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Sample records for carpi ulnaris firing

  1. Spontaneous Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Compartment Syndrome.

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    Stewart, Sarah K; Singleton, James A G

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of isolated compartment syndrome within the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) compartment in the forearm of a 40-year-old diabetic man. Magnetic resonance imaging of his forearm showed isolated changes in the ECU muscle belly; compartment syndrome was confirmed on manometry. In view of the short history of symptoms and his diabetic status, the patient was managed conservatively. Twenty-four hours after onset of the symptoms, the pain and swelling resolved and he was able to be discharged. To date, 3 cases of ECU compartment syndrome secondary to trauma have been reported. This report illustrates a case of confirmed compartment syndrome without antecedent trauma, highly unusual in terms of both its etiology and its anatomical location. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Flexor carpi ulnaris tenotomy alone does not eliminate its contribution to wrist torque

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    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J. C.; Kreulen, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle tenotomy and transfer to the extensor side of the wrist are common procedures used to improve wrist position and dexterity in patients with cerebral palsy. Our aim was to determine whether this muscle still influences wrist torque even after tenotomy of its distal tendon.

  3. Isolated Acute Exertional Compartment Syndrome (AECS) of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris.

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    Mika, Joerg; Brinkmann, Olaf; Clanton, Thomas O; Szalay, Gabor; Kinne, Raimund W

    2016-01-01

    Only two cases of an isolated compartment syndrome of the extensor carpi ulnaris have been described previously [1,2]. In both cases, the onset was acute. In the first case, histological examination revealed no necrosis. The second case was regarded to be due to a previously unknown anatomic variation and no necrotic tissue was recognized upon gross examination. This case report describes a third case of an isolated acute exertional compartment syndrome (AECS) of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle with focal areas of necrotic tissue. We report the third case of an isolated AECS of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle. A 35 year-old left-handed man, a motor mechanic by profession, presented to the emergency department with excruciating pain at the ulnar side of the left dorsal forearm. The previous day, he had repetitively used a sliding hammer with his left arm. Since then he had experienced severe pain despite the use of over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here, in contrast to the previously reported cases, the histological examination revealed focal areas of necrotic tissue. No anatomic variations were found during surgical decompression. Postoperatively, the patient had complete pain relief and return of function. This report again indicates that the extensor carpi ulnaris is especially prone to develop the AECS syndrome and raises the question whether involvement of the other extensor muscles may rather be secondary to the excessive swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris and not to strenuous exercise. This should be taken into consideration when humans load their forearm repeatedly during heavy labor or sports. In addition, we are showing that even with histologically confirmed areas of partial muscle necrosis the patient can return to normal muscle function.

  4. Avulsion Fracture of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Due to Roller Injury

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    Ching-Yin Lee

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion fractures of the radial wrist extensor from the metacarpal base are rare injuries, and have previously been reported in only a few papers. Although 2 cases of closed rupture of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU were mentioned in 1 report, no case of avulsion fracture of the ECU from its insertion was found in the literature. We recently encountered such a case. The patient, a machine operator, suffered multiple fractures of his forearm, wrist and hand when his left hand was caught in a machine roller. He immediately underwent emergency operation, during which we found the avulsed bone fragment from the ECU insertion. This fragment was retracted to the ECU groove of the ulna, and was located beside the fracture fragment of the ulnar styloid on X-ray. The avulsed fragment was reattached to the base of the fifth metacarpal with Kirschner wires and wire loop, and the patient returned to work 4 months after the operation.

  5. The extensor carpi ulnaris pseudolesion: evaluation with microCT, histology, and MRI

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    Ali, Sayed; Cunningham, Ryan; Mohamed, Feroze [Temple University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Amin, Mamta; Popoff, Steven N.; Barbe, Mary F. [Temple University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To determine if magic angle plays a role in apparent central increased signal intensity of the distal extensor carpi ulnaris tendon (ECU) on MRI, to see if histologic findings of tendon degeneration are associated with increased T1 or T2 tendon signal on MR imaging, and to determine the prevalence of the ECU ''pseudolesion''. A standard 3 Tesla protocol was utilized to scan ten cadaveric wrists. A 40 mm length of 10 ECU and four extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendons were immersion fixed before microCT scanning. Staining with Alcian blue, Masson's trichrome and Safranin O was performed before light microscopy. Fifty clinical wrist MRIs were also reviewed for the presence of increased T1 and/or T2 signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal was observed in 9 of 10 cadaveric ECU tendons, but not in ECRB tendons. MicroCT and histology showed inter-tendinous matrix between the two distal heads of the ECU. Increased mucoid degeneration correlated with increased MRI signal intensity. The tendon fibers were at a maximum of 8.39 to the longitudinal axis on microCT. Clinical MRIs showed increased T1 signal in 6 %, increased T2 signal in 8 %, increased T1 and T2 signal in 80 %, and 6 % showing no increased signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal in the ECU tendon indicates the presence of normal inter-tendinous ground substance, with increased proteoglycan content (mucoid degeneration) responsible for increased signal intensity. None of the fibers were shown on microCT to approach the magic angle. (orig.)

