stasis of flow presented increased risk for gastroduodenal ulceration. Patients who had undergone bevacizumab therapy were at high risk for developing stasis.

  16. Root Cause Analysis of Gastroduodenal Ulceration After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Banerjee, Subhas; Louie, John D.; Abdelmaksoud, Mohamed H. K.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Ennen, Rebecca E.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionA root cause analysis was performed on the occurrence of gastroduodenal ulceration after hepatic radioembolization (RE). We aimed to identify the risk factors in the treated population and to determine the specific mechanism of nontarget RE in individual cases. Methods: The records of 247 consecutive patients treated with yttrium-90 RE for primary (n = 90) or metastatic (n = 157) liver cancer using either resin (n = 181) or glass (n = 66) microspheres were reviewed. All patients who developed a biopsy-proven microsphere-induced gastroduodenal ulcer were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on baseline parameters and procedural data to determine possible risk factors in the total population. Individual cases were analyzed to ascertain the specific cause, including identification of the culprit vessel(s) leading to extrahepatic deposition of the microspheres. Results: Eight patients (3.2 %) developed a gastroduodenal ulcer. Stasis during injection was the strongest independent risk factor (p = 0.004), followed by distal origin of the gastroduodenal artery (p = 0.004), young age (p = 0.040), and proximal injection of the microspheres (p = 0.043). Prolonged administrations, pain during administration, whole liver treatment, and use of resin microspheres also showed interrelated trends in multivariate analysis. Retrospective review of intraprocedural and postprocedural imaging showed a probable or possible culprit vessel, each a tiny complex collateral vessel, in seven patients. Conclusion: Proximal administrations and those resulting in stasis of flow presented increased risk for gastroduodenal ulceration. Patients who had undergone bevacizumab therapy were at high risk for developing stasis

  17. [Endodontic treatment of a periapical lesion causing root separation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canalda Sahli, C

    1990-01-01

    A case is presented of a periapical lesion of a rather large size, which produced an important separation of two inferior incisor roots. The root canal was treated, with calcium hydroxide overextending the apex. Clinic and radiographic control after two years complete reparation of the periapex.

  18. Systemic allergic dermatitis caused by Apiaceae root vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Petersen, Thomas H; Fretté, Xavier C

    2014-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to root vegetables of the Umbelliferae plant family (Apiaceae) is well known. Delayed-type hypersensitivity is rarely reported.......Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to root vegetables of the Umbelliferae plant family (Apiaceae) is well known. Delayed-type hypersensitivity is rarely reported....

  19. Root cause analysis of transfusion error: identifying causes to implement changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhence, Priti; Veena, S; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Chaudhary, R K

    2010-12-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to improve transfusion safety, an error reporting system was implemented in our hospital-based transfusion medicine unit at a tertiary care medical institute. This system is based on Medical Event Reporting System-Transfusion Medicine (MERS-TM) and collects data on all near miss, no harm, and misadventures related to the transfusion process. Root cause analyses of one such innocuous appearing error demonstrate how weaknesses in the system can be identified to make necessary changes to achieve transfusion safety. The reported error was investigated, classified, coded, and analyzed using MERS-TM prototype, modified and adopted for our institute. The consequent error was a "mistransfusion" but a "no-harm event" as the transfused unit was of the same blood group as the patient. It was a high event severity level error (level 1). Multiple errors preceded the final error at various functional locations in the transfusion process. Human, organizational, and patient-related factors were identified as root causes and corrective actions were initiated to prevent future occurrences. This case illustrates the usefulness of having an error reporting system in hospitals to highlight human and system failures associated with transfusion that may otherwise go unnoticed. Areas can be identified where resources need to be targeted to improve patient safety. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Trial application of the candidate root cause categorization scheme and preliminary assessment of selected data bases for the root causes of component failures program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruske, S.Z.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Stepina, P.L.

    1985-04-01

    The objective of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Root Causes of Component Failures Program is to develop and apply a categorization scheme for identifying root causes of failures for components that comprise safety and safety support systems of nuclear power plants. Results from this program will provide valuable input in the areas of probabilistic risk assessment, reliability assurance, and application of risk assessments in the inspection program. This report presents the trial application and assessment of the candidate root cause categorization scheme to three failure data bases: the In-Plant Reliability Data System (IPRDS), the Licensee Event Report (LER) data base, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). Results of the trial application/assessment show that significant root cause information can be obtained from these failure data bases

  1. RESULTS OF THE SELECTION OF BREEDING SAMPLES OF CARROT BASED ON BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    OpenAIRE

    V. K. Cherkasova; O. N. Shabetya

    2014-01-01

    12 samples of carrot were analyzed for biochemical components in roots. 5 genotypes with high content of vitamin C, β-carotene, and total sugar were selected as genetic sources of high biochemical components.

  2. Regional Aggressive Root Resorption Caused by Neuronal Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Kjær

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During orthodontic treatment, root resorption can occur unexplainably. No clear distinction has been made between resorption located within specific regions and resorption occurring generally in the dentition. The purpose is to present cases with idiopathic (of unknown origin root resorption occurring regionally. Two cases of female patients, 26 and 28 years old, referred with aggressive root resorption were investigated clinically and radiographically. Anamnestic information revealed severe virus diseases during childhood, meningitis in one case and whooping cough in the other. One of the patients was treated with dental implants. Virus spreading along nerve paths is a possible explanation for the unexpected resorptions. In both cases, the resorptions began cervically. The extent of the resorption processes in the dentition followed the virus infected nerve paths and the resorption process stopped when reaching regions that were innervated differently and not infected by virus. In one case, histological examination revealed multinuclear dentinoclasts. The pattern of resorption in the two cases indicates that innervation is a factor, which under normal conditions may protect the root surface against resorption. Therefore, the normal nerve pattern is important for diagnostics and for predicting the course of severe unexpected root resorption.

  3. Seleção para resistência de genótipos de cenoura aos nematóides-das-galhas Selection for carrot genotypes resistance to root-knot nematodes in field and greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani O da Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Foi verificada a relação entre caracteres avaliados em campo e casa-de-vegetação, relativos à avaliação de genótipos de cenoura quanto à resistência ao nematóide-das-galhas (Meloidogyne spp., visando identificar quais caracteres possibilitam a diferenciação entre os genótipos e verificar a possibilidade de avaliação apenas em um ambiente ou a eliminação de caracteres que apresentem correlação alta. Avaliaram-se 38 progênies da população '0812518' e 31 progênies da população '0812519', além das cultivares Brasília e Kuronan como testemunhas tolerante e suscetível, respectivamente. Em campo naturalmente infestado por uma mistura de Meloidogyne incognita raça 1 e Meloidoigyne javanica, a seleção para resistência ao nematóide-das-galhas foi realizada com base na menor porcentagem de infecção na raiz principal dos genótipos de cenoura, rendimento de raiz e o fator de reprodução, enquanto que em casa-de-vegetação, para cada uma das mesmas espécies de nematóides e também para a mistura de ambas, foi medido o índice de galhas e índice de massa de ovos. Verificou-se que não houve possibilidade de seleção em apenas um dos ambientes testados ou a eliminação de caracteres, indicando que para a obtenção de cultivares mais produtivas e mais tolerantes é necessária a seleção combinada nos diferentes caracteres e ambientes. Para o experimento realizado em campo foi possível diferenciar os genótipos apenas para o rendimento de raiz. No experimento em casa-de-vegetação, para todos os caracteres foi possível identificar genótipos superiores. Porém, as médias das populações não foram melhores que a testemunha 'Brasília' da qual estas se originaram, confirmando a necessidade da busca por métodos mais eficientes de seleção.We verified the relation among the evaluated characters in field and greenhouse, concerning to the evaluation to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp. for the carrot crop, to

  4. Fungicides reduce Rhododendron root rot and mortality caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, but not by P. plurivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhododendron root rot, caused by several Phytophthora species, can cause devastating losses in nursery-grown plants. Most research on chemical control of root rot has focused on Phytophthora cinnamomi. However, it is unknown whether treatments recommended for P. cinnamomi are also effective for othe...

  5. Effect of foliar application of selenium on its uptake and speciation in carrot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kápolna, Emese; Hillestrøm, Peter René; Laursen, K.H.

    2009-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota) shoots were enriched by selenium using foliar application. Solutions of sodium selenite or sodium selenate at 10 and 100 mu g Se ml(-1), were sprayed on the carrot leaves and the selenium content and uptake rate of selenium were estimated by ICP-MS analysis. Anion and cation......(-1) (dry mass) in the carrot root whereas the selenium concentration in the controls was below the limit of detection at 0.045 mu g Se g(-1) (dry mass). Selenate-enriched carrot leaves accumulated as much as 80 mu g Se g(-1) (dry mass), while the selenite-enriched leaves contained approximately 50 mu...... g Se g(-1) (dry mass). The speciation analyses showed that inorganic selenium was present in both roots and leaves. The predominant metabolised organic forms of selenium in the roots were selenomethionine and gamma-glutamyl-selenomethyl-selenocysteine, regardless of which of the inorganic species...

  6. Precise design-based defect characterization and root cause analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qian; Venkatachalam, Panneerselvam; Lee, Julie; Chen, Zhijin; Zafar, Khurram

    2017-03-01

    that human operators will typically miss), to obtain the exact defect location on design, to compare all defective patterns thus detected against a library of known patterns, and to classify all defective patterns as either new or known. By applying the computer to these tasks, we automate the entire process from defective pattern identification to pattern classification with high precision, and we perform this operation en masse during R & D, ramp, and volume production. By adopting the methodology, whenever a specific weak pattern is identified, we are able to run a series of characterization operations to ultimately arrive at the root cause. These characterization operations can include (a) searching all pre-existing Review SEM images for the presence of the specific weak pattern to determine whether there is any spatial (within die or within wafer) or temporal (within any particular date range, before or after a mask revision, etc.) correlation and (b) understanding the failure rate of the specific weak pattern to prioritize the urgency of the problem, (c) comparing the weak pattern against an OPC (Optical Procimity Correction) Verification report or a PWQ (Process Window Qualification)/FEM (Focus Exposure Matrix) result to assess the likelihood of it being a litho-sensitive pattern, etc. After resolving the specific weak pattern, we will categorize it as known pattern, and the engineer will move forward with discovering new weak patterns.

  7. Regional aggressive root resorption caused by neuronal virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger; Strøm, Carsten; Worsaae, Nils

    2012-01-01

    occurring regionally. Two cases of female patients, 26 and 28 years old, referred with aggressive root resorption were investigated clinically and radiographically. Anamnestic information revealed severe virus diseases during childhood, meningitis in one case and whooping cough in the other. One...... of the patients was treated with dental implants. Virus spreading along nerve paths is a possible explanation for the unexpected resorptions. In both cases, the resorptions began cervically. The extent of the resorption processes in the dentition followed the virus infected nerve paths and the resorption process...... stopped when reaching regions that were innervated differently and not infected by virus. In one case, histological examination revealed multinuclear dentinoclasts. The pattern of resorption in the two cases indicates that innervation is a factor, which under normal conditions may protect the root surface...

  8. Anger as the root cause of malpractice claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorney, M

    1999-01-01

    The virtually unrelenting stress of practicing medicine in the United States today is undoubtedly exerting powerful negative effects on the mood and, by implication, the effectiveness of American plastic surgeons. The author points out that anger is at the root of malpractice claims and offers physicians advice on how to prepare their patients for the realities of plastic surgery. By creating an atmosphere of trust and partnership, physicians can relieve their patients' anxieties and diffuse their anger.

  9. The root cause of ability and inability to assemble and install components using written manual with or without diagrams among non-native English speakers: Root cause analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukri, S. Ahmad; Millar, R.; Gratton, G.; Garner, M.; Noh, H. Mohd

    2017-12-01

    Documentation errors and human errors are often claimed to be the contributory factors for aircraft maintenance mistakes. This paper highlights the preliminary results of the third phase of a four-phased research on communication media that are utilised in an aircraft maintenance organisation. The second phase has looked into the probability of success and failure in completing a task by 60 subjects while in this third phase, the same subjects have been interviewed immediately after completing the task by using Root Cause Analysis (RCA) method. It is discovered that the root cause of their inability to finish the task while using only written manual is the absence of diagrams. However, haste is identified to be the root cause for the incompletion of the task when both manual and diagram are given to the participants. It is observed that those who are able to complete the task is due to their reference to both manual and diagram, simultaneously.

  10. Correlations between Polyacetylene Concentrations in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and Various Soil Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Granstedt, Artur; Olsson, Marie E

    2016-08-31

    This study assessed the concentrations of three falcarinol-type polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol, falcarindiol-3-acetate) in carrots and the correlations between these and different soil traits. A total of 144 carrot samples, from three different harvests taken a single season, were analysed in terms of their polyacetylene concentrations and root development. On one of the harvesting occasions, 48 soil samples were also taken and analysed. The chemical composition of the soil was found to influence the concentrations of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes in carrots. When the total soil potassium level was 200 mg/100 g soil, the concentration of falcarindiol (FaDOH) in the carrot samples was 630 μg/g DW, but when carrots were grown in soil with a total potassium level of 300 mg/100 g soil, the FaDOH concentration in the carrots fell to 445 μg/g DW. Carrots grown in soils generally low in available phosphorus exhibited higher levels of falcarindiol if the soil was also low in available magnesium and calcium. The concentrations of polyacetylenes in carrots were positively correlated with total soil phosphorus level, but negatively correlated with total soil potassium level. Of the three polyacetylenes analysed, FaDOH concentrations were influenced most by changes in soil chemical composition.

  11. Correlations between Polyacetylene Concentrations in Carrot (Daucus carota L. and Various Soil Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kjellenberg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the concentrations of three falcarinol-type polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol, falcarindiol-3-acetate in carrots and the correlations between these and different soil traits. A total of 144 carrot samples, from three different harvests taken a single season, were analysed in terms of their polyacetylene concentrations and root development. On one of the harvesting occasions, 48 soil samples were also taken and analysed. The chemical composition of the soil was found to influence the concentrations of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes in carrots. When the total soil potassium level was 200 mg/100 g soil, the concentration of falcarindiol (FaDOH in the carrot samples was 630 μg/g DW, but when carrots were grown in soil with a total potassium level of 300 mg/100 g soil, the FaDOH concentration in the carrots fell to 445 μg/g DW. Carrots grown in soils generally low in available phosphorus exhibited higher levels of falcarindiol if the soil was also low in available magnesium and calcium. The concentrations of polyacetylenes in carrots were positively correlated with total soil phosphorus level, but negatively correlated with total soil potassium level. Of the three polyacetylenes analysed, FaDOH concentrations were influenced most by changes in soil chemical composition.

  12. Root cause analysis in support of reliability enhancement of engineering components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mishra, Vivek; Joshi, N.S.; Varde, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Reliability based methods have been widely used for the safety assessment of plant system, structures and components. These methods provide a quantitative estimation of system reliability but do not give insight into the failure mechanism. Understanding the failure mechanism is a must to avoid the recurrence of the events and enhancement of the system reliability. Root cause analysis provides a tool for gaining detailed insights into the causes of failure of component with particular attention to the identification of fault in component design, operation, surveillance, maintenance, training, procedures and policies which must be improved to prevent repetition of incidents. Root cause analysis also helps in developing Probabilistic Safety Analysis models. A probabilistic precursor study provides a complement to the root cause analysis approach in event analysis by focusing on how an event might have developed adversely. This paper discusses the root cause analysis methodologies and their application in the specific case studies for enhancement of system reliability. (author)

  13. Soil salinity and water productivity of carrot-millet system as influenced by irrigation regimes with saline water in arid regions of Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathia - El Mokh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were conducted for three years to determine the effects of irrigation regimes with saline water (3.6 dS/m on soil salinity, yield and water productivity of carrot and millet under actual commercial-farming conditions in the arid region of Tunisia. Carrot and millet were grown during fall-winter and summer seasons on a sandy soil and surface and drip-irrigated with well water having an ECi of 3.6 dS/m. For three years, a complete randomized block design with four replicates was used to evaluate five irrigation regimes. Irrigation regimes consisted in water replacements of cumulated ETc at levels of 100% (SWB100, full irrigation, 80% (DI-80, 60% (DI-60, when the readily available water in SWB100 treatment is depleted, deficit irrigation during ripening stage (SWB100-DI60 and farmer method corresponding to irrigation practices implemented by the local farmers. The results showed that soil salinity was significantly affected by irrigation treatments. Higher soil salinity was maintained in the root zone with DI-60 and farmer irrigation treatments than full irrigation (SWB100. SWB100-DI60 and DI-80 treatments resulted also in low ECe values. Soil salinity was kept within acceptable limits for the growth of the crops grown in the rotation when SWB100, SWB100-DI60 and DI-80 strategies were employed. The rainfalls received during fall-winter and spring periods were effective in leaching salts from the soil profile. During the three year period, carrot and millet yield was highest for the SWB100 full treatment, (29.5, 28.7 and 26.8 t/ha for carrot and 27.2, 28.3 and 26.9 q/ha for millet although no significant differences were observed with the regulated deficit irrigation treatment (SWB100-DI60. However, the DI-80 and DI-60 deficit irrigation treatments caused significant reductions in carrot and millet yields through a reduction in roots number and weight, panicle number, kernel number and weight in comparison with SWB100. The farmer

  14. Analysis of unintended events in hospitals: inter-rater reliability of constructing causal trees and classifying root causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Janssen, J.; Vet, de H.C.W.; Zwaan, L.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Root cause analysis is a method to examine causes of unintended events. PRISMA (Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis: is a root cause analysis tool. With PRISMA, events are described in causal trees and root causes are subsequently classified with the

  15. Analysis of unintended events in hospitals : inter-rater reliability of constructing causal trees and classifying root causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Janssen, J.; Vet, R. de; Zwaan, L.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Timmermans, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Root cause analysis is a method to examine causes of unintended events. PRISMA (Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis) is a root cause analysis tool. With PRISMA, events are described in causal trees and root causes are subsequently classified with the

  16. Analysis of unintended events in hospitals: inter-rater reliability of constructing causal trees and classifying root causes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Janssen, J.; Vet, R. de; Zwaan, L.; Timmermans, D.; Groenewegen, P.; Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Root cause analysis is a method to examine causes of unintended events. PRISMA (Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis) is a root cause analysis tool. With PRISMA, events are described in causal trees and root causes are subsequently classified with the

  17. Are the cause(s) responsible for urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk rooted in families or individuals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2006-01-01

    evaluated whether the nearest older sibling's place of birth had an independent effect on schizophrenia risk. If the cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences are rooted in individuals only, the nearest older sibling's place of birth should have no independent effect. In this analysis......, the nearest older sibling's place of birth had an independent effect; among persons who lived in a rural area during their first 15 years of life, the relative risk was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 2.30) if their nearest older sibling had been born in the capital area as compared with a rural area......Many studies have identified urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk. Hypothetical underlying cause(s) may include toxic exposures, diet, infections, and selective migration. The authors investigated whether the underlying cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences were rooted...

  18. Distance Based Root Cause Analysis and Change Impact Analysis of Performance Regressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzan Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance regression testing is applied to uncover both performance and functional problems of software releases. A performance problem revealed by performance testing can be high response time, low throughput, or even being out of service. Mature performance testing process helps systematically detect software performance problems. However, it is difficult to identify the root cause and evaluate the potential change impact. In this paper, we present an approach leveraging server side logs for identifying root causes of performance problems. Firstly, server side logs are used to recover call tree of each business transaction. We define a novel distance based metric computed from call trees for root cause analysis and apply inverted index from methods to business transactions for change impact analysis. Empirical studies show that our approach can effectively and efficiently help developers diagnose root cause of performance problems.

  19. Economics, Politics and Young Males. Root Causes of Terrorism on the Aggregate Level in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Roaldsnes, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The research question posed in this thesis is: what are the root causes of terrorism on the aggregate level in Europe. There is little convergence on the root causes of terrorism in the field of terrorism research, and many findings are challenged on data and conceptual grounds. The analysis is done with two dependent variables each representing an operationalization of terrorism, a count of the number of killed in terrorism events for each country-year observation and a count of the numbe...

  20. Pathogenic mycoflora on carrot seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Altogether 300 seed samples were collected during 9 years in 8 regions of Poland and the fungi Were isolated and their pathogenicity to carrot seedlings was examined. Alternaria rudicina provcd to be the most important pathogen although. A. alternata was more common. The other important pathogens were Fusarium spp., Phoma spp. and Botrytis cinerea. The infection of carrot seeds by A. radicina should be used as an important criterium in seed quality evaluation.

  1. Radappertization of minimally processed carrots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walder, Juliana F.A.; Walder, Julio M.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: juwalder@gmail.com; jmwalder@cena.usp.br; Souza, Miriam C. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mcsouza@unimep.br; Spoto, Marta H.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ)]. E-mail: mhfspoto@esalq.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Full text: The goal of this work was to obtain shelf-stable irradiated carrots. It was evaluate the effect of high-doses (radappertization) of gamma radiation (Cobalt-60) on minimally processed carrots cv. Nantes. Before irradiation carrots were blanched, vacuum packaged in polyethylene film (52 {mu}m) and frozen (-80 deg C) prior to and during radiation processing. Used doses were 10, 20 and 30 kGy. After irradiation the carrot bags were kept at room conditions (25 - 28 deg C and RH 60-80 %) for 90 days period. Physical-chemical characteristics and microorganism population were determined at 1, 30 60 and 90 days after radiation process. Radappertization decreased total soluble solids (TSS), hardness and color. Radiation was responsible for reduction of 15,5% of total carotenoids content. By the other hand the storage period was responsible for 35 % losses. pH was not affected by radiation nor by storage period. Complete sterilization was achieved with doses of 20 kGy and 30 kGy. Radappertization affected negatively the sensorial characteristics of flavor, color and general appearance. Through sensorial analysis was possible to evaluate that polyethylene seal was inadequate for the purpose because allowed photo-chemical reactions in the carrots during the storage period. The metallized film kept best appearance of the irradiated carrots after 90 days storage. (author)

  2. Rectal cancer: involved circumferential resection margin - a root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, H; Collantes, E C; Rashid, S H; Wong, L S; Baragwanath, P

    2009-06-01

    An involved circumferential resection margin (CRM) following surgery for rectal cancer is the strongest predictor of local recurrence and may represent a failure of the multidisciplinary team (MDT) process. The study analyses the causes of positive CRM in patients undergoing elective surgery for rectal cancer with respect to the decision-making process of the MDT, preoperative rectal cancer staging and surgical technique. From March 2002 to September 2005, data were collected prospectively on all patients undergoing elective rectal cancer surgery with curative intent. The data on all patients identified with positive CRM were analysed. Of 158 patients (male:female = 2.2:1) who underwent potentially curative surgery, 16 (10%) patients had a positive CRM on postoperative histology. Four were due to failure of the pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging scans to predict an involved margin, two with an equivocal CRM on MRI did not have preoperative radiotherapy, one had an inaccurate assessment of the site of primary tumour and in one intra-operative difficulty was encountered. No failure of staging or surgery was identified in the remaining eight of the 16 patients. Abdominoperineal resection (APR) was associated with a 26% positive CRM, compared with 5% for anterior resection. No single consistent cause was found for a positive CRM. The current MDT process and/or surgical technique may be inadequate for low rectal tumours requiring APR.

  3. Process quality planning of quality function deployment for carrot syrup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekawati, Yurida; Noya, Sunday; Widjaja, Filemon

    2017-06-01

    Carrot products are rarely available in the market. Based on previous research that had been done using QFD to generate product design of carrots products, the research to produce the process quality planning had been carried out. The carrot product studied was carrot syrup. The research resulted in a process planning matrix for carrot syrup. The matrix gives information about critical process plan and the priority of the critical process plan. The critical process plan on the production process of carrot syrup consists of carrots sorting, carrots peeling, carrots washing, blanching process, carrots cutting, the making of pureed carrots, filtering carrot juice, the addition of sugar in carrot juice, the addition of food additives in carrot juice, syrup boiling, syrup filtering, syrup filling into the bottle, the bottle closure and cooling. The information will help the design of the production process of carrot syrup.

  4. Flavonoids induce Rhizobium leguminosarum to produce nodDABC gene-related factors that cause thick, short roots and root hair responses on common vetch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, S. A.; van Brussel, A. A.; Tak, T.; Pees, E.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1987-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum produced a factor(s) that caused thick, short roots (Tsr phenotype) as well as root hair induction (Hai phenotype) and deformation (Had phenotype) in Vicia sativa plants upon incubation with root exudate or with one of the nod gene inducers naringenin or apigenin; this was a

  5. Environmental Factors on the Development of Root Rot on Ginseng Caused by Cylindrocarpon destructans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Sup Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Cylindrocarpon destructans is the cause of root rot in many ginseng production areas in Korea. A total of 57 isolates of C. destructans were recovered from diseased roots in a survey of ginseng–growing fields from 2011-2012. Among these isolates, 37% were classified as highly virulent (causing lesions on unwounded mature roots and 61% were weakly virulent(causing lesions only on previously wounded roots. Radial growth of highly and weakly virulent isolates on potato dextrose agar was highest at 20°C and there was no growth at 35°C. Mycelial mass production was significantly (P = 0.05 lower at pH 7.0 compared with pH 5.0. To study the effects of pH (5.0 and 7.0 and wounding on disease development, ginseng roots were grown hydroponically in nutrient solution. Lesions were significantly larger (P < 0.01 at pH 5.0 compared with pH 7.0 and wounding enhanced disease by a highly virulent isolate at both pHs. In artificially infested soil, 2-yearold ginseng roots were most susceptible to Cylindrocarpon root rot among all root ages tested (1 to 4 years when evaluated using a combined scale of disease incidence and severity. Root rot severity was significantly (P<0.05 enhanced by increasing the inoculum density from 3.5 × 102 cfu/g of soil to 2.0×103 cfu/g of soil.

  6. A field study on root cause analysis of defects in space software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Nuno; Cunha, João Carlos; Vieira, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Critical systems, such as space systems, are developed under strict requirements envisaging high integrity in accordance to specific standards. For such software systems, an independent assessment is put into effect (Independent Software Verification and Validation – ISVV) after the regular development lifecycle and V&V activities, aiming at finding residual faults and raising confidence in the software. However, it has been observed that there is still a significant number of defects remaining at this stage, questioning the effectiveness of the previous engineering processes. This paper presents a root cause analysis of 1070 defects found in four space software projects during ISVV, by applying an improved Orthogonal Defect Classification (ODC) taxonomy and examining the defect types, triggers and impacts, in order to identify why they reached such a later stage in the development. The paper also puts forward proposals for modifications to both the software development (to prevent defects) and the V&V activities (to better detect defects) and an assessment methodology for future works on root cause analysis. - Highlights: • Root cause analysis of space software defects by using an enhanced ODC taxonomy. • Prioritization of the root causes according to the more important defect impacts. • Identification of improvements to systems engineering and development processes. • Improvements to V&V activities as means to reduce the occurrence of defects. • Generic process to achieve the defects root causes and the corrections suggestions.

  7. Root-Cause Analysis of a Potentially Sentinel Transfusion Event: Lessons for Improvement of Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Jeddian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Errors prevention and patient safety in transfusion medicine are a serious concern. Errors can occur at any step in transfusion and evaluation of their root causes can be helpful for preventive measures. Root cause analysis as a structured and systematic approach can be used for identification of underlying causes of adverse events. To specify system vulnerabilities and illustrate the potential of such an approach, we describe the root cause analysis of a case of transfusion error in emergency ward that could have been fatal. After reporting of the mentioned event, through reviewing records and interviews with the responsible personnel, the details of the incident were elaborated. Then, an expert panel meeting was held to define event timeline and the care and service delivery problems and discuss their underlying causes, safeguards and preventive measures. Root cause analysis of the mentioned event demonstrated that certain defects of the system and the ensuing errors were main causes of the event. It also points out systematic corrective actions. It can be concluded that health care organizations should endeavor to provide opportunities to discuss errors and adverse events and introduce preventive measures to find areas where resources need to be allocated to improve patient safety.

  8. 21 CFR 73.300 - Carrot oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carrot oil. 73.300 Section 73.300 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.300 Carrot oil. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive carrot oil is the liquid or the solid portion of the mixture or the mixture itself obtained by the hexane...

  9. Effect of intercropping carrot (Daucus carota L. with two aromatic plants, coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. and summer savory (Satureja hortensis L., on the population density of select carrot pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowska Beata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intercropping, or the use of different aspects of the interaction between organisms in ecosystems, can be classified as an ecological method that limits harmful human interference in the environment, especially the consumption of chemicals. The impact of intercropping carrot with coriander Coriandrum sativum L. and summer savory Satureja hortensis L. on the occurrence of select carrot pests was estimated in the years 2010-2011. Intercropping had a significant effect on the decrease of the number of roots damaged by carrot rust fly Psila rosae. During harvest, the least number of damaged roots was observed in combination with summer savory S. hortensis L. The number of carrot psyllid Trioza viridula Zett. and aphids on carrot leaves and roots damaged by nematodes was significantly lower on plots where carrot was intercropped. Intercropping both herbs had a positive influence on the number of beneficial insects. In all of the years of the study, the highest number of Coccinellidae and Syrphidae were observed on plots where carrot was intercropped with coriander.

  10. Eating Quality of Carrots (Daucus carota L.) Grown in One Conventional and Three Organic Cropping Systems over Three Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Vibe; Kidmose, Ulla; Kristensen, Hanne L; Edelenbos, Merete

    2015-11-11

    The eating quality of carrots (Daucus carota L.) was investigated to evaluate the impact of cropping systems (one conventional and three organic systems) and growing years (2007, 2008, and 2009) on root size, chemical composition, and sensory quality. The content of dry matter, sugars, polyacetylenes, and terpenes as well as the sensory quality and root size were related to the climate during the three growing years. A higher global radiation and a higher temperature sum in 2009 as compared to 2007 and 2008 resulted in larger roots, higher contents of dry matter, sucrose, total sugars, and total polyacetylenes, and lower contents of terpenes, fructose, and glucose. No differences were found between conventional and organic carrots with regard to the investigated parameters. This result shows that organically grown carrots have the same eating quality as conventionally grown carrots, while being produced in a more sustainable way.

  11. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF GENE POOL OF CARROT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Burenin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of comprehensive assessment of the collection samples of carrot are presented. Such traits as a resistance to carrot psylla and carrot fly, high yield, earlyripeness, high content of carotene were evaluated. The carrot varieties total resistant to psylla were not found. The genotypes with combination of such traits as a mild tolerance to pests, stable productivity and fruits quality are recommended as the initial breeding material for development of new varieties and hybrids of carrot.

  12. IAEA-ASSET's root cause analysis method applied to sodium leakage incident at Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Hirano, Masashi

    1997-08-01

    The present study applied the ASSET (Analysis and Screening of Safety Events Team) methodology (This method identifies occurrences such as component failures and operator errors, identifies their respective direct/root causes and determines corrective actions.) to the analysis of the sodium leakage incident at Monju, based on the published reports by mainly the Science and Technology Agency, aiming at systematic identification of direct/root causes and corrective actions, and discussed the effectiveness and problems of the ASSET methodology. The results revealed the following seven occurrences and showed the direct/root causes and contributing factors for the individual occurrences: failure of thermometer well tube, delayed reactor manual trip, inadequate continuous monitoring of leakage, misjudgment of leak rate, non-required operator action (turbine trip), retarded emergency sodium drainage, and retarded securing of ventilation system. Most of the occurrences stemmed from deficiencies in emergency operating procedures (EOPs), which were mainly caused by defects in the EOP preparation process and operator training programs. The corrective actions already proposed in the published reports were reviewed, identifying issues to be further studied. Possible corrective actions were discussed for these issues. The present study also demonstrated the effectiveness of the ASSET methodology and pointed out some problems, for example, in delineating causal relations among occurrences, for applying it to the detail and systematic analysis of event direct/root causes and determination of concrete measures. (J.P.N.)

  13. Functional gene polymorphism to reveal species history: the case of the CRTISO gene in cultivated carrots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Soufflet-Freslon

    Full Text Available Carrot is a vegetable cultivated worldwide for the consumption of its root. Historical data indicate that root colour has been differentially selected over time and according to geographical areas. Root pigmentation depends on the relative proportion of different carotenoids for the white, yellow, orange and red types but only internally for the purple one. The genetic control for root carotenoid content might be partially associated with carotenoid biosynthetic genes. Carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO has emerged as a regulatory step in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and could be a good candidate to show how a metabolic pathway gene reflects a species genetic history.In this study, the nucleotide polymorphism and the linkage disequilibrium among the complete CRTISO sequence, and the deviation from neutral expectation were analysed by considering population subdivision revealed with 17 microsatellite markers. A sample of 39 accessions, which represented different geographical origins and root colours, was used. Cultivated carrot was divided into two genetic groups: one from Middle East and Asia (Eastern group, and another one mainly from Europe (Western group. The Western and Eastern genetic groups were suggested to be differentially affected by selection: a signature of balancing selection was detected within the first group whereas the second one showed no selection. A focus on orange-rooted carrots revealed that cultivars cultivated in Asia were mainly assigned to the Western group but showed CRTISO haplotypes common to Eastern carrots.The carotenoid pathway CRTISO gene data proved to be complementary to neutral markers in order to bring critical insight in the cultivated carrot history. We confirmed the occurrence of two migration events since domestication. Our results showed a European background in material from Japan and Central Asia. While confirming the introduction of European carrots in Japanese resources, the history of Central Asia

  14. Root cause analysis of pump valve failures of three membrane pump systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, L.J.; Eijk, A.; Hooft, L. van

    2014-01-01

    This paper will present the root cause analysis and the solution of fatigue failures of the pump valves of three membrane pump systems installed on a chemical plant of Momentive in Pernis, the Netherlands. The membrane pumps were installed approximately 30 years ago. Each system has encountered

  15. Evaluation of the root cause for MSR high level trip in Maanshan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, L.-Y.; Ferng, Y.-M.; Jange, S.J.; Ko, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    Reactor trip due to Moisture Separator Reheater (MSR) high water level has been a long time issue for Maanshan nuclear power plant. The operating experience shows that there are five reactor trips due to MSR high water level. Four out of the five reactor trips are generated when Combined Intermediate valve (CIV) no. 1 is closed during CIV closure test. The fifth reactor trip occurs when the reactor power is increasing from 99% to 100%. An extensive root cause analysis has been performed by Taipower Company. It is concluded that the water accumulated in the cross under leg between the exhaust of high pressure turbine and the inlet of MSR was the water source contributing to the MSR high level trip. Although, Maanshan does not have similar trip after the root cause analysis, it is interested to evaluate the proposed root cause from thermal hydraulic point of view. It is also hoped that some useful guidelines can be established. This paper includes a description of the scenario of reactor trips, a summary of the root cause analysis done by Taipower Company, an examination of possible mechanisms, an identification of key parameters and a presentation of major findings. In addition, the applicability of RELAP5/MOD3 under this condition is discussed. (author)

  16. Utilization of Concept Mapping Program at the Root Cause Analysis of Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bae-Joo; Kim, Gwang-Bong

    2008-01-01

    KHNP introduced the Corrective Action Program (CAP) as a part of the nuclear operation innovation. The Key program of the CAP is the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) program. The RCA is a technique to extract root causes and take actions to prevent a recurrence in the event that management doesn't want it to happen again. KHNP establishes a temporary team for RCA of some event. KHNP should assign some human resources to the temporary team. KNPEI introduced a RCA training program from Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station in 2005 and began training the engineers from 2006. But the RCA Program doesn't operate well at the stations because of two reasons. KNPEI performed a research project from March 2006 to September 2007 to capture experience knowledge from seniors and transfer it to juniors. As part of the research activity KNPEI introduced a Concept Mapping Program and set up a Concept Mapping server to capture experience knowledge. Originally, the Concept Mapping Program was to teach conceptual knowledge by remote. But this Concept Mapping Program has some characteristics that can be used in root causes analysis. The purpose of this report is to suggest the utilization method in root causes analysis in the Concept Mapping

  17. The Root Cause Of Violence In Nigeria: The Niger Delta Crisis, A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    That is not possible. Nigerians have often been roasted in the flame of violence. What is the root cause of this violence? What prices have Nigerians been paying for it? Is there anything that can be done to avert it completely or reduce the rate at which it occurs? These are main questions to be addressed in this paper.

  18. Management Perspectives Pertaining to Root Cause Analyses of Nunn-McCurdy Breaches. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    63 3.16. Unit Cost and Quantity, RAM ...of Defense Directive DoDI Department of Defense Instruction DDR &E Director of Defense Research and Engineering DSB Defense Science Board DT&E...Manager, Ship PR program review RAM rolling airframe missile RCA root cause analysis RDA research, development, and acquisition RDT&E research

  19. The root causes of ineffective and inefficient healthcare technology management in Benin public health sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houngbo, T.; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.; Bunders- Aelen, J.G.F.; Coleman, H.L.S.; Medenou, D.; Dakpanon, L.Y.; de Cock Buning, Tjard

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the root causes and solutions of main problems facing Healthcare Technology Management in Benin׳s public health sector. Conducted in Benin from 2008 to 2010, two surveys were used with key actors in Healthcare Technology Management. The first survey was based on 377

  20. Resistance to Root Galling Caused by the Powdery Scab Pathogen Spongospora subterranea in Potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato selections (clones and commercial cultivars) were examined for resistance to root galling, caused by the powdery scab pathogen Spongospora subterranea in 7 field trials conducted between 2003 and 2007 in the states of Washington (WA) and Idaho (ID). In 2003, Shepody demonstrated the highest l...

  1. Growth and development of cultured carrot cells and embryos under spaceflight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.; Dutcher, F. R.; Quinn, C. E.; Steward, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Morphogenetically competent proembryonic cells and well-developed somatic embryos of carrot at two levels of organization were exposed for 18.5 days to a hypogravity environment aboard the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 1129. It was confirmed that cultured totipotent cells of carrot can give rise to embryos with well-developed roots and minimally developed shoots. It was also shown that the space hypogravity environment could support the further growth of already-organized, later somatic embryonic stages and give rise to fully developed embryo-plantlets with roots and shoots.

  2. Assessment of allelopathic properties of Aloe ferox Mill. on turnip, beetroot and carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Arowosegbe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa L., beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. and carrot (Daucus carota L. are common vegetables in South Africa. The allelopathic potential of aqueous leaf and root extracts of Aloe ferox Mill.- a highly valued medicinal plant- was evaluated against seed germination and seedling growth of the three vegetables in Petri dish experiments. The extracts were tested at concentrations of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mg/mL. Leaf extract concentrations above 4 mg/mL inhibited the germination of all the crops, while the root extract had no significant effect on germination irrespective of concentration. Interestingly, the lowest concentration of leaf extract stimulated root length elongation of beetroot by 31.71%. Other concentrations significantly inhibited both root and shoot growth of the vegetable crops except the turnip shoot. The most sensitive crop was carrot, with percentage inhibition ranging from 29.15 to 100% for root and shoot lengths. Lower percentage inhibition was observed for the root extract than the leaf extract against shoot growth of beetroot and carrot. The results from this study suggested the presence of allelochemicals mostly in the leaves of A. ferox that could inhibit the growth of the turnip, beetroot and carrot.

  3. MODELING OF YIELD AND QUALITY OF TABLE ROOT CROPS WITH THE USE OF DIFFERENT AGROTECHNICAL METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Nadezhkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different fertilizer rates, irrigation, sowing rate for carrot and red beet were studied in the field condition in food-hills zone of Chechen Republic. The use of N40-80P40-80K40-80 caused the increase in yield from 22.8 to 30.8-33.2 t/ha or by 35-46%, when cultivating a carrot crop. Under irrigation the yield increases by 30-33%. Application of N40P40K40 and maintenance of soil moisture at 70% of moisture rate provoked the improvement in value, market and biochemical characteristics of roots; where the increased contents of dry matter, total sugar and vitamins were observed. The mathematical modeling for the process of yielding abilities and root quality in carrot and red beet showed that highest productivity can be achieved on chernozem soil at Central Pre-Caucasus zone when the level of mineral plant nutrition was N40-60P40-60K40-60. The further increment in fertilizer doses does not bring an improvement to yields and leads to decrease in quality of yields. The increased level of antecedent soil water moisture 70-75% of moisture rates does not raise the yield, on the contrary decreasing at the same time the root quality. The use of mathematical modeling enables to rationally define the fertilizer rates depending on application of irrigation and sowing rates in cultivation of carrot and red beet.

  4. CARROT SEED GROWING THROUGH WINTERING SEEDLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Zvedenuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of research work on carrot seed growing through wintering seedlings carried out at laboratory of seed studies and seed production of Transnistrian Research Institute of Agriculture, on the soil of the first terrace at the rive Dniester were presented in the article. Seed bearing plants of garden carrot ‘Krasavka’ were the object of the study. The seeds were sown to produce the seedlings on 15-16 August. In the first decade of December the plants were covered with white agrotextile with density 23g/m2 that was removed at the beginning of April. The proportion of plant that passed the winter depending on a year of cultivation was 95-100% under argotextile, and 50-80% in open plot. The plants under agrotextile reached 28 cm a high and had 5-7 well-developed leaves, while those on the open plot were at phase of active foliage growing about 10-13 cm. long. Thus, for early mechanized planting in optimal terms the wintering seedlings grown under agrotextile had the best biometrical characteristics. Moreover the outcome of carrot seedlings was 1.2-1.25 million per hectare. Such quantity of seedlings was sufficient to plant 9-10 ha of carrot plants, where the coefficient of multiplication reached 9-10, and only 3 when growing seeds through mother plant as biennial culture. Viability of seed plants grown through seedlings was 100%. Losses of plant with weight 120-150 grams from damage caused by diseases was 23%. The seed yield, when growing seedlings was 639 kg/ha, but growing through plants was 332 kg/ha. The seed outcome suitable for precise mechanized sowing through seedling growing was 77%, where seed germination was 90%, with seed fraction 1.51 and >2.0 mm. It was essentially improved their yielding characteristics. Seed outcome from this fraction obtained through planting method was 32%. The proportion of seeds in fraction 1-1.5 mm was 68%. For mechanized single-seed sowing, the seeds can be used only after mini-coating. The seed

  5. Using root cause analysis to promote critical thinking in final year Bachelor of Midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Sidebotham, Mary; Creedy, Debra K; Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny

    2014-06-01

    Midwives require well developed critical thinking to practice autonomously. However, multiple factors impinge on students' deep learning in the clinical context. Analysis of actual case scenarios using root cause analysis may foster students' critical thinking and application of 'best practice' principles in complex clinical situations. To examine the effectiveness of an innovative teaching strategy involving root cause analysis to develop students' perceptions of their critical thinking abilities. A descriptive, mixed methods design was used. Final 3rd year undergraduate midwifery students (n=22) worked in teams to complete and present an assessment item based on root cause analysis. The cases were adapted from coroners' reports. After graduation, 17 (77%) students evaluated the course using a standard university assessment tool. In addition 12 (54%) students provided specific feedback on the teaching strategy using a 16-item survey tool based on the domain concepts of Educational Acceptability, Educational Impact, and Preparation for Practice. Survey responses were on a 5-point Likert scale and analysed using descriptive statistics. Open-ended responses were analysed using content analysis. The majority of students perceived the course and this teaching strategy positively. The domain mean scores were high for Educational Acceptability (mean=4.3, SD=.49) and Educational Impact (mean=4.19, SD=.75) but slightly lower for Preparation for Practice (mean=3.7, SD=.77). Overall student responses to each item were positive with no item mean less than 3.42. Students found the root cause analysis challenging and time consuming but reported development of critical thinking skills about the complexity of practice, clinical governance and risk management principles. Analysing complex real life clinical cases to determine a root cause enhanced midwifery students' perceptions of their critical thinking. Teaching and assessment strategies to promote critical thinking need to be

  6. Carrot cells: a pioneering platform for biopharmaceuticals production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Tello-Olea, Marlene Anahí

    2015-03-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is of importance in the molecular farming field as it constitutes the first plant species approved to produce biopharmaceuticals for human use. In this review, features that make carrot an advantageous species in the molecular farming field are analyzed and a description of the developments achieved with this crop thus far is presented. A guide for genetic transformation procedures is also included. The state of the art comprises ten vaccine prototypes against Measles virus, Hepatitis B virus, Human immunodeficiency virus, Yersinia pestis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium diphtheria/Clostridium tetani/Bordetella pertussis, and Helicobacter pylori; as well as the case of the glucocerebrosidase, an enzyme used for replacement therapy, and other therapeutics. Perspectives for these developments are envisioned and innovations are proposed such as the use of transplastomic technologies-, hairy roots-, and viral expression-based systems to improve yields and develop new products derived from this advantageous plant species.

  7. Root Cause Failure Analysis of Stator Winding Insulation failure on 6.2 MW hydropower generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhi Nugroho, Agus; Widihastuti, Ida; Ary, As

    2017-04-01

    Insulation failure on generator winding insulation occurred in the Wonogiri Hydropower plant has caused stator damage since ase was short circuited to ground. The fault has made the generator stop to operate. Wonogiri Hydropower plant is one of the hydroelectric plants run by PT. Indonesia Power UBP Mrica with capacity 2 × 6.2 MW. To prevent damage to occur again on hydropower generators, an analysis is carried out using Root Cause Failure Analysis RCFA is a systematic approach to identify the root cause of the main orbasic root cause of a problem or a condition that is not wanted. There are several aspects to concerned such as: loading pattern and operations, protection systems, generator insulation resistance, vibration, the cleanliness of the air and the ambient air. Insulation damage caused by gradual inhomogeneous cooling at the surface of winding may lead in to partial discharge. In homogeneous cooling may present due to lattice hampered by dust and oil deposits. To avoid repetitive defects and unwanted condition above, it is necessary to perform major maintenance overhaul every 5000-6000 hours of operation.

  8. Hybrids between cultivated and wild carrots in natural populations in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, L S; Hauser, T P

    2007-08-01

    Many cultivated plant species are able to hybridize with related wild plants. However, it is not clear whether their hybrids are able to survive and reproduce outside managed fields, and if cultivar genes introgress into wild populations. In areas where wild carrots co-occur with carrot root-crops, pollen and seeds may flow from two different sources in the fields to the surrounding wild populations: from pure cultivar plants that occasionally flower, and from flowering 'bolters' that originate from hybridizations between wild (male) and cultivated carrots (female) in seed production fields in warmer regions of the world. To test whether hybrids are formed and survive in wild Danish populations, and whether prolonged hybridization has led to introgression of cultivar genes, we collected leaf material from adult individuals growing close to carrot fields and analysed their genotypic composition by AFLP. Four hybrids were identified among the 71 plants analysed, and these were most likely F(2) or backcross individuals, sired by pollen from hybrid bolters. Wild populations close to fields were genetically somewhat more similar to cultivars than wild populations far from fields, suggesting that neutral or beneficial cultivar alleles can introgress into the wild gene pool. Despite generations of improvement and adaptation of cultivar carrots to highly managed field conditions, hybrids can thus sometimes survive in wild populations close to carrot fields, and their genes transfer to wild populations by introgression.

  9. Root rots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  10. Root causes occurrence of low BIM adoption in Malaysia: System dynamics modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamter, Shahela; Aziz, Abdul Rashid Abdul; Zulkepli, Jafri

    2017-11-01

    The global implementation of BIM in the construction field is increasing worldwide. Due to the advantages offered by BIM, its implementation is considered important in the construction projects. Nevertheless, the Construction Industry Transformation Plan has reported that the adoption of Building Information Modelling (BIM) in Malaysia is still low and it is estimated at only 10 percent adoption amongst construction stake players. The barriers influencing the occurrence of low adoption BIM in Malaysia have been studied by some researchers. However, these researchers did not investigate the root causes which might lead to the recurring of the barriers to BIM adoption. Root causes that immediately occurrence of barriers, also known as precipitants or trigger causes. This conceptual paper developed the causal loop diagram (CLD) which presents the relationship between the perceived variables using system dynamic modelling approach. The findings revealed a novelty validated diagrams that design the holistic dynamic relationship on the root causes occurrence of low BIM adoption. Nonetheless, the diagram subject to more empirical testing for its practicability and further refinement upon more results expected to emerge as the research progresses.

  11. Guideline for regulatory agencies in evaluating contents of root cause analysis by operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Takaya; Makino, Maomi; Kosaka, Atsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    'Guideline for Regulatory Agencies in Evaluating Contents of Root cause Analysis by Operators' was enacted as the policy for new inspection system in Japan. The objective is to indicate the view point to verify the appropriateness of the corrective actions and preventive actions implemented by operators based on root cause analysis and its analysis results. This guideline is leading to take four points into special consideration for adequate application. They are encouragement of further activities of the operators, flexible interpretation of the intention, versatility of the analysis methods and concepts and consideration of no blame culture. Moreover, as view point for regulatory agencies, it indicates with special emphasis that neutrality of the analyzing party, objectivity of analysis result, and logicality of the analysis method are ensured. This guideline shall be continuously reviewed through integration of lessons learned from active use in future. (author)

  12. Guideline for regulatory agencies in evaluating contents of root cause analysis by operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Takaya; Makino, Maomi; Kosaka, Atsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    'Guideline for Regulatory Agencies in Evaluating Contents of Root Cause Analysis by Operators' was enacted as the policy for a new inspection system in Japan. The objective is to indicate the viewpoint to verify the appropriateness of the corrective and preventive actions implemented by operators based on root cause analysis and its analysis results. This guideline leads to taking four points into special consideration for adequate application. They are encouragement of further activities of operators, flexible interpretation of the intention, versatility of analysis methods and concepts, and consideration of no blame culture. Moreover, a viewpoint for regulatory agencies indicates with special emphasis that neutrality of the analyzing party, objectivity of analysis results, and logicality of the analysis method used are ensured. This guide-line shall be continuously reviewed through integration of lessons learned from active use in the future. (author)

  13. Analysis of root causes of major hazard precursors (hydrocarbon leaks) in the Norwegian offshore petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnem, Jan Erik; Hestad, Jon Andreas; Kvaloy, Jan Terje; Skogdalen, Jon Espen

    2010-01-01

    The offshore petroleum industry in Norway reports major hazard precursors to the authorities, and data are available for the period 1996 through 2009. Barrier data have been reported since 2002, as have data from an extensive questionnaire survey covering working environment, organizational culture and perceived risk among all employees on offshore installations. Several attempts have been made to analyse different data sources in order to discover relations that may cast some light on possible root causes of major hazard precursors. These previous attempts were inconclusive. The study presented in this paper is the most extensive study performed so far. The data were analysed using linear regression. The conclusion is that there are significant correlations between number of leaks and safety climate indicators. The discussion points to possible root causes of major accidents.

  14. FFTF Event Fact Sheet root cause analysis calendar year 1985 through 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, G.B.

    1988-12-01

    The Event Fact Sheets written from January 1985 through mid August 1988 were reviewed to determine their root causes. The review group represented many of the technical disciplines present in plant operation. The review was initiated as an internal critique aimed at maximizing the ``lessons learned`` from the event reporting system. The root causes were subjected to a Pareto analysis to determine the significant causal factor groups. Recommendations for correction of the high frequency causal factors were then developed and presented to the FFTF Plant management. In general, the distributions of the causal factors were found to closely follow the industry averages. The impacts of the events were also studied and it was determined that we generally report events of a level of severity below that of the available studies. Therefore it is concluded that the recommendations for corrective action are ones to improve the overall quality of operations and not to correct significant operational deficiencies. 17 figs.

  15. Influence of technical processing units on chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of carrot (Daucus carrot L.) juice essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tingting; Luo, Jiyang; Tian, Chengrui; Sun, Xiangyu; Quan, Meiping; Zheng, Cuiping; Kang, Lina; Zhan, Jicheng

    2015-03-01

    The effect of three processing units (blanching, enzyme liquefaction, pasteurisation) on chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of carrot juice essential oil was investigated in this paper. A total of 36 compounds were identified by GC-MS from fresh carrot juice essential oil. The main constituents were carotol (20.20%), sabinene (12.80%), β-caryophyllene (8.04%) and α-pinene (6.05%). Compared with the oil of fresh juice, blanching and pasteurisation could significantly decrease the components of the juice essential oil, whereas enzyme liquefaction had no considerable effect on the composition of juice essential oil. With regard to the antimicrobial activity, carrot juice essential oil could cause physical damage and morphological alteration on microorganisms, while the three different processing units showed noticeable differences on the species of microorganisms, the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. Results revealed that the carrot juice essential oil has great potential for application as a natural antimicrobial applied in pharmaceutical and food industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced lignin monomer production caused by cinnamic Acid and its hydroxylated derivatives inhibits soybean root growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Barbosa Lima

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid and its hydroxylated derivatives (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids are known allelochemicals that affect the seed germination and root growth of many plant species. Recent studies have indicated that the reduction of root growth by these allelochemicals is associated with premature cell wall lignification. We hypothesized that an influx of these compounds into the phenylpropanoid pathway increases the lignin monomer content and reduces the root growth. To confirm this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids on soybean root growth, lignin and the composition of p-hydroxyphenyl (H, guaiacyl (G and syringyl (S monomers. To this end, three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in nutrient solution with or without allelochemical (or selective enzymatic inhibitors of the phenylpropanoid pathway in a growth chamber for 24 h. In general, the results showed that 1 cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids reduced root growth and increased lignin content; 2 cinnamic and p-coumaric acids increased p-hydroxyphenyl (H monomer content, whereas p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids increased guaiacyl (G content, and sinapic acid increased sinapyl (S content; 3 when applied in conjunction with piperonylic acid (PIP, an inhibitor of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, C4H, cinnamic acid reduced H, G and S contents; and 4 when applied in conjunction with 3,4-(methylenedioxycinnamic acid (MDCA, an inhibitor of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, 4CL, p-coumaric acid reduced H, G and S contents, whereas caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids reduced G and S contents. These results confirm our hypothesis that exogenously applied allelochemicals are channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway causing excessive production of lignin and its main monomers. By consequence, an enhanced stiffening of the cell wall restricts soybean root growth.

