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Sample records for carpocapsa pomonella

  1. Occurrence and Prevalence of Insect Pathogens in Populations of the Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella L.: A Long-Term Diagnostic Survey

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    Regina G. Kleespies

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available About 20,550 larvae, pupae and adults of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella L., were diagnosed for pathogens during long-term investigations (1955–2012 at the Institute for Biological Control in Darmstadt, Germany. The prevailing entomopathogens diagnosed in these studies were insect pathogenic fungi, especially Beauveria bassiana and Isaria farinosa, the microsporidium, Nosema carpocapsae, the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV, as well as mostly undetermined bacteria. While the CpGV was observed exclusively in larvae and pupae from laboratory colonies or from field experiments with this virus, entomopathogenic fungi were most frequently diagnosed in last instars in autumn and in diapausing larvae and pupae in spring. B. bassiana was identified as the major fungal pathogen, causing larval prevalences of 0.9% to 100% (mean, about 32%. During prognostic long-term studies in larvae and adults of C. pomonella, N. carpocapsae was diagnosed in codling moth populations from various locations in Germany. The mean prevalence generally ranged between 20% and 50%. Experiments revealed that the fecundity and fertility of microsporidia-infected female adults were significantly reduced compared to healthy ones. The results underpin the importance of naturally occurring microbial antagonists and represent a base for further ecological studies on developing new or additional biological and integrated control strategies.

  2. Storage of osmotically treated entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae

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    SHI-PENG FENG; RI-CHOU HAN; XUE-HONG QIU; LI CAO; JING-HUA CHEN; GUO-HONG WANG

    2006-01-01

    The infective juveniles (IJs) of Steinernema carpocapsae 'All' were osmotically stressed by a mixture of ionic (fortified artificial seawater) and non-ionic (3.2 mol/Lglycerol) solutions to establish a method for osmotic storage of entomopathogenic nematodes.Seven combinations (termed solution A to G) with different proportions of these two solutions were tested, with sterile extra pure water (sepH2O, termed solution H) as a control. The mortality of the IJs at a concentration of 5 × 105 IJ/mL in the solutions A to G, and H were 13.2%,16.2%, 16.7%, 13.5%, 25.2%, 31.6%, 44.6%, and 1.0%, respectively, after 21 days storage at 25℃. Most of the IJs shrunk and stopped motility after 6-9 hours incubation at 25℃ in solutions A to D. Based on the results, solutions A to D and H were chosen to further test the osmotic survival of the IJs at different IJ concentrations (5×105, 2.5 × 105, 2000 IJ/mL) and incubation temperature (30℃, 25℃, 10℃). The resulting IJs were exposed to a high temperature assay (45℃ for 4 h, HTA). Osmotically stressed IJs showed improved heat tolerance. The mortality of the IJs increased with the increasing concentrations of the test IJs and the storage temperatures after exposing to the HTA. More than 88.4%, 62.3% or 2.4% of the treated IJs died at the above three IJ concentrations, respectively. At the three IJ concentrations (2 000 IJs/mL, 2.5 × 105 IJs/mL or 5 × 105 IJs/mL), the highest mortality was recorded in solution D (11.6%, 85.9% or 98.0%, respectively), and the lowest mortality in solution B (2.4%, 62.3% or 86.6%, respectively). No untreated IJs survived after the heat treatment. During 42 days storage at 10℃, the IJs mortality in the solutions A to D and H were 7.19%, 5.97%,4.41%, 4.34%, and 4.34% respectively, and showed no significant differences. In conclusion,solutions enhances the heat tolerance. The mortality of the IJs after HTA increased with the increasing concentrations of the test IJs and the storage

  3. Effects of Eight Brighteners as Solar Radiation Protectants for Steinernema carpocapsae, All Strain

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    Nickle, W. R.; M. Shapiro

    1994-01-01

    Seven commercially available Blankophor fluorescent brighteners were compared with the standard Tinopal LPW as solar radiation protectants for Steinernema carpocapsae (All strain). Blankophor BBH and Tinopal LPW were the most successful UV screens, with 95% of the original nematode infectivity to larvae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, retained after 4 hours of exposure to direct sunlight. The Blankophor HRS and DML preserved 80 and 85% infectivity, and the P167 preserved 70% inf...

  4. Effects of Insecticides on Movement, Nictation, and Infectivity of Steinernema carpocapsae

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Nobuyoshi; Takii, Shinji

    1993-01-01

    Movement, nictation, and infectivity of Steinernema carpocapsae strain All were compared for ensheathed (EnJ) and desheathed (DeJ) infective juveniles exposed to the insecticides acephate, dichlorvos, methomyl, oxamyl, or permethrin. Nematode response to various solutions included normal sinusoidal movement, uncoordinated motion, twitching, convulsion or formation of a pretzel shape, an inactive "S" posture with fine twitching, or a quiescent straight posture. The DeJ displayed these movement...

  5. MASS PRODUCTION OF THE BENEFICIAL NEMATODE STEINERNEMA CARPOCAPSAE UTILIZING A FED-BATCH CULTURING PROCESS

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    Leonard D. Holmes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the batch and fed-batch mass production of Steinernema carpocapsae. S. carpocapsae is an entomoparasitic nematode that is used as a biological control agent of soil-borne crop insect pests. The ability and efficiency of fed-batch culture process was successful through the utilization of the nematode’s bacterial symbiont Xenorhabdus nematophila. Results from the fed-batch process were compared to those obtain from the standard batch process. The fed-batch process successively improved the mass production process of S. carpocapsae employing liquid medium technology. Within the first week of the fed-batch process (day six, the nematode density obtained was 202,000 nematodes mL−1; whereas on day six, batch culture mode resulted in a nematode density of 23,000 nematodes mL−1. The fed-batch process was superior to that of batch production with a yield approximately 8.8-fold higher. In fed-batch process, the nematode yield was improved 88.6 % higher within a short amount of time compared to the batch process. Fed-batch seems to make the process more efficient and possibly economically viable.

  6. Pathogenicity of Steinernema carpocapsae and Steinernema glaseri (Nematoda:Steinernematidae) to Ixodes Scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae)

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    Zhioua, E.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Aeschliman, A.

    1995-01-01

    The entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) and S. glaseri (Steiner) are pathogenic to engorged adult, blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis (Say), but not to unfed females, engorged nymphs, or engorged larvae. Nematodes apparently enter the tick through the genital pore, thus precluding infection of immature ticks. The timing of tick mortality, and overall mortality after 17 d, did not differ between infections by S. carpocapsae and S. glaseri. These nematodes typically do not complete their life cycles or produce infective juveniles in I. scapularis. However, both species successfully produced infective juveniles when the tick body was slit before nematode infection. Mortality of engorged I. scapularis females infected by S. carpocapsae was greater than uninfected controls, but did not vary significantly with nematode concentration (50-3,000 infective juveniles per 5-cm-diameter petri dish). The LC50 was 347.8 infective juveniles per petri dish (5 ticks per dish). Hatched egg masses of infected ticks weighed less than those of uninfected controls. Mortality of infected ticks was greatest between 20 and 30?C, and was lower at 15?C.

  7. Transcripts analysis of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae induced in vitro with insect haemolymph☆

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    Hao, You-Jin; Montiel, Rafael; Abubucker, Sahar; Mitreva, Makedonka; Simões, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Steinernema carpocapsae is an insect parasitic nematode widely used in pest control programs. The efficacy of this nematode in controlling insects has been found to be related to the pathogenicity of the infective stage. In order to study the parasitic mechanisms exhibited by this parasite, a cDNA library of the induced S. carpocapsae parasitic phase was generated. A total of 2500 clones were sequenced and 2180 high-quality ESTs were obtained from this library. Cluster analysis generated a total of 1592 unique sequences including 1393 singletons. About 63% of the unique sequences had significant hits (e≤1e-05) to the non-redundant protein database. The remaining sequences most likely represent putative novel protein coding genes. Comparative analysis identified 377 homologs in C. elegans, 431 in C. briggsae and 75 in other nematodes. Classification of the predicted proteins revealed involvement in diverse cellular, metabolic and extracellular functions. One hundred and nineteen clusters were predicted to encode putative secreted proteins such as proteases, proteases inhibitors, lectins, saposin-like proteins, acetyl-cholinesterase, anti-oxidants, and heat-shock proteins, which can possibly have host interactions. This dataset provides a basis for genomic studies towards a better understanding of the events that occur in the parasitic process of this entomopathogenic nematode, including invasion of the insect haemocoelium, adaptations to insect innate immunity and stress responses, and production of virulence factors. The identification of key genes in the parasitic process provides useful tools for the improvement of S. carpocapsae as a biological agent. PMID:19836423

  8. Effects of Eight Brighteners as Solar Radiation Protectants for Steinernema carpocapsae, All Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickle, W R; Shapiro, M

    1994-12-01

    Seven commercially available Blankophor fluorescent brighteners were compared with the standard Tinopal LPW as solar radiation protectants for Steinernema carpocapsae (All strain). Blankophor BBH and Tinopal LPW were the most successful UV screens, with 95% of the original nematode infectivity to larvae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, retained after 4 hours of exposure to direct sunlight. The Blankophor HRS and DML preserved 80 and 85% infectivity, and the P167 preserved 70% infectivity after the sunlight exposure. The other Blankophors (RKH, LPG, and BSU) were not as effective.

  9. Analysis of Surstylus and Aculeus Shape and Size Using Geometric Morphometrics to Discriminate Rhagoletis pomonella and Rhagoletis zephyria (Diptera: Tephritidae)

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    Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) and Rhagoletis zephyria Snow both occur in the Pacific Northwest of the U. S. and are frequently confused with one another due to their morphological similarity. The apple maggot, R. pomonella, is a threat to commercial apples in the Pacific Northwest, whereas R. zephyr...

  10. Infectivity of Steinernema carpocapsae and S. feltiae to Larvae and Adults of the Hazelnut Weevil, Curculio nucum: Differential Virulence and Entry Routes.

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    Batalla-Carrera, Laia; Morton, Ana; Shapiro-Ilan, David; Strand, Michael R; García-Del-Pino, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the existing susceptibility differences of the hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum L. (Coleoptera:, Curculionidae) to entomopathogenic nematodes by assessing the main route of entry of the nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae strain B14 and S. feltiae strain D114, into larvae and adult insects, as well as host immune response. Our results suggested that S. carpocapsae B14 and S. feltiae D114 primarily entered adult insects and larvae through the anus. Larvae were more susceptible to S. feltiae D114 than S. carpocapsae B14 and adults were highly susceptible to S. carpocapsae B14 but displayed low susceptibility to S. feltiae D114. Penetration rate correlated with nematode virulence. We observed little evidence that hazelnut weevils mounted any cellular immune response toward S. carpocapsae B14 or S. feltiae D114. We conclude the differential susceptibility of hazelnut weevil larvae and adults to S. carpocapsae B14 and S. feltiae D114 primarily reflected differences in the ability of these two nematodes to penetrate the host.

  11. Serine Protease-mediated Host Invasion by the Parasitic Nematode Steinernema carpocapsae*

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    Toubarro, Duarte; Lucena-Robles, Miguel; Nascimento, Gisela; Santos, Romana; Montiel, Rafael; Veríssimo, Paula; Pires, Euclides; Faro, Carlos; Coelho, Ana V.; Simões, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Steinernema carpocapsae is an insect parasitic nematode used in biological control, which infects insects penetrating by mouth and anus and invading the hemocoelium through the midgut wall. Invasion has been described as a key factor in nematode virulence and suggested to be mediated by proteases. A serine protease cDNA from the parasitic stage was sequenced (sc-sp-1); the recombinant protein was produced in an Escherichia coli system, and a native protein was purified from the secreted products. Both proteins were confirmed by mass spectrometry to be encoded by the sc-sp-1 gene. Sc-SP-1 has a pI of 8.7, a molecular mass of 27.3 kDa, a catalytic efficiency of 22.2 × 104 s−1 m−1 against N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA, and is inhibited by chymostatin (IC 0.07) and PMSF (IC 0.73). Sc-SP-1 belongs to the chymotrypsin family, based on sequence and biochemical analysis. Only the nematode parasitic stage expressed sc-sp-1. These nematodes in the midgut lumen, prepared to invade the insect hemocoelium, expressed higher levels than those already in the hemocoelium. Moreover, parasitic nematode sense insect peritrophic membrane and hemolymph more quickly than they do other tissues, which initiates sc-sp-1 expression. Ex vivo, Sc-SP-1 was able to bind to insect midgut epithelium and to cause cell detachment from basal lamina. In vitro, Sc-SP-1 formed holes in an artificial membrane model (Matrigel), whereas Sc-SP-1 treated with PMSF did not, very likely because it hydrolyzes matrix glycoproteins. These findings highlight the S. carpocapsae-invasive process that is a key step in the parasitism thus opening new perspectives for improving nematode virulence to use in biological control. PMID:20656686

  12. Assessment of control strategies against Cydia pomonella (L. in Morocco

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    Iraqui Salma El

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L., is the key pest of apple production worldwide. In Morocco, there is a sustainable presence of codling moth causing considerable damage in apple orchards despite frequent applications of broad spectrum insecticides. For 12 years, sexual trapping and chemical control were performed and the development of the codling moth population was analysed in an orchard which was in the region of Azrou. The efficacy of some insecticides (azinphos-methyl, chlorpyriphos-ethyl, diflubenzuron, thiacloprid, methoxyfenozide, spinosad, and deltamethrin was also evaluated on neonate larvae and compared with a laboratory sensitive strain. This procedure was done to assess an eventual resistance in Moroccan populations. The action threshold was usually exceeded, leading to an intensive chemical control, with an average frequency of 9 to 13 days. The chemical control was done according to the action persistence time of the insecticides and the trap captures. However, those two parameters are compromised in Moroccan conditions because of the high summer temperatures which disrupt the action of insecticides and exacerbate populations. The pheromone traps may become ineffective and useless. Neonate larvae were resistant to five insecticides out of seven. Such results suggest the presence of a cross resistance in local strains. Overall, the insect resistance, the functioning of the sexual traps, and some insecticides properties (persistence action, pre-harvest interval are the key factors that could explain the failure to control these moths under Moroccan conditions.

  13. Evaluación en campo del granulovirus CpGV sobre Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae CpGV field evaluation on Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae

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    Claudio Ríos-Velasco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Del 01 de abril al 30 de mayo de 2007, se hicieron aplicaciones de concentraciones bajas de granulovirus de Cydia pomonella (CpGV a la recomendada comercialmente en larvas de C. pomonella en Jamé, Arteaga, Coahuila, México, que fueron de 35, 75 y 150 mL/ha (7.7X10(11, 1.65X10(12 y 3.3X10(12 granulos ha, en un huerto experimental de manzano con variedades Golden y Red Delicious. La eficiencia se estableció en relación al porcentaje acumulado de frutos dañados, en el periodo de evaluación, para lo cual se cuantificó el total de los frutos dañados en cada fecha de muestreo. Se observó diferencia significativa (pFrom April 1st to May 30ª, 2007, lower concentrations than commercially recommended of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus(CpGV were applied to the larvae of C. pomonella in Jamé, Arteaga, Coahuila, México, which were 35, 75 and 150 mL ha (7.7X10(11, 1.65X10(12, and granules 3.3X10(12 ha, in an experimental orchard of apple with Golden and Red Delicious varieties. Efficiency was established in relation to the cumulative percentage of damaged fruit in the evaluation period, quantifying the total damaged fruits at each sampling date. There was a significant difference (p <0.05 in the percentage of damaged fruit treated with CpGV (0.09% to 0.58% compared to the internal and external controls, 1.43% to 4.77% respectively. According to the results, low CpGV doses are effective for controlling the codling moth, as long as they apply on the day of emergence of the larvae.

  14. Genetic Transformation of the Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella L., with piggyBac EGFP

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    Genetic transformation of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, was accomplished through embryo microinjection with a plasmid-based piggyBac vector containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. Sequencing of the flanking regions around the inserted construct results in identification o...

  15. The chemosensory receptors of codling moth Cydia pomonella – expression in larvae and adults

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    Background: Codling moth, Cydia pomonella, is a worldwide key pest of apple and pear. Behavior-modifying semiochemicals are successfully used and are being further developed for environmentally safe control of codling moth. The chemical senses, olfaction and gustation, play critically important role...

  16. An unusual food plant for Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae in Mexico

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    Alejandro Salinas-Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An unusual food plant for Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae in Mexico. Larvae of Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus, 1758 were discovered on floral cones of Magnolia schiedeana (Schltdl, 1864 near the natural reserve of La Martinica, Veracruz, México. Magnolia represents an unusual host for this moth species, which is known throughout the world as the "codling moth", a serious pest of fruits of Rosaceae, especially apples. The larvae were identified using taxonomic keys, and identification was corroborated using molecular markers. Further sampling resulted in no additional larvae, hence, the observation was probably that of an ovipositional error by the female, and M. schiedeana is not at risk of attack by this important moth pest.

  17. Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis D(delta)-endotoxins against codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.) larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boncheva, R.; Dukiandjiev, S.; Minkov, I.; Maagd, de R.A.; Naimov, S.

    2006-01-01

    Solubilized protoxins of nine Cry1 and one hybrid Cry1 ¿-endotoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis were tested for their activity against larvae of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella L). Cry1Da was the most toxic, followed by Cry1Ab, Cry1Ba, and Cry1Ac, while Cry1Aa, Cry1Fa, Cry1Ia, and SN19 were still l

  18. Field Efficacy of Steinernema Carpocapsae Against Lima Bean Pod Borer, Etiella zynckenella Treitschke, Attacking Groundnut

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    Dwinardi Apriyanto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lima bean pod borer (LBPB, Etiella zynckenella Trietschke, is major insect pest of soybean in Indonesia. Currently it was also reported attacking groundnut in some parts of Sumatera causing serious yield loss. Insecticide treatment is not only ecologically unsafe, but also is not practical due to concealed behavior of the larvae within pods below soil surface. Systemic insecticide might be so but unsafe as it might leave unaccepted residue in harvested pods. It is clear that safer more effective technology such as biological control is badly needed. A Field study was conducted at the University of Bengkulu Research Station in 2012-2013. The objectives was to determine the effectiveness of non  local strain of entomopathoegen nematode (EPN, Sterinenema carpocapsae, to control LBPB attacking groundnut. Groundnut seeds were sewed in plots which were later treated with S. carpocasae produce by Biological Control Laboratory University of Jember at the dose of 500.000 JI m-2. EPN was sprayed upon plants and soil surface twice at plant age of 45 and 65 days after sewing (DAS. There were insecticide treatment and control plots as comparison. Observations of damaged pods and the presence of LBPB larvae were done at plant age of 63, 77,  90 DAS and at the haevesting date. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and the means of damaged pods were separated with least significant different (LSD. The result revealed that in two years study,  damaged pods consistently tended to be less in plots treated with S. carpocasae or insecticide than those in controls, indicating that it might be effective against PLPB. The lack of significant different between EPN treated and control  plots might be as a result of low percentages of EPN larval survival due shipment problem (i.e. inappropriate packaging and long transportation that toke several days or it might be that the strain was less adapted yet to local conditions. I speculate that local strain of EPN

  19. Microbial population dynamics in the hemolymph of Manduca sexta infected with Xenorhabdus nematophila and the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae.

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    Singh, Swati; Reese, Jordan M; Casanova-Torres, Angel M; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Forst, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Xenorhabdus nematophila engages in a mutualistic association with the nematode Steinernema carpocapsae. The nematode invades and traverses the gut of susceptible insects. X. nematophila is released in the insect blood (hemolymph), where it suppresses host immune responses and functions as a pathogen. X. nematophila produces diverse antimicrobials in laboratory cultures. The natural competitors that X. nematophila encounters in the hemolymph and the role of antimicrobials in interspecies competition in the host are poorly understood. We show that gut microbes translocate into the hemolymph when the nematode penetrates the insect intestine. During natural infection, Staphylococcus saprophyticus was initially present and subsequently disappeared from the hemolymph, while Enterococcus faecalis proliferated. S. saprophyticus was sensitive to X. nematophila antibiotics and was eliminated from the hemolymph when coinjected with X. nematophila. In contrast, E. faecalis was relatively resistant to X. nematophila antibiotics. When injected by itself, E. faecalis persisted (~10(3) CFU/ml), but when coinjected with X. nematophila, it proliferated to ~10(9) CFU/ml. Injection of E. faecalis into the insect caused the upregulation of an insect antimicrobial peptide, while the transcript levels were suppressed when E. faecalis was coinjected with X. nematophila. Its relative antibiotic resistance together with suppression of the host immune system by X. nematophila may account for the growth of E. faecalis. At higher injected levels (10(6) CFU/insect), E. faecalis could kill insects, suggesting that it may contribute to virulence in an X. nematophila infection. These findings provide new insights into the competitive events that occur early in infection after S. carpocapsae invades the host hemocoel. PMID:24814780

  20. Sympatric ecological speciation meets pyrosequencing: sampling the transcriptome of the apple maggot Rhagoletis pomonella

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    Ragland Gregory J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The full power of modern genetics has been applied to the study of speciation in only a small handful of genetic model species - all of which speciated allopatrically. Here we report the first large expressed sequence tag (EST study of a candidate for ecological sympatric speciation, the apple maggot Rhagoletis pomonella, using massively parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-FLX platform. To maximize transcript diversity we created and sequenced separate libraries from larvae, pupae, adult heads, and headless adult bodies. Results We obtained 239,531 sequences which assembled into 24,373 contigs. A total of 6810 unique protein coding genes were identified among the contigs and long singletons, corresponding to 48% of all known Drosophila melanogaster protein-coding genes. Their distribution across GO classes suggests that we have obtained a representative sample of the transcriptome. Among these sequences are many candidates for potential R. pomonella "speciation genes" (or "barrier genes" such as those controlling chemosensory and life-history timing processes. Furthermore, we identified important marker loci including more than 40,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and over 100 microsatellites. An initial search for SNPs at which the apple and hawthorn host races differ suggested at least 75 loci warranting further work. We also determined that developmental expression differences remained even after normalization; transcripts expected to show different expression levels between larvae and pupae in D. melanogaster also did so in R. pomonella. Preliminary comparative analysis of transcript presences and absences revealed evidence of gene loss in Drosophila and gain in the higher dipteran clade Schizophora. Conclusions These data provide a much needed resource for exploring mechanisms of divergence in this important model for sympatric ecological speciation. Our description of ESTs from a substantial portion of the

  1. Hawthorn-infesting populations of Rhagoletis pomonella in Mexico and speciation mode plurality.

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    Xie, Xianfa; Rull, Juan; Michel, Andrew P; Velez, Sebastian; Forbes, Andrew A; Lobo, Neil F; Aluja, Martin; Feder, Jeffrey L

    2007-05-01

    Categorizing speciation into dichotomous allopatric versus nonallopatric modes may not always adequately describe the geographic context of divergence for taxa. If some of the genetic changes generating inherent barriers to gene flow between populations evolved in geographic isolation, whereas others arose in sympatry, then the mode of divergence would be mixed. The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, has contributed to this emerging concept of a mixed speciation mode "plurality." Genetic studies have implied that a source of diapause life-history variation associated with inversions and contributing to sympatric host race formation and speciation for R. pomonella in the United States may have introgressed from the Eje Volcanico Trans Mexicano (EVTM; a.k.a. the Altiplano) in the past. A critical unresolved issue concerning the introgression hypothesis is how past gene flow occurred given the current 1200-km disjunction in the ranges of hawthorn-infesting flies in the EVTM region of Mexico and the southern extreme of the U.S. population in Texas. Here, we report the discovery of a hawthorn-infesting population of R. pomonella in the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains (SMO) of Mexico. Sequence data from 15 nuclear loci and mitochondrial DNA imply that the SMO flies are related to, but still different from, U.S. and EVTM flies. The host affiliations, diapause characteristics, and phylogeography of the SMO population are consistent with it having served as a conduit for gene flow between Mexico and the United States. We also present evidence suggesting greater permeability of collinear versus rearranged regions of the genome to introgression, in accord with recent models of chromosomal speciation. We discuss the implications of the results in the context of speciation mode plurality. We do not argue for abandoning the terms sympatry or allopatry, but caution that categorizing divergence into either/or geographic modes may not describe the genetic origins of all

  2. Effects of gamma radiation on codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) fertility and reproductive behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted with codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), to examine the effects of gamma radiation on fertility and reproductive behaviour. Data accumulated during these studies showed that egg production and hatch decreased with increasing radiation dose. Females were more sensitive to radiation treatment than were males. A dose of 150 Gy caused 100% sterility in females and significantly reduced fecundity, and a dose of 350 Gy reduced male fertility to less than 1%. Radiation dosages up to 400 Gy had no adverse effect on male longevity or competitiveness in cages using laboratory reared moths. However, males exposed to a dose of 350 or 400 Gy mated fewer times than unirradiated males. (author)

  3. The geographic distribution of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera:Tephritidae) in the western United States: Introduced species or native population?

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    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a major pest of commercially grown domesticated apple (Malus domestica) in North America. The shift of the fly from its native host hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to apple in the eastern U.S. is often cited as an example of inc...

  4. Are apple and hawthorn fruit volatiles more attractive than ammonium carbonate to Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Washington state?

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    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh), is an introduced, quarantine pest of apple (Malus domestica Borkhausen) in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. In the eastern U.S. where the fly is native, fruit volatiles have been reported to be more attractive than ammonia compounds to R. pomonel...

  5. Apple and sugar feeding in adult codling moths, Cydia pomonella: effects on longevity, fecundity, and egg fertility

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    Attraction of adult codling moths, Cydia pomonella (L.)(Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), to sweet baits has been well documented; however, beneficial effects of sugar feeding on moth fitness have not been demonstrated convincingly. Longevity, fecundity, and egg fertility were examined for female/male pair...

  6. Effect of rearing strategy and gamma radiation on fecundity and fertility of codling moth Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

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    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), is a serious pest of pome fruit worldwide. In an effort to reduce the use of pesticides to control this pest, the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is being used or considered as an integrated pest control tactic. Rearing codling moths through diapause has been...

  7. The integrated use of chemical insecticides and the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae(Nematoda: Steinernematidae), for the control of sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew G. S. Cuthbertson; James J. Mathers; Phil Northing; Anthony J. Prickett; Keith F. A. Waiters

    2008-01-01

    The integration of chemical insecticides and infective juveniles of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (Wesier) (Nematoda:Steinernematidae), to control second instars of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) was investigated. Using a sand bioassay, the effects of direct exposure of S. carpocapsae for 24 h to field rate dilutions of four insecticides (spiromesifen, thiacloprid, imidaeloprid and pymetrozine) on infectivity to Galleria rnellonella larvae were tested. Although all chemicals tested, except spiromesifen, produced acceptable nematode infectivity rates, they were all significantly less than the water control. The effect of insecticide treatment (dry residues of spiromesifen, thiacloprid and pymetrozine and soil drench of imidacloprid) on the efficacy of the nematode against B. tabaci was also investigated. Nematodes in combination with thiacloprid and spiromesifen gave higher B.tabaci mortality (86.5% and 94.3% respectively) compared to using nematodes alone (75.2%) on tomato plants. There was no significant difference in B. tabaci mortality when using the chemicals imidacloprid, pymetrozine and spiromesifen in conjunction with nematodes compared to using the chemicals alone. However, using thiaeloprid in combination with the nematodes produced significantly higher B. tabaci mortality than using the chemical alone. The integration of S. carpocapsae and these chemical agents into current integrated pest management programmes for the control of B. tabaci is discussed.