  6. Single tendon transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris for high radial nerve injury.

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    Sankaran, Ajeesh; Thora, Ankit; Arora, Sumit; Dhal, Anil

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome after single tendon transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) to the digital extensors for high radial nerve palsy. Records of 10 patients aged 16 to 43 (median, 27) years who underwent single tendon transfer of the FCU to the digital extensors for high radial nerve palsy secondary to closed (n=4) or open (n=4) diaphyseal humeral fractures or deltoid injection (n=2) were reviewed. Two of the patients with open fractures also underwent treatment for non-union in a staged manner. Grip strength (power grip and precision grip) was measured monthly using an automated dynamometer. The range of motion of the wrist, and metacarpophalangeal joints of the thumb and fingers was measured monthly using a goniometer. All patients were followed up for at least one year. Preoperatively, the overall power grip strength of the injured hands was about 1/5 of the normal hands. At 12 months, the mean improvement was 202.5% for overall power grip strength and 43% to 57% for precision grip strength parameters. Compared with the normal hands, the mean deficit of the operated hands was 39% for overall power grip strength and 32% to 37% for precision grip strength parameters. At 12 months, mean wrist extension was 50.4º, with about 10º lag in finger and thumb extension. The mean total active motion was 86.7º in the operated wrists and 128.1º in normal wrists. The decrease in wrist flexion and ulnar deviation was 7.8º and 6.8º, respectively. Single tendon transfer of the FCU is a viable option to restore hand function and strength following high radial nerve injuries.

  7. Anatomical study of the musculus deltoideus and musculus flexor carpi ulnaris in 3 species of wild birds.

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    Canova, Marco; Bedoni, Carla; Harper, Valeria; Rambaldi, Anna Maria; Bombardi, Cristiano; Grandis, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Given the limited information regarding the anatomy of the thoracic limb in European avian species, we decided to investigate the related muscles in the grey heron (Ardea cinerea), in the eurasian buzzard (Buteo buteo), and in the common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus). Therefore we performed a stratigraphic dissection of the wing in 3 subjects. The pars major and minor of the musculus deltoideus, despite being roughly in line with those reported by other authors in other species, displayed unique features. Concerning the pars propatagialis of the musculus deltoideus, from what was observed in the grey heron, we believe this structure can contribute to maintain the propatagial tension. In this way vibrations of this structure, which could cause diminished lift, are avoided. Moreover the peculiarity evidenced in the distal insertion of the common kestrel could influence the control of the pronation-supination of the wing during hovering. With respect to the musculus flexor carpi ulnaris, we believe the presence of a sesamoid-like structure at the base tendon, found in the grey heron and in the eurasian buzzard, may help complete the articular surfaces of the elbow. This study shows interesting data on species not previously examined and provides a possible functional correlation between the peculiarity observed and the kind of flight of each species.

  8. A RARE CASE OF BILATERAL FLEXOR CARPI ULNARIS VARIATION: ANATOMICAL AND CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS AND LITERATURE REVIEW. Un caso raro de variación bilateral del músculo flexor carpi ulnaris-significado anatómico y clínico y revisión literaria

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    Alexandar Iliev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Various aberrant muscles and fibro-tendinous structures have been identified in the anterior wrist, some of them blamed to be possible causes for neurovascular compression syndromes. Herewith, we describe such an intriguing structure related to the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle. During routine dissection of both upper limbs of an adult cadaver, an interesting crescent-shaped fibro-tendinous structure was identified bilaterally, arising broadly from the lateral side of the distal tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris. This aberrant structure arched over the ulnar artery and nerve before they enter the canal of Guyon and the median nerve just before the carpal tunnel. Further distally, the fibro-tendinous arch narrowed and interlaced with the flexor retinaculum and palmar aponeurosis longitudinal fibres. In this case there was also concomitant bilateral absence of the palmaris longus muscle. Because this aberrant fibro-tendinous arch has very close relations to the median nerve and ulnar nerve and artery in the wrist, it may possibly cause neurovascular compression during some muscle activity.Varios músculos y estructuras fibro-tendinosas aberrantes se han identificado en la parte anterior de la muñeca, muchas de las cuales se considera que pueden causar síndromes de compresión neurovascular. A continuación describimos una tal estructura relacionada con el músculo flexor carpi ulnaris. Durante disecciones de rutina de ambos miembros superiores de cadáveres de adultos fue descubierta una estructura fibro-tendinosa con forma de medialuna en ambos miembros originando de la parte lateral del tendón distal del flexor carpi ulnaris. Esta estructura formaba un arco pasando sobre y cubriendo la arteria y el nervio ulnar antes de que entren en el canal de Guyon, y sobre el nervio mediano justo antes de que entre en el canal carpal. Este arco fibro-tendinoso seguía estrechándose hasta entrelazarse con el ligamento transverso del carpo y las fibras

  9. Athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris subsheath: MRI findings and utility of gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination

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    Jeantroux, Jeremy; Guerini, Henri; Drape, Jean-Luc [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); Becce, Fabio [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); University of Lausanne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Montalvan, Bernard [French Tennis Federation, Paris (France); Viet, Dominique Le [Hand Institute, Clinique Jouvenet, Paris (France)