  17. Green-Lean Synergy - Root-Cause Analysis in Food Waste Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Amani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose_The goal of this paper is to explore the possible synergetic effects between lean philosophy and green endeavors in improving resource efficiency in the food sector. To that end, it is investigated how a proper and tailor-made adaptation of the lean six sigma root cause analysis method could help in overcoming the complexities of increased resource efficiency in food production.Design/methodology/approach_The case study concerned reduction of waste at an industrial production line of a dough-based product, through the implementation of the lean six sigma tool.Findings_An achievement of a 50% reduction of waste on the studied process line was reached, thus exceeding the initial improvement goal.Research limitations/implications (if applicable_While the explicit findings on the specific root causes of waste on this actual production line are not immediately transferrable to other cases, they show that applying this method to identifying and eliminating root causes of waste for other products and processes in the food sector could not only reduce costs but also contribute to more resource-efficient and sustainable industrial food production.Practical implications (if applicable_ Political and public high interest in environmental and social sustainability associated with food waste render this an important development.Originality/value_ While the potential of linking green and lean efforts has been acknowledged, the application of the lean six sigma methodology for more sustainable food production has not yet been explored. This paper contributes to this research

  18. Two decades of radiological accidents direct causes, roots causes and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozental Jose de Julio

    2002-01-01

    of Safety Performance and Safety Culture. Accident investigation is the first step toward avoiding future injures and financial losses, by prevention of recur recurrence. On the other hand, accident investigation is also essential for the establishment of the responsibilities and liability for the consequences. This document discuss the main accidents that have happened in the last two decades, in terms of causes, consequences, similarities and lessons learned when sealed sources have been damaged, lost, stolen and abandoned. In considerable majority death and serious injuries were resulted from failures in the safety system for radiation sources and for the security of radioactive materials.

  19. Stand tending and root rot in Norway spruce stands - economical effects caused by root rot at different thinning regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Mats

    1997-01-01

    This report is divided into three parts: 1) a literature study describing the most common fungi causing rot in wood and descriptions of various strategies to reduce economic loss from root rot, 2) a check of a model describing the development of butt rot in pure Norway spruce plantations in southern Sweden, and 3) simulated economic effects of root rot in stands with various stand tending. The rot model was used to estimate future rot frequencies in the economic calculations. In order to avoid overestimations of rot frequencies, the calculations were also executed when assuming slower growth of rot than shown in the model. When analysing the economical effects of rot, the following three thinning programmes were used: Program 1: thinning at the ages of 30- and 45 years. Final felling at the ages 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70 years. Program 2: thinning at the ages of 40- and 60- years. Final felling at the ages 65 and 75 years. Program 3: thinning at the ages of 30-, 40-, 55-, and 70 years. Final felling at the ages 80 and 90 years. With an interest rate of 3%, programme 2 (final felling at the age of 65 years) had the highest value at present. This result was valid when presuming butt rot in the stand as well as when presuming no butt rot in the stand. There was a small difference between the value at present in programme 1 (final felling at the age of 60 years) and in programme 3 (final felling at the age of 80 years). When presuming butt rot in the stand, the value at present in programme 3 decreased somewhat more in comparison to the value at present in programme 1. Compared to no butt rot in the stand, the optimal final felling time appeared five to ten years earlier when assuming butt rot in the stand. Stand tending programme 1 and an interest rate of 3% were used. Interest rates 2 and 4% did not indicate shorter rotation. The calculated optimal time of final felling appeared at the same stand age whether assuming rot preset or not. The results in this study

  20. RESULTS OF THE SELECTION OF BREEDING SAMPLES OF CARROT BASED ON BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Cherkasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 12 samples of carrot were analyzed for biochemical components in roots. 5 genotypes with high content of vitamin C, β-carotene, and total sugar were selected as genetic sources of high biochemical components.

  1. Bridging the gap between individual-level risk for HIV and structural determinants: using root cause analysis in strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Nancy; Chutuape, Kate; Stines, Stephanie; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    HIV prevention efforts have expanded beyond individual-level interventions to address structural determinants of risk. Coalitions have been an important vehicle for addressing similar intractable and deeply rooted health-related issues. A root cause analysis process may aid coalitions in identifying fundamental, structural-level contributors to risk and in identifying appropriate solutions. For this article, strategic plans for 13 coalitions were analyzed both before and after a root cause analysis approach was applied to determine the coalitions' strategic plans potential impact and comprehensiveness. After root cause analysis, strategic plans trended toward targeting policies and practices rather than on single agency programmatic changes. Plans expanded to target multiple sectors and several changes within sectors to penetrate deeply into a sector or system. Findings suggest that root cause analysis may be a viable tool to assist coalitions in identifying structural determinants and possible solutions for HIV risk.

  2. Production and characterization of curcumin microcrystals and evaluation of the antimicrobial and sensory aspects in minimally processed carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anderson Clayton da; Santos, Priscila Dayane de Freitas; Palazzi, Nicole Campezato; Leimann, Fernanda Vitória; Fuchs, Renata Hernandez Barros; Bracht, Lívia; Gonçalves, Odinei Hess

    2017-05-24

    Nontoxic conserving agents are in demand by the food industry due to consumers concern about synthetic conservatives, especially in minimally processed food. The antimicrobial activity of curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, has been extensively investigated but hydrophobicity is an issue when applying curcumin to foodstuff. The objective of this work was to evaluate curcumin microcrystals as an antimicrobial agent in minimally processed carrots. The antimicrobial activity of curcumin microcrystals was evaluated in vitro against Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) microorganisms, showing a statistically significant (p processed carrots. Sensory analyses were carried out showing no significant difference (p processed carrots without causing noticeable differences that could be detected by the consumer. One may conclude that the analyses of the minimally processed carrots demonstrated that curcumin microcrystals are a suitable natural compound to inhibit the natural microbiota of carrots from a statistical point of view.

  3. Gastroprotective Effect of Carrot (Daucus carota L. Juice in Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Hui Jiin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastritis has become one of the very common gastrointestinal tract disorders in clinical practice. One of the factors causing gastritis is the prolonged intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs which is commonly adopted by people suffering pain. The NSAIDs such as aspirin cause loss of mucosal integrity resulting in gastric mucosa inflamation. Carrot (Daucus carota L. has long been used as a traditional medicine for various ailments. The presence of flavonoids and carotenoids in carrot is associated with gastroprotective effect. Methods: The present study was undertaken to determine the gastroprotective effect of 4.08 g carrot juice administered by feeding tube on the hydrochloric acid (HCL concentration in the stomach in aspirin-induced Wistar-strain rats. This was a laboratory experimental study performed at the Pharmacology Laboratory Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung Indonesia in October 2012. The parameter used HCL Concentration determined by titration method. Results: The result of carrot juice consumption together with aspirin shows a statistically significant reduction in HCL concentration in the stomach (p<0.05. The result was also significant when compared with another medication, Misoprostol. Conclusion: Carrot juice extract possesses gastroprotective effect when consumed with aspirin and thus support the use of carrot as an alternative treatment. [AMJ.2014;1(1:35–9

  4. The impact of no-tillage cultivation and white mustard as a cover crop on weed infestation and yield of carrot and red beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Borowy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In a two-year field experiment, no-tillage cultivation using white mustard (Sinapis alba L. ‘Bardena’, 30 kg ha−1, as a cover crop did not influence emergence of red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ‘Czerwona Kula REW’ and had a favorable effect on emergence of carrot (Daucus carota L. ‘Berlikumer 2 – Perfekcja REW’. However, further growth of both vegetables was significantly slower under no-tillage cultivation. Both vegetables produced a higher yield of roots and the diameter of these roots was bigger under conventional cultivation. The effect of cultivation method on the content of total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium in carrot and red beet leaves varied, while the content of dry matter, monosaccharides and total sugars was significantly higher in the roots of both vegetables harvested under no-tillage cultivation. The number of weeds growing on no-tilled plots covered with mustard mulch 4 weeks after seed sowing was lower by about 75%, but their fresh weight was higher more than 6 times in comparison to that under conventional cultivation. This was caused by the emergence of wintering and winter hardy weeds in places not covered by mustard plants in the autumn of the year preceding the cultivation of vegetables. Next year, they started to grow in the early spring and some of them produced a considerable amount of fresh weight and attained the flowering stage in the middle of April.

  5. Herdabilidade e correlações genotípicas entre caracteres de folhagem e sistema radicular em famílias de cenoura, cultivar Brasília Heritability and genotypic correlation among leaf and root traits in carrot, cultivar Brasilia progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos da S Alves

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi implementado com o objetivo de estimar parâmetros genéticos para os seguintes caracteres de importância para o melhoramento genético da cenoura: número de folhas por planta (NFP, comprimento da maior folha na planta (CF, comprimento da raiz (CR, peso da raiz (PR, diâmetro da raiz (DR e diâmetro do xilema (DX. Este experimento foi conduzido em condições de campo durante o verão de 1999/2000, sendo utilizadas 69 famílias de meios-irmãos derivadas da cultivar Brasília. As progênies foram cultivadas em delineamento de blocos ao acaso com duas repetições e parcelas de 2 m², com quatro linhas de 20 plantas cada. Os valores observados para coeficiente de variação genética oscilaram de 4,8 a 10,9. Os valores calculados de herdabilidade no sentido amplo (h a² foram medianamente altos para todos os caracteres, com uma variação observada entre 29,9% (para DR e 77,6% (para CF. Foram também obtidas estimativas de valores de correlações fenotípicas, genotípicas e ambientais entre os caracteres avaliados, com destaque para a magnitude do valor da correlação genotípica entre PR e DR, de 0,85. Correlação genotípica negativa foi observada entre CR e DX indicando a possibilidade de desenvolver, a partir de populações derivadas de 'Brasília', novas cultivares com arquitetura de raiz mais adequada para a produção de mini-cenouras ("baby-carrots". Valores de correlações ambientais negativos e altos foram observados entre PR e DX e entre DR e DX. Este conjunto de informações representa uma importante base de dados genéticos com implicações diretas na otimização do processo de seleção dentro de populações de cenoura derivadas da cultivar Brasília.The present work was conducted aiming to estimate genetic parameters associated with traits of importance to carrot breeding, including: number of leaves per plant (NL, length of the longest leaf in the plant (LL, root length (RL, root weight (RW

  6. Impact of egyptian broomrape (Orobanche aegyptiaca (Pers.) parasitism on amino acid composition of carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandula, V K; Foster, J G; Foy, C L

    2000-09-01

    The relationship between the organic nitrogen status of Egyptian broomrape and one of its hosts, carrot, was studied by comparing amino acid profiles of leaf and root tissues of nonparasitized and broomrape-parasitized carrot plants and by analyzing amino acid profiles of broomrape at different growth stages. Total N concentrations, expressed as a percentage of the dry weight of the tissues, were similar in leaves of nonparasitized and parasitized carrot plants but were lower in parasitized roots than in nonparasitized roots. In both dry and germinated broomrape seeds, N concentrations were lower than or similar to those in broomrape tubercles, shoots, or callus. Individual amino acid concentrations in hydrolysates of leaves of parasitized carrot plants tended to be similar to or greater than those in hydrolysates of nonparasitized carrot plants. Roots of parasitized plants tended to have similar or lower amino acid concentrations than roots of nonparasitized plants. Dry and germinated broomrape seeds had similar amino acid profiles, but individual amino acid concentrations were lower than in the other broomrape tissues examined. The broomrape shoot tended to have lower amino acid concentrations than the tubercle and callus. Free amino acid profiles of leaves and roots of parasitized plants paralleled those of nonparasitized plants, respectively. Individual free amino acids tended to occur at similar or lower levels in dry and germinated broomrape seeds than in the tubercle, shoot, or callus. Free amino acid composition of the broomrape tubercle was similar to that of the parasitized root. Arginine and alanine concentrations in broomrape callus were dramatically higher than those of other amino acids in this or other tissues investigated. These results indicate that changes in the composition of both free and bound amino acids in carrot are associated with broomrape parasitism.

  7. Morphological Characteristics, Anatomical Structure, and Gene Expression: Novel Insights into Cytokinin Accumulation during Carrot Growth and Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Long Wang

    Full Text Available Cytokinins have been implicated in normal plant growth and development. These bioactive molecules are essential for cell production and expansion in higher plants. Carrot is an Apiaceae vegetable with great value and undergoes significant size changes over the process of plant growth. However, cytokinin accumulation and its potential roles in carrot growth have not been elucidated. To address this problem, carrot plants at five stages were collected, and morphological and anatomical characteristics and expression profiles of cytokinin-related genes were determined. During carrot growth and development, cytokinin levels were the highest at the second stage in the roots, whereas relatively stable levels were observed in the petioles and leaves. DcCYP735A2 showed high expression at stage 2 in the roots, which may contribute largely to the higher cytokinin level at this stage. However, expression of most metabolic genes did not follow a pattern similar to that of cytokinin accumulation, indicating that cytokinin biosynthesis was regulated through a complex network. Genes involved in cytokinin signal perception and transduction were also integrated to normal plant growth and development. The results from the present work suggested that cytokinins may regulate plant growth in a stage-dependent manner. Our work would shed novel insights into cytokinin accumulation and its potential roles during carrot growth. Further studies regarding carrot cytokinins may be achieved by modification of the genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, inactivation, and perception.

  8. Biocontrol traits of plant growth suppressive arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi against root rot in tomato caused by Pythium aphanidermatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi known to cause plant growth depressions in tomato were examined for their biocontrol effects against root rot caused by Pythium aphanidermatum. The main hypothesis was that plant growth suppressive AM fungi would elicit a defence response in the host plant reducing...... after AM fungi inoculation, roots were challenged with P. aphanidermatum. Variables evaluated at each harvest were root colonization levels of the interacting fungi, plant growth responses, and expression of a plant pathogenesis related protein gene (PR-1). All of the tested AM fungi caused marked...

  9. Root Cause Analysis and Productivity Improvement Of An Apparel Industry In Bangladesh Through Kaizen Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taposh Kumar Kapuria

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Garments industry is playing the pioneering role in improving Bangladesh economic condition. It was started in late 1970’s and now the leading foreign currency earner for Bangladesh. It’s no dubiousness to say that, the Bangladesh garment industry is ameliorating garment’s service quality and innovative design features to exist in the global competitive market. Global competition in the garment’s market is changing day to day. Leading garment manufacturer from all over the world are adopting new innovative features and techniques to sustain global fierce competitive market. But the point is, Bangladeshi garment manufacturers are not lingered. They are also emphasizing on better service quality by adding latest design features and using the latest technologies to the garments. The sole purpose of this paper is to identify the root causes of sewing defects of an apparel industry in Bangladesh and continuous improvement in reducing the defects through Kaizen (Continuous Improvement system. In short, productivity improvement of the apparel industry. Our studied garment manufacturing company is “ABONTI Color Tex. Ltd.”. Pareto Analysis is used to identify the top defect items. Cause-Effect Analysis helped to identify the root causes of sewing defects. Then, Kaizen is used for continuous improvement of the minimization of sewing defects.

  10. Optimization of flat plate drying of carrot pomace (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrot (Daucus carota var. sativus) pomace is a co-product of the carrot juice and cut-carrot industry; it has high nutritional value but is currently underutilized. Drum drying is one method that could be used to dry and stabilize carrot pomace. However, optimum conditions for the dryer surface tem...

  11. rDNA-based characterization of a new binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. causing root rot on kale in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramae, E.E.; Buzeto, A.L.; Nakatani, A.K.; Souza, N.L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the first report of the occurrence of a binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. causing hypocotyl and root rot in kale in Brazil. Rhizoctonia spp. were isolated from kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with symptoms of hypocotyl and root rot. The isolates, characterized as binucleate

  12. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  13. Model-Based Fault Diagnosis: Performing Root Cause and Impact Analyses in Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Jorge F.; Walker, Mark G.; Kapadia, Ravi; Morris, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Generic, object-oriented fault models, built according to causal-directed graph theory, have been integrated into an overall software architecture dedicated to monitoring and predicting the health of mission- critical systems. Processing over the generic fault models is triggered by event detection logic that is defined according to the specific functional requirements of the system and its components. Once triggered, the fault models provide an automated way for performing both upstream root cause analysis (RCA), and for predicting downstream effects or impact analysis. The methodology has been applied to integrated system health management (ISHM) implementations at NASA SSC's Rocket Engine Test Stands (RETS).

  14. Defect diagnosis and root cause analysis for thrust roller bearing of centrifugal charging pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yi

    2012-01-01

    The centrifugal charging pump is one of the most important equipment for Nuclear power plant which requires very high reliability, during C9 fuel-cycle, the continuous high level vibration alarm happened on the centrifugal charging pump B, we diagnosed its faults correctly and selected the right operation mode and right time to dismantle it which ensure the safety and economic benefits of Nuclear power plant, and through deeply analysis the root causes of thrust bearing defaults, we can learn much from it especially for the diagnosis and analysis to the bearing faults which is common for rotating equipment. (author)

  15. Increasing Reliability by Means of Root Cause Aware HARQ and Interference Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Gerardino, Guillermo Andrés Pocovi; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2015-01-01

    of the network. Combined with a ROot Cause Aware HARQ (ROCA-HARQ), which provides additional information when a transmission fails, the joint mechanism is relevant for any LTE/LTE-A deployment and can be easily implemented in a real network. System-level simulations show attractive BLER reductions up to 80......The arrival of mission critical applications in the context of vehicular, medical and industrial wireless communications calls for reliability constraints never seen before in cellular systems. Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) has been widely investigated in the context of LTE...

  16. Produção e qualidade de sementes e raízes de cenoura cultivada em solo com adubação orgânica e mineral Production and quality of seeds and roots of carrot cultivated under organic and mineral fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riselane de Lucena Alcântara Bruno

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A ausência de sementes orgânicas no mercado e a escassez de informações sobre o assunto têm sido fortes empecilhos para a produção orgânica. Avaliou-se a eficiência da adubação verde (AV, do composto orgânico (CO e do biofertilizante (B na produção da cenoura e na qualidade das sementes, comparados à adubação convencional (AC-testemunha, nos tratamentos: 1 AC; 2 AV+B via solo; 3 AV+B via planta; 4 CO+B via solo; 5 CO+B via planta; 6 CO+AV+B via solo e 7 CO+AV+B via planta. Os maiores valores morfológicos (altura, comprimento e diâmetro, de germinação e de vigor foram proporcionados pelo tratamento 5, enquanto a produção e os sólidos solúveis totais alcançaram maiores gradientes nas plantas cultivadas com o tratamento 4, superando os dados do tratamento 1. O tratamento 3 proporcionou produção de raízes com menor número de galhas de nematóide. As cenouras procedentes dos tratamentos 2 e 6 foram classificadas em tamanho curto. A decomposição do AV, associado ao B via planta, pode ter proporcionado maior resistência das cenouras aos nematóides e melhor classificação comercial. Os tratamentos orgânicos proporcionaram boa qualidade de raízes, sementes e maior produção.The inexistence of organic seeds in the market and the absence of information constitute a difficulty for the organic production. The green fertilizer efficiency (GF was evaluated, of organic compound (OC, and biofertilizer (B in carrot production and seeds quality, compared to conventional fertilizer (CF-control, through the treatments: 1 CF; 2, GF+B via soil; 3 GF+B via plant; 4 OC+B via soil; 5 OC+B via plant; 6 OC+GF+B via soil and 7 OC+GF+B via plant. Higher morphological values (height, length and diameter, of germination and vigor were given by treatment 5, while production and total soluble solids reached higher gradients when growing plants with treatment 4, upper data of treatment 1. Treatment 3 resulted in root production with lower

  17. Root cause investigation of deviations in protein chromatography based on mechanistic models and artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Briskot, Till; Hahn, Tobias; Baumann, Pascal; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2017-09-15

    In protein chromatography, process variations, such as aging of column or process errors, can result in deviations of the product and impurity levels. Consequently, the process performance described by purity, yield, or production rate may decrease. Based on visual inspection of the UV signal, it is hard to identify the source of the error and almost unfeasible to determine the quantity of deviation. The problem becomes even more pronounced, if multiple root causes of the deviation are interconnected and lead to an observable deviation. In the presented work, a novel method based on the combination of mechanistic chromatography models and the artificial neural networks is suggested to solve this problem. In a case study using a model protein mixture, the determination of deviations in column capacity and elution gradient length was shown. Maximal errors of 1.5% and 4.90% for the prediction of deviation in column capacity and elution gradient length respectively demonstrated the capability of this method for root cause investigation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Random safety auditing, root cause analysis, failure mode and effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursprung, Robert; Gray, James

    2010-03-01

    Improving quality and safety in health care is a major concern for health care providers, the general public, and policy makers. Errors and quality issues are leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the health care industry. There is evidence that patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at high risk for serious medical errors. To facilitate compliance with safe practices, many institutions have established quality-assurance monitoring procedures. Three techniques that have been found useful in the health care setting are failure mode and effects analysis, root cause analysis, and random safety auditing. When used together, these techniques are effective tools for system analysis and redesign focused on providing safe delivery of care in the complex NICU system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. VIIRS On-Orbit Optical Anomaly - Investigation, Analysis, Root Cause Determination and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iona, Glenn; Butler, James; Guenther, Bruce; Graziani, Larissa; Johnson, Eric; Kennedy, Brian; Kent, Criag; Lambeck, Robert; Waluschka, Eugne; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2012-01-01

    A gradual, but persistent, decrease in the optical throughput was detected during the early commissioning phase for the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Near Infrared (NIR) bands. Its initial rate and unknown cause were coincidently coupled with a decrease in sensitivity in the same spectral wavelength of the Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor (SDSM) raising concerns about contamination or the possibility of a system-level satellite problem. An anomaly team was formed to investigate and provide recommendations before commissioning could resume. With few hard facts in hand, there was much speculation about possible causes and consequences of the degradation. Two different causes were determined as will be explained in this paper. This paper will describe the build and test history of VIIRS, why there were no indicators, even with hindsight, of an on-orbit problem, the appearance of the on-orbit anomaly, the initial work attempting to understand and determine the cause, the discovery of the root cause and what Test-As-You-Fly (TAYF) activities, can be done in the future to greatly reduce the likelihood of similar optical anomalies. These TAYF activities are captured in the lessons learned section of this paper.

  20. Finding the Root Causes of Statistical Inconsistency in Community Earth System Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, D.; Hammerling, D.; Baker, A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Baker et al (2015) developed the Community Earth System Model Ensemble Consistency Test (CESM-ECT) to provide a metric for software quality assurance by determining statistical consistency between an ensemble of CESM outputs and new test runs. The test has proved useful for detecting statistical difference caused by compiler bugs and errors in physical modules. However, detection is only the necessary first step in finding the causes of statistical difference. The CESM is a vastly complex model comprised of millions of lines of code which is developed and maintained by a large community of software engineers and scientists. Any root cause analysis is correspondingly challenging. We propose a new capability for CESM-ECT: identifying the sections of code that cause statistical distinguishability. The first step is to discover CESM variables that cause CESM-ECT to classify new runs as statistically distinct, which we achieve via Randomized Logistic Regression. Next we use a tool developed to identify CESM components that define or compute the variables found in the first step. Finally, we employ the application Kernel GENerator (KGEN) created in Kim et al (2016) to detect fine-grained floating point differences. We demonstrate an example of the procedure and advance a plan to automate this process in our future work.

  1. Conifer root and butt rot caused by Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. s.l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiegbu, Fred O; Adomas, Aleksandra; Stenlid, Jan

    2005-07-01

    SUMMARY The root and butt rot caused by Heterobasidon annosum is one of the most destructive diseases of conifers in the northern temperate regions of the world, particularly in Europe. Economic losses attributable to Heterobasidion infection in Europe are estimated at 800 million euros annually. The fungus has been classified into three separate European intersterile species P (H. annosum), S (H. parviporum) and F (H. abietinum) based on their main host preferences: pine, spruce and fir, respectively. In North America, two intersterile groups are present, P and S/F, but these have not been given scientific names. The ecology of the disease spread has been intensively studied but the genetics, biochemistry and molecular aspects of pathogen virulence have been relatively little examined. Recent advances in transcript profiling, molecular characterization of pathogenicity factors and establishment of DNA-transformation systems have paved the way for future advances in our understanding of this pathosystem. Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref., H. parviporum Niemelä & Korhonen and H. abietinum Niemelä & Korhonen; kingdom Fungi; class Basidiomycotina; order Aphyllophorales; family Bondarzewiaceae; genus Heterobasidion. presence of the fungus fruit bodies, basidiocarps whitish in the margins, upper surface is tan to dark brown, usually irregular shaped, 3.5 (-7) cm thick and up to 40 cm in diameter; pores 5-19, 7-22 and 13-26 mm(2) for the P, F and S groups, respectively. Small brownish non-sporulating postules develop on the outside of infected roots. Asexual spores (conidiospores) are 3.8-6.6 x 2.8-5.0 microm in size. Mating tests are necessary for identification of intersterility groups. The fungus attacks many coniferous tree species. In Europe, particularly trees of the genera Pinus and Juniperus (P), Picea (S), Abies (F) and in North America Pinus (P) and Picea, Tsuga and Abies (S/F). To a lesser extent it causes root rot on some decidous trees (Betula and Quercus

  2. Development of a root cause analysis workstation and application in identification of the causes of reactor scrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.N.M.; Danner, M.A.; Modarres, M.; Chung, D.

    1988-01-01

    A natural outgrowth of work performed jointly between the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company and the University of Maryland over the past 5 yr has been a formalized approach to industrial process reliability and risk analysis that utilizes goal trees. Goal-tree analysis is a method by which the success of an industrial process can be described in terms of a set of logically interrelated goals that can be achieved either by the proper functioning of hardware or of humans. The final product is in hierarchical tree format and relates the somewhat ephemeral objectives of the process to the very real and physical success paths that achieve them. Because of the rigor, which, of necessity, must be employed by the analyst during its development, the completed goal tree provides not only a very concise and complete description of the way in which all elements of the process must operate in concert to achieve the objective but also allows an analyst to infer the consequences when certain elements of the process function improperly. In other words, the completed goal tree not only provides a very concise description of the process design basis but can also provide the analyst with a precise cause/consequence description for the process. It is this latter attribute of the tree that has been explored to provide a means for defining an analytical method for improving hardware performance and the foundation for understanding the way that a goal tree could ultimately be used to provide the framework for a root-cause analysis method

  3. An information transfer based novel framework for fault root cause tracing of complex electromechanical systems in the processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongxi; Gao, Xu; Gao, Jianmin; Gao, Zhiyong; Kang, Jiani

    2018-02-01

    As one of the most important approaches for analyzing the mechanism of fault pervasion, fault root cause tracing is a powerful and useful tool for detecting the fundamental causes of faults so as to prevent any further propagation and amplification. Focused on the problems arising from the lack of systematic and comprehensive integration, an information transfer-based novel data-driven framework for fault root cause tracing of complex electromechanical systems in the processing industry was proposed, taking into consideration the experience and qualitative analysis of conventional fault root cause tracing methods. Firstly, an improved symbolic transfer entropy method was presented to construct a directed-weighted information model for a specific complex electromechanical system based on the information flow. Secondly, considering the feedback mechanisms in the complex electromechanical systems, a method for determining the threshold values of weights was developed to explore the disciplines of fault propagation. Lastly, an iterative method was introduced to identify the fault development process. The fault root cause was traced by analyzing the changes in information transfer between the nodes along with the fault propagation pathway. An actual fault root cause tracing application of a complex electromechanical system is used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed framework. A unique fault root cause is obtained regardless of the choice of the initial variable. Thus, the proposed framework can be flexibly and effectively used in fault root cause tracing for complex electromechanical systems in the processing industry, and formulate the foundation of system vulnerability analysis and condition prediction, as well as other engineering applications.

  4. The root caused analysis of leakaged heat exchanger tube; Ursachenanalyse einer Leckage an einem Waermeuebertraegerrohr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsudin, Shaiful Rizam; Salleh, M.A.A. Mohd; Rahmat, Azmi; Anuar, Mohd Arif [Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP) (Malaysia). Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology (CEGeoGTech); Harun, Mohd; Zayid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Selangor (Malaysia). Industry Technology Div.; Noor, Mazlee Mohd [Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP) (Malaysia). School of Materials Engineering

    2015-05-01

    AISI type 316L stainless steel was used as a heat exchanger tube material in an inter-cooler column. After less than a year of operation, severe corrosion failures occurred and a transverse opening leakage was observed on one of the heat exchanger tubes. The failed tube was carefully analyzed using various metallurgical laboratory equipments. The root cause of the tube leakage was believed due to the presence of horizontal micro and macro pores as a hydrogen gas entrapment during casting of the parent ingot. The overlapped and gaping pores formed notch on the shell side of the tube surface, and it increasingly evident when the use of a high-energy water-jet and metal brush as cleaning procedure results in an establishment of pitting type local-action corrosion cells penetrated the tube wall. As a result, corrosive fluid in the tube side dissolved into the cooling water, accelerating the corrosion process.

  5. Minimising complications in abdominoplasty: An approach based on the root cause analysis and focused preventive steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rangaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant complications still occur after abdominoplasty, the rate varies widely in different series. This variation suggests that there is a lot of scope for improvement. This paper reviews the various complications and also the technical improvements reported in the last 20 years. The root cause of each complication is analysed and preventive steps are suggested based on the literature and the author′s own personal series with very low complication rates. Proper case selection, risk stratified prophylaxis of thromboembolism, initial synchronous liposuction, flap elevation at the Scarpa fascia level, discontinuous incremental flap dissection, vascular preservation and obliteration of the sub-flap space by multiple sutures emerge as the strongest preventive factors. It is proposed that most of the complications of abdominoplasty are preventable and that it is possible to greatly enhance the aesthetic and safety profile of this surgery.

  6. Phosphate Availability Alters Architecture and Causes Changes in Hormone Sensitivity in the Arabidopsis Root System1

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bucio, José; Hernández-Abreu, Esmeralda; Sánchez-Calderón, Lenin; Nieto-Jacobo, María Fernanda; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2002-01-01

    The postembryonic developmental program of the plant root system is plastic and allows changes in root architecture to adapt to environmental conditions such as water and nutrient availability. Among essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) often limits plant productivity because of its low mobility in soil. Therefore, the architecture of the root system may determine the capacity of the plant to acquire this nutrient. We studied the effect of P availability on the development of the root system in Arabidopsis. We found that at P-limiting conditions (<50 μm), the Arabidopsis root system undergoes major architectural changes in terms of lateral root number, lateral root density, and primary root length. Treatment with auxins and auxin antagonists indicate that these changes are related to an increase in auxin sensitivity in the roots of P-deprived Arabidopsis seedlings. It was also found that the axr1-3, axr2-1, and axr4-1 Arabidopsis mutants have normal responses to low P availability conditions, whereas the iaa28-1 mutant shows resistance to the stimulatory effects of low P on root hair and lateral root formation. Analysis of ethylene signaling mutants and treatments with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid showed that ethylene does not promote lateral root formation under P deprivation. These results suggest that in Arabidopsis, auxin sensitivity may play a fundamental role in the modifications of root architecture by P availability. PMID:12011355

  7. Report: Identification of root cause failure of piping in a service water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutey, R.W. [Buckman Labs. International, Inc., Memphis, TN (United States); Mason, P.D. [Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Co., East Haddam, CT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report deals with studies on the identification of the root cause of piping failures in a service water system, and to develop a proposal for action to prevent further failures. The failures were characterized as pin hole through-wall penetrations associated with butt-welds, restricted to stagnant flow carbon steel piping. Based on extensive tests, inspections and observations the conclusions presented in this report are summarized as follows: (1) the pin hole failures were characterized as root cause, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), this conclusion was based upon microbiological, visual, and chemical testing at the as-is site of a recent failure, pipe segments were available for extensive testing and comparison to previous failures; (2) failures were isolated to stagnant sites at points where poor weld penetration provided optimum conditions for MIC to occur; (3) extensive examination of the process flow and intermittent flow sites characterized as high risk areas were made, no evidence of microbiological involvement with corrosion was found, no evidence of any type of significant pitting corrosion was found at these sites; (4) removal and replacement of stagnant line and weld sites was done as a major step in preventing further failures. MIC inoculum, primarily anaerobic microorganisms, was found at many anaerobic and aerobic sites in the system. This suggested that a preventive chemical treatment program would be appropriate to maintain the system at a MIC free status. A monitoring program was suggested to assess on a real-time-basis, the potential for MIC and to monitor the mitigation of MIC.

  8. Comparative and population genomic landscape of Phellinus noxius: A hypervariable fungus causing root rot in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chia-Lin; Lee, Tracy J; Akiba, Mitsuteru; Lee, Hsin-Han; Kuo, Tzu-Hao; Liu, Dang; Ke, Huei-Mien; Yokoi, Toshiro; Roa, Marylette B; Lu, Mei-Yeh J; Chang, Ya-Yun; Ann, Pao-Jen; Tsai, Jyh-Nong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Ota, Yuko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Sahashi, Norio; Liou, Ruey-Fen; Kikuchi, Taisei; Tsai, Isheng J

    2017-11-01

    The order Hymenochaetales of white rot fungi contain some of the most aggressive wood decayers causing tree deaths around the world. Despite their ecological importance and the impact of diseases they cause, little is known about the evolution and transmission patterns of these pathogens. Here, we sequenced and undertook comparative genomic analyses of Hymenochaetales genomes using brown root rot fungus Phellinus noxius, wood-decomposing fungus Phellinus lamaensis, laminated root rot fungus Phellinus sulphurascens and trunk pathogen Porodaedalea pini. Many gene families of lignin-degrading enzymes were identified from these fungi, reflecting their ability as white rot fungi. Comparing against distant fungi highlighted the expansion of 1,3-beta-glucan synthases in P. noxius, which may account for its fast-growing attribute. We identified 13 linkage groups conserved within Agaricomycetes, suggesting the evolution of stable karyotypes. We determined that P. noxius has a bipolar heterothallic mating system, with unusual highly expanded ~60 kb A locus as a result of accumulating gene transposition. We investigated the population genomics of 60 P. noxius isolates across multiple islands of the Asia Pacific region. Whole-genome sequencing showed this multinucleate species contains abundant poly-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms with atypical allele frequencies. Different patterns of intra-isolate polymorphism reflect mono-/heterokaryotic states which are both prevalent in nature. We have shown two genetically separated lineages with one spanning across many islands despite the geographical barriers. Both populations possess extraordinary genetic diversity and show contrasting evolutionary scenarios. These results provide a framework to further investigate the genetic basis underlying the fitness and virulence of white rot fungi. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Root Cause Analysis Following an Event at a Nuclear Installation: Reference Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Following an event at a nuclear installation, it is important to determine accurately its root causes so that effective corrective actions can be implemented. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles: “Processes must be put in place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience”. If this process is completed effectively, the probability of a similar event occurring is significantly reduced. Guidance on how to establish and implement such a process is given in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-2.11, A System for the Feedback of Experience from Events in Nuclear Installations. To cater for the diverse nature of operating experience events, several different root cause analysis (RCA) methodologies and techniques have been developed for effective investigation and analysis. An event here is understood as any unanticipated sequence of occurrences that results in, or potentially results in, consequences to plant operation and safety. RCA is not a topic uniquely relevant to event investigators: knowledge of the concepts enhances the learning characteristics of the whole organization. This knowledge also makes a positive contribution to nuclear safety and helps to foster a culture of preventing event occurrence. This publication allows organizations to deepen their knowledge of these methodologies and techniques and also provides new organizations with a broad overview of the RCA process. It is the outcome of a coordinated effort involving the participation of experts from nuclear organizations, the energy industry and research centres in several Member States. This publication also complements IAEA Services Series No. 10, PROSPER Guidelines: Guidelines for Peer Review and for Plant Self- Assessment of Operational Experience Feedback Process, and is intended to form part of a suite of publications developing the principles set forth in these guidelines. In addition to the information and description of RCA

  10. Root Cause Analysis Following an Event at a Nuclear Installation: Reference Manual. Companion CD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Following an event at a nuclear installation, it is important to determine accurately its root causes so that effective corrective actions can be implemented. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles: “Processes must be put in place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience”. If this process is completed effectively, the probability of a similar event occurring is significantly reduced. Guidance on how to establish and implement such a process is given in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-2.11, A System for the Feedback of Experience from Events in Nuclear Installations. To cater for the diverse nature of operating experience events, several different root cause analysis (RCA) methodologies and techniques have been developed for effective investigation and analysis. An event here is understood as any unanticipated sequence of occurrences that results in, or potentially results in, consequences to plant operation and safety. RCA is not a topic uniquely relevant to event investigators: knowledge of the concepts enhances the learning characteristics of the whole organization. This knowledge also makes a positive contribution to nuclear safety and helps to foster a culture of preventing event occurrence. This publication allows organizations to deepen their knowledge of these methodologies and techniques and also provides new organizations with a broad overview of the RCA process. It is the outcome of a coordinated effort involving the participation of experts from nuclear organizations, the energy industry and research centres in several Member States. This publication also complements IAEA Services Series No. 10, PROSPER Guidelines: Guidelines for Peer Review and for Plant Self- Assessment of Operational Experience Feedback Process, and is intended to form part of a suite of publications developing the principles set forth in these guidelines. In addition to the information and description of RCA

  11. Partial Resistance of Carrot to Alternaria dauci Correlates with In Vitro Cultured Carrot Cell Resistance to Fungal Exudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisine, Linda; Gatto, Julia; Hélesbeux, Jean-Jacques; Séraphin, Denis; Peña-Rodriguez, Luis M.; Richomme, Pascal; Boedo, Cora; Yovanopoulos, Claire; Gyomlai, Melvina; Briard, Mathilde; Simoneau, Philippe; Poupard, Pascal; Berruyer, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Although different mechanisms have been proposed in the recent years, plant pathogen partial resistance is still poorly understood. Components of the chemical warfare, including the production of plant defense compounds and plant resistance to pathogen-produced toxins, are likely to play a role. Toxins are indeed recognized as important determinants of pathogenicity in necrotrophic fungi. Partial resistance based on quantitative resistance loci and linked to a pathogen-produced toxin has never been fully described. We tested this hypothesis using the Alternaria dauci – carrot pathosystem. Alternaria dauci, causing carrot leaf blight, is a necrotrophic fungus known to produce zinniol, a compound described as a non-host selective toxin. Embryogenic cellular cultures from carrot genotypes varying in resistance against A. dauci were confronted with zinniol at different concentrations or to fungal exudates (raw, organic or aqueous extracts). The plant response was analyzed through the measurement of cytoplasmic esterase activity, as a marker of cell viability, and the differentiation of somatic embryos in cellular cultures. A differential response to toxicity was demonstrated between susceptible and partially resistant genotypes, with a good correlation noted between the resistance to the fungus at the whole plant level and resistance at the cellular level to fungal exudates from raw and organic extracts. No toxic reaction of embryogenic cultures was observed after treatment with the aqueous extract or zinniol used at physiological concentration. Moreover, we did not detect zinniol in toxic fungal extracts by UHPLC analysis. These results suggest that strong phytotoxic compounds are present in the organic extract and remain to be characterized. Our results clearly show that carrot tolerance to A. dauci toxins is one component of its partial resistance. PMID:24983469

  12. Phosphate availability alters architecture and causes changes in hormone sensitivity in the Arabidopsis root system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bucio, José; Hernández-Abreu, Esmeralda; Sánchez-Calderón, Lenin; Nieto-Jacobo, María Fernanda; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2002-05-01

    The postembryonic developmental program of the plant root system is plastic and allows changes in root architecture to adapt to environmental conditions such as water and nutrient availability. Among essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) often limits plant productivity because of its low mobility in soil. Therefore, the architecture of the root system may determine the capacity of the plant to acquire this nutrient. We studied the effect of P availability on the development of the root system in Arabidopsis. We found that at P-limiting conditions (resistance to the stimulatory effects of low P on root hair and lateral root formation. Analysis of ethylene signaling mutants and treatments with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid showed that ethylene does not promote lateral root formation under P deprivation. These results suggest that in Arabidopsis, auxin sensitivity may play a fundamental role in the modifications of root architecture by P availability.

  13. Biochar reduces the bioaccumulation of PAHs from soil to carrot (Daucus carota L.) in the rhizosphere: A mechanism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ni; Song, Yang; Shi, Renyong; Liu, Zongtang; Bian, Yongrong; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xinglun; Gu, Chenggang; Jiang, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the mechanisms on how biochar reduces bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tuberous vegetables. Corn straw-derived biochar pyrolyzed at 300°C (CB300) or bamboo-derived biochar pyrolyzed at 700°C (BB700) was amended into PAH-contaminated soil planted with carrot (Daucus carota L.). After 150days, 2% CB300 or 2% BB700 amendments significantly reduced the bioaccumulation of PAHs in carrot root (pbiochars both showed better effectiveness at reducing the bioavailability of high-molecular-weight PAHs than the low-molecular-weight PAHs in the rhizosphere. Therefore, the mechanisms on how biochar reduces the PAH uptake into carrot are dependent on the type of biochar (e.g., pyrolysis temperature and feedstock) and root presence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nine years of irrigation cause vegetation and fine root shifts in a water-limited pine forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Herzog

    Full Text Available Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L. in the inner-Alpine dry valleys of Switzerland have suffered from increased mortality during the past decades, which has been caused by longer and more frequent dry periods. In addition, a proceeding replacement of Scots pines by pubescent oaks (Quercus pubescens Willd. has been observed. In 2003, an irrigation experiment was performed to track changes by reducing drought pressure on the natural pine forest. After nine years of irrigation, we observed major adaptations in the vegetation and shifts in Scots pine fine root abundance and structure. Irrigation permitted new plant species to assemble and promote canopy closure with a subsequent loss of herb and moss coverage. Fine root dry weight increased under irrigation and fine roots had a tendency to elongate. Structural composition of fine roots remained unaffected by irrigation, expressing preserved proportions of cellulose, lignin and phenolic substances. A shift to a more negative δ13C signal in the fine root C indicates an increased photosynthetic activity in irrigated pine trees. Using radiocarbon (14C measurement, a reduced mean age of the fine roots in irrigated plots was revealed. The reason for this is either an increase in newly produced fine roots, supported by the increase in fine root biomass, or a reduced lifespan of fine roots which corresponds to an enhanced turnover rate. Overall, the responses belowground to irrigation are less conspicuous than the more rapid adaptations aboveground. Lagged and conservative adaptations of tree roots with decadal lifespans are challenging to detect, hence demanding for long-term surveys. Investigations concerning fine root turnover rate and degradation processes under a changing climate are crucial for a complete understanding of C cycling.

  15. Effects of Fungicides, Essential Oils and Gamma Irradiated Bioagents on Chickpea Root Rot Caused by Sclerotium rolfsii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Batal, A.I.; Fathy, R.M.; Ismail, A.A.; Mubark, H.M.; Mahmoud, Y.A.

    2011-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii (S. rolfsii) causes root rot disease in several crops including Cicer arietinum (chickpea) that results in low yield. In vitro experiments on fungicides, vitavax and monceren T, and essential oils, clove and mint oils, were conducted to control root rot disease of chickpea caused by S. rolfsii. The treatments resulted in 80 % suppression of root rot disease. Gliocladium virens (G. virens) and Gliocladium deliquescens (G. deliquescens) were effective as biocontrol agents against S. rolfsii. The results showed that these treatments greatly reduced the root rot disease in chickpea. In this study, the effect of gamma irradiation at doses 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 kGy on the pathogenecity of G. virens and G. deliquescens against S. rolfsii were investigated. The results revealed that gamma irradiation increased the pathogenecity of G. virens and G. deliquescens against S. rolfsii

  16. Soil moisture causes dynamic adjustments to root reinforcement that reduce slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristram C. Hales; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2017-01-01

    In steep soil-mantled landscapes, the initiation of shallow landslides is strongly controlled by the distribution of vegetation, whose roots reinforce the soil. The magnitude of root reinforcement depends on the number, diameter distribution, orientation and the mechanical properties of roots that cross potential failure planes. Understanding how these...

  17. Evaluation of the use of plastic film of polyvinyl chloride (PVC in the storage of carrots Avaliação do uso de filme plástico de policloreto de vinila (PVC no armazenamento de cenouras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Yamamoto Reghin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In carrot roots, reducing the percentage of mass and the occurrence of diseases are the leading causes of post-harvest losses during storage and marketing. Also, budding and rooting are indicated as the possible effect on the use of modified atmosphere in root vegetables and tubers. This study was conducted to compare forms of packaging and storage time on weight loss, percentage of sprouted roots and concentration of ? carotene in three carrot cultivars. The carrots were placed in shallow trays of polystyrene and wrapped with PVC film, and put two roots per tray, or in bulk. Then, the roots were stored in the dark at ambient conditions for 20 days Carrots stored with plastic film (PVC remained commercially viable for up to 12 days. When stored in bulk showed weight loss of more than 5% in 4 days, which is not feasible to trade. The content of carotenoids was constant throughout the storage period for the in three cultivars.Em raízes de cenoura, a redução da porcentagem de massa e a ocorrência de doenças são as principais causas de perda pós-colheita durante o armazenamento e a comercialização. Também, a brotação e o enraizamento são apontados como os possíveis prejuízos ao uso da atmosfera modificada em hortaliças de raízes e tubérculos. O presente estudo foi realizado com o objetivo de comparar formas de embalagem e tempo de armazenamento sobre a perda de massa, porcentagem de raízes brotadas e concentração de ? caroteno em três cultivares de cenoura. As cenouras foram acondicionadas em bandejas rasas de poliestireno e embaladas com filme plástico de PVC, sendo acondicionadas duas raízes por bandeja, ou a granel. Em seguida, as raízes foram armazenadas no escuro em condições ambiente durante 20 dias As cenouras armazenadas com filme plástico de (PVC mantiveram-se viáveis comercialmente por até 12 dias. Quando armazenadas à granel apresentaram perda de peso superior a 5% em 4 dias, não sendo viável para o com

  18. Biological characteristics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens AK-0 and suppression of ginseng root rot caused by Cylindrocarpon destructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Balaraju, K; Jeon, Y H

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens AK-0 (AK-0) on ginseng root rot disease caused by Cylindrocarpon destructans was investigated. From 190 ginseng rhizosphere bacteria, AK-0 was selected for further analysis; its morphological characteristics were investigated by microscopy. AK-0 was identified as B. amyloliquefaciens using the Biolog system, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and examination of morphological and biochemical characteristics. Bacterial population and media optimization were estimated by the bacterial growth curve. The number of AK-0 cells was relatively higher in brain-heart infusion (BHI) medium than in other media. The potential antifungal effect of AK-0 culture filtrate on the in vitro conidial germination of C. destructans and root rot development on root discs and 4-year-old ginseng roots were assessed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of antibiotic biosynthesis gene expression suggested that the release of antibiotic compounds is involved in the antifungal effect of AK-0 and the suppression of ginseng root rot. These results indicate that the CF of AK-0 has antifungal effects on fungal pathogens of ginseng, resulting in the suppression of root rot disease caused by C. destructans. AK-0 is a potential source of novel bioactive metabolites. AK-0 CF exhibited antifungal effects against C. destructans on ginseng roots. PCR analysis indicated that the AK-0 harbours genes involved in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial compounds. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. in Artificially Polluted Soil—Carrots System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sablayrolles

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are widely used in household and industrial products. The risk of incorporation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS from biosolids, wastewater, and fertilizers land application to the food chain is being assessed at present by the European Union. In the present work, a complete analytical method for LAS trace determination has been developed and successfully applied to LAS (C10–C13 uptake in carrot plants used as model. These carrots were grown in soil with the trace organics compounds added directly into the plant containers in pure substances form. LAS trace determination (μg kg-1 dry matter in carrots samples was achieved by Soxtec apparatus and high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. The methodology developed provides LAS determination at low detection limits (5 μg kg-1 dry matter for carrot sample (2 g dry matter with good recoveries rate (>90%. Transfer of LAS has been followed into the various parts of the carrot plant. LAS are generally found in the carrot leaves and percentage transfer remains very low (0.02%.

  20. Root cause analysis of SG tube leakage at Fessenheim unit 2 in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.; Deotto, G.; Mathon, C.; Madurel, A.; Pitner, P.; Gay, N.; Guivarch, M.

    2015-01-01

    In February 2008, a primary-to-secondary leak caused an unscheduled shutdown at Fessenheim Unit 2 NPP. A circumferential crack was observed just above the top support plate of Row 12 Column 62 U-bend tube on Steam Generator (SG) number 3, which has been attributed to high cycle fatigue. This tube was pulled out in 2011, just before the SG replacement at the third decenal outage, in order to perform exhaustive metallurgical investigations. The destructive examinations revealed that the circumferential crack (70 degrees of extension) was due to high cycle fatigue, with several external initiation areas associated with the presence of small piles of Intergranular Attack (IGA) (600 MA tube) and with very low stress intensity factors ΔK (close to the non-propagating threshold region). This paper complements the metallurgical investigations by carrying out numerical analyses (thermal-hydraulic computation, fluid-elastic instability evaluation, tube vibratory response analysis and fatigue evaluation). The first objective of the study is to attempt to clarify the effect of IGA and the role of several competing factors that could be involved in the tube vibration induced fatigue failure. From these results, a root cause analysis of the R12C62 tube fatigue failure is then provided. It appears that a combination of various factors led to the failure of the tube

  1. Applying the 5 WHYs to Identify Root Causes to Non-completions in On-Site Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhard, Søren Munch

    2014-01-01

    In on-site production, mass-customized subproducts are assembled through standardized processes. The production is pushing mass customization to the edge by producing unique and complex products. Due to the project structure, it has proven difficult to avoid repetitions of problems and to learn...... from mistakes. A central part of the control framework Last Planner System is to identify not completed activities to identify root causes and to learn. One tool to investigate root causes is the 5 WHYs approach. The 5 WHYs approach has been applied in a case study research to analysis the root cause...... to not completed activities. In total, 17 non-completed activities were registered and analyzed. To reduce non-completions, the risks each activity is carrying should be analyzed and understood, the product should be followed to identify problems early and to reveal time for intervention, and finally...

  2. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  3. Comparison of Polyacetylene Content in Organically and Conventionally Grown Carrots Using a Fast Ultrasonic Liquid Extraction Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Malene; Eriksen, Morten Rosbjørn; Träger, Anne Wibe Brændholt

    2010-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method for quantification of polyacetylenes in carrot roots was developed. The traditional extraction method (stirring) was compared to a new ultrasonic liquid processor (ULP)-based methodology using high-performance liquid chromatography−ultraviolet (HPLC−UV) and...

  4. Duplication of a permanent maxillary incisor root caused by trauma to the predecessor primary tooth: clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, T; Lenzi, M; Simões, M; Campos, V

    2011-07-01

    This report describes a permanent maxillary incisor tooth with two roots possibly caused by trauma to the predecessor primary tooth. Diagnosis, aetiology, clinical implications and endodontic and aesthetic treatment of an incisor tooth with two roots are presented. Diagnosis, early intervention by a multidisciplinary team and clinical and radiographic examination of patients who suffer trauma to primary teeth are of importance to minimize or avoid damage to successor teeth. • A possible sequelae of trauma to a primary tooth is root duplication in the permanent tooth. • Root duplication is a rare anomaly that has its diagnosis based on the radiographic examination. • Careful diagnosis and follow-up are necessary to prevent future complications related to the successor tooth. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  5. Wheat protection from root rot caused by fusarium culmorum using silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, A.O.M.; Mohamed, A.A.R.; Abobakr, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials have a positive impact on agriculture. Silver nanoparticles were used to enhance seed germination, plant growth, and as antimicrobial agents to control plant diseases. In the present study, the effectiveness of silver nanoparticles on seed germination of wheat, growth parameters, and control of root rot disease caused by Fusarium culmorum were examined. Three different concentrations (10, 20, and 40 mg/l) were used. Exposure to AgNPs had no significant effects on the seed germination at 10 mg/l and 20 mg/l while at 40 mg/l significant effects were observed compared to that in the control (untreated). Germination was highest (86 percent) after exposure to 20 mg/l of AgNPs. AgNPs, at all concentrations tested, had significant effects on the pre-emergence, post-emergence and survival as compared to the control (infected and untreated with AgNPs); the highest effects were observed after exposure to 40 mg/l of AgNPs (15, 10, and 75 percent respectively). Additionally, our results indicate that plant height, fresh weight, and dry weight were significantly increased at 10 mg/l (23.4 cm, 6 g, and 1.45 g), and 20 mg/l (27.3 cm, 7.5 g, and 1.98 g) respectively, compared with that of the control. However, higher concentration (40 mg/l) of AgNPs decreased the growth parameters. (author)

  6. Towards the development of multilevel-multiagent diagnostic aids. [Root-cause analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, R.C.; Jarrell, D.B.

    1991-09-01

    Presented here is our methodology for developing automated aids for diagnosing faults in complex systems based on research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. We have designed these aids as multilevel-multiagent diagnostic aids based on principles that should be generally applicable to any complex system. Our research in fault diagnosis at PNL grew out of our work in root-cause analysis (RCA). Our approach consists of those major activities which we categorize as (1) determining knowledge requirements, (2) constructing models, and (3) developing the requirements for representation schemes. We group knowledge for fault diagnosis into two broad groups: cognitive task and process-system knowledge. Our research indicates that a useful representation scheme can be developed employing function and object hierarchies, task required inference, and task specified reasoning control. Formal modeling of the reasoning task determines the required task inference and control. This research has focused on the use of the representation scheme for fault diagnosis. However, preliminary analysis indicates that this same scheme may be useful in automating control tasks. The next phase of this research is to develop a prototype. The prototype system has been specified and we are presently developing knowledge models of the components and system. 19 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Power Processing Unit (PPU) Capacitor Failure Root Cause Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, James F.; Pinero, Luis; Schneidegger, Robert; Dunning, John; Birchenough, Art

    2012-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project is developing an advanced ion propulsion system for future NASA missions for solar system exploration. A critical element of the propulsion system is the Power Processing Unit (PPU) which supplies regulated power to the key components of the thruster. The PPU contains six different power supplies including the beam, discharge, discharge heater, neutralizer, neutralizer heater, and accelerator supplies. The beam supply is the largest and processes up to 93+% of the power. The NEXT PPU had been operated for approximately 200+ hours and has experienced a series of three capacitor failures in the beam supply. The capacitors are in the same, nominally non-critical location the input filter capacitor to a full wave switching inverter. The three failures occurred after about 20, 30, and 135 hours of operation. This paper provides background on the NEXT PPU and the capacitor failures. It discusses the failure investigation approach, the beam supply power switching topology and its operating modes, capacitor characteristics and circuit testing. Finally, it identifies root cause of the failures to be the unusual confluence of circuit switching frequency, the physical layout of the power circuits, and the characteristics of the capacitor.