  8. Baculovirus resistance in codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.) caused by early block of virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asser-Kaiser, Sabine; Radtke, Pit; El-Salamouny, Said; Winstanley, Doreen; Jehle, Johannes A

    2011-02-20

    An up to 10,000-fold resistance against the biocontrol agent Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) was observed in field populations of codling moth, C. pomonella, in Europe. Following different experimental approaches, a modified peritrophic membrane, a modified midgut receptor, or a change of the innate immune response could be excluded as possible resistance mechanisms. When CpGV replication was traced by quantitative PCR in different tissues of susceptible and resistant insects after oral and intra-hemocoelic infection, no virus replication could be detected in any of the tissues of resistant insects, suggesting a systemic block prior to viral DNA replication. This conclusion was corroborated by fluorescence microscopy using a modified CpGV (bacCpGV(hsp-eGFP)) carrying enhanced green fluorescent gene (eGFP), which showed that infection in resistant insects did not spread. In conclusion, the different lines of evidence indicate that CpGV can enter but not replicate in the cells of resistant codling moth larvae. PMID:21190707

  9. Identification of biotransformation enzymes in the antennae of codling moth Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinglong; Liu, Lu; Su, Xiaoji; Feng, Jinian

    2016-04-10

    Biotransformation enzymes are found in insect antennae and play a critical role in degrading xenobiotics and odorants. In Cydia pomonella, we identified 26 biotransformation enzymes. Among these enzymes, twelve carboxylesterases (CXEs), two aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) and six alcohol dehydrogenases (ADs) were predominantly expressed in antennae. Each of the CpomCXEs presents a conserved catalytic triad "Ser-His-Glu", which is the structural characteristic of known insect CXEs. CpomAOXs present two redox centers, a FAD-binding domain and a molybdenum cofactor/substrate-binding domain. The antennal CpomADs are from two protein families, short-chain dehydrogenases/reducetases (SDRs) and medium-chain dehydrogenases/reducetases (MDRs). Putative catalytic active domain and cofactor binding domain were found in these CpomADs. Potential functions of these enzymes were determined by phylogenetic analysis. The results showed that these enzymes share close relationship with odorant degrading enzymes (ODEs) and resistance-associated enzymes of other insect species. Because of commonly observed roles of insect antennal biotransformation enzymes, we suggest antennal biotransformation enzymes presented here are candidate that involved in degradation of odorants and xenobiotics within antennae of C. pomonella.

  10. CpSAT-1, a transcribed satellite sequence from the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Věchtová, Pavlína; Dalíková, Martina; Sýkorová, Miroslava; Žurovcová, Martina; Füssy, Zoltán; Zrzavá, Magda

    2016-08-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a non-coding component of eukaryotic genomes, located mainly in heterochromatic regions. Relevance of satDNA began to emerge with accumulating evidence of its potential yet hardly comprehensible role that it can play in the genome of many organisms. We isolated the first satDNA of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Tortricidae, Lepidoptera), a species with holokinetic chromosomes and a single large heterochromatic element, the W chromosome in females. The satDNA, called CpSAT-1, is located on all chromosomes of the complement, although in different amounts. Surprisingly, the satellite is almost missing in the heterochromatic W chromosome. Additionally, we isolated mRNA from all developmental stages (1st-5th instar larva, pupa, adult), both sexes (adult male and female) and several tissues (Malpighian tubules, gut, heart, testes, and ovaries) of the codling moth and showed the CpSAT-1 sequence was transcribed in all tested samples. Using CpSAT-1 specific primers we amplified, cloned and sequenced 40 monomers from cDNA and gDNA, respectively. The sequence analysis revealed a high mutation rate and the presence of potentially functional motifs, mainly in non-conserved regions of the monomers. Both the chromosomal distribution and the sequence analysis suggest that CPSAT-1 has no function in the C. pomonella genome.

  11. Pathogenicity of bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila isolated from entomopathogenic nematode (Steinernema carpocapsae) and its secretion against Galleria mellonella larvae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAHAR Ali Nawaz; MUNIR Muhammad; ELAWAD Sami; GOWEN Simon Richard; HAGUE Nigel Graham Meckenzi

    2005-01-01

    The entomopathogenic bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila was isolated from the hemolymph of Galleria mellonella infected with Steinernema carpocapsae. The bacterial cells and its metabolic secretions have been found lethal to the Galleria larvae. Toxic secretion in broth caused 95% mortality within 4 d of application whereas the bacterial cells caused 93%mortality after 6 d. When filter and sand substrates were compared, the later one was observed as appropriate. Similarly, bacterial cells and secretion in broth were more effective at 14% moisture and 25 ℃ temperature treatments. Maximum insect mortality (100%) was observed when bacterial concentration of4×106 cells/ml was used. Similarly, maximum bacterial cells in broth (95%)were penetrated into the insect body within 2 h of their application. However, when stored bacterial toxic secretion was applied to the insects its efficacy declined. On the other hand, when the same toxic secretion was dried and then dissolved either in broth or water was proved to be effective. The present study showed that the bacterium, X. nematophila or its toxic secretion can be used as an important component of integrated pest management against Galleria.

  12. The Effects of Different Fungicides on the Viability of Entomopathogenic Nematodes Steinernema feltiae (Filipjev, S. carpocapsae Weiser, and Heterorhabditis downesi Stock, Griffin & Burnell (Nematoda: Rhabditida under Laboratory Conditions Efecto de Diferentes Fungicidas en la Viabilidad de Nemátodos Entomopatógenos Steinernema feltiae (Filipjev, S. carpocapsae Weiser, and Heterorhabditis downesi Stock, Griffin & Burnell (Nematoda: Rhabditida bajo Condiciones de Laboratorio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Laznik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To increase our knowledge on the susceptibility of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN species to agrochemicals, the compatibility of the infective juveniles (IJ of the entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema feltiae, S. carpocapsae, and Heterorhabditis downesi with 15 chemical fungicides was investigated under laboratory conditions. The effect of direct IJ exposure to fungicides for 24 h was tested in a petri dish at 15, 20, and 25 °C. The results showed that the compatibility of S. feltiae with azoxystrobin was high, and similar findings were obtained for S. carpocapsae (strain C67 and all of the tested fungicides, except for tebuconazole + spiroxamine + triadimenol, maneb, dinocap, and copper (II hydroxide + metalaxil-M. Nematode H. downesi (strain 3173 suffered the highest mortality rate when infective juveniles were mixed with tebuconazole + spiroxamine + triadimenol. The integration of the aforementioned agents into a pest management program is also discussed.Para aumentar nuestro conocimiento sobre la susceptibilidad de especies de nematodos entomopatogénicos (EPN, se estudió la compatibilidad de los juveniles infectivos (IJ de los EPN Steinernema feltiae, S. carpocapsae, y Heterorhabditis downesi con 15 fungicidas químicos bajo condiciones de laboratorio. El efecto de exposición directa de IJ a fungicidas por 24 h se evaluó en una placa Petri a 15, 20 y 25 °C. Los resultados mostraron que la compatibilidad de S. feltiae con azoxystrobin fue alta, y hallazgos similares se obtuvieron para S. carpocapsae (cepa C67 y todos los fungicidas probados, excepto para tebuconazole + spiroxamina + triadimenol, maneb, dinocap, y cobre (II hidróxido + metalaxil-M. El nematodo H. downesi (cepa 3173 presentó la mayor tasa de mortalidad cuando los IJ fueron tratados con tebuconazole + spiroxamina + triadimenol. También se discute la integración de los agentes antes mencionados en un programa de manejo integral de plagas.

  13. Captures of MFO-resistant Cydia pomonella adults as affected by lure, crop management system and flight

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, D; Rodríguez, M.A.; Avilla, J.

    2015-01-01

    The main resistance mechanism of codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in the tree fruit area of Lleida (NE Spain) is multifunction oxidases (MFO). We studied the frequency of MFO-resistant adults captured by different lures, with and without pear ester, and flights in orchards under different crop management systems. The factor year affected codling moth MFO-resistance level, particularly in the untreated orchards, highlighting the great influence of codling moth migration on the spread of resistan...

  14. Microbial control of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae) using bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) and its metabolites from the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAHARAliNawaz; MUNIRMuhammad; ELAWADSami

    2004-01-01

    Cells and cell-free solutions of the culture filtrate of the bacterial symbiont, Xenorhabdus nematophila taken from the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae in aqueous broth suspensions were lethal to larvae of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella. Their application on leaves of Chinese cabbage indicated that the cells can penetrate into the insects in the absence of the nematode vector. Cell-free solutions containing metabolites were also proved as effective as bacterial cells suspension. The application of aqueous suspensions of cells of X.nematophila or solutions containing its toxic metabolites to the leaves represents a possible new strategy for controlling insect pests on foliage.

  15. Microbial control of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L.(Lepidoptera:Yponomeutidae) using bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) and its metabolites from the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAHAR Ali Nawaz; MUNIR Muhammad; ELAWAD Sami; GOWEN Simon Richard; HAGUE Nigel Graham Meckenzi

    2004-01-01

    Cells and cell-free solutions of the culture filtrate of the bacterial symbiont, Xenorhabdus nematophila taken from the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae in aqueous broth suspensions were lethal to larvae of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella. Their application on leaves of Chinese cabbage indicated that the cells can penetrate into the insects in the absence of the nematode vector. Cell-free solutions containing metabolites were also proved as effective as bacterial cells suspension. The application of aqueous suspensions of cells of X. nematophila or solutions containing its toxic metabolites to the leaves represents a possible new strategy for controlling insect pests on foliage.

  16. Role of secondary metabolites in establishment of the mutualistic partnership between Xenorhabdus nematophila and the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swati; Orr, David; Divinagracia, Emmanuel; McGraw, Joseph; Dorff, Kellen; Forst, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Xenorhabdus nematophila engages in a mutualistic partnership with the nematode Steinernema carpocapsae, which invades insects, migrates through the gut, and penetrates into the hemocoel (body cavity). We showed previously that during invasion of Manduca sexta, the gut microbe Staphylococcus saprophyticus appeared transiently in the hemocoel, while Enterococcus faecalis proliferated as X. nematophila became dominant. X. nematophila produces diverse secondary metabolites, including the major water-soluble antimicrobial xenocoumacin. Here, we study the role of X. nematophila antimicrobials in interspecies competition under biologically relevant conditions using strains lacking either xenocoumacin (ΔxcnKL strain), xenocoumacin and the newly discovered antibiotic F (ΔxcnKL:F strain), or all ngrA-derived secondary metabolites (ngrA strain). Competition experiments were performed in Grace's insect medium, which is based on lepidopteran hemolymph. S. saprophyticus was eliminated when inoculated into growing cultures of either the ΔxcnKL strain or ΔxcnKL:F strain but grew in the presence of the ngrA strain, indicating that ngrA-derived antimicrobials, excluding xenocoumacin or antibiotic F, were required to eliminate the competitor. In contrast, S. saprophyticus was eliminated when coinjected into M. sexta with either the ΔxcnKL or ngrA strain, indicating that ngrA-derived antimicrobials were not required to eliminate the competitor in vivo. E. faecalis growth was facilitated when coinjected with either of the mutant strains. Furthermore, nematode reproduction in M. sexta naturally infected with infective juveniles colonized with the ngrA strain was markedly reduced relative to the level of reproduction when infective juveniles were colonized with the wild-type strain. These findings provide new insights into interspecies competition in a host environment and suggest that ngrA-derived compounds serve as signals for in vivo nematode reproduction. PMID:25398871

  17. Potential geographical distribution of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae)in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Geng; Zhi-Hong Li; Edwin G. Rajotte; Fang-Hao Wan; Xiao-Yu Lu; Zhi-Ling Wang

    2011-01-01

    Apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) is a major pest causing considerable economic losses of fruits in North America. During the development of international trade, apple maggot fly has become a threat to Chinese agriculture. In this study, CLIMEX and ArcGIS were used to predict the potential geographical distribution of apple maggot fly in China. The parameters used in CLIMEX for apple maggot fly were derived from ecological data and the present geographical distribution of apple maggot fly in North America. Then the potential distribution map in China was presented based on the adjusted values of these parameters. The results showed that apple maggot fly has a wide potential distribution area in China; 47.5% of 748 meteorological stations presented high or medium suitability of pest establishment. These high suitable stations are mainly located in northeast, southwest and northwest of China, such as Liaoning, Shandong,Gansu and Shaanxi Provinces. These areas are also the central regions of apple, pear and peach production in China. Two hundred and twenty-five stations (30.1%) in western and southern China, such as Tibet, Qinghai, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan and Taiwan,were unsuitable for establishment of apple maggot fly populations. In order to prevent the introduction of apple maggot fly in China, the present plant quarantine measures should be enhanced, especially in the areas with high suitability for the presence of apple maggot fly.

  18. Intraspecific Variation in Female Sex Pheromone of the Codling Moth Cydia pomonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Duménil

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae, is a major pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. This pest is often controlled using the biologically friendly control method known as pheromone-based mating disruption. Mating disruption likely exerts selection on the sexual communication system of codling moth, as male and female moths will persist in their attempt to meet and mate. Surprisingly little is known on the intraspecific variation of sexual communication in this species. We started an investigation to determine the level of individual variation in the female sex pheromone composition of this moth and whether variation among different populations might be correlated with use of mating disruption against those populations. By extracting pheromone glands of individual females from a laboratory population in Canada and from populations from apple orchards in Spain and Italy, we found significant between- and within-population variation. Comparing females that had been exposed to mating disruption, or not, revealed a significant difference in sex pheromone composition for two of the minor components. Overall, the intraspecific variation observed shows the potential for a shift in female sexual signal when selection pressure is high, as is the case with continuous use of mating disruption.

  19. Optimizing Aerosol Dispensers for Mating Disruption of Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Peter S; Miller, James R; Thomson, Donald R; Gut, Larry J

    2016-07-01

    Experiments were conducted in commercial apple orchards to determine if improved efficiencies in pheromone delivery may be realized by using aerosol pheromone dispensers for codling moth (CM), Cydia pomonella L., mating disruption. Specifically, we tested how reducing: pheromone concentration, period of dispenser operation, and frequency of pheromone emission from aerosol dispensers affected orientational disruption of male CM to pheromone-baited monitoring traps. Isomate® CM MIST formulated with 50 % less codlemone (3.5 mg/ emission) provided orientation disruption equal to the standard commercial formulation (7 mg / emission). Decreased periods of dispenser operation (3 and 6 h) and frequency of pheromone emission (30 and 60 min) provided a level of orientational disruption similar to the current standard protocol of releasing pheromone over a 12 h period on a 15 min cycle, respectively. These three modifications provide a means of substantially reducing the amount of pheromone necessary for CM disruption. The savings accompanying pheromone conservation could lead to increased adoption of CM mating disruption and, moreover, provide an opportunity for achieving higher levels of disruption by increasing dispenser densities. PMID:27369280

  20. Effects of some insecticides on the neutral lipid percentage, survival and infectivity of Steinernema carpocapsae ALL and Heterorhabditis amazonensis JPM 4

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    Paulo Henrique de Siqueira Sabino

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are an important energy source for entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs and directly influence their infectivity in the host. Some insecticides reduce the infectivity of infective juveniles (IJs while keeping them viable after exposure. Thus, the objective of this study was to correlate the amounts of lipid reserves in the EPN Heterorhabditis amazonensis JPM 4 and Steinernema carpocapsae ALL with their survival and infectivity when exposed to insecticides that keep the nematodes viable but reduced their infective capacity against Galleria mellonella. Among the tested insecticides, Vertimec and Klorpan were incompatible (class 2 with the two EPN species because they reduced infectivity. The insecticides Vertimec and Klorpan maintained the viability of the IJs but reduced their infectivity and their lipid amounts after insecticide exposure.

  1. Overwintering strategy and mechanisms of cold tolerance in the codling moth (Cydia pomonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Rozsypal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The codling moth (Cydia pomonella is a major insect pest of apples worldwide. Fully grown last instar larvae overwinter in diapause state. Their overwintering strategies and physiological principles of cold tolerance have been insufficiently studied. No elaborate analysis of overwintering physiology is available for European populations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that codling moth larvae of a Central European population prefer to overwinter in the microhabitat of litter layer near the base of trees. Reliance on extensive supercooling, or freeze-avoidance, appears as their major strategy for survival of the winter cold. The supercooling point decreases from approximately -15.3 °C during summer to -26.3 °C during winter. Seasonal extension of supercooling capacity is assisted by partial dehydration, increasing osmolality of body fluids, and the accumulation of a complex mixture of winter specific metabolites. Glycogen and glutamine reserves are depleted, while fructose, alanine and some other sugars, polyols and free amino acids are accumulated during winter. The concentrations of trehalose and proline remain high and relatively constant throughout the season, and may contribute to the stabilization of proteins and membranes at subzero temperatures. In addition to supercooling, overwintering larvae acquire considerable capacity to survive at subzero temperatures, down to -15 °C, even in partially frozen state. CONCLUSION: Our detailed laboratory analysis of cold tolerance, and whole-winter survival assays in semi-natural conditions, suggest that the average winter cold does not represent a major threat for codling moth populations. More than 83% of larvae survived over winter in the field and pupated in spring irrespective of the overwintering microhabitat (cold-exposed tree trunk or temperature-buffered litter layer.

  2. Improvement of the sterile insect technique for codling moth Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus)(Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) to facilitate expansion of field application

    Science.gov (United States)

    The codling moth Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is a key pest of most pome fruit (apple, pear and quince) and walnut orchards in the temperate regions of the world. Efforts to control the codling moth have in the past mostly relied on the use of broad spectrum insecticide spra...

  3. Targeting Cydia pomonella (L.)(Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Adults with Low Volume Applications of Insecticides Alone and in Combination with Sex Pheromone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies examined the effectiveness of adding insecticides to low volume sprays of a microencapsulated (MEC) sex pheromone to manage codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L). The activities of fifteen insecticides against the adult stage were first evaluated with a plastic cup assay. In general, moth longev...

  4. Effects of Ginkgo biloba constituents on fruit-infesting behavior of codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczolkowski, Maciej A; Durden, Kevin; Sellars, Samantha; Cowell, Brian; Brown, John J

    2011-10-26

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), is a cosmopolitan pest of apple, potentially causing severe damage to the fruit. Currently used methods of combating this insect do not warrant full success or are harmful to the environment. The use of plant-derived semiochemicals for manipulation with fruit-infesting behavior is one of the new avenues for controlling this pest. Here, we explore the potential of Ginkgo biloba and its synthetic metabolites for preventing apple feeding and infestation by neonate larvae of C. pomonella. Experiments with crude extracts indicated that deterrent constituents of ginkgo are present among alkylphenols, terpene trilactones, and flavonol glycosides. Further experiments with ginkgo synthetic metabolites of medical importance, ginkgolic acids, kaempferol, quercetin, isorhamnetin, ginkgolides, and bilobalide, indicated that three out of these chemicals have feeding deterrent properties. Ginkgolic acid 15:0 prevented fruit infestation at concentrations as low as 1 mg/mL, bilobalide had deterrent effects at 0.1 mg/mL and higher concentrations, and ginkgolide B at 10 mg/mL. On the other hand, kaempferol and quercetin promoted fruit infestation by codling moth neonates. Ginkgolic acids 13:0, 15:1, and 17:1, isorhamnetin, and ginkgolides A and C had no effects on fruit infestation-related behavior. Our research is the first report showing that ginkgo constituents influence fruit infestation behavior and have potential applications in fruit protection. PMID:21905729

  5. Comparison of fatty acid composition in total lipid of diapause and non-diapause larvae of Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ABBAS KHANI; SAEID MOHARRAMIPOUR; MOHSEN BARZEGAR; HOSSEIN NADERI-MANESH

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the fatty acid composition of the total lipid extracted from the whole body of Cydia pomonella L. larvae were determined by gas chromatography. The six most abundant fatty acids in both non-diapause and diapause larvae of codling moth were oleic (35%-39%), palmitic (23%-33%), linoleic (16%-30%), palmitoleic (5%-10%),stearic (1.5%-3.0%) and linolenic acids (1.0%-2.5%). This represents a typical complement of Lepidopteran fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of total lipid of C. pomonella larvae was related to diapause. In similarity to most other reports, the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids increased in diapause initiation state. The total lipid of diapause larvae contained more linoleic acid (25.8% vs. 16.1%) and less palmitic acid (24.7% vs. 33.4%),than that ofnon-diapause larvae. The weight percentage of linoleic acid (C18:2) increased from 16% to 26% from early-August through early-September during transition to diapause,while palmitic acid (C16:0) decreased from 33% to 25% at the same time. These changes resulted in an increase in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) from 1.72 in non-diapause larvae to 2.63 in diapause larvae.

  6. Feeding and oviposition deterrent activities of microencapsulated cardamom oleoresin and eucalyptol against Cydia pomonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun Baris Kovanci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral manipulation of codling moth with spice-based deterrents may provide an alternative control strategy. Microencapsulation technology could lead to more effective use of spice essential oils and oleoresins in the field by extending their residual activity. The feeding and oviposition deterrent potential of the microencapsulated cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum [L.] Maton oleoresin (MEC-C and eucalyptol (MEC-E were evaluated against codling moth, Cydia pomonella Linnaeus, 1758. MEC-C capsules contained both 1,8-cineole and a-terpinyl acetate, whereas MEC-E capsules contained only 1,8-cineole. In larval feeding bioassays, MEC-E exhibited the lowest feeding deterrent activity (33% while MEC-C at 100 mg mL-1 had the highest (91%. The highest oviposition deterrence activity against gravid females was also shown by MEC-C at 100 mg mL-1 with 84% effective repellency. In 2010 and 2011, two apple orchards were divided into four 1 ha blocks and sprayed with the following treatments in ultra-low volume sprays: (a MEC-E at 100 g L-1, (b MEC-C at 50 g L-1, (c MEC-C at 100 g L-1, and (d MEC-pyrethrin at 15 mL L-1. Water-treated abandoned orchards were used as negative controls. Moth catches were monitored weekly using Ajar traps baited with the combination of codlemone, pear ester, and terpinyl acetate. Based on pooled data, mean cumulative moth catch per trap per week was significantly higher in the MEC-E blocks (26.3 male and 13.5 female moths than those in other treatments except the abandoned blocks. At mid-season and pre-harvest damage assessment, the percentage of infested fruits with live larvae in the high dose MEC-C-treated blocks was reduced to 1.9% and 2.3% in 2010 and to 1.1% and 1.8% in 2011, respectively. Since fruit damage exceeded the economic damage threshold of 1%, high-dose MEC-C treatment may only offer supplementary protection against codling moth in integrated pest management programs.

  7. Rapid and repeatable shifts in life‐history timing of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) following colonization of novel host plants in the Pacific Northwestern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Mattsson, Monte; Hood, Glen R.; Jeffrey L. Feder; Ruedas, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Host shifts of phytophagous insect specialists to novel plants can result in divergent ecological adaptation, generating reproductive isolation and potentially new species. Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies in eastern North America underwent a host shift ~160 ya from native downy hawthorn ( Crataegus mollis) to introduced, domesticated apple ( Malus domestica). Divergent selection on diapause phenology related to the earlier fruiting time of apples versus downy hawthorns resulted in p...

  8. Gene expression analysis and enzyme assay reveal a potential role of the carboxylesterase gene CpCE-1 from Cydia pomonella in detoxification of insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) are responsible for metabolism of xenobiotics including insecticides in insects. Understanding the expression patterns of a such detoxifying gene and effect of insecticides on its enzyme activity are important to clarify the function of this gene relevant to insecticides-detoxifying process, but little information is available in the codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.). In this study, we investigated the expression profiles of CarE gene CpCE-1 at different developmental stages and in different tissues of C. pomonella, as well as the larvae exposed to chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin by using absolute real-time quantitative PCR (absolute RT-qPCR). Results indicated that CpCE-1 expression was significantly altered during C. pomonella development stages, and this expression differed between sexes, with a higher transcript in females than males. Meanwhile, CpCE-1 is overexpressed in cuticle, midgut and head than silk gland, fat body and Malpighian tubules. Exposure of third instar larvae to a non-lethal dosage of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in induction of CpCE-1 transcript. The total carboxylesterase enzyme activity was inhibited by chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vivo; in contrast, the activity of Escherichia coli produced recombinant CpCE-1 was significantly inhibited by both lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vitro. These results suggested that CpCE-1 in C. pomonella is potentially involved in the development and in detoxification of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin. PMID:27017882

  9. Characterization of glutathione S-transferases from Sus scrofa, Cydia pomonella and Triticum aestivum: their responses to cantharidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a key role in detoxification of xenobiotics in organisms. However, their other functions, especially response to the natural toxin cantharidin produced by beetles in the Meloidae and Oedemeridae families, are less known. We obtained GST cDNAs from three sources: Cydia pomonella (CpGSTd1), Sus scrofa (SsGSTα1), and Triticum aestivum (TaGSTf3). The predicted molecular mass is 24.19, 25.28 and 24.49 kDa, respectively. These proteins contain typical N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Recombinant GSTs were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins. Their optimal activities are exhibited at pH 7.0-7.5 at 30 °C. Activity of CpGSTd1 is strongly inhibited by cantharidin and cantharidic acid, but is only slightly suppressed by the demethylated analog of cantharidin and cantharidic acid. Enzymatic assays revealed that cantharidin has no effect on SsGSTα1 activity, while it significantly stimulates TaGSTf3 activity, with an EC50 value of 0.3852 mM. Activities of these proteins are potently inhibited by the known GST competitive inhibitor: S-hexylglutathione (GTX). Our results suggest that these GSTs from different sources share similar structural and biochemical characteristics. Our results also suggest that CpGSTd1 might act as a binding protein with cantharidin and its analogs.

  10. The genetic structure of hawthorn-infesting Rhagoletis pomonella populations in Mexico: implications for sympatric host race formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Andrew P; Rull, Juan; Aluja, Martin; Feder, Jeffrey L

    2007-07-01

    The genetic origins of species may not all trace to the same time and place as the proximate cause(s) for population divergence. Moreover, inherent gene-flow barriers separating populations may not all have evolved under the same geographical circumstances. These considerations have lead to a greater appreciation of the plurality of speciation: that one geographical mode for divergence may not always be sufficient to describe a speciation event. The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, a model system for sympatric speciation via host-plant shifting, has been a surprising contributor to the concept of speciation mode plurality. Previous studies have suggested that past introgression of inversion polymorphism from a hawthorn-fly population in the trans-Mexican volcanic belt (EVTM) introduced diapause life-history variation into a more northern fly population that subsequently contributed to sympatric host race formation and speciation in the United States (US). Here, we report results from a microsatellite survey implying (i) that volcanic activity in the eastern EVTM may have been responsible for the initial geographical isolation of the Mexican and northern hawthorn-fly populations c. 1.57 mya; and (ii) that flies in the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains (SMO) likely served as a conduit for past gene flow from the EVTM into the US. Indeed, the microsatellite data suggest that the current US population may represent a range expansion from the northern SMO. We discuss the implications of these findings for sympatric race formation in Rhagoletis and speciation theory.