    2011-01-15

    To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, assessing the utility of gadolinium-enhanced (Gd) fat-saturated (FS) T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Sixteen patients (13 male, three female; mean age 30.3 years) with athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath sustained between January 2003 and June 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Initial and follow-up 1.5-T wrist MRIs were performed with transverse T1-weighted and STIR sequences in pronation, and Gd FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Two radiologists assessed the type of injury (A to C), ECU tendon stability, associated lesions and rated pulse sequences using a three-point scale: 1 = poor, 2 = good and 3 = excellent. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted transverse sequences in supination (2.63) and pronation (2.56) were most valuable, compared with STIR (2.19) and T1-weighted (1.94). Nine type A, one type B and six type C injuries were found. There were trends towards diminution in size, signal intensity and enhancement of associated pouches on follow-up MRI and tendon stabilisation within the ulnar groove. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination are most valuable in assessing and follow-up athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath on 1.5-T MRI. (orig.)

  10. Pressure and tendon strain in the sixth extensor compartment of the wrist during simulated provocative maneuvers for diagnosing extensor carpi ulnaris tendinitis.

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    Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Moritomo, Hisao; Omori, Shinsuke; Iida, Akio; Omokawa, Shohei; Suzuki, Daisuke; Fujimiya, Mineko; Wada, Takuro; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-11-01

    Various provocative maneuvers for diagnosing extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendinitis have been reported; however, it remains unclear which maneuver is the most sensitive to detect ECU tendinitis. To clarify this, we investigated and compared the extratendinous pressure and ECU tendon strain in the sixth extensor compartment of the wrist during various provocative maneuvers for diagnosing ECU tendinitis. Nine upper extremities from nine fresh-frozen cadavers were examined. We investigated extratendinous pressure in the ECU fibro-osseous tunnel of the distal ulna and ECU tendon strain during eight forearm positions-neutral rotation, pronation, supination, pronation with wrist flexion, supination with wrist flexion, supination with wrist extension, both hand and forearm supination, and supination with ECU full loading-to simulate provocative maneuvers reported to detect ECU tendinitis. Pressure was significantly higher during both hand and forearm supination (carpal supination test) and during supination with wrist extension (prayer's hand supination test) than during neutral rotation. The pressure during the carpal supination test was 3 times higher than that during the prayer's hand supination test and 27 times higher than that during the neutral position. Strain was significantly higher during the carpal supination test and during supination with ECU full loading (the ECU synergy test) than during other maneuvers. Both pressure and tendon strain increased most notably during the carpal supination test compared to the other maneuvers, which suggests that the carpal supination test is the most sensitive for the detection of ECU tendinitis.

  11. Stabilization of the Proximal Ulnar Stump after the Darrach or Sauvé-Kapandji Procedure by Using the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendon

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    Chu, Po-Jung; Lee, Hung-Maan; Hung, Sheng-Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The Darrach and Sauvé-Kapandji procedures are considered to be useful treatment options for distal radioulnar joint disorders. Postoperative instability of the proximal ulnar stump and radioulnar convergence, however, may cause further symptoms. From October 1999 to May 2002, a total of 19 wrists in 15 men and four women, with an average age of 48.3 years, were treated by stabilizing the proximal ulnar stump with a half-slip of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon using modified Darrach and Sauvé-Kapandji procedures. The average follow-up period was 77 months (range, 62 to 91 months). No patient complained of symptoms due to instability of the proximal ulnar stump. Grip strength improved in all wrists after surgery. Postoperative X-rays, including loading X-rays, showed improved alignment in both coronal and lateral planes. We concluded that stabilization of the proximal ulnar stump with ECU tenodesis is an effective procedure for treating distal radioulnar joint disorder after the Darrach and Sauvé-Kapandji procedures. PMID:18780014

  12. Deoxygenation and the blood volume signals in the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles obtained during the execution of the Mirallas's test of judo athletes

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    Verdaguer-Codina, Joan; Mirallas, Jaume A.

    1996-12-01

    The technique of execution of any movement in Judo is extremely important. The coaches want tests and tools easy to use and cheaper, to evaluate the progress of a judoist in the tatame. In this paper we present a test developed by Mirallas, which has his name 'Test of Mirallas' to evaluate the maximal power capacity of the judoist. The near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals were obtained to have a measurement of the metabolic work of the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles, during the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement, allowing this measurement to assess by NIRS the maximal oxygen uptake. Also obtained were tympanic, skin forehead, and biceps brachii temperatures during the test time and recovery phase to study the effects of ambient conditions and the post-exercise oxygen consumption. The deoxygenation and blood volume signals obtained gave different results, demonstrating the hypothesis of the coaches that some judoist do the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement correctly and the rest didn't. The heart rate frequency obtained in the group of judoist was between 190-207 bpm, and in the minute five of post-exercise was 114-137 bpm; the time employed in the MIrallas's test were from 7 feet 14 inches to 13 feet 49 inches, and the total of movements were from 199 to 409. The data obtained in the skin forehead, and skin biceps brachii confirms previous works that the oxygen consumption remains after exercise in the muscle studied. According to the results, the test developed by Mirallas is a good tool to evaluate the performance of judoist any time, giving better results compared with standard tests.