  8. All-inkjet-printed thin-film transistors: manufacturing process reliability by root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowade, Enrico; Ramon, Eloi; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Martínez-Domingo, Carme; Pedró, Marta; Pallarès, Jofre; Loffredo, Fausta; Villani, Fulvia; Gomes, Henrique L; Terés, Lluís; Baumann, Reinhard R

    2016-09-21

    We report on the detailed electrical investigation of all-inkjet-printed thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays focusing on TFT failures and their origins. The TFT arrays were manufactured on flexible polymer substrates in ambient condition without the need for cleanroom environment or inert atmosphere and at a maximum temperature of 150 °C. Alternative manufacturing processes for electronic devices such as inkjet printing suffer from lower accuracy compared to traditional microelectronic manufacturing methods. Furthermore, usually printing methods do not allow the manufacturing of electronic devices with high yield (high number of functional devices). In general, the manufacturing yield is much lower compared to the established conventional manufacturing methods based on lithography. Thus, the focus of this contribution is set on a comprehensive analysis of defective TFTs printed by inkjet technology. Based on root cause analysis, we present the defects by developing failure categories and discuss the reasons for the defects. This procedure identifies failure origins and allows the optimization of the manufacturing resulting finally to a yield improvement.

  9. Using swarm intelligence to boost the root cause analysis process and enhance patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In an effort to strengthen patient safety, leadership at the University of Kentucky HealthCare (UKHC) decided to replace its traditional approach to root cause analysis (RCA) with a process based on swarm intelligence, a concept borrowed from other industries. Under this process, when a problem or error is identified, staff quickly hold a swarm--a meeting in which all those involved in the incident or problem quickly evaluate why the issue occurred and identify potential solutions for implementation. A pillar of the swarm concept is a mandate that there be no punishments or finger-pointing during the swarms. The idea is to encourage staff to be forthcoming to achieve effective solutions. Typically, swarms last for one hour and result in action plans designed to correct problems or deficiencies within a specific period of time. The ED was one of the first areas where UKHC applied swarms. For example, hospital administrators note that the approach has been used to address issues involving patient flow, triage protocols, assessments, overcrowding, and boarding. After seven years, incident reporting at UKHC has increased by 52%, and the health system has experienced a 37% decrease in the observed-to-expected mortality ratio.

  10. Chronic maxillary sinusitis caused by root canal overfilling of Calcipex II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of chronic maxillary sinusitis caused by root canal overfilling of Calcipex II (Techno-Dent. A 60 year-old male complained of dull pain in the right maxillary molar area after complicated endodontic treatment using Calcipex II paste and was finally diagnosed with a chronic maxillary sinusitis through a clinical and radiological observation. In the biopsy examination, the periapical granuloma contained a lot of dark and translucent Calcipex II granules which were not stained with hematoxylin and eosin. They were usually engulfed by macrophages but rarely resorbed, resulting in scattering and migrating into antral mucosa. Most of the Calcipex II granules were also accumulated in the cytoplasms of secretory columnar epithelial cells, and small amount of Calcipex II granules were gradually secreted into sinus lumen by exocytosis. However, chronic granulomatous inflammation occurred without the additional recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs and lymphocytes, and many macrophages which engulfed the Calcipex II granules were finally destroyed in the processes of cellular apoptosis. It is presumed that Calcipex II granules are likely to have a causative role to induce the granulomatous foreign body inflammation in the periapical region, and subsequently to exacerbate the chronic maxillary sinusitis in this study.

  11. Power, Politics, and Health: A New Public Health Practice Targeting the Root Causes of Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iton, Anthony; Shrimali, Bina Patel

    2016-08-01

    Purpose Understanding the WHY, WHAT, and HOW of place-based work in maternal and child health (MCH) is critical to examining the components of the environment that shape health opportunity through the relationship between life expectancy and neighborhood residence. Description On September 18, 2014, during the CityMatCH Leadership and MCH Epidemiology Conference, Dr. Anthony Iton provided the Keynote Address focused on the root causes of health inequities. Assessment The address focused on issues of equity in California and initiatives designed to mitigate and prevent disparities, including the Bay Area Regional Health Equities Initiative framework. Dr. Iton presented information on how the framework translated into investment strategies and a policy and systems change approach to place-based work. Conclusion The field of MCH, because of its focus on supporting health during critical periods of development, is poised to play a significant role in reducing health inequities. Recognizing that human health suffers when low income communities are passive, disenfranchised and disorganized, in order to change this status quo, understanding that human capital is the greatest asset is the urgent challenge to the field of MCH.

  12. Root-cause estimation of ultrasonic scattering signatures within a complex textured titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackshire, James L.; Na, Jeong K.; Freed, Shaun

    2016-02-01

    The nondestructive evaluation of polycrystalline materials has been an active area of research for many decades, and continues to be an area of growth in recent years. Titanium alloys in particular have become a critical material system used in modern turbine engine applications, where an evaluation of the local microstructure properties of engine disk/blade components is desired for performance and remaining life assessments. Current NDE methods are often limited to estimating ensemble material properties or detecting localized voids, inclusions, or damage features within a material. Recent advances in computational NDE and material science characterization methods are providing new and unprecedented access to heterogeneous material properties, which permits microstructure-sensing interactions to be studied in detail. In the present research, Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) methods and tools are being leveraged to gain a comprehensive understanding of root-cause ultrasonic scattering processes occurring within a textured titanium aerospace material. A combination of destructive, nondestructive, and computational methods are combined within the ICME framework to collect, holistically integrate, and study complex ultrasound scattering using realistic 2-dimensional representations of the microstructure properties. Progress towards validating the computational sensing methods are discussed, along with insight into the key scattering processes occurring within the bulk microstructure, and how they manifest in pulse-echo immersion ultrasound measurements.

  13. Treating the root cause: acupuncture for the treatment of migraine, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Amber E; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Bauer, Brent A

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of a single intervention, acupuncture, for relieving or abolishing severe migraines, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia and, thus, markedly improving quality of life. A 49-year-old woman was referred for acupuncture treatment of her daily migraines, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia. The patient had received polypharmacy treatment for these conditions for several years but had rather limited relief of her symptoms. The patient received 10 weekly or biweekly acupuncture treatments over three months. Her migraines reduced in frequency and intensity after her first acupuncture treatment, and she was able to discontinue use of her migraine medications after her eighth treatment. Subsequently, her menopausal vasomotor symptoms and chronic insomnia resolved. This case illustrates successful treatment of the symptoms of three medical conditions with a single complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine procedure, namely, acupuncture, one of the key elements of traditional Chinese medicine. The patient's medical problems had been treated for years with a multitude of medications, which led to adverse effects and little symptomatic improvement. Providers of complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine and providers practicing allopathic medicine should seek treatment options for their patients that promise to be helpful for various symptoms or diseases, that is, treating the root cause rather than using polypharmacy for various symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The root cause of patient safety concerns in an Internet pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Isaac D

    2008-07-01

    The Internet has become a revolutionary technology that affords worldwide opportunities never seen before. One such opportunity is the purchase of drugs over the Internet and the business of Internet pharmacies which has become prolific. Associated with this proliferation is the concern for patient safety. Numerous studies have shown that drugs purchased over the Internet come from pharmacies in a country other than the one where the patient resides and these pharmacies are not licensed, sometimes provide drugs without a prescription and that are not of the same composition as they should be, and do not provide adequate directions to the patient. In addition, the packaging of the drugs may be compromised resulting in altered medication. This paper examines the root cause of patient safety issues in Internet pharmacies. A review of the literature including the marketing literature was conducted. Healthcare marketing concepts guide business owners to identify patients' wants and distinguish them from their needs. Marketing principles detail aggressive marketing strategies within an organization's mission and in an ethical manner. Some Internet pharmacies misinterpret proven marketing principles and become overly aggressive in the market place focusing only on sales and profit rather than focusing on patient safety and long-term success of the Internet pharmacy.

  15. Root-cause analysis of burner tip failures in coal-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citirik, E.

    2014-01-01

    Warpage and complete or partial tear of burner material was frequently experienced in coal-fired power plants due to material overheating. Root-cause analysis of a burner tip failure is investigated employing stress modeling in the burner tip material in this study. The analyses performed in this research paper include heat transfer and stress analyses employing computational tools. Thermal analysis was performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT for computing temperature distribution within the burner tip due to convection and radiation. Once the temperature distribution in the burner tip is determined, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is employed using ANSYS to determine the maximum stress and deformations in burner tip material. Both FLUENT and ANSYS are numerical commercial simulation tools employed in this study. Large temperature gradients along the burner tip result in local bending stresses. These stresses resulting in creep stresses might be causing warpage in the burner tip. In this study, a design option was exercised to eliminate the excessive stress gradient in the burner tip material. Seven different FEA models were developed to simulate different operating conditions. Proposed design modification (Model 5) was able to reduce the maximum compressive stress from 76.09 MPa to 33.59 MPa. Significant reduction in the thermal stress due to design modification in Model 5 made author believe that the proposed design solution would eliminate the burner tip failures in this particular power plant. - Highlights: • Maximum stress and displacement values in the baseline model were computed. • Computations were performed using commercial FEA software ANSYS. • Different operating conditions were simulated in models 1-2-3-4. • Proposed geometry to prevent the failure is simulated in Models 5 and 6. • The proposed design solution reduced the maximum compressive stresses by ∼50%

  16. Globesity: the root causes of the obesity epidemic in the USA and now worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Fima; Lifshitz, Jere Ziffer

    2014-09-01

    The epidemic of obesity is a well-known phenomenon affecting the world population. This pandemic has occurred since the 1980's with increasing frequency, despite multiple attempts and recommendations to mitigate the prevalence of obesity and its co-morbidities. The causes of obesity have been recognized and are largely related to a genetic predisposition and an environmental susceptibility to gain weight due to increased energy intake and reduced energy expenditures. Furthermore, various structural environmental changes that have occurred since the 1980's have created an obesogenic environment with abundance of high-caloric density, low-quality food and under activity. All of this leads to increased body weight gain and a global public health problem--not only a distinct patient's disease that generally fails to respond to diets and/or increased activity. The structural environmental changes resulted from the unintended consequences of laws that created unregulated marketing and advertisements, food subsidies to a "food industrial complex" which manufactures obesogenic foods that foster addiction to its foodstuffs. Additionally, the economic policies implemented over the last 3 to 4 decades have produced a stagnation of income and wages for the preponderance of the population with major wealth disparities between the majority of people versus the top of the socioeconomic group. The current economic realities have resulted in altered family dynamics, eating habits, and food availability compared to previous generations. The root causes of the epidemic of obesity are governmental policies and the food industry which make obesity difficult to escape in the US and now worldwide.

  17. Maturation-related changes of carrot lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Judith; Trierweiler, Bernhard; Bunzel, Mirko

    2018-02-01

    Lignified cell walls are important factors for textural and physiological properties of plant-based foods. However, carrot lignins and their modifications during maturation are poorly described. The objective of this study was to describe carrot lignins in detail and to study lignin structural alterations at later stages of maturity. Klason and acetyl bromide soluble lignin contents of insoluble fibers of carrots harvested at different times (26, 29 and 35 weeks after seeding) ranged between 46.38 and 62.68 g kg -1 and between 19.79 and 28.08 g kg -1 , respectively. As determined by both 2D-nuclear magnetic resonance and the derivatization followed by reductive cleavage method, coniferyl alcohol heavily dominated the traditional monolignol composition in carrot lignins, independently of harvest times. By using 2D-nuclear magnetic resonance experiments on isolated lignins, p-hydroxybenzoate was identified as a less common lignin constituent, attached to lignin γ-hydroxyl groups and being increasingly incorporated with maturation. β-Aryl ethers, phenylcoumaran, resinol and dibenzodioxocin structures were identified as lignin interunit linkages, largely independent of harvest times and with β-aryl ethers being expectedly dominant. Carrots contain guaiacyl-rich lignins that incorporate increasing amounts of p-hydroxybenzoate with maturation. All other lignin characteristics appear to be widely independent of harvest times. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. First report of Armillaria root disease caused by Armillaria tabescens on Araucaria araucana in Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W. Hanna; P. Cannon; R. Medel; A. Lopez

    2010-01-01

    In September 2007, bark samples were collected from the root collar of a single Araucaria araucana tree that had recently died and was suspected of being killed by Armillaria root disease. Disease symptoms and signs included a thinning crown and fruiting bodies at the tree base over a several-year period before tree death.

  19. Interaction of Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizopus stolonifer Causing Root Rot of Sugar Beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, growers in Michigan and other sugar beet production areas of the United States have reported increasing incidence of root rot with little or no crown or foliar symptoms in sugar beet with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot. In addition, Rhizoctonia-resistant beets have been reported wit...

  20. Effect of low doses of irradiation on the carotenoids in head to eat carrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, K.S.C.; Lima, A.L.S.; Freitas, L.C.; Della-Modesta, R.C.; Godoy, R.L.O.

    2004-01-01

    This study aims was to evaluate the effect of low doses of g radiation on the total carotenoids, α and β-carotene content in minimally processed carrots, during the shelflife. Carrots are the mains vegetable source of carotenoids provitamin A (α and β-carotene). According to the Family Budget Survey (FBS) carried out in the Brazilian Southeast, within the roots and tubers group, carrots are widely consumed. The carotenoid stability varies largely during the stages of processing and storage, depending upon structure, temperature, oxygen availability, light exposure, humidity content, water activity and acid, metal anti-oxidant and pro-oxidant presence. The minimally processed carrots in this experiment were manually peeled, rinsed, cutted into diskis, packaged under 5% O 2 / 10% CO 2 and 21% O 2 (sintetic air), g ionizing radiation treatments was carried out with a 137 Cs source, of 0,25, 0,50, 0,75 and 1,0kGy doses, and shelf-stored at 5°C for 24 days. Total carotenoids quantification was by 449nm spectrophotometer. Determination of a and β-carotenes was made by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The different treatments and control group were, too, evaluated by analysing of colour and volatiles, by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy with solid phase microextration (CG-MS/SPME), for study the significant carotenoids losses during the process [pt

  1. Changes in volatile compounds of carrots (Daucus carota L.) during refrigerated and frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Christensen, Lars P; Edelenbos, Merete

    2003-08-27

    Carrots (Daucus carota L.) of cv. Bolero and cv. Carlo were processed into shreds and stored for up to 4 months at -24 degrees C (frozen storage), or the roots were stored for up to 4 months at 1 degrees C (refrigerated storage) followed by processing into shreds. Volatiles from the carrot shreds were collected by dynamic headspace technique and analyzed by GC-FID, GC-MS, GC-MS/MS, and GC-O to determine the volatile composition and aroma active components of carrots stored under different temperature conditions. A total of 52 compounds were quantified, of which mono- and sesquiterpenes accounted for approximately 99% of the total volatile mass. Major volatile compounds were (-)-alpha-pinene, beta-myrcene, (-)-limonene, (+)-limonene, (+)-sabinene, gamma-terpinene, p-cymene, terpinolene, beta-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, and (E)- and (Z)-gamma-bisabolene. A considerable increase in the concentration of mono- and sesquiterpenes was observed during refrigerated storage, whereas the concentration of terpenoids was around the same level during frozen storage. GC-O revealed that the major volatiles together with (+)-alpha-pinene, (-)-beta-pinene, (+)-beta-pinene, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, (-)-beta-bisabolene, beta-ionone, and myristicin had an odor sensation, which included notes of "carrot top", "terpene-like", "green", "earthy", "fruity", "citrus-like", "spicy", "woody", and "sweet".

  2. Control of root rot of chickpea caused by Sclerotium rolfsii by different agents and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasha Mohammed Fathy El- Said, R.M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii causes root rot disease in several crops including chickpea that result in low yield. Artificial infection of chickpea seedlings by S. rolfsii in vitro demonstrated that different tissues of the plant completely disintegrated by fungal infection. In vitro and green house pot experiments demonstrated that inducers in combination with fungicides, oils and bio agents resulted in about 80 % suppression of root rot disease. Treatments have no phyto toxic effect on chickpea seedlings at low doses. Gliocladium virens and Gliocladium deliquescens were effective as biocontrol agents against Sclerotium rolfsii. The percent of survival plants, fresh weight, dry weight and plant height of chickpea plants increased with different treatments with inducers compared with the control. Chlorophyll a, b, and total chlorophyll amounts increased to the maximum values. The activity of two plant enzymes, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase increased. In this study, gamma irradiation of chickpea seeds at doses 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 Gy have negative effect on survival, plant height, fresh weight and dry weight of chickpea. The effect of gamma irradiation at doses 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 kGy on the antagonistic effect of Gliocladium virens and Gliocladium deliquescens against S. rolfsii were investigated. The results revealed that gamma irradiation increase the antagonistic effect of Gliocladium virens and Gliocladium deliquescens against S. rolfsii . Effect of gamma irradiation at doses of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 5 kGy on the mycelial growth and pathogenicity of S. rolfsii were investigated. The results revealed that gamma irradiation at doses 0.25 up to 3.0 kGy increase the pathogenicity of S. rolfsii but gamma irradiation at dose 5.0 kGy completely inhibited the growth of S. rolfsii. Extracellular polygalacturonase was characterized and purified by precipitation with 70 % ammonium sulfate, dialysis and gel filtration through Sephadex 75

  3. Stimulating a Sustainable Construction through Holistic BIM Adoption: The Root Causes of Recurring Low BIM Adoption in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamter, S.; Abdul-Aziz, AR; Mamat, ME

    2017-06-01

    Fostering the Building Information Modelling (BIM) implementation is one of Malaysia sustainable strategies towards greener construction. Hence, the Eleventh Malaysia plan focuses on transforming construction industry through the increase of technology adoption in order to enhance construction productivity. Therefore, there is a growing and urgent demand to provide BIM competent. However, a significant number of parties are reluctant to develop and invest in BIM due to unsolved root causes. Scholars have identified barriers relating to the infancy stage of BIM adoption in Malaysia. Unfortunately, there is a lack of study to explore deeper the root causes of recurring for the barriers anticipate the low BIM adoption. This paper attempts to delve into the initiatives of BIM stake players in fostering BIM adoption and to determine the root causes of recurring barriers due to low BIM adoption. The study adopted the semi-structured interviews which involved BIM stake players as a sample population. From the findings, authors revealed four root causes of recurring barriers; absence of BIM policy and BIM compulsion, poor holistic readiness, software integration competition strategy, and reluctant in sharing knowledge. The findings espoused here are preliminary and more results are expected to emerge as the research progresses.

  4. RESIDUES IN CARROTS TREATED WITH LINURON

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out on residues of linuron and its breakdown products in carrots sprayed with Jinuron at 1, 2, or 4 kg a.i./ha, 0, 19, 28, 36 or 60 days after sowing (up to 57 days before harvesting). The extracted residues were separated into three fractions by liquid......,4-dichloroaniline and iodide ion, followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detector. Only 5-13% of the extract-able residues were breakdown products. Most of the detectable residue (87-95%) was identified as linuron. The relative proportions of linuron and breakdown products in carrots at the time...

  5. VARIETAL FEATURES OF CARROT PLANTS (DAUCUS CAROTA L. IN THE CONTEXT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIATION OF QUALITATIVE TRAITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Dobrutskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of evaluation of phenotypic individual variation of four cultivars (Nantskaya4, Moskovskaya zimnjaya A- 515, Marlinka, and Minor and two hybrids (Mars F1, Gribovchanin F1 of carrot are presented. The genotype-dependence of variability of such traits as «diameter and high of leaves rosette», «leaves number», «length and width of leaf blade», «length and thickness of petiole», «length, diameter, and weight of roots» are shown. Utilization of data of phenotypic variability of studied traits for development of variety technologies of carrot is recommended. The insufficient informativeness of the coefficient of variability for estimation and selection of carrot forms for adaptivity is discussed.

  6. Analysis of volatiles in dehydrated carrot samples by solid-phase microextraction followed by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Ana Cristina; Sanz, Jesús; Villamiel, Mar

    2008-10-01

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-based method for the GC-MS analysis of volatiles in dehydrated carrot root samples has been developed and the effect of the most important factors (fibre coating, extraction temperature, equilibrium time and extraction time) on the fractionation of different volatiles has been studied. GC-MS chromatograms showed terpenoids relevant to carrot aroma such as alpha-pinene, sabinene, beta-myrcene, limonene, gamma-terpinene, terpinolene, trans-caryophyllene and beta-bisabolene, and several furan derivatives whose origin is discussed in this paper. As an example of application, this methodology has been used for the characterization of volatile composition of industrially dehydrated carrots. SPME followed by GC-MS is shown as an affordable, fast and solvent-free technique which can be performed with low sample amounts and be easily implemented at an industry for quality control purposes.

  7. Characterization of centromeric histone H3 (CENH3 variants in cultivated and wild carrots (Daucus sp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Dunemann

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, centromeres are the assembly sites for the kinetochore, a multi-protein complex to which spindle microtubules are attached at mitosis and meiosis, thereby ensuring segregation of chromosomes during cell division. They are specified by incorporation of CENH3, a centromere specific histone H3 variant which replaces canonical histone H3 in the nucleosomes of functional centromeres. To lay a first foundation of a putative alternative haploidization strategy based on centromere-mediated genome elimination in cultivated carrots, in the presented research we aimed at the identification and cloning of functional CENH3 genes in Daucus carota and three distantly related wild species of genus Daucus varying in basic chromosome numbers. Based on mining the carrot transcriptome followed by a subsequent PCR-based cloning, homologous coding sequences for CENH3s of the four Daucus species were identified. The ORFs of the CENH3 variants were very similar, and an amino acid sequence length of 146 aa was found in three out of the four species. Comparison of Daucus CENH3 amino acid sequences with those of other plant CENH3s as well as their phylogenetic arrangement among other dicot CENH3s suggest that the identified genes are authentic CENH3 homologs. To verify the location of the CENH3 protein in the kinetochore regions of the Daucus chromosomes, a polyclonal antibody based on a peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of DcCENH3 was developed and used for anti-CENH3 immunostaining of mitotic root cells. The chromosomal location of CENH3 proteins in the centromere regions of the chromosomes could be confirmed. For genetic localization of the CENH3 gene in the carrot genome, a previously constructed linkage map for carrot was used for mapping a CENH3-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR marker, and the CENH3 locus was mapped on the carrot chromosome 9.

  8. Effect of carrot puree edible films on quality preservation of fresh-cut carrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of edible films based on carrot puree, chitosan, corn starch, gelatin, glycerol and cinnamaldehyde on fresh-cut carrots was studied during storage. Several parameters, such as firmness, colour, weight loss, total carotenoids, total phenols, polyphenol oxidase (PPO activity and peroxidase (POD activity in coated carrots were determined at regular intervals and then compared with the uncoated carrots throughout the storage period. Significant and expected changes were observed in all carrot samples that were compared. The coating treatment significantly (P < 0.05 delayed the senescence, reduced the deterioration of exterior quality and retained total carotenoids well compared with control (P < 0.05. In addition, significant inhibition of PPO activity (P < 0.05 and POD activity (P < 0.05 as well as reduced accumulation of polyphenols (P < 0.05 were observed for all coated samples. All of these favourable responses induced by coating treatment on minimally processed fresh-cut carrots showed beneficial physiological effects, which would give some useful references to the fresh-cut fruit and vegetable processing industry and satisfy people’s requirements allowing for extending product shelf life without negatively affecting the sensory quality or acceptability.

  9. Photoelastic analysis of stress distribution in mandibular second molar roots caused by several uprighting mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrão, André Felipe; Domingos, Rafael Golghetto; de Paiva, João Batista; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Abrão, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    Mandibular molar uprighting is indicated when mesial inclination of the second molars occurs because of missing first molars. There are many methodologies to perform such movement. In this study, we aimed to analyze and compare the stress distributions in different molar uprighting techniques. Four photoelastic models were designed to evaluate different mandibular second molar uprighting techniques: a miniscrew positioned in the retromolar region, a beta-titanium alloy cantilever spring, a beta-titanium alloy wire with a T-loop spring, and an 0.018-in stainless steel archwire with an open-coil spring between the second premolar and the second molar. On the miniscrew test specimen, the greatest concentration of strains was observed in the cervical zone of the distal root. The cantilever spring had many strains in the cervical zone of the mesial root. On the T-loop spring test specimen, mainly the observed strains were in the apical zone of the mesial root. The open-coil spring specimen showed fringes in the cervical zone and the apical zone of the mesial root without formation of large sequences of strains. The miniscrew mechanical action had the least and the cantilever spring mechanical action had the greatest strain means on the roots of mandibular second molars. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Populational density and harvest age of carrots for baby carrot manufacture Densidade populacional e idade de colheita de cenoura para produção de minicenoura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano do N Simões

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of baby carrots may be associated to the standard of the raw material that in turn, may be influenced by agronomic practices. Thus, the effect of planting density and harvest age were assessed on physical and morphological characteristics, yield and end quality of intact and minimally processed carrots in the form of baby carrots. A randomized block experimental design was used with the density in the plots (4 x 20 cm and 4 x 7.5 cm and the harvest age in the subplots (50, 57, 64, 71, 78, 85, 92, 99 and 106 days, with five replications. The experimental unit consisted of 25 plants. The assessments of diameter, length, yield, secondary phloem translocation with the cambio and total carotenoids were decisive in selecting the carrot harvest age for baby carrot manufacture. Under the 4 x 20 cm and 4 x 7.5 cm adensed conditions, harvested between 85 and 92 days, carrot roots became thinner and more orange in color (with maximum carotenoid accumulation, larger and with satisfactory yields and therefore more acceptable for minimal processing in the form of baby carrots. Thus the decision of populational density associated to harvest age will depend on the market demand, on price, quality and other variables. The use of adensed cropping with early harvests may lead to obtain carrots and respective baby carrots that are more acceptable for commercialization.A qualidade final de minicenoura pode estar associada ao padrão da matéria prima, que, por sua vez, pode ser influenciada por práticas agronômicas. Por isso, objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da densidade de plantio e da idade de colheita em características físicas, morfológicas, no rendimento e na qualidade final de cenoura inteira e minimamente processada na forma de minicenoura. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi em blocos casualizado, tendo nas parcelas as densidades (4 x 20 cm e 4 x 7,5 cm e nas subparcelas a idade de colheita (50, 57, 64, 71, 78, 85, 92, 99 e 106 dias, com

  11. Embryo forming cells in carrot suspension cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toonen, M.A.J.

    1997-01-01


    Somatic cells of many plant species can be cultured in vitro and induced to form embryos that are able to develop into mature plants. This process, termed somatic embryogenesis, was originally described in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Somatic embryos develop through the same characteristic

  12. Rhexocercosporidium panacis sp. nov., a new anamorphic species causing rusted root of ginseng (Panax [corrected] quinquefolius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeleder, R D

    2007-01-01

    A new species of the anamorphic genus Rhexocercosporidium is described. Isolates of a Rhex-Rhexocercosporidium sp. were obtained from ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) roots with symptoms of rusted root. These isolates were found to be genetically and morphologically distinct from the only described species in this genus, R. carotae. Sequence data from the ribosomal DNA region spanning the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 and from a portion of the 3-tubulin gene of the ginseng Rhexocercosporidium were compared to those of R. carotae. Parsimony analyses of sequence data showed that R. carotae and the ginseng isolates belonged to distinct but closely related clades. Conidia of a typical ginseng isolate were significantly shorter and possessed fewer septa than R. carotae but shared rhexolytic secession of conidia with R. carotae. The binomial Rhexocercosporidium panacis is proposed to accommodate isolates of this genus that are associated with the rusted root disease.

  13. Field data analysis of asphalt road paving damages caused by tree roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissteiner, Clemens; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2015-04-01

    Tree root damages are a frequent problem along paved cycling paths and service roads of rivers and streams. Damages occur mostly on streets with thin asphalt layers and especially in the upper part of the pavement structure. The maintainers of these roads are faced with frequent and high annual repair costs in order to guarantee traffic safety and pleasant cycling conditions. The focus of this research project is to get an insight in the processes governing the growth of the tree roots in asphalt layers and to develop test methods to avoid rood penetration into the road structure. Tree vegetation has been analysed selectively along a 300 km long cycle and service path of the Danube River in the region of Austria. Tree characteristics, topographic as well as hydrologic conditions have been analysed at 119 spots with different asphalt damage intensities. On 5 spots additional investigations on the root growth characteristics where performed. First results underline a high potential damage of pioneer trees which are growing naturally along rivers. Mostly, local occurring fast growing tree species penetrated the road layer structure. In a few cases other tree species where as well responsible for road structure damages. The age respectively the size of the trees didn't seem to influence significantly the occurrence of asphalt damages. Road structure damages were found to appear unaffected by hydrologic or topographic conditions. However, results have to be interpreted with care as the investigations represent a temporally limited view of the problem situation. The investigations of the root growth characteristics proved that tree roots penetrate the road structure mostly between the gravel sublayer and the asphalt layer as the layers it selves don't allow a penetration because of their high compaction. Furthermore roots appear to be attracted by condensed water at the underside of the asphalt layer. Further steps of the research project imply testing of different

  14. Calonectria spp. causing leaf spot, crown and root rot of ornamental plants in Tunisia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Polizzi, G.; Guarnaccia, V.; Vitale, A.; Crous, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Calonectria spp. are important pathogens of ornamental plants in nurseries, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. They are commonly associated with a wide range of disease symptoms of roots, leaves and shoots. During a recent survey in Tunisia, a number of Calonectria spp. were isolated from

  15. Calonectria spp. causing leaf spot, crown and root rot of ornamental plants in Tunisia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Polizzi, G.; Guarnaccia, V.; Vitale, A.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Calonectria spp. are important pathogens of ornamental plants in nurseries, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. They are commonly associated with a wide range of disease symptoms of roots, leaves and shoots. During a recent survey in Tunisia, a number of Calonectria spp. were isolated from

  16. Fusarium oxysporum protects Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings from root disease caused by Fusarium commune

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Mee-Sook Kim; Robert L. James

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium root disease can be a serious problem in forest and conservation nurseries in the western United States. Fusarium inoculum is commonly found in most container and bareroot nurseries on healthy and diseased seedlings, in nursery soils, and on conifer seeds. Fusarium spp. within the F. oxysporum species complex have been recognized as pathogens for more than a...

  17. Understanding the Root Causes of Military Coups and Governmental Instability in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    the controversial issue of a coup attempt in 1962 by Prime Minister Mamadou Dia who is campaigning for a revolutionary change of the governmental...military involvement whatsoever. The recurrent issue of military coups is rooted in the perception of the overseer and engraved in the West African

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and methyl jasmonate avoid the inhibition of root hydraulic conductivity caused by drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Romera, Beatriz; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Zamarreño, Ángel María; García-Mina, José María; Aroca, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    Hormonal regulation and symbiotic relationships provide benefits for plants to overcome stress conditions. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application on root hydraulic conductivity (L) of Phaseolus vulgaris plants which established arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis under two water regimes (well-watered and drought conditions). The variation in endogenous contents of several hormones (MeJA, JA, abscisic acid (ABA), indol-3-acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid (SA)) and the changes in aquaporin gene expression, protein abundance and phosphorylation state were analyzed. AM symbiosis decreased L under well-watered conditions, which was partially reverted by the MeJA treatment, apparently by a drop in root IAA contents. Also, AM symbiosis and MeJA prevented inhibition of L under drought conditions, most probably by a reduction in root SA contents. Additionally, the gene expression of two fungal aquaporins was upregulated under drought conditions, independently of the MeJA treatment. Plant aquaporin gene expression could not explain the behaviour of L. Conversely, evidence was found for the control of L by phosphorylation of aquaporins. Hence, MeJA addition modified the response of L to both AM symbiosis and drought, presumably by regulating the root contents of IAA and SA and the phosphorylation state of aquaporins.

  19. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Permyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L. genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  20. Management of chili pepper root rot and wilt (caused by Phytophthora nicotianae by grafting onto resistant rootstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad SAADOUN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Root rot and plant wilting caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is a severe disease of chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L. in open fields and under greenhouse production in Tunisia. Chili pepper grafting for disease manage- ment is attracting increased interest in recent years. Using the tube grafting technique, different compatible scion/rootstock combinations were obtained with the wild-type pepper SCM334 and the local chili pepper cultivars ‘Beldi’ and ‘Baker’. SCM334 was resistant to P. nicotianae, while the cultivars Beldi and Baker were susceptible. Plant inoculations were performed with P. nicotianae zoospores, and severity of root rot was rated 30 days post- inoculation using a 0 (healthy plant to 5 (dead plant severity score. On SCM334 rootstock and with ‘Beldi’ or ‘Baker’ scions, the intensity of root rot was very low (mean score 0.1–0.2 and plants were healthy. However, with Baker or Beldi rootstocks and SCM334 scions, root rot was severe (mean score 3.1–4.6, leading to high numbers of wilting and dead plants. This severe root rot was similar to that observed on non-grafted plants of ‘Baker’ and ‘Beldi’ inoculated with the pathogen. Under greenhouse conditions, measurements of agronomic characters indicated non-consistent improvement of these features on the scion cultivar when SCM334 was the rootstock. Since plant foliage is not attacked by this pathogen, these results show that susceptible chili pepper scions grafted onto SCM334 rootstocks could be used for root rot management and improvement of pepper yields in P. nicotianae infested soils.

  1. Efecto de la incorporación de plantas antagónicas sobre la actividad parasítica del nematodo del nudo de la raíz Meloidogyne hapla en un cultivo de zanahoria bajo condiciones de invernadero Effect of the incorporation of antagonistic plants on the parasitic activity of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne hapla in a greenhouse carrot crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez César G.

    1998-12-01

    intensity of root-knotting of carrot. No significant differences were detected in the biological yield of carrot plants, but commercial average production obtained from plots.treated with R. graveolens and T. officinale were the highest (3070 g.m·2 and 2270 g.m·2 and significantly different from the control plots (1090 g.m·2. Final average population densities of infective secondstage
    juveniles [J2] of M. hapla were significantly lower in the plots treated with R. communis, T. officinale, B. campes tris and T. erecta (65-130 Jj100 g of soil than in the control plots (435 J2/100 g of soil. Significant differences were detected between rootknotting intensity of control plots (5.0 knots per root tip and the averages of other treaments (1.9-2.6 knots per root tip.

  2. Response of P, K, Mg and NO 3 -N contents of carrots to irrigation, soil compaction, and nitrogen fertilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. PIETOLA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Soils ploughed in autumn were loosened by different tillage tools, or compacted to a depth of 25-30 cm by a tractor weighing 3 Mg (once or three times before seed bed preparation for carrot under moist soil condition. Sprinkler irrigation was also applied to mineral soils when the soil moisture in top soil was 50% of plant-available water capacity, and the response of additional N application of 30 kg ha-1 was studied in an organic soil. Higher soil moisture tended to promote nutrient uptake, as the P content of carrot tap roots was increased by irrigation in loam. Compaction of organic soil low in P increased P and K contents and uptake by carrot roots and shoots. In severely compacted clay soil, the nutrient use decreased by increasing soil compactness. NO3-N contents were the highest in early season (25-30 mg kg-1 fresh matter and decreased with advancing season. In loam, NO3-N content was increased by irrigation or loosening. Increasing the N fertilisation of organic soil from 30 kg ha-1 to 60 kg ha-1 increased the NO3-N content 30%. Soil type and its nutrient status, weather conditions, and growth stage had much more significant influence on the P, K, and Mg contents of carrots than soil treatments.

  3. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of sucrose-cleaving enzymes in carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, A

    1996-08-01

    The amount of carbon transported into storage organs of crop plants to a large degree determines crop yield. The role of sucrose-cleaving enzymes in this process is not clear and it is the main goal of our work to tackle this question. Sucrose cleavage is catalysed either by invertase or sucrose synthase both of which exist in several isoforms with different subcellular locations. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) contains three major isoenzymes of acid invertase, which either accumulate as soluble polypeptides in the vacuole (isoenzymes I and II) or are ionically bound to the cell wall. Carrot sucrose synthase is thought to be a cytoplasmic enzyme encoded by two genes. cDNA clones have been isolated and characterized for cell wall invertase, for isoenzymes I and II of vacuolar invertase, and for sucrose synthase. Gene-specific fragments of these clones were used to determine the steady-state levels of transcripts in the prominent sink and source organs of developing carrot plants. The expression patterns of each gene were different and were organ- and development-specific. Developing tap roots contained only transcripts for isoenzyme II of vacuolar invertase and sucrose synthase. The source/sink balance of these plants was manipulated and only the expression of these two genes was markedly altered, indicating their importance in sucrose partitioning. Based on these results, a model is proposed for sucrose partitioning in carrot plants with developing tap roots in which sucrose synthase regulates sucrose utilization, whereas isoenzyme II of vacuolar invertase controls sucrose storage and sugar composition.

  4. Application of spectral deconvolution and inverse mechanistic modelling as a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brestrich, Nina; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-03-11

    In chromatographic protein purification, process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors can lead to deviations of the expected elution behavior of product and contaminants and can result in a decreased pool purity or yield. A different elution behavior of all or several involved species leads to a deviating chromatogram. The causes for deviations are however hard to identify by visual inspection and complicate the correction of a problem in the next cycle or batch. To overcome this issue, a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography was developed. The tool combines a spectral deconvolution with inverse mechanistic modelling. Mid-UV spectral data and Partial Least Squares Regression were first applied to deconvolute peaks to obtain the individual elution profiles of co-eluting proteins. The individual elution profiles were subsequently used to identify errors in process parameters by curve fitting to a mechanistic chromatography model. The functionality of the tool for root cause investigation was successfully demonstrated in a model protein study with lysozyme, cytochrome c, and ribonuclease A. Deviating chromatograms were generated by deliberately caused errors in the process parameters flow rate and sodium-ion concentration in loading and elution buffer according to a design of experiments. The actual values of the three process parameters and, thus, the causes of the deviations were estimated with errors of less than 4.4%. Consequently, the established tool for root cause investigation is a valuable approach to rapidly identify process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors. This might help to minimize batch rejections or contribute to an increased productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation and detection of the fungi Alternaria dauci (Kühn Groves et Skolk and Alternaria radicina Meier, Drechsler et Eddy from carrot seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Dragana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrot is among the most important vegetable crops because of its composition and vitamin content. The fungi belonging to genus Alternaria, especially A. dauci (Kühn Groves et Skolk, causal agent of leaf spot and blight of carrots, and A. radicina Meier, Drechsler et Eddy, the agent of black root rot, can jeopardize the entire production of carrots. Both types can be found in a high percentage of seeds, carrots, parsley and celery. The method of detection filter paper (blotter method and the method of isolation on malt agar were recommended by ISTA Rules. The presence of A. dauci (causal agent of leaf spot and blight of carrots and A. radicina was performed on 12 samples of potentially infected carrot seeds originating from France, as part of laboratory ring tests. The presence of A. dauci and A. radicina using the filter paper method in 12 tested samples ranged from 0% to 21% and from 1% to 30% respectively. On MA medium the respective percentages ranged from 0% to 23% and from 1% to 31%.

  6. Hydrogen production from carrot pulp by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Budde, M.A.W.; Lips, S.J.J.; Bakker, R.R.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen was produced from carrot pulp hydrolysate, untreated carrot pulp and (mixtures of) glucose and fructose by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana in pH-controlled bioreactors. Carrot pulp hydrolysate was obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis

  7. Basal Root Rot, a new Disease of Teak (Tectona grandis in Malaysia caused by Phellinus noxius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farid, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal root rot of teak was first reported from Sabak Bernam, Selangor making this the first report of the disease on teak in Peninsular Malaysia. The fungus found associated with the disease was Phellinus noxious. The disease aggressively killed its host irrespective of the host health status. Bark depression at the root collar which was visible from a distance was the characteristic symptom and the main indicator in identifying the disease in the plantation since above ground symptoms of the canopy could not be differentiated from crowns of healthy trees. However, although above ground symptoms were not easily discernible, the disease was already advanced and the trees mostly beyond treatment; 3.4 % of the trees in the plantation were affected and the disease occurred both on solitary trees and in patches. Below ground, infected trees had rotted root systems, mainly below and around the collar region with brown discolored wood and irregular golden-brown honeycomb-like pockets of fungal hyphae in the wood. Pathogenicity tests showed that the fungus produced symptoms similar to those observed in the plantation and killed two year-old teak plants. The disease killed all the inoculated hosts within three months, irrespective of wounded or unwounded treatments.

  8. Pleural malignant mesothelioma causing cord infiltration through the nerve root. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Hidehiro; Suga, Yasuo; Akiyama, Osamu; Kudo, Kentaro; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori; Izumi, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Kazu

    2009-04-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with a rare pleural malignant mesothelioma of the spine manifesting as progressive weakness of the bilateral lower extremities, numbness in the body and both legs, and dysfunction of the bladder and bowel. He had previous occupational exposure to asbestos while working at a car repair shop and had undergone right panpleuropneumonectomy under a diagnosis of sarcomatous type mesothelioma in the right pleural space. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine with gadolinium showed an enhanced intramedullary tumor at the T4 level. Operative findings disclosed the clouded and swollen right posterior nerve root, and the pial surface was covered by clouded arachnoid-like membrane. The removed part of the T4 posterior nerve root and intramedullary tumor revealed malignant mesothelioma with invasion spreading along the posterior nerve root. He died of respiratory failure 3 months after the diagnosis. This case shows that spinal metastasis must be considered if a patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma shows neurological worsening and neuroimaging shows an abnormal lesion in the thoracic spinal cord. However, the patient's neurological condition is very difficult to improve in the presence of spinal cord infiltration.

  9. Bioavailability and speciation of arsenic in carrots grown in contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgesen, H.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1998-01-01

    increasing depression of growth with increasing level of contamination, At the experimental plots E-G with soil arsenic concentrations above 400 mu g g(-1) no carrots developed. Whether this effect was caused by arsenic or the concomitant copper content which ranged from 11 to 810 mu g g(-1) in the soil...... mixtures is unknown. The arsenic species extracted from the soils and carrots were separated and detected using anion-exchange HPLC coupled with ICP-MS, In the less contaminated soils from plots A and B arsenite (As-III) was more abundant than arsenate (As-V) in the soil using 1 mmole l(-1) calcium nitrate...... as extractant, In the soils from plots C and D however, As-V dominated over As-III whereas in the corresponding carrots As-V and As-III were found at similar concentrations, Methylated arsenic species were sought after but not detected in any of the samples. The soil-to-carrot uptake rate (bioavailability...

  10. Role of plant root exudate and Sym plasmid-localized nodulation genes in the synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum of Tsr factor, which causes thick and short roots on common vetch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, A. A.; Zaat, S. A.; Cremers, H. C.; Wijffelman, C. A.; Pees, E.; Tak, T.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper it was shown that cocultivation of Rhizobium leguminosarum with the plant Vicia sativa subsp. nigra on solid medium causes a changed mode of growth of the plant roots, resulting in thick and short roots (Tsr). The Sym plasmid present in the bacterium appeared to be essential for

  11. ROOT VEGETABLES, BREEDING TRENDS, RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fedorova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main advantage of root vegetables is their unique specificity and high economic importance. The benefits and medicinal properties of root vegetables being highly demanded by the market requirements to the commodity are highlighted in the article. The main directions of breeding program for root vegetable crops, including species of Apiaceae family with carrot, parsnips; Chenopodioideae family with red beet; Brassicaceae family with radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga. Initial breeding accessions of carrot, red beet, radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga have been selected out to be used for breeding program for heterosis. The mf and ms breeding lines were developed, and with the use of them the new gene pool was created. Variety supporting breeding program and methods were also proposed. 

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-01-01

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores

  13. Chlorhexidine Prevents Root Dentine Mineral Loss and Fracture Caused by Calcium Hydroxide over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ranniery Garcia Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the mineral ion loss of root dentine after treatment with 2% chlorhexidine solution (CHX and to compare its yield and flexural strength (fs after exposure to calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH2]. Materials and Methods. Dentine bars (DB were made from 90 roots of bovine incisors and randomized into three groups: GControl: distilled/deionized water (DDW, GNaOCl: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite + 17% EDTA, and GCHX: CHX + DDW. The release of phosphate (PO4 and calcium (Ca ions was measured by spectrophotometry. The DB were exposed to Ca(OH2 paste for 0, 30, 90, and 180 days. DB were subjected to the three-point bending test to obtain yield and fs values. The fracture patterns were evaluated (20x. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post hoc tests or one- and two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test (α=0.05. Results. GCHX showed lower PO43- and Ca2+ ionic release than GNaOCl (pGNaOCl in all periods (p<0.001, except for yield strength values on 90 days (p=0.791. A larger frequency of vertical fractures was observed in GNaOCl and that of oblique fractures in GCHX (p<0.05. Conclusions. CHX prevented PO43- and Ca2+ loss and showed a tendency to preserve the yield and fs of root dentine over time following exposure to Ca(OH2 paste.

  14. Conjunctively screening of biocontrol agents (BCAs) against fusarium root rot and fusarium head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu-Yao; Xie, Yue-Shen; Cui, Yuan-Yu; Xu, Jianjun; He, Wei; Chen, Huai-Gu; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Fusarium root-rot and fusarium head blight are plant diseases caused by Fusarium sp. in different growth periods of wheat, bring heavy losses to crop production in China. This research is aiming to screen biocontrol agents conjunctively for controlling these two diseases at the same time, as well as evaluate our previous BCAs (Biological Control Agents) screening strategies in more complex situation, considering biocontrol is well concerned as an environmental-friendly plant disease controlling method. Totally 966 bacterial isolates were screened from different parts of wheat tissues, of which potential biocontrol values were detected according to their abilities in antagonism inhibition and secreting extracellular hydrolytic enzyme. Biocontrol tests against fusarium root rot and fusarium head blight were carried out on 37 bacterial isolates with potential biocontrol capacity after pre-selection through ARDRA- and BOX-PCR analysis on strains with high assessment points. We acquired 10 BCAs with obvious biocontrol efficacy (more than 40%) in greenhouse and field tests. Pseudomonas fluorescens LY1-8 performed well in both two tests (biocontrol efficacy: 44.62% and 58.31%), respectively. Overall, correlation coefficient is 0.720 between assessment values of 37 tested BCA strains and their biocontrol efficacy in trails against fusarium root rot; correlation coefficient is 0.806 between their assessment values and biocontrol efficacy in trails against fusarium head blight. We acquired 10 well-performed potential BCAs, especially P. fluorescens LY1-8 displayed good biocontrol capacity against two different diseases on wheat. Biocontrol efficacies results in both greenhouse and field tests showed high positive correlation with assessment values (0.720 and 0.806), suggesting that the BCAs screening and assessing strategy previously developed in our lab is also adaptable for conjunctively screening BCAs for controlling both root and shoot diseases on wheat caused by same

  15. Nasolacrimal obstruction caused by root abscess of the upper canine in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, James M G; Sandmeyer, Lynne S; Laycock, Amanda R

    2010-03-01

    A 10-year-old, castrated male domestic short hair cat was presented to the Small Animal Clinic at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine with a presenting complaint of chronic, ocular discharge from the left eye. Ocular examination confirmed epiphora and mucopurulent discharge but there were no apparent reasons for the ocular discharge, and nasolacrimal obstruction was suspected. The cat had swelling of the left side of the face, severe periodontal disease and a fractured upper left canine tooth with pulpal exposure. Dacryocystorhinography revealed narrowing of the nasolacrimal duct above the root of the fractured upper left canine and dental radiographs showed a severe periapical lucency at the apex of the upper left canine tooth. The fractured canine tooth was removed. Subsequently, the ocular discharge and facial swelling resolved. After 2 years, the epiphora has never reoccurred. This is a noteworthy case because a suspected root abscess resulted in extralumenal compression of the nasolacrimal duct, which shows the importance of a thorough oral examination when nasolacrimal obstruction is evident.

  16. Investigation of Cd Adsorption and Accumulation from Contaminated Soil in Different Parts of Root Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Yargholi

    2010-01-01

        Environmental pollution with heavy metals and their absorption by plants form a universal problem around the world. Numerous investigations have been conducted to put wastewaters containing heavy metals to agricultural reuse. Little is known, however, about the absorption of cadmium in the root zone and its accumulation in the different organs of crops, particularly in root crops. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of different levels of Cd concentration in the root zone on the accumulation rate in various parts of four different types of common root crops in karaj Iran. The experiment was performed in a factorial testing plan in random blocks and in four treatments with three replicates. The treatments included four levels of Cd concentration in soil (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, control without Cd addition and water with 0.5 molar of EDTA. The soil used in this study was prepared by passing through a sieve with a 2mm mesh and adding Nitrate Cadmium (Cd(NO32. Cylinder plastic vases 40 Cm in diameter and 60 cm high were employed to cultivate vegetables. Water demandwas estimated via the Penman-Mantith method, in which Kc was calculated by means of recorded data at Meshgin-Abad synoptic station in Karaj. At the end of the growing season, samples were taken from different organs of the plants to measure Cadmium accumulation. The SPSS software was used for the variance analysis of the collected data. The Dunkan test (at 0.01 and 0.05 levels was then used to evaluate averages of the specifications in the factorial testing levels. The results indicate a direct relationship between Cd concentration in the root zone and Cd accumulation in plant organs. Adding 0.5 molar of EDTA to the irrigation water caused Cd accumulation in plant organs to exceed 60 percent. The results also show that Cd concentration, except for the control, was in excess of the limit for human consumption and that its accumulation levels in the different species tested

  17. The Causes of Their Death Appear (Unto Our Shame Perpetual): Why Root Cause Analysis Is Not the Best Model for Error Investigation in Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrklevski, Lila Petar; McKechnie, Leanne; OʼConnor, Nick

    2018-03-01

    Root cause analysis (RCA) is the model of accident investigation mandated by the New South Wales Ministry of Health in Australia to review all serious incidents. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the RCA model is not suitable for reviewing adverse events in mental health services such as suicides and homicides. The aims of the research were to evaluate the impact of RCA on improving patient outcomes in a regional mental health service in New South Wales, Australia, and to discover whether the RCA model is the most appropriate model in mental health. The literature on RCA was reviewed. The effectiveness of implementation of RCA recommendations was evaluated using quantitative and qualitative data. Suicides and homicides, which constitute 90% of serious critical incidents in mental health, do not always lend themselves well to identification of a root cause. There is evidence for low clinician engagement in the recommendations that arise from RCAs and a poor level of evidence that implementation of RCA recommendations results in safer patient care. Most troubling is the finding that RCAs frequently make recommendations that repeat existing policy or previous recommendations. Although the RCA model offers a formal and systematic approach to the review of serious critical incidents in mental health, it is not the model of best fit. Only 65% of recommendations made through RCA reviews are implemented within 12 months.