  11. Effectiveness of 12 Insecticides to a Laboratory Population of Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Newly Established in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Shang, Su-Qin

    2015-06-01

    The codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.) is an economically important fruit pest that has spread rapidly from its original site in Xinjiang to other northwestern regions of China. Insecticides are widely used to control this pest but its invasion has never been completely stopped. The aim of this study was to establish a laboratory population of the codling moth occurring in China, to investigate the effectiveness of 12 conventional insecticides to this laboratory population, and to recommend the discriminating doses for use in resistance monitoring. The laboratory population was generally similar to other laboratory strains although parameters such as survival rate and larval duration were low when compared with field populations. Toxicity varied among the insecticides tested with LC50 values ranging from 0.016 mg/l for emamectin benzoate to 55.77 mg/l for chlorbenzuron. Discriminating dose levels were determined from dose-mortality reference curves for the detection of resistance in field populations. Effectiveness of 12 insecticides to a laboratory population of codling moth in China was evaluated for the first time. This can be integrated into resistance management strategies, especially in orchards with a history of frequent insecticides applications, in order to monitor or decrease insecticide resistance in the future.

  12. Crystalline protein profiling and cry gene detection in Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated during epizootics in Cydia pomonella L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konecka Edyta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The composition of Bacillus thuringiensis crystalline inclusions was characterized in 18 strains: 12 isolates were obtained from the intestinal tract of Cydia pomonella larvae during epizootics, 2 isolates were cultured from Leucoma salicis larvae taken from their natural populations, and 4 reference strains. The number and molecular mass of B. thuringiensis crystalline proteins (Cry and Cyt was estimated by the sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The crystals contained 1-8 proteins with molecular masses of 36-155 kDa. The toxin profiles differed both quantatively and qualitatively. The B. thuringiensis MPU B9 isolate had the highest number and diversity of Cry toxins. The analysis of crystal composition by SDS-PAGE was insufficient to detect groups and subgroups of Cry proteins. We identified 20 groups and 3 subgroups of Cry and Cyt crystalline toxins. Only one epizootic strain harboured cry25. In single reference strains, the cry1H, cry10 and cry25 genes were found. We did not find any correlation between the occurrence of cry genes and electrophoretic protein profiles of crystalline toxins.

  13. Relevamiento y evaluación de parasitoides de huevo para el control de Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae y Grapholita molesta (Lepidotera: Tortricideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar E. TORTOSA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde el mes de octubre hasta el mes de abril de los años 2005-2006 y 2006-2007 realizamos la búsqueda e identificación de parasitoides de huevo de Cydia pomonella (L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae y Grapholita molesta (Busck (Lepi - doptera: Tortricidae en tres sitios de Mendoza, Argentina. Trichogramma cacoe - ciae Marchal (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae fue colectado en huevos de las dos especies plagas, en todos los sitios del relevamiento, durante los dos ciclos de colecta. Se encontró Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogram - matidae solo en un sitio en el mes de diciembre de 2005. En los años 2008 y 2009 T. cacoeciae fue criado, liberado y evaluada su eficiencia en el control de C. pomonella y G. molesta a través del daño en los frutos. Realizamos dos ensayos de evaluación a campo en dos cultivos de peral orgánicos, en uno de ellos el daño promedio en frutos por C. pomonella y G. molesta fue de 5,07% ± 0,82 (testigo sin liberación 15,60% ± 4,73 y en el otro ensayo el daño promedio de ambas plagas fue de 1,92% ± 0,50 (testigo sin liberación 11,34 % ± 1,13. En ambos casos existi - eron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre tratamiento y testigo.

  14. Effect of temperature and sorbitol in improving the solubility of carboxylesterases protein CpCE-1 from Cydia pomonella and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueqing; Zhang, Yalin

    2013-12-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are enzymes responsible for the detoxification of insecticides in insects. In the Cydia pomonella, CEs are involved in synthetic pyrethroid, neonicotinoid, carbamate, and organophosphate detoxification. However, functional overexpression of CEs proteins in Escherichia coli systems often results in insoluble proteins. In this study, we expressed the fusion protein CpCE-1 in E. coli BL21 (DE3). This recombinant protein was overexpressed as inclusion bodies at 37 °C whereas it produced a higher percentage of soluble protein at lower growth temperatures. Production of soluble proteins and enzyme activity increased in the presence of sorbitol in the growth medium. The fusion protein was purified from the lysate supernatant using a Ni(2+)-NTA agarose gel column. The enzyme exhibited a higher affinity and substrate specificity for α-naphthyl acetate (α-NA), with k cat/K m of 100 s(-1) μM(-1) for α-NA, and the value is 29.78 s(-1) μM(-1) for β-naphthyl acetate. The V max and K m were also determined to be 12.9 μmol/min/mg protein and 13.4 μM using substrate α-NA. The optimum pH was 7.0 and temperature was 25 °C. An enzyme inhibition assay shows that PMSF and DEPC strongly inhibit the enzyme activity, while the metal ions Cu(2+) and Mg(2+) significantly activated the activity. More importantly, cypermethrin, methomyl, and acephate were found to suppress enzyme activity. The data demonstrated here provide information for heterologous expression of soluble protein and further study on insecticide metabolism in C. pomonella in vitro. This is the first report of the characterization of CEs protein from C. pomonella.

  15. Rapid and repeatable shifts in life-history timing of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) following colonization of novel host plants in the Pacific Northwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Monte; Hood, Glen R; Feder, Jeffrey L; Ruedas, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    Host shifts of phytophagous insect specialists to novel plants can result in divergent ecological adaptation, generating reproductive isolation and potentially new species. Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies in eastern North America underwent a host shift ~160 ya from native downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to introduced, domesticated apple (Malus domestica). Divergent selection on diapause phenology related to the earlier fruiting time of apples versus downy hawthorns resulted in partial allochronic reproductive isolation between the fly races. Here, we test for how rapid and repeatable shifts in life-history timing are driving ecological divergence of R. pomonella in the Pacific Northwestern USA. The fly was introduced into the region via larval-infested apples 40-65 ya and now attacks native black hawthorn (Crataegus douglasii) and introduced ornamental hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), in addition to early- and late-maturing apple varieties in the region. To investigate the life-history timing hypothesis, we used a field-based experiment to characterize the host-associated eclosion and flight activity patterns of adults, and the feeding times of larvae at a field site in Vancouver, Washington. We also assessed the degree to which differences in host-fruiting time generate allochronic isolation among apple-, black hawthorn-, and ornamental hawthorn-associated fly populations. We conclude that host-associated fly populations are temporally offset 24.4% to 92.6% in their seasonal distributions. Our results imply that R. pomonella possesses the capacity for rapid and repeatable shifts in diapause life history to match host-fruiting phenology, which can generate ecologically based reproductive isolation, and potentially biodiversity in the process. PMID:26811757

  16. Isolation, characterization and localization of orthologous sequence of the \\kur{Drosophila Notch} gene in codling moth, \\kur{Cydia pomonella}

    OpenAIRE

    Kůta, Václav

    2011-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Tortricidae) is a significant pest in apple orchards. In the 1990ies, a control programme using the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) has been established, based on bisexual releases of sterile insects into wild populations of this pest. Male-only releases are not possible due to the lack of an efficient system to produce male-only progeny. Recently, a new approach has been proposed for the development of genetic sexing strains in Lepidoptera. It is based on in...

  17. Exploración de enemigos naturales nativos de Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh, (Díptera: Tephritidae) en tejocote Crataegus spp. en comunidades del centro de México.

    OpenAIRE

    Muñiz Reyes, Erica

    2011-01-01

    El manejo del tefrítido Rhagoletis pomonella en zonas productoras de tejocote Crataegus spp. en México, se realiza bajo un esquema convencional basado en el uso de insecticidas químicos. Es importante considerar una transición agroecológica, que comience por la unidad productiva, para lo cual es esencial la participación de los productores agrícolas involucrados. La inclusión de la investigación social en este estudio permitió conocer la manera en la que los productores enfrentan el problema ...

  18. Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae – Major Pest in Apple Production: an Overview of its Biology, Resistance, Genetic Structure and Control Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Pajač

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The codling moth Cydia pomonella (CM (Linnaeus is a key pest in pome fruit production with a preference for apple. The pest is very adaptable to different climatic conditions and is known for developing resistance to several chemical groups of insecticides. Because of these reasons, the populations of codling moth are differentiated in many ecotypes of various biological and physiological development requirements. The article provides a bibliographic review of investigation about: morphology, biology, dispersal, damages, resistance to insecticides, population genetic structure and genetic control of this pest.

  19. Impact of climate change on voltinism and prospective diapause induction of a global pest insect--Cydia pomonella (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckli, Sibylle; Hirschi, Martin; Spirig, Christoph; Calanca, Pierluigi; Rotach, Mathias W; Samietz, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Global warming will lead to earlier beginnings and prolongation of growing seasons in temperate regions and will have pronounced effects on phenology and life-history adaptation in many species. These changes were not easy to simulate for actual phenologies because of the rudimentary temporal (season) and spatial (regional) resolution of climate model projections. We investigate the effect of climate change on the regional incidence of a pest insect with nearly worldwide distribution and very high potential for adaptation to season length and temperature--the Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella. Seasonal and regional climate change signals were downscaled to the hourly temporal scale of a pest phenology model and the spatial scale of pest habitats using a stochastic weather generator operating at daily scale in combination with a re-sampling approach for simulation of hourly weather data. Under future conditions of increased temperatures (2045-2074), the present risk of below 20% for a pronounced second generation (peak larval emergence) in Switzerland will increase to 70-100%. The risk of an additional third generation will increase from presently 0-2% to 100%. We identified a significant two-week shift to earlier dates in phenological stages, such as overwintering adult flight. The relative extent (magnitude) of first generation pupae and all later stages will significantly increase. The presence of first generation pupae and later stages will be prolonged. A significant decrease in the length of overlap of first and second generation larval emergence was identified. Such shifts in phenology may induce changes in life-history traits regulating the life cycle. An accordingly life-history adaptation in photoperiodic diapause induction to shorter day-length is expected and would thereby even more increase the risk of an additional generation. With respect to Codling Moth management, the shifts in phenology and voltinism projected here will require adaptations of plant

  20. Impact of Climate Change on Voltinism and Prospective Diapause Induction of a Global Pest Insect – Cydia pomonella (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckli, Sibylle; Hirschi, Martin; Spirig, Christoph; Calanca, Pierluigi; Rotach, Mathias W.; Samietz, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Global warming will lead to earlier beginnings and prolongation of growing seasons in temperate regions and will have pronounced effects on phenology and life-history adaptation in many species. These changes were not easy to simulate for actual phenologies because of the rudimentary temporal (season) and spatial (regional) resolution of climate model projections. We investigate the effect of climate change on the regional incidence of a pest insect with nearly worldwide distribution and very high potential for adaptation to season length and temperature – the Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella. Seasonal and regional climate change signals were downscaled to the hourly temporal scale of a pest phenology model and the spatial scale of pest habitats using a stochastic weather generator operating at daily scale in combination with a re-sampling approach for simulation of hourly weather data. Under future conditions of increased temperatures (2045–2074), the present risk of below 20% for a pronounced second generation (peak larval emergence) in Switzerland will increase to 70–100%. The risk of an additional third generation will increase from presently 0–2% to 100%. We identified a significant two-week shift to earlier dates in phenological stages, such as overwintering adult flight. The relative extent (magnitude) of first generation pupae and all later stages will significantly increase. The presence of first generation pupae and later stages will be prolonged. A significant decrease in the length of overlap of first and second generation larval emergence was identified. Such shifts in phenology may induce changes in life-history traits regulating the life cycle. An accordingly life-history adaptation in photoperiodic diapause induction to shorter day-length is expected and would thereby even more increase the risk of an additional generation. With respect to Codling Moth management, the shifts in phenology and voltinism projected here will require adaptations of

  1. Captures of MFO-resistant Cydia pomonella adults as affected by lure, crop management system and flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, D; Rodríguez, M A; Avilla, J

    2016-02-01

    The main resistance mechanism of codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in the tree fruit area of Lleida (NE Spain) is multifunction oxidases (MFO). We studied the frequency of MFO-resistant adults captured by different lures, with and without pear ester, and flights in orchards under different crop management systems. The factor year affected codling moth MFO-resistance level, particularly in the untreated orchards, highlighting the great influence of codling moth migration on the spread of resistance in field populations. Chemical treatments and adult flight were also very important but mating disruption technique showed no influence. The second adult flight showed the highest frequency, followed by the first flight and the third flight. In untreated orchards, there were no significant differences in the frequency of MFO-resistant individuals attracted by Combo and BioLure. Red septa lures baited with pear ester (DA) captured sufficient insects only in the first generation of 2010, obtaining a significantly lower proportion of MFO-resistant adults than Combo and BioLure. In the chemically treated orchards, in 2009 BioLure caught a significantly lower proportion of MFO-resistant adults than Combo during the first and third flight, and also than DA during the first flight. No significant differences were found between the lures or flights in 2010. These results cannot support the idea of a higher attractiveness of the pear ester for MFO-resistant adults in the field but do suggest a high influence of the response to the attractant depending on the management of the orchard, particularly with regard to the use of chemical insecticides. PMID:26497943

  2. Captures of MFO-resistant Cydia pomonella adults as affected by lure, crop management system and flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, D; Rodríguez, M A; Avilla, J

    2016-02-01

    The main resistance mechanism of codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in the tree fruit area of Lleida (NE Spain) is multifunction oxidases (MFO). We studied the frequency of MFO-resistant adults captured by different lures, with and without pear ester, and flights in orchards under different crop management systems. The factor year affected codling moth MFO-resistance level, particularly in the untreated orchards, highlighting the great influence of codling moth migration on the spread of resistance in field populations. Chemical treatments and adult flight were also very important but mating disruption technique showed no influence. The second adult flight showed the highest frequency, followed by the first flight and the third flight. In untreated orchards, there were no significant differences in the frequency of MFO-resistant individuals attracted by Combo and BioLure. Red septa lures baited with pear ester (DA) captured sufficient insects only in the first generation of 2010, obtaining a significantly lower proportion of MFO-resistant adults than Combo and BioLure. In the chemically treated orchards, in 2009 BioLure caught a significantly lower proportion of MFO-resistant adults than Combo during the first and third flight, and also than DA during the first flight. No significant differences were found between the lures or flights in 2010. These results cannot support the idea of a higher attractiveness of the pear ester for MFO-resistant adults in the field but do suggest a high influence of the response to the attractant depending on the management of the orchard, particularly with regard to the use of chemical insecticides.

  3. Putative nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits express differentially through the life cycle of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica A; Garczynski, Stephen F

    2016-04-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the targets of neonicotinoids and spinosads, two insecticides used in orchards to effectively control codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Orchardists in Washington State are concerned about the possibility of codling moth field populations developing resistance to these two insecticides. In an effort to help mitigate this issue, we initiated a project to identify and characterize codling moth nAChR subunits expressed in heads. This study had two main goals; (i) identify transcripts from a codling moth head transcriptome that encode for nAChR subunits, and (ii) determine nAChR subunit expression profiles in various life stages of codling moth. From a codling moth head transcriptome, 24 transcripts encoding for 12 putative nAChR subunit classes were identified and verified by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequence determination. Characterization of the deduced protein sequences encoded by putative nAChR transcripts revealed that they share the distinguishing features of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily with 9 α-type subunits and 3 β-type subunits identified. Phylogenetic analysis comparing these protein sequences to those of other insect nAChR subunits supports the identification of these proteins as nAChR subunits. Stage expression studies determined that there is clear differential expression of many of these subunits throughout the codling moth life cycle. The information from this study will be used in the future to monitor for potential target-site resistance mechanisms to neonicotinoids and spinosads in tolerant codling moth populations.

  4. Impact of climate change on voltinism and prospective diapause induction of a global pest insect--Cydia pomonella (L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibylle Stoeckli

    Full Text Available Global warming will lead to earlier beginnings and prolongation of growing seasons in temperate regions and will have pronounced effects on phenology and life-history adaptation in many species. These changes were not easy to simulate for actual phenologies because of the rudimentary temporal (season and spatial (regional resolution of climate model projections. We investigate the effect of climate change on the regional incidence of a pest insect with nearly worldwide distribution and very high potential for adaptation to season length and temperature--the Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella. Seasonal and regional climate change signals were downscaled to the hourly temporal scale of a pest phenology model and the spatial scale of pest habitats using a stochastic weather generator operating at daily scale in combination with a re-sampling approach for simulation of hourly weather data. Under future conditions of increased temperatures (2045-2074, the present risk of below 20% for a pronounced second generation (peak larval emergence in Switzerland will increase to 70-100%. The risk of an additional third generation will increase from presently 0-2% to 100%. We identified a significant two-week shift to earlier dates in phenological stages, such as overwintering adult flight. The relative extent (magnitude of first generation pupae and all later stages will significantly increase. The presence of first generation pupae and later stages will be prolonged. A significant decrease in the length of overlap of first and second generation larval emergence was identified. Such shifts in phenology may induce changes in life-history traits regulating the life cycle. An accordingly life-history adaptation in photoperiodic diapause induction to shorter day-length is expected and would thereby even more increase the risk of an additional generation. With respect to Codling Moth management, the shifts in phenology and voltinism projected here will require

  5. 斯氏线虫对天幕毛虫幼虫取食差异性的初步研究%Preliminary Study on the Feeding Difference of Steinernem Carpocapsae on Larva of Malacosoma Neustria Testacea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春蕾

    2014-01-01

    利用斯氏线虫属小卷叶蛾线虫(Steinernem carpocapsae)防治鳞翅目天幕毛虫幼虫。分别以不同浓度的活线虫组织匀浆溶液和死线虫组织匀浆溶液喷洒叶片,让供试昆虫食用。试验结果表明:昆虫病原线虫对天幕毛虫的防治效果良好。%This research aimed at using Steinernem carpocapsae to control larva of Malacosoma neustria testacea. Solutions of living nematodes homogenate and dead worm homogenates of different concentrations were sprayed on leaves to make them edible for insects. The experimentation results indicated that nematode has good effect on the control of Malacosoma neustria testacea.

  6. Utilización de Microsatélites para la Determinación de la Polilla de la Manzana Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) en Chile Central Utilization of Microsatellites to Determine Genetic Variability of the Codling Moth Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Juan L Espinoza; Eduardo Fuentes-Contreras; Wilson Barros; Claudio Ramírez

    2007-01-01

    La polilla de la manzana (Cydia pomonella L.) es la plaga más importante de los frutales pomáceos en el mundo. A pesar de su gran importancia económica, poco se sabe acerca de su estructura genética y patrones de movimiento a escala local y regional, aspectos importantes para establecer una estrategia de control de esta plaga. Mediante la utilización de microsatélites se realizó un análisis de la variabilidad genética de seis poblaciones de la polilla de la manzana en las dos principales regi...

  7. Molecular phylogeny and population structure of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in Central Europe: I. Ancient clade splitting revealed by mitochondrial haplotype markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraner, A; Brandstätter, A; Thaler, R; Aray, B; Unterlechner, M; Niederstätter, H; Parson, W; Zelger, R; Dalla Via, J; Dallinger, R

    2008-09-01

    The codling moth (Cydia pomonella L., Tortricidae, Lepidoptera) is an important pest of pome fruit with global distribution. It has adapted successfully to different habitats by forming various ecotypes and populations, often termed strains, which differ among each other in several morphological, developmental, and physiological features. Many strains of Cydia pomonella have developed resistance against a broad range of chemically different pesticides. Obviously, pesticide-resistant strains must have a genetic basis inherent to the gene pool of codling moth populations, and this deserves our particular attention. The primary intention of the present study was to contribute novel information regarding the evolutionary phylogeny and phylogeography of codling moth populations in Central Europe. In addition, we aimed at testing the hypothesis that differential biological traits and response patterns towards pesticides in codling moth populations may be reflected at a mitochondrial DNA level. In particular, we wanted to test if pesticide resistance in codling moths is associated repeatedly and independently with more than one mitochondrial haplotype. To this end, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA and constructed phylogenetic trees based on three mitochondrial genes: cytochrome oxidase I (COI), the A+T-rich region of the control region (CR), and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5). The results indicate that Central European populations of Cydia pomonella are clearly divided in two ancient clades. As shown by means of a molecular clock approach, the splitting of the two clades can be dated to a time period between the lower and middle Pleistocene, about 1.29-0.20 million years ago. It is assumed that the cyclic changes of warm and cold periods during Pleistocene may have lead to the geographic separation of codling moth populations due to glaciation, giving rise to the formation of the two separate refugial clades, as already shown for many

  8. Codling Moth (Cydia pomonella)

    OpenAIRE

    Alston, Diane; Murray, Marion; Reding, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Codling moth (Order Lepidoptera, Family Tortricidae) is the most serious pest of apple and pear worldwide. In most commercial fruit producing regions and home yards in Utah, fruit must be protected to harvest a crop. Insecticides are the main control tactic. There are new insecticides available, many of which are less toxic to humans and beneficial insects and mites than earlier insecticides. For commercial orchards with more than 10 acres of contiguous apple and pear plantings, pheromone-bas...

  9. 苹果蠹蛾抗药性研究进展%Research advances concerning insecticide resistance in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段辛乐; 乔宪凤; 陈茂华

    2015-01-01

    苹果蠹蛾是世界各国高度关注的严重危害苹果生产的外来有害生物。该虫于20世纪50年代在我国首次报道,目前是我国一类进境检疫性有害生物,正严重威胁我国苹果主产区的水果生产安全。苹果蠹蛾以幼虫钻蛀到果实内部为害,防治难度高,对其主要采用化学农药、交配干扰和苹果蠹蛾颗粒体病毒进行防治。由于农药的长期大量使用,苹果蠹蛾已对有机磷、氨基甲酸酯、拟除虫菊酯、昆虫生长调节剂、阿维菌素和苹果蠹蛾颗粒体病毒等不同类型的杀虫剂产生了抗药性。本文总结了国内外有关苹果蠹蛾抗药性现状和抗药性机理方面的研究,并分析了其对几种农药产生抗性的主要原因,同时结合国外苹果蠹蛾防治和抗药性相关研究,以及其在我国发生与防治的现状,提出该虫抗药性治理策略,即及时对我国疫区苹果蠹蛾的抗药性现状进行监测,在此基础上,注意科学地使用化学农药,并结合农业防治和生物防治等措施对该虫进行综合治理。%The codling moth, Cydia pomonella, is one of the most important pest insects in fruit orchards worldwide as well as an important invasive species in different regions of the world.In China, C.pomonella was first reported in the 1950ie-s and was consid-ered a serious invasive species, threatening the safety of fruit production.As the larvae of codling moth bear into the fruit, it is diffi-cult to control this pest.Chemical insecticides, mating disruption and the virus CpGV were the main control methods.In different re-gions of the world, C.pomonella had developed resistance to different types of insecticides including organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, insect growth regulators, abamectin and CpGV.In this paper, the status of insecticide resistance, knowledge on the de-velopment insecticide resistance, the resistance mechanisms and the main reasons causing

  10. Costs and benefits of thermal acclimation for codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): implications for pest control and the sterile insect release programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidawanyika, Frank; Terblanche, John S

    2011-01-01

    Sterile insect release (SIR) is used to suppress insect pest populations in agro-ecosystems, but its success hinges on the performance of the released insects and prevailing environmental conditions. For example, low temperatures dramatically reduce SIR efficacy in cooler conditions. Here, we report on the costs and benefits of thermal acclimation for laboratory and field responses of codling moth, Cydia pomonella. Using a component of field fitness, we demonstrate that low temperature acclimated laboratory-reared moths are recaptured significantly more (∼2–4×) under cooler conditions in the wild relative to warm-acclimated or control moths. However, improvements in low temperature performance in cold-acclimated moths came at a cost to performance under warmer conditions. At high ambient temperatures, warm-acclimation improved field performance relative to control or cold-acclimated moths. Laboratory assessments of thermal activity and their limits matched the field results, indicating that these laboratory assays may be transferable to field performance. This study demonstrates clear costs and benefits of thermal acclimation on laboratory and field performance and the potential utility of thermal pretreatments for offsetting negative efficacy in SIR programmes under adverse thermal conditions. Consequently, the present work shows that evolutionary principles of phenotypic plasticity can be used to improve field performance and thus possibly enhance pest control programmes seeking increased efficacy. PMID:25568003

  11. Biological Characteristics of Experimental Genotype Mixtures of Cydia Pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV: Ability to Control Susceptible and Resistant Pest Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Graillot

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The detection of resistance in codling moth (Cydia pomonella populations against the Mexican isolate of its granulovirus (CpGV-M, raised questions on the sustainability of the use of this biological insecticide. In resistant host cells, CpGV-M is not able to complete its replication cycle because replication is blocked at an early step. Virus isolates able to overcome this resistance have been characterized—among them, the CpGV-R5 isolate. In mixed infections on resistant insects, both CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 viruses replicate, while CpGV-M alone does not induce mortality. Genetically heterogeneous virus populations, containing 50% of each CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 appear to control resistant host populations as well as CpGV-R5 alone at the same final concentration, even if the concentration of CpGV-R5 is only half in the former. The use of mixed genotype virus preparations instead of genotypically homogeneous populations may constitute a better approach than traditional methods for the development of baculovirus-based biological insecticides.

  12. Biological Characteristics of Experimental Genotype Mixtures of Cydia Pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV): Ability to Control Susceptible and Resistant Pest Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graillot, Benoit; Bayle, Sandrine; Blachere-Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Siegwart, Myriam; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2016-05-21

    The detection of resistance in codling moth (Cydia pomonella) populations against the Mexican isolate of its granulovirus (CpGV-M), raised questions on the sustainability of the use of this biological insecticide. In resistant host cells, CpGV-M is not able to complete its replication cycle because replication is blocked at an early step. Virus isolates able to overcome this resistance have been characterized-among them, the CpGV-R5 isolate. In mixed infections on resistant insects, both CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 viruses replicate, while CpGV-M alone does not induce mortality. Genetically heterogeneous virus populations, containing 50% of each CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 appear to control resistant host populations as well as CpGV-R5 alone at the same final concentration, even if the concentration of CpGV-R5 is only half in the former. The use of mixed genotype virus preparations instead of genotypically homogeneous populations may constitute a better approach than traditional methods for the development of baculovirus-based biological insecticides.