  13. Menofilo e i Carpi

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    Barbara SCARDIGLI

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: En el presente artículo la autora aborda las complejas relaciones existentes entre el gobernador romano de MesiaTullio Menofilo y el pueblo de los Carpos, a través del análisis del texto griego que trata la noticia, abordando también la propia transmisión de dicha información.ABSTRACT: In this author focuses on the complex relationships existing between the Roman governor of Messia. Tullius Monophilus, and the Carpi, by analyzing the Greek text that deals with the information.The transmission of this information is also analyzed.

  14. Berengario da Carpi.

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    De Santo, N G; Bisaccia, C; De Santo, L S; De Santo, R M; Di Leo, V A; Papalia, T; Cirillo, M; Touwaide, A

    1999-01-01

    Berengario da Carpi was magister of anatomy and surgery at the University of Bologna from 1502 to 1527. Eustachio and Falloppia defined him as 'the restaurator of anatomy'. He was a great surgeon, anatomist and physician of illustrious patients including Lorenzo II dei Medici, Giovanni dalle Bande Nere, Galeazzo Pallavicini, Cardinal Colonna, and Alessandro Soderini. He had strong links to the intellectuals of his time (Forni, Bonamici, Manuzio, Pomponazzi) as well as with the Medici family. He was respected by the Popes Julius II, Leo X and Clement VII. His main contributions are the Isogogae Breves, De Fractura calvae sive cranei, and the illustrated Commentaria on the Anatomy of Mondino de Liucci, a textbook utilized for more than 200 years, which Berengario aimed to restore to its initial text. The Commentaria constitutes the material for the last part of this paper which concludes with a personal translation of some passages on 'The kidney', where the author gives poignant examples of experimental ingenuity.

  15. The triceps–flexor carpi ulnaris (TRIFCU) approach to the elbow

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    Deakin, DE; Deshmukh, SC

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intra-articular fractures of the distal humerus frequently require internal fixation. Several approaches have been described, with the posterior approaches being most common. We present a new approach to the distal humerus via the lateral border of the triceps muscle. PATIENTS AND METHODS The senior author has used this technique for fixation of intra-articular fractures of the distal humerus in 12 patients. RESULTS The approach is equally useful for intra- and extra-articular fractures. No cases of postoperative ulna nerve neuropraxia have been encountered. There have been no postoperative wound complications. The exposure has allowed sufficient access to allow anatomically contoured plates to be easily applied to both sides of the distal humerus with confirmation of intra-articular fracture reduction. CONCLUSIONS The approach has the advantages of leaving the muscular bed of the ulna nerve undisturbed, whilst still providing excellent exposure of the distal humerus. The triceps mechanism is not divided or split allowing rapid recovery of extensor function. Additionally, because of the natural carrying angle of the elbow, repositioning of the reflected triceps aponeurosis is easy. PMID:20412674

  16. Case study of Berengario da Carpi and Lorenzo de' Medici.

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    Lippi, D

    2017-09-01

    Jacopo Berengario da Carpi (c.1460-c.1530) made several important advances in anatomy, being universally considered the founder of 'animated anatomy' (anatomia animata). In addition to being a famous anatomist, Berengario was also a highly regarded surgeon. One of his famous clients was Lorenzo de' Medici, Duke of Urbino (1492-1519). In 1517, Lorenzo suffered a skull injury from an harquebus shot and Berengario was asked to come to his bedside. Lorenzo's case gave Berengario the opportunity to write his Tractatus de Fractura Calve sive Cranei, published in Bologna by Gerolamo Benedetti in 1518. Berengario addressed his treatise to Lorenzo himself. This illustrated monograph was the most original neurosurgical treatise at that time, as Berengario was able to cite both from contemporary information and from his own direct observation all possible kinds of skull fracture, including the relationship between the site of the lesions and the resulting neurological effects. At the end of the book, Berengario explained and illustrated the surgical equipment to be used in each case, depicting a drill previously unseen in a medical volume and providing the recipe for a human dressing, a kind of poultice made of mummified human remins, to be applied regularly to wounds. Lorenzo de' Medici died in 1519 and was buried in the Church of San Lorenzo in Florence. His corpse was exhumed in 1875 and 1947. The casts of his skull made on those occasions are now preserved in the museums of Florence University, and clearly show evidence of the wound. Read more about the stories behind this masterpiece in an essay online. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Prechannel Entrapment of the Ulnary Nerve by an Intermuscular Arcade: The Importance of Ultrasonographic Neurography in the Demonstrating of Compression Site

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    Cengiz Cokluk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Ultrasonographic neurography is a described method in the cases with peripheral nerve injury and entrapment. The usual entrapment of the peripheral nerves had been described previously.  Material and Method: In this report it was presented the unusual entrapment of the ulnar nerve and the neurographic findings in an illustrative case. The case was admitted to our neurosurgery department with the symptoms of ulnar nerve entrapment. Results:  Electrophisiologic examination revealed that ulnary nerve entrapment before entering ulnary nerve canal. We examined the patient by using ultrasound assisted neurographic examination before operation. Ultrasonographic neurography demonstrated ulnary nerve compression 5 cm proximal portion from its entrance into the ulnary nerve canal. The patient was operated. Operative findings were similar with those of ultrasonographic neurography. Discussion: In this report we present clinical and operative findings of this case including the role of ultrasonographic neurography in the demonstrating these type of pathologies in the clinical practice.