  18. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  19. Influence of gamma irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Sabato, Suzy F., E-mail: fmayumi@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Galvao, Natascha S.; Lanfer-Marquez, Ursula M., E-mail: lanferum@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCF/USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    2013-07-01

    Consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables provide several health benefits including risk reduction of oxidative stress-related diseases. These benefits have been associated with bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic compounds. Minimally processed products are a growing segment in food retail establishments due its practicality and convenience without significantly altering fresh-like characteristics. To extend the shelf life of these products, an application of ionizing radiation is an alternative, based on a physical and non-thermal method of preservation. The effect of irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots have not been reported in literature yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of phenolic compounds in baby carrots after the irradiation process. Samples of minimally processed baby carrots were purchased at a local supermarket and irradiated with doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. Phenolic compounds were extracted from shredded carrots with MeOH and analyzed spectrophotometrically by the Folin Ciocalteau method using a gallic acid standard curve. The results showed that the phenolic contents decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing radiation dose. In non-irradiated baby carrots (control), the levels of phenolic compounds were about 330 μg eq. gallic acid/g, while irradiated samples with 0.5 kGy, showed an approximately 10% reduction when compared with the control. An irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy caused a loss of 20%. Although the radiation has affected the phenolic content, the process seems to be interesting by maintaining their fresh-like characteristics. (author)

  20. Influence of gamma irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Sabato, Suzy F.; Galvao, Natascha S.; Lanfer-Marquez, Ursula M.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables provide several health benefits including risk reduction of oxidative stress-related diseases. These benefits have been associated with bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic compounds. Minimally processed products are a growing segment in food retail establishments due its practicality and convenience without significantly altering fresh-like characteristics. To extend the shelf life of these products, an application of ionizing radiation is an alternative, based on a physical and non-thermal method of preservation. The effect of irradiation on phenolic compounds of minimally processed baby carrots have not been reported in literature yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of phenolic compounds in baby carrots after the irradiation process. Samples of minimally processed baby carrots were purchased at a local supermarket and irradiated with doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. Phenolic compounds were extracted from shredded carrots with MeOH and analyzed spectrophotometrically by the Folin Ciocalteau method using a gallic acid standard curve. The results showed that the phenolic contents decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing radiation dose. In non-irradiated baby carrots (control), the levels of phenolic compounds were about 330 μg eq. gallic acid/g, while irradiated samples with 0.5 kGy, showed an approximately 10% reduction when compared with the control. An irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy caused a loss of 20%. Although the radiation has affected the phenolic content, the process seems to be interesting by maintaining their fresh-like characteristics. (author)

  1. [Application of cone-beam computed tomography in the diagnosis and treatment of external root resorption of adjacent teeth caused by impacted teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijin; Guo, Jiaping; Shi, Yongmei; Dong, Qingshan; Wang, Xiang; Xiong, Caihua; Gui, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of external root resorption of adjacent teeth caused by impacted teeth via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 19 teeth from 15 patients with uncertain external root resorption caused by an adjacent impacted tooth were examined from January 2011 to December 2011. All teeth with uncertain external root resorption were scanned by CBCT. Three dimensions reconstruction were the conducted to determine the location and extent of resorption. In all cases, CBCT identified the accurate location and extent of external root resorption caused by adjacent impacted teeth. Furthermore, the technique provided impacted teeth location in three dimensions, including the relation between the impacted teeth and surrounding vital structures. CBCT can provide direct and accurate images of the location and extent of external root resorption, as well as the location of the adjacent impacted teeth in three dimensions. Therefore, the proposed technique provides reliable information for clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Training pharmacists to deliver a complex information technology intervention (PINCER) using the principles of educational outreach and root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Stacey; Rodgers, Sarah; Howard, Rachel; Morris, Caroline J; Avery, Anthony J

    2014-02-01

    To describe the training undertaken by pharmacists employed in a pharmacist-led information technology-based intervention study to reduce medication errors in primary care (PINCER Trial), evaluate pharmacists' assessment of the training, and the time implications of undertaking the training. Six pharmacists received training, which included training on root cause analysis and educational outreach, to enable them to deliver the PINCER Trial intervention. This was evaluated using self-report questionnaires at the end of each training session. The time taken to complete each session was recorded. Data from the evaluation forms were entered onto a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, independently checked and the summary of results further verified. Frequencies were calculated for responses to the three-point Likert scale questions. Free-text comments from the evaluation forms and pharmacists' diaries were analysed thematically. All six pharmacists received 22 h of training over five sessions. In four out of the five sessions, the pharmacists who completed an evaluation form (27 out of 30 were completed) stated they were satisfied or very satisfied with the various elements of the training package. Analysis of free-text comments and the pharmacists' diaries showed that the principles of root cause analysis and educational outreach were viewed as useful tools to help pharmacists conduct pharmaceutical interventions in both the study and other pharmacy roles that they undertook. The opportunity to undertake role play was a valuable part of the training received. Findings presented in this paper suggest that providing the PINCER pharmacists with training in root cause analysis and educational outreach contributed to the successful delivery of PINCER interventions and could potentially be utilised by other pharmacists based in general practice to deliver pharmaceutical interventions to improve patient safety. © 2013 The Authors. IJPP © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Root-cause Investigation for No Setback Initiation at Liquid Zone Control Unit Perturbation in CANDU6 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Liquid zone control system (LZCS) is one of the indigenous systems in CANDU type reactor for reactor reactivity control. The LZCS is filled with light water and used to provide a continuous fine control of the reactivity and the reactor power level. This system is also designed to accomplish spatial control of the power distribution, automatically, which prevents xenon induced power oscillations. As the tilt control term is phased out, it is replaced by a level control term, which tends to drive the individual zone levels towards the average level of all the zones. Most of CANDU reactors have been experienced these events. Generally setback or stepback conditions are on when variables of spatial control off, high zone power, etc. are reached to the initiating conditions before ROP trip. But the condition of setback or stepback is not initiated before ROP trip sometime. In this study the root-causes for this event are investigated, and the impact assessment is performed by physics computational modeling. To investigate the root-cause of ROP trip before initiating setback at abnormal operating condition, some LZC perturbation models were simulated and investigated the neutron flux readings of zone detector and ROP detector. Two root-causes were founded. The first, flux variation by water level change is more gradual than other zones due to design characteristics in zone 03. The second, ROP detector (SDS no. 2 3G) in the near zone 03 is very sensitive below 40% of water level due to ROP detector installed position. Even though setback is initiated earlier than ROP trip in case of zone 03 perturbation, ROP trip will be occurred because power decreasing rate is very slow(0.1%/sec) on setback condition.

  4. Investigation of Lab Fire Prevention Management System of Combining Root Cause Analysis and Analytic Hierarchy Process with Event Tree Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chan Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a new approach, combining root cause analysis (RCA, analytic hierarchy process (AHP, and event tree analysis (ETA in a loop to systematically evaluate various laboratory safety prevention strategies. First, 139 fire accidents were reviewed to identify the root causes and draw out prevention strategies. Most fires were caused due to runaway reactions, operation error and equipment failure, and flammable material release. These mostly occurred in working places of no prompt fire protection. We also used AHP to evaluate the priority of these strategies and found that chemical fire prevention strategy is the most important control element, and strengthening maintenance and safety inspection intensity is the most important action. Also together with our surveys results, we proposed that equipment design is also critical for fire prevention. Therefore a technical improvement was propounded: installing fire detector, automatic sprinkler, and manual extinguisher in the lab hood as proactive fire protections. ETA was then used as a tool to evaluate laboratory fire risks. The results indicated that the total risk of a fire occurring decreases from 0.0351 to 0.0042 without/with equipment taking actions. Establishing such system can make Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S office not only analyze and prioritize fire prevention policies more practically, but also demonstrate how effective protective equipment improvement can achieve and the probabilities of the initiating event developing into a serious accident or controlled by the existing safety system.

  5. The research project KLIMAT. Report of carrot case study; Forskningsprosjektet KLIMAT. Rapport fra gulrot case studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svanes, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The research project 'KLIMAT' was 1.1.2009 to 31.8.2012. The main goal of this project was to develop a 'best practice' methodology for quantifying the carbon footprint of products with a focus on fruits, vegetables, dairy and meat products. The methodology was tested on six selected case products. One of these products was the carrot. The product was selected because it is a product with high sales volume, a large part of the production takes place in Norway, and it may be assumed to represent the root vegetables which are a very important group of vegetable products. Oestfold Research, in conjunction with BAMA and Gartnerhallen, collected the necessary data to conduct the study. Data came from a group of 13 producers with ties to Laagendalen that all products supplied to the Laagen Gulrot for processing and packing. The producers were voluntarily affiliated with an online reporting system for a variety of information, including information about resource use that were used in this study. Climate track of carrot packed in the cup was, according to the methodology that was developed 0.39 kg Co2-ekv/kg product delivered to the consumer, 0.44 kg Co2-ekv/kg consumed carrot. (Author)

  6. Unconventional alternatives for control of tomato root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani under greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Amany

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to assess the antifungal effect of some biocontrol agents effective microorganisms (EMs1, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus pumilus, titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles, black cumin and wheat germ oils as well as the recommended fungicide (flutolanil against root rot of tomato. Moreover, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS examination was completed to identify the bioactive compounds in plant oils (dark cumin and wheat germ. Also the impact of these medicines on some biochemical and growth parameters of tomato was examined. Flutolanil was the best treatment followed by dark cumin, TiO2, EMs1, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus pumilus and wheat germ oil, individually in both test seasons. The outcomes demonstrated a marked increase in each biochemical character (chlorophyll substance, peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase and plant development (height and fresh and dry weight under all the tried treatments in comparison to the controls.

  7. Quantifying Coronal Tooth Discoloration Caused by Biodentine and EndoSequence Root Repair Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Hannah; Svec, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot [PR]; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK) has been shown to have high rates of success in various endodontic applications. A major drawback is its tendency to discolor dentin. Two new bioceramics (BD, Biodentine [BD]; Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France; and EndoSequence [ES]; Brasseler, Savannah, GA) have been developed that claim to not discolor teeth. The aim of this study was to compare tooth discoloration between these 3 materials. Forty-eight bovine mandibular incisors (4 groups, n = 12) were obtained and prepared from the apical aspect after root resection. Canals were prepared with sequentially larger ParaPost drills (Coltene/Whaledent Inc, Cuyahoga Falls, OH) to size 7 to 3 mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction. Experimental materials were condensed into the crowns and the access sealed. Color was assessed at various times up to 2 months according to the CIE L*a*b* color space system. Change in color, ΔE, was compared among groups and over time using analysis of variance. For all materials, there was a sharp increase in ΔE after placement. There was a rebound effect on day 1. After a rebound toward the initial color, all materials displayed a trend toward discoloration through the experimental period. At the end of 8 weeks, both BD and ES had discolored significantly more than either control or PR. BD and ES were not significantly different from each other. Control and PR were not significantly different from one another at the end of the experimental period. BD and ES discolor bovine tooth structure to a perceptible degree. At 8 weeks, this was significantly more than PR. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Root causes of corporal punishment of children: approaches and mechanisms to confront it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hasani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult behavior has a profound effect on the personality and habits developed in children. Corporal punishment means the use of physical force to cause pain without injury, to discipline - 'behavior correction or control’- children. Corporal punishment of children can both have short-term and long-term harmful effects on their body and mind. In general, parents’ frequent use of corporal punishment is likely to be due to the fact that they may have experienced depression, drug abuse, alcohol use, quarrels, sexual abuse and adopting an authoritarian parenting style. Also, a high number of corporal punishment cases are reported to have occurred in families with low income and young parents. In addition, children experiencing severe corporal punishment and physical violence receive less love and warmth from other members of the family during childhood. These issues require that corporal punishment and the factors influencing it be discussed and explored scientifically and systematically. In this paper, following an introduction, a literature review of the empirical research on corporal punishment and root causes and experiential factors influencing it as well as the psychological and physical abuse of children will be dealt with. The second part will address theories explaining violence and corporal punishment including the "theory of interaction", "theory of personal ecology", "socio-cultural theory" and "structural approach". The last part of the article, as a general conclusion, offers some suggestions and guidelines. طرز رفتار بزرگسالان اثر عمیقی بر شخصیت کودکان و عادات کسب شده توسط آنها دارد. تنبیه بدنی به معنای استفاده از نیروی فیزیکی جهت ایجاد درد بدون صدمه، به منظور تربیت «تصحیح یا کنترل رفتار» کودک می­باشد. تنبیه­بدنی دارای اثرات مخرب کوتاه­مدت

  9. Comparison of Polyacetylene Content in Organically and Conventionally Grown Carrots Using a Fast Ultrasonic Liquid Extraction Method

    OpenAIRE

    Søltoft, Malene; Eriksen, M.R.; Träger, A.W.B.; Nielsen, J.; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Husted, Søren; Halekoh, Ulrich; Knuthsen, Pia

    2010-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method for quantification of polyacetylenes in carrot roots was developed. The traditional extraction method (stirring) was compared to a new ultrasonic liquid processor (ULP)-based methodology using high-performance liquid chromatography−ultraviolet (HPLC−UV) and mass spectrometry (MS) for identification and quantification of three polyacetylenes. ULP was superior because a significant reduction in extraction time and improved extraction efficiencies were ob...

  10. Experience with diagnosis of root causes of human performance problems in Indian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Low capacity factor, in any NPP, is a result of high occurrence rates of significant events. A substantial portion of such occurrences is caused by inappropriate action due to inadequate human performance. To improve human performance we need first to do its evaluation. This paper describes the essential elements of the first basic step in that context: diagnosis or identification of the fundamental causes of human performance problems in Indian NPPs. (author)

  11. growth and yield response of carrot (daucus carota l.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is an important vege- table which is .... plants. Watering was done daily to keep the soil moist throughout the growing period. The spaces between the rows of carrot plants were stirred with a hand fork fortnightly to remove weeds and to .... tial soil nutrients and sunlight which probably promoted the ...

  12. Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Alternaria Toxins in Carrots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solfrizzo, M.; Girolamo, De A.; Vitti, C.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2004-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for the determination of Alternaria radicina and A. alternata toxins in carrots. Toxins were extracted from carrot with an acidified mixture of water¿methanol¿acetonitrile. The filtered extract was divided in 2 parts that were purified by

  13. Antifungal activity of fabricated mesoporous alumina nanoparticles against root rot disease of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, Mohamed; Derbalah, Aly; Hamza, Amany; Mohamed, Ahmed; El Safty, Sherif

    2017-06-01

    The present work involved the synthesis and characterisation of mesoporous alumina sphere (MAS) nanoparticles to evaluate their biological activity against tomato root rot caused by Fusarium oxysporium, as compared with the recommended fungicide, tolclofos-methyl, under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The effects of MAS nanoparticles on the growth of tomato plants were also evaluated and compared with those of tolclofos-methyl. The physical characteristics and structural features of MAS nanoparticles, such as their large surface-area-to-volume ratio, active surface sites and open channel pores, caused high antifungal efficacy against F. oxysporium. MAS nanoparticles presented an antifungal potential similar to that of tolclofos-methyl and much greater than that of the control under both laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The highest growth parameters were recorded in tomato plants treated with MAS nanoparticles, followed by those treated with tolclofos-methyl. Our study demonstrated the possible use of cylindrically cubic MAS nanoparticles as an effective alternative for the control of Fusarium root rot in tomato. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Chemical, physical and morphometric properties of Peruvian carrot (Arracacia xanthorrhiza B.) starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, E E; Borneo, R; Melito, C G; Tovar, J

    1999-01-01

    Starch was isolated from Peruvian carrot (PC)--or arracacha--(Arraccacia xanthorrhiza B.) roots. Its chemical, physical, physicochemical and granular structural properties were compared to those of commercial cassava starch. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a granular size for PC starch ranging between 4 and 26 microns in diameter, with spherical and truncated-egg shapes. PC and cassava starches were similar regarding gross chemical composition and basic physical characteristics but differed in pasting properties, with PC starch showing lower breakdown and consistency indices. The two starches also showed different water absorption and solubility patterns.

  15. Nutritional composition of selected green leafy vegetables, herbs and carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G; Kawatra, A; Sehgal, S

    2001-01-01

    Six green leafy vegetables and herbs - spinach, amaranth, bengal gram, cauliflower, mint, coriander and carrots - were analyzed for moisture, protein, ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, total iron, ionizable iron (as % of total iron) in vitro iron (% of total iron), copper, manganese and zinc. Moisture content of the leaves and carrots varied from 75.1 percent (bengal gram) to 95.4 percent (carrot) and protein from 9.83 percent (carrots) to 30.9 (mint) percent. Ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, total iron and ionizable iron contents were at a maximum in case of bengal gram leaves whereas level of ionizable iron and in vitro iron as a percent of total iron was highest in carrots. Copper, manganese and zinc contents were maximum in spinach.

  16. Root cause analysis underscores the importance of understanding, addressing, and communicating cold chain equipment failures to improve equipment performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Pat; Atuhaire, Brian; Yavari, Shahrzad; Sampath, Vidya; Mvundura, Mercy; Ramanathan, Nithya; Robertson, Joanie

    2017-04-19

    Vaccine cold chain equipment (CCE) in developing countries is often exposed to harsh environmental conditions, such as extreme temperatures and humidity, and is subject to many additional challenges, including intermittent power supply, insufficient maintenance capacity, and a scarcity of replacement parts. Together, these challenges lead to high failure rates for refrigerators, potentially damaging vaccines and adversely affecting immunization coverage. Providing a sustainable solution for improving CCE performance requires an understanding of the root causes of failure. Project teams conducted small-scale studies to determine the root causes of CCE failure in selected locations in Uganda and Mozambique. The evaluations covered 59 failed refrigerators and freezers in Uganda and 27 refrigerators in Mozambique. In Uganda, the vast majority of failures were due to a cooling unit fault in one widely used refrigerator model. In Mozambique, 11 of the 27 problems were attributable to solar refrigerators with batteries that were unable to hold a charge, and another eight problems were associated with a need to adjust thermostat settings. The studies showed that tracking and evaluation of equipment performance and failure can yield important, actionable information for a range of stakeholders, including local CCE technicians, the ministry of health, equipment manufacturers, and international partners such as the United Nations Children's Fund, World Health Organization, and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Collaborative efforts to systematically collect and communicate data on CCE performance and causes of failure will help to improve the efficiency and reach of immunization programs in low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Organic amendments conditions on the control of Fusarium crown and root rot of asparagus caused by three Fusarium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Borrego-Benjumea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum (Fo, F. proliferatum (Fp and F. solani (Fs are causal agents associated with roots of asparagus affected by crown and root rot, a disease inflicting serious losses worldwide. The propagule viability of Fusarium spp. was determined on substrate artificially infested with Fo5, Fp3 or Fs2 isolates, amended with either poultry manure (PM, its pellet (PPM, or olive residue compost (ORC and, thereafter, incubated at 30 or 35°C for different periods. Inoculum viability was significantly affected by these organic amendments (OAs in combination with temperature and incubation period. The greatest reduction in viability of Fo5 and Fs2 occurred with PPM and loss of viability achieved was higher at 35°C than at 30ºC, and longer incubation period (45 days. However, the viability of Fp3 did not decrease greatly in most of the treatments, as compared to the infested and un-amended control, when incubated at 30ºC. After incubation, seedlings of asparagus `Grande´ were transplanted into pots containing substrates infested with the different species of Fusarium. After three months in greenhouse, symptoms severity in roots showed highly significant decreases, but Fp3 caused lower severity than Fo5 and Fs2. Severity reduction was particularly high at 30ºC (by 15 days incubation for Fs2 and by 30-45 days for Fo5, after PPM treatment, as well as PM-2% for Fo5 and Fs2 incubated during 30 and 45 days at both temperatures, and with ORC (15-30 days incubation. Moreover, assessment of plants fresh weight showed significantly high increases in Fo5 and Fs2, with some rates of the three OAs tested, depending on incubation period and temperature.

  18. Organic amendments conditions on the control of Fusarium crown and root rot of asparagus caused by three Fusarium spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego-Benjumea, A.I.; Melero-Vara, J.M.; Basallote-Ureba, M.J.

    2015-07-01

    Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), F. proliferatum (Fp) and F. solani (Fs) are causal agents associated with roots of asparagus affected by crown and root rot, a disease inflicting serious losses worldwide. The propagule viability of Fusarium spp. was determined on substrate artificially infested with Fo5, Fp3 or Fs2 isolates, amended with either poultry manure (PM), its pellet (PPM), or olive residue compost (ORC) and, thereafter, incubated at 30 or 35°C for different periods. Inoculum viability was significantly affected by these organic amendments (OAs) in combination with temperature and incubation period. The greatest reduction in viability of Fo5 and Fs2 occurred with PPM and loss of viability achieved was higher at 35°C than at 30ºC, and longer incubation period (45 days). However, the viability of Fp3 did not decrease greatly in most of the treatments, as compared to the infested and un-amended control, when incubated at 30ºC. After incubation, seedlings of asparagus Grande´ were transplanted into pots containing substrates infested with the different species of Fusarium. After three months in greenhouse, symptoms severity in roots showed highly significant decreases, but Fp3 caused lower severity than Fo5 and Fs2. Severity reduction was particularly high at 30ºC (by 15 days incubation for Fs2 and by 30-45 days for Fo5), after PPM treatment, as well as PM-2% for Fo5 and Fs2 incubated during 30 and 45 days at both temperatures, and with ORC (15-30 days incubation). Moreover, assessment of plants fresh weight showed significantly high increases in Fo5 and Fs2, with some rates of the three OAs tested, depending on incubat. (Author)

  19. Pentalinon andrieuxii root extract is effective in the topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania mexicana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezama-Dávila, Claudio M.; Pan, Li; Isaac-Márquez, Angelica P.; Terrazas, Cesar; Oghumu, Steve; Isaac-Márquez, Ricardo; Pech-Dzib, MY; Barbi, Joseph; Calomeni, Edward; Parinandi, Narasimham; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) manifests as localized skin lesions, which lead to significant tissue destruction and disfigurement. In the Yucatan Peninsula, Mayan traditional healers use Pentalinon andrieuxii Muell.-Arg. (Apocynaceae) roots for the topical treatment of CL. Here, we studied the effect of P. andrieuxii root hexane extract (PARE) on the parasites and host cells in vitro and examined its efficacy in the topical treatment of CL caused by L. mexicana. PARE exhibited potent antiparasitic activity in vitro against promastigotes as well as amastigotes residing in macrophages. Electron microscopy of PARE-treated parasites revealed direct membrane damage. PARE also activated NF-κB and enhanced IFN-γR and MHC class II expression and TNF-α production in macrophages. In addition, PARE induced production of the Th1 promoting cytokine IL-12 in dendritic cells as well as enhanced expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86. In vivo studies showed that L. mexicana-infected mice treated by topical application of PARE resulted in the significant reduction in lesion size and parasite burden compared to controls. These findings indicate that PARE could be used as an alternative therapy for the topical treatment of CL. PMID:24347110

  20. Pentalinon andrieuxii root extract is effective in the topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezama-Dávila, Claudio M; Pan, Li; Isaac-Márquez, Angelica P; Terrazas, Cesar; Oghumu, Steve; Isaac-Márquez, Ricardo; Pech-Dzib, M Y; Barbi, Joseph; Calomeni, Edward; Parinandi, Narasimham; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-06-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) manifests as localized skin lesions, which lead to significant tissue destruction and disfigurement. In the Yucatan Peninsula, Mayan traditional healers use Pentalinon andrieuxii Muell.-Arg. (Apocynaceae) roots for the topical treatment of CL. Here, we studied the effect of P. andrieuxii root hexane extract (PARE) on the parasites and host cells in vitro and examined its efficacy in the topical treatment of CL caused by Leishmania mexicana. PARE exhibited potent antiparasitic activity in vitro against promastigotes as well as amastigotes residing in macrophages. Electron microscopy of PARE-treated parasites revealed direct membrane damage. PARE also activated nuclear factor kappaB and enhanced interferon-γ receptor and MHC class II expression and TNF-α production in macrophages. In addition, PARE induced production of the Th1 promoting cytokine IL-12 in dendritic cells as well as enhanced expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86. In vivo studies showed that L. mexicana-infected mice treated by topical application of PARE resulted in the significant reduction in lesion size and parasite burden compared to controls. These findings indicate that PARE could be used as an alternative therapy for the topical treatment of CL. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Space Shuttle Operations and Infrastructure: A Systems Analysis of Design Root Causes and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, Carey M.

    2005-01-01

    This NASA Technical Publication explores and documents the nature of Space Shuttle operations and its supporting infrastructure and addresses fundamental questions often asked of the Space Shuttle program why does it take so long to turnaround the Space Shuttle for flight and why does it cost so much? Further, the report provides an overview of the cause-and effect relationships between generic flight and ground system design characteristics and resulting operations by using actual cumulative maintenance task times as a relative measure of direct work content. In addition, this NASA TP provides an overview of how the Space Shuttle program's operational infrastructure extends and accumulates from these design characteristics. Finally, and most important, the report derives a set of generic needs from which designers can revolutionize space travel from the inside out by developing and maturing more operable and supportable systems.

  2. No Fault Found events in maintenance engineering Part 2: Root causes, technical developments and future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Samir; Phillips, Paul; Hockley, Chris; Jennions, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This is the second half of a two paper series covering aspects of the no fault found (NFF) phenomenon, which is highly challenging and is becoming even more important due to increasing complexity and criticality of technical systems. Part 1 introduced the fundamental concept of unknown failures from an organizational, behavioral and cultural stand point. It also reported an industrial outlook to the problem, recent procedural standards, whilst discussing the financial implications and safety concerns. In this issue, the authors examine the technical aspects, reviewing the common causes of NFF failures in electronic, software and mechanical systems. This is followed by a survey on technological techniques actively being used to reduce the consequence of such instances. After discussing improvements in testability, the article identifies gaps in literature and points out the core areas that should be focused in the future. Special attention is paid to the recent trends on knowledge sharing and troubleshooting tools; with potential research on technical diagnosis being enumerated

  3. Descriptions of verbal communication errors between staff. An analysis of 84 root cause analysis-reports from Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; Andersen, Mette Lehmann; Østergaard, Doris

    2011-01-01

    incidents. The objective of this study is to review RCA reports (RCAR) for characteristics of verbal communication errors between hospital staff in an organisational perspective. Method Two independent raters analysed 84 RCARs, conducted in six Danish hospitals between 2004 and 2006, for descriptions...... and characteristics of verbal communication errors such as handover errors and error during teamwork. Results Raters found description of verbal communication errors in 44 reports (52%). These included handover errors (35 (86%)), communication errors between different staff groups (19 (43%)), misunderstandings (13...... units and consults from other specialties, were particularly vulnerable processes. Conclusion With the risk of bias in mind, it is concluded that more than half of the RCARs described erroneous verbal communication between staff members as root causes of or contributing factors of severe patient safety...

  4. Raman spectroscopy application in frozen carrot cooked in different ways and the relationship with carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorani, Paolo; Chiavaro, Emma; Cristofolini, Luigi; Paciulli, Maria; Zaupa, Maria; Visconti, Attilio; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-08-30

    Raman spectroscopy, in its confocal micro-Raman variation, has been recently proposed as a spatially resolved method to identify carotenoids in various food matrices, being faster, non-destructive, and avoiding sample extraction, but no data are present in the literature concerning its application to the evaluation of carotenoid pattern changes after thermal treatment of carrots. The effect of three cooking methods (i.e. boiling, steaming and microwaving) was evaluated on frozen carrot, comparing changes on carotenoid profiles measured by means of Raman spectroscopy with their high-performance liquid chromatographic determination and colour. A more pronounced detrimental effect on carotenoids was detected in steamed carrots, in accordance with colour data. Conversely, boiling and, to a lesser extent, microwaving caused an increase in carotenoid concentration. Cooking procedures affected the Raman spectral features of carotenoids, causing a shift of vibration frequencies towards a higher energy, increase in the spectral baseline and peak intensities as well as a broadening of their width, probably in relation to the thermal degradation of longer carotenoids (i.e. the all-trans form) and the isomerization process. In particular, steamed samples showed a significantly higher increase of centre frequency, in accordance with a more pronounced isomerization and changes in colour parameters. This work showed that the evolution of Raman spectral parameters could provide information on carotenoid bioaccessibility for carrots cooked using various methods. This paves the way for a future use of this technique to monitor and optimize cooking processes aimed at maximizing carotenoid bioaccessibility and bioavailability. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Producing nanofibres from carrots with a chemical-free process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanasi, Swambabu; Henzel, Leeav; Sharman, Scot; Batchelor, Warren; Garnier, Gil

    2018-03-15

    The production of nanofibres (NF) from fresh carrots residue was investigated with a mechanical process without using any pulping or bleaching chemicals. Refining with a PFI mill followed by mechanical fibrillation with a homogenizer was used to produce fine NF. Blanching with hot water was carried out to leach the extractives from carrot fibres prior to refining. The energy required to prepare carrot pulp is one order of magnitude lower than for wood pulp and the fibrillation of nanofibres from carrot residue is four times lower in energy than using wood pulp as feedstock. The average diameter and length of carrot NF are 18 nm and 5.1 μm, respectively. The chemical composition of the manufactured nanofibers, as measured by HPLC, was 53% glucose and 47% xylose. Translucent and strong flexible films were prepared from the carrot NF using a filtration based papermaking process. The strength and water vapor permeability of these carrot NF paper like composites are similar to those derived from wood-fibre of comparable dimensions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Innovative Approach to Establish Root Causes for Cracking in Aggressive Reactor Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.; Vetrano, John S.; Simonen, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    The research focuses on the high-resolution characterization of degradation microstructures and microchemistries in specimens tested under controlled conditions for the environment and for the material where in-service complexities can be minimized. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of crack-tip processes is employed to analyze corrosion-induced structures and gain insights into degradation mechanisms. Novel mechanistic ''fingerprinting'' of crack-tip structures is used to isolate causes of environmental cracking in tandem with quantitative measurements of crack growth. Sample preparation methods and advanced analytical techniques are used to characterize corrosion/oxidation reactions and crack-tip structures at near atomic dimensions in order to gain insight into fundamental environmental cracking mechanisms. Reactions at buried interfaces, not accessible by conventional approaches, are being systematically interrogated. Crack-growth experiments in high-temperature water environments are evaluating and isolating the effects of material condition (matrix strength, grain boundary composition and precipitation) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The fundamental understanding of crack advance mechanisms will establish the basis to design new corrosion-resistant alloys for current light-water reactors and advanced reactor systems

  7. Cenourete e Catetinho: minicenouras brasileiras Cenourete and Catetinho: the mini Brazilian carrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milza M. Lana

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available A produção anual brasileira de cenoura é de 750 mil toneladas. Cerca de 10% desta produção é constituída por raízes consideradas finas, classificadas comercialmente como tipo 1A, que, dependendo da época de plantio, da região e do sistema de produção empregado, este percentual pode representar até 20% da produção total. Em geral, esta categoria de raiz apresenta cotação de preço inferior em relação às demais categorias, sendo que em algumas regiões nos períodos de maior oferta de produto, grande parte destas é descartada por ser antieconômico a sua retirada da lavoura. A tecnologia proposta viabiliza a utilização desta categoria de raízes, possibilitando a obtenção de CENOURETE, mini cenouras semelhantes à "baby carrot" americana, ou de CATETINHO, mini cenouras em forma de bolinhas, utilizando-se o processamento mínimo como forma de agregação de valor ao produto final. O produto final obtido é atrativo visualmente, saudável e 100% pronto para consumo. Em face disto, espera-se um aumento do consumo de cenoura, particularmente entre crianças e donas de casa dos grandes centros urbanos brasileiros. O processamento consiste basicamente no torneamento de pedaços cilíndricos de raiz, pelo atrito contra uma superfície abrasiva. Após o processamento, os pedaços que se apresentam com formato de pequenas cenouras ou bolinhas, são submetidos a uma etapa de acabamento, para reduzir a aspereza da superfície, sendo então sanitizados e embalados para serem consumidos como aperitivos, crus ou cozidos. Essa tecnologia é de baixo custo de investimento, sendo acessível a qualquer agroindústria familiar.Brazilian carrot production is around 750,000 tons per year. About 10% of this total is composed of thin roots graded as 1A type. Depending on the production system, planting date, and growing region, the percentage of 1A roots can reach about 20% of the total production. These 1A roots are cheaper than other grades

  8. Using a Systematic Approach to Identifying Organizational Factors in Root Cause Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallogly, Kay Wilde

    2011-01-01

    This presentation set the scene for the second discussion session. In her presentation, the author observed that: - Investigators do not see the connection between the analysis tools available and the identification of HOF. Most investigators use the tools in a cursory manner and so do not derive the full benefits of the tools. Some tools are used for presentation purposes as opposed to being used for analytical purposes e.g. event and causal factors charts. In some cases, the report will indicate that specific analytical tools were used in the investigation but the analysis is not in the body of the report. - Some investigators are documenting HOF causes but do not recognize them as such. This indicates a lack of understanding of HOF. - Others investigators focus on technical issues because of their own comfort level. - The culture of the Organisation will affect the depth of the investigation and therefore the use of the analytical tools to pursue HOF issues. - The author contends that if analysis tools are applied systematically to gather factually based data, then HOF issues can be identified. The use of factual information (without judgement and subjectivity) is important to maintain the credibility of the investigation especially when HOF issues are identified. - Systematic use of tools assists in better communication of the issues to foster greater understanding and acceptance by senior management. - Barrier Analysis, Change Analysis, and TWIN (Task Demands, Work Environment, Individual Capabilities, and Human Nature) all offer the opportunity to identify HOF issues if the analyst pursues this line of investigation. It was illustrated that many elements of the TWIN Error Precursors are themselves Organisational in nature. - The TWIN model applied to the Anatomy of an Event will help to distinguish those which are Organisational issues (Latent Organisational Weaknesses, Error Precursors and Flawed Defences) and those which are human factors (Active Errors

  9. The effects of gamma irradiation on the growth and cytology of carrot (Dacus Carota L.) tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Safady, B.; Simon, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Carrot (Dacus Carota L.) tissue suspension cultures were subjected to 0.5-40 krad of gamma irradiation. Callus fresh weight was significantly increased and dry weight slightly increased by low doses (0.5 and 1 krad). Cells size increased at all doses. Cell number and colony-forming ability decreased. There was a negative correlation between radiation dose and mitotic index, and a positive correlation between dose and mitotic abnormalities (multipolar separations, lagging chromosomes, and bridges). Frequency of prophase was increased, and ana phase and telophase were reduced. Tissue culture conditions increased the incidence of aneuploidy and polyploidy in comparison to carrot root tips. Aneuploidy in tissue cultures was decreased and polyploidy was increased by gamma irradiation. Gamma irradiation stimulated shoot formation at 1 krad, and inhibited shoot formation at high doses (20-40 krads). The frequency of abnormal plants (albinos, and plants with no roots or deformation of leaves) regenerated from carrot cell cultures was increased by gamma irradiation. (authors). 30 refs., 3 figs

  10. Patterns of unexpected in-hospital deaths: a root cause analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Respiratory alarm monitoring and rapid response team alerts on hospital general floors are based on detection of simple numeric threshold breaches. Although some uncontrolled observation trials in select patient populations have been encouraging, randomized controlled trials suggest that this simplistic approach may not reduce the unexpected death rate in this complex environment. The purpose of this review is to examine the history and scientific basis for threshold alarms and to compare thresholds with the actual pathophysiologic patterns of evolving death which must be timely detected. Methods The Pubmed database was searched for articles relating to methods for triggering rapid response teams and respiratory alarms and these were contrasted with the fundamental timed pathophysiologic patterns of death which evolve due to sepsis, congestive heart failure, pulmonary embolism, hypoventilation, narcotic overdose, and sleep apnea. Results In contrast to the simplicity of the numeric threshold breach method of generating alerts, the actual patterns of evolving death are complex and do not share common features until near death. On hospital general floors, unexpected clinical instability leading to death often progresses along three distinct patterns which can be designated as Types I, II and III. Type I is a pattern comprised of hyperventilation compensated respiratory failure typical of congestive heart failure and sepsis. Here, early hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis can conceal the onset of instability. Type II is the pattern of classic CO2 narcosis. Type III occurs only during sleep and is a pattern of ventilation and SPO2 cycling caused by instability of ventilation and/or upper airway control followed by precipitous and fatal oxygen desaturation if arousal failure is induced by narcotics and/or sedation. Conclusion The traditional threshold breach method of detecting instability on hospital wards was not scientifically derived; explaining

  11. Patterns of unexpected in-hospital deaths: a root cause analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curry J Paul

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory alarm monitoring and rapid response team alerts on hospital general floors are based on detection of simple numeric threshold breaches. Although some uncontrolled observation trials in select patient populations have been encouraging, randomized controlled trials suggest that this simplistic approach may not reduce the unexpected death rate in this complex environment. The purpose of this review is to examine the history and scientific basis for threshold alarms and to compare thresholds with the actual pathophysiologic patterns of evolving death which must be timely detected. Methods The Pubmed database was searched for articles relating to methods for triggering rapid response teams and respiratory alarms and these were contrasted with the fundamental timed pathophysiologic patterns of death which evolve due to sepsis, congestive heart failure, pulmonary embolism, hypoventilation, narcotic overdose, and sleep apnea. Results In contrast to the simplicity of the numeric threshold breach method of generating alerts, the actual patterns of evolving death are complex and do not share common features until near death. On hospital general floors, unexpected clinical instability leading to death often progresses along three distinct patterns which can be designated as Types I, II and III. Type I is a pattern comprised of hyperventilation compensated respiratory failure typical of congestive heart failure and sepsis. Here, early hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis can conceal the onset of instability. Type II is the pattern of classic CO2 narcosis. Type III occurs only during sleep and is a pattern of ventilation and SPO2 cycling caused by instability of ventilation and/or upper airway control followed by precipitous and fatal oxygen desaturation if arousal failure is induced by narcotics and/or sedation. Conclusion The traditional threshold breach method of detecting instability on hospital wards was not

  12. Conservação de cenouras 'Brasília' tratadas com cera Storage of 'Brasília' carrot treated with waxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Caron

    2003-12-01

    :3 (in water, Bentevi with dilution 1:6, Fruit Wax undiluted, Fruit Wax with dilution 1:3, Fruit Wax with dilution 1:6, Stafresh, Megh Wax undiluted, Megh Wax with dilution 1:3 and Megh Wax with dilution 1:6. Carrots without wax treatment were used as control. After treatments the carrots were kept at room temperature (26ºC and 70% relative humidity. Fresh weight loss, turgor pressure (by flattening method, incidence of decay and appearance were evaluated two, four, six and eight days after storage. The experiment was set in a completely randomized design with fifteen treatments. Four replications and ten roots per plot were used. The Citrosol A, M and AK caused 100% decay after two days at room temperature. After eight days the lowest percentage of decay was observed in carrots treated with pure Stafresh and Bentevi. The fresh weight loss was high during the experiment. Only Stafresh and Bentevi alone showed some protection against root loss. The high fresh weight loss caused the lowest turgor pressure of roots in all treatment, except for Stafresh treatment, which kept higher turgor pressure until the 6th day. Only Stafresh treatment was able to maintain the quality of carrots cv. Brasília during 6 days of storage. No benefits were detected in the postharvest preservation of carrot roots by using other wax treatments.

  13. May humic acids or mineral fertilisation mitigate arsenic mobility and availability to carrot plants (Daucus carota L.) in a volcanic soil polluted by As from irrigation water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporale, Antonio G; Adamo, Paola; Azam, Shah M G G; Rao, Maria A; Pigna, Massimo

    2018-02-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is a widely consumed root vegetable, whose growth and safety might be threatened by growing-medium arsenic (As) contamination. By this work, we evaluated the effects of humic acids from Leonardite and NPK mineral fertilisation on As mobility and availability to carrot plants grown for 60 days in a volcanic soil irrigated with As-contaminated water - representing the most common scenario occurring in As-affected Italian areas. As expected, the irrigation with As-contaminated water caused a serious toxic effect on plant growth and photosynthetic rate; the highest rate of As also inhibited soil enzymatic activity. In contrast, the organic and mineral fertilisation alleviated, at least partially, the toxicity of As, essentially by stimulating plant growth and promoting nutrient uptake. The mobility of As in the volcanic soil and thus its phytoavailability were differently affected by the organic and mineral fertilisers; the application of humic acids mitigated the availability of the contaminant, likely by its partial immobilisation on humic acid sorption sites - thus raising up the intrinsic anionic sorption capacity of the volcanic soil; the mineral fertilisation enhanced the mobility of As in soil, probably due to competition of P for the anionic sorption sites of the soil variable-charge minerals, very affine to available P. These findings hence suggest that a proper soil management of As-polluted volcanic soils and amendment by stable organic matter might mitigate the environmental risk of these soils, thus minimising the availability of As to biota. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Badanie wzrostu kultur korzeniowych oraz tworzenia i wzrostu in vitro kalusów z różnych organów marchmi odmiany Terfekcja [Growth and callus formation of tissue cultures derived from various carrot organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Domańska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The clones of excised roots, leaves, petioles, cotylenods, hypocotyls and root calluses derived from the respective carrot fragments (cv. 'Perfekcja' commonly cultivated in Poland were cultured in vitro. An influence of thiamine concentrations on the growth of root tissue was examined. Several various media were tested for callus cultures. Bee bread extract was also applied. The growth of isolated clones during early and later culture periods was compared.

  15. Identifying Factors and Root Causes Associated With Near-Miss or Safety Incidents in Patients Treated With Radiotherapy: A Case-Control Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Gregory D; Mosaly, Prithima R; Mazur, Lukasz M; Tracton, Gregg; Marks, Lawrence B; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-08-01

    To identify factors associated with a near-miss or safety incident (NMSI) in patients undergoing radiotherapy and identify common root causes of NMSIs and their relationship with incident severity. We retrospectively studied NMSIs filed between October 2014 and April 2016. We extracted patient-, treatment-, and disease-specific data from patients with an NMSI (n = 200; incident group) and a similar group of control patients (n = 200) matched in time, without an NMSI. A root cause and incident severity were determined for each NMSI. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine which specific factors were contributing to NMSIs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine root causes of NMSIs and their relationship with incident severity. NMSIs were associated with the following factors: head and neck sites (odds ratio [OR], 5.2; P = .01), image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (OR, 3; P = .009), daily imaging (OR, 7; P importance of a strong reporting system to support a safety culture.

  16. The effect of slicing type on drying kinetics and quality of dried carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naghipour zadeh mahani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carrot is one of the most common vegetables used for human nutrition because of its high vitamin and fiber contents. Drying improves the product shelf life without addition of any chemical preservative and reduces both the size of package and the transport cost. Drying also aidsto reduce postharvest losses of fruits and vegetables especially, which can be as high as 70%. Dried carrots are used in dehydrated soups and in the form of powder in pastries and sauces. The main aim of drying agricultural products is decrease the moisture content to a level which allows safe storage over an extended period. Many fruits and vegetables can be sliced before drying.because of different tissue of a fruit or vegetable, cutting them in different direction and shape created different tissue slices. Due to drying is the exiting process of the moisture from internal tissue so different tissue slices caused different drying kinetics. Therefore, the study on effect of cutting parameters on drying is necessary. Materials and Methods: Carrots (Daucus carota L. were purchased from the local market (Kerman, Iran and stored in a refrigerator at 5°C. The initial moisture contents of the Carrot samples were determined by the oven drying method. The sample was dried in an oven at 105±2°C about 24 hours. The carrots cut by 3 models blade at 3 directions. The samples were dried in an oven at 70°C. Moisture content of the carrot slices were determined by weighting of samples during drying. Volume changes because of sample shrinkage were measured by a water displacement method. Rehydration experiment was performed by immersing a weighted amount of dried samples into hot water 50 °C for 30 min. In this study the effect of some cutting parameters was considered on carrot drying and the quality of final drying product. The tests were performed as a completely random design. The effects of carrot thickness at two levels (3 and 6 mm, blade in 3 models (flat blade

  17. Development and quality evaluation of honey based carrot candy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Anisa Musarath; Srivastava, P K; Verma, Sangeeta

    2011-08-01

    Candy was prepared with 3 different combinations of honey and carrot by using 750 g honey + 1,000 g carrot (T1), 1,000 g honey + 1,000 g carrot (T2) and 1,250 g honey + 1,000 g carrot (T3). To establish the best product, sensory evaluation was done on 9-point Hedonic scale. T1 was found to be most preferred candy. Further the T1 candy was assessed for overall quality during storage at room temperature (25-30 °C) for 6 months. Candy can be preserved safely for 6 months in both glass and LDPE packaging materials.

  18. An analysis of root cause identification and continuous quality improvement in public health H1N1 after-action reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Christa-Marie; Debastiani, Summer; Rose, Dale; Kahn, Emily B

    2014-01-01

    To identify the extent to which the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program's (HSEEP) After Action Report/Improvement Plan (AAR/IP) template was followed by public health entities and facilitated the identification of detailed corrective actions and continuous improvement. Data were drawn from the US H1N1 Public Health Emergency Response (PHER) federal grant awardees (n = 62). After action report/improvement plan text was examined to identify the presence of AAR/IP HSEEP elements and characterized as "minimally complete," "partially complete," or "complete." Corrective actions (CA) and recommendations within the IP focusing on performance deficits were coded as specific, measurable, and time-bound, and whether they were associated with a problem that met root cause criteria and whether the CA/recommendation was intended to address or fix the root cause. A total of 2619 CA/recommendations were identified. More than half (n = 1480, 57%) addressed root causes. Corrective actions/recommendations associated with complete AARs more frequently addressed root cause (58% vs 51%, χ = 9.1, P < 0.003) and were more specific (34% vs 23%, χ = 32.3, P < 0.0001), measurable (30% vs 18%, χ = 37.9, P < 0.0001), and time-bound (38% vs 15%, χ = 115.5, P < 0.0001) than partially complete AARs. The same pattern was not observed with completeness of IPs. Corrective actions and recommendations were similarly specific and measurable. Recommendations significantly addressed root cause more than CAs. Our analysis indicates a possible lack of awardee distinction between CA and recommendations in AARs. As HSEEP adapts to align with the 2011 National Preparedness Goal and National Preparedness System, future HSEEP documents should emphasize the importance of root cause analysis as a required element within AAR documents and templates in the exercise and real incident environment, as well as the need for specific and measurable CAs.

  19. Presence of indicator bacteria, diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes and Salmonella in fresh carrot juice from Mexican restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Vitela, M D R; Gómez Aldapa, C A; Cerna-Cortes, J F; Villarruel-López, A; Rangel-Vargas, E; Castro-Rosas, J

    2013-03-01

    Coliform bacteria (CB), faecal coliforms (FC), Escherichia coli, diarrhoeagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEP) and Salmonella frequencies were determined for fresh carrot juice from restaurants in Pachuca city, Mexico. Two hundred and eighty carrot juice samples were purchased in three types of restaurants: (A), national chain restaurants; (B), local restaurants; and (C), very small restaurants. Two restaurants for each A and B, and three for C, were included. Forty juice samples were purchased at each restaurant. All tested juice samples had poor microbiological quality. Of these samples, 100, 96·8, 54·3, 8·9 and 8·6% had CB, FC, E. coli, DEP and Salmonella, respectively. CB were present in all juice samples regardless of source, with limits ranging from 3·6 × 10² to 8·5 × 10⁷ CFU ml⁻¹, and the limits for FC and E. coli were restaurants at levels of 5% or above: DEP, 5% (A₁, B₂, 10% (A₂, B₁, C₁, C₂) and 12·5% (C₃); Salmonella, 5% (A₁, A₂, B₂), 7·5% (C₂), 10% (C₁, 12·5% (B₁) and 15% (C₃). This is the first report of microbiological quality and Salmonella, enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) isolation from fresh carrot juice in Mexico. Fresh carrot juice from restaurants could be an important factor contributing to the endemicity of EIEC-, ETEC- and STEC- and Salmonella-caused gastroenteritis in Mexico. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Microbes Associated with Freshly Prepared Juices of Citrus and Carrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Rai Aneja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruit juices are popular drinks as they contain antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals that are essential for human being and play important role in the prevention of heart diseases, cancer, and diabetes. They contain essential nutrients which support the growth of acid tolerant bacteria, yeasts, and moulds. In the present study, we have conducted a microbiological examination of freshly prepared juices (sweet lime, orange, and carrot by serial dilution agar plate technique. A total of 30 juice samples were examined for their microbiological quality. Twenty-five microbial species including 9 bacterial isolates, 5 yeast isolates, and 11 mould isolates were isolated from juices. Yeasts and moulds were the main cause of spoilage of juices. Aspergillus flavus and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were observed in the maximum number of juice samples. Among bacteria Bacillus cereus and Serratia were dominant. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were detected in few samples. Candida sp., Curvularia, Colletotrichum, and Acetobacter were observed only in citrus juice samples. Alternaria, Aspergillus terreus, A. niger, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were also observed in tested juice samples. Some of the microorganisms detected in these juice samples can cause disease in human beings, so there is need for some guidelines that can improve the quality of fruit juices.

  1. Root Hairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  2. Root cause analysis of oxide scale forming and shedding in high temperature reheater of a 200MW super high pressure boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Jiang; Hao, Weidong; Hu, Zhihong; Liu, Fuguo

    2015-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of over temperature tube-burst caused by oxide scale shedding and blocking tubes of high temperature reheater of a 200MW super high pressure power plant boiler, this paper expounds the mechanism of scale forming and shedding, and analyzes the probable causes of the tube-burst failure. The results show that the root cause of scale forming is that greater steam extraction flow after reforming of the second extraction leads to less steam flow into reheater, which causes over temperature to some of the heated tubes; and the root cause of scale shedding is that long term operation in AGC-R mode brings about great fluctuations of unit load, steam temperature and pressure, accelerating scale shedding. In conclusion, preventive measures are drawn up considering the operation mode of the unit.

  3. Preliminary Evidences of Biofortification with Iodine of “Carota di Polignano”, An Italian Carrot Landrace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Signore

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The “Carota di Polignano” (Polignano Carrot – PC, Daucus carota L. is a multi-colored landrace, cultivated in the Southern Italy, whose colors range from yellow to purple. Iodine is an essential micronutrient for humans, since it is a key component of thyroid hormones, which regulate the growth and development of the human body. The main source for iodine assumption is represented by diet, but its concentration in the vegetables is usually limited with respect to human needs. To this purpose, two experimental trials (in open field and in greenhouse with a soil-less system were carried out to enrich PC with iodine. Three levels of iodine (control treatment, C – 0 mg·L−1; low, L – 50 mg·L−1; and high, H – 500 mg·L−1, distributed with foliar spray fertilizations (in both open field and greenhouse or with nutrient solution (in greenhouse, at the level of 50 mg·L−1 in the form of KIO3 were compared. In open field, the H treatment showed a biofortification that was double and triple respect to L and C treatments, respectively, without influencing color and biometric parameters, such as the fresh and dry weight of roots and DM percentage. In greenhouse, the biofortification done with foliar spray fertilization followed the same trend of open field, while the biofortification by means of nutrient solution was more effective but reached very high levels that had toxic effects on the plants and could be too high for human nutrition. However, the concentrations of iodine into biofortified carrots in open field can allow to satisfy the recommended daily allowance (RDA by consuming 100 and 200 g of fresh product for the treatment H and L, respectively. Regarding the greenhouse biofortification, the RDA would be satisfied by consuming 200 g of fresh carrots (with the high level of foliar fertilization.

  4. Endophytic Bacteria Improve Plant Growth, Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and Induce Suppression of Root Rot Caused by Fusarium solani under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza Egamberdieva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Salinity causes disturbance in symbiotic performance of plants, and increases susceptibility of plants to soil-borne pathogens. Endophytic bacteria are an essential determinant of cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. The aim of this study was to isolate non–rhizobial endophytic bacteria from the root nodules of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., and to assess their ability to improve plant growth and symbiotic performance, and to control root rot in chickpea under saline soil conditions. A total of 40 bacterial isolates from internal root tissues of chickpea grown in salinated soil were isolated. Four bacterial isolates, namely Bacillus cereus NUU1, Achromobacter xylosoxidans NUU2, Bacillus thuringiensis NUU3, and Bacillus subtilis NUU4 colonizing root tissue demonstrated plant beneficial traits and/or antagonistic activity against F. solani and thus were characterized in more detail. The strain B. subtilis NUU4 proved significant plant growth promotion capabilities, improved symbiotic performance of host plant with rhizobia, and promoted yield under saline soil as compared to untreated control plants under field conditions. A combined inoculation of chickpea with M. ciceri IC53 and B. subtilis NUU4 decreased H2O2 concentrations and increased proline contents compared to the un-inoculated plants indicating an alleviation of adverse effects of salt stress. Furthermore, the bacterial isolate was capable to reduce the infection rate of root rot in chickpea caused by F. solani. This is the first report of F. solani causing root rot of chickpea in a salinated soil of Uzbekistan. Our findings demonstrated that the endophytic B. subtilis strain NUU4 provides high potentials as a stimulator for plant growth and as biological control agent of chickpea root rot under saline soil conditions. These multiple relationships could provide promising practical approaches to increase the productivity of legumes under salt stress.

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF LEAF BLIGHT OF CARROT (Daucus carota L. CAUSED BY Alternaria dauci (KÜHN GROVES & SKOLKO: SURVIVAL OF Alternaria dauci IN VEGETAL RESIDUES OF CARROT (Daucus carota L. CROP ASPECTOS EPIDEMIOLÓGICOS DA QUEIMA DAS FOLHAS DA CENOURA (Daucus carota L. CAUSADA POR Alternaria dauci (Kühn GROVES & SKOLKO: Sobrevivência de Alternaria dauci (Kühn Groves & SKOLKO em restos culturais da cenoura (Daucus carota L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Martins Chaves

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The spore viability of Alternaria dauci (Kühn Groves & Skolko in carrot (Daucus carota L. debris which were kept at different levels of temperature and relative humidity, without light, was studied. The temperature levels tested were 8, 16, 24 and 32°C, and the relative humidity levels 3, 18, 51, 73 and 100%. The treatments were different combinations of these levels. Humidity was the more important factor in preserving the fungus spore ability to germinate and its infectivity. Under conditions of high relative humidity and temperatures of 24 and 32°C, the spores rapidly lost their viability. This did not happen when the relative humidity was equal to, or below, 51%. The survival of fungus mycelium on carrot petioles was studied in non-treated organic soil, at different humidity levels, at three different depths, during a period of 120 days. Soil humidity was the factor of major significance in the persistence of the mycelium, followed by depths and time factors. In petioles kept at depths of 10 and 20 cm in humid soil, the survival was greatly reduced, while survival was markedly higher in those kept at the surface of dry soil. The effect of humidity on the viability of mycelium was studied also under soiless condition. Petioles were maintained in relative humidity controlled chamber, at 24°C. In saturated atmosphere (100% humidity, the mycelium viability was lost in less than 20 days. It was concluded that both, the conidial and mycelial form of Alternaria dauci are quite sensitive to high humidity levels.