  13. Biological Characteristics of Experimental Genotype Mixtures of Cydia Pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV): Ability to Control Susceptible and Resistant Pest Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graillot, Benoit; Bayle, Sandrine; Blachere-Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Siegwart, Myriam; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The detection of resistance in codling moth (Cydia pomonella) populations against the Mexican isolate of its granulovirus (CpGV-M), raised questions on the sustainability of the use of this biological insecticide. In resistant host cells, CpGV-M is not able to complete its replication cycle because replication is blocked at an early step. Virus isolates able to overcome this resistance have been characterized-among them, the CpGV-R5 isolate. In mixed infections on resistant insects, both CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 viruses replicate, while CpGV-M alone does not induce mortality. Genetically heterogeneous virus populations, containing 50% of each CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 appear to control resistant host populations as well as CpGV-R5 alone at the same final concentration, even if the concentration of CpGV-R5 is only half in the former. The use of mixed genotype virus preparations instead of genotypically homogeneous populations may constitute a better approach than traditional methods for the development of baculovirus-based biological insecticides. PMID:27213431

  14. Comparing the genetic structure of codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.) from Greece and France: long distance gene-flow in a sedentary pest species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouris, C Ch; Franck, P; Olivares, J; Sauphanor, B; Mamuris, Z; Tsitsipis, J A; Margaritopoulos, J T

    2012-04-01

    Codling moth Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is the most important insect pest of apple production in Europe. Despite the economic importance of this pest, there is not information about the genetic structure of its population in Greece and the patterns of gene-flow which might affect the success of control programs. In this study, we analysed nine samples from apple, pear and walnut from various regions of mainland Greece using 11 microsatellite loci. Six samples from the aforementioned hosts from southern France were also examined for comparison. Bayesian clustering and genetic distance analyses separated the codling moth samples in two genetic clusters. The first cluster consisted mainly of the individuals from Greece, and the second of those from France, although admixture and miss-classified individuals were also observed. The low genetic differentiation among samples within each country was also revealed by F(ST) statistics (0.009 among Greek samples and 0.0150 among French samples compared to 0.050 global value among all samples and 0.032 the mean of the pair-wise values between the two countries). These F(ST) values suggest little structuring at large geographical scales in agreement with previous published studies. The host species and local factors (climatic conditions, topography, pest control programs) did not affect the genetic structure of codling moth populations within each country. The results are discussed in relation to human-made activities that promote gene-flow even at large geographic distances. Possible factors for the genetic differentiation between the two genetic clusters are also discussed. PMID:22032419

  15. 苹果蠹蛾老熟幼虫诱杀技术%Investigation of the effectiveness of trapping Cydia pomonella larvae with chemical insecticide impregnated bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林明极; 焦晓丹; 隋广义

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of bands made from different types of material and impregnated with insecticides to trap codling moth larvae was investigated. The results show that bands made from old clothes were better than those made from woven bags or corrugated strips. 68.42% of larvae were trapped by bands made from old clothes. The relative effectiveness of insecticides was, in descending order, Lorsban ( Chlorpyrifos) , dichlorvos, Beauveria bassiana, difluron, beta-cypermethrin. Lorsban achieved larval mortality of up to 98. 20% . A 500 part dilution of Lorsban was the most effective achieving larval mortality of 91.61% . A mixture of a 500 part dilution of Lorsban and a 50 part dilution of Beauveria bassiana was an ideal combination for controlling codling moth larvae; effective for 40 days with larval mortality > 96% after 37 days.%本文对简易杀虫诱集带诱杀苹果蠹蛾Cydia pomonella(L.)老熟幼虫的效果进行了研究.发现在编织袋,旧衣物,瓦楞纸3种材料中,旧衣物对苹果蠹蛾的老熟幼虫捕获效果最好,其诱捕量占总诱捕量的68.42%;在诱集带中添加的农药中(包括乐斯本、敌敌畏、白僵菌、灭幼脲3号、高效氯氰菊酯等),乐斯本的杀虫效果最好,幼虫死亡率达到98.20%;在不同浓度的乐斯本溶液中,500倍乐斯本杀虫效果最好,幼虫死亡率达到91.61%,且对幼虫没有驱避作用;5 00倍乐斯本+50倍白僵菌药杀虫诱集带有效期长达40多天,37 d后对幼虫的杀伤效果依然达到96%以上,作为老熟幼虫的防治措施十分理想.

  16. Identification of host fruit volatiles from three mayhaw species (Crataegus series Aestivales) attractive to mayhaw-origin Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Dong H; Powell, Thomas H Q; Feder, Jeffrey L; Linn, Charles E

    2011-09-01

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, infests several hawthorn species in the southern USA. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these populations could serve as reservoirs for fruit odor discrimination behaviors facilitating sympatric host race formation and speciation, specifically the recent shift from downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to domestic apple (Malus domestica) in the northern USA. Coupled gas chromatography and electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and flight tunnel bioassays were used to identify the behaviorally active natal fruit volatile blends for three of the five major southern hawthorns: C. opaca (western mayhaw), C. aestivalis (eastern mayhaw), and C. rufula (a possible hybrid between C. opaca and C. aestivalis). A 6-component blend was developed for C. opaca (3-methylbutan-1-ol [44%], pentyl acetate [6%], butyl butanoate [6%], propyl hexanoate [6%], butyl hexanoate [26%], and hexyl butanoate [12%]); an 8-component blend for C. aestivalis (3-methylbutan-1-ol [2%], butyl acetate [47%], pentyl acetate [2%], butyl butanoate [12%], propyl hexanoate [1%], butyl hexanoate [25%], hexyl butanoate [9%], and pentyl hexanoate [2%]); and a 9-component blend for C. rufula (3-methylbutan-1-ol [1%], butyl acetate [57%], 3-methylbutyl acetate [3%], butyl butanoate [5%], propyl hexanoate [1%], hexyl propionate [1%], butyl hexanoate [23%], hexyl butanoate [6%], and pentyl hexanoate [3%]). Crataegus aestivalis and C. opaca-origin flies showed significantly higher levels of upwind directed flight to their natal blend in flight tunnel assays compared to the non-natal blend and previously developed apple, northern downy hawthorn, and flowering dogwood blends. Eastern and western mayhaw flies also were tested to the C. rufula blend, with eastern flies displaying higher levels of upwind flight compared with the western flies, likely due to the presence of butyl acetate in the C. aestivalis and C. rufula

  17. Advances in the Research and Application of Biological Control of the Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae)%苹果蠹蛾生物防治技术的研究和应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    南宫自艳; 宋萍; 王永娟; 王勤英

    2014-01-01

    苹果蠹蛾Cydia pomonella(L.)是我国重要的检疫害虫,已经在我国新疆、甘肃、宁夏、内蒙古、黑龙江和吉林6个省区发现,对我国苹果产业构成了严重威胁。目前,我国苹果蠹蛾的主要防治方法仍旧是传统的化学防治。但考虑到安全性、环境影响和化学农药持久性等问题,人们开始重视采取害虫综合治理策略(IPM),其中生物防治占有非常重要的地位。本文综述了国内外苏云金芽胞杆菌、白僵菌、颗粒体病毒、昆虫病原线虫和寄生蜂在苹果蠹蛾防治中的研究和应用情况。同时,针对生防技术在果园农业生态系统IPM防治体系中所发挥的作用也进行了探讨,包括目前亟待解决的问题和应用前景,以期为我国苹果蠹蛾防控策略的研究和应用提供参考。%Cydia pomonella (L.) is an important quarantine pest in China, which has so far invaded in Xinjiang, Gansu, Ningxia, Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang and Jilin provinces, and poses a serious threat to China apple industry. Now, traditional control methods have been based predominantly on broad spectrum insecticides in China. Considering food safety, environmental impact, and sustainability of synthetic pesticides, people have started to pay attention to IPM, in which biological control plays a key role. A variety of biocontrol agents of C. pomonella have been reviewed in this paper, including Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana, granulovirus, entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) and parasitic wasp. The role of biological control in IPM in the orchard agroecosystem was discussed, including the problems and the application prospect of biological control, in order to provide a reference for IPM strategy and its application in C. pomonella management.

  18. The behavior of Cydia pomonella larvae both inside and outside fruit%苹果蠹蛾的蛀果与脱果特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜磊; 刘伟; 柴绍忠; 杨建强; 张润志

    2012-01-01

    The codling moth Cydia pomonella ( L. ) is an important quarantine pest in China that inflicts serious damage to apple and pear crops. The newly hatched larvae bore into the fruit, and eat the seed to complete the larval stage. The mature larvae leave the fruit at night to find suitable sites to form cocoons. In order to better understand the behavioral traits of codling moth larvae and provide basic information to improve control of this pest we studied the behavior of codling moth larvae in Celingbulongtan in Inner Mongolia. The main results were as follows: (1) at high population densities, the average numbers of holes bored in fruit was 5. 25 and the initial number of larvae that entered was 2-8; (2) The number of larvae in damaged fruit had no relationship to the numbers of holes bored in the fruit. In general, damaged fruit contained less than 3 larvae. (3) When the number of holes in fruit was high ( on apples > 5 , on pears > 2) larvae stopped eating seeds and began to eat pulp. (4) 43. 1% of larvae left damaged apples within 5days and 99. 9% of them left within 15 days. (5) 94% of the larvae left damaged apples at night and 6% of them left during the day. (6) 64% of larvae remained in damaged apples when the study ended. These results indicate that codling moth larvae are subject to intense competition at high population density, and collecting fallen fruit will be an effective control method.%苹果蠹蛾Cydia pomonella(L.)是我国重大植物检疫性有害生物,对苹果属以及梨属的水果生产造成严重的危害.该虫以初孵化的1龄幼虫蛀入果肉,在果实内部取食为害并完成发育,老熟幼虫在黑暗中离开果实并寻找场所结茧化蛹.为掌握苹果蠹蛾幼虫进入及脱出果实时的行为特性,从而为实施有效的防治措施提供基础信息,本文在内蒙古格棱布楞滩对苹果蠹蛾幼虫的蛀果与脱果特性开展了详细研究.取得的主要研究结果如下:1)在苹果蠹蛾种群密度

  19. 苹果蠹蛾种群遗传多样性研究进展%Recent advances concerning the population genetic diversity of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉婷; 陈茂华

    2015-01-01

    苹果蠹蛾是重要的世界性果树害虫,寄主广泛,通过形成各种生态型或种群适应新入侵环境,对当地果品生产造成严重损失。本文综述了国内外有关苹果蠹蛾遗传多样性的研究进展。相关研究表明,寄主植物、地理隔离和杀虫剂等因素影响种群间的遗传多样性和遗传分化。其中,地理隔离是种群间形成遗传分化的主要原因之一,寄主分布格局、气候条件、虫体飞行能力和人为活动等因素都会影响种群间遗传分化的程度。苹果蠹蛾是我国重要的入侵害虫,我国东北地区和西北地区的苹果蠹蛾种群具有不同的遗传多样性水平,并且种群间有一定程度的分化,今后需要进一步研究影响我国苹果蠹蛾种群遗传的重要因素,明确该虫种群间分化情况、入侵来源和扩散路径,这对于延缓苹果蠹蛾在我国的扩散,制定合理有效的综合防治策略具有重要意义。%The codling moth, Cydia pomonella is an important cosmopolitan fruit pest. This species has a wide host range, and forms various ecotypes or populations to adapt newly invaded habitats, thus causing serious economic losses to fruit production every year. The research progresses of C. pomonella genetic diversity in China and other counties were reviewed in the current paper. The previ ̄ous research showed that some factors including host plants, geographic isolation and insecticide application could affect the popula ̄tion genetics of C. pomonella. Geographic isolation was one of the major factors which caused genetic differentiation of the pest, whilst other factors including host plant distribution, climate, flight capacity and anthropogentic measures could also influence the extent of genetic differentiation. C. pomonella populations from the northwestern vs. northeastern China have different level of genetic diversity, and show genetic differentiation. The further research need to be

  20. Identification of fruit volatiles from green hawthorn (Crataegus viridis) and blueberry hawthorn (Crataegus brachyacantha) host plants attractive to different phenotypes of Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Dong H; Powell, Thomas H Q; Feder, Jeffrey L; Linn, Charles E

    2011-09-01

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, infests several hawthorn species in the southern USA. In a companion paper, we showed that R. pomonella flies infesting two different mayhaw species (Crataegus opaca and C. aestivalis) can discriminate between volatile blends developed for each host fruit, and that these blends are different from previously constructed blends for northern fly populations that infest domestic apple (Malus domestica), downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis), and flowering dogwood (Cornus florida). Here, we show by using coupled gas chromatography and electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and flight tunnel bioassays, that two additional southern hawthorn fly populations infesting C. viridis (green hawthorn) and C. brachyacantha (blueberry hawthorn) also can discriminate between volatile blends for each host fruit type. A 9-component blend was developed for C. viridis (3-methylbutan-1-ol [5%], butyl butanoate [19.5%], propyl hexanoate [1.5%], butyl hexanoate [24%], hexyl butanoate [24%], pentyl hexanoate [2.5%], 1-octen-3-ol [0.5%], pentyl butanoate [2.5%], and (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT) [20.5%]) and an 8-component blend for C. brachyacantha (3-methylbutan-1-ol [0.6%], butyl acetate [50%], pentyl acetate [3.5%], butyl butanoate [9%], butyl hexanoate [16.8%], hexyl butanoate [16.8%], 1-octen-3-ol [0.3%], and pentyl butanoate [3%]). Crataegus viridis and C. brachyacantha-origin flies showed significantly higher levels of upwind oriented flight to their natal blend in flight tunnel assays compared to the alternate, non-natal blend and previously developed northern host plant blends. The presence of DMNT in C. viridis and butyl acetate in C. brachyacantha appeared to be largely responsible for driving the differential response. This sharp behavioral distinction underscores the diversity of odor response phenotypes in the southern USA, points to possible host race formation in these

  1. Application of biological pesticides in the control of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.)%生物源农药在苹果蠹蛾防治中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴正伟; 杨雪清; 张雅林

    2015-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae), a notorious quarantine fruit pest worldwide, poses a serious threat to the main apple producing areas in China. In terms of food safety, environmentally friendly biological pesticides are desirable substitutes for chemical pesticides;the long ̄term use of the latter have caused resistance, preventing its long team use for codling moth control. The present review summarized the use of biological pesticides, including parasitoids, sterilized insect, granu ̄lovirus, entomopathogenic nematodes, Bacillus thuringiensis, entomopathogenic fungi, microsporidia, sex pheromone, cantharidin, and spinosad that have been either applied or suggested to control codling moth. The challenges faced by biological pesticides are al ̄so discussed, and anyhow it will play an important role in the integrated pest management of codling moth due to its characteristics of infinite variety, wide source, good selectivity in application.%苹果蠹蛾是世界性检疫害虫,对我国苹果优势产区构成了巨大威胁。长期依赖化学防治使该虫抗性问题变得十分严峻。为了保障食品安全,以环境友好的生物源农药替代化学农药已成为当前苹果蠹蛾防治的热点。本文对国内外现有的生物源农药,如寄生蜂、不育昆虫、颗粒体病毒、病原线虫、Bt、病原真菌、微孢子虫、性信息素、斑蝥素、多杀菌素等,在苹果蠹蛾防治中的最新应用及其存在的问题进行论述,讨论了生物源农药凭借其种类多、来源广且在用药时期上选择性强等特点,在该虫综合治理中的重要地位及面临的挑战。

  2. 苹果蠹蛾的综合防控和遗传控制研究进展%The status of the integrated pest management of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) in China, and the prospects for the application of genetically modified insects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申建茹; 武强; 万方浩

    2015-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae), is a worldwide quarantine pest of fruits and nuts. Efforts to control the codling moth in the past mostly relied on broad ̄spectrum chemical pesticides. Recently, alternative non ̄chemi ̄cal control methods such as mating disruption and the granulovirus of C. pomonella ( CpGV) are increasingly being adopted, the pest could not be eradicated or suppressed effectively. This lead to a demand for new control tactics that are not only effective but also friendly to the environment. The sterile insect technique ( SIT) is one of the cost effective methods for eradication or suppression of the target population. However, the traditional SIT have some drawbacks:the amount of radiation required for full sterilization leads to lower competitiveness and field performance than those of the wild type, and the sex identification requires manual separation, making the method very labor ̄intensive. The developments of the genetically modified insects may address some of these limitations. Research progress in the SIT developmental history and the improvement caused by the genetically modified approach in the codling moth is reviewed, and the advantages and the feasibility of the genetically modified approach for codling moth control in China is also discussed.%苹果蠹蛾是仁果类水果的重要检疫害虫,在世界各地造成了巨大的经济损失。目前对其化学防治、化学生态调控、病毒等防治方法研究较多,但仍不能满足防控该害虫的需要,对新型防控技术的需求日益增强。不育昆虫释放技术( SIT)是一种可控制甚至根除靶标害虫的环境友好型防控技术,但传统SIT技术存在一定的局限性,如较难区分性别与筛选雌雄虫、辐射不育昆虫的交配竞争力和适合度降低等问题,这些缺陷随着昆虫遗传修饰技术的发展将得以解决,并将在害虫防控进程中起到积极作用。本文综

  3. Earthworms as phoretic hosts for Steinernema carpocapsae and Beauveria bassiana: Implications for enhanced biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior research indicated that earthworms may serve as phoretic hosts to entomopathogenic nematodes. Therefore, we hypothesized that biocontrol efficacy of nematodes could be enhanced in the presence of earthworms based on increased nematode dispersal through the soil. We also hypothesized that ear...

  4. Gene : CBRC-FCAT-01-0220 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ase F0 subunit 6 [Steinernema carpocapsae] gb|AAT00525.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Steinernema carpocapsae...VLLILFCLVHFATAASIHDCSSVIAFLFSFWLFFTSFISAERESNLFSTPFSILIIMILNSVSDILLVSVLVKSLAVVSSCSFFWCEFLRFIILKGEKELMR ...

  5. A flight cylinder bioassay as a simple, effective quality control test for Cydia pomonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of quality of the sterile male insects that are being mass-reared for release in area-wide integrated pest management programmes that include a sterile insect technique component is crucial for the success of these programmes. Routine monitoring of sterile male quality needs to be carried...

  6. Modeling population dynamics and dispersion of Codling moth Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Gharehkhani, Gholamhossein

    2009-01-01

    The study of insect dispersal plays an essential role in estimating the spread of damage caused by a newly invaded pest or the spatial distribution of an insect during the active period in growing season. Moreover concerning dispersal, quantitative information performs a crucial role in the evaluation and implementation of pest control. Since rearing clean and healthy insects in sufficient numbers is the most important prerequisite for many basic research programs and for developing pest cont...

  7. Control of codling moth (Cydia pomonella) using the area-wide approach in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Management of codling moth (CM) is being conducted in southern Chile using an area-wide approach and integrating different tools such us Geographic Information System (GIS), classical biological control, inundative biological control and mating disruption. The total area covers 6,000 ha, and extends from the foothills of the Andes mountains and is bordered in the south and north by rivers. Vegetation cover is predominantly pastures, pine forests and berries, including six commercial apple orchards. Codling moth control in the commercial orchards is based on chemical insecticides, mating disruption or organic practices. Many alternative hosts for CM grow in this area, mainly as ornamentals, in abandoned orchards and in gardens for self-consumption. The most important species are noncommercial apple, pear, quince, walnut and apricot. Satellite images were obtained and every alternate host tree was georeferenced and drawn on these images. Pheromone traps are being used to identify main migrant sources and to quantify migration from sources to commercial orchards. Classical biological control includes importation and release of an egg/larval parasitoid (Ascogaster quadridentata) from USA to Chile. CM is reared on artificial diet and eggs are used to increase the A. quadridentata colony and allow field releases in the 2004-2005 growing season, especially in isolated and abandoned trees. Related to inundative biological control, several strains of entomopathogenic organisms have been collected and evaluated against CM, including the fungus (Beauveria bassiana) and nematodes. In addition, a Chilean species of trichogrammatid wasps, Trichogramma nerudai and Trichogramma caccociae, have been used under an inundative approach, especially in abandoned orchards. The Chilean species T. nerudai has shown similar or better preference and laboratory performance than introduced species such as T. bactrae, T. caccociae, T. dendrolimi and T. platneri. (author)

  8. Comparison of laboratory and field bioassays of lab-reared Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) quality and field performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximum production and fitness of insect species that are mass-reared for biological control programs such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) have benefitted from the employment of quality control and quality management. With a growing interest in the use of SIT as a tactic for the suppression/e...

  9. Quality control tests of lab-reared Cydia pomonella and Cactoblastis cactorum field performance: Comparison of laboratory and field bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research, operational, and commercial programs which rely on mass-reared insects of high quality and performance, need accurate methods for monitoring quality degradation during each step of production, handling and release. With continued interest in the use of the sterile insect technique (SIT) a...

  10. Preliminary study of the quarantine treatment by gamma rays for codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in apples and pears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After irradiation, important variations have been observed in the behaviour and metabolism of the moth larvae that are clearly attributable to the effects of gamma rays. The variation includes the loss of the characteristic pink colour, partial or total loss of appetite, loss of turgidity, etc. (author)

  11. The potential use of entomopathogenic nematodes against Typhaea stercorea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Tina Stendal; Steenberg, Tove

    2000-01-01

    bait traps, biological control, broiler houses, checken litter and manure, hairy fungus beetle, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, Heterorhabditis megidis, Salmonella spp., Steinernema carpocapsae,......bait traps, biological control, broiler houses, checken litter and manure, hairy fungus beetle, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, Heterorhabditis megidis, Salmonella spp., Steinernema carpocapsae,...

  12. Effects of Earthworms on the Dispersal of Steinernema spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, D. I.; Tylka, G. L.; Berry, E. C.; Lewis, L. C.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that dispersal of S. carpocapsae may be enhanced in soil with earthworms. The objective of this research was to determine and compare the effects of earthworms on dispersal of other Steinernema spp. Vertical dispersal of Steinernema carpocapsae, S. feltiae, and S. glaseri was tested in soil columns in the presence and absence of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Dispersal was evaluated by a bioassay and by direct extraction of nematodes from soil. Upward dispersal ...

  13. 斯氏线虫对有机茶园角胸叶甲的田间控制效应%Field efficacy of Steinernema carpocapsae (Nematoda: Steinernematidae ) against the larvae of tea brown beetle, Basilepta melanopus Lefevre ( Cleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in organic tea plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖冬晴; 梁广文; 岑伊静

    2007-01-01

    角胸叶甲Basilepta melanopus Lefevre是危害凤凰单丛茶的重要害虫,该虫以成虫危害茶叶,幼虫取食茶树的幼根,导致茶叶产量减少,品质下降。斯氏线虫Steinernema carpocapsae是控制角胸叶甲幼虫的重要天敌。作者于2004年10月在广东省潮州市凤凰山风凰单丛茶园就该天敌在有机茶园对角胸叶甲幼虫的田间控制效果进行了研究。

  14. Difficulties and Successes in the Mass Rearing of Insects in the Laboratory, and the Possibility of Autocidal Control of some Harmful Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    developing ways of overcoming the diapause in laboratory populations in order to ensure continuous rearing. This can be done either by reactivating the insects by temperature changes or by instituting a period of illumination which prevents die diapause from starting. A further possible method is that of selecting and crossing diapausing and non-diapausing strains of a given species. A number of species of Orthoptera having a fairly wide natural habitat have been used to show the possibility of autocidal control by adding to a natural population which normally has a diapause specimens of a non-diapausing population from other parts of the habitat. This possibility has been demonstrated for the cricket Teleogryllus corn modus Walk, in Australia and for sub-species of Locusta migratoria L. in the Old World. The development of this form of autocidal control of insects merits close attention. The work reported is devoted mainly to developing methods of autocidal control and techniques for mass laborarory breeding of such harmful species as Carpocapsa pomonella L., Eurygaster integriceps Put, and Locusta migratoria L. (author)

  15. Biological control agent of larger black flour beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): A nuisance pest developing in cotton gin trash piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larger black flour beetles (LBFB), Cynaeus angustus, feed on saprophytic fungi found in gin trash piles, and become nuisance pests in homes and businesses. We examined the dose-response of three entomopathogenic nematode species (Steinernema carpocapsae, S. feltiae, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora...

  16. Lateral Dispersal and Foraging Behavior of Entomopathogenic Nematodes in the Absence and Presence of Mobile and Non-Mobile Hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harit K Bal

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic nematodes have been classified into cruisers (active searchers and ambushers (sit and wait foragers. However, little is known about their dispersal and foraging behavior at population level in soil. We studied lateral dispersal of the ambush foraging Steinernema carpocapsae (ALL strain and cruise foraging Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (GPS11 strain from infected host cadavers in microcosms (0.05 m2 containing Wooster silt-loam soil (Oxyaquic fragiudalf and vegetation in the presence or absence of non-mobile and mobile hosts. Results showed that the presence of a non-mobile host (Galleria mellonella larva in a wire mesh cage enhanced H. bacteriophora dispersal for up to 24 hr compared with no-host treatment, but had no impact on S. carpocapsae dispersal. In contrast, presence of a mobile host (G. mellonella larvae increased dispersal of S. carpocapsae compared with no host treatment, but had no effect on H. bacteriophora dispersal. Also H. bacteriophora was better at infecting non-mobile than mobile hosts released into the microcosms and S. carpocapsae was better at infecting mobile than non-mobile hosts, thus affirming the established cruiser-ambusher theory. However, results also revealed that a large proportion of infective juveniles (IJs of both species stayed near (≤ 3.8 cm the source cadaver (88-96% S. carpocapsae; 67-79% H. bacteriophora, and the proportion of IJs reaching the farthest distance (11.4 cm was significantly higher for S. carpocapsae (1.4% than H. bacteriophora (0.4% in the presence of mobile hosts. S. carpocapsae also had higher average population displacement than H. bacteriophora in the presence of both the non-mobile (5.07 vs. 3.6 cm/day and mobile (8.06 vs. 5.3 cm/day hosts. We conclude that the two species differ in their dispersal and foraging behavior at the population level and this behavior is affected by both the presence and absence of hosts and by their mobility.

  17. Evidence for the non-pest status of codling moth on commercial fresh sweet cherries intended for export

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain acceptance of a systems approach as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation for U.S. fresh sweet cherries, Prunus avium (L.) L., exported to Japan, additional evidence was needed to show that sweet cherries are poor or non-hosts for codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortri...

  18. Before harvest survival of codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in artificially infested sweet cherries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 2009 season, sweet cherries, Prunus avium (L.) L., from North America were required to be fumigated with methyl bromide before being exported to Japan to eliminate possible infestation by codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). However, based on recent biological...

  19. Creating Point Sources for Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) with Low-Volume Sprays of a Microencapsulated Sex Pheromone Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to examine the depositioin of microcapsules and the attractiveness of treated apple leaves for codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), following low volume concentrated sprays of a microencapsulated (MEC) sex pheromone formulation (CheckMate CM-F). Nearly 30% of leaves collected f...

  20. Identification of a New Alcaligenes faecalis Strain MOR02 and Assessment of Its Toxicity and Pathogenicity to Insects

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Estela Quiroz-Castañeda; Ared Mendoza-Mejía; Verónica Obregón-Barboza; Fernando Martínez-Ocampo; Armando Hernández-Mendoza; Felipe Martínez-Garduño; Gabriel Guillén-Solís; Federico Sánchez-Rodríguez; Guadalupe Peña-Chora; Laura Ortíz-Hernández; Paul Gaytán-Colín; Edgar Dantán-González

    2015-01-01

    We report the isolation of a bacterium from Galleria mellonella larva and its identification using genome sequencing and phylogenomic analysis. This bacterium was named Alcaligenes faecalis strain MOR02. Microscopic analyses revealed that the bacteria are located in the esophagus and intestine of the nematodes Steinernema feltiae, S. carpocapsae, and H. bacteriophora. Using G. mellonella larvae as a model, when the larvae were injected with 24,000 CFU in their hemocoel, more than 96% mortalit...

  1. Les bactéries entomopathogènes du genre Xenorhabdus : description pathologique et génomique de souches à la virulence atténuée

    OpenAIRE

    Bisch, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Xenorhabdus are enterobacteria pathogenic of insect larvae and symbiotic of nematodes from the Steinernema genus. The Steinernema-Xenorhabdus associations are used against a wide range of insect pests. The two partners of the model Steinernema carpocapsae-Xenorhabdus nematophila association can be experimentally dissociated. Each partner is pathogenic for insect larvae. Contrarily, some other Xenorhabdus strains are non-virulent when injected directly into insect larvae. In this thesis, we ch...

  2. The potential use of entomopathogenic nematodesagainst Typhaea stercorea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Tina Stendal; Steenberg, Tove

    2000-01-01

    Four entomopathogenic nematode species, Steinernema carpocapsae, S. feltiae, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and H. megidis, were tested in a petri dish assay against larvae and , were tested in a petri dish assay against larvae and adults of the hairy fungus beetle Typhaea stercorea. In general, a...... mould probably limited the nematode infection. When the bait was used in tube traps, desiccation and growth of mould was prevented, but nematode efficacy dropped to 4.4% in the traps and 12% in the surrounding litter....