  18. Evaluation of cranial tibial and extensor carpi radialis reflexes before and after anesthetic block in cats.

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    Tudury, Eduardo Alberto; de Figueiredo, Marcella Luiz; Fernandes, Thaiza Helena Tavares; Araújo, Bruno Martins; Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; Diogo, Camila Cardoso; Silva, Amanda Camilo; Santos, Cássia Regina Oliveira; Rocha, Nadyne Lorrayne Farias Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Objectives This study aimed to test the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats before and after anesthetic block of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus, respectively, to determine whether they depend on a myotatic reflex arc. Methods Fifty-five cats with a normal neurologic examination that were referred for elective gonadectomy were divided into group 1 (29 cats) for testing the extensor carpi radialis reflex, and group 2 (26 cats) for testing the cranial tibial reflex. In group 1, the extensor carpi radialis reflex was tested after anesthetic induction and 15 mins after brachial plexus block with lidocaine. In group 2, the cranial tibial, withdrawal and patellar reflexes were elicited in 52 hindlimbs and retested 15 mins after epidural anesthesia. Results In group 1, before the anesthetic block, 55.17% of the cats had a decreased and 44.83% had a normal extensor carpi radialis reflex. After the block, 68.96% showed a decreased and 27.59% a normal reflex. No cat had an increased or absent reflex before anesthetic block. In group 2, prior to the anesthetic block, 15.38% of the cats had a decreased cranial tibial reflex and 84.62% had a normal response, whereas after the block it was decreased in 26.92% and normal in 73.08% of the cats. None of the cats had an increased or absent reflex. Regarding the presence of both reflexes before and after anesthetic block, there was no significant difference at 1% ( P = 0.013). Conclusions and relevance The extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats are not strictly myotatic reflexes, as they are independent of the reflex arc, and may be idiomuscular responses. Therefore, they are not reliable for neurologic examination in this species.

  19. Enthesopathy of the Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis Origin: Effective Communication Strategies.

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    Drake, Matthew L; Ring, David C

    2016-06-01

    Enthesopathy of the extensor carpi radialis brevis origin, generally known as tennis elbow, is a common condition arising in middle-aged persons. The diagnosis is typically clear based on the patient interview and physical examination alone; therefore, imaging and other diagnostic tests are usually unnecessary. The natural history of the disorder is spontaneous resolution, but it can last for >1 year. The patient's attitude and circumstances, including stress, distress, and ineffective coping strategies, determine the intensity of the pain and the magnitude of the disability. Despite the best efforts of medical science, no treatments, invasive or noninvasive, have been proven to alter the natural history of the condition. Given the lack of disease-modifying treatments for enthesopathy of the extensor carpi radialis brevis origin, orthopaedic surgeons can benefit from learning effective communication strategies to help convey accurate information that is hopeful and enabling.

  20. High incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis after trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for basal joint arthritis.

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    Low, T H; Hales, P F

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis in 77 patients (81 thumbs) who had trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis. Eighteen patients, 20 wrists (25%) had flexor carpi radialis tendinitis. The onset was 2-10 months (mean 4.7) after surgery. Two cases had preceding trauma. Eight cases (40%) responded to splinting and steroid injection. Ten patients, 12 wrists (60%) underwent surgery after failing non-operative treatment. Eleven wrists had frayed or partially torn flexor carpi radialis tendon and one had a complete tendon rupture with pseudotendon formation. Flexor carpi radialis tenotomy and pseudotendon excision were performed. All operated patients obtained good pain relief initially post-operatively. However, the pain recurred in two patients after 8 months. One required a local steroid injection for localized tenderness at the site of the proximal tendon stump. The other patient required a revision operation for scaphotrapezoid impingement. Both obtained complete pain relief. Our study has shown a high incidence of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis following trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty. Patients should be warned about this potential complication. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Treatise on skull fractures by Berengario da Carpi (1460-1530).