    Estudou-se a sobrevivência das formas conidial e miceliana de Alternaria dauci, respectivamente, sobre folhas necrosadas e pecíolos de cenoura, sob diferentes condições mesológicas. Os esporos do fungo sobre conidióforos em folhas necrosadas de cenoura foram mantidos por 120 dias sob condi

  6. Esplanada: cultivar de cenoura de verão para fins de processamento Esplanada: a new tropical carrot variety suitable for minimum processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo V. Vieira

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A cenoura é uma das hortaliças tradicionais mais consumidas no Brasil. Entretanto, o consumo de mini cenouras tipo "cenourete" obtidas via processamento mínimo ainda é muito pequeno no país. Isto se deve possivelmente ao restrito conhecimento da tecnologia de produção deste produto e da dificuldade em se obter matéria prima de qualidade e com regularidade, especialmente no período de verão. As raízes das principais cultivares utilizadas no Brasil não apresentam características de qualidade como coloração, formato e tamanho adequados para possibilitar máximo rendimento industrial. Neste contexto, foi desenvolvida a cultivar de polinização aberta "Esplanada", que apresenta boa adaptação às condições edafoclimáticas brasileiras, possui alta resistência à queima-das-folhas, baixa incidência de florescimento precoce no verão e resistência moderada a nematóides formadores de galhas. Estas características viabilizam seu cultivo em qualquer época do ano, nas principais regiões de produção. As raízes são compridas, finas e apresentam coloração uniforme, características estas adequadas para o processamento mínimo visando a produção de cenourete. Esta cultivar poderá ocupar posição estratégica na cadeia produtiva de cenoura, uma vez que vai possibilitar a produção de mini cenouras durante todo o ano em qualquer região do país.Carrot is one of the most consumed vegetables in Brazil. However, the consumption of "baby carrots", obtained by minimally processed roots, is still very low in the country, due to lack of processing technology knowledge and the low amount of minimally processed carrots produced in Brazil as a consequence of the low industrial productivity. The carrot varieties currently employed in minimum processing have as major disadvantages a series of low quality attributes including inadequate root shape and size which precludes reaching the maximum industrial yield. In this context, Embrapa

  7. Antioxidant Activity of Cabbage and/or Carrot Against Oxidative Stress Induced by Gamma Irradiation in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, R.G.; Mahmoud, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    could modulate the oxidative stress and protect against chronic diseases caused by radiation exposure and that may be due to the antioxidant activity of both cabbage and carrot

  8. Quality of carrots as affected by pre- and postharvest factors and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljåsen, Randi; Kristensen, Hanne L; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Wyss, Gabriela S; Kretzschmar, Ursula; Birlouez-Aragone, Inès; Kahl, Johannes

    2013-08-30

    The aim of this review is to provide an update on factors contributing to quality of carrots, with special focus on the role of pre- and postharvest factors and processing. The genetic factor shows the highest impact on quality variables in carrots, causing a 7-11-fold difference between varieties in content of terpenes, β-carotene, magnesium, iron and phenolics as well as a 1-4-fold difference in falcarindiol, bitter taste and sweet taste. Climate-related factors may cause a difference of up to 20-fold for terpenes, 82% for total sugars and 30-40% for β-carotene, sweet taste and bitter taste. Organic farming in comparison with conventional farming has shown 70% higher levels for magnesium and 10% for iron. Low nitrogen fertilisation level may cause up to 100% increase in terpene content, minor increase in dry matter (+4 to +6%) and magnesium (+8%) and reduction in β-carotene content (-8 to -11%). Retail storage at room temperature causes the highest reduction in β-carotene (-70%) and ascorbic acid (-70%). Heat processing by boiling reduces shear force (-300 to -1000%) and crispiness (-67%) as well as content of phenolics (-150%), terpenes (-85%) and total carotenes (-20%) and increases the risk of furan accumulation. Sensory and chemical quality parameters of carrots are determined mainly by genetic and climate-related factors and to a minor extent by cultivation method. Retail temperature and storage atmosphere as well as heating procedure in processing have the highest impact in quality reduction. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Control of spread of Augusta disease caused by tobacco necrosis virus in tulip by composting residual waste of small bulbs, tunics, roots and soil debris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asjes, C.J.; Barnhoorn, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this study the elimination of the infectious virus/fungus complex of tobacco necrosis virus (TNV; cause of Augusta disease in tulip) and Olpidium brassicae in different soil types and residual waste material of soil debris, small tulip bulbs, roots and tunics by temperature treatments of

  10. Republished error management: Descriptions of verbal communication errors between staff. An analysis of 84 root cause analysis-reports from Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; Andersen, Mette Lehmann; Østergaard, Doris

    2011-01-01

    units and consults from other specialties, were particularly vulnerable processes. Conclusion With the risk of bias in mind, it is concluded that more than half of the RCARs described erroneous verbal communication between staff members as root causes of or contributing factors of severe patient safety...

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF DYEING PARAMETERS TO DYE COTTON WITH CARROT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRALLES Verónica

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural dyes derived from flora and fauna are believed to be safe because of non-toxic, non-carcinogenic and biodegradable nature. Furthermore, natural dyes do not cause pollution and waste water problems. Natural dyes as well as synthetic dyes need the optimum parameters to get a good dyeing. On some occasions, It is necessary the use of mordants to increase the affinity between cellulose fiber and natural dye, but there are other conditions to optimize in the dyeing process, like time, temperature, auxiliary porducts, etc. In addition, the optimum conditions are different depends on the type of dye and the fiber nature. The aim of this work is the use of carrot extract to dye cotton fabric by exhaustion at diverse dyeing conditions. Diffferent dyeing processes were carried out to study the effect of pH condition and the temperature, using 7, 6 and 4 pH values and 95 ºC and 130ºC for an hour. As a result some images of dyed samples are shown. Moreover, to evaluate the colour of each sample CIELAB parameters are analysed obtained by reflexion spectrophotometre. The results showed that the temperature used has an important influence on the colour of the dyed sample.

  12. IP3 stimulates CA++ efflux from fusogenic carrot protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, M.; Boss, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositide breakdown plays an important role in signal transduction in animal cells (Berridge and Irvine, 1984, Nature, 312:315). Upon stimulation, phospholipase C hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ) and diacylglycerol both of which act as cellular second messengers. IP 3 mobilizes Ca ++ from internal stores, hence the cytosolic free Ca ++ concentration increases and those physiological activities regulated by Ca ++ are stimulated. To test if plant cells also responded to IP 3 , Ca ++ efflux studies were done with fusogenic carrot protoplasts released in EGTA. The protoplasts were preloaded with 45 Ca ++ placed in a Ca ++ -free medium, and efflux determined as 45 Ca ++ loss from the protoplasts. IP 3 (10-20μM) caused enhanced 45 Ca ++ efflux and the response was sustained for at least 15 min. In plants, as in animals, the observed IP 3 -enhanced 45 Ca ++ efflux suggested that IP 3 released Ca ++ from internal stores, and the increased free cytosolic Ca ++ activated Ca ++ pumping mechanisms which restored the Ca ++ concentration in the cytosol to the normal level

  13. The lethal effect of carrot on Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-The, C; Lund, B M

    1991-06-01

    When shredded or sliced carrots were inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes the number of viable listerias decreased rapidly. On carrot slices stored at 8 degrees C there was a decrease after 3d followed by an increase, after 7d, to numbers similar to those present initially. The numbers of spoilage micro-organisms increased throughout storage at 8 degrees C. Carrots macerated in a Stomacher Lab Blender also showed an antilisterial activity which resulted in a decrease in number of viable bacteria and in sublethal damage. The effect was shown by five carrot cultivars and acted on nine strains of L. monocytogenes and single strains of L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri, L. melshimeri. This antilisterial effect was heat-labile, was inactivated after a few hours at 4 degrees C or at 30 degrees C and was active over the pH range 5.8 to 7.0. Maceration of carrots in an Atomix blender for 1 min or in liquid nitrogen destroyed the antilisterial activity.

  14. Quality of carrots as affected by pre- and postharvest factors and processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seljåsen, Randi; Kristensen, Hanne L; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    in content of terpenes, β-carotene, magnesium, iron and phenolics as well as a 1–4-fold difference in falcarindiol, bitter taste and sweet taste. Climate-related factors may cause a difference of up to 20-fold for terpenes, 82% for total sugars and 30–40% for β-carotene, sweet taste and bitter taste. Organic...... of furan accumulation. Sensory and chemical quality parameters of carrots are determined mainly by genetic and climate-related factors and to a minor extent by cultivation method. Retail temperature and storage atmosphere as well as heating procedure in processing have the highest impact in quality...

  15. Polyacetylene diversity and bioactivity in orange market and locally grown colored carrots (Daucus carota L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brandon T; Barnes, David M

    2009-12-09

    Carrots contain a wide array of phytochemicals such as carotenoids, phenolics, alpha-tocopherol, and polyacetylenes. Carrots are most known for their pro-vitamin A carotenoids but also contain other phytochemicals with documented health benefits. The phytochemicals in colored carrots present a challenge and opportunity due to the wide diversity of potent bioactive compounds. Two commercial carrots, 1 wild carrot, and 13 colored carrot varieties were characterized phytochemically. The carrots were screened in an anti-inflammatory model of lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production. Deep Purple carrot had the highest concentration of total polyacetylenes, alpha-tocopherol, and total phenolics. Commercial fresh market and baby orange carrots both had high concentrations of pro-vitamin A carotenoids. Purple carrots had higher antioxidant capacity values due to their anthocyanin content. Only seven carrot varieties had inhibitory activity (IC(25) = 257-1321 microg/mL) in macrophage cells. Among the varieties tested during the selected growing season, Deep Purple had the highest polyacetylene content and other important antioxidant phytochemicals. Further work is needed to identify other potential anti-inflammatory phytochemicals in colored carrots on the basis of this research.

  16. Differential selection on carotenoid biosynthesis genes as a function of gene position in the metabolic pathway: a study on the carrot and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Clotault

    Full Text Available Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics.Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway.Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history.

  17. FEATURES OF THE SEED DORMANCY IN UMBELLIFER CROPS CAUSED BY VARIOUS FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Baleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out at FGBNU VNIIO in 20112016. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of different types of organic dormancy caused by various factors on seed quality of some representatives of umbellifer crops. The objects of the study were seeds: parsnip ‘Kulinar’ (Pastinaca sativa L.; carrot ‘Rogneda’ (Daucus carrota L.; root parsley ‘Ljubasha’ (Petroselinum crispum (Mill. Nyman ex A.W. Hill.; root celery ‘Kupidon’ (Apium graveolens L.; coriander ‘Yantar’ (Coriandrum sativum L. and dill ‘Kentavr’ (Anethum graveolens L.. In all seeds studied, the speed of embryo growth was decreased by 30% or0.03 mma day. Under influence of the induced dormancy caused by incubation in extract from dill seeds, the speed of embryo growth in all species was decreased by 94-97% on average. The process of germination of just picked seeds in all crops studied showed itself in reduction of germinated seed number by 54% as compared with control variant. Under the effect of incubation at high temperature the seeds of parsnip and root celery didn’t germinate, whereas the germination in the seeds of coriander, root parsley and carrot was decreased by 51%, 47% and 46%, respectively as compared with control. There is no germination observed in parsnip, carrot, root celery and coriander under influence of induced dormancy caused by incubation in extract from dill seeds. In this case, the germination of seeds of root parsley and dill was 8.1% and 15%, respectively. The Pearson correlation between the speed of embryo growth and percent of seed germination showed the significant and positive relationship in the range 0.706-0.952. Analysis of variance (ANOVA showed that induced by temperature or allelopathic dormancy had impact on the speed of embryo’s growth in the crops studied, where factor effect was 89-86% depending on type of dormancy. Analysis of variance between the factors of dormancy and germination revealed that all

  18. NM-Scale Anatomy of an Entire Stardust Carrot Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.

    2009-01-01

    Comet Wild-2 samples collected by NASA s Stardust mission are extremely complex, heterogeneous, and have experienced wide ranges of alteration during the capture process. There are two major types of track morphologies: "carrot" and "bulbous," that reflect different structural/compositional properties of the impactors. Carrot type tracks are typically produced by compact or single mineral grains which survive essentially intact as a single large terminal particle. Bulbous tracks are likely produced by fine-grained or organic-rich impactors [1]. Owing to their challenging nature and especially high value of Stardust samples, we have invested considerable effort in developing both sample preparation and analytical techniques tailored for Stardust sample analyses. Our report focuses on our systematic disassembly and coordinated analysis of Stardust carrot track #112 from the mm to nm-scale.

  19. Microbial population of shredded carrot in modified atmosphere packaging as related to irradiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenmaier, R.D.; Baker, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Shredded carrots in modified atmosphere packaging were treated with low-dose irradiation of 0.5 kGy in order to determine whether additional reduction of microbial population would be achieved for carrots previously treated with chlorine. Commercially prepared shredded carrots treated with irradiation had a mean microbial population of 1300 CFU/g at the expiration date (9 days after irradiation) compared with 87,000 CFU/g for nonirradiated, chlorinated controls. Oxygen content of the headspace gas and ethanol content of the carrots were not significantly affected. Irradiation appears to be a suitable technology for shredded carrots

  20. Antisense repression of vacuolar and cell wall invertase in transgenic carrot alters early plant development and sucrose partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G Q; Lüscher, M; Sturm, A

    1999-02-01

    To unravel the functions of cell wall and vacuolar invertases in carrot, we used an antisense technique to generate transgenic carrot plants with reduced enzyme activity. Phenotypic alterations appeared at very early stages of development; indeed, the morphology of cotyledon-stage embryos was markedly changed. At the stage at which control plantlets had two to three leaves and one primary root, shoots of transgenic plantlets did not separate into individual leaves but consisted of stunted, interconnected green structures. When transgenic plantlets were grown on media containing a mixture of sucrose, glucose, and fructose rather than sucrose alone, the malformation was alleviated, and plantlets looked normal. Plantlets from hexose-containing media produced mature plants when transferred to soil. Plants expressing antisense mRNA for cell wall invertase had a bushy appearance due to the development of extra leaves, which accumulated elevated levels of sucrose and starch. Simultaneously, tap root development was markedly reduced, and the resulting smaller organs contained lower levels of carbohydrates. Compared with control plants, the dry weight leaf-to-root ratio of cell wall invertase antisense plants was shifted from 1:3 to 17:1. Plants expressing antisense mRNA for vacuolar invertase also had more leaves than did control plants, but tap roots developed normally, although they were smaller, and the leaf-to-root ratio was 1.5:1. Again, the carbohydrate content of leaves was elevated, and that of roots was reduced. Our data suggest that acid invertases play an important role in early plant development, most likely via control of sugar composition and metabolic fluxes. Later in plant development, both isoenzymes seem to have important functions in sucrose partitioning.

  1. Produção e renda bruta de mandioquinha-salsa, solteira e consorciada com cenoura e coentro = Yield and gross income of Peruvian carrot in monocrop system and intercropped with carrot and coriander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Antonio Heredia Zárate

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudadas a mandioquinha-salsa ‘Amarela de Carandaí’- M, a cenoura ‘Brasília - Ce o coentro ‘Tipo Português’- Co em cultivos solteiros e os consórcios MCe e MCo. Os cinco tratamentos foram arranjados no campo, no delineamento experimental de blocos casualizados, com cinco repetições. A colheita da cenoura foi aos 95 dias após a semeadura; a do coentro, aos 112 dias e a da mandioquinha-salsa, aos 247 dias após o plantio. A altura das plantas (42,3 cm e as massas frescas de raízes total (9,07 t ha-1 e comercial (6,55 t ha-1 da cenoura no consórcio MCe tiveram aumentos significativos de 4,4 cm; 2,34 e 1,73 t ha-1, respectivamente, em relação às plantas cultivadas solteiras. No coentro, a altura (24,0 cm e a massa fresca de folhas (2,98 t ha-1 das plantas solteiras foram significativamente maiores que as consorciadas. Na mandioquinha-salsa, houve influência significativa da forma de cultivo e os maiores valores de massas frescas, em t ha-1, de folhas(17,84, rebentos (4,07, coroas (3,99 e de raízes totais (14,04, comerciais (10,46 e nãocomerciais (3,58 foram obtidos no cultivo solteiro. O consórcio MCe foi considerado efetivo (RAE = 1,47 e o MCo foi inefetivo (RAE = 0,76. A renda bruta indicou que osdois consórcios não devem ser recomendados para o produtor de mandioquinha-salsa porque induziriam perdas de R$ 8.650,00 e R$ 7.011,25, respectivamente.‘Amarela de Carandaí’ Peruvian carrot (M, ‘Brasília’ carrot (Ce and ‘Tipo Português’ coriander (Co were studied in monocrop system and intercropped with carrot and coriander. Five treatments were arranged at field in a completely randomized block design with five replications. Harvest of carrot occurred 95 days after sowing; coriander harvest occurred 112 days after sowing; and the Peruvian carrot harvest, 247 days after planting. Plant height (42.3 cm and fresh masses of total (9.07 t ha-1 and commercial (6.55 t ha-1 roots of carrot in the MCe intercrop

  2. Characterization of Source- and Sink-Specific Sucrose/H+ Symporters from Carrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Roshani; Sturm, Arnd

    1998-01-01

    To understand how sucrose (Suc) is transported from source leaves to developing tap roots of carrot (Daucus carota L.), we cloned two cDNAs (DcSUT1 and DcSUT2) for proteins with homologies to plant Suc/H+ symporters. The deduced polypeptide sequences are 52% identical and have 12 predicted membrane-spanning domains each. Transport activities were confirmed by expression of the clones in yeast cells. Both transporters had optimal activity below pH 5.0 and Michaelis constant values of 0.5 mm. Suc uptake was inhibited by protonophores, suggesting that Suc transport is linked to the proton electrochemical potential across the plasma membrane. DcSUT1 and DcSUT2 had markedly different expression patterns. Transcripts of DcSUT1 were found only in the green parts of plants, with highest levels in the lamina of source leaves, indicating that DcSUT1 is required for the loading of Suc into the phloem. In leaf lamina expression was diurnally regulated, suggesting that Suc export from the leaves is higher during the day than during the night. The mRNA of DcSUT2 was found mainly in sink organs, and no diurnal expression pattern was detected in the storage root. Here, expression was not restricted to the phloem but was much higher in storage parenchyma tissues of phloem and xylem. The close relationship of DcSUT2 with a Suc/H+ symporter from fava bean, which facilitates Suc uptake into the cotyledons of developing seeds, indicates that this carrot Suc transporter may be involved in loading Suc into storage parenchyma cells. PMID:9847123

  3. Wilt, crown, and root rot of common rose mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos) caused by a novel Fusarium sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new crown and root rot disease of landscape plantings of the malvaceous ornamental common rose mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos) was first detected in Washington State in 2012. The main objectives of this study were to complete Koch's postulates, document the disease sypmtoms photographically, and iden...

  4. Genetic stability in potato germplasm for resistance to root galling caused by the powdery scab pathogen spongospora subterranea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spongospora subteranea, the causal agent of potato powdery scab is becoming increasingly important worldwide. Little is known about the genetic basis of resistance to this disease. The present study tested the hypothesis that potato genotypes with stable genetic resistance to "Spongospora root galli...

  5. Regolith properties under trees and the biomechanical effects caused by tree root systems as recognized by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Łukasz; Kasprzak, Marek

    2018-01-01

    Following previous findings regarding the influence of vascular plants (mainly trees) on weathering, soil production and hillslope stability, in this study, we attempted to test a hypothesis regarding significant impacts of tree root systems on soil and regolith properties. Different types of impacts from tree root system (direct and indirect) are commonly gathered under the key term of "biomechanical effects". To add to the discussion of the biomechanical effects of trees, we used a non-invasive geophysical method, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), to investigate the profiles of four different configurations at three study sites within the Polish section of the Outer Western Carpathians. At each site, one long profile (up to 189 m) of a large section of a hillslope and three short profiles (up to 19.5 m), that is, microsites occupied by trees or their remnants, were made. Short profiles included the tree root zone of a healthy large tree, the tree stump of a decaying tree and the pit-and-mound topography formed after a tree uprooting. The resistivity of regolith and bedrock presented on the long profiles and in comparison with the short profiles through the microsites it can be seen how tree roots impact soil and regolith properties and add to the complexity of the whole soil/regolith profile. Trees change soil and regolith properties directly through root channels and moisture migration and indirectly through the uprooting of trees and the formation of pit-and-mound topography. Within tree stump microsites, the impact of tree root systems, evaluated by a resistivity model, was smaller compared to microsites with living trees or those with pit-and-mound topography but was still visible even several decades after the trees were windbroken or cut down. The ERT method is highly useful for quick evaluation of the impact of tree root systems on soils and regolith. This method, in contrast to traditional soil analyses, offers a continuous dataset for the entire

  6. Back to the drawing board-relearn the clinical skills: A root cause analysis of a missed case of bilateral vocal cord paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suruchi Ambasta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral vocal cord paralysis being misdiagnosed as bronchial asthma has been reported in the literature on several occasions. Diagnosing this condition needs precise clinical acumen which could lead us to make an integrated diagnostic and treatment plan. Here, we report another missed case of bilateral vocal cord paralysis and the root cause analysis of the incident. This report emphasises the need for appropriate clinical examinations and workup during the pre-operative assessment.

  7. Management of chili pepper root rot and wilt (caused by Phytophthora nicotianae) by grafting onto resistant rootstock

    OpenAIRE

    Mourad SAADOUN; Mohamed Bechir ALLAGUI

    2013-01-01

    Root rot and plant wilting caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is a severe disease of chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) in open fields and under greenhouse production in Tunisia. Chili pepper grafting for disease manage- ment is attracting increased interest in recent years. Using the tube grafting technique, different compatible scion/rootstock combinations were obtained with the wild-type pepper SCM334 and the local chili pepper cultivars ‘Beldi’ and ‘Baker’. SCM334 was resistant to P. nicoti...

  8. PRODUCTION OF DH-PLANTS IN CULTURE OF ISOLATED MICROSPORE IN CARROT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Vjurtts

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goals of the research were to study the factors affecting on the process of embryogenesis in culture of isolated microspores, optimize the existing protocols, and finally produce the doubled haploid plants in carrot (DH-plants. Out of 10 carrot accessions tested in 2017 the embyoids were obtained in 8 carrot accessions with the use of 5 different media. The highest yield of embyoids was obtained in accessions 7kt (84 embryoids per Petri dish. It was shown that       optimal                explants              were     buds      containing microspores at late vacuolated uninucleate stage. The first divisions in microspores were seen in 3 days of cultivation. After 40 days, the welldeveloped embryoids can be observed by naked eye. It was also shown that further cultivation of these embryoids on medium with 13% agarose over 60 days provoked the active secondary embryoid formation. Owing to this, it is recommended to place the embryoids at heart-shaped stages on another regeneration medium supplied with 2 % of agarose, enabling to register correctly the number of well-formed embryoids. We carried out the study on influence of such factors as genotype and composition of medium, and their combination on embryoid formation in 8 genotypes on 5 various media. ANOVA analysis showed that the plant genotype was the main factor causing the embryoid formation, whereas the effect of both factors had an impact on the number of embryoids developed. The counting the chromosome number in meristem cells and also observation of chloroplast number in stoma guard cells enabled to reveal that most of the plants produced were the doubled haploids

  9. Root cause analysis for waste area grouping 1, Batch I, Series 1 Tank T-30 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Four inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks were scheduled for remedial actions as the Batch L Series I Tank Project during fiscal year (FY) 1995. These tanks are 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. The initial tank remediation project was conducted as a maintenance action. One project objective was to gain experience in remediation efforts (under maintenance actions) to assist in conducting remedial action projects for the 33 remaining inactive LLLW tanks. Batch I, Series 1 project activities resulted in the successful remediation of tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and 3013. Tank T-30 remedial actions were halted as a result of information obtained during waste characterization activities. The conditions discovered on tank T-30 would not allow completion of tank removal and smelting as originally planned. A decision was made to conduct a root cause analysis of Tank T-30 events to identify and, where possible, correct weaknesses that, if uncorrected, could result in similar delays for completion of future inactive tank remediation projects. The objective of the analysis was to determine why a portion of expected project end results for Tank T-30 were not fully achieved. The root cause analysis evaluates project events and recommends beneficial improvements for application to future projects. This report presents the results of the Batch I, Series root cause analysis results and makes recommendations based on that analysis

  10. A MYB transcription factor, DcMYB6, is involved in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in purple carrot taproots

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Feng, Kai; Que, Feng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Carrots are widely grown and enjoyed around the world. Purple carrots accumulate rich anthocyanins in the taproots, while orange, yellow, and red carrots accumulate rich carotenoids in the taproots. Our previous studies indicated that variation in the activity of regulatory genes may be responsible for variations in anthocyanin production among various carrot cultivars. In this study, an R2R3-type MYB gene, designated as DcMYB6, was isolated from a purple carrot cultivar. In a phylogenetic an...

  11. Improving microbiological safety and maintaining sensory and nutritional quality of pre-cut tomato and carrot by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohácsi-Farkas, Cs.; Nyirő-Fekete, B.; Daood, H.; Dalmadi, I.; Kiskó, G.

    2014-01-01

    commodities. - Highlights: • 1 kGy dose improves sufficiently the microbial safety of pre-cut tomato and carrot. • Low-dose radiation treatment eliminates Listeria monocytogenes from pre-cut produce. • 1 kGy dose does not diminish significantly the organoleptic quality. • Low-dose irradiation causes tolerable losses even in the most sensitive vitamins

  12. Thermal time model for Egyptian broomrape ‎‎(Phelipanche aegyptiaca parasitism dynamics in carrot ‎‎(Daucus carota L.: Field validation ‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Cochavi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Carrot, a highly profitable crop in Israel, is severely damaged by Phelipanche aegyptiaca ‎parasitism. Herbicides can effectively control the parasite and prevent damage, but for ‎optimal results, knowledge about the soil-subsurface phenological stage of the parasite is ‎essential. Parasitism dynamics models have been successfully developed for the parasites P. ‎aegyptiaca, Orobanche cumana and O. minor in the summer crops, tomato, sunflower and ‎red clover, respectively. However, these models, which are based on a linear relationship ‎between thermal time and the parasitism dynamics, may not necessarily be directly ‎applicable to the P. aegyptiaca-carrot system. The objective of the current study was to ‎develop a thermal time model to predict the effect of P. aegyptiaca parasitism dynamics on ‎carrot growth. For development and validation of the models, data was collected from a ‎temperature-controlled growth experiment and from 13 plots naturally infested with P. ‎aegyptiaca in commercial carrot fields. Our results revealed that P. aegyptiaca development ‎is related to soil temperature. Moreover, unlike P. aegyptiaca parasitism in sunflower and ‎tomato, which could be predicted both a linear model, P. aegyptiaca parasitism dynamics ‎on carrot roots required a nonlinear model, due to the wider range of growth temperatures of ‎both the carrot and the parasite. Hence, two different nonlinear models were developed for ‎optimizing the prediction of P. aegyptiaca parasitism dynamics. Both models, a beta ‎function model and combined model composed of a beta function and a sigmoid curve, were ‎able to predict first P. aegyptiaca attachment. However, overall P. aegyptiaca dynamics was ‎described more accurately by the combined model (RMSE =14.58 and 10.79, respectively. ‎The results of this study will complement previous studies on P. aegyptiaca management by ‎herbicides to facilitate optimal carrot growth and

  13. Perforating internal root resorption repaired with mineral trioxide aggregate caused complete resolution of odontogenic sinus mucositis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendyk-Szeffer, Maja; Łagocka, Ryta; Trusewicz, Matylda; Lipski, Mariusz; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2015-02-01

    An extensive perforating internal root resorption accompanied by apical periodontitis and odontogenic sinus mucositis was detected on preoperative cone-beam computed tomographic scans in a first maxillary molar. After the chemomechanical debridement of the root canals, calcium hydroxide was placed as a temporary dressing for 7 days. Mineral trioxide aggregate was used to fill the perforation site with the aid of a surgical microscope. At the next visit, the root with the resorption defect was filled with warm vertical compaction of gutta-percha. A control cone-beam computed tomographic scan acquired 6 months after the endodontic treatment revealed complete resolution of the sinus retention cyst. Moreover, the patient's frequent otolaryngologic disturbances ceased. The tooth was functional with satisfactory clinical and radiographic results after 12 months. Based on the results of this case, successful repair of an extensive, perforating internal resorption with mineral trioxide aggregate may lead to complete resolution of apical periodontitis and maxillary sinus retention cyst. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enrichment of Noodles with Soy Flour and Carrot Powder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noodles were produced from four flour blends of whole wheat, wheat-cassava, wheat-cassava-soy flour and wheatcassava- carrot flour blends respectively. The flours were analyzed for proximate analysis, functional properties and total carotenoid content. The cooking time of all samples was also determined. Results show ...

  15. Stability of blend of carrot, pineapple and soymilk treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Juice was made from carrot and pineapple and was blended with soymilk in the ratio 35%:35%:30% respectively and treated with powdered extract of A. danielli in varying proportions (1g, 2g and 3g). The treated samples were stored for twelve weeks with the control (sample without A. danielli extract) and analyses carried ...

  16. Postharvest quality of carrot cultivars, packaged and in bulk | Gioppo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at evaluating the postharvest durability of different carrot cultivars stored in bulk. The experimental design was completely randomized, with four repetitions. The treatments were arranged in a 3 x 2 factorial design comprising three cultivars (Brasília RL and AF-1620 from SAKATA, and Alvorada from ...

  17. Postharvest quality of carrot cultivars, packaged and in bulk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... Pantastico ERB (Ed.). Fisiologia de la postrecoleccion, manejo y utilizacion de frutas y hortalizas tropicales y subtropicales. México: Continental. pp. 375-405. Shibairo SI, Upadhyaya MK, Toivonen, PMA (1997). Postharvest moisture loss characteristics of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cultivars during short-term.

  18. Quantitative Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of carrot bioactives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Daniel P; Sansom, Catherine E; Lill, Ross E; Eason, Jocelyn R; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2013-03-20

    Rapid quantitative near-infrared Fourier transform Raman analyses of the key phytonutrients in carrots, polyacetylenes and carotenoids, are reported here for the first time. Solvent extracts of 31 carrot lines were analyzed for these phytonutrients by conventional methods, polyacetylenes by GC-FID and carotenoids by visible spectrophotometry. Carotenoid concentrations were 0-5586 μg g(-1) dry weight (DW). Polyacetylene concentrations were 74-4846 μg g(-1) DW, highest in wild carrots. The polyacetylenes were falcarinol, 6-1237 μg g(-1) DW; falcarindiol, 42-3475 μg g(-1) DW; and falcarindiol 3-acetate, 27-649 μg g(-1) DW. Strong Raman bands for carotenoids gave good correlation to results by visible spectrophotometry. A chemometric model capable of quantitating carotenoids from Raman data was developed. A classification model for rapidly distinguishing carrots with high and low polyacetylene (limit of detection = 1400 μg g(-1)) concentrations based on Raman spectral intensity in the region of 2250 cm(-1) was produced.

  19. Municipal Household Solid Waste Compost: Effects on Carrot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of municipal household solid waste compost on N, P and K uptake and yield of carrot (Daucus carrota), using a coastal savanna Haplic Acrisol. Bulked samples of fresh solid waste from 45 households within the Cape Coast Municipality in the Central Region of Ghana ...

  20. Aspects of the Biology of the Carrot Aphid Chomaphis (dysaphis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1958), and often covered with soil. Although C.foeniculus has hitherto not been reported from Uganda, recent observations at. Makerere University Agricultural Research In- stitute, Kabanyolo (MUARIK), suggest that sig- nificant infestation of carrots by the aphid oc- curs in the country. Given this pest potential (a.

  1. Acetylated pectins in raw and heat processed carrots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broxterman, Suzanne E.; Picouet, Pierre; Schols, Henk A.

    2017-01-01

    Heat processing results in softening of carrots, changing the pectin structure. The effect of heat processing on pectin was studied, showing that the amount of pectin in water soluble solids (WSS) and chelating agent soluble solids (ChSS) increased substantially upon heat processing of the

  2. (gnld) and carrot extracted carotenoids on immune param

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The immunomodulatory effect of Carotenoid complex from Golden Neo-Life Dynamite. (GNLD) and carrot extracted Carotenoid was assessed using 24 albino Wistar rats. The rats were assigned to 4 groups of 6 rats each consisting of group 1(control group treated with distilled water), group 2 (treated with olive ...

  3. Symptomology and etiology of a new disease, yellow stunt, and root rot of standing milkvetch caused by Embellisia sp. in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Zhong; Nan, Zhi Biao

    2007-06-01

    An Embellisia sp. has been established as the cause of a new disease of the herbaceous perennial forage legume, 'standing milkvetch' (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) in Northern China, which severely reduces plant density and degrades A. adsurgens stands. The disease was common at an experimental location in Gansu Province where it was recognized by the occurrence of stunted plants with reddish-brown stems and yellow and necrotic leaf blades. An Embellisia sp. was isolated from symptomatic stem, leaf blade, petiole, and root tissues at varying frequencies of up to 90%. Single-spore isolates grew very slowly on PCA, PDA, V-8 and, wheat hay decoction agar. Pathogenicity was confirmed by inoculation of seeds, dipping 2-day-old pre-germinated seedlings in inoculum and spraying inoculum on 6-month-old plants. Symptoms on test plants included yellow leaf lesions, brown lesions on stems and petioles, stunted side-shoots with yellow, small, distorted and necrotic leaves, shoot blight, bud death, crown rot, root rot, and plant death. The disease is named as 'yellow stunt and root rot' of A. adsurgens to distinguish it from diseases caused by other known pathogens. Embellisia sp. is also pathogenic to A. sinicus but not to 11 other tested plant species.

  4. Yield, chemical composition and nutritional quality responses of carrot, radish and turnip to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Andaleeb; Khan, Ikhtiar; Mahmood, Abid; Hameed, Abdul

    2013-10-01

    Future concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is very important due to its apparent economic and environmental impact in terms of climate change. However, a compressive assessment of its effect on the nutritional and chemical characteristics of food crops has yet to be established. In the present study the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the yield, chemical composition and nutritional quality of three root vegetables, carrot (Daucus carota L. cv. T-1-111), radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Mino) and turnip (Brassica rapa L. cv. Grabe) has been investigated. The yield of carrot, radish and turnip increased by 69, 139 and 72%, respectively, when grown under elevated CO2 conditions. Among the proximate composition, protein, vitamin C and fat contents decreased significantly for all the vegetables while sugar and fibre contents were increased. Response of the vegetables to elevated CO2 , in terms of elemental composition, was different with a significant decrease in many important minerals. Elevated CO2 decreased the amount of majority of the fatty acids and amino acids in these vegetables. It was observed that elevated CO2 increased the yield of root vegetables but many important nutritional parameters including protein, vitamin C, minerals, essential fatty acids and amino acids were decreased. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Transgenic sweet potato expressing thionin from barley gives resistance to black rot disease caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata in leaves and storage roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Tomoko; Shimamura, Takashi; Mitsukawa, Norihiro; Hori, Etsuko; Koda, Katsunori; Otani, Motoyasu; Hirai, Masana; Nakamura, Kenzo; Imaeda, Takao

    2012-06-01

    Black rot of sweet potato caused by pathogenic fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata severely deteriorates both growth of plants and post-harvest storage. Antimicrobial peptides from various organisms have broad range activities of killing bacteria, mycobacteria, and fungi. Plant thionin peptide exhibited anti-fungal activity against C. fimbriata. A gene for barley α-hordothionin (αHT) was placed downstream of a strong constitutive promoter of E12Ω or the promoter of a sweet potato gene for β-amylase of storage roots, and introduced into sweet potato commercial cultivar Kokei No. 14. Transgenic E12Ω:αHT plants showed high-level expression of αHT mRNA in both leaves and storage roots. Transgenic β-Amy:αHT plants showed sucrose-inducible expression of αHT mRNA in leaves, in addition to expression in storage roots. Leaves of E12Ω:αHT plants exhibited reduced yellowing upon infection by C. fimbriata compared to leaves of non-transgenic Kokei No. 14, although the level of resistance was weaker than resistance cultivar Tamayutaka. Storage roots of both E12Ω:αHT and β-Amy:αHT plants exhibited reduced lesion areas around the site inoculated with C. fimbriata spores compared to Kokei No. 14, and some of the transgenic lines showed resistance level similar to Tamayutaka. Growth of plants and production of storage roots of these transgenic plants were not significantly different from non-transgenic plants. These results highlight the usefulness of transgenic sweet potato expressing antimicrobial peptide to reduce damages of sweet potato from the black rot disease and to reduce the use of agricultural chemicals.

  6. Is the Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) taken up by plants from soils previously planted with Bt corn and by carrot from hydroponic culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icoz, I; Andow, D; Zwahlen, C; Stotzky, G

    2009-07-01

    The uptake of the insecticidal Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) by various crops from soils on which Bt corn had previously grown was determined. In 2005, the Cry1Ab protein was detected by Western blot in tissues (leaves plus stems) of basil, carrot, kale, lettuce, okra, parsnip, radish, snap bean, and soybean but not in tissues of beet and spinach and was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to be 0.05 +/- 0.003 ng g(-1) of fresh plant tissue in basil, 0.02 +/- 0.014 ng g(-1) in okra, and 0.34 +/- 0.176 ng g(-1) in snap bean. However, the protein was not detected by ELISA in carrot, kale, lettuce, parsnip, radish, and soybean or in the soils by Western blot. In 2006, the Cry1Ab protein was detected by Western blot in tissues of basil, carrot, kale, radish, snap bean, and soybean from soils on which Bt corn had been grown the previous year and was estimated by ELISA to be 0.02 +/- 0.014 ng g(-1) of fresh plant tissue in basil, 0.19 +/- 0.060 ng g(-1) in carrot, 0.05 +/- 0.018 ng g(-1) in kale, 0.04 +/- 0.022 ng g(-1) in radish, 0.53 +/- 0.170 ng g(-1) in snap bean, and 0.15 +/- 0.071 ng g(-1) in soybean. The Cry1Ab protein was also detected by Western blot in tissues of basil, carrot, kale, radish, and snap bean but not of soybean grown in soil on which Bt corn had not been grown since 2002; the concentration was estimated by ELISA to be 0.03 +/- 0.021 ng g(-1) in basil, 0.02 +/- 0.008 ng g(-1) in carrot, 0.04 +/- 0.017 ng g(-1) in kale, 0.02 +/- 0.012 ng g(-1) in radish, 0.05 +/- 0.004 ng g(-1) in snap bean, and 0.09 +/- 0.015 ng g(-1) in soybean. The protein was detected by Western blot in 2006 in most soils on which Bt corn had or had not been grown since 2002. The Cry1Ab protein was detected by Western blot in leaves plus stems and in roots of carrot after 56 days of growth in sterile hydroponic culture to which purified Cry1Ab protein had been added and was estimated by ELISA to be 0.08 +/- 0.021 and 0.60 +/- 0.148 ng g(-1) of

  7. Influence of carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis) feeding or exogenous limonene or methyl jasmonate treatment on composition of carrot (Daucus carota) leaf essential oil and headspace volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissinen, Anne; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kainulainen, Pirjo; Tiilikkala, Kari; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2005-11-02

    The effect of carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis Förster) feeding and limonene and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatments on the essential oil composition and headspace volatiles of carrot (Daucus carota ssp. sativus), cvs. Parano and Splendid, leaves was studied. Carrot psyllid feeding significantly increased the concentrations of sabinene, beta-pinene, and limonene, whereas limonene treatment increased the concentration of (Z)-beta-ocimene in the leaves of both cultivars. The limonene treatment significantly increased the concentration of total phenolics in the leaves of both cultivars, and MeJA treatment increased phenolic concentration in the leaves of Parano. Exogenous limonene spray did not decrease the number of carrot psyllid eggs laid either 2 or 24 h after treatment. The results suggest that carrot psyllid feeding induces changes in the endogenous monoterpene pool in the carrot leaves. Limonene and MeJA treatments affect some induced defenses of the carrot, but the exogenous limonene spray is not an effective oviposition deterrent against carrot psyllid.

  8. Management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode and root wilt fungus on pigeonpea through soil organically enriched with Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza, karanj (Pongamia pinnata) oilseed cake and farmyard manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, B K; Pandey, Rajesh Kumar; Goswami, Jaideep; Tewari, D D

    2007-11-01

    This investigation was undertaken to compare the percentage response of colonization and development of VA-Mycorrhiza (Glomus fasciculatum) on a number of pulse crops viz. cowpea, chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea and lentil under glasshouse conditions. Among the above-mentioned crops, pigeonpea exhibited the best performance and was selected for further studies. In this host the development and colonization percentage of G. fasciculatum was investigated under two separate substrates i. e. soil amended with FYM and karanj oilseed cake keeping a control treatment of field soil. A third treatment amended with karanj oilseed cake and farm yard manure (FYM) was also kept which responded best in terms of colonization percentage. This treatment showing improved plant health as well as integration with G. fasciculatum was selected as an ideal treatment for the management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita and root wilt fungus, Fusarium udum on pigeonpea. Thus the treatment constituting FYM, karanj oilseed cake and VA-Mycorrhiza reduced the disease incidence caused by both maladies to a great extent with the most promising improvement in plant growth parameters as compared to all others. The present investigation, in addition to proposing an ideal eco-friendly treatment for the management of this disease complex also proposed an excellent medium for the proliferation of the obligate bio-protectant, G. fasciculatum.

  9. Root resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper summarizes the different conditions, which have a well-known influence on the resorption of tooth roots, exemplified by trauma and orthodontic treatment. The concept of the paper is to summarize and explain symptoms and signs of importance for avoiding resorption during...... orthodontic treatment. The Hypothesis: The hypothesis in this paper is that three different tissue layers covering the root in the so-called periroot sheet can explain signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment. These different tissue layers are; outermost......-an ectodermal tissue layer (Malassez′s epithelium), a middle layer-composed by the collagen-mesodermal tissue layer, and an innermost root-close innervation layer. Abnormalities in one of these tissue layers are thought to cause inflammatory processes in the periodontal membrane comparable to inflammatory...

  10. Factors and root causes of corporal punishment within home and family environment and how to tackle the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Niknami

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Corporal punishment is one way of disciplining children which has been used by parents and child care takers over long centuries and there are still children who experience and fear violence. Studies indicate that corporal punishment is an important factor in the development of violent attitudes and actions and it has a devastating impact on an individual’s childhood and life. As a result, it has a detrimental effect on development of children and formation of proper norms of discipline. Furthermore, beating children as a factor involving risks can cause physical and psychological harms and even lead to a child‘s death. Thus, it violates the child fundamental rights such as inherent dignity. Nevertheless, corporal punishment is a legal and common practice in many countries and sometimes religion is used to justify its validity. Therefore, to tackle this concern and global problem, we need to identify its root causes and then take measures to eliminate all forms of it. This article is an attempt to explore the causes and consequences of corporal punishment of children and to offer solutions regarding how to tackle this problem. raise some misconceptions regarding the contradiction between domestic law and religious opinions on the matter with international law and may cast doubt on its international commitments. In addition to describing the legal status of corporal punishment of children, this study will reveal the position of the legal system of the Islamic Republic of Iran towards this important international document more than before. طرز رفتار بزرگسالان اثر عمیقی بر شخصیت کودکان و عادات کسب شده توسط آنها دارد. تنبیه بدنی به معنای استفاده از نیروی فیزیکی جهت ایجاد درد بدون صدمه، به منظور تربیت «تصحیح یا کنترل رفتار» کودک می‌باشد. تنبیه‌بدنی دارای اثرات

  11. Characteristic anatomical conformation of the vertebral artery causing vascular compression against the root exit zone of the facial nerve in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Soo; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young; Lee, Jong-Myong

    2015-03-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is caused by tortuous offending vessels near the facial nerve root exit zone. However, the definitive mechanism of offending vessel formation remains unclear. We hypothesized that vascular angulation and tortuosity, probably caused by uneven vertebral artery blood flow, result in vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone. The authors observed two anatomical characteristics of the vertebrobasilar arterial system in 120 subjects in the surgical group and 188 controls. The presence of the dominant vertebral artery (DVA) and laterality of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) were observed. We also analyzed the morphological characteristics of the surgical group showing the presence of DVA. The morphological characteristics were classified into three types: type I had the VBJ and DVA on the same side, type II had the VBJ within 2 mm of the midline, and type III had the VBJ opposite the DVA. The DVA was more prevalent in the surgical group than in the control group (71 % versus 54 %, P DVA on the left (P DVA on the right (P DVA, which corresponds with the laterality of the HFS. In the surgical group with the DVA and HFS on the same side, type I was predominant, but in the surgical group with a contralateral DVA and HFS, type III was predominant. The presence of a DVA and shifting of the VBJ on the same side plays a role in the angulation and tortuosity of vessels in the perivertebrobasilar junction, resulting in neurovascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone and thereby causing HFS.

  12. Seletividade de herbicidas aplicados em pós-emergência para a cultura da mandioquinha-salsa Peruvian carrot tolerance to post-emergence herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Freitas

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A suscetibilidade da cultura de mandioquinha-salsa a herbicidas aplicados em pós-emergência foi avaliada, cultivando-se três mudas pré-enraizadas e uniformes por vaso de cinco litros de capacidade, preenchidos com solo Podzólico Vermelho-Amarelo Câmbico, fase terraço, coletado na camada de 0-20 cm. Utilizou-se o delineamento de blocos ao acaso, com três repetições e 39 tratamentos obtidos do arranjo fatorial (13 x 3, sendo 12 herbicidas e uma testemunha sem herbicida e três doses (uma dose baixa, uma média e uma alta. As doses dos herbicidas (em g ha-1 foram: bentazon (600, 720 e 960, clethodim (84, 96 e 108, fenoxaprop-p-ethyl (68, 90 e 110, flazasulfuron (50, 75, 100, fluazifop-p-butil (94, 187 e 250, halosulfuron (75, 112 e 150, imazamox (28, 35 e 42, linuron (900, 1.350 e 1.800, oxadiazon (500, 750 e 1.000, propaquizafop (100, 125 e 150, sethoxydim (184, 230 e 276 e amônio-glufosinato (200, 300 e 400. A colheita das plantas foi realizada aos 49 dias após a aplicação dos tratamentos (DAA. Os herbicidas halosulfuron, flazasulfuron, imazamox e bentazon causaram alta toxicidade e prejuízos para as características avaliadas, sendo considerados não-seletivos para a cultura. O linuron e oxadiazon, nas doses baixa e média, e o amônio-glufosinato, na dose baixa, proporcionaram toxicidade às plantas de mandioquinha-salsa no início das avaliações, porém observou-se boa recuperação a partir de 28 DAA. O fluazifop-p-butil foi seletivo nas menores doses utilizadas. Os herbicidas clethodim, fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, propaquizafop e sethoxydim foram os mais seletivos.The tolerance of peruvian carrot to post-emergence herbicides was evaluated. Three pre-rooted uniform seedlings were grown in 5-liter pots with Red Yellow Podzolic Cambic soil, terrace phase, collected from a 0-20 cm depth layer The experimental design was a 13 x 3 factorial arrangement [twelve herbicides, a control without herbicide, and three herbicide doses (low, medium

  13. Use of high throughput sequencing to study oomycete communities in soil and roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapkota, Rumakanta; Nicolaisen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Many of the plant diseases caused by oomycetes such as cavity spot and damping off involve a complex of several species emphasizing the need to use a community approach when studying these organisms. Despite the economically importance of plant pathogens such as Phytophthora and Pythium, we have...... limited understanding of the diversity of oomycetes in symptomatic plant tissue as well as in root zones. The aim of this study was to improve and validate techniques for using high throughput sequencing as a tool for studying oomycete communities. Primer sets ITS4, ITS6 and ITS7 that have been used...... communities, DNA extracted from carrot tissue samples with symptoms of Pythium infection and soil samples collected from agricultural fields. Sequence data from Pythium and Phytophthora mock communities showed that our strategy successfully detected all included species. Taxonomic assignments of operational...

  14. Republished error management: Descriptions of verbal communication errors between staff. An analysis of 84 root cause analysis-reports from Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; Andersen, Mette Lehmann; Østergaard, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Poor teamwork and communication between healthcare staff are correlated to patient safety incidents. However, the organisational factors responsible for these issues are unexplored. Root cause analyses (RCA) use human factors thinking to analyse the systems behind severe patient safety...... incidents. The RCARs rich descriptions of the incidents revealed the organisational factors and needs related to these errors....... incidents. The objective of this study is to review RCA reports (RCAR) for characteristics of verbal communication errors between hospital staff in an organisational perspective. Method Two independent raters analysed 84 RCARs, conducted in six Danish hospitals between 2004 and 2006, for descriptions...

  15. Impact of organic and conventional carrots on intestinal and peripheral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roselli, Marianna; Finamore, Alberto; Brasili, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    ) were grown in three ORG (O1, O2 and O3) and one CV cropping system (D-CV). Italian carrots (Maestro and Excelso varieties) were grown in one ORG and one CV field for each variety. Immune phenotypes of blood, spleen and intestinal lymphocytes, and cytokine serum levels were analyzed in mice fed...... the different carrots for 30 days. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed in mice fed the Danish carrots. The consumption of the ‘more organic’ O2 and O3 carrots induced some changes in lymphocyte populations, including an increase in regulatory T cells. In Italian carrots more differences between ORG...... and CV were observed in the first as compared to the second year. No relevant differences were observed in cytokine secretion. PCA showed a clear separation among mice fed the O1, O2, O3 and D-CV carrots. CONCLUSIONS: Although a great variability was observed between the two years, an immune stimulation...

  16. Evaluation the Sensory and Probiotics Properties of the Yogurt Supplemented with Carrot Juice

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen R. Pop; Cătălina Topan; Ancuţa M. Rotar; Cristina Semeniuc; Liana Salanţă

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new type of yogurt through addition of carrot juice. Yogurt is a fermented milk product obtained from fermentation of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains. The effect of carrot juice at different levels (0%, 8%, 16%, 24%) on sensory properties and the viability of probiotic bacteria in yogurts during storage (21 days) at refrigerated temperature (4°C) was evaluated. The yogurt supplementation with 24 % carrot juice significantly improve...

  17. Effects of ionization and nitrous oxide on grated carrot respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervin, C.

    1992-06-01

    Two treatments (nitrous oxide and irradiation) have been applied on grated carrots to reduce the respiratory crisis induced by wounding. Nitrous oxide inhibited cytochrome c oxidase; but, it neither diminished O 2 consumption of the tissues, nor modified atmospheres in a favourable way for conservation of grated carrots, stored in plastic bags (in the conditions chosen for this study). On the contrary, irradiation inhibited simultaneously the respiratory crisis and the ethylene production, both induced by wounding. This behaviour led to a lower consumption of sugars in irradiated tissues and to the generation of atmospheres, which were better adapted to the conservation needs (it was necessary to use plastic film with high permeability). Finally, an applied study demonstrated that irradiation, by permitting a less denaturing preparation than industrial process, allowed the conservation of produces with a better quality (nutritional, sensory and microbiological). Biochemical analyses have been validated by sensory analyses

  18. Investigation of Cd Uptake and Transfer in Different Parts of Wheat, Spinach, Cucumber and Carrot Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Yargholi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution due to the accumulation of heavy metals in soil and their subsequent transfer to crops is a global concern that arises from improper application of industrial wastewaters. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of soil Cd on its accumulation rate in the various organs of four common crops in Iran (namely, wheat, spinach, cucumber, and carrot. The experiment was performed in a factorial design with random blocks including 3 treatments with 0 (control, 50, and 100 mg/kg.soil in 4 replicates. Soil was collected from the farm belonging to the Research Institute for Plant and Seed Breeding (Karaj and filtered twice using 2-mm sieves before Cadmium Nitrate (Cd(NO32 was added and completely mixed. Crops were planted in plastic pots 40 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. The water demand was determined using the Jenman Mantite method. At the end of the growing season, samples were taken from various organs of the crops and their Cd concentrations were measured. The results revealed a direct relationship between Cd accumulation and Cd concentration in the root region. All the treatments other than the control exhibited Cd concentrations higher than the standard limits for human consumption. Cadmium accumulation in the different organs of the crops exhibited the following orders: Root: Cucumber

  19. The fungi causin damping-off of carrot seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When 136 samples of dying carrot seedlings from several fields were analyzed Alternaria rudicina proved to be the most common seedling pathogen (41%, followed by some Fusarium species (27%, mostly F. avenaceum.The less common seedling pathogens were Pythium spp. (13%, Phoma spp.(2,5% and Botrytis cinerea (1,4%. Some other fungi (Bipolaris sorokiniana, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Stemphylium botryosym and Ulocladium consortiale were found in less than 1% of seedlings examined.

  20. Selective mimics of strigolactone actions and their potential use for controlling damage caused by root parasitic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kosuke; Ito, Shinsaku; Asami, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones and rhizosphere communication signals, although the molecular mechanisms underlying their activities have not yet been fully determined. Nor is their application in agriculture well developed. The importance of plant hormone agonists has been demonstrated in both basic and applied research, and chemicals that mimic strigolactone functions should greatly facilitate strigolactone research. Here, we report our discovery of a new phenoxyfuranone compound, 4-Br debranone (4BD), that shows similar activity to that of the major strigolactone (SL) analog GR24 in many aspects of a biological assay on plants. 4BD strongly inhibited tiller bud outgrowth in the SL-deficient rice mutant d10 at the same concentration as GR24, with no adverse effects, even during prolonged cultivation. This result was also observed in the Arabidopsis thaliana SL-deficient mutants max1, max3, and max4. However, the application of 4BD to the Arabidopsis SL-insensitive mutant max2 induced no morphological changes in it. The expression of SL biosynthetic genes was also reduced by 4BD treatment, probably via negative feedback regulation. However, in a seed germination assay on Striga hermonthica, a root parasitic plant, 4BD showed far less activity than GR24. These results suggest that 4BD is the first plant-specific strigolactone mimic.

  1. Sanitation procedure affects biochemical and nutritional changes of shredded carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cruz, Saúl; Islas-Osuna, María A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Vázquez-Ortiz, Francisco; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A

    2007-03-01

    Fresh-cut vegetables are considered convenient but with less nutritional quality compared to raw natural produce. Carrots are highly appreciated because of their carotene and antioxidant nutrients, but processing requires an appropriate sanitation procedure that ensures microbiological safety to consumers. The effect of the sanitation processing on the nutritional composition of shredded carrots was studied. Treatments tested were tap water, 200 ppm sodium hypochlorite (Cl), 40 ppm peroxyacetic acid (PA), and 100, 250, and 500 ppm acidified sodium chlorite (ASC). Measured parameters were oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC), total phenolics and carotenoids, sugars, and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and peroxidase (POD) activity. Shredded carrots sanitized with ASC retained higher levels of sugars, carotene, and antioxidant capacity. ASC also delayed the PAL and POD activity. These results show the importance of evaluating nutritional parameters during processing stages, since minimal processing does not necessarily imply loss of nutritional value. Furthermore, the availability of fresh-cut produce may increase the intake of nutrients, with a positive effect on health.