  3. A Comparison of Novel Entomopathogenic Nematode Application Methods for Control of the Chive Gnat, Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Guang-Ying; Xu, Hua; Fu, Ya-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Guang-Shuang; Ma, Hai-Kun; Feng, Xiaoling; Pan, Jie; Gu, Xi-Shu; Guo, Yong-Ze; Ruan, Wei-Bin; Shapiro-Ilan, David I

    2016-10-01

    Bradysia odoriphaga Yang & Zhang (Diptera: Sciaridae) is the most serious pest of Chinese chive, Allium tuberosum Chemical pesticide application has become a necessary step to control B. odoriphaga after each of the four to six harvests during the growing season. We compared the effects of application type (nematode-infected cadaver, aqueous nematode suspension, and mixture of cadaver and aqueous suspension) and nematode species (Heterorhabditis bacteriophora vs. Steinernema carpocapsae) on B. odoriphaga control. Nematode species combinations and the use of the cadaver method has only been tested in a relatively few studies, and has not been tested for this target pest, B. odoriphaga. Furthermore, this is the first report of combining application methods (aqueous and cadaver). Results indicated that the cadaver treatment produced higher mortality of B. odoriphaga than the aqueous treatment, and H. bacteriophora caused higher mortality of B. odoriphaga than S. carpocapsae. The mortality of B. odoriphaga was 96.7% in H. bacteriophora cadaver treatment and only 27.5% in control treatment without nematode addition. Cadaver treatments caused higher biomass of A. tuberosum than that of aqueous treatment. The plant biomass in H. bacteriophora cadaver treatment was 10 folds as much as that in the control treatment. The mixed aqueous suspension of H. bacteriophora and S. carpocapsae did not increase the mortality in pot trial. Our findings indicate that entomopathogenic nematodes applied as cadavers might be a potential alternative biological agent in the integrated management of B. odoriphaga for Chinese chive production. PMID:27480971

  4. Correction: Graillot, B.; et al. Progressive Adaptation of a CpGV Isolate to Codling Moth Populations Resistant to CpGV-M. Viruses 2014, 6, 5135–5144

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Graillot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In our article “Progressive Adaptation of a CpGV Isolate to Codling Moth Populations Resistant to CpGV-M.” (Viruses 2014, 6, 5135–5144; doi:10.3390/v6125135 [1] we obtained resistance values of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, RGV laboratory colony [2], when challenged with Cydia pomonella Granulovirus, Mexican Isolate (CpGV-M, that were lower than those previously published [2]. Careful analysis of both the RGV colony and the CpGV-M virus stock used led to the realization that a low level contamination of this virus stock with CpGV-R5 occurred. We have made new tests with a verified stock, and the results are now in agreement with those previously published.

  5. Estimation of demographic parameters of an insect pest in apple-orchards landscape, from genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Emily; Klein, Etienne; Roques, Lionel; Franck, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In the context of agrosystem management in order to reduce the use of pesticides, we aim to understand population dynamics at the landscape scale of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella), an insect pest in apple orchards. To analyse statistically the genetic markers data (22 microsatellites) obtained from a thousand georeferenced individuals (sampled in 51 different orchards), we developed a spatially explicit metapopulation model. The objective is to estimate population sizes and...

  6. Combining mutualistic yeast and pathogenic virus - a novel method for codling moth control

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Alan; Witzgall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The combination of a pathogenic virus and mutualistic yeasts isolated from larvae of codling moth Cydia pomonella is proposed as a novel insect control technique. Apples were treated with codling moth granulovirus (CpGV) and either one of three yeasts, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Cryptococcus tephrensis, or Aureobasidium pullulans. The combination of yeasts with CpGV significantly increased mortality of neonate codling moth larvae, compared with CpGV alone. The three yeasts were equally effici...

  7. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for walnuts infested with codling moths (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation may be a potential quarantine treatment for either diapausing or nondiapausing codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae in walnuts. Exposure of larvae to 51.9 Gy from a 60Co source significantly reduced emergence of normal adults. The dose required for quarantine security (99.9968% mortality) was 230 Gy based on emergence of adults from treated larvae. Normal adults did not emerge from larvae exposed to 177 Gy in walnuts

  8. Effects of an entomopathogen nematode on the immune response of the insect pest red palm weevil: Focus on the host antimicrobial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda-Rossetti, Simona; Mastore, Maristella; Protasoni, Marina; Brivio, Maurizio F

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between parasites and hosts can be drastic, depending on the balance between parasite strategies and the efficiency of the host immune response. In the case of entomopathogenic nematodes and their insect hosts, we must also consider the role of bacterial symbionts, as the interaction among them is tripartite and each component plays a critical role in death or survival. We analyzed the effects induced by the nematode-bacteria complex Steinernema carpocapsae, against red palm weevil (RPW) larvae, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. We examined the antimicrobial response of the insect when in the presence of nematocomplexes or of its symbionts, Xenorhabdus nematophila. In detail, we investigated the potential interference of live and dead S. carpocapsae, their isolated cuticles, live or dead bacterial symbionts and their lipopolysaccharides, on the synthesis and activity of host antimicrobial peptides. Our data indicate that both live nematodes and live bacterial symbionts are able to depress the host antimicrobial response. When nematodes or symbionts were killed, they lacked inhibitory properties, as detected by the presence of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the host hemolymph and by assays of antimicrobial activity. Moreover, we isolated S. carpocapsae cuticles; when cuticles were injected into hosts they revealed evasive properties because they were not immunogenic and were not recognized by the host immune system. We observed that weevil AMPs did not damage X. nematophila, and the lipopolysaccharides purified from symbionts seemed to be non-immunogenic. We believe that our data provide more information on the biology of entomopathogenic nematodes, in particular concerning their role and the activity mediated by symbionts in the relationship with insect hosts. PMID:26549224

  9. Effects of an entomopathogen nematode on the immune response of the insect pest red palm weevil: Focus on the host antimicrobial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda-Rossetti, Simona; Mastore, Maristella; Protasoni, Marina; Brivio, Maurizio F

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between parasites and hosts can be drastic, depending on the balance between parasite strategies and the efficiency of the host immune response. In the case of entomopathogenic nematodes and their insect hosts, we must also consider the role of bacterial symbionts, as the interaction among them is tripartite and each component plays a critical role in death or survival. We analyzed the effects induced by the nematode-bacteria complex Steinernema carpocapsae, against red palm weevil (RPW) larvae, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. We examined the antimicrobial response of the insect when in the presence of nematocomplexes or of its symbionts, Xenorhabdus nematophila. In detail, we investigated the potential interference of live and dead S. carpocapsae, their isolated cuticles, live or dead bacterial symbionts and their lipopolysaccharides, on the synthesis and activity of host antimicrobial peptides. Our data indicate that both live nematodes and live bacterial symbionts are able to depress the host antimicrobial response. When nematodes or symbionts were killed, they lacked inhibitory properties, as detected by the presence of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the host hemolymph and by assays of antimicrobial activity. Moreover, we isolated S. carpocapsae cuticles; when cuticles were injected into hosts they revealed evasive properties because they were not immunogenic and were not recognized by the host immune system. We observed that weevil AMPs did not damage X. nematophila, and the lipopolysaccharides purified from symbionts seemed to be non-immunogenic. We believe that our data provide more information on the biology of entomopathogenic nematodes, in particular concerning their role and the activity mediated by symbionts in the relationship with insect hosts.

  10. Control biològic del Rhynchophorus ferrugineus a partir de diferents soques de nematodes entomopatògens i la seva problemàtica a Catalunya

    OpenAIRE

    Sarsanedas Palau, Joan; García del Pino, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    En el present treball s'ha avaluat el potencial dels nemàtodes entomopatògens per a controlar la plaga de R. ferrugineus. Per fer-ho, s'ha determinat la susceptibilitat d'aquesta a 4 espècies diferents de nemàtodes: Steinernema carpocasae (soca B14, IDEBIO, BIOVERD), Steinernema feltiae (soca D114), Steinernema sp. (D122) i Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (soca DG46). D'altra banda, s'ha determinat la predació de Steinernema carpocapsae per part de l'àcar Centroupeda almerodai (Acari: Acaridae)...

  11. Virulence of four entomopathogenic nematode species for plum sawfly, Hoplocampa flava L. (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TC Ulu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The yellow sawfly Hoplocampa flava is an important pest of plum all around the world. Larvae feed on the seed with damaged fruit falling prematurely. There are many studies on the control of other pests with entomopathogenic nematode (EPN, but few on the control of plum sawfly. The present study was conducted to determine virulence of four EPN species: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, H. marelatus, Steinernema carpocapsae Tur-S4 and S. feltiae Tur-S3 against plum sawfly Hoplocampa flava L. (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae under laboratory conditions. For each nematode species, six different doses (3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 Infective Juveniles (IJs /larva were applied against last instar larvae of H. flava. Assays were done in 24 well tissue culture plates filled with 10 % (w/v moist silver sand. The most virulent species was H. bacteriophora which had LD50 and LD90 values of 6.51 and 15.46 IJs, respectively. The least virulent was S. carpocapsae Tur-S4 with LD50 and LD90 values of 16.617 and 33.779 IJs, respectively.

  12. Variation in the susceptibility of Drosophila to different entomopathogenic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jennifer M; Carrillo, Mayra A; Hallem, Elissa A

    2015-03-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are lethal parasites of insects that are of interest as models for understanding parasite-host interactions and as biocontrol agents for insect pests. EPNs harbor a bacterial endosymbiont in their gut that assists in insect killing. EPNs are capable of infecting and killing a wide range of insects, yet how the nematodes and their bacterial endosymbionts interact with the insect immune system is poorly understood. Here, we develop a versatile model system for understanding the insect immune response to parasitic nematode infection that consists of seven species of EPNs as model parasites and five species of Drosophila fruit flies as model hosts. We show that the EPN Steinernema carpocapsae, which is widely used for insect control, is capable of infecting and killing D. melanogaster larvae. S. carpocapsae is associated with the bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila, and we show that X. nematophila induces expression of a subset of antimicrobial peptide genes and suppresses the melanization response to the nematode. We further show that EPNs vary in their virulence toward D. melanogaster and that Drosophila species vary in their susceptibilities to EPN infection. Differences in virulence among different EPN-host combinations result from differences in both rates of infection and rates of postinfection survival. Our results establish a powerful model system for understanding mechanisms of host-parasite interactions and the insect immune response to parasitic nematode infection.

  13. Entomopathogenic nematodes for the control of phorid and sciarid flies in mushroom crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Navarro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of two nematodes, Steinernema feltiae and S. carpocapsae, to control mushroom flies and to evaluate the effect of these treatments on Agaricus bisporus production. Two mushroom cultivation trials were carried out in controlled conditions, in substrate previously infested with the diptera Megaselia halterata and Lycoriella auripila, with two treatments: 106infective juveniles (IJ per square meter of S. feltiae and 0.5x106IJ m-2S. feltiae + 0.5x106IJ m-2S. carpocapsae. Another experiment was carried out using the same treatments to evaluate the possible nematode effect on mushroom yield. The number of adults emerging from the substrate was evaluated for each fly species. No decrease in the population of M. halterata was detected with nematode application, whereas the number of L. auripila was reduced in both treatments, particularly in the individual treatment with S. feltiae. The application of entomopathogenic nematodes has no adverse effect on mushroom production.

  14. PREMISE Insect Model: Integrated Population Dynamics Model for the Ex-ante Evaluation of IPM against Insect Pest

    OpenAIRE

    Hennen, Wil; Alaphilippe, Aude

    2015-01-01

    Codling moth Cydia pomonella L. is the most serious pest of apple and pear worldwide and causes damage and decreasedyields. To minimize this risk, IPM tools can be applied to reduce the use of chemicals. A cost-effective application of IPM dependson the number of insects at the time of application. Several conditions and factors influence the lifecycle and numbers of generationswithin a year. In order to perform ex-ante evaluations of the cost-effectiveness of IPM measures against pest insect...

  15. Use of \\kur{Notch} gene for the production of genetic "sexing" lines of codling moth.

    OpenAIRE

    ŠVELLEROVÁ, Hana

    2013-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella, is the key pest of pome fruit and walnut orchards in the temperate regions of the world. The extensive use of insecticides for a control of this pest has resulted in the development of resistance to these chemicals, and there is an increasing demand on the use of environment-friendly control tactics, such as the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Codling moth SIT relies on the mass rearing and release of genetically sterile both males and females into a wild po...

  16. Contribución al estudio de la familia Tortricidae Latreille, 1803 (Lepidoptera), con especial referencia a la fauna neotropical

    OpenAIRE

    Lincango Chorlango, María Piedad

    2015-01-01

    La familia Tortricidae Latreille es uno de los grupos de lepidópteros más diversos con alrededor de 10.000 especies, distribuidas en tres subfamilias (Chlidanotinae, Tortricinae y Olethreutinae), 20 tribus y más de 1070 géneros. Dentro de esta familia se encuentran plagas de gran importancia económica como el gusano de las yemas del abeto, Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens 1865 (Tortricinae: Archipini), y el gusano de la manzana, Cydia pomonella L. 1758 (Olethreutinae: Grapholitini). La clasif...

  17. The Relationship between Polarized Moonlight and the Number of Pest Microlepidoptera Specimens Caught in Pheromone Traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowinszky László

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pheromone traps were deployed in Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén County (Hungary between 1982 and 1988, in 1990 and also between 1993 and 2013. These traps attracted 8 Microlepidoptera species: Phyllonorycter blancardella, P. corylifoliella, Anarsia lineatella, Eupoecilia ambiguella, Lobesia botrana, Grapholita funebrana, G. molesta and Cydia pomonella. We examined the trapping data of these species in the context of lunar phases and polarized moonlight. Catches of the European Vine Moth (Lobesia botrana and the Codling Moth (Cydia pomonella were higher in the First Quarter, whereas catches of Peach Twig Borer (Anarsia lineatella, Vine Moth (Eupoecilia ambiguella, Plum Fruit Moth (Grapholita funebrana and Oriental Fruit Moth (Grapholita molesta were larger in the Last Quarter. Catches of the other two species, the Spotted Tentiform Leafminer (Phyllonorycter blancardella and Hawthorn Red Midget Moth (P. corylifoliella, were higher in both the First and Last Quarters. When using pheromone traps, insects do not fly to a light source, so moonlight does not modify either the catching distance or flight activity. However, at high levels of polarized moonlight, pheromone trap catches will increase, as in the case of light-trap catches. The results are comprehensible when one considers that the target species can fly both during the daytime and also at night.

  18. Biological control agent of larger black flour beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): a nuisance pest developing in cotton gin trash piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansen, Christian; Stokes, Bryan; James, Jacob; Porter, Patrick; Shields, Eilson J; Wheeler, Terry; Meikle, William G

    2013-04-01

    The larger black flour beetles, Cynaeus angustus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), feeds on saprophytic fungi found in gin trash piles and occasionally becomes a nuisance pest in adjacent homes and businesses. The potential of Steinernema carpocapsae 'NY 001,' as a potential control agent of larger black flour beetle under experimental conditions was examined with particular reference to the importance of soil moisture content. Without prospects of insecticides being labeled for control of larger black flour beetle in gin trash, the data presented here support further research into applications of entomopathogenic nematodes underneath gin trash piles as a way to minimize risk of larger black flour beetle populations causing nuisance to nearby homes and businesses.

  19. Screening Commercially Available Entomopathogenic Biocontrol Agents for the Control of Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Mathers, James J; Blackburn, Lisa F; Powell, Michelle E; Marris, Gay; Pietravalle, Stephane; Brown, Mike A; Budge, Giles E

    2012-08-09

    The Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, is an invasive pest of honey bees. Indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa, it has now become established in North America and Australia. It represents a serious threat to European honey bees. Commercially available entomopathogenic agents were screened for their potential to control beetle larvae. Entomopathogenic fungi investigated had minimal impact. The nematodes Steinernema kraussei and S. carpocapsae provided excellent control with 100% mortality of larvae being obtained. Sequential applications of the nematodes following larvae entering sand to pupate also provided excellent control for up to 3 weeks. The information gained supports the development of contingency plans to deal with A. tumida should it occur in the UK, and is relevant to the management of Small hive beetle where it is already present.

  20. Screening Commercially Available Entomopathogenic Biocontrol Agents for the Control of Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles E. Budge

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, is an invasive pest of honey bees. Indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa, it has now become established in North America and Australia. It represents a serious threat to European honey bees. Commercially available entomopathogenic agents were screened for their potential to control beetle larvae. Entomopathogenic fungi investigated had minimal impact. The nematodes Steinernema kraussei and S. carpocapsae provided excellent control with 100% mortality of larvae being obtained. Sequential applications of the nematodes following larvae entering sand to pupate also provided excellent control for up to 3 weeks. The information gained supports the development of contingency plans to deal with A. tumida should it occur in the UK, and is relevant to the management of Small hive beetle where it is already present.

  1. Screening Commercially Available Entomopathogenic Biocontrol Agents for the Control of Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Mathers, James J; Blackburn, Lisa F; Powell, Michelle E; Marris, Gay; Pietravalle, Stephane; Brown, Mike A; Budge, Giles E

    2012-01-01

    The Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, is an invasive pest of honey bees. Indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa, it has now become established in North America and Australia. It represents a serious threat to European honey bees. Commercially available entomopathogenic agents were screened for their potential to control beetle larvae. Entomopathogenic fungi investigated had minimal impact. The nematodes Steinernema kraussei and S. carpocapsae provided excellent control with 100% mortality of larvae being obtained. Sequential applications of the nematodes following larvae entering sand to pupate also provided excellent control for up to 3 weeks. The information gained supports the development of contingency plans to deal with A. tumida should it occur in the UK, and is relevant to the management of Small hive beetle where it is already present. PMID:26466625

  2. Biological control agent of larger black flour beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): a nuisance pest developing in cotton gin trash piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansen, Christian; Stokes, Bryan; James, Jacob; Porter, Patrick; Shields, Eilson J; Wheeler, Terry; Meikle, William G

    2013-04-01

    The larger black flour beetles, Cynaeus angustus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), feeds on saprophytic fungi found in gin trash piles and occasionally becomes a nuisance pest in adjacent homes and businesses. The potential of Steinernema carpocapsae 'NY 001,' as a potential control agent of larger black flour beetle under experimental conditions was examined with particular reference to the importance of soil moisture content. Without prospects of insecticides being labeled for control of larger black flour beetle in gin trash, the data presented here support further research into applications of entomopathogenic nematodes underneath gin trash piles as a way to minimize risk of larger black flour beetle populations causing nuisance to nearby homes and businesses. PMID:23786050

  3. Evaluation of efficacy of 18 strains of entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditida) against Planococcus citri (Risso, 1813) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Negrisoli, Carla Ruth de Carvalho; Negrisoli Júnior, Aldomario Santo; Botton, Marcos; Garcia, Mauro Silveira; Bernardi, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Planococcus citri (Risso, 1813) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) is an important plant virus vector in grapevine crops in Brazil and other countries. The mealybug grows in roots and leaves of the grapes. Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) are efficient control agents against insects associated to the soil and could be applied with the same equipment used for chemical insecticides. The aim of this study was to select effective EPNs for controlling P. citri females in laboratory conditions (25±1°C, UR 60±10%). We tested 17 native [Steinernema rarum (6 strains), Steinernema glaseri, Steinernema feltiae, Steinernema riobrave, Steinernema sp., Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (7 strains)] and only one exotic strain (Steinernema carpocapsae ALL). The bioassays were done on Petri dishes infested with females of P. citri, which were sprayed with EPNs juveniles. The strain with larger pathogenicity and virulence in laboratory was H. bacteriophora RS33 (from 69.0% to 92.2% of mortality), native of Rio Grande do Sul.

  4. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  5. Effects of a novel entomopathogenic nematode-infected host formulation on cadaver integrity, nematode yield, and suppression of Diaprepes abbreviatus and Aethina tumida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, Maria G; Tedders, Walker L

    2010-02-01

    An alternative approach to applying entomopathogenic nematodes entails the distribution of nematodes in their infected insect hosts. Protection of the infected host from rupturing, and improving ease of handling, may be necessary to facilitate application. In this study our objective was to test the potential of a new method of formulating the infected hosts, i.e., enclosing the infected host in masking tape. Tenebrio molitor L. cadavers infected with Heterorhabditis indica Poinar, Karunakar and David or Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) were wrapped in tape using an automatic packaging machine; the machine was developed to reduce labor and to standardize the final product. The effects of the tape formulation on the ability to protect the cadavers from mechanical damage, nematode yield, and pest control efficacy were tested. After exposure to mechanical agitation at 7-d-post-infection, S. carpocapsae cadavers in tape were more resistant to rupture than cadavers without tape, yet H. indica cadavers 7-d-post-infection were not affected by mechanical agitation (with or without tape), nor was either nematode affected when 4-d-old cadavers were tested. Experiments indicated that infective juvenile yield was not affected by the tape formulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted measuring survival of the root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.), or the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray, after the application of two H. indica-infected hosts with or without tape per 15 cm pot (filled with soil). A greenhouse experiment was also conducted in a similar manner measuring survival of D. abbreviatus. In all experiments, both the tape and no-tape treatments caused significant reductions in insect survival relative to the control, and no differences were detected between the nematode treatments. Fifteen days post-application, the infected host treatments caused up to 78% control in A. tumida, 91% control in D. abbreviatus in the lab, and 75% in the greenhouse. These

  6. effect of gamma radiation and parasitic nematodes on the black cut-worm agrotis ipsilon(HUFN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sterility effects were examined on the P1 generation of the black cutworm; Agrotis ipsilon (Hufn.) after gamma sterilization with at 0, 75, 100,125, 150,175 and 200 Gy, to identify the dose of gamma irradiation that would allow for maximum production of partially sterile P1 adults while inducing full sterility in the F1 generation. The studied effects were included the percentage mated males with untreated females, copulation duration to format spermatophores directly in the female bursa copulatrix, number of eggs /female deposited by females mated to irradiated males and egg hatch through three sequential females.The irradiated males with tested doses as well as untreated control were tested for mating successive and starting copulation at the same period of the scotophase. The mating competitiveness calculated from the direct observation in A. ipsilon males emerged from pupae irradiated at doses 75 to 200 Gy was noticed. The effect of substerilizing dose (125Gy) on certain biological aspects and reproduction was studied among parental generation, as well as immature stages were investigated throughout two successive generations. The influence of two entomopathogenic nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae and Steinernema riobrivae on the insect management was included. Special attention was given to combined effect of F1 progeny of partially sterile males and S. Carpocapsae (All) on A .ipsilon, the combination of tested treatments at all concentrations analyzed for synergistic effect. The parasitisation efficacy of EPNs, the morbidity and mortality induced by normal IJs (i.e., IJs derived from untreated host) and the incubation time taken by normal IJs were compared with these of IJs derived from irradiated host with 125 Gy

  7. Effects of a novel entomopathogenic nematode-infected host formulation on cadaver integrity, nematode yield, and suppression of Diaprepes abbreviatus and Aethina tumida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, Maria G; Tedders, Walker L

    2010-02-01

    An alternative approach to applying entomopathogenic nematodes entails the distribution of nematodes in their infected insect hosts. Protection of the infected host from rupturing, and improving ease of handling, may be necessary to facilitate application. In this study our objective was to test the potential of a new method of formulating the infected hosts, i.e., enclosing the infected host in masking tape. Tenebrio molitor L. cadavers infected with Heterorhabditis indica Poinar, Karunakar and David or Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) were wrapped in tape using an automatic packaging machine; the machine was developed to reduce labor and to standardize the final product. The effects of the tape formulation on the ability to protect the cadavers from mechanical damage, nematode yield, and pest control efficacy were tested. After exposure to mechanical agitation at 7-d-post-infection, S. carpocapsae cadavers in tape were more resistant to rupture than cadavers without tape, yet H. indica cadavers 7-d-post-infection were not affected by mechanical agitation (with or without tape), nor was either nematode affected when 4-d-old cadavers were tested. Experiments indicated that infective juvenile yield was not affected by the tape formulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted measuring survival of the root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.), or the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray, after the application of two H. indica-infected hosts with or without tape per 15 cm pot (filled with soil). A greenhouse experiment was also conducted in a similar manner measuring survival of D. abbreviatus. In all experiments, both the tape and no-tape treatments caused significant reductions in insect survival relative to the control, and no differences were detected between the nematode treatments. Fifteen days post-application, the infected host treatments caused up to 78% control in A. tumida, 91% control in D. abbreviatus in the lab, and 75% in the greenhouse. These

  8. Unexpected Variation in Neuroanatomy among Diverse Nematode Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ziduan; Boas, Stephanie; Schroeder, Nathan E

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are considered excellent models for understanding fundamental aspects of neuron function. However, nematodes are less frequently used as models for examining the evolution of nervous systems. While the habitats and behaviors of nematodes are diverse, the neuroanatomy of nematodes is often considered highly conserved. A small number of nematode species greatly influences our understanding of nematode neurobiology. The free-living species Caenorhabditis elegans and, to a lesser extent, the mammalian gastrointestinal parasite Ascaris suum are, historically, the primary sources of knowledge regarding nematode neurobiology. Despite differences in size and habitat, C. elegans and A. suum share a surprisingly similar neuroanatomy. Here, we examined species across several clades in the phylum Nematoda and show that there is a surprising degree of neuroanatomical variation both within and among nematode clades when compared to C. elegans and Ascaris. We found variation in the numbers of neurons in the ventral nerve cord and dye-filling pattern of sensory neurons. For example, we found that Pristionchus pacificus, a bacterial feeding species used for comparative developmental research had 20% fewer ventral cord neurons compared to C. elegans. Steinernema carpocapsae, an insect-parasitic nematode capable of jumping behavior, had 40% more ventral cord neurons than C. elegans. Interestingly, the non-jumping congeneric nematode, S. glaseri showed an identical number of ventral cord neurons as S. carpocapsae. There was also variability in the timing of neurodevelopment of the ventral cord with two of five species that hatch as second-stage juveniles showing delayed neurodevelopment. We also found unexpected variation in the dye-filling of sensory neurons among examined species. Again, sensory neuron dye-filling pattern did not strictly correlate with phylogeny. Our results demonstrate that variation in nematode neuroanatomy is more prevalent than previously assumed and

  9. Compatibility of entomopathogenic nematodes and aqueous plant extracts aiming at the control of fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann (Diptera: TephritidaeCompatibilidade de nematóides entomopatogênicos e extratos vegetais aquosos visando o controle da mosca-das-frutas Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhiane Rohde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae has been controlled mainly by the chemical method, which is responsible for environmental and public health impacts. It has often been ineffective due to development of resistant insect populations. Thus, it has necessary to research new effective and less impacting control forms. In this sense, the use of entomopathogenic nematodes and plant extracts has been effective for controlling this pest. However, studies are needed to assess the compatibility between these methods, aiming at their use in integrated management programs for this pest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of the nematodes Steinernema carpocapsae ALL and Heterorhabditis sp. JPM4 with aqueous extracts prepared from dried plant of cinnamon leaf, twig and fruit (Melia azedarach, rue leaf (Ruta graveolens, ginger (Zingiber officinale and garlic (Allium sativum for the control of C. capitata. The bioassay was carried out in completely randomized design with four replicates per treatment. Each replication consisted of a glass tube containing 1 mL of plant extract 40% w/v and 1 mL suspension of entomopathogenic nematodes with 1800 JI/mL for S. carpocapsae ALL and 600 JI/mL for Heterorhabditis sp. JPM4. The viability and infectivity of this nematode were evaluated on C. capitata larvae after 48 and 120 hours. It was found that all extracts reduced the viability and infectivity of both nematodes and they were incompatible after 120 hours of exposure. The nematode Heterorhabditis sp. JPM4 was more sensitive than the S. carpocapsae ALL as it showed, in the first 48 hours, a reduction in the viability and infectivity of more than 80 and 75%, respectively, when exposed to all the extracts except the ginger.A mosca-das-frutas Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae tem sido controlada, principalmente, pelo método químico, que é o responsável por impactos ambientais e na saúde pública e, muitas

  10. Quantitative relationships between different injury factors and development of brown rot caused by Monilinia fructigena in integrated and organic apple orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holb, I J; Scherm, H

    2008-01-01

    In a 4-year study, the incidence of various types of injuries (caused by insects, birds, growth cracks, mechanical wounding, and other, unidentified factors) was assessed in relation to brown rot development (caused by Monilinia fructigena) on fruit of three apple cultivars (Prima, Jonathan, and Mutsu) in integrated and organic blocks of two apple orchards in Hungary. In addition, populations of male codling moths (Cydia pomonella) were monitored with pheromone traps season-long in both management systems. On average, injury incidence on fruit at harvest was 6.1 and 19.2% in the integrated and organic treatments, respectively. Insect injury, which was caused primarily by C. pomonella, had the highest incidence among the five injury types, accounting for 79.4% of the total injury by harvest in the organic blocks and 36.6% in the integrated blocks. Levels of all other injury types remained close to zero during most of the season, but the incidence of bird injury and growth cracks increased markedly in the final 3 to 5 weeks before harvest in both production systems. Brown rot developed more slowly and reached a lower incidence in the integrated (6.4% final incidence on average) compared with the organic blocks (20.1% average incidence). In addition, the disease developed later but attained higher levels as the cultivar ripening season increased from early-maturing Prima to late-maturing Mutsu. Overall, 94.3 to 98.7% of all injured fruit were also infected by M. fructigena, whereas the incidence of brown-rotted fruit without visible injury was very low (0.8 to 1.6%). Correlation coefficients (on a per plot basis) and association indices (on a per-fruit basis) were calculated between brown rot and the various injury types for two selected assessment dates 4 weeks preharvest and at harvest. At both dates, the strongest significant (P < 0.05) relationships were observed between brown rot and insect injury and between brown rot and the cumulative number of trapped C

  11. Investigating physiological methods to determine previous exposure of immature insects to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of gamma radiation on phenoloxidase activity in codling moth, Cydia pomonella L., larvae was investigated. Phenoloxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring the increase in optical density at 490 nm, or by observing the degree of melanization in larvae killed by freezing. Results showed that, in unirradiated larvae, phenoloxidase activity could be detected in 7 day old larvae and activity continued to increase throughout the larval stage. This increase was not observed when larvae were irradiated with a minimum dose of 50 Gy during the 1st week of their development. However, irradiating larvae in which enzyme activity was already high (24 week old) did not eliminate the activity but reduced further increase. Larval melanization studies were in general agreement with the results of the phenoloxidase assay. (author)

  12. Pharmacological analysis of feeding in a caterpillar: different transduction pathways for umami and saccharin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczolkowski, Maciej A.; Durden, Kevin; Marquis, Juleah; Ramaswamy, Sonny B.; Brown, John J.