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    Mazzola, Riccardo F; Mazzola, Isabella C

    2009-11-01

    Jacopo Berengario was born in Carpi, a medieval city close to Modena (northern Italy), circa 1460. He studied medicine at Bologna University and, in 1489, graduated in philosophy and medicine. He was appointed lecturer in anatomy and surgery at the same university, a position that he maintained for 24 years. Between 1514 and 1523, Berengario published some important anatomic and surgical works, which gave considerable fame to him.Commentaria... supra Anatomiam Mundini (Commentary... on the Anatomy of Mondino), published in 1521, constitutes the first example of an illustrated anatomic textbook ever printed. The anatomic illustrations were intended for explaining the text. Artistically speaking, the plates are typical examples of the Renaissance period and worthy of the greatest consideration.De Fractura Calvae sive Cranei (On Fracture of the Calvaria or Cranium), published in Bologna in 1518, is the first treatise devoted to head injuries ever printed. It is a landmark in the development of cranial surgery that went through numerous editions. The text was prepared in 2 months and dedicated to Lorenzo de' Medici, Duke of Urbino, who experienced a skull injury in the occipital region. Berengario wanted to demonstrate to other physicians his knowledge of anatomy and his expertise on the brain and head traumas. The book includes the illustration of an entire surgical kit or a corpus instrumentorum for performing cranial operations, which appeared for the first time in a printed book. However, Berengario's highly commendable aim was to indicate to the reader the step-by-step procedure of craniotomy for management of skull fractures along with the sequential use of the previously presented instruments.

  2. Anatomía arterial de los colgajos musculares de extensor carpi radialis longus y extensor carpi radialis brevis para su uso en transferencia muscular funcional libre Arterial anatomy of the extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle flaps related to its use in free functioning muscle transfer

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    A. Rodríguez Lorenzo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es documentar el aporte arterial y el patrón vascular intramuscular de los músculos Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus (ECRL y Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis (ECRB para analizar su utilización como colgajos libres en transferencia muscular funcional para reanimación facial. Realizamos un estudio anatómico en 29 brazos humanos en fresco. Las técnicas de inyección utilizadas fueron la modificada de oxido de plomo y gelatina en 11 cadáveres y la de inyección pulsátil de látex color en 18. Disecamos los músculos ECRL y ECRB y sus pedículos, los fotodocumentamos y radiografiamos valorando los resultados en función del patrón vascular intramuscular, relaciones anatómicas, calibres y longitud de pedículos. Encontramos dos patrones vasculares diferentes en las 29 disecciones siguiendo la clasificación de Mathes y Nahai de la anatomía vascular de los músculos (en función del número de pedículos vasculares y su dominancia: Tipo I( 37,9% ECRL y 20,7% ECRB y Tipo II(62,1% del ECRL y 79,3% del ECRB. El pedículo principal del ECRL (de diámetro medio 1,73 mm y longitud de pedículo media de 32,32 mm es en el 100% de los casos rama de la arteria recurrente radial y el pedículo principal del ECRB (de diámetro medio 1,11 mm y longitud de pedículo media de 27,77 mm es rama de la arteria radial en el 68,9% de los casos y de la arteria recurrente radial en el 31,1% de los casos. Concluimos que El ECRL y ECRB presentan dos tipos de patrones vasculares: tipo I y tipo II, siendo más frecuente en nuestro trabajo el tipo II, que hacen que ambos puedan ser transferidos como colgajos libres por su pedículo principal. Ambos músculos presentan un tamaño, contorno, contenido fascial importante para el anclaje de suturas y una longitud de pedículo y calibre vascular adecuados para su transferencia microvascular libre en reanimación facial. De los dos, el más realizable como colgajo libre es el ECRB ya que la relaci

  3. The effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the Musculus brachiocephalicus and the Musculus extensor carpi radialis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Antonia; Bockstahler, Barbara; Peham, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. 19 horses and ponies of different breeds (body weight: 496±117 kg), gender (8 mares, 10 geldings and 3 stallions) and ages (14.9±6.9 years old) were analysed without Kinesio Tape ("no tape"), with Kinesio Tape (muscle facilitation application on both muscles of both sides, "with tape") and immediately after Kinesio Taping ("post tape") through kinematic motion analysis and surface electromyography on a treadmill at the walk (speed: 1.5±0.1 m/s) and trot (speed: 3.1±0.3 m/s). The results of the surface electromyography (maximum muscle activity at the walk and trot) and the kinematic motion analysis (maximum stride length and maximum height of the forelimbs flight arc at the walk and trot) showed that there were no significant differences between "no tape", "with tape" and "post tape". To sum up, Kinesio Taping on the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis does not affect (in a positive or negative manner) the trajectory of the forelimb or the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses.

  4. The effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the Musculus brachiocephalicus and the Musculus extensor carpi radialis in horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Zellner

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. 19 horses and ponies of different breeds (body weight: 496±117 kg, gender (8 mares, 10 geldings and 3 stallions and ages (14.9±6.9 years old were analysed without Kinesio Tape ("no tape", with Kinesio Tape (muscle facilitation application on both muscles of both sides, "with tape" and immediately after Kinesio Taping ("post tape" through kinematic motion analysis and surface electromyography on a treadmill at the walk (speed: 1.5±0.1 m/s and trot (speed: 3.1±0.3 m/s.The results of the surface electromyography (maximum muscle activity at the walk and trot and the kinematic motion analysis (maximum stride length and maximum height of the forelimbs flight arc at the walk and trot showed that there were no significant differences between "no tape", "with tape" and "post tape".To sum up, Kinesio Taping on the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis does not affect (in a positive or negative manner the trajectory of the forelimb or the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses.