  2. Degradation of a washed carrot preparation by cellulases and pectinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, H K; Frey, M D; Radola, B J; Scherz, H

    1984-07-01

    A washed carrot substrate, prepared with high yields and easy handling properties, was found to be a suitable substrate for studying cellulolytic and pectinolytic degradation processes. A cellulase from Trichoderma reesei, and Rohament P, a macerating enzyme from Aspergillus alleaceus in endopolygalacturonase, degraded the washed carrot substrate to an extent of 60%. With the combined action of both enzymes, degradation was more than 80%. Simultaneous action of both enzymes was more efficient than their sequential use. The effect of temperature, pH, incubation time, enzyme concentration, and substrate concentration on the degradation by the single enzymes and their mixture were studied. Gas chromatographic sugar analysis revealed that Rohament P liberated glucose, arabinose, and galactose in the low-molecular-weight fraction obtained by ultrafiltration, in addition to high amounts of galacturonic acid. These carbohydrates were also found in the high-molecular-weight fraction (retentate) together with rhamnose and mannose. Cellulase BC released mainly glucose, although galacturonic acid, arabinose, xylose, and mannose were also detected both in the ultrafiltrate and retentate. Morphologically, during Rohament P degradation of the washed carrot substrate, damaged tissues and disintegrated cells were seen, whereas on cellulase BC action mainly disintegrated cell walls were observed.

  3. Characterization of inositol phosphates in carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, M.; Chen, Q.; Boss, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    We have shown previously that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ) stimulates an efflux of 45 Ca 2+ from fusogenic carrot protoplasts. In light of these results, we suggested that IP 3 might serve as a second messenger for the mobilization of intracellular Ca 2+ in higher plant cells. To determine whether or not IP 3 and other inositol phosphates were present in the carrot cells, the cells were labeled with myo-[2- 3 H]inositol for 18 hours and extracted with ice-cold 10% trichloroacetic acid. The inositol metabolites were separated by anion exchange chromatography and by paper electrophoresis. We found that [ 3 H]inositol metabolites coeluted with inositol bisphosphate (IP 2 ) and IP 3 when separated by anion exchange chromatography. However, we could not detect IP 2 or IP 3 when the inositol metabolites were analyzed by paper electrophoresis even though the polyphosphoinositides, which are the source of IP 2 and IP 3 , were present in these cells. Thus, [ 3 H]inositol metabolites other than IP 2 and IP 3 had coeluted on the anion exchange columns. The data indicate that either IP 3 is rapidly metabolized or that it is not present at a detectable level in the carrot cells

  4. Morphology, gas exchange, and chlorophyll content of longleaf pine seedlings in response to rooting volume, copper root pruning, and nitrogen supply in a container nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Amy Ross-Davis; D. Andrew Scott

    2013-01-01

    Few pine species develop a seedling grass stage; this growth phase, characterized by strong, carrot-like taproots and a stem-less nature, poses unique challenges during nursery production. Fertilization levels beyond optimum could result in excessive diameter growth that reduces seedling quality as measured by the root bound index (RBI). We grew longleaf pine (Pinus...

  5. Utilization of Landsat-8 data for the estimation of carrot and maize crop water footprint under the arid climate of Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangaswamy Madugundu

    Full Text Available The crop Water Footprint (WF can provide a comprehensive knowledge of the use of water through the demarcation of the amount of the water consumed by different crops. The WF has three components: green (WFg, blue (WFb and grey (WFgr water footprints. The WFg refers to the rainwater stored in the root zone soil layer and is mainly utilized for agricultural, horticultural and forestry production. The WFb, however, is the consumptive use of water from surface or groundwater resources and mainly deals with irrigated agriculture, industry, domestic water use, etc. While the WFgr is the amount of fresh water required to assimilate pollutants resulting from the use of fertilizers/agrochemicals. This study was conducted on six agricultural fields in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia, during the period from December 2015 to December 2016, to investigate the spatiotemporal variation of the WF of silage maize and carrot crops. The WF of each crop was estimated in two ways, namely agro-meteorological (WFAgro and remote sensing (WFRS methods. The blue, green and grey components of WFAgro were computed with the use of weather station/Eddy covariance measurements and field recorded crop yield datasets. The WFRS estimated by applying surface energy balance principles on Landsat-8 imageries. However, due to non-availability of Landsat-8 data on the event of rainy days, this study was limited to blue component (WFRS-b. The WFAgro of silage maize was found to range from 3545 m3 t-1 to 4960 m3 t-1; on an average, the WFAgro-g, WFAgro-b, and WFAgro-gr are composed of < 1%, 77%, and 22%, respectively. In the case of carrot, the WFAgro ranged between 297 m3 t-1 and 502 m3 t-1. The WFAgro-g of carrot crop was estimated at <1%, while WFAgro-b and WFAgro-gr was 67% and 32%, respectively. The WFAgro-b is occupied as a major portion in WF of silage maize (77% and carrot (68% crops. This is due to the high crop water demand combined with a very erratic rainfall, the

  6. Dync1h1 Mutation Causes Proprioceptive Sensory Neuron Loss and Impaired Retrograde Axonal Transport of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Yi; Xu, Huan; Fu, Yuan; Qian, Ting; Bo, Deng; Lu, Yan-Xin; Xiong, Yi; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Sprawling (Swl) is a radiation-induced mutation which has been identified to have a nine base pair deletion in dynein heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1: encoded by a single gene Dync1h1). This study is to investigate the phenotype and the underlying mechanism of the Dync1h1 mutant. To display the phenotype of Swl mutant mice, we examined the embryos of homozygous (Swl/Swl) and heterozygous (Swl/+) mice and their postnatal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of surviving Swl/+ mice. The Swl/+ mice could survive for a normal life span, while Swl/Swl could only survive till embryonic (E) 8.5 days. Excessive apoptosis of Swl/+ DRG neurons was revealed during E11.5-E15.5 days, and the peak rate was at E13.5 days. In vitro study of mutated DRG neurons showed impaired retrograde transport of dynein-driven nerve growth factor (NGF). Mitochondria, another dynein-driven cargo, demonstrated much slower retrograde transport velocity in Swl/+ neurons than in wild-type (WT) neurons. Nevertheless, the Swl, Loa, and Cra mutations did not affect homodimerization of DYNC1H1. The Swl/Swl mutation of Dync1h1 gene led to embryonic mal-development and lethality, whereas the Swl/+ DRG neurons demonstrated deficient retrograde transport in dynein-driven cargos and excessive apoptosis during mid- to late-developmental stages. The underlying mechanism of the mutation may not be due to impaired homodimerization of DYNC1H1. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Potential of multispectral imaging for real-time determination of colour change and moisture distribution in carrot slices during hot air dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhong; Liu, Wei; Lu, Xuzhong; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2016-03-15

    Colour and moisture content are important indices in quality monitoring of dehydrating carrot slices during dehydration process. This study investigated the potential of using multispectral imaging for real-time and non-destructive determination of colour change and moisture distribution during the hot air dehydration of carrot slices. Multispectral reflectance images, ranging from 405 to 970 nm, were acquired and then calibrated based on three chemometrics models of partial least squares (PLS), least squares-support vector machines (LS-SVM), and back propagation neural network (BPNN), respectively. Compared with PLS and LS-SVM, BPNN considerably improved the prediction performance with coefficient of determination in prediction (RP(2))=0.991, root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP)=1.482% and residual predictive deviation (RPD)=11.378 for moisture content. It was concluded that multispectral imaging has an excellent potential for rapid, non-destructive and simultaneous determination of colour change and moisture distribution of carrot slices during dehydration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of polyacetylene content in organically and conventionally grown carrots using a fast ultrasonic liquid extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søltoft, Malene; Eriksen, Morten Rosbjørn; Träger, Anne Wibe Braendholt; Nielsen, John; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Husted, Søren; Halekoh, Ulrich; Knuthsen, Pia

    2010-07-14

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method for quantification of polyacetylenes in carrot roots was developed. The traditional extraction method (stirring) was compared to a new ultrasonic liquid processor (ULP)-based methodology using high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) and mass spectrometry (MS) for identification and quantification of three polyacetylenes. ULP was superior because a significant reduction in extraction time and improved extraction efficiencies were obtained. After optimization, the ULP method showed good selectivity, precision [relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.3-3.6%], and recovery (93% of falcarindiol) of the polyacetylenes. The applicability of the method was documented by comparative analyses of carrots grown organically or conventionally in a 2 year field trial study. The average concentrations of falcarindiol, falcarindiol-3-acetate, and falcarinol in year 1 were 222, 30, and 94 mug of falcarindiol equiv/g of dry weight, respectively, and 3-15% lower in year 2. The concentrations were not significantly influenced by the growth system, but a significant year-year variation was observed for falcarindiol-3-acetate.

  9. Comparative study of the cell wall composition of broccoli, carrot, and tomato: structural characterization of the extractable pectins and hemicelluloses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Ken; Jolie, Ruben P; Fraeye, Ilse; Van Loey, Ann M; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2011-07-01

    This study delivers a comparison of the pectic and hemicellulosic cell wall polysaccharides between the commonly used vegetables broccoli (stem and florets separately), carrot, and tomato. Alcohol-insoluble residues were prepared from the plant sources and sequentially extracted with water, cyclohexane-trans-1,2-diamine tetra-acetic acid, sodium carbonate, and potassium hydroxide solutions, to obtain individual fractions, each containing polysaccharides bound to the cell wall in a specific manner. Structural characterization of the polysaccharide fractions was conducted using colorimetric and chromatographic approaches. Sugar ratios were defined to ameliorate data interpretation. These ratios allowed gaining information concerning polysaccharide structure from sugar composition data. Structural analysis of broccoli revealed organ-specific characteristics: the pectin degree of methoxylation (DM) of stem and florets differed, the sugar composition data inferred differences in polymeric composition. On the other hand, the molar mass (MM) distribution profiles of the polysaccharide fractions were virtually identical for both organs. Carrot root displayed a different MM distribution for the polysaccharides solubilized by potassium hydroxide compared to broccoli and tomato, possibly due to the high contribution of branched pectins to this otherwise hemicellulose-enriched fraction. Tomato fruit showed the pectins with the broadest range in DM, the highest MM, the greatest overall linearity and the lowest extent of branching of rhamnogalacturonan I, pointing to particularly long, linear pectins in tomato compared with the other vegetable organs studied, suggesting possible implications toward functional behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Root Cause Analysis and Correction of Single Metal Contact Open-Induced Scan Chain Failure in 90nm node VLSI

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, Chao-Cheng; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-Hsien; Tsai, Chung-Ching; Shih, Liwen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the localization of open metal contact for 90nm node SOC is reported based on Electron Beam Absorbed Current (EBAC) technique and scan diagnosis for the first time. According to the detected excess carbon, silicon and oxygen signals obtained from X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), the failure was deemed to be caused by the incomplete removal of silicate photoresist polymer formed during the O2 plasma dry clean before copper plating. Based on this, we proposed to replac...

  11. The incidence, root-causes, and outcomes of adverse events in surgical units: implication for potential prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We need to know the scale and underlying causes of surgical adverse events (AEs in order to improve the safety of care in surgical units. However, there is little recent data. Previous record review studies that reported on surgical AEs in detail are now more than ten years old. Since then surgical technology and quality assurance have changed rapidly. The objective of this study was to provide more recent data on the incidence, consequences, preventability, causes and potential strategies to prevent AEs among hospitalized patients in surgical units. Methods A structured record review study of 7,926 patient records was carried out by trained nurses and medical specialist reviewers in 21 Dutch hospitals. The aim was to determine the presence of AEs during hospitalizations in 2004 and to consider how far they could be prevented. Of all AEs, the consequences, responsible medical specialty, causes and potential prevention strategies were identified. Surgical AEs were defined as AEs attributable to surgical treatment and care processes and were selected for analysis in detail. Results Surgical AEs occurred in 3.6% of hospital admissions and represented 65% of all AEs. Forty-one percent of the surgical AEs was considered to be preventable. The consequences of surgical AEs were more severe than for other types of AEs, resulting in more permanent disability, extra treatment, prolonged hospital stay, unplanned readmissions and extra outpatient visits. Almost 40% of the surgical AEs were infections, 23% bleeding, and 22% injury by mechanical, physical or chemical cause. Human factors were involved in the causation of 65% of surgical AEs and were considered to be preventable through quality assurance and training. Conclusions Surgical AEs occur more often than other types of AEs, are more often preventable and their consequences are more severe. Therefore, surgical AEs have a major impact on the burden of AEs during hospitalizations

  12. Identifying the factors and root causes associated with the unintentional usage of an adrenaline auto-injector in Japanese children and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kemal; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Sugiura, Shiro; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Ito, Komei

    2018-03-05

    The unintentional usage of adrenaline auto-injectors may cause injury to caregivers or patients. To prevent such incidents, we assessed the causative factors of these incidents. The Anaphylaxis Working Group of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology requested that society members register cases in which adrenaline auto-injectors were unintentionally used. One hundred cases were reported from June 2015 to March 2016. We identified the root causes of 70 child and 25 adult cases, separately. The incidents occurred with repeated prescriptions as well as the first prescription. Three cases resulted in a failure to administer an adrenaline auto-injector to children with anaphylaxis. Four caregivers used it with improper application (epilepsy or enteritis). Among the child cases, the median age at the time of the incident was 5.5 years (range, 2-14 years). Five children injected the adrenaline auto-injector on their own body trunk. Twenty children were not the allergic patients themselves. Improper management protocol of the device and the child's development were concomitantly involved in most of the cases. A variety of human behaviors were identified as the root causes in the adult cases. At least 34 cases were associated with mix-ups between the actual and training device. Health workers should provide sufficient education regarding safety use of adrenaline auto-injector for caregivers tailored to their experience levels at both first and repeated prescriptions. Such education must cover anticipatory behavior based on normal child development. Devices should also be further improved to prevent such incidents. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of cross-flow membrane filtration in a recirculating hydroponic system to suppress root disease in pepper caused by Pythium myriotylum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, Andrew C; Hammer, William

    2009-05-01

    Zoosporic pathogens in the genera Pythium and Phytophthora cause extensive root disease epiphytotics in recirculating hydroponic vegetable-production greenhouses. Zoospore cysts of Pythium myriotylum Drechsler were used to evaluate the effectiveness of cross-flow membrane filters to control pythiaceous pathogens in recirculating hydroponic systems. Four membrane filter brands (Honeycomb, Polypure, Polymate, and Absolife) were tested alone or in combination to determine which filters would effectively remove infective propagules of P. myriotylum from solutions and reduce disease incidence and severity. Zoospore cysts of P. myriotylum generally measured 8 to 10 microm, and it was hypothesized that filters with pore-sizespepper plants from root infection. Single-filter assays with Honeycomb and Polypure brands removed 85 to 95% of zoospore cysts when pore sizes were rated at 1, 5, 10, 20, or 30 microm. Single-filter assays of Polymate and Absolife brands were more effective, exhibiting apparently 100% removal of zoospore cysts from nutrient solutions on filters rated at 1 to 10 microm. However, plant bioassays with Honeycomb and Polymate single filters failed to give long-term protection of pepper plants. Double-filter assays with 1- and 0.5-microm Polymate filters significantly increased the protection of pepper plants grown in nutrient film technique systems but, eventually, root disease and plant wilt could be observed. Insect transmissions by shore flies were not factors in disease development. Scanning electron microscopy images of zoospore cysts entrapped on Polymate filters revealed zoospore cysts that were either fully encysted, partially encysted, or of unusually small size (3 microm in diameter). It was concluded that either the atypically small or pliable pleomorphic zoospore cysts were able to penetrate filter membranes that theoretically should have captured them.

  14. High oxygen and high carbon dioxide modified atmospheres for shelf-life extension of minimally processed carrots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amanatidou, A.; Slump, R.A.; Gorris, L.G.M.; Smid, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The impact of high O2 + high CO2 modified atmospheres (MA), on the preservation of minimally processed carrots was studied. A combination of 50% O2 + 30% CO2 prolonged the shelf life of sliced carrots compared to storage in air by 2 to 3 d. When the carrots received a pre-treatment with a 0.1%

  15. Effect of ultrasound treatment on quality and microbial load of carrot juice

    OpenAIRE

    ZOU,Yu; JIANG,Aili

    2016-01-01

    Effect of ultrasound treatment on carrot juice was investigated through measuring pH, electrical conductivity, viscosity, visual color, total soluble solids, total sugars, total carotenoids, ascorbic acid contents and microbial load. No significant effect (p>0.05) of ultrasound treatment on pH of carrot juice was observed. Electrical conductivity, viscosity and color values gradually increased (p

  16. New carrot and garlic germplasm to advance breeding and understand crop origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic variation provided by diverse plant germplasm is the basic building material used for crop improvement that shapes the crops we grow today. Wild carrot from the U.S. provided the cytoplasm used to develop a reliable system to produce hybrid carrots that account for most of the commercial...

  17. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' associated with psyllid-affected carrots in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) plants with symptoms resembling those of the carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis and “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” damage were observed in 70% of commercial fields in southern Sweden in August 2011; all cultivars grown were affected, at about 1 to 45% symptomatic plants pe...

  18. Hydrogen production from carrot pulp by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrije, Truus de; Budde, Miriam A.W.; Lips, Steef J.; Bakker, Robert R.; Mars, Astrid E.; Claassen, Pieternel A.M. [Wageningen UR, Food and Biobased Research, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogen was produced from carrot pulp hydrolysate, untreated carrot pulp and (mixtures of) glucose and fructose by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana in pH-controlled bioreactors. Carrot pulp hydrolysate was obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction in carrot pulp. The main sugars in the hydrolysate were glucose, fructose, and sucrose. In fermentations with glucose hydrogen yields and productivities were similar for both strains. With fructose the hydrogen yield of C. saccharolyticus was reduced which might be related to uptake of glucose and fructose by different types of transport systems. With T. neapolitana the fructose consumption rate and consequently the hydrogen productivity were low. The hydrogen yields of both thermophiles were 2.7-2.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol hexose with 10 g/L sugars from carrot pulp hydrolysate. With 20 g/L sugars the yield of T. neapolitana was 2.4 mol H{sub 2}/mol hexose while the yield of C. saccharolyticus was reduced to 1.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol hexose due to high lactate production in the stationary growth phase. C. saccharolyticus was able to grow on carrot pulp and utilized soluble sugars and, after adaptation, pectin and some (hemi)cellulose. No growth was observed with T. neapolitana when using carrot pulp in agitated fermentations. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction prior to fermentation increased the hydrogen yield with almost 10% to 2.3 g/kg of hydrolyzed carrot pulp. (author)

  19. The next generation of carotenoid studies in carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange carrot (Daucus carota L.) is one of the richest sources of naturally occurring ß-carotene while red and yellow carrot varieties contain large quantities of lycopene and lutein. The human body utilizes carotenoids, particularly ß-carotene (provitamin A) as a precursor for the production of ret...

  20. Controlling the root and stem rot of cucumber, caused by Pythium aphanidermatum, using resistance cultivars and grafting onto the cucurbit rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rostami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber damping off caused by Pythium aphanidermatum is the most important root and stem rot that limits greenhouse cultivations. In this study, relative susceptibility of grafting commercial cucumber cultivars including Alpha, Caspian 340, Storm 5910, Shalim 616, Delta scar, Janette 810, Festibal C5, Royal, Negyn, Soltan and Fadia on two Cucurbita rootstocks were evaluated against P. aphanidermatum . Disease severity, survival and seedling growth were used for the evaluation. The results showed significant differences between the studied cultivars (p≤0.01. Caspian 340 and Alpha with 15.7% and 100% disease severity had more and less tolerant to P. aphanidermatum, respectively. Cucurbita maxima rootstock was more resistant than Cucurbita pepo to P. aphanidermatum. C. pepo had less compatibility with the cucumber and showed little resistance to the pathogen. The study revealed that grafting Caspian340 on the resistant cucurbit rootstock i.e. Cucurbita maxima could be used as disease control strategies in greenhouses.

  1. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis 2A-2B strain: a rhizospheric inhabitant of Sporobolus airoides (Torr.) Torr., with antifungal activity against root rot causing phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Raudales, Inés; De La Cruz-Rodríguez, Yumiko; Alvarado-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Fraire-Mayorga, Ahuitz; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Balderas-Hernández, Victor; Fraire-Velázquez, Saúl

    2017-01-01

    A Bacillus velezensis strain from the rhizosphere of Sporobolus airoides (Torr.) Torr . , a grass in central-north México, was isolated during a biocontrol of phytopathogens scrutiny study. The 2A-2B strain exhibited at least 60% of growth inhibition of virulent isolates of phytopathogens causing root rot. These phytopathogens include Phytophthora capsici , Fusarium solani , Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani . Furthermore, the 2A-2B strain is an indolacetic acid producer, and a plant inducer of PR1, which is an induced systemic resistance related gene in chili pepper plantlets. Whole genome sequencing was performed to generate a draft genome assembly of 3.953 MB with 46.36% of GC content, and a N50 of 294,737. The genome contains 3713 protein coding genes and 89 RNA genes. Moreover, comparative genome analysis revealed that the 2A-2B strain had the greatest identity (98.4%) with Bacillus velezensis.

  2. Effects of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 2-1 on roots of wheat and oil seed rape quantified using X-ray Computed Tomography and real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig J. Sturrock

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes significant establishment and yield losses to several important food crops globally. This is the first application of high resolution X-ray micro Computed Tomography (X-ray µCT and real-time PCR to study host-pathogen interactions in situ and elucidate the mechanism of Rhizoctonia damping-off disease over a 6-day period caused by R. solani, anastomosis group (AG 2-1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Gallant and oil seed rape (OSR, Brassica napus cv. Marinka. Temporal, non-destructive analysis of root system architectures was performed using RooTrak and validated by the destructive method of root washing. Disease was assessed visually and related to pathogen DNA quantification in soil using real-time PCR. R. solani AG2-1 at similar initial DNA concentrations in soil was capable of causing significant damage to the developing root systems of both wheat and OSR. Disease caused reductions in primary root number, root volume, root surface area and convex hull which were affected less in the monocotyledonous host. Wheat was more tolerant to the pathogen, exhibited fewer symptoms and developed more complex root system. In contrast, R. solani caused earlier damage and maceration of the taproot of the dicot, OSR. Disease severity was related to pathogen DNA accumulation in soil only for OSR, however reductions in root traits were significantly associated with both disease and pathogen DNA. The method offers the first steps in advancing current understanding of soil-borne pathogen behaviour in situ at the pore scale, which may lead to the development of mitigation measures to combat disease influence in the field.

  3. Not addressing the root cause: An analysis of submissions made to the South Australian Government on a Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Elizabeth; Schmied, Virginia; Peters, Kath; Dahlen, Hannah

    2015-06-01

    Reports of unregulated birth workers attending birth at home, with no registered midwife in attendance (freebirth), have become more frequent in Australia in recent years. A Coronial Inquiry (2012) into the deaths of three babies born at home in South Australia resulted in a call for legislation to restrict the practice of midwifery to registered midwives. A Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice in South Australia was issued as a consultation paper in January 2013. To report the views of those making a submission to the Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice in South Australia. Thirty submissions to the South Australian Government were downloaded, read and thematically analysed. Twenty-five (81%) submissions supported the legislation, 5 (16%) opposed it and 2 (6%) were neither for nor against. Support for the proposed legislation was strong, however the underlying root causes that have led to the rise of UBWs attending homebirth in Australia were not addressed. Recommendations called for all stakeholders to work with women to develop a better framework of care that respected and met their needs and choices whilst safeguarding maternal and neonatal health. The Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice may promote greater protection of midwifery practice however, Private Indemnity Insurance (PII), collaborative agreements and power struggles associated with the medical domination of childbirth continue to marginalise homebirth and prevent women from accessing the care they want and need. These unresolved issues represent the root causes for UBWs attending homebirth; hence the proposal is only a partial solution. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification and root cause analysis of cell culture media precipitates in the viral deactivation treatment with high-temperature/short-time method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaolin; Stimpfl, Gregory; Wen, Zai-Qing; Frank, Gregory; Hunter, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature/short-time (HTST) treatment of cell culture media is one of the proven techniques used in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry for the prevention and mitigation of media viral contamination. With the HTST method, the formulated media is pasteurized (virus-deactivated) by heating and pumping the media continuously through the preset high-temperature holding tubes to achieve a specified period of time at a specific temperature. Recently, during the evaluation and implementation of HTST method in multiple Amgen, Inc. manufacturing facilities, media precipitates were observed in the tests of HTST treatments. The media precipitates may have adverse consequences such as clogging the HTST system, altering operating conditions and compromising the efficacy of viral deactivation, and ultimately affecting the media composition and cell growth. In this study, we report the identification of the composition of media precipitates from multiple media HTST runs using combined microspectroscopic methods including Raman, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The major composition in the precipitates was determined to be metal phosphates, including calcium phosphate, magnesium phosphate, and iron (III) phosphate. Based on the composition, stoichiometry, and root-cause study of media precipitations, methods were implemented for the mitigation and prevention of the occurrence of the media precipitation. Viral contamination in cell culture media is an important issue in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry and may have serious consequences on product quality, efficacy, and safety. High-temperature/short-time (HTST) treatment of cell culture media is one of the proven techniques used in the industry for the prevention and mitigation of media viral contamination. With the HTST method, the formulated media is pasteurized (virus-deactivated) by heating at preset conditions. This

  5. Effect of ultrasound treatment on quality and microbial load of carrot juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu ZOU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of ultrasound treatment on carrot juice was investigated through measuring pH, electrical conductivity, viscosity, visual color, total soluble solids, total sugars, total carotenoids, ascorbic acid contents and microbial load. No significant effect (p>0.05 of ultrasound treatment on pH of carrot juice was observed. Electrical conductivity, viscosity and color values gradually increased (p<0.05 with treatment time increase. Total soluble solids, total sugars, total carotenoids and ascorbic acid contents of carrot juice were significantly improved (p<0.05 due to ultrasound treatment. Moreover, significant decrease (p<0.05 in microbial load of sonicated carrot juice was observed. Results from present study suggested that ultrasound treatment could improve quality and safety of carrot juice.

  6. Evaluation the Sensory and Probiotics Properties of the Yogurt Supplemented with Carrot Juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen R. Pop

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a new type of yogurt through addition of carrot juice. Yogurt is a fermented milk product obtained from fermentation of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains. The effect of carrot juice at different levels (0%, 8%, 16%, 24% on sensory properties and the viability of probiotic bacteria in yogurts during storage (21 days at refrigerated temperature (4°C was evaluated. The yogurt supplementation with 24 % carrot juice significantly improves the stability of the lactic acid bacteria, that contained the recommended levels of 107 cfu/g probiotic bacteria at the end of 21-days shelf life. The yogurt with 24% carrot juice was the most appreciated (7.07 points, followed by the classic yogurt (6 points, yogurt with 8% (5.28 points and yogurt with16% carrot juice (5.5 points.

  7. Mapping the variation of the carrot metabolome using 1H NMR spectroscopy and consensus PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Edelenbos, Merete; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2014-05-14

    Genetic variation is the most influential factor for carrot (Daucus carota L.) composition. However, difference in metabolite content between carrot varieties has not been described by NMR, although primary metabolites are important for human health and sensory properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of genotype on carrot metabolite composition using a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach. After extraction using aqueous and organic solvents, 25 hydrophilic metabolites, β-carotene, sterols, triacylglycerols, and phospholipids were detected. Multiblock PCA showed that three principal components could be identified for classification of the five carrot varieties using different spectroscopic regions and the results of the two solvent extraction methods as blocks. The varieties were characterized by differences in carbohydrate, amino acid, nucleotide, fatty acid, sterol, and β-carotene contents. (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multiblock data analysis was an efficient and useful tool to map the carrot metabolome and identify genetic differences between varieties.

  8. Analysis of texture in baby carrot (Daucus carota) subjected to the process of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Sabato, Susy F.

    2011-01-01

    The carrot is a vegetable of great economic value due to its versatility in the food industry and can be used as raw or minimally processed vegetable or aggregating value to the product, transforming the fresh carrots in baby carrots. It is well known that the application of gamma radiation in food may help in maintaining the quality of food. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation on texture of minimally processed baby carrot after the processing in a Multipurpose 60 Co irradiator. It can be concluded that the treatment with low doses of gamma radiation keep the quality of fresh-cut baby carrot. (author)

  9. Value Chains of Carrot Commodity on Suthomadansih Agropolitan Area in Karanganyar Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Feri Yatnanto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Central Java Government has been starting the implementation of agropolitanprogram in some regency that has the potential in the agriculture sector, Karanganyar Regency one of them. Through this program, SuthomadansihAgropolitan Area was established. One of the leading commodities from Suthomadansih is carrot commodity. Carrot commodity is then taken into consideration in the implementation of agropolitan program, in the form of provision of infrastructure and community development programs. The objectives of the research study are to investigate the value chain of carrot in Suthomadansih, as well as to analyze how the implementation of agropolitan program supports the value chain of carrot. Meanwhile, in order to investigate how the implementation of agropolitan program in suthomadansih supports to value chain of carrot, there are three indicators that will be identified; the development of supporting infrastructure, agribusiness system, and development of human resource (Iqbal and Iwan, 2009. Both of qualitative and quantitative analysis has been applied into the study with the performance table of the implementation of agropolitan program and value chain analysis as tool to conduct the analysis. Based on the value chain of carrot in Suthomadansih, some development programs from Local Government through the agropolitan program has been conducted from upstream to downstream of carrot commodity. However, some programs are failed to support the value chain of carrot so that the improvement of value chain of carrot could not be optimized. Those programs are Agribusiness Sub Terminal, Worta Cluster, Vitmaka, and Farm Road Improvement Program.The implementation of agropolitan program is not sustainable because of the absence of the budgets of local governments. The program is only implemented for 3 years (2007-2009 so that there are no significant effects of the program on the agricultural sector, especially for carrot commodity.

  10. Researches concerning nitrates and nitrites accumulation in carrots, along of the vegetation stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica NEGREA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with the determination of nitrates and nitrites content in carrots, in different vegetation stages of the carrot culture. High nitrates and nitrites concentration in vegetables is mainly due to excessive nitrogen content in the soil system, thus deteriorating the nutritional and hygienic values of products and complicating the processing and storage. The determination was tested on carrot samples assayed from an experimental field set up near Timisoara. In experimental field, to the carrot culture was administrated different doses of fertilizers (NPK and the samples for analysis were assayed in different phases of vegetation. The obtained results indicated that the highest level of nitrate in carrots was found to the variant b3 (N150P90K90 in experimental field, who was above maximum limit allowed (LMA. Maximum limit allowed for nitrates in carrots, in accordance with ORDER No. 293/640/2001-1/2002 regarding security and quality conditions for vegetables and fresh fruits for human consumption is 400 ppm. For all other samples of carrots the nitrates level was below of LMA. The nitrite content grows in case of fertilizer administration during the whole vegetation stages of the plant. In variant N150P90K90 the nitrite content was above (LMA in carrot samples in all stages of vegetation. The nitrite content in carrots should not exceed 1-2 ppm. Nitrate and nitrite content in carrots was done with the help of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC in the Laboratory for the Measurement of Residues of the Department of Agro-techniques of the U.S.A-V.M.B in Timisoara.

  11. Irradiation treatment of minimally processed carrots for ensuring microbiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf Chaudry, Muhammad; Bibi, Nizakat; Khan, Misal; Khan, Maazullah; Badshah, Amal; Jamil Qureshi, Muhammad

    2004-01-01

    Minimally processed fruits and vegetables are very common in developed countries and are gaining popularity in developing countries due to their convenience and freshness. However, minimally processing may result in undesirable changes in colour, taste and appearance due to the transfer of microbes from skin to the flesh. Irradiation is a well-known technology for elimination of microbial contamination. Food irradiation has been approved by 50 countries and is being applied commercially in USA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on the quality of minimally processed carrots. Fresh carrots were peeled, sliced and PE packaged. The samples were irradiated (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 kGy) and stored at 5 deg. C for 2 weeks. The samples were analyzed for hardness, organoleptic acceptance and microbial load at 0, 7th and 15th day. The mean firmness of the control and all irradiated samples remained between 4.31 and 4.42 kg of force, showing no adverse effect of radiation dose. The effect of storage (2 weeks) was significant (P 5 cfu/g, 3.0x10 2 and few colonies(>10) in all other irradiated samples(1.0, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 kGy) after 2 weeks storage. No coliform or E. coli were detected in any of the samples (radiated or control) immediately after irradiation and during the entire storage period in minimally processed carrots. A dose of 2.0 kGy completely controlled the fungal and bacterial counts. The irradiated samples (2.0 kGy) were also acceptable sensorially

  12. Irradiation treatment of minimally processed carrots for ensuring microbiological safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashraf Chaudry, Muhammad; Bibi, Nizakat; Khan, Misal; Khan, Maazullah; Badshah, Amal; Jamil Qureshi, Muhammad

    2004-10-01

    Minimally processed fruits and vegetables are very common in developed countries and are gaining popularity in developing countries due to their convenience and freshness. However, minimally processing may result in undesirable changes in colour, taste and appearance due to the transfer of microbes from skin to the flesh. Irradiation is a well-known technology for elimination of microbial contamination. Food irradiation has been approved by 50 countries and is being applied commercially in USA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on the quality of minimally processed carrots. Fresh carrots were peeled, sliced and PE packaged. The samples were irradiated (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 kGy) and stored at 5 deg. C for 2 weeks. The samples were analyzed for hardness, organoleptic acceptance and microbial load at 0, 7th and 15th day. The mean firmness of the control and all irradiated samples remained between 4.31 and 4.42 kg of force, showing no adverse effect of radiation dose. The effect of storage (2 weeks) was significant (P< 0.05) with values ranging between 4.28 and 4.39 kg of force. The total bacterial counts at 5 deg. C for non-irradiated and 0.5 kGy irradiated samples were 6.3x10{sup 5} cfu/g, 3.0x10{sup 2} and few colonies(>10) in all other irradiated samples(1.0, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 kGy) after 2 weeks storage. No coliform or E. coli were detected in any of the samples (radiated or control) immediately after irradiation and during the entire storage period in minimally processed carrots. A dose of 2.0 kGy completely controlled the fungal and bacterial counts. The irradiated samples (2.0 kGy) were also acceptable sensorially.

  13. Root cause study on hydrogen generation and explosion through radiation-induced electrolysis in the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Genn, E-mail: sajig@bd5.so-net.ne.jp

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Reviewed how LWRs have coped with “water radiolysis”, during normal operation to severe accidents. • Concluded “water radiolysis” is not likely a route course of the hydrogen explosions at Fukushima. • Performed modeling studies based on “radiation-induced electrolysis” on Unit 1–Unit 4. • Generation of several tens of thousands cubic meters hydrogen gas is predicted before the hydrogen explosions. • Upon SBO, early safe disposal of hydrogen from RPVs is indispensable in BWRs. - Abstract: Since the scientific cause for a series of hydrogen explosions during the Fukushima accident has not been established, the author investigated his basic theory named “radiation-induced electrolysis (RIE)” by applying the estimation of the amounts of H{sub 2} generation during the active phase of the Fukushima accident. The author's theory was originally developed by including Faraday's law of electrolysis into the basic time-dependent material balance equation of radiation-chemical species for his study on accelerated corrosion phenomena which is widely observed in aged plants. As such this theory applies to the early phase of the accident before the loss of water levels in the reactor cores, although the simulations were performed from the time of seismic reactor trip to the hydrogen explosions in this paper. Through this mechanism as much as 29,400 m{sup 3}-STP of hydrogen gas is estimated to be accumulated inside the PCV just prior to the hydrogen explosion which occurred one day after the reactor trip in 1F1. With this large volume of hydrogen gas the explosion was a viable possibility upon the “venting” operation. In view of this observation, hydrogen generation from the spent fuel pools was also investigated. For the investigation of the 1F4 SFP, the pool water temperature and flow velocity due to natural circulation were changed widely to identify conditions of large hydrogen generation. During the trial calculations

  14. Carrot (Daucus carota L.): Nephroprotective against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodimbaku, Vamsi; Pujari, Latha; Mullangi, Raviteja; Marri, Saisudheer

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Daucus carota L.(DC) commonly known as carrot, folkorically used as ethnomedicine to treat nephrosis and other urinary disorders. Hence, the present study was aimed to investigate the nephroprotective effects of ethanolic root extract of DC against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in Albino Wistar rats. Methods: Nephrotoxicity in rats was induced by intraperitoneal administration of gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day) for 8 days. Rats of either sex were divided into four groups (n = 6). Group 1 served as control that received normal saline (i.p.) whereas Group 2 (GM) was treated with gentamicin which served as gentamicin-intoxicated group. Group 3–4 (DC200, DC 400) were pretreated with DC at doses of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg (p.o.), respectively, 1 h before the gentamicin intoxication. Following treatment, the nephroprotective effects of DC were evaluated by using serum levels of urea, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), uric acid, and creatinine levels; change in body weight and wet kidney weight along with the histological observations among the experimental groups. Results: Gentamicin intoxication induced elevated serum urea, BUN, uric acid, and creatinine levels which was found to be significantly (P < 0.01) decreased in a dose-dependent manner in groups received DC which was also evidenced by the histological observations. Conclusion: DC showed a significant nephroprotective effect in a dose-dependent manner by ameliorating the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and thus authenticates its ethnomedicinal use. PMID:27127313

  15. Polyacetylenes from carrots (Daucus carota) improve glucose uptake in vitro in adipocytes and myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Houri, Rime B; Kotowska, Dorota; Christensen, Kathrine B; Bhattacharya, Sumangala; Oksbjerg, Niels; Wolber, Gerhard; Kristiansen, Karsten; Christensen, Lars P

    2015-07-01

    A dichloromethane (DCM) extract of carrot roots was found to stimulate insulin-dependent glucose uptake (GU) in adipocytes in a dose dependent manner. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the DCM extract resulted in the isolation of the polyacetylenes falcarinol and falcarindiol. Both polyacetylenes were able to significantly stimulate basal and/or insulin-dependent GU in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and porcine myotube cell cultures in a dose-dependent manner. Falcarindiol increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ-mediated transactivation significantly at concentrations of 3, 10 and 30 μM, while PPARγ-mediated transactivation by falcarinol was only observed at 10 μM. Docking studies accordingly indicated that falcarindiol binds to the ligand binding domain of PPARγ with higher affinity than falcarinol and that both polyacetylenes exhibit characteristics of PPARγ partial agonists. Falcarinol was shown to inhibit adipocyte differentiation as evident by gene expression studies and Oil Red O staining, whereas falcarindiol did not inhibit adipocyte differentiation, which indicates that these polyacetylenes have distinct modes of action. The results of the present study suggest that falcarinol and falcarindiol may represent scaffolds for novel partial PPARγ agonists with possible antidiabetic properties.

  16. Characterization of the carrot beta-tubulin gene coding a divergent isotype, beta-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, S; Naito, K; Sonehara, S; Ohkawa, H; Kuramori, S; Tatsuta, M; Minamizono, M; Kataoka, T

    1997-04-01

    Four different beta-tubulin clones were isolated from carrot genomic and cDNA libraries. Their nucleotide sequences were determined 1 and their predicted amino acids were compared with each other. The predicted amino acid composition of the C-terminal region of three of them (beta-1, 3, 4) resembled one another, but that of one isotype (beta-2) was divergent. The beta-2 tubulin included two hydroxyl amino acids, serine and threonine, and consisted of a lower number of negatively charged amino acids than the others in the C-terminal region. The predicted hydrophobicity profile of the beta-2 tubulin around the residue 200 is less hydrophobic than beta-1, but it is still more hydrophobic than those of animal and fungal beta-tubulins. The beta-2 gene was transcribed in cultured cells and flowers, while the beta-1 gene was ubiquitously transcribed in cultured cells, roots, shoots and flowers. When the predicted amino acids of plant tubulin were compared with those of other organisms, substitutions from non-polar amino acids to those with hydroxyl group were conspicuous in the region corresponding to the third exon in the plant genes.

  17. Carrot, Corn, Lettuce and Soybean Nutrient Contents are ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar, the carbon-rich material remaining after pyrolysis of cellulosic and manure feedstocks, has the potential as a soil amendment to sequester carbon and to improve soil water-holding and nutrient properties- thereby enhancing plant growth. However, biochar produced from some feedstocks also could adversely affect crop quality by changing soil pH and reducing nutrients (e.g., Ca, K, Mg, N, Na, and P) in plant tissues. To evaluate effects of biochar on the nutrient quality of four crops, we conducted a greenhouse study using pots with: carrot (Daucus carota cv. Tendersweet), corn (Zea mays, cv. Golden Bantam), lettuce (Lactuca sativa, cv. Black-Seeded Simpson) and soybean (Glycine max cv. Viking 2265). Plants were grown in one of two South Carolina sandy Coastal Plain soils (Norfolk and Coxville Soil Series), along with biochar (1% by weight) produced from pine chips (PC), poultry litter (PL), swine solids (SS), switchgrass (SG), and two blends of pine chips plus poultry litter (PC/PL, 50/50% and 80/20%). Each of the feedstocks and feedstock blends was pyrolyzed at 350, 500, and 700 ̊ C to produce the biochar used to amend the Norfolk and Coxville soils. Effects of biochar on leaf nutrients (% dry weight) statistically varied with species, soil, feedstock and temperature and nutrient. For carrot and lettuce, the PL, PL/PC, and SS biochars generally decreased leaf N, Ca, Mg, and P; while PL and PL/PC increased K and Na. Biochars had little effect on lea

  18. An elemental analysis of conventionally, organically and self-grown carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejčová, Anna; Návesník, Jakub; Jičínská, Jaroslava; Černohorský, Tomáš

    2016-02-01

    Conventionally-, organically- and self-grown carrots available across the Czech market were characterised based on their elemental, nitrate and dry matter content (218 samples, 20 parameters) in order to assess the quality of the carrots and address the question whether organic also means better. The results were compared with information describing the elemental composition of carrots published previously, recommended daily intakes, and legislative limits for contaminants in food. Significant differences in the amounts of Na, K, S, Al, Mn, Ni, As and Cd were observed between conventional and organic carrots. From the perspective of inter-element interactions, and the origin of these, a principal components analysis of the datasets found no significant differences between conventionally- and organically-grown carrots. For the consumer, it is valuable to know there are no differences between conventionally- and organically-grown carrots, and no potential harm arising from heavy metal contamination. Based on our data, carrots are an excellent source of potassium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantifying biochemical quality parameters in carrots (Daucus carota L.) - FT-Raman spectroscopy as efficient tool for rapid metabolite profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krähmer, Andrea; Böttcher, Christoph; Rode, Andrea; Nothnagel, Thomas; Schulz, Hartwig

    2016-12-01

    Application of FT-Raman spectroscopy for simultaneous quantification of carotenoids, carbohydrates, polyacetylenes and phenylpropanoids with high bioactive potential was investigated in storage roots of Daucus carota. Within single FT-Raman experiment carbohydrates, carotenoids, and polyacetylenes could be reliably quantified with high coefficients of determination of R(2)>0.91. The most abundant individual representatives of each compound class could be quantified with comparably high quality resulting in R(2)=0.97 and 0.96 for α-carotene and β-carotene, in R(2)=0.90 for falcarindiol (FaDOH), R(2)=0.99, 0.98 and 0.96 for fructose, glucose and sucrose. In contrast, application of FT-Raman spectroscopy for quantification of two laserine-type phenylpropanoids was investigated but failed due to low concentration and Raman response. Furthermore, evaluation of metabolic profiles by principle component analysis (PCA) revealed metabolic variety of carrot root composition depending on root color and botanical relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuro-Genetics of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) as the Root Cause of "Addiction Transfer": A New Phenomenon Common after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Bailey, John; Gonzalez, Anthony M; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Liu, Yijun; Giordano, John; Braverman, Eric; Gold, Mark

    2011-12-23

    Now after many years of successful bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries directed at the obesity epidemic clinicians are reporting that some patients are replacing compulsive overeating with newly acquired compulsive disorders such as alcoholism, gambling, drugs, and other addictions like compulsive shopping and exercise. This review article explores evidence from psychiatric genetic animal and human studies that link compulsive overeating and other compulsive disorders to explain the phenomenon of addiction transfer. Possibly due to neurochemical similarities, overeating and obesity may act as protective factors reducing drug reward and addictive behaviors. In animal models of addiction withdrawal from sugar induces imbalances in the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and dopamine, similar to opiate withdrawal. Many human neuroimaging studies have supported the concept of linking food craving to drug craving behavior. Previously our laboratory coined the term Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) for common genetic determinants in predicting addictive disorders and reported that the predictive value for future RDS behaviors in subjects carrying the DRD2 Taq A1 allele was 74%. While poly genes play a role in RDS, we have also inferred that disruptions in dopamine function may predispose certain individuals to addictive behaviors and obesity. It is now known that family history of alcoholism is a significant obesity risk factor. Therefore, we hypothesize here that RDS is the root cause of substituting food addiction for other dependencies and potentially explains this recently described Phenomenon (addiction transfer) common after bariatric surgery.

  1. Neuro-Genetics of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) as the Root Cause of “Addiction Transfer”: A New Phenomenon Common after Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Bailey, John; Gonzalez, Anthony M; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Liu, Yijun; Giordano, John; Braverman, Eric; Gold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Now after many years of successful bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries directed at the obesity epidemic clinicians are reporting that some patients are replacing compulsive overeating with newly acquired compulsive disorders such as alcoholism, gambling, drugs, and other addictions like compulsive shopping and exercise. This review article explores evidence from psychiatric genetic animal and human studies that link compulsive overeating and other compulsive disorders to explain the phenomenon of addiction transfer. Possibly due to neurochemical similarities, overeating and obesity may act as protective factors reducing drug reward and addictive behaviors. In animal models of addiction withdrawal from sugar induces imbalances in the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and dopamine, similar to opiate withdrawal. Many human neuroimaging studies have supported the concept of linking food craving to drug craving behavior. Previously our laboratory coined the term Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) for common genetic determinants in predicting addictive disorders and reported that the predictive value for future RDS behaviors in subjects carrying the DRD2 Taq A1 allele was 74%. While poly genes play a role in RDS, we have also inferred that disruptions in dopamine function may predispose certain individuals to addictive behaviors and obesity. It is now known that family history of alcoholism is a significant obesity risk factor. Therefore, we hypothesize here that RDS is the root cause of substituting food addiction for other dependencies and potentially explains this recently described Phenomenon (addiction transfer) common after bariatric surgery. PMID:23483116

  2. Fractionation of Plant Bioactives from Black Carrots (Daucus carota subspecies sativus varietas atrorubens Alef.) by Adsorptive Membrane Chromatography and Analysis of Their Potential Anti-Diabetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Rodríguez-Werner, Miriam; Schlösser, Anke; Liehr, Martin; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-07-27

    Black and purple carrots have attracted interest as colored extracts for coloring food due to their high content of anthocyanins. This study aimed to investigate the polyphenol composition of black carrots. Particularly, the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds of the variety Deep Purple carrot (DPC), which presents a very dark color, was performed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analyses. The separation of polyphenols from a DPC XAD-7 extract into an anthocyanin fraction (AF) and co-pigment fraction (CF; primarily phenolic acids) was carried out by membrane chromatography. Furthermore, possible anti-diabetic effects of the DPC XAD-7 extract and its AF and CF were determined. DPC samples (XAD-7, CF, and AF) inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, DPC XAD-7 and chlorogenic acid, but not DPC CF and DPC AF, caused a moderate inhibition of intestinal glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells. However, DPC samples did not affect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) activity. Overall, DPC exhibits an inhibitory effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity and on cellular glucose uptake indicating potential anti-diabetic properties.

  3. Structural and sensory characterization of compounds contributing to the bitter off-taste of carrots (Daucus carota L.) and carrot puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepa, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2003-06-18

    Sequential application of solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatography, and HPLC in combination with taste dilution analyses revealed that not a sole compound but a multiplicity of bitter tastants contribute to the bitter off-taste of cold-stored carrots and commercial carrot puree, respectively. Among these bitter compounds, 3-methyl-6-methoxy-8-hydroxy-3,4-dihydroisocoumarin (6-methoxymellein), 5-hydroxy-7-methoxy-2-methylchromone (eugenin), 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde (gazarin), (Z)-heptadeca-1,9-diene-4,6-diin-3,8-diol (falcarindiol), (Z)-heptadeca-1,9-diene-4,6-diin-3-ol (falcarinol), and (Z)-3-acetoxy-heptadeca-1,9-diene-4,6-diin-8-ol (falcarindiol 3-acetate) could be identified on the basis of MS as well as 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. Due to the low concentrations of falcarindiol in stored carrots and, even more pronounced, in carrot puree were found to be 9- and 13-fold above its low bitter detection concentration of 0.04 mmol/kg, thus demonstrating that this acetylenic diol significantly contributes to the bitter taste of the carrot products investigated.

  4. Reação de cultivares de alface a Thielaviopsis basicola Lettuce reaction to black root rot caused by Thielaviospsis basicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C Sala

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A alface é a folhosa de maior importância no Brasil. O presente trabalho visou determinar a reação de cultivares de alface à murchadeira provocada pelo fungo Thielaviopsis basicola, na fase juvenil. Um experimento foi conduzido em casa-de-vegetação em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 37 x 2 (cultivares, com e sem inoculação, com três repetições. Mudas com 30 dias foram transplantadas para bandejas de 128 células preenchidas com 1/3 de substrato colonizado com 7,5 x 10(5 conídios/g de substrato. Logo após o transplante, inoculou-se 3 mL de suspensão de esporos de concentração 2 x 10(6 conídios/mL, próximo ao colo de cada planta. A reação do hospedeiro ao patógeno e sua avaliação foi realizada utilizando escala de nota de 1 (ausência de sintomas a 5 (mais de 90% das raízes afetadas, com base na severidade da doença. Cultivares do tipo crespa e batavia foram todas resistentes. Cultivares do tipo americana e lisa apresentaram variação inter-varietal quanto à reação da hospedeira ao patógeno.Lettuce is the most important leafy crop in Brazil. The varietal reaction of four lettuce types to lettuce black root rot (LBRR caused by Thielaviopsis basicola at the juvenile stage were determined. The trial was carried out in controlled greenhouse conditions and arranged in completely randomized design, in a 37 x 2 (cultivars with and without inoculation cheme with three replications. 30-day old seedlings were transplanted to styrofoam tray of 128 cells filled with 1/3 of colonized substrate with 7,5 x 10(5 conidia/g of substrate. After transplant, seedlings were reinoculated with a spore suspension with 2 x 10(6 conidia/mL poured next to the seedling stem. Host reaction to the pathogen and its evaluation were performed according to a severity scale from 1 (absence of symptoms to 5 (more than 90% of rotted roots. Lettuce cultivars belonging to the loose leaf and batavia types were all resistant to

  5. Reduced ABA Accumulation in the Root System is Caused by ABA Exudation in Upland Rice (Oryza sativa L. var. Gaoshan1) and this Enhanced Drought Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu; Guo, Miaomiao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Yinggao; Liu, Rui; Xia, Yiji; Cui, Suxia; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-05-01

    Lowland rice (Nipponbare) and upland rice (Gaoshan 1) that are comparable under normal and moderate drought conditions showed dramatic differences in severe drought conditions, both naturally occurring long-term drought and simulated rapid water deficits. We focused on their root response and found that enhanced tolerance of upland rice to severe drought conditions was mainly due to the lower level of ABA in its roots than in those of the lowland rice. We first excluded the effect of ABA biosynthesis and catabolism on root-accumulated ABA levels in both types of rice by monitoring the expression of four OsNCED genes and two OsABA8ox genes. Next, we excluded the impact of the aerial parts on roots by suppressing leaf-biosynthesized ABA with fluridone and NDGA (nordihydroguaiaretic acid), and measuring the ABA level in detached roots. Instead, we proved that upland rice had the ability to export considerably more root-sourced ABA than lowland rice under severe drought, which improved ABA-dependent drought adaptation. The investigation of apoplastic pH in root cells and root anatomy showed that ABA leakage in the root system of upland rice was related to high apoplastic pH and the absence of Casparian bands in the sclerenchyma layer. Finally, taking some genes as examples, we predicted that different ABA levels in rice roots stimulated distinct ABA perception and signaling cascades, which influenced its response to water stress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Produtividade de cenoura e alface em sistema de consorciação Production of lettuce and carrot in an intercropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos S. Caetano

    1999-07-01

    , Regina-71, Vitória and Marisa. The carrot cultivar Brasília was used in both experiments. Lettuce cultivars were used in monoculture and in an intercropping with carrot. The experimental design comprised randomized blocks with four replications. For carrot, six treatments were analysed (monoculture and intercropping with five lettuce cultivars, and for lettuce, a factorial arrangement with two systems and five cultivars was used. Each experimental plot had the dimensions of 1 m x 1.5 m. The intercropping system efficiency was measured by the "Land Equivalent Ratio" (LER technique. For both experiments and crops, in monoculture and intercropping system, productions were considered suitable for marketing. However, when carrot was intercropped with the lettuce cultivar Marisa there was a decrease observed in carrot root quality. The LER values of 1.74 and 1.76 provide evidence that this practice was advantageous in both experiments, that is, to harvest the equivalent production of lettuce or carrot in a monoculture system there would be a need to increase the planted area by 74% and 76%, considering two years of experimentation, respectively

  7. Effect of simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration on quality characteristics of carrot slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects of various processing parameters on carrot slices exposed to infrared (IR) radiation heating for achieving simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD). The investigated parameters were product surface temperature, slice thickness and processing ti...

  8. Dof transcription factors in carrot: genome-wide analysis and their response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Huang, Ying; Li, Meng-yao; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhi-sheng; Xiong, Ai-sheng

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding one zinc finger (Dof) family transcription factors (TF) are involved in stress response. Dof TFs in carrot were identified and the responses of DcDof genes to abiotic stresses were analyzed. 46 DcDofs in carrot were identified from carrot genome database. Based on the conserved domain in Dof TF family of Arabidopsis thaliana, the DcDof TFs were divided into four classes, named class A, B, C and D. Carrot and Arabidopsis shared most motifs in the same subgroup. Real-time quantification PCR analysis showed tissue-specific expression patterns in DcDofs. DcDofs from eight subgroups responded to four abiotic stress treatments. The expression profiles were different with the abiotic stresses changed, indicating complicated regulatory mechanisms in Dof TF family in higher plant, and the response mechanisms of Dof genes may be influenced by different plant species.