    2009-05-01

    Neonate larvae of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), modify their behavior in the presence of saccharin, monosodium glutamate (MSG), or L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) by commencing their feeding earlier. Previously published pharmacological analysis demonstrated that phagostimulatory effects of MSG and L-AP4 (which elicit umami taste sensation in humans) are reversed by adenylate cyclase activator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In this study, by measuring the time needed to start ingestion of foliage treated with mixtures of phagostimulants and signal transduction modulators, we show that phagostimulatory effects of l-aspartate (the third hallmark umami substance) are also abolished by both adenylate cyclase activator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but not by phospholipase C inhibitor. However, stimulatory effects of hemicalcium saccharin were affected only by phospholipase C inhibitor. The results suggest that codling moth neonates use different transduction pathways for perception of hemicalcium saccharin and umami.

  13. Integrated assessment of climate change impact on surface runoff contamination by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Patrick; Sheedy, Claudia; Rousseau, Alain N; Bourgeois, Gaétan; Chouinard, Gérald

    2016-07-01

    Pesticide transport by surface runoff depends on climate, agricultural practices, topography, soil characteristics, crop type, and pest phenology. To accurately assess the impact of climate change, these factors must be accounted for in a single framework by integrating their interaction and uncertainty. This article presents the development and application of a framework to assess the impact of climate change on pesticide transport by surface runoff in southern Québec (Canada) for the 1981-2040 period. The crop enemies investigated were: weeds for corn (Zea mays); and for apple orchard (Malus pumila), 3 insect pests (codling moth [Cydia pomonella], plum curculio [Conotrachelus nenuphar], and apple maggot [Rhagoletis pomonella]), 2 diseases (apple scab [Venturia inaequalis], and fire blight [Erwinia amylovora]). A total of 23 climate simulations, 19 sites, and 11 active ingredients were considered. The relationship between climate and phenology was accounted for by bioclimatic models of the Computer Centre for Agricultural Pest Forecasting (CIPRA) software. Exported loads of pesticides were evaluated at the edge-of-field scale using the Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM), simulating both hydrology and chemical transport. A stochastic model was developed to account for PRZM parameter uncertainty. Results of this study indicate that for the 2011-2040 period, application dates would be advanced from 3 to 7 days on average with respect to the 1981-2010 period. However, the impact of climate change on maximum daily rainfall during the application window is not statistically significant, mainly due to the high variability of extreme rainfall events. Hence, for the studied sites and crop enemies considered, climate change impact on pesticide transported in surface runoff is not statistically significant throughout the 2011-2040 period. Integr Environ Assess Managem 2016;12:559-571. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2015; Published 2015 SETAC. PMID:26331624

  14. Primer registro de Hypercompe indecisa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Arctiinae en perales y álamos en la Patagonia First record of Hypercompe indecisa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Arctiinae on pear trees and poplars in Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Dapoto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available La región del Alto Valle de Río Negro y Neuquén es la zona más importante de producción de frutas de pepita de la Argentina. La principal plaga de estos cultivos es Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae. Los cambios implementados en las estrategias de control, principalmente la generalización del uso de la Técnica de Confusión Sexual, han causado en los últimos años cambios en la biodiversidad en esos cultivos. Durante la temporada 2008/09, en un establecimiento frutícola de producción orgánica en Vista Alegre (Neuquén, fue detectada Hypercompe indecisa (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, produciendo graves daños en frutos y hojas de perales y sobre el follaje de Populus spp. Se cita por primera vez H. indecisa para la Patagonia y el primer hallazgo de esta especie sobre Populus spp. y Pyrus communis L.The Alto Valle of Río Negro and Neuquén is the main production zone of pomme fruits from Argentina. The main pest is Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae. Changes operated in control strategies in the last years have brought changes in the biodiversity of fruit orchards. During the season 2008/09, Hypercompe indecisa (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae was detected in a fruit establishment of Vista Alegre (Neuquén under organic production causing serious damages on fruits and leaves of pear trees and in the leaves of Populus spp. Hypercompe indecisa is reported for the first time in Patagonia and is the first record of this species on Populus spp.and Pyrus communis L.

  15. Sequence and analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region in the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pereira Bravo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at the sequence and analysis of the mtDNA control region (CR of the Diatraea saccharalis. The genome PCR amplification was performed using the complementary primers to the flanking regions of Bombyx mori CR mitochondrial segment. The sequencing revealed that the amplified product was 568 bp long, which was smaller than that observed for B. mori (725 bp. Within the amplified segment, a sequence with 338 nucleotides was identified as the control region, which displayed a high AT content (93.5%. The D. saccharalis mtDNA CR multiple sequence alignment analysis showed that this region had high similarity with the Lepidoptera Cydia pomonella.A broca da cana, Diatraea saccharalis pertence à família dos lepidópteros. A presença da larva pode ser extremamente destrutiva, chegando a inviabilizar a atividade canavieira, causando prejuízos consideráveis à agroindústria sucro-alcooleira. Atualmente a broca da cana vem sendo extinta da plantação por métodos de controle biológico, entretanto a evolução desses programas depende de maiores conhecimentos básicos da biologia molecular deste inseto. O estudo do segmento do genoma mitocondrial denominado região controle é amplamente utilizado em análises genéticas e filogenéticas em insetos. O objetivo desse trabalho foi sequenciar e analisar a região controle do genoma mitocondrial de Diatraea saccharalis. Esse segmento apresentou 338 nucleotídeos, menor que o observado em Bombyx mori, com conteúdo de 93,5% de A/T. As analises realizadas mostraram que Diatraea saccharalis apresenta 76% de similaridade com Cydia pomonella.

  16. Integrated assessment of climate change impact on surface runoff contamination by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Patrick; Sheedy, Claudia; Rousseau, Alain N; Bourgeois, Gaétan; Chouinard, Gérald

    2016-07-01

    Pesticide transport by surface runoff depends on climate, agricultural practices, topography, soil characteristics, crop type, and pest phenology. To accurately assess the impact of climate change, these factors must be accounted for in a single framework by integrating their interaction and uncertainty. This article presents the development and application of a framework to assess the impact of climate change on pesticide transport by surface runoff in southern Québec (Canada) for the 1981-2040 period. The crop enemies investigated were: weeds for corn (Zea mays); and for apple orchard (Malus pumila), 3 insect pests (codling moth [Cydia pomonella], plum curculio [Conotrachelus nenuphar], and apple maggot [Rhagoletis pomonella]), 2 diseases (apple scab [Venturia inaequalis], and fire blight [Erwinia amylovora]). A total of 23 climate simulations, 19 sites, and 11 active ingredients were considered. The relationship between climate and phenology was accounted for by bioclimatic models of the Computer Centre for Agricultural Pest Forecasting (CIPRA) software. Exported loads of pesticides were evaluated at the edge-of-field scale using the Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM), simulating both hydrology and chemical transport. A stochastic model was developed to account for PRZM parameter uncertainty. Results of this study indicate that for the 2011-2040 period, application dates would be advanced from 3 to 7 days on average with respect to the 1981-2010 period. However, the impact of climate change on maximum daily rainfall during the application window is not statistically significant, mainly due to the high variability of extreme rainfall events. Hence, for the studied sites and crop enemies considered, climate change impact on pesticide transported in surface runoff is not statistically significant throughout the 2011-2040 period. Integr Environ Assess Managem 2016;12:559-571. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2015; Published 2015 SETAC.

  17. Sustainable management tactics for control of Phyllotreta cruciferae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) on canola in Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gadi V P; Tangtrakulwanich, Khanobporn; Miller, John H; Ophus, Victoria L; Prewett, Julie

    2014-04-01

    The crucifer flea beetle, Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), has recently emerged as a serious pest of canola (Brassica napus L.) in Montana. The adult beetles feed on canola leaves, causing many small holes that stunt growth and reduce yield. In 2013, damage to canola seedlings was high (approximately 80%) in many parts of Montana, evidence that when flea beetles emerge in large numbers, they can quickly destroy a young canola crop. In the current study, the effectiveness of several biopesticides was evaluated and compared with two insecticides (deltamethrin and bifenthrin) commonly used as foliar sprays as well as seed treatment with an imidacloprid insecticide for the control of P. cruciferae under field conditions in 2013. The biopesticides used included an entomopathogenic nematode (Steinernema carpocapsae), two entomopathogenic fungi (Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum), neem, and petroleum spray oils. The control agents were delivered in combination or alone in a single or repeated applications at different times. The plant-derived compound neem (azadirachtin), petroleum spray oil, and fatty acids (M-Pede) only showed moderate effect, although they significantly reduced leaf injuries caused by P. cruciferae and resulted in higher canola yield than the untreated control. Combined use of B. bassiana and M. brunneum in two repeated applications and bifenthrin in five applications were most effective in reducing feeding injuries and improving yield levels at both trial locations. This indicates that entomopathogenic fungi are effective against P. cruciferae, and may serve as alternatives to conventional insecticides or seed treatments in managing this pest. PMID:24772547

  18. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic nematodes in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasco, E; Clausi, M; Rappazzo, G; Panzavolta, T; Curto, G; Sorino, R; Oreste, M; Longo, A; Leone, D; Tiberi, R; Vinciguerra, M T; Triggiani, O

    2015-05-01

    An investigation was carried out on the distribution and biodiversity of steinernematid and heterorhabdtid entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) in nine regions of Italy in the period 1990-2010. More than 2000 samples were collected from 580 localities and 133 of them yielded EPN specimens. A mapping of EPN distribution in Italy showed 133 indigenous EPN strains belonging to 12 species: 43 isolates of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, 1 of H. downesi, 1 of H. megidis, 51 of Steinernema feltiae, 12 of S. affine, 4 of S. kraussei, 8 of S. apuliae, 5 of S. ichnusae, 3 of S. carpocapsae, 1 of S. vulcanicum, 3 of Steinernema 'isolate S.sp.MY7' of 'S. intermedium group' and 1 of S. arenarium. Steinernematids are more widespread than heterorhabditids and S. feltiae and H. bacteriophora are the most commonly encountered species. Sampling sites were grouped into 11 habitats: uncultivated land, orchard, field, sea coast, pinewood, broadleaf wood, grasslands, river and lake borders, caves, salt pan and moist zones; the soil texture of each site was defined and the preferences of habitat and soil texture of each species was assessed. Except for the two dominant species, S. feltiae and H. bacteriophora, EPN occurrence tends to be correlated with a specific vegetation habitat. Steinernema kraussei, H. downesi and H. megidis were collected only in Sicily and three of the species recently described - S. apuliae, S. ichnusae and S. vulcanicum - are known only from Italy and seem to be endemic.

  19. Histopathological Effects of the Protein Toxin from Xenorhabdus nematophila on the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NANGONG Zi-yan; WANG Qin-ying; SONG Ping; YANG Jun; MAO Wen-jie

    2006-01-01

    Xenorhabdus nematophila HB310, which is highly virulent for many insects, is symbiotic with Steinernema carpocapsae HB310. Toxin Ⅱ was obtained using methods such as salting out and native-PAGE from the cells of X. Nematophila HB310. The histopathology of toxin Ⅱ on H. Armigera larvae was studied by dissecting an olefin slice of the midgut. The symptoms showed that the histopathology of the H. Armigera midgut was similar to that of other novel midgut-active toxins such as the δ-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis, as well as Tca from Photorhabdus luminescens W14. The midgut tissues of H. Armigera fourth-instar larvae began to transform after the oral intake of the toxin Ⅱ over 6 h. First, the anterior region of the peritrophic membrane (PM) began to degrade followed by the elongation of the columnar cells.The epithelium decomposed gradually, and the midgut tissues were either loose or disordered. The PM disappeared after 12 h but reappeared after 72 h following transient or sublethal exposure to the toxin Ⅱ. Toxin Ⅱ also directly destroyed in vitro PMs of H. Armigera.

  20. Attraction Behaviors of Entomopathogenic Nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) to Synthetic Volatiles Emitted by Insect Damaged Potato Tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laznik, Žiga; Trdan, Stanislav

    2016-04-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) play a role in indirect defense of plants under attack by root herbivores. Several investigations have shown that EPNs are attracted or repelled by various volatile compounds (VOCs) released from insect damaged plant roots. We hypothesized that the directional responses of EPNs to the VOCs would be affected by foraging strategy and would vary among species, VOC type, and VOC concentrations. We tested the chemotactic responses of four commercial EPN species (Steinernema feltiae, S. carpocapsae, S. kraussei, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora) to seven compounds released from insect (Melolontha hippocastani)-damaged (decanal, nonanal, octanal, undecane, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) and undamaged (2-ethyl-1-hexanol) potato tubers. Our results suggest that EPNs are able to distinguish herbivore-induced VOCs from those that are typical for healthy potato tubers. In our investigation, nonanal, octanal, and decanal had a greater influence on the movement of EPNs than other tested synthetic volatiles. Decanal was an attractant for H. bacteriophora and S. kraussei at both tested concentrations (as a pure compound and at a concentration of 0.03 ppm). The results suggest that the susceptibility to perception of chemical stimuli from the environment is a species-specific characteristic that prevails over the influence of the foraging strategy. PMID:27108451

  1. Steinernema balochiense n. sp. (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae) a new entomopathogenic nematode from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Shahina; Khanum, Tabassum Ara; Ali, Shaukat; Solangi, Ghulam Sarwar; Gulsher, Mehreen; Javed, Salma

    2015-01-07

    A new species of entomopathogenic nematode (EPN) named Steinernema balochiense n. sp. belonging to the family Steinernematidae was isolated from Psidium guajava L., rhizophere soil samples of Balochistan, Pakistan. This new species belongs to the carpocapsae group. The new species can be separated from other described species by morphological and morphometrics characteristics as well as DNA sequence polymorphisms. This new nematode species is morphologically characterized by features of infective juveniles (IJ) and males. For the IJ average body length was (455; 415-528) µm, distance from anterior end to excretory pore (35; 32-38) µm, pharynx length (90; 85-98) µm, tail length (44.3; 40-51) µm, D% and E% values (39; 36-44) and (80; 70-92), respectively. For male specimens, the diagnostic characters included total body length (1330; 1135-1632) µm, gubernaculum length (44.4; 40-47) µm, D% (43.8; 40-51) and ratio of GS (63.8; 53-75). Morphological diagnostic traits for new species include the presence of a funnel shaped gubernaculum at the proximal end. S. balochiense n. sp. differs from infective stage juveniles of closest species S. nepalense by having 6 ridges vs 7 ridges in the lateral field. Molecular phylogenetic trees based on sequence of ITS-rDNA, D2D3 regions and the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene supports the description of this nematode isolate as a new species.

  2. A Serpin Released by an Entomopathogen Impairs Clot Formation in Insect Defense System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, YouJin; Balasubramanian, Natesan; Jing, Yingjun; Montiel, Rafael; Faria, Tiago Q.; Brito, Rui M.; Simões, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Steinernema carpocapsae is an entomopathogenic nematode widely used for the control of insect pests due to its virulence, which is mainly attributed to the ability the parasitic stage has to overcome insect defences. To identify the mechanisms underlying such a characteristic, we studied a novel serpin-like inhibitor (sc-srp-6) that was detected in a transcriptome analysis. Recombinant Sc-SRP-6 produced in Escherichia coli had a native fold of serpins belonging to the α-1-peptidase family and exhibited inhibitory activity against trypsin and α-chymotrypsin with Ki of 0.42×10−7 M and 1.22×10−7 M, respectively. Functional analysis revealed that Sc-SRP-6 inhibits insect digestive enzymes, thus preventing the hydrolysis of ingested particles. Moreover, Sc-SRP-6 impaired the formation of hard clots at the injury site, a major insect defence mechanism against invasive pathogens. Sc-SRP-6 does not prevent the formation of clot fibres and the activation of prophenoloxidases but impairs the incorporation of the melanin into the clot. Binding assays showed a complex formation between Sc-SRP-6 and three proteins in the hemolymph of lepidopteran required for clotting, apolipophorin, hexamerin and trypsin-like, although the catalytic inhibition occurred exclusively in trypsin-like. This data allowed the conclusion that Sc-SRP-6 promotes nematode virulence by inhibiting insect gut juices and by impairing immune clot reaction. PMID:23874900

  3. Invertebrate Iridovirus Modulation of Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor Williams; Nllesh S. Chitnis; Sh(a)n L. Bilimoria

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a key host response to virus infection. Viruses that can modulate host apoptotic responses are likely to gain important opportunities for transmission. Here we review recent studies that demonstrate that particles of Invertebrate iridescent virus 6 (IIV-6) (Iridoviridae, genus Iridovirus), or an IIV-6 virion protein extract, are capable of inducing apoptosis in lepidopteran and coleopteran cells, at concentrations 1000-fold lower than that required to shut-off host macromolecular synthesis. Induction of apoptosis depends on endocytosis of one or more heat-sensitive virion component(s). Studies with a JNK inh ibitor(SP600125) indicated that the JNK signaling pathway is significantly involved in apoptosis in IIV-6 infections of Choristoneurafumiferana ceils. The genome of IIV-6 codes for an inhibitor of apoptosis iap gene (193R) that encodes a protein of 208 aa with 15% identity and 28% similarity in its amino acid sequence to IAP-3 from Cydia pomonella ganulovirus (CpGV). Transcription of IIV-6 iap did not require prior DNA or protein synthesis, indicating that it is an immediate-early class gene. Transient expression and gene knockdown studies have confirmed the functional nature of the IIV-6 iap gene. We present a tentative model for IIV-6 induction and inhibition of apoptosis in insect cells and discuss the potential applications of these findings in insect pest control.

  4. Transgenic approaches applied to the sterile insect technique of codling moth control%转基因在苹果蠹蛾不育昆虫释放技术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱虹昱; 徐婧; 张润志

    2012-01-01

    使用不育昆虫释放技术是一项新兴的苹果蠹蛾Cydia pomonella(L.)防治方法,使用转基因得到不育雄蛾具有比传统辐射方法更多的优点.转基因技术通过使用基于piggyBac等转座子的质粒载体,并插入显性条件致死基因以培育遗传性别品系,同时插入荧光蛋白等标记基因来显示转基因的效果;在人工控制的发育条件,建立成熟的稳定苹果蠹蛾品系,用以最终的田间释放以达到防治的目的.%The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a relatively new approach to controlling the codling moth. Compared with the traditional irradiation method, the application of transgenic techniques is much better at producing sterile males. In addition to manual control of developmental conditions this involves using plasmid vectors based on the piggyBac transposon, inserting a dominant conditional lethal gene to culture genetic sexing strains and inserting marker genes such as fluorescent proteins to elucidate the efficacy of gene transfer.

  5. Effects of the insecticide phosmet on solitary bee foraging and nesting in orchards of Capitol Reef National Park, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Diane G; Tepedino, Vincent J; Bradley, Brosi A; Toler, Trent R; Griswold, Terry L; Messinger, Susanna M

    2007-08-01

    Capitol Reef National Park, in southcentral Utah, contains 22 small orchards planted with antique fruit varieties by Mormon pioneers beginning over a century ago. The orchards continue to be managed in a pick-and-pay program, which includes spraying with phosmet to suppress codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.). The park is also home to a rich diversity of flowering plants, many of which are rare, bee-pollinated, and have populations within 1 km of the orchards. Over 3 yr, we studied the short-term effects of phosmet spraying on bee populations: (1) foraging on plants within the orchard understory and adjacent to it; and (2) nesting in, and at several distances from, the orchards. We recorded a rich bee fauna (47 taxa) in the orchards and on plants nearby. In 2 yr (2002 and 2004), we found no difference in the number of native bee visits to several species of plants flowering in and near to orchards immediately before and 1 d after spraying. Conversely, our nesting studies using the semidomesticated alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata (F.), showed strong significant declines in the number of adult males, nesting females, and progeny production subsequent to spraying at distances up to 160 m from sprayed orchards where the bees were presumably foraging. We showed that M. rotundata is negatively affected by phosmet spraying and suggest that caution should be exercised in its use in areas where bees are apt to forage. PMID:17716471

  6. Primer registro de Hypercompe indecisa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Arctiinae en perales y álamos en la Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela DAPOTO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La región del Alto Valle de Río Negro y Neuquén es la zona más importante de producción de frutas de pepita de la Argentina. La principal plaga de estos cultivos es Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae. Los cambios implementados en las estrategias de control, principalmente la generalización del uso de la Técnica de Confusión Sexual, han causado en los últimos años cambios en la biodiversidad en esos cultivos. Durante la temporada 2008/09, en un establecimiento frutícola de producción orgánica en Vista Alegre (Neuquén, fue detectada Hypercompe indecisa (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, produciendo graves daños en frutos y hojas de perales y sobre el follaje de Populus spp. Se cita por primera vez a H. indecisa para la Patagonia y el primer hallazgo de esta especie sobre Populus spp. y Pyrus communis L.

  7. Field Trials of CpGV Virus Isolates Overcoming Resistance to CpGV-M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Berling; J. -B. Rey; S. -J. Ondet; Y. Tallot; O. Soubabère; A. Bonhomme; B. Sauphanor; M. Lopez-Ferber

    2009-01-01

    The Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) has been used for many years as biological agent for codling moth control in apple orchards. Resistance to the Mexican strain of CpGV was detected in orchards in Germany, France and Italy. A laboratory insect colony was started from insects collected in a French resistant orchard. It was named RGV. Various virus isolates were identified as active against this resistant insect colony. Field tests were carried out in 2007 to test if the two virus isolates CpGV-I12 and NPP-R1 were effective in the field. Although these virus isolates were not able to reduce insect caused fruit damages, they significantly reduced the overwintering insect populations. NPP-R1 was subjected to eight passages on RGV larvae (NPP-R1.8) that improved its biological activity on RGV larvae. 2008 field trials were set up to test this improved virus strain, compared to CpGV-I12 and Madex plus active on RGV. These tests confirmed the ability to control both in susceptible and resistant insect populations.

  8. A Binary Host Plant Volatile Lure Combined With Acetic Acid to Monitor Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, A L; Basoalto, E; Katalin, J; El-Sayed, A M

    2015-10-01

    Field studies were conducted in the United States, Hungary, and New Zealand to evaluate the effectiveness of septa lures loaded with ethyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester) and (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (nonatriene) alone and in combination with an acetic acid co-lure for both sexes of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.). Additional studies were conducted to evaluate these host plant volatiles and acetic acid in combination with the sex pheromone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol (codlemone). Traps baited with pear ester/nonatriene + acetic acid placed within orchards treated either with codlemone dispensers or left untreated caught significantly more males, females, and total moths than similar traps baited with pear ester + acetic acid in some assays. Similarly, traps baited with codlemone/pear ester/nonatriene + acetic acid caught significantly greater numbers of moths than traps with codlemone/pear ester + acetic acid lures in some assays in orchards treated with combinational dispensers (dispensers loaded with codlemone/pear ester). These data suggest that monitoring of codling moth can be marginally improved in orchards under variable management plans using a binary host plant volatile lure in combination with codlemone and acetic acid. These results are likely to be most significant in orchards treated with combinational dispensers. Significant increases in the catch of female codling moths in traps with the binary host plant volatile blend plus acetic acid should be useful in developing more effective mass trapping strategies.