  5. The effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the Musculus brachiocephalicus and the Musculus extensor carpi radialis in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Antonia; Bockstahler, Barbara; Peham, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background information The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. 19 horses and ponies of different breeds (body weight: 496±117 kg), gender (8 mares, 10 geldings and 3 stallions) and ages (14.9±6.9 years old) were analysed without Kinesio Tape (“no tape”), with Kinesio Tape (muscle facilitation application on both muscles of both sides, “with tape”) and immediately after Kinesio Taping (“post tape”) through kinematic motion analysis and surface electromyography on a treadmill at the walk (speed: 1.5±0.1 m/s) and trot (speed: 3.1±0.3 m/s). Results The results of the surface electromyography (maximum muscle activity at the walk and trot) and the kinematic motion analysis (maximum stride length and maximum height of the forelimbs flight arc at the walk and trot) showed that there were no significant differences between "no tape", "with tape" and "post tape". Conclusion To sum up, Kinesio Taping on the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis does not affect (in a positive or negative manner) the trajectory of the forelimb or the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. PMID:29166657

  6. Clinical and radiographic changes of carpi, tarsi and interphalangeal joints of beef zebu bulls on semen collection regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Motta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis and osteochondrosis are highly correlated to reproductive failure in bulls. This study aimed to evaluate the carpal, tarsal and interphalangeal lesions in beef zebu bulls on semen collection regimen. Twenty-one beef cattle bulls, in a total of forty-one animals, were split into three age-based groups: animals from two to four years old (GI, from more than four to eight years old (GII and above eight years old (GIII. The clinical findings were conformational changes of limbs, synovial effusion, peripheral venous engorgement of joints and prolonged decubitus. The total population showed moderate clinical manifestation and radiographic score. The GIII presented more severe joint lesions. Carpi and tarsi regions had discrete to difuse osteophytosis, subchondral cysts, cartilaginous flaps, bone incongruence and fragmentation, osteitis, and ankylosis. Interphalangeal joints presented osteophytosis, distal phalanx osteitis and enthesophytosis. The digital radiographic examination allowed full identification of articular lesions and their clinical correspondences, besides the positive correlation between age, body weight and radiographic score.

  7. Radial forearm flap plus Flexor Carpi Radialis tendon in Achilles tendon reconstruction: Surgical technique, functional results, and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Marco; Tani, Massimiliano; Carulli, Christian; Ghezzi, Serena; Raspanti, Andrea; Menichini, Giulio

    2015-11-01

    Wound dehiscence, infection, and necrosis of tendon and overlying skin are severe complications after open repairs of Achilles tendon. A simultaneous reconstruction should be provided in a single stage operation. We evaluated the outcomes of one of the possible options: the radial forearm free flap with Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) tendon. Between 2006 and 2014, six patients affected by infection and necrosis after Achilles tendon open repair underwent multi-tissutal reconstruction by a composite radial forearm free flap including a vascularized FCR tendon. The mean skin and tendon defect was respectively 9.8 cm × 4.7 cm and 6.5 cm. After reconstruction, patients underwent clinical examination, including the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) questionnaire, DASH score, MRI study, and a computer-assisted gait analysis. All flaps survived and no complications were recorded. Full weightbearing was allowed within 2 months after surgery. The mean follow-up was 36.2 months (range 12-96). MRI showed an optimal reconstruction of the tendon. Range of motion was minimally reduced if compared to the contralateral side. Gait analysis showed the recovery of a nearly symmetrical stance phase, time to heel off, and step length of the gate. ATRS and DASH score improved to a mean value of 85.2 (range 83-88) and 8.0 (range 3-15) respectively. This procedure provided an anatomical reconstruction of the Achilles tendon and skin achieving good and objective functional results; donor site morbidity was limited to the sacrifice of the radial artery, which, in our opinion, is a minor drawback if compared to the quality of the results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Tendon transfer to restore the extension of the thumb using the extensor carpi radialis brevis: A long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shusen; Yang, Guang; Li, Qiang; Wu, Guangzhi; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Ju; Yu, Wei

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the long-term functional and clinical outcomes of a tendon transfer to restore the extension of the thumb using the extensor carpi radialis brevis. From June 2005 to September 2012, eight patients (six males; two females) with a mean age of 30 years (range, 16-52 years) who suffered rupture or division of extensor pollicis longus underwent a tendon transfer to restore the extension of the thumb using the extensor carpi radialis brevis. The range of motion, pinch, and grip strength of thumb were compared with the nonoperated hand and evaluated for all the study patients using the Geldmacher scoring system. At an average follow-up of 56 months, all eight patients could extend their thumbs fully and were assessed as good or excellent according to the Geldmacher scoring system. Average grip and tip pinch strengths of the operated hand were 95% (34.9 kg ± 14.0 kg vs. 36.6 kg ± 14.6 kg) and 92% (9.2 kg ± 4.8 kg vs. 9.9 kg ± 4.7 kg) of the nonoperative side, respectively. There was no marked loss of extension motion or strength of the wrist nor any other postoperative complications. The procedure of transferring the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon to the extensor pollicis longus provides excellent long-term clinical results for restoring the extension of the thumb. The procedure is safe, with few complications, and it can be an alternate procedure of restoring the extension of the thumb. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fire History

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2002. Some fires...