  9. Detection and quantification of Leptographium wageneri, the cause of black-stain root disease, from bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North California using regular and real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Schweigkofler; William J. Otrosina; Sheri L. Smith; Daniel R. Cluck; Kevin Maeda; Kabir G. Peay; Matteo Garbelotto

    2005-01-01

    Black-stain root disease is a threat to conifer forests in western North America. The disease is caused by the ophiostomatoid fungus Leptographium wageneri (W.B. Kendr.) M.J. Wingf., which is associated with a number of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and weevil species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). We developed a polymerase chain reaction test...

  10. Herbicide contamination in carrot grown in punjab, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, M.; Ahmad, T.; Jahangir, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Food safety and security is a burning issue of the time whereas vegetable production is an important aspect of agriculture. Use of herbicides for vegetable production is very common in Pakistan but no proper procedure has been planned to keep optimal level of doses of herbicide under permissible limit. To estimate the pesticide residues, samples from the leading carrot producing sites were collected along with the samples from the market. The samples were processed using standard procedures and qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). It was concluded that all the samples were contaminated with S-metolachlor in the range of 0.45 to 0.73 mg kg-1 which was above the permissible limit (0.40 mg kg-1). (author)

  11. Effect of acidification on carrot (Daucus carota) juice cloud stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Alison K; Barrett, Diane M; Dungan, Stephanie R

    2014-11-26

    Effects of acidity on cloud stability in pasteurized carrot juice were examined over the pH range of 3.5-6.2. Cloud sedimentation, particle diameter, and ζ potential were measured at each pH condition to quantify juice cloud stability and clarification during 3 days of storage. Acidification below pH 4.9 resulted in a less negative ζ potential, an increased particle size, and an unstable cloud, leading to juice clarification. As the acidity increased, clarification occurred more rapidly and to a greater extent. Only a weak effect of ionic strength was observed when sodium salts were added to the juice, but the addition of calcium salts significantly reduced the cloud stability.

  12. Effect of carrot decoction on the gasric ulcer of white male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Suhatri Suhatri; Rusdi Rusdi; Emi Sugesti

    2015-01-01

    A study on the effect of carrot decoction to the gastric ulcer of white male rats induced by absolute ethanol 1 ml/200 g orally has been conducted. The study showed that carrot decoction in the doses of 3; 6; and 12 ml/kg could improve the ulcer by amount of 28.41; 46.79; and 75.76 %, respectively. The decoction could also reduce the pH of gastric juice significantly toward the normal level (P

  13. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L..., which is a field, where the corn has been grown must have been inspected at least once during the...

  14. Biochemical studies on weaning foods based legumes and carrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabag, Fatima Omer

    1997-01-01

    Attempts were made to utilize available food sources in formulation of weaning foods. Common legumes (chick pea and pigeon pea ) were used as protein source. While dehydrated carrots powder were used as a vitamin A source. Addition of 25% chick pea increased the protein content of the weaning foods to 16.7% and 14.4%,respectively ,while Cerelac and Riri gave protein content of 15.3% and 7.3%,respectively. In corporation of carrots at 10% level gave a vitamin A content of 564 RE/100 g material. Weaning food containing chick pea recorded higher preference among panelists and significantly better (p≤0.05)than samples containing pigeon pea. The bulk density of newly developed based formulae CP 3 , PP 3 (0.7 g/ml, 0.8 g/ml, respectively ) was higher than the market weaning food Cerelac and Riri (0.6 g/ml and 0.5 g/ml,respectively )The formula CP 3 recorded lower hot paste viscosity (3500 cp.) than both values obtained for Cerelac (4500 cp.) and Riri (extremely viscous). The lysine content of CP 3 (3.9 g/100 g protein) was higher than respective values in market foods and for better when calculated per weaning material (0.65 g/100 g material) compared to the other products (0.57; 0.28 g/100 material of Cerelac and Riri, respectively). Chick pea-based formula (CP 3 ) was also found to possess higher in vitro protein didestibility (95.2%) compared to Cerelac (94.2%) and Riri (88.5%). The calculated protein efficiency ratio (C-PER) of CP 3 (1.7) was higher than that of Riri (1.6) and lower than that of cerelac (2.7). (Author)

  15. Vitamin C content and sensorial properties of dehydrated carrots blanched conventionally or by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Cristina Soria, A; Pérez-Mateos, Miriam; Carrasco, J Atanasio; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar

    2013-01-15

    Vitamin C content and sensorial properties have been evaluated in air-dried carrots previously subjected to different ultrasound (US) or conventional blanching pretreatments. In addition, mass spectral fingerprints obtained by the Headspace ChemSensor System have been evaluated for the first time for classification of carrots according to their processing. Conventional blanching treatments at high temperature gave rise to carrots with retention of vitamin C in the range 37.5-85%, whereas carrots blanched conventionally at 60°C and by US-probe at temperatures up to 60 and 70°C showed vitamin C retention values lower than 4%. Regarding sensorial analysis of rehydrated carrots, US-pretreated samples presented acceptable quality, and no statistically significant differences with respect to conventionally blanched carrots, were detected. In spite of this, differentiation of samples processed under comparable intensity conditions and/or with similar composition was possible from their mass spectral fingerprints after chemometric data analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Production of Bioethanol from Carrot Pomace Using the Thermotolerant Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi-Yang Yu; Bo-Hong Jiang; Kow-Jen Duan [Tatung University, Tapei, Taiwan (China). Department of Bioengineering

    2013-03-15

    Carrot pomace, a major agricultural waste from the juice industry, was used as a feedstock for bioethanol production by fermentation with the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus. Treatment of the carrot pomace with Accellerase(TM) 1000 and pectinase at 50 °C for 84 h, resulted in conversion of 42% of its mass to fermentable sugars, mainly glucose, fructose, and sucrose. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 42 °C was performed on 10% (w/v) carrot pomace; the concentration of ethanol reached 18 g/L and the yield of ethanol from carrot pomace was 0.18 g/g. The highest ethanol concentration of 37 g/L was observed with an additional charge of 10% supplemented to the original 10% of carrot pomace after 12 h; the corresponding yield was 0.185 g/g. Our results clearly demonstrated the potential of combining a SSF process with thermotolerant yeast for the production of bioethanol using carrot pomace as a feedstock.

  17. Quality review of an adverse incident reporting system and root cause analysis of serious adverse surgical incidents in a teaching hospital of Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorsandi Maziar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant proportion of surgical patients are unintentionally harmed during their hospital stay. Root Cause Analysis (RCA aims to determine the aetiology of adverse incidents that lead to patient harm and produce a series of recommendations, which would minimise the risk of recurrence of similar events, if appropriately applied to clinical practice. A review of the quality of the adverse incident reporting system and the RCA of serious adverse incidents at the Department of Surgery of Ninewells hospital, in Dundee, United Kingdom was performed. Methods The Adverse Incident Management (AIM database of the Department of Surgery of Ninewells Hospital was retrospectively reviewed. Details of all serious (red, sentinel incidents recorded between May 2004 and December 2009, including the RCA reports and outcomes, where applicable, were reviewed. Additional related information was gathered by interviewing the involved members of staff. Results The total number of reported surgical incidents was 3142, of which 81 (2.58% cases had been reported as red or sentinel. 19 of the 81 incidents (23.4% had been inappropriately reported as red. In 31 reports (38.2% vital information with regards to the details of the adverse incidents had not been recorded. In 12 cases (14.8% the description of incidents was of poor quality. RCA was performed for 47 cases (58% and only 12 cases (15% received recommendations aiming to improve clinical practice. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate the need for improvement in the quality of incident reporting. There are enormous benefits to be gained by this time and resource consuming process, however appropriate staff training on the use of this system is a pre-requisite. Furthermore, sufficient support and resources are required for the implementation of RCA recommendations in clinical practice.

  18. Clostridium difficile multidisciplinary team root cause analysis: impact on clinical care and circumvention of financial penalties posed by clinical commissioning groups, but at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Kordo; Petridou, Christina; Gray, Hazel; Dryden, Matthew; Davis-Blues, Karen; Lucero, Sheryl; Parker, Natalie; Keyser, Taryn; Matthews, Tanya; Cortes, Nick; Kidd, Stephen; Thomas, Claire; Peacock, Heather; Hornzee, Joanna; Wake, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    In Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, in addition to an on-the-spot investigation into hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) by the infection prevention team, a multidisciplinary team root cause analysis (MDT-RCA) forum has been developed. The MDT-RCA aims to deliver a more thorough investigation into individual cases and the recommendation of cases to the clinical commissioning groups (CCG) appeals panel against potential financial penalties (£10,000 per breached case). We mainly aimed to investigate the financial impact of MDT-RCAs to the Trust. Over two years, 84 cases of hospital-onset CDI cases were reviewed by the MDT-RCA forum. Among this cohort, no additional learning outcomes were identified by the MDT-RCAs over those that were found by on-the-spot investigations. In total, 543 staff members attended the MDT-RCAs at a potential cost to the Trust of £23,795.74-£51,670.10. The Trust appealed against financial penalties for 27 cases and 14 were successful, i.e. £140,000 would have been avoided had targets been breached by 14 cases. However, targets were only breached by two cases, meaning only £20,000 in fines was avoided. Deducting this from the total costs of the MDT-RCA meant the Trust lost £3,795.74-£31,670.10. Over the two years reviewed, the MDT-RCA proved to be costly to the Trust, with no additional learning or quality improvement measures identified.

  19. Root cause investigation of catastrophic degradation in high power multi-mode InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; Ives, Neil; Presser, Nathan; Moss, Steven C.

    2010-02-01

    Optimization of broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained-quantum-well lasers has led to successful demonstration of high power and high efficient operation for industrial applications. State-of-the-art broad-area single emitters show an optical output power of over 20W and a power conversion efficiency of over 70% under CW operation. However, understanding of long-term reliability and degradation processes of these devices is still poor. This paper investigates the root causes of catastrophic degradation in broad-area lasers by performing accelerated lifetests of these devices and failure mode analyses of degraded devices using various techniques. We investigated MOCVDgrown broad-area strained InGaAs-AlGaAs single QW lasers at ~975nm. Our study included both passivated and unpassivated broad-area lasers that yielded catastrophic failures at the facet and also in the bulk. Our accelerated lifetests generated failures at different stages of degradation by forcing them to reach a preset drop in optical output power. Deep-level-transient-spectroscopy (DLTS) was employed to study deep traps in degraded devices. Trap densities and capture cross-sections were estimated from a series of degraded devices to understand the role that point defects and extended defects play in degradation processes via recombination enhanced defect reaction. Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) was employed to find correlation between dark line defects in degraded lasers and test stress conditions. Time-resolved electroluminescence (EL) was employed to study formation and progression of dark spots and dark lines in real time to understand mechanisms leading to catastrophic facet and bulk degradation. Lastly, we present our physics-of-failure-based model of catastrophic degradation processes in these broad-area lasers.

  20. Desempenho agroeconômico do bicultivo de alface em sistema solteiro e consorciado com cenoura Agrieconomic performance of lettuce under bicropping, sole crop and intercropped with carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Q. de Oliveira

    2004-12-01

    ções', tiveram os melhores indicadores agroeconômicos, com índices de uso eficiente da terra de 2,16 e 2,15, taxas de retorno de 2,05 e 2,33, e índices de lucratividade de 53,92% e 59,83%, respectivamente.Two experiments were carried out from September to May 2002, in Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil, to evaluate the agrieconomic performance of two lettuce groups under bicropping, sole crop and intercropping system with two carrot cultivars (Alvorada and Brasília in a strip-intercropping arrangement. The experimental design was of group balanced blocks with four replications. The evaluated lettuce cvs. were from the crispleaf group (Lucy Brown, Tainá, Laurel and Verônica and looseleaf group (Babá de Verão, Maravilha das Quatro Estações, Elisa and Carolina. In the intercropping experiment, the split-plot scheme was used. In the plots the carrot cvs. were assigned and in the subplots the lettuce cvs. of both groups. From the lettuce cvs. were obtained data of leaf yield and, for the carrot cvs. were obtained total and commercial yield, besides the root classes. Agrieconomic indices such as land equivalent ratio, gross and net income, monetary advantage, rate of return and profit margin were used to measure the efficiency of intercropping systems. No significant interaction was obtained between carrot and lettuce cvs. in yield of both crops. Carrot cvs. did not influence crop yield and lettuce cvs. had no influence on carrot yield. In the bicropping of lettuce with carrot, the cvs. Lucy Brown and Tainá (crispleaf group and Babá de Verão and Maravilha das Quatro Estações (looseleaf group had presented the best yield performance in the first planting. In the second planting, only cv. Maravilha das Quatro Estações of looseleaf lettuce group had presented the best performance under intercropping. Lettuce cvs. of crispleaf group intercropped with carrot had presented the best yield performance when compared to those of the looseleaf group. The intercropping

  1. Quantitative studies and sensory analyses on the influence of cultivar, spatial tissue distribution, and industrial processing on the bitter off-taste of carrots (Daucus carota l.) and carrot products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepa, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2004-07-14

    Although various reports pointed to 6-methoxymellein (1) as a key player imparting the bitter taste in carrots, activity-guided fractionation experiments recently gave evidence that not this isocoumarin but bisacetylenic oxylipins contribute mainly to the off-taste. Among these, (Z)-heptadeca-1,9-dien-4,6-diyn-3-ol (2), (Z)-3-acetoxy-heptadeca-1,9-dien-4,6-diyn-8-ol (3), and (Z)-heptadeca-1,9-dien-4,6-diyn-3,8-diol (falcarindiol, 4) have been successfully identified. In the present study, an analytical procedure was developed enabling an accurate quantitation of 1-4 in carrots and carrot products. To achieve this, (E)-heptadeca-1,9-dien-4,6-diyn-3,8-diol was synthesized as a suitable internal standard for the quantitative analysis of the bisacetylenes. On the basis of taste activity values, calculated as the ratio of the concentration and the human sensory threshold of a compound, a close relationship between the concentration of 4 and the intensity of the bitter off-taste in carrots, carrot puree, and carrot juice was demonstrated, thus showing that compound 4 might offer a new analytical measure for an objective evaluation of the quality of carrot products. Quantitative analysis on the intermediate products in industrial carrot processing revealed that removing the peel as well as green parts successfully decreased the concentrations in the final carrot puree by more than 50%.

  2. Phytophthora cinnamon causing stem canker and root rot of nursery-grown Platanus × acerifolia: first report in the Northern emisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo PILOTTI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lethal stem and root cankers were observed in nursery-grown Platanus × acerifolia trees in Rome. Externally, canker lesions appeared as bluish or blackish areas starting from the stem base and extending upward. Inner bark was necrotised. In some cases an irregularly-shaped callus reaction attempted to heal the bark lesions. Black-stained necrosis affected the primary roots and the small branch roots to different degrees. The presence of Ceratocystis platani was excluded in the diseased trees. Phytophthora-like organisms were isolated from the altered tissue. Morphological and ITS-region-based analyses identified the isolates as Phytophthora cinnamomi. A pathogenicity test confirmed P. cinnamomi as the causal agent of the disease here defined as: stem canker and root rot of plane tree. This is the first report of P. cinnamomi in Platanus spp. in the Northern emisphere.

  3. Influence of carrot pomace powder on the rheological characteristics of wheat flour dough and on wheat rolls quality

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatica Kohajdová; Jolana Karovičová; Michaela Jurasová

    2012-01-01

    Background.Vegetable by-products are considered as good sources of dietary fibre and other biologically important compounds. Moreover, they are inexpensive and are available in large quantities. The objective of this study was to determine chemical composition and hydration properties of dietary fibrerich carrot pomace powder. The impact supplementation of carrot pomace at different levels (replacing of fine wheat flour with 1, 3, 5 and 10% of carrot pomace) on farinographic properties of whe...

  4. Identification and Characterization of DcUSAGT1, a UDP-Glucose: Sinapic Acid Glucosyltransferase from Purple Carrot Taproots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Purple carrots accumulate abundant cyanidin-based anthocyanins in taproots. UDP-glucose: sinapic acid glucosyltransferase (USAGT can transfer the glucose moiety to the carboxyl group of sinapic acid thereby forming the ester bond between the carboxyl-C and the C1 of glucose (1-O-sinapoylglucose. 1-O-sinapoylglucose can serve as an acyl donor in acylation of anthocyanins and generate cyanidin 3-xylosyl (sinapoylglucosyl galactoside in purple carrots. This final product helps stabilize the accumulation of anthocyanins. In this study, a gene named DcUSAGT1 encoding USAGT was cloned from 'Deep purple' carrot taproots. Enzymatic activity was determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The optimal temperature and pH value were 30°C and 7.0, respectively. Kinetic analysis suggested a Km (sinapic acid of 0.59 mM. Expression profiles of DcUSAGT1 showed high expression levels in the taproots of all the three purple carrot cultivars but low expression levels in those of non-purple carrot cultivars. The USAGT activity of different carrots in vitro indicated that crude enzyme extracted from the purple carrot taproots rather than non-purple carrot taproots exhibited USAGT activity. These results indicated that DcUSAGT1 may influence anthocyanin biosynthesis of purple carrot taproots.

  5. Characterization of a deep-coverage carrot (Daucus carota L.) BAC library and initial analysis of BAC-end sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, Pablo F; Chung, Sang-Min; Szklarczyk, Marek; Grzebelus, Dariusz; Senalik, Douglas; Atkins, Anne E; Simon, Philipp W

    2009-03-01

    Carrot is the most economically important member of the Apiaceae family and a major source of provitamin A carotenoids in the human diet. However, carrot molecular resources are relatively underdeveloped, hampering a number of genetic studies. Here, we report on the synthesis and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of carrot. The library is 17.3-fold redundant and consists of 92,160 clones with an average insert size of 121 kb. To provide an overview of the composition and organization of the carrot nuclear genome we generated and analyzed 2,696 BAC-end sequences (BES) from nearly 2,000 BACs, totaling 1.74 Mb of BES. This analysis revealed that 14% of the BES consists of known repetitive elements, with transposable elements representing more than 80% of this fraction. Eleven novel carrot repetitive elements were identified, covering 8.5% of the BES. Analysis of microsatellites showed a comparably low frequency for these elements in the carrot BES. Comparisons of the translated BES with protein databases indicated that approximately 10% of the carrot genome represents coding sequences. Moreover, among eight dicot species used for comparison purposes, carrot BES had highest homology to protein-coding sequences from tomato. This deep-coverage library will aid carrot breeding and genetics.

  6. A MYB transcription factor, DcMYB6, is involved in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in purple carrot taproots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Feng, Kai; Que, Feng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2017-03-27

    Carrots are widely grown and enjoyed around the world. Purple carrots accumulate rich anthocyanins in the taproots, while orange, yellow, and red carrots accumulate rich carotenoids in the taproots. Our previous studies indicated that variation in the activity of regulatory genes may be responsible for variations in anthocyanin production among various carrot cultivars. In this study, an R2R3-type MYB gene, designated as DcMYB6, was isolated from a purple carrot cultivar. In a phylogenetic analysis, DcMYB6 was grouped into an anthocyanin biosynthesis-related MYB clade. Sequence analyses revealed that DcMYB6 contained the conserved bHLH-interaction motif and two atypical motifs of anthocyanin regulators. The expression pattern of DcMYB6 was correlated with anthocyanin production. DcMYB6 transcripts were detected at high levels in three purple carrot cultivars but at much lower levels in six non-purple carrot cultivars. Overexpression of DcMYB6 in Arabidopsis led to enhanced anthocyanin accumulation in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and upregulated transcript levels of all seven tested anthocyanin-related structural genes. Together, these results show that DcMYB6 is involved in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in purple carrots. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of anthocyanin synthesis in purple carrot cultivars.

  7. Training health care professionals in root cause analysis: a cross-sectional study of post-training experiences, benefits and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Skinner, Joe; de Wet, Carl

    2013-02-07

    Root cause analysis (RCA) originated in the manufacturing engineering sector but has been adapted for routine use in healthcare to investigate patient safety incidents and facilitate organizational learning. Despite the limitations of the RCA evidence base, healthcare authorities and decision makers in NHS Scotland - similar to those internationally - have invested heavily in developing training programmes to build local capacity and capability, and this is a cornerstone of many organizational policies for investigating safety-critical issues. However, to our knowledge there has been no systematic attempt to follow-up and evaluate post-training experiences of RCA-trained staff in Scotland. Given the significant investment in people, time and funding we aimed to capture and learn from the reported experiences, benefits and attitudes of RCA-trained staff and the perceived impact on healthcare systems and safety. We adapted a questionnaire used in a published Australian research study to undertake a cross sectional online survey of health care professionals (e.g. nursing & midwifery, medical doctors and pharmacists) formally trained in RCA by a single territorial health board region in NHS Scotland. A total of 228/469 of invited staff completed the survey (48%). A majority of respondents had yet to participate in a post-training RCA investigation (n=127, 55.7%). Of RCA-experience staff, 71 had assumed a lead investigator role (70.3%) on one or more occasions. A clear majority indicated that their improvement recommendations were generally or partly implemented (82%). The top three barriers to RCA success were cited as: lack of time (54.6%), unwilling colleagues (34%) and inter-professional differences (31%). Differences in agreement levels between RCA-experienced and inexperienced respondents were noted on whether a follow-up session would be beneficial after conducting RCA (65.3% v 39.4%) and if peer feedback on RCA reports would be of educational value (83.2% v 37

  8. Evaluation of microbial products for the control of zucchini foot and root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. cucurbitae race 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta ROBERTI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial products containing bacteria (Cedomon [Pseudomonas chlororaphis MA342, PC-MA342], Mycostop [Streptomyces sp. K61, SG-K61], Proradix®Agro [Pseudomonas sp. DSMZ13134, PS-DSMZ13134] and fungi (Clonotry [Trichoderma harzianum and Clonostachys rosea, TH+CR], Remedier [T. asperellum ICC012 and T. gamsii ICC080, TA-ICC012+TG-ICC080], Rootshield WP [T. harzianum T22, TH-T22] were tested for efficacy against Fusarium solani f. sp. cucurbitae race 1 (FSC7 strain on zucchini. They were applied to seeds (S, plant growth substrate (PGS and both (S+PGS in a growth chamber experiment, and to PGS, transplantation soil mixture (TSM and both (PGS+TSM in a greenhouse experiment. FSC7 was inoculated in PGS at sowing time in the growth chamber and in TSM at transplant in the greenhouse. In the growth chamber, the most effective products were Cedomon (S and S+PGS treatments, Rootshield (PGS treatment and Proradix (S+PGS treatment, reducing the disease by 39.7, 43.1, 25.8 and 36.4%, respectively. In the greenhouse, all tested products applied to PGS reduced the disease severity and more markedly when applied to PGS+TSM. In the PGS and PGS+TSM treatments, Cedomon was the most effective product showing a disease decrease by 42.4 and 59.5%, respectively. The data obtained in vivo were consistent with the ability of the antagonists to colonize zucchini rhizosphere and with their inhibitory effects on the growth of the pathogen in in vitro assays. The bacteria caused the greatest growth inhibition of FSC7 showing abnormal morphology, while Trichoderma spp. parasitized FSC7 hyphae. Bacteria were the most active in reducing pathogen colony growth through antibiotic metabolites. All antagonists produced exo- and endochitinase enzymes. Trichoderma strains showed greater levels of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase and endochitinase, whereas SG-K61 was the most active producer of chitin 1,4-β-chitobiosidase. These results indicate that the studied bioproducts have potential

  9. Training health care professionals in root cause analysis: a cross-sectional study of post-training experiences, benefits and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowie Paul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root cause analysis (RCA originated in the manufacturing engineering sector but has been adapted for routine use in healthcare to investigate patient safety incidents and facilitate organizational learning. Despite the limitations of the RCA evidence base, healthcare authorities and decision makers in NHS Scotland – similar to those internationally - have invested heavily in developing training programmes to build local capacity and capability, and this is a cornerstone of many organizational policies for investigating safety-critical issues. However, to our knowledge there has been no systematic attempt to follow-up and evaluate post-training experiences of RCA-trained staff in Scotland. Given the significant investment in people, time and funding we aimed to capture and learn from the reported experiences, benefits and attitudes of RCA-trained staff and the perceived impact on healthcare systems and safety. Methods We adapted a questionnaire used in a published Australian research study to undertake a cross sectional online survey of health care professionals (e.g. nursing & midwifery, medical doctors and pharmacists formally trained in RCA by a single territorial health board region in NHS Scotland. Results A total of 228/469 of invited staff completed the survey (48%. A majority of respondents had yet to participate in a post-training RCA investigation (n=127, 55.7%. Of RCA-experience staff, 71 had assumed a lead investigator role (70.3% on one or more occasions. A clear majority indicated that their improvement recommendations were generally or partly implemented (82%. The top three barriers to RCA success were cited as: lack of time (54.6%, unwilling colleagues (34% and inter-professional differences (31%. Differences in agreement levels between RCA-experienced and inexperienced respondents were noted on whether a follow-up session would be beneficial after conducting RCA (65.3% v 39.4% and if peer feedback on RCA

  10. Orthodontic Treatment of Maxillary Incisors with Severe Root Resorption Caused by Bilateral Canine Impaction in a Class II Division 1 Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Na-Young; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Cho, Jin-Hyoung; An, Ki-Yong; Chae, Jong-Moon

    2016-01-01

    This case report shows the successful alignment of bilateral impacted maxillary canines. A 12-year-old male with the chief complaint of the protrusion of his maxillary anterior teeth happened to have bilateral maxillary canine impaction on the labial side of his maxillary incisors. Four maxillary incisors showed severe root resorption because of the impacted canines. The patient was diagnosed as skeletal Class II malocclusion with proclined maxillary incisors. The impacted canine was carefully retracted using sectional buccal arch wires to avoid further root resorption of the maxillary incisors. To distalize the maxillary dentition, two palatal miniscrews were used. After 25 months of treatment, the maxillary canines were well aligned without any additional root resorption of the maxillary incisors.

  11. Isolation, Purification and Characterization of Two Laccases from Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and Their Response to Abiotic and Metal Ions Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Laccases, which belong to the blue copper oxidase enzyme family, oxidize many organic and inorganic compounds. The laccase-encoding genes DcLac1 and DcLac2 were isolated from the economically important tuberous root carrot, and their proteins were successfully expressed and purified using the Escherichia coli expression system BL21(DE3). DcLac1 and DcLac2 had molecular masses of approximately 64 and 61.9 kDa, respectively. With 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate acid) as the substrate, DcLac1 and DcLac2 had K m values of 3.9043 and 1.255 mM, respectively, and V max values of 54.0832 and 81.7996 μM mg(-1) min(-1), respectively. Moreover, DcLac1 and DcLac2 had optimal pH values of 2.8 and 2.6, respectively, and optimal temperatures of 45 and 40 °C, respectively. The activities of the two enzymes were promoted by Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Na(+) but inhibited by Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), K(+), SDS, and EDTA. Expression profiles showed that the two DcLac genes had almost identical responses to high and low temperature stresses but different responses to salt, drought, and metal stresses. This study provided insights into the characteristics and tolerance response mechanisms of laccase in carrot.

  12. Effect of thermal processing on physico-chemical properties of dietary fibre in carrot and red beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Elkner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal processing (boiling in water and steaming on changes in dietary fibre fractions and the functional properties of carrot and red beet fibre were studied. Boiling in water caused significantly larger changes in qualitative and quantitative composition of the vegetable fibre than steaming. It was observed that boiling resulted in an increase of the neutral detergent fibre (NDF, cellulose, a slight increase in lignin content and decrease of hemicellulose. Boiling of these vegetables in water, in comparison to steaming, affected the changes of functional properties of fibre. After boiling in water the ability of water holding capacity of fibre was increased, whereas the cation exchange capacity was decreased.

  13. Carrot β-carotene degradation and isomerization kinetics during thermal processing in the presence of oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knockaert, Griet; Pulissery, Sudheer K; Lemmens, Lien; Van Buggenhout, Sandy; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2012-10-17

    The effect of thermal processing (85-130 °C) on the stability and isomerization of β-carotene in both an olive oil/carrot emulsion and an olive oil phase enriched with carrot β-carotene was studied. During processing, degradation of total β-carotene took place. Initially, total β-carotene concentration decreased quickly, after which a plateau value was reached, which was dependent on the applied temperature. In the oil/carrot emulsion, the total β-carotene concentration could be modeled by a fractional conversion model. The temperature dependence of the degradation rate constants was described by the activation energy and was estimated to be 45.0 kJ/mol. In the enriched oil phase, less degradation took place and the results could not be modeled. Besides degradation, β-carotene isomerization was studied. In both matrices, a fractional conversion model could be used to model total isomerization and formation of 13-Z- and 15-Z-β-carotene. β-Carotene isomerization was similar in both the oil/carrot emulsion and enriched oil phase as the simultaneously estimated kinetic parameters (isomerization reaction rate constant and activation energy) of both matrices did not differ significantly. The activation energies of isomerization were estimated to be 70.5 and 75.0 kJ/mol in the oil/carrot emulsion and enriched oil phase, respectively.

  14. Development and sensory evaluation of yogurt added of “caviar” of carrot by children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richtier Gonçalves Cruz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed investigated to the preparation of yogurt with addition of “caviar” carrot and realize carried out sensory analysis of acceptance by children from elementary school. The “caviar” was prepared using the spherification technique with sodium alginate and added to the beaten-type yogurt without pulp addition at the ratio of one portion of the carrot for one portion of yogurt. Were conducted microbiological analyses and subsequently the sensory evaluation with children. The microbiological analyses showed that the product was fit for consumption. The average score in points obtained in the sensory analysis with 52 children was 6.7 (with 6.6 in males and 6.8 in females, it is that girls had higher scores (p < 0.05. The general index of acceptability to yogurt with “caviar” of carrot was 95.70%. It concludes that yogurt plus “caviar” carrot sensory was accepted because it presents high notes reflecting on their acceptability index, suggesting that this product is used as an alternative to increase the consumption of carrots by children.

  15. Ionizing radiation from Chernobyl affects development of wild carrot plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratyński, Zbyszek; Arias, Javi Miranda; Garcia, Cristina; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Pajares, Antonio Jesús Muñoz; Piwczyński, Marcin; Tukalenko, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Radioactivity released from disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima is a global hazard and a threat to exposed biota. To minimize the deleterious effects of stressors organisms adopt various strategies. Plants, for example, may delay germination or stay dormant during stressful periods. However, an intense stress may halt germination or heavily affect various developmental stages and select for life history changes. Here, we test for the consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation on plant development. We conducted a common garden experiment in an uncontaminated greenhouse using 660 seeds originating from 33 wild carrots (Daucus carota) collected near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. These maternal plants had been exposed to radiation levels that varied by three orders of magnitude. We found strong negative effects of elevated radiation on the timing and rates of seed germination. In addition, later stages of development and the timing of emergence of consecutive leaves were delayed by exposure to radiation. We hypothesize that low quality of resources stored in seeds, damaged DNA, or both, delayed development and halted germination of seeds from plants exposed to elevated levels of ionizing radiation. We propose that high levels of spatial heterogeneity in background radiation may hamper adaptive life history responses.

  16. Interferência de plantas daninhas na cultura da cenoura (Daucus carota Weed interference on carrot crop (Daucus carota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Coelho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A cenoura é uma importante hortaliça no Brasil, cuja produtividade pode ser muito reduzida devido à interferência de plantas daninhas. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar efeitos de períodos de convivência das plantas daninhas na produtividade da cenoura cultivar "Brasília" e na comunidade de plantas daninhas. Os tratamentos foram constituídos de períodos crescentes de convivência ou controle das plantas daninhas. A comunidade de plantas daninhas foi avaliada quanto a número de indivíduos, matéria seca acumulada e frequência de ocorrência das espécies, e a cultura, quanto à produtividade comercial. As principais plantas daninhas foram Ageratum conyzoides, Digitaria nuda, Eleusine indica e Lepidium virginicum. A presença da comunidade de plantas daninhas durante todo o ciclo da cultura pode acarretar perdas de 94% na produtividade, evidenciando alta suscetibilidade da cenoura à interferência das plantas daninhas. Contudo, não houve período crítico de prevenção à interferência, e um único controle das plantas daninhas, entre 22 e 31 dias após a semeadura, foi suficiente para garantir a produção da cultura.Carrot is an important horticultural crop in Brazil, and its productivity may be highly reduced due to weed interference. This study evaluated the effects of weed coexistence periods on carrot cultivar 'Brasilia' yield and on the weed community. The treatments were constituted of increasing weed coexistence periods or weed-free periods. The weed community was evaluated based on number of individuals, dry matter accumulation, and frequency of occurrence; while the crop was evaluated based on marketable productivity. The main weeds were Ageratum conyzoides, Digitaria nuda, Eleusine indica, and Lepidium virginicum. The presence of the weed community throughout the crop season can cause yield losses of 94%, showing high susceptibility of the carrot crop to weed interference. However, there was no critical period for

  17. Different arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are present in carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell culture medium and in seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immerzeel, P.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Vries, de S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) were isolated by Yariv phenylglycoside precipitation from the medium of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell cultures and from carrot seeds. The isolates showed a different composition of AGPs. The medium AGPs contained an arabinose poor AGP fraction that had relatively

  18. Use of low doses of cobalt 60 gamma radiation on beet (Beta vulgaris L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seed to stimulate increase yield; Emprego da radiacao gama do cobalto 60 em sementes de beterraba (Beta vulgaris L.), cenoura (Daucus carota L.) e rabanete (Raphanus sativus L.) para estimular o aumento da producao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovi, Jose Eduardo

    2000-07-01

    The research had the aim of evaluating the effects of low doses of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation on seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cultiva Champion, cultivars Nantes Forto (european origin) and Brasilia (Rio Grande do Sul origin) carrot (Daucus carota L. var. sativus (Hoffm.) Thell), and red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) cultivar Tall Top Early Wonder before sowing, its effects on plant growth, on the yield and roots storage of two tillages: with sowing in the same day of radiation and six days after radiation seeds. The data showed that the seeds radiation did not interfered negatively on plants growth, and the species presented differences as roots production and doses on both plantation: radish with 5,0 Gy and 2,5 Gy doses respectively to the first and the second sowings, Brasilia carrot with 2,5 Gy dose to both sowings. Nantes carrot with 2,5 Gy and 5,0 Gy respectively to the first and the second sowings, and beet with 7,5 Gy and 5,0 Gy respectively to the first and the second plantations. There is not statistics difference by Tukey test (5% and 1%) and none relation between seeds radiation and loss weight on roots storage. (author)

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF PRETREATMENT CONDITIONS OF CARROTS TO MAXIMIZE JUICE RECOVERY BY RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. SHARMA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Carrot juice was expressed in a hydraulic press using a wooden set up. Carrot samples pretreated at different designed combinations, using Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD, Response Surface Methodology (RSM, of pH, temperature and time were expressed and juice so obtained was characterized for various physico-chemical parameters which involved yield, TSS and water content, reducing sugars, total sugars and color (absorbance. The study indicated that carrots exposed to the different pretreatment conditions resulted in increased amount of yield than that of the control. The responses were optimized by numerical method and were found to be 78.23% yield, 0.93% color (abs, 3.41% reducing sugars, 5.53% total sugars, 6.69obrix, and 90.50% water content. All the derived mathematical models for the various responses were found to be fit significantly to predict the data.

  20. Effects of harvesting date and storage on the amounts of polyacetylenes in carrots, Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Olsson, Marie E

    2010-11-24

    The amounts of three main polyacetylenes in carrots; falcarinol, falcarindiol, and falcarindiol-3-acetate, were determined by HPLC, during three seasons, in carrots harvested several times per season and at different locations in Sweden. The amounts of falcarindiol first decreased from a relatively high level and then increased later in the harvest season. The amounts of falcarindiol-3-acetate showed similar variations, whereas the amounts of falcarinol did not exhibit any significant variation during the harvest season. During storage the amount of polyacetylenes leveled off, increasing in samples initially low and decreasing in samples initially high in polyacetylenes. The amounts of all polyacetylenes varied significantly due to external factors and between stored and fresh samples. This variation opens up possibilities to achieve a chemical composition of polyacetylenes at harvest that minimizes the risk of bitter off-taste and maximizes the positive health effects reported in connection with polyacetylenes in carrots.

  1. First report of Armillaria sinapina, a cause of armillaria root disease, associated with a variety of forest tree hosts on sites with diverse climates in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; J. E. Lundquist; J. W. Hanna; M.-S. Kim; G. I. McDonald

    2009-01-01

    In August of 2007, a preliminary survey was conducted in Alaska to evaluate potential impacts of climate change on forest trees. Armillaria sinapina, a root-disease pathogen, was isolated from conifer and hardwood hosts on climatically diverse sites spanning 675 km from the Kenai Peninsula to the Arctic Circle. Seven isolates (NKAK1, NKAK2, NKAK5, NKAK6, NKAK9F, NKAK13...

  2. Tween® 20-Enhanced Bioreduction of Acetophenones Promoted by Daucus carota Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rodrigues da Costa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surfactants on the bioreduction of acetophenones mediated by carrot (Daucus carota root was investigated. Among the tested surfactants, Tween® 20 slightly improved the conversion. The amount of surfactant was optimised, and the presented methodology was applied to other substituted acetophenones, which led to the preparation of their respective optically enriched 1-phenylethanols with high conversion levels and high enantioselectivities.

  3. Carrot (Daucus carota L . ssp. sativus (Hoffm. Arcang. as source of antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judita BYSTRICKÁ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Carrot (Daucus carota L. s sp. sativus (Hoffm. Arcang. is a significant source of vitamins (A, B, C and beta carotene. Further it contains vitamins B, C, E, H, folic acid and pantothenic acid. Carrot is an important source of trace elements (K, Na, Ca, Mg, P, S, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Consumption of carrot improves eyesight, lowers cholesterol and improves digestion. In this work we evaluated and compared content of total polyphenols, ß-caroteneand antioxidant activity in five varieties of carrot (’Jitka’, Kardila’, Katlen , Rubína’ and Koloseum Samples of carrot were collected at full maturity stages from area of Bardejov. Samples of fresh carrot were homogenized (25 g in 50 ml 80 % ethanol and analysed after sixteen hours. The content of the total polyphenols was determined by using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (FCR. The content of ß-carotene was determined spectrophotometricaly at 450 nm. Antioxidant activity was measured using a compound DPPH (2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl at 515.6 nm using spectrophotometer. Total polyphenols content in samples ranged from 81.25 ± 13.11 mg/kg to 113.69 ± 11.57 mg/kg and content of ß-carotenes ranged from 24.58 ± 2.38 mg/kg to 124.28 ± 3.54 mg/kg. We also evaluated and compared the antioxidant activity in selected varieties of ca rrot, which varied from 6.88 ± 0.92 % to 9.83 ± 0.62 %. Statistically si gnificant the highest value of total polyphenols was recorded in variety of Koloseum (113.69 ± 11.57 mg/kg. This variety is also character ized by the highest content of ß- carotene (124.28 ± 3.54 mg/kg as well as the highest value of antioxidant activity (9.83 ± 0.62 %.

  4. Danos causados pelo impacto de queda na qualidade pós-colheita de raízes de mandioquinha-salsa Damages caused by drop impact on the postharvest quality of arracacha roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Paulo Henz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Como as raízes de mandioquinha-salsa são frágeis e muito suscetíveis a ferimentos, avaliou-se os danos físicos que ocorrem nas raízes devido ao impacto de queda no manuseio pós-colheita e suas conseqüências na durabilidade do produto. As raízes foram soltas de duas alturas (45 e 90 cm e três posições de queda: horizontal; vertical com "ombro" para baixo (=distal e para cima (=proximal, simulando-se uma situação comum no beneficiamento e na comercialização. O experimento foi conduzido em delineamento casualizado com três repetições de 40 raízes por parcela. Após a queda, as raízes foram examinadas individualmente, determinando-se os tipos de ferimentos (quebradas, rachaduras, rupturas, lesões superficiais em relação àquelas aparentemente intactas. A altura de queda afetou diretamente a incidência de injúrias mais graves, como quebras e rupturas. Na queda de 90 cm, a posição de soltura proximal causou 40,7% de rachaduras, 19,2% de rupturas e 22,3% de lesões superficiais; na posição distal causou 45,8% de rupturas e 23,3% de quebra nas raízes. Em outro experimento, avaliou-se a respiração, perda de matéria fresca e a deterioração em raízes submetidas à injúria por impacto de queda (90 cm e armazenadas a 5ºC e 24ºC, comparadas com testemunhas não injuriadas, em três repetições (1,5 kg raízes/parcela distribuídas ao acaso. As raízes submetidas à injúria por queda apresentaram taxas respiratórias superiores em comparação com aquelas intactas quando mantidas na mesma temperatura, e a 24ºC variou de 15,3 ml CO2 kg-1 h-1 (intactas a 34,4 ml CO2 kg-1 h-1 (injuriadas. As raízes injuriadas mantidas a 24ºC apresentaram 84% de deterioração após quatro dias, enquanto aquelas a 5ºC não apresentaram deterioração.Arracacha roots are very fragile and susceptible to mechanical damage. The postharvest handling system may cause many lesions, mainly by impacts and drops. The effect of drop impact on

  5. Draft genome sequence of Paenibacillus dauci sp. nov., a carrot-associated endophytic actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus dauci sp. nov., a new kind of endophytic actinobacteria, is separated from the inner tissues of carrot sample, which forms intimated associations with carrot acting as biological control agents. Here we report a 5.37-Mb assembly of its genome sequence and other useful information, including the coding sequences (CDSs responsible for biological processes such as antibiotic metabolic process, antimicrobial metabolism, anaerobic regulation and the biosynthesis of vitamin B and polysaccharide. This novel strain can be a potential source of novel lead products for exploitation in the field of pharmaceutical, agriculture and industry.

  6. Draft genome sequence of Paenibacillus dauci sp. nov., a carrot-associated endophytic actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Zhu, Liying; Jiang, Ling; Xu, Xian; Xu, Qing; Zhang, Zhidong; Huang, He

    2015-09-01

    Paenibacillus dauci sp. nov., a new kind of endophytic actinobacteria, is separated from the inner tissues of carrot sample, which forms intimated associations with carrot acting as biological control agents. Here we report a 5.37-Mb assembly of its genome sequence and other useful information, including the coding sequences (CDSs) responsible for biological processes such as antibiotic metabolic process, antimicrobial metabolism, anaerobic regulation and the biosynthesis of vitamin B and polysaccharide. This novel strain can be a potential source of novel lead products for exploitation in the field of pharmaceutical, agriculture and industry.

  7. Effect of carrot decoction on the gasric ulcer of white male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhatri Suhatri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A study on the effect of carrot decoction to the gastric ulcer of white male rats induced by absolute ethanol 1 ml/200 g orally has been conducted. The study showed that carrot decoction in the doses of 3; 6; and 12 ml/kg could improve the ulcer by amount of 28.41; 46.79; and 75.76 %, respectively. The decoction could also reduce the pH of gastric juice significantly toward the normal level (P<0.01.

  8. Potato carrot agar with manganese as an isolation medium for Alternaria, Epicoccum and Phoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Mogensen, Jesper Mølgaard; Thrane, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    A semi-selective medium for isolation of Alternaria spp., Epicoccum sp. and Phoma spp. from soil and plant samples was developed. The basal medium was a modified potato carrot agar (PCA), containing 10 g/L of potato and carrot. It is known that the target genera sporulate well on standard PCA when...... samples and eight grain samples were examined using PCA-Mn and three commonly used isolation media, DRYES, DG18 and V8. On the three conventional media growth of several genera was observed with the predominant being Aspergillus, Eurotium. Fusarium. Mucor. Penicillium and Rhizopus. Of these only F...

  9. Case report: management of crown-root fracture in lower first primary molar caused by injury to the chin: report of an unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, V S; Rayen, R

    2012-08-01

    Dental traumas are highly prevalent lesions in primary teeth, but crown-root fractures are seldom observed in primary molars. When trauma is sustained to the chin, the posterior primary teeth are at increased risk of trauma. The treatment of fractured teeth can be complicated, sometimes because of difficulties with the final restoration. A 4-year-old girl was referred to a Specialty Dental clinic by a general dental practitioner with complaints of pain in her left mandibular posterior teeth region while biting. History revealed that she had fallen ten days before while playing. Chin laceration was sutured in the trauma centre, but no dental treatment was carried out. She was subsequently discharged. Later, she had pain while biting for which she was referred to the clinic by her general dental practitioner. Extra-oral examination demonstrated a healing laceration on the chin. Radiographic examination showed the presence of an unusual complicated crown-root fracture of the left mandibular first primary molar. Pulpectomy was carried out and the fracture was stabilised with glass ionomer cement and a preformed metal crown was placed. Patient was reviewed after 3, 6 and 12 months both radiographically and clinically. Though radiographically it was found that the obturating material was resorbed completely at the 12 month visit, clinically the patient was asymptomatic until now (after 15 months). The patient is still under review. This case highlights the need for a systematic history and examination in all cases of dental trauma. It also demonstrates that conservative management is possible and not all primary teeth with crown-root fractures need to be extracted.

  10. Reclassification of rhizosphere bacteria including strains causing corky root of lettuce and proposal of Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov., Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Isolde M; Jochimsen, Kenneth N; De Vos, Paul; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-04-01

    The genus Rhizorhapis gen. nov. (to replace the illegitimate genus name Rhizomonas) is proposed for strains of Gram-negative bacteria causing corky root of lettuce, a widespread and important lettuce disease worldwide. Only one species of the genus Rhizomonas was described, Rhizomonas suberifaciens, which was subsequently reclassified as Sphingomonas suberifaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the presence of sphingoglycolipid in the cell envelope. However, the genus Sphingomonas is so diverse that further reclassification was deemed necessary. Twenty new Rhizorhapis gen. nov.- and Sphingomonas-like isolates were obtained from lettuce or sow thistle roots, or from soil using lettuce seedlings as bait. These and previously reported isolates were characterized in a polyphasic study including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid composition, morphology, substrate oxidation, temperature and pH sensitivity, and pathogenicity to lettuce. The isolates causing lettuce corky root belonged to the genera Rhizorhapis gen. nov., Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis and Rhizorhabdus gen. nov. More specifically, we propose to reclassify Rhizomonas suberifaciens as Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain, CA1(T) = LMG 17323(T) = ATCC 49355(T)), and also propose the novel species Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov. with the type strains NL9(T) ( = LMG 12560(T) = ATCC 51296(T)), WI4(T) ( = LMG 11032(T) = ATCC 51292(T)) and SP1(T) ( = LMG 12581(T) = ATCC 51289(T)), respectively. Several strains isolated from lettuce roots belonged to the genus Sphingomonas, but none of them were pathogenic.

  11. Avaliação de herbicidas no controle de plantas daninhas em mandioquinha-salsa Herbicide efficiency in controlling weeds in peruvian carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Nogueira Sediyama

    2008-12-01

    the time of harvest, the yield of root, crown and aerial parts were evaluated. There were no differences among treatments for plant emergence. Plant emergence was highest at 45 DAP and later, followed by a decrease in the stand when atrazine + mineral oil and oxadiazon were used in pre-emergence. Despite being efficient, these herbicides caused toxicity to the crop. The following treatments stood out for root yield: atrazine + fluazifop-p-butil, diuron + fluazifop-p-butil, diuron + oxadiazon, linuron + fluazifop-p-butil, metolachlor + metribuzin + linuron e oxadiazon + diuron, giving good weed control and yield of commercial roots similar to the control kept with no weed (8.62 t ha-1.

  12. A comprehensive approach to evaluate the freshness of strawberries and carrots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peneau, S.; Brockhoff, Per B.; Escher, F.

    2007-01-01

    of attributes contributed to the freshness of strawberries and carrots and that those were also indicators of the physiological ageing of these products. Our results suggest that consumer evaluation of fruit and vegetable freshness corresponds to an evaluation of this ageing process through the observation...

  13. Quality evaluation of functional chicken nuggets incorporated with ground carrot and mashed sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, S S; Biswas, A K; Sahoo, J; Chatli, M K; Sharma, D K; Sikka, S S

    2011-06-01

    This study was envisaged to evaluate the effect of ground raw carrot (0%, 5%, 10% and 15%) and mashed sweet potato (0%, 5%, 10% and 15%) as functional ingredients on the quality of chicken meat nuggets. The products were evaluated for physicochemical quality, proximate composition, nutritive value, sensory quality as well as color and texture profile analyses. Additions of either raw carrot or mashed sweet potato represent an improvement in the nutritional value and have some beneficial effects due to the presence of dietary fibers and β-carotene. They were also found to be effective in sustaining the desired cooking yield and emulsion stability. Treated samples showed lower (p > 0.05) protein, fat and ash contents but higher (p qualities, and control samples as well as samples with 10% added carrot/sweet potato had higher overall acceptability scores. Hunter color values (L*, a* and b* values) were higher (p parameters were nearly unchanged. In conclusion, carrot and sweet potato at 10% added level have greater potential as good source of dietary fibers and β-carotene and may find their way in meat industry.

  14. [Chemical, chemosensory and human-sensory experiments on taste and flavor of carrots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, R G; Broda, S; Schnitzler, W H

    1998-12-01

    The relationship between sensory quality of carrots and their contents and composition of essential oils and total sugars as influenced by nitrogen fertilization was investigated. Carrots (Daucus carota L.) of the variety 'Nanthya' F1 (S&G Sandoz Seeds) were grown in Weihenstephan 1996 with three levels of inorganic nitrogen fertilization (3 levels in 4 replications). Medium- and higher-boiling flavour-components were extracted as essential oils and separated gas-chromatographically (GC-FID). Lower-boiling flavour-components were taken from the headspace and analysed chemosensorially. The human sensory assessments were performed by an untrained panel of 300 people (students and employees of the TU München)--these results were compared with those of the chemical analyses. Carrots with lower nitrogen application were found to taste more intensive, more fruity, sweeter and better and at the same time less bitter and less earthy. They had higher contents of total sugar and a higher percentage of dry matter. Fertilization with nitrogen does not only affect the quantity but also the composition of the essential oils. The taste intensive was positively correlated with the quantity of essential oils, the taste sweet was positively correlated with the content of total sugars. It was possible to differentiate the carrots from each other by chemo-sensorial headspace analyses according to their N-fertilization levels.

  15. Antioxidants and Antioxidant Capacity of Biofortified Carrots (Daucus Carota, L.) of Various Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antioxidants and antioxidant capacity of seven colored carrots were determined. Five anthocyanins, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and four carotenoids, were quantified by HPLC. Total phenolic content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. Antioxidant capacities of the hydrophilic and hyd...

  16. Imaging of polarity during zygotic and somatic embryogenesis of carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, A.C.J.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis a study of the regulation of coordinated growth and the development of polarity during embryogenesis of carrot, Daucus carota L., is described. To this end, several microscopical techniques were used, such as light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy,

  17. Only the Carrot, Not the Stick: Incorporating Trust into the Enforcement of Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendoza Rodriguez, J.P.; Wielhouwer, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    New enforcement strategies allow agents to gain the regulator's trust and consequently face a lower audit probability. Prior research suggests that, in order to prevent lower compliance, a reduction in the audit probability (the "carrot ") must be compensated with the introduction of a higher

  18. Effect of Carrot-Juice on Exopolisaccharides and β-D Galactosidase Activity in Yogurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilik Eka Radiati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carrot juice and milk  were  blended and fermented by  culture bacteria Streptococcus thermophillus  and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.  Carrot juice  affect significantly  on   lactic acid content   (1.09± 0.12% – 1.15± 0.01%,   pH value (3.80±0.06 – 4.17± 0.10,   viscosity  (133±2.30 cP–146±2.10cP,  β-carotene (0-173.19±1.02 µg/g, EPS (11.90 ±0.50 - 18.00 ±0.40 mg/100g,   β-D-galactosidase activity (2.27±0.30-192.40±0.48 µ/g yogurt, but did not affect significantly on  bacteria number (9.0± 0.5 – 9.8±0.4 log CFU/g.    Carrot juice increased the yogurt culture activity with increasing acidifying, β-catotene, EPS and β-D-galactosidase, suggesting that yogurt could be fortified with carrot juice.

  19. Retention of ß-carotene in frozen carrots under varying conditions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Retention was found to be better in 3 min blanched samples than in 5 min ones. There was an increase in β-carotene content in carrots after 5 days at all storage temperatures: 0, –8, –14, and –18oC. Decrease was found to be insignificant ...

  20. Statistical Quality Assessment of Pre-fried Carrots Using Multispectral Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Sara; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Løje, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral imaging is increasingly being used for quality assessment of food items due to its non-invasive benefits. In this paper, we investigate the use of multispectral images of pre-fried carrots, to detect changes over a period of 14 days. The idea is to distinguish changes in quality from...

  1. Home-based preparation approaches altered the availability of health beneficial components from carrots and blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects of different home food preparation methods on the availability of the total phenolic contents (TPC) and radical scavenging components, as well as the selected health beneficial compounds from fresh blueberries and carrots. High performance liquid chromatography (...

  2. Effect of the gamma radiation of cobalt 60 on the beta carotids present in the carrot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Lopez, Sergio Victor Hugo

    1997-01-01

    In the present work it was investigated the effect of the gamma radiation of cobalt 60 on the beta carotid's in the carrot (daucus carota), using for it three different radiation dose (100, 150 and 200 kilo-rad) and analyzing them by means of the liquid chromatography technique of high resolution (HPLC)

  3. Effects of inulin, carrot and cellulose fibres on the properties of raw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of inulin, carrot, and cellulose fibres (3%, 6%, and 9%) on raw and fried chicken meatballs were studied. Meatball pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and colour values were determined for raw samples in refrigerated storage on the 1st, 5th and 10th days. The effects of fibres and their various ...

  4. Response of carrot ( Daucus carota L.) yield and quality to organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field study was conducted at Umsunduze Training Centre, KwaZulu-Natal, for two seasons (2005 and 2006) to determine the response of carrot (Daucus carota cv. Kuroda) to organic fertiliser. Three different organic fertilisers were applied at four rates (chicken manure: 0, 6.25, 12.5 and 25 kg 10 m−2; kraal manure: 0, ...