  9. Cost-benefit trade-offs of bird activity in apple orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Manu E.; Luck, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Birds active in apple orchards in south–eastern Australia can contribute positively (e.g., control crop pests) or negatively (e.g., crop damage) to crop yields. Our study is the first to identify net outcomes of these activities, using six apple orchards, varying in management intensity, in south–eastern Australia as a study system. We also conducted a predation experiment using real and artificial codling moth (Cydia pomonella) larvae (a major pest in apple crops). We found that: (1) excluding birds from branches of apple trees resulted in an average of 12.8% more apples damaged by insects; (2) bird damage to apples was low (1.9% of apples); and (3) when trading off the potential benefits (biological control) with costs (bird damage to apples), birds provided an overall net benefit to orchard growers. We found that predation of real codling moth larvae was higher than for plasticine larvae, suggesting that plasticine prey models are not useful for inferring actual predation levels. Our study shows how complex ecological interactions between birds and invertebrates affect crop yield in apples, and provides practical strategies for improving the sustainability of orchard systems. PMID:27413639

  10. Water fluxes and encapsulation efficiency in double emulsions: impact of emulsification and osmotic pressure unbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Maxime; Mercé, Manuel; Laurichesse, Eric; Pezon, Annaïck; Soubabère, Olivier; Besse, Samantha; Schmitt, Véronique

    2016-04-14

    We study the influence of the emulsification process on encapsulation efficiency of drugs in double water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. Two drugs were used, first vitamin B12 which can be considered as a model drug and secondly a suspension of Cydia pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV), a virus used in organic agriculture to protect fruits against the Carpocapse insect. Encapsulation is measured by classical UV-Vis spectroscopy method. Additionally we show that rheology is a useful tool to determine water exchanges during emulsification. In a two-step emulsification process, using rotor-stator mixers, encapsulation reaches high levels, close to 100% whatever the flowing regime. This encapsulation decreases only if two conditions are fulfilled simultaneously: (i) during the second emulsification step the flow is turbulent and (ii) it leads to excessive fragmentation inducing formation of too small drops. We also investigate the effect of a deliberate loss of osmotic pressure balance on the encapsulation and characterize the induced water fluxes. We show that encapsulation of vitamin B12 is not affected by the osmotic pressure unbalance, while water exchanges, if they exist, are very fast and aim at restoring equilibrium. As a consequence, the emulsification efficiency is not very sensitive to osmotic stresses provided that the interfaces resist mechanically. PMID:26936127

  11. Investigations on the use of the sterile male technique for the control of codling moth in an integrated pest control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diapause of the codling moth, Laspeyresia pomonella L., was studied in relation to various altitudes of origin. Altitudes of 350 m and 1300 m above sea level showed that low-altitude moths had a longer diapause. Altitude appears to affect the duration of larval diapause. Biological control by virus-induced granulosis was investigated, using 3 to 4 applications of the virus per tree per season, at the rate of 2x1011 to 9x1011 virus capsules per application. Codling moth infestation was reduced by 74.2% to 88.2%. Trichomma enecator and Ascogaster quadridentatus Wesm., both parasites of the codling moth, were both colonized in the laboratory, and population dynamics are being studied. Copulatory behaviour in the males of A. quadridentatus is elicited primarily by pheromones produced by the female. Males emit some sounds which appear primarily intended to convey territorial rights to other males. The frequencies produced by males and by females differ. Codling moth odours stimulate females to oviposit. The effect of pesticides on parasitation is being studied. Details of a planned mass-rearing facility for lepidopteran and other pests are given

  12. Gamma irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh pome fruits produced in Patagonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J.; Lires, C.; Horak, C.; Pawlak, E.; Docters, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15, (B1802AYA) Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kairiyama, E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15, (B1802AYA) Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: kairiyam@cae.cnea.gov.ar

    2009-07-15

    Argentina produces 1.8 million tons/year of apples (Malus domestica L.) and pears (Pyrus communis L.) in the Patagonia region. Cydia pomonella, codling moth, and Grapholita molesta, Oriental fruit moth, (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are quarantine pests in pome fruits. Irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment because a dose of 200 Gy completely prevents pest adult emergence. A pilot irradiation process of commercially packaged 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears was performed in an irradiation facility with a Cobalt 60 source. Quality analyses were carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months of storage (1 deg. C, RH 99%) to evaluate fruit tolerance at 200, 400 and 800 Gy. Irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy had no undesirable effects on fruit quality (pulp firmness, external colour, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA) and sensory evaluations). Irradiation of 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears can be applied as a commercial quarantine treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 200 Gy (to control codling moth and Oriental fruit moth) and <800 Gy (according to quality results)

  13. Gamma irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh pome fruits produced in Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J.; Lires, C.; Horak, C.; Pawlak, E.; Docters, A.; Kairiyama, E.

    2009-07-01

    Argentina produces 1.8 million tons/year of apples ( Malus domestica L.) and pears ( Pyrus communis L.) in the Patagonia region. Cydia pomonella, codling moth, and Grapholita molesta, Oriental fruit moth, ( Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are quarantine pests in pome fruits. Irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment because a dose of 200 Gy completely prevents pest adult emergence. A pilot irradiation process of commercially packaged 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears was performed in an irradiation facility with a Cobalt 60 source. Quality analyses were carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months of storage (1 °C, RH 99%) to evaluate fruit tolerance at 200, 400 and 800 Gy. Irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy had no undesirable effects on fruit quality (pulp firmness, external colour, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA) and sensory evaluations). Irradiation of 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears can be applied as a commercial quarantine treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 200 Gy (to control codling moth and Oriental fruit moth) and <800 Gy (according to quality results).

  14. Study of the mechanism and possibilities of using F1 sterility for genetic control of codling moth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer based model was developed to simulate the suppression through three filial generations of field populations of codling moths, Laspeyresia pomonella (L.), that have been exposed to the release of codling moths exposed to doses of gamma rays ranging from 1 to 500 Gy. The main purpose of the model is to select the optimal dose of radiation. The model runs on an IBM compatible computer. Numerous experiments were conducted to provide the experimental data required for the model. The model takes into account the fact that individual moths are affected in different ways by exposure to gamma rays. Some irradiated males mate and form spermatophore, while others fail to mate. Some males that form spermatophores fail to produce eupyrene sperm. These undesirable effects occur with increasing frequencies as the dose increases. Indeed, a high doses of radiation these negative effects are so great that the treated moths are totally non-competitive with the untreated moths. The release of F1 individuals has a number of advantages for the control of the codling moth. This approach involves the mass rearing and stockpiling of diapausing F1 larvae during the winter months. It facilitates the synchronization of the emergence and flight of genetically impaired individuals with the emergence and flight of the wild population. In addition, this approach facilitates the separation of the sexes and the release of only F1 males. The optimum dose for this approach was found to be 100 Gy. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs

  15. Studies on the codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) response to different codlemone release rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, S; Miñarro, M; Bosch, M D; Primo, J; Navarro-Llopis, V

    2013-12-01

    The response of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)) to different emission values of its main pheromone component, 8E,10E-dodecadien-1-ol (codlemone), was investigated in three field trials conducted in plots without mating disruption treatments. Moth catches obtained in traps baited with pheromone dispensers were correlated with the corresponding codlemone release rates by multiple regression analysis. In a preliminary trial conducted in Lleida (NE Spain), a decreasing trend of captures was observed based on increasing pheromone levels. After this, the pheromone release profiles of the pheromone dispensers were studied, in parallel with the field trials, by residual codlemone extraction and gas chromatography quantification. In the trials carried out in Asturias (NW Spain), a correlation between trap catches and emission levels (within the range from 11 to 1,078 μg/d) was found and fitted a logarithmic model. Captures followed a decreasing linear trend in the range of emission rates from 11 to 134 μg/d. Given that release values comprised between 11 and 67 μg/d did not lead to significantly different catches in traps, this emission range could be considered to develop effective formulations for attraction purposes when mating disruption is not acting in the environment.

  16. Toxicity of Six Insecticides on Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Effect on Expression of Detoxification Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Qing; Wu, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Barros-Parada, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), is a key worldwide fruit pest that has evolved high levels of resistance to almost all classes of conventional insecticides. Neonicotinoids, a new reduced-risk biorational insecticide class, have remained an effective control approach. In this study, the toxicity and sublethal effect of conventional and reduced-risk biorational insecticides on transcripts abundance of three detoxification genes in codling moth were determined. Bioassays on a codling moth laboratory strain suggested that acetamiprid had the highest oral toxicity against the third-instar larvae compared with the other five pesticides. Results also indicated that acetamiprid exhibits long-term efficacy against codling moth even at 120 h post feeding. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the detoxification genes CYP9A61, CpGST1, and CpCE-1 were differentially induced or suppressed by deltamethrin, cypermethrin, methomyl, carbaryl, and imidacloprid, depending on the type of insecticides; in contrast, no significant difference in CYP9A61, CpGST1, and CpCE-1 expressions were observed after acetamiprid exposure, when compared with the control. These results suggest that the reduced-risk biorational insecticide acetamiprid is an effective insecticide with no induction of detoxification genes and can be integrated into the management of codling moth.

  17. ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY OF DIFFERENT PROTECTION TREATMENTS IN APPLE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Tomaš

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apple is the most represented fruit species in Croatia. Codling moth, Cydia pomonella L, is one of the most important apple pests whose population is growing from year to year. The aim of this study was to determine the economic effectiveness of four treatments against codling moth (1 - based on baculovirus; 2 - based on the group of synthetic pyrethroid; 3 - based on kaolin, 4 - control treatment, on the three apple varieties. The experiment was performed at the Agricultural Institute Osijek, Croatia, during three years (2012-2014. In order to analyze the results of apple production it was necessary to calculate production efficiency, labor productivity, and profitability of production. The results of the research of economic efficiency according to market prices treatment 1 and treatment 2 had economic coefficient above 1 with tendency of significant growth, while treatment 3 and 4 were uneconomical. The treatment 1showed advantage over the treatment 2 because of its positive effects on human health and biodiversity, as well as satisfactory economic efficiency.

  18. Identification of irradiated apples for phytosanitary purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Celina I.; Di Giorgio, Marina; Kairiyama, Eulogia

    2009-07-01

    The irradiation treatment of fresh fruits and vegetables for phytosanitary purposes is a satisfactory alternative method to others like fumigation and cold and hot treatments. Its use is increasing in several countries, and at present its approval is under revision by the National Regulatory Authorities. To verify the control process, apart from irradiation and dosimetry certificates, National Authorities require complementary evidence to show the efficacy of this treatment, especially when the documentation is not clear. The irradiation of fresh fruits produces single and double fragmentation in the DNA molecule, which can be measured using the microgel electrophoresis of individual cell (comet assay). The purpose of this work was to evaluate if it is possible to identify the irradiated apples for phytosanitary purposes from the others that were not treated. The possibility to estimate the absorbed dose was also evaluated. The methodology was carried out on the cell suspension obtained from irradiated seed cells with incremental doses (100, 200 and 300 Gy). The irradiation treatment for phytosanitary purposes to avoid emergency of codling moth ( Cydia pomonella) is 200 Gy. The fragmentation produced in the irradiated samples was proportional with the incremental doses applied. These results show that with this methodology it can be determined if the apple was irradiated or not. This comet assay is a simple, economical and interesting method that can be used, in case of necessity, by the National Authorities.

  19. DNA diagnostics to identify internal feeders (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) of pome fruits of quarantine importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcenas, N M; Unruh, T R; Neven, L G

    2005-04-01

    A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is presented for differentiating among the North American internal apple-feeding pests codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.); oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck); lesser appleworm, Grapholita prunivora (Walsh); and cherry fruitworm, Grapholita packardi Zeller. An approximately 470-bp fragment of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was sequenced in three to six specimens of each species. Consistent and diagnostic differences were observed among the species in two regions of COI from which forward and reverse primers were designed to amplify a 112-116-bp segment of the gene. The primer sets were used to selectively amplify DNA from specimens of diverse geographic origin for each corresponding target species. Protocols were adapted for conventional and quantitative PCR, the latter being substantially faster. The method was validated as a decision-making tool for quarantine identifications for Mexico by representatives of their phytosanitary agency (Sanidad Vegetal). The method can facilitate identification of intercepted internal feeding Lepidoptera in apple and pear for many other importing nations.

  20. Assessing the quality of mass-reared codling moths (Lepidoptera: tortricidae) by using field release-recapture tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following small-scale field releases of sterile, mass-reared codling moths, Cydia pomonella (L.), in the spring of 1995, significantly higher numbers of adults originating from larvae that had been induced into diapause were recaptured in passive interception traps compared with standard (nondiapaused) colony moths reared under either constant or fluctuating temperatures. When releases were made in the summer, significantly more diapaused females were again recaptured and similar numbers of diapaused and fluctuating temperature-reared standard males were trapped. Our field data showed that both male and female codling moths dispersed farther as ambient temperatures increased. When standard and diapaused sterile codling moths were released into replicated 1-ha plots under large-scale Sterile Insect Release program conditions in the summer and fall of 1996 and the spring of 1997, the proportion of recaptured diapaused males was significantly higher than for standard (nondiapaused) moths. This was true for recapture of males with passive interception, pheromone-baited, and virgin female-baited traps

  1. Cost-benefit trade-offs of bird activity in apple orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisley, Rebecca K; Saunders, Manu E; Luck, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    Birds active in apple orchards in south-eastern Australia can contribute positively (e.g., control crop pests) or negatively (e.g., crop damage) to crop yields. Our study is the first to identify net outcomes of these activities, using six apple orchards, varying in management intensity, in south-eastern Australia as a study system. We also conducted a predation experiment using real and artificial codling moth (Cydia pomonella) larvae (a major pest in apple crops). We found that: (1) excluding birds from branches of apple trees resulted in an average of 12.8% more apples damaged by insects; (2) bird damage to apples was low (1.9% of apples); and (3) when trading off the potential benefits (biological control) with costs (bird damage to apples), birds provided an overall net benefit to orchard growers. We found that predation of real codling moth larvae was higher than for plasticine larvae, suggesting that plasticine prey models are not useful for inferring actual predation levels. Our study shows how complex ecological interactions between birds and invertebrates affect crop yield in apples, and provides practical strategies for improving the sustainability of orchard systems. PMID:27413639

  2. Interspecific competition between entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema is modified by their bacterial symbionts (Xenorhabdus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pages Sylvie

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symbioses between invertebrates and prokaryotes are biological systems of particular interest in order to study the evolution of mutualism. The symbioses between the entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema and their bacterial symbiont Xenorhabdus are very tractable model systems. Previous studies demonstrated (i a highly specialized relationship between each strain of nematodes and its naturally associated bacterial strain and (ii that mutualism plays a role in several important life history traits of each partner such as access to insect host resources, dispersal and protection against various biotic and abiotic factors. The goal of the present study was to address the question of the impact of Xenorhabdus symbionts on the progression and outcome of interspecific competition between individuals belonging to different Steinernema species. For this, we monitored experimental interspecific competition between (i two nematode species: S. carpocapsae and S. scapterisci and (ii their respective symbionts: X. nematophila and X. innexi within an experimental insect-host (Galleria mellonella. Three conditions of competition between nematodes were tested: (i infection of insects with aposymbiotic IJs (i.e. without symbiont of both species (ii infection of insects with aposymbiotic IJs of both species in presence of variable proportion of their two Xenorhabdus symbionts and (iii infection of insects with symbiotic IJs (i.e. naturally associated with their symbionts of both species. Results We found that both the progression and the outcome of interspecific competition between entomopathogenic nematodes were influenced by their bacterial symbionts. Thus, the results obtained with aposymbiotic nematodes were totally opposite to those obtained with symbiotic nematodes. Moreover, the experimental introduction of different ratios of Xenorhabdus symbionts in the insect-host during competition between Steinernema modified the proportion of

  3. Unexpected variation in neuroanatomy among diverse nematode species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziduan eHan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes are considered excellent models for understanding fundamental aspects of neuron function. However, nematodes are less frequently used as models for examining the evolution of nervous systems. While the habitats and behaviors of nematodes are diverse, the neuroanatomy of nematodes is often considered highly conserved. A small number of nematode species greatly influences our understanding of nematode neurobiology. The free-living species Caenorhabditis elegans and, to a lesser extent, the mammalian gastrointestinal parasite Ascaris suum are, historically, the primary sources of knowledge regarding nematode neurobiology. Despite differences in size and habitat, C. elegans and Ascaris suum share a surprisingly similar neuroanatomy. Here, we examined species across several clades in the phylum Nematoda and show that there is a surprising degree of neuroanatomical variation both within and among nematode clades when compared to C. elegans and Ascaris. We found variation in the numbers of neurons in the ventral nerve cord and dye-filling pattern of sensory neurons. For example, we found that Pristionchus pacificus, a bacterial feeding species used for comparative developmental research, had 20% fewer ventral cord neurons compared to C. elegans. Steinernema carpocapse, an insect-parasitic nematode capable of jumping behavior, had 40% more ventral cord neurons than C. elegans. Interestingly, the non-jumping congeneric nematode, S. glaseri showed an identical number of ventral cord neurons as S. carpocapsae. There was also variability in the timing of neurodevelopment of the ventral cord with two of five species that hatch as second-stage juveniles showing delayed neurodevelopment. We also found unexpected variation in the dye-filling of sensory neurons among examined species. Again, sensory neuron dye-filling pattern did not strictly correlate with phylogeny. Our results demonstrate that variation in nematode neuroanatomy is more prevalent

  4. Divergence of the diapause transcriptome in apple maggot flies: winter regulation and post-winter transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Peter J; Powell, Thomas H Q; Walden, Kimberly K O; Schieferecke, Adam J; Feder, Jeffrey L; Hahn, Daniel A; Robertson, Hugh M; Berlocher, Stewart H; Ragland, Gregory J

    2016-09-01

    The duration of dormancy regulates seasonal timing in many organisms and may be modulated by day length and temperature. Though photoperiodic modulation has been well studied, temperature modulation of dormancy has received less attention. Here, we leverage genetic variation in diapause in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, to test whether gene expression during winter or following spring warming regulates diapause duration. We used RNAseq to compare transcript abundance during and after simulated winter between an apple-infesting population and a hawthorn-infesting population where the apple population ends pupal diapause earlier than the hawthorn-infesting population. Marked differences in transcription between the two populations during winter suggests that the 'early' apple population is developmentally advanced compared with the 'late' hawthorn population prior to spring warming, with transcripts participating in growth and developmental processes relatively up-regulated in apple pupae during the winter cold period. Thus, regulatory differences during winter ultimately drive phenological differences that manifest themselves in the following summer. Expression and polymorphism analysis identify candidate genes in the Wnt and insulin signaling pathways that contribute to population differences in seasonality. Both populations remained in diapause and displayed a pattern of up- and then down-regulation (or vice versa) of growth-related transcripts following warming, consistent with transcriptional repression. The ability to repress growth stimulated by permissive temperatures is likely critical to avoid mismatched phenology and excessive metabolic demand. Compared with diapause studies in other insects, our results suggest some overlap in candidate genes/pathways, though the timing and direction of changes in transcription are likely species specific. PMID:27312473

  5. Sterile insect technique in codling moth control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of mature pupae or adult codling moths, Cydia pomonella (L.), to 30-40 krad of gamma radiation induces a high level of sterility in the male and complete sterility in the female without seriously affecting behaviour except for sperm competitiveness which is drastically reduced. Substerilizing doses (below about 25 krad) have very little adverse effect and induces higher level of sterility in the F1 male than in the irradiated male parent. The most satisfactory method of measuring the population density of native moths is by examining fruit for larval exit holes. Population increase per generation depends largely on evening temperatures during the moth's reproductive period. The codling moth is a sedentary species, and its distribution is very uneven in commercial orchards. Neglected host trees must be sprayed or destroyed to avoid reinfestation of sterile insect release orchards with immigrant moths. Laboratory-reared moths may be marked externally with fluorescent powders or internally with calco oil red without adverse effects. Mass rearing is still unreliable and expensive, and prolonged colonization affects the insects' behaviour. Successful codling moth suppression was achieved in North America and/or Europe by release of sterile males, sterile females or sterile mixed sexes; by substerile males; and by F1 male progeny (released as diapausing larvae) of substerile males X untreated females. Arthropod predators and parasites held aphids and spider mites at noninjurious levels in most insect release orchards, but leafrollers eventually built up to damaging numbers. The sterile insect technique for commercial control of the codling moth is not feasible at this time because of high costs. (author)

  6. New technology for mating disruption and prospects for integration with SIT: ExosexTM and ExolureTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Exosex autoconfusion system has been successfully trialed against a variety of insect pests and is now registered for use in certain countries. It differs fundamentally from all other mating disruption systems by contaminating the target pest with electrostatically charged powder formulated with pheromone or other biologically active materials. The method requires only 25 dispensers and less than 100 mg of pheromone per hectare. The mode of action in disrupting mate location, courtship, and mating, may include a variety of effects, all of which contribute to the efficacy of management of the pest in question. The most important are believed to be the following: - False trail following: - Habituation; - Trail masking; - Sensory imbalance; - Inhibition of courtship; - Enhancement of predation and; - Delay of mating. Factors making Exosex autoconfusion such a uniquely powerful technology are demonstrated by the following calculations based on the threshold responsiveness of Cydia pomonella to pheromone. One particle of EntostatTM (wax) powder contains on average 67 femtograms (6.7 x 10 14 g) of formulated pheromone, and there are approximately 1.5 x 1010 particles per gram of powder. One particle resting on the antennae would theoretically release sufficient pheromone to induce habituation of responsiveness to pheromone. Approximately 1,800 particles would constitute an attractive source for a male moth in the field. Hence the contents of one Exosex dispenser are theoretically capable of contaminating around 1 billion male codling moths with enough pheromone to make them attractive sources to other males. The Exosect technology has also given rise to a highly efficient lure and kill method, in which slow-acting chemical insecticides or entomopathogens can be spread throughout a pest population by autodissemination. Both the mating disruption and lure and kill technologies are clearly compatible with SIT, and several new ideas will be presented

  7. Quality of 'Brightwell' and 'Tifblue' blueberries after gamma irradiation for quarantine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blueberries must be subjected to a quarantine treatment of methyl bromide fumigation when shipped to certain domestic or export markets. The principle insects that inhibit distribution of blueberries are the apple maggot [Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh)], blueberry maggot (R. mendax Curran), and plum curculio [Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst)]. Methyl bromide fumigation is the only approved quarantine treatment for blueberries and it is scheduled to be phased out by the year 2001. Highbush blueberries’ tolerance to low-dose irradiation is cultivar-dependent (Eaton et al., 1970). Two main cultivars grown in Florida, ‘Climax’ and ‘Sharpblue’, will tolerate irradiation up to 0.75 kGy without loss of fruit market quality (Miller et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995). A 1.0-kGy dose is the maximum allowed (U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 1986) for treatment of fresh fruit or vegetables, and reportedly (personal communications, J. Sharp and G. Hallman) »0.3 kGy is sufficient for control of blueberry insects requiring quarantine certification. Two or three times the minimum dose may, however, be required to assure that the minimum dose is absorbed by all berries during commercial application. Therefore, it is most important to determine the tolerance of berries to irradiation stress. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of low-dose irradiation on the quality and condition of ‘Brightwell’ and ‘Tifblue’, two major rabbiteye cultivars grown in Georgia. The data were subjected to analysis of variance (P £ 0.05) on a split-block experimental design, with harvest dates for ‘Brightwell’, and randomized sample sets as replications for ‘Tifblue’ berries. The data were tested for the main effect of irradiation dosage on quality attributes

  8. Population Dynamics and Flight Phenology Model of Codling Moth Differ between Commercial and Abandoned Apple Orchard Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Neelendra K.; Rajotte, Edwin G.; Naithani, Kusum J.; Krawczyk, Greg; Hull, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Apple orchard management practices may affect development and phenology of arthropod pests, such as the codling moth (CM), Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), which is a serious internal fruit-feeding pest of apples worldwide. Estimating population dynamics and accurately predicting the timing of CM development and phenology events (for instance, adult flight, and egg-hatch) allows growers to understand and control local populations of CM. Studies were conducted to compare the CM flight phenology in commercial and abandoned apple orchard ecosystems using a logistic function model based on degree-days accumulation. The flight models for these orchards were derived from the cumulative percent moth capture using two types of commercially available CM lure baited traps. Models from both types of orchards were also compared to another model known as PETE (prediction extension timing estimator) that was developed in 1970s to predict life cycle events for many fruit pests including CM across different fruit growing regions of the United States. We found that the flight phenology of CM was significantly different in commercial and abandoned orchards. CM male flight patterns for first and second generations as predicted by the constrained and unconstrained PCM (Pennsylvania Codling Moth) models in commercial and abandoned orchards were different than the flight patterns predicted by the currently used CM model (i.e., PETE model). In commercial orchards, during the first and second generations, the PCM unconstrained model predicted delays in moth emergence compared to current model. In addition, the flight patterns of females were different between commercial and abandoned orchards. Such differences in CM flight phenology between commercial and abandoned orchard ecosystems suggest potential impact of orchard environment and crop management practices on CM biology. PMID:27713702

  9. Use of glacial acetic acid to enhance bisexual monitoring of tortricid pests with kairomone lures in pome fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, A L; Hilton, R; Basoalto, E; Stelinski, L L

    2014-12-01

    Studies were conducted to assess glacial acetic acid (GAA) with various host plant volatiles (HPVs) and the sex pheromone, (E,E)-8, 10-dodecadien-1-ol, of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L), as lures in traps for tortricid pests that often co-occur in tree fruits in the western United States. In addition to codling moth, field trapping studies were conducted with oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), obliquebanded leafroller Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris), the leafroller Pandemis pyrusana Kearfott, and the eyespotted budmoth, Spilonota ocellana (Denis and Schiffermüller). HPVs included ethyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester), (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, butyl hexanoate, (E)-β-ocimene, (E)-β-farnesene, and farnesol. Three types of GAA co-lures differing in a 10-fold range in weekly evaporation rates were tested. The evaporation rate of GAA co-lures was an important factor affecting moth catches. The highest rate tested captured fewer codling moth but more leafrollers and eyespotted budmoth. GAA co-lures caught both sexes of each species. The field life of butyl hexanoate and (E)-β-ocimene lures were much shorter than pear ester or sex pheromone lures. Adding GAA to pear ester or to (E)-β-ocimene significantly increased the catches of only codling moth or oriental fruit moth, respectively. Combining pear ester or (E)-β-ocimene with GAA did not affect the catch of either species compared with the single more attractive HPV. Adding HPVs to GAA did not increase the catches of either leafroller species or eyespotted budmoth. Traps baited with pear ester, sex pheromone, and GAA for monitoring codling moth were also effective in classifying pest pressure of both leafroller species within orchards.

  10. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of agricultural commodities against arthropod pests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of quarantine treatments is to eliminate, as far as possible, the risks of introduction or establishment of exotic pests in countries or regions where they do not already occur. Treatments may be applied to host commodities traded commercially or carried by travellers. Ionizing radiation is very effective when used as a quarantine treatment to disinfest fresh, dried or processed fruits, grains and other plant materials. It is highly effective in killing or inactivating arthropod pests, leaves no residues, and at the low doses required it can be used on most commodities without affecting the quality. The most important single pest group of quarantine importance internationally is arguably fruit flies in fresh fruits and vegetables. More than thirty species of fruit flies are recognized as serious quarantine pests. Dose-mortality studies with irradiation have shown that doses of 75-150 Gy prevent adult emergence. At two Task Force Meetings on Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment convened by the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation, a generic dose of 150 Gy was recommended against any fruit, based on extensive research data for these pests. Most fruits are relatively unaffected by quarantine disinfestation treatments of 100-300 Gy but some, for example avocado, appear to be intolerant. Other pests of quarantine importance for which irradiation is an appropriate disinfestation treatment include certain moths (Lepidoptera), beetles (Coleoptera), bugs (Homoptera), flies (Diptera), thrips (Thysanoptera) and mites (Acarina). The Task Force Group also recommended that a generic treatment of 300 Gy, based on the inability to perpetuate the species, would be appropriate for any pest other than fruit fly. This was derived from extensive research on the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), and the mango seed weevil, Sternochaetus mangiferae (Fabricius), with supporting results on eleven other pests from six orders. (author). 54 refs, 2 tabs

  11. Consultants Group Meeting on Improvement of Codling Moth SIT to Facilitate Expansion of Field Application. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIT currently has only limited application in Lepidoptera control. Prospects for improvement of the technique however are good, and the species with the best immediate prospect is the codling moth (Cydia pomonella). Codling moth is the key pest of most apple and pear orchards in the world and the cause of intensive insecticide use during the whole fruiting season. As a result of increasing development of insecticide resistance in codling moth, the banning of essential insecticides, as well as public concerns about the environment and food safety, the Subprogramme continues to receive enquiries from a number of countries as to the applicability of SIT as a suppression method for this species. SIT is currently used as part of areawide codling moth control in British Columbia, Canada and in the border area with Washington State, USA. The SIT can be integrated with a number of other techniques, including mating disruption as in the trial in Washington State. The Canadian programme is co-funded by growers, local and national government. The programme is proving effective at controlling the moth in an environmental friendly way. Currently the programme is only financially attractive with government subsidy although in view of the replacement of insecticide use with SIT, growers will be able to access the rapidly growing and very lucrative market for organic fruit. A new CRP is proposed with the objective of improving the efficiency of all stages of the SIT for codling moth. This will cover reducing the cost of production, product and process quality control, genetic sexing, strain compatibility and field monitoring among others.