  5. Structure determination of bisacetylenic oxylipins in carrots (Daucus carota L.) and enantioselective synthesis of falcarindiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiech, Ludger; Alayrac, Carole; Witulski, Bernhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2009-11-25

    Although bisacetylenic oxylipins have been demonstrated to exhibit diverse biological activities, the chemical structures of many representatives of this class of phytochemicals still remain elusive. As carrots play an important role in our daily diet and are known as a source of bisacetylenes, an extract made from Daucus carota L. was screened for bisacetylenic oxylipins, and, after isolation, their structures were determined by means of LC-MS and 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Besides the previously reported falcarinol, falcarindiol, and falcarindiol 3-acetate, nine additional bisacetylenes were identified, among which six derivatives are reported for the first time in literature and three compounds were previously not identified in carrots. To determine the absolute stereochemistry of falcarindiol in carrots, the (3R,8R)-, (3R,8S)-, (3S,8R)-, and (3S,8S)-stereoisomers of falcarindiol were synthesized according to a novel 10-step total synthesis involving a Cadiot-Chodkiewicz cross-coupling reaction of (S)- and (R)-trimethylsilanyl-4-dodecen-1-yn-3-ol and (R)- and (S)-5-bromo-1-penten-4-yn-3-ol, respectively. Comparative chiral HPLC analysis of the synthetic stereoisomers with the isolated phytochemical led to the unequivocal assignment of the (Z)-(3R,8S)-configuration for falcarindiol in carrot extracts from Daucus carota L.

  6. An efficient in vitro test to determine carrot genotypes resistance to cavity spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelon, S; Vandemoortele, J L

    2001-01-01

    As part of a carrot breeding programme, our objective was to develop a test for determining genotypes resistance against two Pythium species responsible for cavity spot. Ten different media were tested for carrot callus culture, Pythium culture and dual cultures. Carrot callus growth was greater on Murashige and Skoog medium plus 1.25 microM 2.4D plus 2.5 microM BA plus 2.5 microM NAA. Pythium violae was more sensitive to medium composition than Pythium sulcatum. When carrot callus were inoculated by Pythium violae or sulcatum on Murashige and Skoog mineral medium, callus growth of Bolero, an resistant cultivar in the field, was highly inhibited whereas Nanco, a susceptible cultivar was not. Such a medium should be used for screening genotypes resistance to Pythium. A Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 1.25 microM 2.4D, 2.5 microM BA and 2.5 microM NAA, where callus growth was highly reduced whatever the genotype used, should be useful for selection of cell lines tolerant to Pythium.

  7. Processing Factors of Several Pesticides and Degradation Products in Carrots by Household and Industrial Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnechere, Aurore; Hanot, Vincent; Jolie, Ruben; Hendrickx, Marc; Bragard, Claude; Bedoret, Thomas; Van Loco, Joris

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the effect of household and industrial processing on the pesticide residues, carrots (Daucus carota) were sprayed during cultivation with three fungicides (boscalid, difenoconazole and tebuconazole), two insecticides (chlorpyrifos and dimethoate) and one herbicide (linuron). The most concentrated formulations were applied pursuant to Good Agricultural Practices, to ensure sufficiently high levels of residues, The subsequent processing conditions were established to correspond as c...

  8. Studies on the Fungi Associated with Soft Rot of Carrot ( Daucus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Altogether, six different fungi were isolated and included were Aspergillus niger, Mucor racemosus, Penicillium italicum, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium sp. and Alternaria sp. The most frequently occurring isolate was M. racemosus (58%) followed by A. niger, (45%) and P. italicum (38%). Carrot samples from the Ipata market ...

  9. Detection and transmission of Carrot torrado virus, a novel putative member of the Torradovirus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Adams, Ian; Collins, Larissa; Fox, Adrian; Dickinson, Matthew; Boonham, Neil

    2016-09-01

    A new Torradovirus tentatively named Carrot torrado virus (CaTV) was an incidental finding following a next generation sequencing study investigating internal vascular necrosis in carrot. The closest related viruses are Lettuce necrotic leaf curl virus (LNLCV) found in the Netherlands in 2011 and Motherwort yellow mottle virus (MYMoV) found in Korea in 2014. Primers for reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and RT-qPCR were designed with the aim of testing for the presence of virus in plant samples collected from the field. Both methods successfully amplified the target from infected samples but not from healthy control samples. The specificity of the CaTV assay was also checked against other known carrot viruses and no cross-reaction was seen. A comparative study between methods showed RT-qPCR was the most reliable method, giving positive results in samples where RT-PCR fails. Evaluation of the Ct values following RT-qPCR and a direct comparison demonstrated this was due to improved sensitivity. The previous published Torradovirus genus specific RT-PCR primers were tested and shown to detect CaTV. Also, virus transmission experiments carried out suggest that unlike other species of the same genus, Carrot torrado virus could be aphid-transmitted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher

  11. Development of composition and technology of dairy dessert with carrot fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Belozerova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of modern traditional technologies of processing of plant raw material leads to a reduction of content in it of fiber. In this regard, it becomes necessary to create a category of products, which are additionally introduced functional ingredients. Conducted researches on studying possibility of using the carrot fiber in the production of dairy products in order to enrich the composition of them dietary fiber. At the initial stage of the study determined the effect of temperature and time of exposure to the swelling capacity of carrot fiber. Based on the organoleptic evaluation of various samples of dairy products with food fibers sour cream with fat mass fraction 20 and 25% is offered as a dairy basis for production of a dessert. The technique of introducing carrot fiber in a product is perfected and its optimal dose equal to 3% is selected. As a flavor filler used cocoa syrup, which is best combined with sour cream base. The research carried out to determine the ratio of cocoa powder and sugar in cocoa syrup, which will allow to obtain a product with a harmonious combination of the studied components. Flavoring fillers are chosen and the rational dose equal to 30% by weight of the product allowing to receive a dessert with high consumer properties is defined. It was found that it is expedient to introduce carrot fiber into the mixture to prepare syrup, because technological parameters of these transactions are almost similar. At the final stage of the study examined the effect of carrot fiber for a period of validity of the developed product. It was found that shelf life of developed product is not reduced compared with the control sample containing no dietary fibers.

  12. Tamanho de amostra para avaliação de caracteres de cenoura em sistemas de cultivo agroecológico Sample size for evaluation of carrot traits in agroecologic cultivation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Olegário da Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O correto dimensionamento de experimentos deve ser utilizado para que se possa reduzir o erro experimental e com isso, maximizar a precisão das informações obtidas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar o número mínimo de famílias e de plantas por parcela para avaliação de caracteres de raiz em uma população de cenoura cultivada em sistema agroecológico. Os ensaios foram conduzidos no verão de 2006/2007 em duas propriedades com cultivo agroecológico em Brasília: Associação Mokiti Okada, que segue modelo de Agricultura Natural em Brazlândia-DF e Núcleo Rural Taguatinga, seguindo modelo de Agricultura Orgânica em Taguatinga-DF. Foram avaliadas 100 famílias de meio-irmãos de cenoura dispostas em delineamento de blocos casualizados com duas repetições e parcelas de 1 m². Foram colhidas 20 plantas competitivas por parcela e avaliadas individualmente para os caracteres comprimento de raiz, diâmetro da raiz, massa da raiz, diâmetro do xilema da raiz, relação diâmetro do xilema/diâmetro da raiz, tipo de ponta da raiz, tipo de ombro da raiz, parâmetro a* para os tecidos xilema e floema. Foi realizada análise de variância conjunta e para cada sistema, com informação entre e dentro de parcelas. Foram realizadas ainda análises de representatividade do número mínimo de famílias e de plantas para representar uma população de cenoura. Foi verificado que uma amostra de 18 plantas competitivas/parcela coletadas em ensaios com 2 repetições, bem como de 74 famílias, são suficientes para garantir uma adequada avaliação de famílias meio-irmãos de cenoura para os caracteres estudados.The correct experiment design should be used to reduce the experimental error and, with that, maximize the precision of the information obtained. The objective of this work was to estimate the minimum number of families and of plants per plot for evaluation of root traits in a carrot population cultivated in agroecologic systems. The

  13. Interferência das plantas daninhas sobre a produtividade e qualidade de cenoura Weed interference in carrot yield and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A.A. Soares

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a interferência das plantas daninhas sobre a produtividade e qualidade de cenoura (Daucus carota, foi realizado um experimento no período de julho a outubro de 2007, em Mossoró-RN. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados, com seis tratamentos e quatro repetições. Os tratamentos consistiram de seis períodos de controle de plantas daninhas, em que a cultura da cenoura permaneceu livre da competição com essas plantas, por meio de capinas, a partir da emergência: 0-12, 0-24, 0-36, 0-48, 0-60 e 0-72 dias (testemunha mantida no limpo. As características avaliadas foram: produtividade comercial de raízes, teores de sólidos solúveis (SS, acidez total (AT, vitamina C e pH de raízes. A produtividade comercial de raízes de cenoura foi alterada pela convivência da cultura com as plantas daninhas, a qual respondeu a capinas até os 40 e 37 DAE, tolerando-se perdas de produtividade de 5 e 10%, respectivamente, em relação ao tratamento mantido no limpo durante todo o ciclo. Os teores de SS e de vitamina C não foram influenciados pela interferência das plantas daninhas, ao passo que a maior convivência da cultura com as plantas daninhas resultou em acidez total e pH das raízes mais elevados e menor relação sólidos solúveis/acidez total.This work aimed to evaluate weed interference in yield and quality of carrots (Daucus carota. An experiment was carried out in a randomized block design, with four replications. The treatments were composed of six periods of weed control (0-12, 0-24, 0-36, 0-48, 0-60 and 0-72 days after emergence (DAE. The characteristics evaluated were: yield of commercial roots, total soluble solids (TSS, total titratable acidity (TTA, vitamin C, TSS/TTA ratio and pH of roots. The commercial root yields decreased with weed interference, with weed control being required until 36 DAE. Root TSS rates and vitamin C did not vary with weed interference. The presence of

  14. Influence of field attack by carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis Förster) on sensory quality, antioxidant capacity and content of terpenes, falcarindiol and 6-methoxymellein of carrots (Daucus carota L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljåsen, Randi; Vogt, Gjermund; Olsen, Elisabeth; Lea, Per; Høgetveit, Lars Arne; Tajet, Torgeir; Meadow, Richard; Bengtsson, Gunnar B

    2013-03-20

    The effect of different degrees of attack by carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis) on quality parameters of carrots was studied in field experiments for two years. Treatments were different degrees of physical insect protection by floating row cover. An increasing attack level of psyllids showed an enhancement effect on the antioxidant capacity (ORAC), content of falcarindiol, 6-methoxymellein, and terpenes, and scores for bitter taste, chemical flavor, terpene flavor, and toughness. Carrot psyllid attack decreased the yield, total sugar, fructose, glucose, and sensory attributes sweet taste, color hue, color strength, crispiness, and juiciness. Carrot plants at 8-10 weeks of age tolerated attack by psyllids at low levels (2% leaves with curling or discoloration).

  15. Utilization of Landsat-8 data for the estimation of carrot and maize crop water footprint under the arid climate of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Al-Gaadi, Khalid A; Tola, ElKamil; Hassaballa, Abdalhaleem A; Kayad, Ahmed G

    2018-01-01

    The crop Water Footprint (WF) can provide a comprehensive knowledge of the use of water through the demarcation of the amount of the water consumed by different crops. The WF has three components: green (WFg), blue (WFb) and grey (WFgr) water footprints. The WFg refers to the rainwater stored in the root zone soil layer and is mainly utilized for agricultural, horticultural and forestry production. The WFb, however, is the consumptive use of water from surface or groundwater resources and mainly deals with irrigated agriculture, industry, domestic water use, etc. While the WFgr is the amount of fresh water required to assimilate pollutants resulting from the use of fertilizers/agrochemicals. This study was conducted on six agricultural fields in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia, during the period from December 2015 to December 2016, to investigate the spatiotemporal variation of the WF of silage maize and carrot crops. The WF of each crop was estimated in two ways, namely agro-meteorological (WFAgro) and remote sensing (WFRS) methods. The blue, green and grey components of WFAgro were computed with the use of weather station/Eddy covariance measurements and field recorded crop yield datasets. The WFRS estimated by applying surface energy balance principles on Landsat-8 imageries. However, due to non-availability of Landsat-8 data on the event of rainy days, this study was limited to blue component (WFRS-b). The WFAgro of silage maize was found to range from 3545 m3 t-1 to 4960 m3 t-1; on an average, the WFAgro-g, WFAgro-b, and WFAgro-gr are composed of estimated at demand combined with a very erratic rainfall, the irrigation is totally provided using groundwater delivered by center pivot irrigation systems. On the other hand, the WFRS-b estimated using Landsat-8 data was varied from 276 (±73) m3 t-1 (carrot) and 2885 (±441) m3 t-1 (silage maize). The variation (RMSE) between WFRS-b and WFAgro-b was about 17% and 14% for silage maize and carrot crops

  16. Water properties and structure of pork sausages as affected by high-pressure processing and addition of carrot fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sandie Mejer; Grossi, Alberto Blak; Christensen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    The effects of high-pressure processing (HPP) and addition of carrot fibre on pork sausages have been studied using NMR T(2) relaxometry and measurements of water-binding capacity (WBC) by centrifugation. Significant effects of temperature (raw, 40, 50, or 60°C), holding time (1s, 3, 6, or 9min......), and addition of carrot fibre on the distribution and mobility of water were found. However, the effect of carrot fibre could not be explained by structural changes in the sausages when examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Correlations between T(2) relaxation measurements and WBC determined...... by centrifugation revealed that T(2) relaxation times were able to explain more than 90% of the variation in WBC for both non-pressure and pressure-treated sausages. However, only 49% of the variation was explained for pressure-treated sausages with carrot fibre, indicating that combining addition of fibre and high...

  17. INFLUENCE OF CULTIVARS AND SEED THERMAL TREATMENT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF FUNGAL PATHOGENS IN CARROT AND ONION PLANTS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudela, M.; Novotný, Čeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2016), s. 1181-1189 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MZe QJ1210165 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : carrot * onion * fungal pathogens * plants infection Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions in the life-cycle of carrots and tomatoes. Methods, data and results from a study of the types and amounts of carrots and tomatoes consumed in Sweden. With arable land use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Kanyama, Annika

    1997-03-01

    Methods, data and results from an assessment of the arable land use and some greenhouse gas emissions during part of the life-cycle of the consumed carrots and tomatoes in Sweden during 1992-1993 are presented in the report. The life-cycle was delineated to transportation, storage, farm production and production of fertilizers. Carrots from six countries and tomatoes from four countries were analyzed. The study is reported with full transparency. The results are presented as the use of arable land (in m{sup 2}) and as the amount of greenhouse gas emissions (in g CO{sub 2} equivalents) required to sustain current Swedish consumption patterns of carrots and tomatoes. Emissions per kg of consumed tomato were 10 times higher than for carrots. Emissions from carrots were lowest when they were produced within or close to Sweden, while the opposite was the case for tomatoes. The key issues in the life-cycle of the analyzed carrots and tomatoes are identified and discussed. The general conclusions are that storage may be a key issue for vegetables with a long durability and adapted to a northern European climate. For vegetables with short durability, the key issue may be transportation if they are not adapted to a northern European climate but still cultivated in the open. The key issue for vegetables with a short durability may be energy requirements during farm production if the vegetables are not adapted to a northern European climate and therefore cultivated under glass. 3 figs, 57 tabs

  19. Hydraulic conductivity of rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, N; Steudle, E; Hirasawa, T; Lafitte, R

    2001-09-01

    A pressure chamber and a root pressure probe technique have been used to measure hydraulic conductivities of rice roots (root Lp(r) per m(2) of root surface area). Young plants of two rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties (an upland variety, cv. Azucena and a lowland variety, cv. IR64) were grown for 31-40 d in 12 h days with 500 micromol m(-2) s(-1) PAR and day/night temperatures of 27 degrees C and 22 degrees C. Root Lp(r) was measured under conditions of steady-state and transient water flow. Different growth conditions (hydroponic and aeroponic culture) did not cause visible differences in root anatomy in either variety. Values of root Lp(r) obtained from hydraulic (hydrostatic) and osmotic water flow were of the order of 10(-8) m s(-1) MPa(-1) and were similar when using the different techniques. In comparison with other herbaceous species, rice roots tended to have a higher hydraulic resistance of the roots per unit root surface area. The data suggest that the low overall hydraulic conductivity of rice roots is caused by the existence of apoplastic barriers in the outer root parts (exodermis and sclerenchymatous (fibre) tissue) and by a strongly developed endodermis rather than by the existence of aerenchyma. According to the composite transport model of the root, the ability to adapt to higher transpirational demands from the shoot should be limited for rice because there were minimal changes in root Lp(r) depending on whether hydrostatic or osmotic forces were acting. It is concluded that this may be one of the reasons why rice suffers from water shortage in the shoot even in flooded fields.

  20. Identification and Characterization of DcUSAGT1, a UDP-Glucose: Sinapic Acid Glucosyltransferase from Purple Carrot Taproots

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purple carrots accumulate abundant cyanidin-based anthocyanins in taproots. UDP-glucose: sinapic acid glucosyltransferase (USAGT) can transfer the glucose moiety to the carboxyl group of sinapic acid thereby forming the ester bond between the carboxyl-C and the C1 of glucose (1-O-sinapoylglucose). 1-O-sinapoylglucose can serve as an acyl donor in acylation of anthocyanins and generate cyanidin 3-xylosyl (sinapoylglucosyl) galactoside in purple carrots. This final product helps stabilize the a...

  1. Licorice Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Licorice Root Share: On This Page Background How Much Do ... This fact sheet provides basic information about licorice root—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources for ...

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alleviate abiotic stresses in potato plants caused by low phosphorus and deficit irrigation/partial root-zone drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Caixia; Ravnskov, Sabine; Lui, Fulai

    2018-01-01

    Deficit irrigation (DI) improves water use efficiency (WUE), but the reduced water input often limits plant growth and nutrient uptake. The current study examined whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could alleviate abiotic stress caused by low phosphorus (P) fertilization and DI...... or improved plant growth and P/nitrogen (N) uptake when subjected to DI/PRD and P0. However, the positive responses to AMF varied with P level and irrigation regime. Functional differences were found in ability of AMF species alleviating plant stress. The largest positive plant biomass response to M1+ and M2......+ was found under FI, both at P1 and P0 (25% increase), while plant biomass response to M1+ and M2+ under DI/PRD (14% increase) was significantly smaller. The large growth response to AMF inoculation, particularly under FI, may relate to greater photosynthetic capacity and leaf area, probably caused...

  3. Root-Zone Redox Dynamics - In Search for the Cause of Damage to Treated-Wastewater Irrigated Orchards in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, David; Shenker, Moshe; Schwartz, Amnon; Assouline, Shmuel; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Treated wastewater (TW) has become a common source of water for agriculture. However recent findings raise concern regarding its use: a marked decrease (up to 40%) in yield appeared in orchards irrigated with TW compared with fresh water (FW) irrigated orchards. These detrimental effects appeared predominantly in orchards cultivated in clay soils. The association of the damage with clay soils rather than sandy soils led us to hypothesize that the damage is linked to soil aeration problems. We suspected that in clay soils, high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and high levels of organic material, both typical of TW, may jointly lead to an extreme decrease in soil oxygen levels, so as to shift soil reduction-oxidation (redox) state down to levels that are known to damage plants. Two-year continuous measurement of redox potential, pH, water tension, and oxygen were conducted in the root-zone (20-35 cm depth) of avocado trees planted in clay soil and irrigated with either TW or FW. Soil solution composition was sampled periodically in-situ and mineral composition was sampled in tree leaves and woody organs biannually. In dry periods the pe+pH values indicated oxic conditions (pe+pH>14), and the fluctuations in redox values were small in both TW and FW plots. Decreases in soil water tension following irrigation or rain were followed by drops in soil oxygen and pe+pH values. TW irrigated plots had significantly lower minimum pe+pH values compared with FW-irrigated plots, the most significant differences occurred during the irrigation season rather than the rain season. A linear correlation appeared between irrigation volume and reduction severity in TW-irrigated plots, but not in the FW plots, indicating a direct link to the irrigation regime in TW-irrigated plots. The minimum pe+pH values measured in the TW plots are indicative of suboxic conditions (9water tension and oxygen concentration levels. The consequences of our findings to plant health will be discussed, and

  4. Qualidade nutricional de cenoura e alface cultivadas em Mossoró-RN em função da densidade populacional Nutritional quality of carrot and lettuce grown in Mossoró-RN, Brazil, as affected by plant densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bezerra Neto

    2006-12-01

    out from June to September of 2003, in the experimental area of "Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Árido" (UFERSA, in Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte state, Brazil, in order to evaluate the effect of carrot and lettuce populational densities in a second growing period on their nutritional quality in a strip-intercropping system. A randomized complete block design was used with the treatments arranged in a 4 x 4 factorial scheme with three replications. The treatments consisted of the combination of four carrot-plant densities (40%, 60%, 80% and 100% of the recommended sole crop density - RSCD with four lettuce-plant densities (40%, 60%, 80% and 100% of the RSCD. The reference populations for carrot and lettuce in sole crop, corresponding to 100%, were of 500,000 plants.ha-1 and 250,000 plants.ha-1, respectively. Carrot cv. Brasília and lettuce cv. Tainá were planted. Quality characteristics evaluated were firmness and content of vitamin C, total carotenoids and beta-carotene for carrot roots and firmness, contents of vitamin C, total carotenoids and total chlorophyll for lettuce leaves. The associations of plant densities of carrot and lettuce did not affect any of the assessed characteristics in both crops. However, both carrot and lettuce plant densities affected the traits evaluated in both crops. The firmness, contents of vitamin C and beta-carotene in carrot roots decreased as the plant densities of carrot increased, while the content of total carotenoids increased as carrot population increased. The same decreasing behavior was observed in contents of vitamin C, total carotenoids and chlorophyll in the lettuce leaves with an increase in the plant densities of lettuce.

  5. Nutritional composition, acceptability, and shelf stability of carrot pomace-incorporated cookies with special reference to total and β-carotene retention

    OpenAIRE

    Shyamala Bellur Nagarajaiah; Jamuna Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrated carrot pomace was assessed for the feasibility of incorporating into baked product by partial substitution of refined flour at 4, 8, and 12% level. As carrot pomace is a good source of antioxidant components and dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber, it was added to the cookies. Carrot pomace and products were analyzed for chemical composition, and products were further evaluated for sensory quality, carotene retention and bioaccessibility, and storage stability. The results show...

  6. Exploring the effects of pulsed electric field processing parameters on polyacetylene extraction from carrot slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Ingrid; Abreu, Corina; Hossain, Mohammad B; Altisent, Rosa; Brunton, Nigel; Viñas, Inmaculada; Rai, Dilip K

    2015-03-02

    The effects of various pulsed electric field (PEF) parameters on the extraction of polyacetylenes from carrot slices were investigated. Optimised conditions with regard to electric field strength (1-4 kV/cm), number of pulses (100-1500), pulse frequency (10-200 Hz) and pulse width (10-30 μs) were identified using response surface methodology (RSM) to maximise the extraction of falcarinol (FaOH), falcarindiol (FaDOH) and falcarindiol-3-acetate (FaDOAc) from carrot slices. Data obtained from RSM and experiments fitted significantly (p pulses of 10 μs at 10 Hz. The predicted values from the developed quadratic polynomial equation were in close agreement with the actual experimental values with low average mean deviations (E%) ranging from 0.68% to 3.58%.

  7. Effect of Carrot-Juice on Exopolisaccharides and β-D Galactosidase Activity in Yogurt

    OpenAIRE

    Radiati, Lilik Eka; Jaya, Firman; Oktavia, Heldy

    2016-01-01

    Carrot juice and milk  were  blended and fermented by  culture bacteria Streptococcus thermophillus  and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.  Carrot juice  affect significantly  on   lactic acid content   (1.09± 0.12% – 1.15± 0.01%),   pH value (3.80±0.06 – 4.17± 0.10),   viscosity  (133±2.30 cP–146±2.10cP),  β-carotene (0-173.19±1.02 µg/g), EPS (11.90 ±0.50 - 18.00 ±0.40 mg/100g),   β-D-galactosidase activity (2.27±0.30-192.40±0.48 µ/g) yogurt, but did not affect significantly on  bacteria number (9.0...

  8. Dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated with black raspberry, black carrot and rosella juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekerek, S.; Kudret, A.; Alver, Ü.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC's) were constructed from black raspberry ( Rubus Ideaus), black carrot ( Daucuscarota L.) and rosella juice ( Hibiscus Sabdariffa L.). In order to fabricate a DSSC the fluorine-doped tin (IV) oxide (FTO) thin films obtained by using spray pyrolysis technique were used as a substrate. TiO2 films on FTO layers were prepared by doctor-blading technique. Platinum-coated counter electrode and liquid Iodide/Iodine electrolyte solution were used to fabricate DSSC's. The efficiencies of solar cells produced with black carrot, rosella and black raspberry juice were calculated as 0.25%, 0.16% and 0.16% respectively, under a sunny day in Kahramanmaraş-Turkey.

  9. Bioactive C₁₇-Polyacetylenes in Carrots (Daucus carota L.): Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, Corinna; Dunemann, Frank; Schwab, Wilfried; Nothnagel, Thomas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    C17-polyacetylenes (PAs) are a prominent group of oxylipins and are primarily produced by plants of the families Apiaceae, Araliaceae, and Asteraceae, respectively. Recent studies on the biological activity of polyacetylenes have indicated their potential to improve human health due to anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and serotogenic effects. These findings suggest targeting vegetables with elevated levels of bisacetylenic oxylipins, such as falcarinol, by breeding studies. Due to the abundant availability, high diversity of cultivars, worldwide experience, and high agricultural yields, in particular, carrot (Daucus carota L.) genotypes are a very promising target vegetable. This paper provides a review on falcarinol-type C17-polyacetylenes in carrots and a perspective on their potential as a future contributor to improving human health and well-being.

  10. Genetic architecture of factors underlying partial resistance to Alternaria leaf blight in carrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Clerc, Valérie; Pawelec, Anna; Birolleau-Touchard, Christelle; Suel, Anita; Briard, Mathilde

    2009-05-01

    In most production areas, Alternaria leaf blight (ALB) is recognized as the most common and destructive foliage disease in carrot. To assess the genetic architecture of carrot ALB resistance, two parental coupling maps were developed with similar number of dominant markers (around 70), sizes (around 650 cM), densities (around 9.5 cM), and marker composition. The F(2:3) progenies were evaluated in field and tunnel for two scoring dates. The continuous distribution of the disease severity value indicated that ALB resistance is under polygenic control. Three QTLs regions were found on three linkage groups. Two of them were tunnel or field specific and were detected only at the second screening date suggesting that the expression of these two QTLs regions involved in resistance to Alternaria dauci might depend on environment and delay after infection.

  11. Optimization of the carrot leaf dehydration aiming at the preservation of omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Vivian de Almeida

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The carrot leaf dehydration conditions in air circulation oven were optimized through response surface methodology (RSM for minimizing the degradation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly alpha-linolenic (LNA, 18:3n-3. The optimized leaf drying time and temperature were 43 h and 70 ºC, respectively. The fatty acids (FA were investigated using gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector and fused silica capillary column; FA were identified with standards and based on equivalent-chain-length. LNA and other FA were quantified against C21:0 internal standard. After dehydration, the amount of LNA, quantified in mg/100 g dry matter of dehydrated carrot leaves, were 984 mg.

  12. Effects of Growth Regulators on the Induction of Anthocyanin Synthesis in Carrot Suspension Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihiro, Ozeki; Atsushi, Komamine; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo:(Present)Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo:(Present)Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Tohoku University

    1986-01-01

    The effects of plant growth regulators were investigated on anthocyanin synthesis induced by removing auxin from carrot suspension cultures. Of the auxins tested, 2,4-D showed the strongest inhibiting effect on anthocyanin synthesis and had the strongest promoting effect on undifferentiated growth. When 2,4-D was added to anthocyanin synthesizing cells, in which cell division had ceased, anthocyanin synthesis was repressed immediately, accumulated anthocyanin disappeared and cell division res...

  13. Metabolism of pharmaceutical and personal care products by carrot cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Fu, Qiuguo; Gan, Jay

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing use of treated wastewater and biosolids in agriculture, residues of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in these reused resources may contaminate food produce via plant uptake, constituting a route for human exposure. Although various PPCPs have been reported to be taken up by plants in laboratories or under field conditions, at present little information is available on their metabolism in plants. In this study, we applied carrot cell cultures to investigate the plant metabolism of PPCPs. Five phase I metabolites of carbamazepine were identified and the potential metabolism pathways of carbamazepine were proposed. We also used the carrot cell cultures as a rapid screening tool to initially assess the metabolism potentials of 18 PPCPs. Eleven PPCPs, including acetaminophen, caffeine, meprobamate, primidone, atenolol, trimethoprim, DEET, carbamazepine, dilantin, diazepam, and triclocarban, were found to be recalcitrant to metabolism. The other 7 PPCPs, including triclosan, naproxen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, sulfamethoxazole, and atorvastatin, displayed rapid metabolism, with 0.4–47.3% remaining in the culture at the end of the experiment. Further investigation using glycosidase hydrolysis showed that 1.3–20.6% of initially spiked naproxen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and gemfibrozil were transformed into glycoside conjugates. Results from this study showed that plant cell cultures may be a useful tool for initially exploring the potential metabolites of PPCPs in plants as well as for rapidly screening the metabolism potentials of a variety of PPCPs or other emerging contaminants, and therefore may be used for prioritizing compounds for further comprehensive evaluations. - Highlights: • Five phase I metabolites of carbamazepine were identified in carrot cell cultures. • The metabolism potentials of 18 PPCPs were evaluated using carrot cell cultures. • Four PPCPs may partially form glycoside conjugates as phase II

  14. Viability of L.casei in symbiotic carrot juice during fermentation and storage

    OpenAIRE

    Petreska Ivanovska, Tanja; Petrusevska Tozi, Lidija; Hadzieva, Jasmina; Smilkov, Katarina; Geskovski, Nikola; Mladenovska, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Although dairy products are generally good matrices for the delivery of probiotics to humans and traditionally the most used, fruit juices are of growing interest, due to their pleasant taste profile and refreshing characteristics. However, the low survival rate of probiotics in fruit juices resulting from acid environment is of concern.In this study, carrot juice was inoculated with free probiotic cells of L. casei and symbiotic microparticles loaded with L. casei to compare the survival rat...

  15. Effects of coatings on storability of carrot under evaporative coolant system.

    OpenAIRE

    Adetunji Charles Oluwaseun; Arowora Kayode; Fawole Oluyemisi Bolajoko; Adetunji Juliana Bunmi

    2013-01-01

    Four different coatings were developed from the mucilage of Cactus and their effects were investigated on the quality and storability of carrot fruits. The four experimental coatings were: Pure mucilage extracts (ME), Mucilage extract mixed with 5ml glycerol (MEG), Mucilage extract mixed 5ml soy oil ( MESO), Mucilage extract mixed with 5ml olive oil(MEOO) the addition of oil served as plasticizer. The following parameters were measured: weight loss, ascorbic acid content, pH, firmness and mic...

  16. Fate of Helicobacter pylori artificially inoculated in lettuce and carrot samples

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes,Bruna C.; Martinis,Elaine C.P. de

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known, worldwide, as the causative agent of gastric diseases. However, its transmission route has not been completely understood. To evaluate the survival of H. pylori (a clinical and a reference strain) artificially inoculated on lettuce and carrot samples, portions of 25 g were inoculated with approximately 10(6) CFU/g of H. pylori and packed under normal and/or modified atmosphere (3% oxygen, 10% carbon dioxide, and 87% nitrogen). The inoculated food samples were sto...

  17. Population densities of five migratory endoparasitic nematodes in carrot disk cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo-Lucas, S; Pinochet, J

    1992-03-01

    Numbers of nematodes recovered per culture varied greatly among five species cultured on carrot disks. Radopholus similis and Pratylenchus vulnus showed the highest population densities, with 23,400-fold and 16,600-fold increases, respectively, in 90 days. Final populations of P. thornei and Zygotytenchus guevarai were similar but lower than those of R. similis and P. vulnus. The population of P. neglectus increased 74 times. Species with the greatest reproduction in this study reproduce sexually.

  18. Potential of Cinnamon Oil Emulsions as Alternative Washing Solutions of Carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Chen, Huaiqiong; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of cinnamon oil emulsions as alternative washing solutions to improve the microbial safety of carrots. Whey protein concentrate (WPC), gum arabic (GA), lecithin, and their combinations were used to prepare cinnamon oil emulsions. The emulsions were characterized for their hydrodynamic diameter (D h ) during 7 days of storage and their antimicrobial activity against cocktails of Salmonella enterica , Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes . The D h of the emulsion prepared with the GA+WPC blend did not change significantly (195.0 to 184.1 nm), whereas all other emulsions showed varying degrees of increases in D h . Compared with free cinnamon oil dissolved in 5% ethanol, all emulsions showed similar or lower MICs and MBCs. Emulsions prepared with GA and equal masses of GA and WPC were chosen and diluted to 0.2 and 0.5% cinnamon oil to wash carrots that were surface inoculated with bacterial cocktails because of their lower MICs and MBCs than free oil. Emulsions resulted in significantly higher reductions of pathogens on carrots than free cinnamon oil, 3.0 to 3.7 versus 2.1 to 2.3 log CFU/g at 0.5% cinnamon oil and 2.0 to 3.0 versus 1.0 to 1.7 log CFU/g at 0.2% cinnamon oil. No transfer of bacteria from inoculated carrots to wash solutions and no effects of organic load on log reductions were only observed for wash treatments with 0.5% emulsified cinnamon oil. Thus, the cinnamon oil emulsions are potential alternative postharvest washing solutions for fresh produce production.

  19. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdin, A.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A.; Fontaine, J.; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Durand, R. [Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Lab. de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, 62 - Calais (France)

    2005-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  20. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdin, A.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A.; Fontaine, J.; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Durand, R.

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  1. Exploring the Effects of Pulsed Electric Field Processing Parameters on Polyacetylene Extraction from Carrot Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Aguiló-Aguayo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of various pulsed electric field (PEF parameters on the extraction of polyacetylenes from carrot slices were investigated. Optimised conditions with regard to electric field strength (1–4 kV/cm, number of pulses (100–1500, pulse frequency (10–200 Hz and pulse width (10–30 μs were identified using response surface methodology (RSM to maximise the extraction of falcarinol (FaOH, falcarindiol (FaDOH and falcarindiol-3-acetate (FaDOAc from carrot slices. Data obtained from RSM and experiments fitted significantly (p < 0.0001 the proposed second-order response functions with high regression coefficients (R2 ranging from 0.82 to 0.75. Maximal FaOH (188%, FaDOH (164.9% and FaDOAc (166.8% levels relative to untreated samples were obtained from carrot slices after applying PEF treatments at 4 kV/cm with 100 number of pulses of 10 μs at 10 Hz. The predicted values from the developed quadratic polynomial equation were in close agreement with the actual experimental values with low average mean deviations (E% ranging from 0.68% to 3.58%.

  2. Identification and genetic characterization of Clostridium botulinum serotype A strains from commercially pasteurized carrot juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kristin M; Nowaczyk, Louis; Raphael, Brian H; Skinner, Guy E; Rukma Reddy, N

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is an important foodborne pathogen capable of forming heat resistant endospores and producing deadly botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). In 2006, C. botulinum was responsible for an international outbreak of botulism attributed to the consumption of commercially pasteurized carrot juice. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize strains of C. botulinum from the adulterated product. Carrot juice bottles retrieved from the manufacturing facility were analyzed for the presence of BoNT and BoNT-producing isolates using DIG-ELISA. Toxigenic isolates from the carrot juice were analyzed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA microarray analysis to determine their genetic relatedness to the original outbreak strains CDC51348 and CDC51303. PFGE revealed that isolates CJ4-1 and CJ10-1 shared an identical pulsotype with strain CDC51303, whereas isolate CJ5-1 displayed a unique restriction banding pattern. DNA microarray analysis identified several phage related genes unique to strain CJ5-1, and Southern hybridization analysis of XhoI digested and nondigested DNA showed their chromosomal location, while a homolog to pCLI_A009 of plasmid pCLI of C. botulinum serotype Langeland F, was located on a small plasmid. The acquisition or loss of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements among C. botulinum strains has epidemiological and evolutionary implications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The effect of osmotic pretreatment on the density of hot-air-dried carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Soleimani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of large amounts of fruits and vegetables throughout the world, have encouraged the development of various methods for their processing. Drying is considers as the most common method for preservation of vegetable and fruits. Although drying extend the shelf-life, it has various side effects on keeping quality of these foods; including decreasing of the color and texture quality as well as missing the flavor and nutritional values. These negative effects have increased the demand for the discovering the alternative drying methods and consequently for the production of fresh-like products. The aim of this study was to introduce and optimize the novel method for the drying of carrot as well as to develop and optimize the quality of osmo-air-dried carrots with special respect to the color, flavor, texture, rehydration properties, density and shriveling of the product. For this, the effect of osmotic pretreatment on the density of carrot slices was investigated, using 50% glucose syrup +5% salt at 40°C with 150 rpm, followed by complementary drying step. The result of treated group was compared with control samples which were dried only by hot-air-drier. The results showed that using osmotic pretreatment could increase the density through inhibition of the product's shrinkage. Meanwhile, in air-dried samples the density was decreased considerably and high shrinkage was also observed.

  4. Polyacetylene levels in carrot juice, effect of pH and thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló-Aguayo, I; Brunton, N; Rai, D K; Balagueró, E; Hossain, M B; Valverde, J

    2014-01-01

    This research focuses on the study of polyacetylenes in carrot juice and their response to pH, storage and thermal processing conditions. Falcarindiol-3-acetate (FaDOAc) and falcarinol (FaOH) were in fresh carrot juice at concentrations of 73 and 233 μg/L, respectively. Reducing the pH of the raw carrot juice from its natural pH 6.13 to pH 3.5 resulted in 2 and 5 fold better extraction of FaDOAc and FaOH respectively in comparison to a control sample (pH 6.13). Polyacetylenes were retained better in acidified juices and cold storage temperatures (4 °C) for first week of storage with respect to untreated juices. An increase in FaDOAc and FaOH of 10- and 16-fold, respectively, as compared to raw unprocessed samples was observed when processing samples at 90 °C for 1 min. This was assumed to be due to cell wall polysaccharides dissolution. However, negative correlation between total polyacetylenes and hexoses was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, indicating some biological links between polyacetylenes and soluble sugars. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of several factors on the efficiency of androgenesis in carrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka, Krystyna; Krzyzanowska, Dorota; Górecki, Ryszard

    2005-01-01

    The influence of cultivar, donor plant and culture procedure on the efficiency of androgenesis was studied in carrot anther culture. Experiments were carried out on five carrot cultivars: CxC 9900 F1, Lucky B F1, HCM, Beta III and Perfekcja, which were chosen because of their high carotene contents. Two procedures of anther culture were compared: (1) incubation in darkness for two weeks, followed by exposure to continuous light and transfer onto a fresh medium of the same composition; and (2) incubation in darkness until embryos appeared, without transfer onto a fresh medium. Temperature was +27 degrees C all the time. Genotype played an important role in the process of androgenesis in carrot anther culture. The efficiency was the highest in cv. HCM - 5.6 embryos per 100 anthers. Considerable differences in the capacity for androgenesis were observed between individual donor plants. The ratio of embryos obtained per 100 anthers for cv. HCM varied from 0.0 to 48.9. The second procedure of anther culture proved to be more efficient, cheaper and less complicated.

  6. Qualidade de mandioquinha-salsa minimamente processada e armazenada sob atmosfera modificada Quality of fresh-cut peruvian carrot: use of modified atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Elena Nunes

    2009-10-01

    para prolongar a vida útil de mandioquinhas-salsa minimamente processadas, preservando seus atributos de qualidade. Diante da avaliação sensorial realizada, a aparência e a cor das fatias de mandioquinha-salsa mantiveram-se aceitáveis para o consumo até o final do período de armazenamento.The aim of this research was to verify the effect of the passive and active modified atmosphere on the conservation of fresh-cut peruvian carrot, cv. Amarela de Senador Amaral, purchased from a commercial crop of Lavras, MG, Brazil. The roots were screened, washed with neutral detergent and rinsed in running water. Afterwards, they were immersed into a solution of 300mg L-1 sodium hypochlorite for 15 minutes and dried at room temperature. The roots were peeled and cut in slices of about 1cm of thickness and immersed into a solution of 50mg L-1 sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes, drained in plastic sieves and packed. The trays containing the slices of Peruvian carrot were stored in a cold room (5±1°C and 98% RH for 15 days. The following analyses were performed every 3 days: : pH, titrable acidity, total soluble solids, firmness, L* and b* values, starch and sensorial evaluation (appearance and color. The experimental design was completely randomized (CRD in a 3 x 6 factorial scheme, with 3 sorts of atmospheres (passive; active with initial injection of the mixtures: 2% O2 + 10% CO2 e 5% O2 + 5% CO2 and 6 times of storage (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days with 3 replicates. The average values of pH, titrable acidity, soluble solids and firmness found in this work were 6.79, 0.13% of malic acid, 4.04°Brix and 5.17 N, respectively. The active modified atmosphere (5% de O2 + 5% CO2 determined higher L* value to the fresh cut Peruvian carrots at the sixth and twelfth day of storage as compared with the active (2% of O2 + 10% CO2. The active modified atmosphere with 5% O2 + 5% CO2 determined higher b* values and starch contents to the slices of Peruvian carrots as compared with the

  7. Root (Botany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Plant roots can contribute significantly to the stability of steep slopes. They can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weakness to more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In deep soil, anchoring to bedrock becomes negligible, and lateral reinforcement predominates

  8. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  9. Radionuclide content of selected root vegetables as influenced by culinary preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriano, D.C.; Doswell, A.C.; Ciravolo, T.G.; Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.

    2000-01-01

    A greenhouse study involving root vegetables (carrot, red beet, and turnips) was conducted primarily to evaluate the effect of culinary processing (light washing, scrubbing, and peeling) on the radionuclide content of the edible portions. In terms of concentration ratio of the radionuclides left in roots after peeling, the trend follows: 90 Sr> 137 Cs>> 234 U congruent with 238 U≥ 238 Pu. The actinide contents in the roots were apparently due to surface adherence of the contaminated soil particulates as indicated by the diminution of the contents upon brushing the surface, which were further decreased by peeling the skin. Rigorous culinary processing of roots, such as scrubbing or peeling, could substantially diminish the contents of the actinides, but not of the more mobile 90 Sr and 137 Cs

  10. Physiological and quality attributes associated with different centrifugation times of baby carrots Atributos fisiológicos e de qualidade associados com tempos de centrifugação de mini-cenouras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Luiz Moretti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugation is one of the most important steps in the fresh-cut industry. Inadequate centrifugation can lead to increased white blush in baby carrots. The present work was carried out aiming at evaluating the effects of different centrifugation times in baby carrots physiological and quality attributes. Carrot roots cv. Alvorada were harvested and minimally processed as baby carrots. After processing, samples were placed in nylon bags and centrifuged (378 rad. s-1 for 0; 30; 60; 90, and 120 seconds. Temperature of baby carrots centrifuged for 120 seconds was 63% higher than the temperature at the beginning of the experiment. Respiratory activity increased 49% when centrifugation time increased from 30 to 120 seconds. Ethylene evolution remained around 1.7 µL kg-1 h-1 until 60 seconds, increasing to 3.5 µL kg-1 h-1 at 120 seconds of centrifugation. Whiteness index increased 34% and 68% when centrifugation time shifted from 30 s to 60 s and from 30 s to 120 s, respectively. No significant changes in total carotenoids content were observed for the different tested centrifugation intervals. Baby carrots should be centrifuged for 30 seconds in order to maintain the quality and to avoid the development of white blush.A centrifugação é uma das etapas mais importantes na indústria de processamento mínimo. A centrifugação inadequada pode levar a um aumento do esbranquiçamento em mini-cenouras. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos de diferentes tempos de centrifugação nas características fisiológicas e de qualidade em minicenouras. Raízes de cenouras cv. Alvorada foram colhidas e minimamente processadas como minicenouras. Após o processamento, as amostras foram colocadas em sacos de nylon e centrifugadas (378 rad. s-1 por 0; 30; 60; 90 e 120 segundos. A temperatura das minicenouras centrifugadas por 120 segundos foi 63% mais alta que a temperatura do início do experimento. A atividade respiratória aumentou 49

  11. Hydrodynamic film thickness measurements and CFD analysis identify the root causes of repetitive thrust bearing failures on a 45 MW hydro generating unit at Hydro-Québec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, P.; Huard, P.

    2016-11-01

    High temperature level recorded on the thrust bearing of a 45 MW hydro generating unit was resulting in frequent production stoppage. In spite of improvements brought to the oil cooling system since the rehabilitation in 2008, the operator had to activate the bearing oil lift system to keep the temperature below acceptable limits. Primary root cause analysis first pointed to the design of the shoe that was centrally pivoted, not allowing the formation of a thick hydrodynamic film. The removal of a strip of the soft metal layer near the trailing edge of the shoe resulted in a significant surface temperature reduction (about 15 deg. C), as predicted by a CFD model of the oil film. The goal of this machining was to increase the pivoting angle by moving the centre of hydrodynamic pressure. Proximity sensors were installed at each corner of the redesigned shoe to measure the film thickness and the bearing attitude. Signal analysis revealed a step of a magnitude close to the oil film thickness between the two halves of the rotating thrust block. This was the cause of another failure few hours since restarting the unit. The lessons learnt through these measurements and analyses were carefully applied to the ultimate build. The unit now runs with a robust thrust bearing and even survived a significant cooling flow reduction event. This paper presents the CFD analysis results and the measurements acquired during these events.

  12. Root disease management guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Forest tree root pathogens are widespread throughout all forested ecosystems in British Columbia. This guidebook provides a background to forest root disease management (including why, where, and how to manage root disease) and describes the necessary tools for managing root disease. It includes a review of the distribution of major root diseases in the province, host susceptibility and symptomology, and root disease and stand dynamics. The tools described include disease hazard and risk assessment, stratification surveys, and treatment methods. The major root diseases covered in the guide are Armillaria root disease, laminated root rot, Tomentosus root rot, blackstain root disease, and Annosus root disease.

  13. Analysis of the use of microcystin-contaminated water in the growth and nutritional quality of the root-vegetable, Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, J; Azevedo, J; Freitas, M; Pinto, E; Almeida, A; Vasconcelos, V; Campos, A

    2017-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are often observed in freshwaters and may reflect the increased eutrophication of these environments and alterations in climate. Cyanotoxins, such as microcystins (MCs), are an effective threat to many life forms, ranging from plants to humans. Despite the research conducted to date on cyanotoxins, the risks associated to the use of contaminated water in agriculture require further elucidation. To tackle this aim, a research was conducted with the root-vegetable Daucus carota. The specific aims of this work were the following: (i) to evaluate the effects of MC-LR on the plant growth and photosynthesis; (ii) to evaluate the nutritional quality of carrot roots; and (iii) to measure bioaccumulation. To this purpose, young carrots were grown in soil during 1 month in natural conditions and exposed to Mycrocystis aeruginosa aqueous extracts containing environmentally realistic concentrations of MC-LR (10 and 50 MC-LR μg/L). The results showed that MC-LR may decrease root growth after 28 days of exposure to 50 μg/L and increase photosynthetic efficiency. We also observed changes in mineral and vitamin content in carrots as a result of the exposure to contaminated water. Moreover, MC-LR was detected in carrot roots by ELISA at very low concentration 5.23 ± 0.47 ng MC eq./g FW. The soil retained 52.7 % of the toxin potentially available for plants. This result could be attributed to MC-LR adsorption by soil particles or due to microbial degradation of the toxin. We conclude that the prolonged use of MC-LR-contaminated water may affect crop growth, alter the nutritional value of vegetable products, and potentiate contamination.

  14. Special Experts Meeting: Identifying and Overcoming Barriers to the Effective Consideration of Human and Organizational Factors in Event Analysis and Root Cause Analysis. Nuclear Energy Agency / Working Group on Human and Organizational Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The main mission of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (WGHOF) is to improve the understanding and treatment of human and organisational factors (HOF) within the nuclear industry in order to support the continued safety performance of nuclear installations and improve the effectiveness of regulatory practices in member countries. WGHOF developed a CSNI (Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations) Activity Proposal Sheet (CAPS) outlining the work and milestones necessary towards achieving the following objectives: - Identify barriers to analyzing and correctly identifying the Human and Organisational Factors (HOF) causes of events; - Identify barriers to implementing lessons learned from these analyses; and - Develop recommendations for overcoming these barriers to: improve the identification of HOF causes of events and support the successful implementation of appropriate corrective actions The CAPS can be found in Appendix A. The first activity under the plan was the development of a questionnaire. This was distributed to WGHOF members and their counterparts from the Working Group on Operating Experience (WGOE). The questionnaire was comprised of 20 questions based on the objectives of the CSNI Activity Proposed Sheet. The intended survey participants were licensees with previous experience conducting root cause analyses. Responses were received from 26 respondents from 11 different countries. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed to identify themes for further discussion during a specialist meeting planned for September 2009. The following themes were presented during the WGHOF meeting in March of 2009 and endorsed for further work: - Roles and Influence of Senior Management, - Skills and Knowledge of the Investigators, - Qualitative Nature of HOF, - Influence of the Regulator, - Systematic Approach to Investigation. A summary of the questionnaire responses is provided in Appendix B

  15. Root Cause Investigation Best Practices Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-30

    Koenigsmann hans.koenigsmann@spacex.c om SpaceX James Koory james.koory@rocket.com Rocket Brian Kosinski Kosinski.Brian@ssd.loral.co m SSL John...Fred Van Milligen fvanmilligen@jdsu.com JDSU Marvin VanderWeg marvin.vanderwag@spacex.c om SpaceX Gerrit VanOmmering gerrit.vanommering@sslmda. com SSL

  16. Embarkables Root Cause for Navy Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    low bandwidth capacity. It performs identity management and application integration and can support multiuser workstations with the ability to... detecting , reporting and remediating of any network vulnerabilities or threats to computer networks are enforced at every level of the Computer Network...LandWarNet, 2008). The HBSS baseline is a COTS-based application for the detection , monitoring, and countering against known cyber-threats to DoD

  17. Effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene and carotenoid content of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, A; Tiwari, B K; Tuohy, M G; O'Donnell, C P; Brunton, N

    2011-09-01

    The effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene (falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate) and carotenoid compounds of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs was investigated. Ultrasound pretreatment followed by hot air drying (UPHD) at the highest amplitude and treatment time investigated resulted in higher retention of polyacetylenes and carotenoids in dried carrot discs than blanching followed by hot air drying. Freeze dried samples had a higher retention of polyacetylene and carotenoid compounds compared to hot air dried samples. Color parameters were strongly correlated with carotenoids (p<0.05). This study shows that ultrasound pretreatment is a potential alternative to conventional blanching treatment in the drying of carrots. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  19. Bioaccessibility, bioavailability, and anti-inflammatory effects of anthocyanins from purple root vegetables using mono- and co-culture cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hassan, Yousef I; Renaud, Justin; Liu, Ronghua; Yang, Cheng; Sun, Yong; Tsao, Rong

    2017-10-01

    Immune-inflammatory signaling and metabolic effects are the main pillars for bioactivity of anthocyanins derived from highly pigmented root vegetables. This study aims to assess the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of purple carrot and potato derived anthocyanins and the molecular mechanisms of their ability to ameliorate cellular inflammation in a mono- and co-culture cell models. An in vitro gastrointestinal model was used and demonstrated bioaccessibility of 44.62 and 71.8% for anthocyanins of purple carrot and potato, respectively. These accessible anthocyanins significantly inhibited cellular inflammation in Caco-2 cells. Intact cyanidinglycoside or petunidinglycoside (respectively from carrots and potatoes) were transported across a transmembrane cell model and detected by LC-MS/MS. Computational docking and glucose uptake analyses suggested uptake of anthocyanins was mediated by hexose transporters. Subsequent experiment using an inflamed Caco-2 BBe1/THP-1 co-culture cell model showed these transported anthocyanins inhibited IL-8 and TNF-α secretion,and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines by blocking NF-κB, and MAPK mediated inflammatory cellular signaling cascades, but with varying degrees due to structural features. Anthocyanins from purple carrots and potatoes possess a promising anti-inflammatory effect in model gut system. They can be absorbed and act differently but are in general beneficial for inflammation-mediated diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Mobilizing cities towards a low-carbon future: Tambourines, carrots and sticks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Delarue, Erik; Meeus, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    In the transition towards a low-carbon future in Europe, cities' actions are of major importance due to the prominence of urbanization, both in terms of population and in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, we need city authorities to act, by using their competences as policy makers as well as energy users. However, cities are still not moving as fast as one might expect, indicating the need for additional incentives to prompt local action. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present an overview of external incentives that might prompt cities to act and to highlight good practices that could be used in future initiatives. This paper first discusses how to evaluate the climate and energy performance of a city and how local authorities can contribute to its improvements. Moreover, it analyses the disincentives that local governments are confronted with, categorizing them as simple market failures, institutional failures and multi-agent failures. The paper then presents a survey of initiatives at national and EU levels to promote local action towards a low-carbon future; grouping them into tambourines, carrots and sticks. We focus on Austria, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden because they are pioneering countries regarding energy policies for cities. - Highlights: • CO 2 and energy consumption could be used to evaluate the performance of cities. • Simple market, institutional and multi-agent failures are hampering local action. • National and EU actions use mainly tambourines and carrots, rather than sticks. • Covenant of Mayors is one of the most noteworthy tambourine type of instruments. • Carrots notable features are: use of competition and involvement of third-parties