  12. Semiochemical Strategies for Tortricid Moth Control in Apple Orchards and Vineyards in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioriatti, Claudio; Lucchi, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    - This review summarizes work done in Italy in taking semiochemical-based management of orchard and vineyard pests from the research and development stage to successful commercial deployment. Mating disruption (MD) of codling moth Cydia pomonella (CM) was originally introduced into the Trentino-South Tyrol areas to address the development of CM resistance to insecticides, particularly insect growth regulators (IGRs), and to mitigate the conflict at the rural/urban interface related to the extensive use of insecticides. Although the mountainous terrain of the area was not optimal for the efficacy of MD, commitment and determination led to the rapid adoption of MD technology throughout the region. Grower cooperatives and their field consultants were strongly influential in convincing growers to accept MD technology. Public research institutions conducted extensive research and education, and provided credible assessments of various MD technologies. By 2016, the deployment of MD in effective area-wide strategies in apple (22,100 ha) and grapes (10,450 ha), has resulted in better control of tortricid moth pests and a substantial decrease in insecticide use. Collaboration between the research community and the pheromone industry has resulted in the development of increasingly effective single-species dispensers, as well as multi-species dispensers for the control of both target and secondary pests. Over the last 20 years, hand-applied reservoir dispensers have shown excellent efficacy in both apple and grapes. Recently, aerosol dispensing systems have been shown to be effective in apple orchards. Further research is needed on the efficacy of aerosols in vineyards before the technology can be widely adopted. The successful implementation of MD in apple and grape production in Trentino-South Tyrol is expediting adoption of the technology in other Italian fruit production regions. PMID:27417503

  13. A conserved odorant receptor detects the same 1-indanone analogs in a tortricid and a noctuid moth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eGonzalez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Odorant receptors (ORs interface animals with airborne chemical signals. They are under strong selection pressure and are therefore highly divergent in different taxa. Yet, some OR orthologs are highly conserved. These ORs may be tuned to odorants of broad importance, across species boundaries. Two widely distributed lepidopteran herbivores, codling moth Cydia pomonella (Tortricidae feeding in apples and pears, and the African cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis (Noctuidae, a moth feeding on foliage of a wide range of herbaceous plants, both express a receptor ortholog, OR19, which shares 58% amino acid identity and 69% amino acid similarity. Following heterologous expression in the empty neuron system of Drosophila melanogaster, we show by single sensillum recordings that CpomOR19 and SlitOR19 show similar affinity to several substituted indanes. Tests with a series of compounds structurally related to 1-indanone show that 2-methyl-1-indanone, 2-ethyl-1-indanone, 3-methyl-1-indanone and 1-indanone elicit a strong response from both ORs. A keto group in position 1 is essential for biological activity and so are both rings of the indane skeleton. However, there is an important difference in steric complementary of the indane rings and the receptor. Methyl substituents on the benzene ring largely suppressed the response. On the other hand, alkyl substituents at position 2 and 3 of the five-membered ring increased the response indicating a higher complementarity with the receptor cavity, in both CpomOR19 and SlitOR19. Our results demonstrate a conserved function of an odorant receptor in two moths that are phylogenetically and ecologically distant. It is conceivable that a conserved OR is tuned to signals that are relevant for both species, although their ecological roles are yet unknown. Our finding demonstrates that functional characterization of ORs leads to the discovery of novel semiochemicals that have not yet been found through chemical

  14. A pathogenic nematode targets recognition proteins to avoid insect defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Toubarro

    Full Text Available Steinernemacarpocapsae is a nematode pathogenic in a wide variety of insect species. The great pathogenicity of this nematode has been ascribed to its ability to overcome the host immune response; however, little is known about the mechanisms involved in this process. The analysis of an expressed sequence tags (EST library in the nematode during the infective phase was performed and a highly abundant contig homologous to serine protease inhibitors was identified. In this work, we show that this contig is part of a 641-bp cDNA that encodes a BPTI-Kunitz family inhibitor (Sc-KU-4, which is up-regulated in the parasite during invasion and installation. Recombinant Sc-KU-4 protein was produced in Escherichia coli and shown to inhibit chymotrypsin and elastase activities in a dose-dependent manner by a competitive mechanism with Ki values of 1.8 nM and 2.6 nM, respectively. Sc-KU-4 also inhibited trypsin and thrombin activities to a lesser extent. Studies of the mode of action of Sc-KU-4 and its effects on insect defenses suggest that although Sc-KU-4 did not inhibit the activation of hemocytes or the formation of clotting fibers, it did inhibit hemocyte aggregation and the entrapment of foreign particles by fibers. Moreover, Sc-KU-4 avoided encapsulation and the deposition of clotting materials, which usually occurs in response to foreign particles. We show by protein-protein interaction that Sc-KU-4 targets recognition proteins of insect immune system such as masquerade-like and serine protease-like homologs. The interaction of Sc-KU-4 with these proteins explains the ability of the nematode to overcome host reactions and its large pathogenic spectrum, once these immune proteins are well conserved in insects. The discovery of this inhibitor targeting insect recognition proteins opens new avenues for the development of S. carpocapsae as a biological control agent and provides a new tool to study host-pathogen interactions.

  15. A pathogenic nematode targets recognition proteins to avoid insect defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubarro, Duarte; Avila, Mónica Martinez; Montiel, Rafael; Simões, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Steinernemacarpocapsae is a nematode pathogenic in a wide variety of insect species. The great pathogenicity of this nematode has been ascribed to its ability to overcome the host immune response; however, little is known about the mechanisms involved in this process. The analysis of an expressed sequence tags (EST) library in the nematode during the infective phase was performed and a highly abundant contig homologous to serine protease inhibitors was identified. In this work, we show that this contig is part of a 641-bp cDNA that encodes a BPTI-Kunitz family inhibitor (Sc-KU-4), which is up-regulated in the parasite during invasion and installation. Recombinant Sc-KU-4 protein was produced in Escherichia coli and shown to inhibit chymotrypsin and elastase activities in a dose-dependent manner by a competitive mechanism with Ki values of 1.8 nM and 2.6 nM, respectively. Sc-KU-4 also inhibited trypsin and thrombin activities to a lesser extent. Studies of the mode of action of Sc-KU-4 and its effects on insect defenses suggest that although Sc-KU-4 did not inhibit the activation of hemocytes or the formation of clotting fibers, it did inhibit hemocyte aggregation and the entrapment of foreign particles by fibers. Moreover, Sc-KU-4 avoided encapsulation and the deposition of clotting materials, which usually occurs in response to foreign particles. We show by protein-protein interaction that Sc-KU-4 targets recognition proteins of insect immune system such as masquerade-like and serine protease-like homologs. The interaction of Sc-KU-4 with these proteins explains the ability of the nematode to overcome host reactions and its large pathogenic spectrum, once these immune proteins are well conserved in insects. The discovery of this inhibitor targeting insect recognition proteins opens new avenues for the development of S. carpocapsae as a biological control agent and provides a new tool to study host-pathogen interactions.

  16. 苹果蠹蛾不育昆虫释放技术研究进展%Advances in the sterile insect technique for controlling codling moth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 徐婧; 张润志

    2012-01-01

    The sterile insect technique ( SIT) involves the mass release of sterile insects to reduce fertility of wild populations of the same species. The codling moth is a major global pest of apple and pear crops that has invaded 71 countries and 5 continents. In this paper, advances in mass rearing, sterilization and the release of sterile insects for codling moth control are introduced, including artificial diet, population construction, rearing facilities and conditions, adult collection and quality control, long distance transport, sterilization source and equipment, radiation sensitivity, release method, marking and saturation rate. The effectiveness of SIT in countries that have used this technique is reviewed. The codling moth had now been found in Xinjiang, Gansu, Ningxia, Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang, Jilin and poses a serious threat to China' s fruit industry. The introduction of SIT' s to China is therefore both timely and important.%不育昆虫释放技术(sterile insect technique,SIT)是一种环境友好、可作为大面积害虫综合治理(AW-IPM)的防治技术,是以压倒性比例释放不育昆虫来减少田间同种害虫繁殖量的害虫治理方法.苹果蠹蛾Cydia pomonella(L.)是世界重要的梨果类害虫,现已入侵世界5洲71国.本文综述了苹果蠹蛾大规模饲养技术、辐射不育技术、释放技术3个关键环节的研究与技术进展,主要包括:苹果蠹蛾人工饲料、实验种群建立、饲养设备与条件、收集和质量评估、长距离运输、辐射源与设备、辐射剂量与敏感性、释放方法、释放标记和释放量等,并介绍了各国采用SIT技术的应用效果.苹果蠹蛾在我国新疆、甘肃、宁夏、内蒙、黑龙江、吉林6个省区发现,对我国苹果产业安全生产构成严重威胁,我国很有必要引进并建立苹果蠹蛾SIT防治技术体系.

  17. Management of lepidopterans through irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    suppression by irradiation include Spodoptera litura, S.exigua, S.frugiperda, Helicoverpa armigera, H.zea, Pectinophora gossypiella, Diatraea saccharalis, Cydia pomonella, C.molesta, Ectomyelois ceratoniae, Ephestia kuehniella, Crocidolomia binotalis, Chilo suppressalis, Ostrinia furnacalis, O.nubilalis, Plutella xylostella and Spilosoma obliqua. (author)

  18. Area-wide population suppression of codling moth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area-wide pest population control concept began with E.F. Knipling (1979) in the 1970s. Control of a pest population on individual fields does little to control the overall pest population because only a portion of the population is being affected. Expanding control tactics beyond individual farms tends to suppress the population on a wider scale and frequently results in suppression of the population for more than one year. The Agriculture Research Service (ARS) believes that this concept has not been addressed with the focus and support that it deserves. The ARS Administration made a conscious decision in 1994 to create a series of area-wide programmes funded out of ARS-based funds that had previously been used for pilot tests. These programmes involve a coordinated effort among ARS and university scientists, growers, and fieldmen for agriculture supply centres and fruit packing houses. The first area-wide programme supported by ARS was the codling moth (CM), Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) suppression programme. The codling moth is the key pest of pome fruit throughout the western United States (Beers et al. 1993). About half of the insecticides applied on these crops are directed toward this pest. A non-insecticidal control technique, mating disruption (MD), is available to replace the organophosphates. Removal of the hard pesticides directed against this pest would do the most to allow natural enemies to survive and reproduce in the orchards, which in turn would have the effect of reducing secondary pests. Elimination of the pesticides would also remove much of the health risks to workers and would minimise buildup of pesticide resistance. The objectives of the Codling Moth Area-wide Program are to enhance the efficacy of the non-pesticide approach, to demonstrate that mating disruption will work if conducted properly, to develop biological technology to lower costs of control that complement mating disruption, to implement effective

  19. History of the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 1930s and 1940s the idea of releasing insects of pest species to introduce sterility (sterile insect technique or SIT) into wild populations, and thus control them, was independently conceived in three extremely diverse intellectual environments. The key researchers were A. S. Serebrovskii at Moscow State University, F. L. Vanderplank at a tsetse field research station in rural Tanganyika (now Tanzania), and E. F. Knipling of the United States Department of Agriculture. Serebrovskii's work on chromosomal translocations for pest population suppression could not succeed in the catastrophic conditions in the USSR during World War II, after which he died. Vanderplank used hybrid sterility to suppress a tsetse population in a large field experiment, but lacked the resources to develop this method further. Knipling and his team exploited H. J. Muller's discovery that ionizing radiation can induce dominant lethal mutations, and after World War II this approach was applied on an area-wide basis to eradicate the New World screwworm Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) in the USA, Mexico, and Central America. Since then very effective programmes integrating the SIT have been mounted against tropical fruit flies, some species of tsetse flies Glossina spp., the pink bollworm Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), and the codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.). In non-isolated onion fields in the Netherlands, the onion maggot Delia antiqua (Meigen) has since 1981 been suppressed by the SIT. In the 1970s there was much research conducted on mosquito SIT, which then went into 'eclipse', but now appears to be reviving. Development of the SIT for use against the boll weevil Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman and the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) has ended, but it is in progress for two sweetpotato weevil species, Cylas formicarius (F.) and Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire), the false codling moth Cryptophlebia leucotreta (Meyrick), the carob moth Ectomyelois ceratoniae

  20. Downscaling climate change scenarios for apple pest and disease modeling in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, M.; Stoeckli, S.; Dubrovsky, M.; Spirig, C.; Calanca, P.; Rotach, M. W.; Fischer, A. M.; Duffy, B.; Samietz, J.

    2012-02-01

    As a consequence of current and projected climate change in temperate regions of Europe, agricultural pests and diseases are expected to occur more frequently and possibly to extend to previously non-affected regions. Given their economic and ecological relevance, detailed forecasting tools for various pests and diseases have been developed, which model their phenology, depending on actual weather conditions, and suggest management decisions on that basis. Assessing the future risk of pest-related damages requires future weather data at high temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we use a combined stochastic weather generator and re-sampling procedure for producing site-specific hourly weather series representing present and future (1980-2009 and 2045-2074 time periods) climate conditions in Switzerland. The climate change scenarios originate from the ENSEMBLES multi-model projections and provide probabilistic information on future regional changes in temperature and precipitation. Hourly weather series are produced by first generating daily weather data for these climate scenarios and then using a nearest neighbor re-sampling approach for creating realistic diurnal cycles. These hourly weather series are then used for modeling the impact of climate change on important life phases of the codling moth and on the number of predicted infection days of fire blight. Codling moth (Cydia pomonella) and fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) are two major pest and disease threats to apple, one of the most important commercial and rural crops across Europe. Results for the codling moth indicate a shift in the occurrence and duration of life phases relevant for pest control. In southern Switzerland, a 3rd generation per season occurs only very rarely under today's climate conditions but is projected to become normal in the 2045-2074 time period. While the potential risk for a 3rd generation is also significantly increasing in northern Switzerland (for most stations from roughly 1

  1. Antennal transcriptome analysis and comparison of olfactory genes in two sympatric defoliators, Dendrolimus houi and Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Hongbin; Kong, Xiangbo

    2014-09-01

    The Yunnan pine and Simao pine caterpillar moths, Dendrolimus houi Lajonquière and Dendrolimus kikuchii Matsumura (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), are two closely related and sympatric pests of coniferous forests in southwestern China, and olfactory communication systems of these two insects have received considerable attention because of their economic importance. However, there is little information on the molecular aspect of odor detection about these insects. Furthermore, although lepidopteran species have been widely used in studies of insect olfaction, few work made comparison between sister moths on the olfactory recognition mechanisms. In this study, next-generation sequencing of the antennal transcriptome of these two moths were performed to identify the major olfactory genes. After comparing the antennal transcriptome of these two moths, we found that they exhibit highly similar transcripts-associated GO terms. Chemosensory gene families were further analyzed in both species. We identified 23 putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSP), two sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 33 odorant receptors (OR), and 10 ionotropic receptors (IR) in D. houi; and 27 putative OBPs, 17 CSPs, two SNMPs, 33 ORs, and nine IRs in D. kikuchii. All these transcripts were full-length or almost full-length. The predicted protein sequences were compared with orthologs in other species of Lepidoptera and model insects, including Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta, Heliothis virescens, Danaus plexippus, Sesamia inferens, Cydia pomonella, and Drosophila melanogaster. The sequence homologies of the orthologous genes in D. houi and D. kikuchii are very high. Furthermore, the olfactory genes were classed according to their expression level, and the highly expressed genes are our target for further function investigation. Interestingly, many highly expressed genes are ortholog gene of D. houi and D. kikuchii. We also found that the Classic OBPs were

  2. Antennal transcriptome analysis and comparison of olfactory genes in two sympatric defoliators, Dendrolimus houi and Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Hongbin; Kong, Xiangbo

    2014-09-01

    The Yunnan pine and Simao pine caterpillar moths, Dendrolimus houi Lajonquière and Dendrolimus kikuchii Matsumura (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), are two closely related and sympatric pests of coniferous forests in southwestern China, and olfactory communication systems of these two insects have received considerable attention because of their economic importance. However, there is little information on the molecular aspect of odor detection about these insects. Furthermore, although lepidopteran species have been widely used in studies of insect olfaction, few work made comparison between sister moths on the olfactory recognition mechanisms. In this study, next-generation sequencing of the antennal transcriptome of these two moths were performed to identify the major olfactory genes. After comparing the antennal transcriptome of these two moths, we found that they exhibit highly similar transcripts-associated GO terms. Chemosensory gene families were further analyzed in both species. We identified 23 putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSP), two sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 33 odorant receptors (OR), and 10 ionotropic receptors (IR) in D. houi; and 27 putative OBPs, 17 CSPs, two SNMPs, 33 ORs, and nine IRs in D. kikuchii. All these transcripts were full-length or almost full-length. The predicted protein sequences were compared with orthologs in other species of Lepidoptera and model insects, including Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta, Heliothis virescens, Danaus plexippus, Sesamia inferens, Cydia pomonella, and Drosophila melanogaster. The sequence homologies of the orthologous genes in D. houi and D. kikuchii are very high. Furthermore, the olfactory genes were classed according to their expression level, and the highly expressed genes are our target for further function investigation. Interestingly, many highly expressed genes are ortholog gene of D. houi and D. kikuchii. We also found that the Classic OBPs were

  3. Privatising an SIT programme: A conflict between business and technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A programme to suppress Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, using the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) has been in operation in South Africa since 1999. After a difficult start, the Hex River Valley SIT Pilot Project over 10,000 ha of table grapes has been regarded as a success. Two other fruit production areas have since joined the fruit fly SIT programme, and other areas are showing strong interest. There is wide acceptance in the fruit industry that SIT suppression, and more particularly the eventual development of fruit fly-free areas, are essential to remain competitive on the international fruit export market. In the meantime, pilot projects for two key fruit pests, codling moth (Cydia pomonella) and false codling moth (Cryptophlebia leucotreta), have recently started. Due to the reluctance of national or provincial Government to assume responsibility for the SIT programme, and in the absence of capital investment, economic realities ultimately compelled the fruit fly SIT programme to privatise its mass-rearing and release operations in 2003. SIT Africa (Pty) Ltd thereby became the first commercial medfly SIT company in the world, albeit a small one. This action, at a time when the existence of the entire SIT programme was seriously threatened, probably saved the programme from an early demise. However, economic forces associated with the successful management of a commercial business pose a risk to the long-term success and expansion of SIT in South Africa. Some of the dilemmas facing the commercialised programme include the following: - The need for the company to maximise sales of sterile flies in order to ensure a positive cashflow is potentially in conflict with, and at the expense of, what is best for the SIT technology - The deciduous fruit industry is in an economic crisis, making it difficult to persuade growers to adopt a new and little-known technology, that may initially be more expensive - Growers in different production areas

  4. Codling moth tans-hemisferic compatibility studies and effect of long-distance airfreighting on adult longevity and mating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The codling moth (CM), Cydia pomonella (L.), is the key pest in pome fruit orchards in South Africa. Approximately 50 % of the pome fruit production area in this country is under a combination of mating disruption and insecticides. Despite the increased use of mating disruption, this technology is not employed in a true area-wide fashion and results have been variable. Consequently producers still rely almost exclusively on an organophosphate programme to control CM. The negative impact of insecticides on the environment coupled with increasing global incidence of CM resistance has necessitated the development of more environmentally friendly products and sustainable control technologies against this pest. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) has been successfully applied against CM in British Columbia since 1992. The mass-rearing facility located in Osoyoos, BC produces between 14-16 million moths per week. Due to the seasonality of this pest, the facility in Canada is only fully utilised for part of the year. The time and expense of implementing SIT against CM in South Africa would be substantially reduced if CM produced in Canada were found to be fully compatible with South African CM. In addition, because the pome fruit-growing season in both countries is opposite, the programme in Canada would benefit by maintaining CM production year-round and selling the CM to South Africa to use in SIT. Studies were conducted in small cages in the laboratory and in an unsprayed apple orchard in October 2003 to examine the mating compatibility of CM from Canada and South Africa. In addition during 2004, four shipments of CM adults and pupae were made through normal airfreighting services and insects were assessed for their longevity and mating ability upon their arrival in South Africa. The results from the small cage study suggest that Canadian CM males were equally attracted to calling Canadian and South African CM females despite the fact that Canadian CM had had

  5. Transgenic approaches to a non-transgenic release of sterile male Lepidoptera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful implementation of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) against codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Tortricidae), in British Columbia, Canada, resulted in demands for the expansion of codling moth SIT and a related suppression strategy, radiation-induced inherited sterility (IS), in other countries. In the current SIT programme, both sterile males and females are released to control the pest population. There are compelling reasons to believe that both codling moth SIT and IS would benefit if efficient ways could be found to produce and release only males. Recently, a new scheme for genetic sexing in Lepidoptera has been proposed. The scheme is based on the construction of transgenic females carrying a dominant conditional lethal gene in the female-determining chromosome W. Following this scheme we intend to develop transgenic sexing strains in the codling moth. This requires basic knowledge of codling moth genome and appropriate molecular tools for codling moth transgenesis. We performed a detailed analysis of codling moth karyotype with a particular focus on the identification and characterization of sex chromosomes. Here we summarize our data on codling moth cytogenetics and discuss the potential of codling moth sex chromosomes for their use in developing transgenic sexing strains. The karyotype of codling moth consists of 2n=56 chromosomes, which can be classified into five groups according to their sizes: extra large (3 pairs), large (3 pairs), medium (15 pairs), small (5 pairs), and dot-like (2 pairs). Females are heterogametic with a W-Z sex chromosome pair, males are homogametic with two Z chromosomes. The W and Z chromosomes represent the two largest elements in female chromosome complements. While the Z is composed of euchromatin and resembles to autosomes, the W consists largely of heterochromatin. For successful development of transgenic sexing strains in the codling moth, it is required to insert a conditional dominant lethal mutation (a

  6. Downscaling climate change scenarios for apple pest and disease modeling in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hirschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of current and projected climate change in temperate regions of Europe, agricultural pests and diseases are expected to occur more frequently and possibly to extend to previously non-affected regions. Given their economic and ecological relevance, detailed forecasting tools for various pests and diseases have been developed, which model their phenology, depending on actual weather conditions, and suggest management decisions on that basis. Assessing the future risk of pest-related damages requires future weather data at high temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we use a combined stochastic weather generator and re-sampling procedure for producing site-specific hourly weather series representing present and future (1980–2009 and 2045–2074 time periods climate conditions in Switzerland. The climate change scenarios originate from the ENSEMBLES multi-model projections and provide probabilistic information on future regional changes in temperature and precipitation. Hourly weather series are produced by first generating daily weather data for these climate scenarios and then using a nearest neighbor re-sampling approach for creating realistic diurnal cycles. These hourly weather series are then used for modeling the impact of climate change on important life phases of the codling moth and on the number of predicted infection days of fire blight. Codling moth (Cydia pomonella and fire blight (Erwinia amylovora are two major pest and disease threats to apple, one of the most important commercial and rural crops across Europe. Results for the codling moth indicate a shift in the occurrence and duration of life phases relevant for pest control. In southern Switzerland, a 3rd generation per season occurs only very rarely under today's climate conditions but is projected to become normal in the 2045–2074 time period. While the potential risk for a 3rd generation is also significantly increasing in northern

  7. Downscaling climate change scenarios for apple pest and disease modeling in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hirschi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of current and projected climate change in temperate regions of Europe, agricultural pests and diseases are expected to occur more frequently and possibly to extend to previously not affected regions. Given their economic and ecological relevance, detailed forecasting tools for various pests and diseases have been developed, which model their phenology depending on actual weather conditions and suggest management decisions on that basis. Assessing the future risk of pest-related damages requires future weather data at high temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we use a combined stochastic weather generator and re-sampling procedure for producing site-specific hourly weather series representing present and future (1980–2009 and 2045–2074 time periods climate conditions in Switzerland. The climate change scenarios originate from the ENSEMBLES multi-model projections and provide probabilistic information on future regional changes in temperature and precipitation. Hourly weather series are produced by first generating daily weather data for these climate scenarios and then using a nearest neighbor re-sampling approach for creating realistic diurnal cycles. These hourly weather series are then used for modeling the impact of climate change on important life phases of the codling moth and on the number of predicted infection days of fire blight. Codling moth (Cydia pomonella and fire blight (Erwinia amylovora are two major pest and disease threats to apple, one of the most important commercial and rural crops across Europe. Results for the codling moth indicate a shift in the occurrence and duration of life phases relevant for pest control. In southern Switzerland, a 3rd generation per season occurs only very rarely under today's climate conditions but is projected to become normal in the 2045–2074 time period. While the potential risk for a 3rd generation is also significantly increasing in northern Switzerland

  8. Mortalidade do ácaro predador Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae em testes de toxicidade residual de inseticidas e acaricidas usuais em pomáceas Mortality of predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae in residual toxicity persistence tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Gustavo Ruiz

    2008-12-01

    . Azimphos-methyl foi o produto que menos afetou a sobrevivência do ácaro predador. Os inseticidas testados, usados na região do "Alto Valle del Río Negro y Neuquén" para o controle de Cydia pomonella, praga-chave das culturas de pomáceas, apresentaram baixa toxicidade sobre N. californicus.Phytoseiid mites, mainly Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, are important biological control agents of Tetranychidae pest mites in pip fruit crops in the region known as "Alto Valle del Río Negro y Neuquén", Argentina. We assessed the mortality of N. californicus when exposed to residues of the insecticides azimphos-methyl, carbaryl and cyfluthrin, as well as the acaricides cyhexatin and propargite. Pear plants were sprayed up to dip-point with pesticides in their recommended label concentrations. One, 3, 6 and 10 days after application (DAA, leaves were collected from treated plants and used to establish experimental arenas. Five adult laboratory-reared N. californicus specimens were transferred into each arena which contained Southern cattail pollen as food source. Experimental arenas were kept at 25 ± 2 ºC, 60 ± 10% RH and a photoperiod of 14 hours. Mite mortality was assessed 24 hours after the confinement. The completely randomized design was adopted for data statistical analysis, mortality means were compared by Dunnett's test (p < 0.05. Progression of pesticide's effect decline was submitted to regression analysis. On 1 and 3 DAA mean mortality in all of the treatments was significantly different from that of the water-treated control. On the sixth DAA, propargite, cyhexatin and cyfluthrin treatments caused about 30% mortality, while mortality levels in treatments with azimphos-methyl and carbaryl were statistically similar to that of control treatment. On the tenth DAA, mortality in none of the pesticide treatments differed from that of control. All of the pesticide treatments presented progressive decline throughout the experimental period, being significant (p < 0