  10. Fire Perimeters

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2003. Some fires...

  11. Fire safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    1999-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Since basic data on fire behavior of wood products...

  12. Fire water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorpe, K. [Lawrence Webster Forrest Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2001-01-01

    The article focuses on the value of water in fighting fires and discusses why refineries should identify water supply and distribution in contingency planning against fire. In the event of a fire, water will be required for (i) extinguishing the fire; (ii) protection of equipment and (iii) confinement of the fire. The thought process for identifying the water demand in the event of a fire is outlined. Tables give data on (a) water rates for cooling storage tanks; (b) water rates for cooling process units (c) guide to water requirements for various sizes of process units and (d) pumping requirements.

  13. Tendon transfer for the restoration of thumb opposition: the effects of friction and pulley location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duymaz, Ahmet; Karabekmez, Furkan E; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Moran, Steven L

    2013-09-01

    The authors compared the gliding resistance among three commonly used pulley sites used for oppositional transfers. Eight fresh-frozen cadaver forearms were studied. The ring finger's flexor digitorum superficialis was used as a donor tendon in all specimens. An oppositional transfer was created to the thumb using three pulley sites: the Royle-Thompson, the Guyon canal, and the flexor carpi ulnaris tendon loop pulleys. The flexor digitorum superficialis was inserted into the palmar radial portion of the abductor pollicis brevis in all cases. Gliding resistance was then measured and compared. Final thumb position was measured to assess the amount of thumb palmar abduction and opposition created with each pulley configuration. The average gliding resistance of tendons passed within the Royle-Thompson, Guyon canal, and flexor carpi ulnaris loop pulley were 1.27, 0.58, and 0.44 N, respectively. Gliding resistance for the Royle-Thompson pulley was found to be significantly higher than that for the Guyon canal or flexor carpi ulnaris loop pulley (p pulleys with regard to gliding resistance. The flexor carpi ulnaris loop pulley produced the greatest amount of palmar abduction (p pulleys produced the greatest amount of thumb opposition. The Guyon canal and flexor carpi ulnaris loop pulleys produced lower friction than the Royle-Thompson pulley. The Guyon canal pulley produced greater thumb opposition compared with the flexor carpi ulnaris loop pulley and represents an ideal pulley site for restoration of thumb opposition.

  14. Colour, composition and quality of M. longissimus dorsi and M. extensor carpi radialis of steers housed on straw or concrete slats or accommodated outdoors on wood-chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, P G; Rogalski, J; Moreno, T; Monahan, F J; French, P; Moloney, A P

    2008-08-01

    Forty-five Charolais crossbred steers were offered a common diet and accommodated either outside on wood-chips (OWP, 18m(2)/head) or in a naturally-ventilated building in slatted-floor pens (SLA, 2.5m(2)/500kg bodyweight) or in straw-bedded pens (STR, 4m(2)/head) for 132 days. Carcass weight averaged 351, 362, and 372 (sed 6.63)kg (P<0.05), for SLA, STR and OWP, respectively. Accommodation system did not affect the colour, drip loss, shear force or composition of Musculus longissimus dorsi (LD) or Musculus extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles or the sensory characteristics of LD. The ultimate pH of ECR was highest (P<0.05) for OWP steers, while their LD was darker at 2 days post-mortem than LD from STR steers. It is concluded that accommodating cattle on OWP had a minor transient effect on beef colour and no impact on beef composition or eating quality.

  15. Fire Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Fire Stations in the United States Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  16. US Fire Administration Fire Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Fire Administration collects data from a variety of sources to provide information and analyses on the status and scope of the fire problem in the United...

  17. Wildland fire limits subsequent fire occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sean A. Parks; Carol Miller; Lisa M. Holsinger; Scott Baggett; Benjamin J. Bird

    2016-01-01

    Several aspects of wildland fire are moderated by site- and landscape-level vegetation changes caused by previous fire, thereby creating a dynamic where one fire exerts a regulatory control on subsequent fire. For example, wildland fire has been shown to regulate the size and severity of subsequent fire. However, wildland fire has the potential to influence...

  18. Effects of tendon and muscle belly dissection on muscular force transmission following tendon transfer in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify to what extent the scar tissue formation following the transfer of flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) to the distal tendon of extensor carpi radialis (ECR) affects the force transmission from transferred FCU in the rat. Five weeks after recovery from surgery

  19. Fire danmarkskort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birger Faurholt

    2017-01-01

    Fire danmarkskort udarbejdet på baggrund af dataudtræk fra indsendte gødningsregnskaber for planperioden 2015/2016......Fire danmarkskort udarbejdet på baggrund af dataudtræk fra indsendte gødningsregnskaber for planperioden 2015/2016...

  20. On fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    The title of this paper: “On fire”, refers to two (maybe three) aspects: firstly as a metaphor of having engagement in a community of practice according to Lave & Wenger (1991), and secondly it refers to the concrete element “fire” in the work of the fire fighters – and thirdly fire as a signifier...

  1. Fire Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  2. Forest-fire models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  3. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length must...

  4. Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Whether the number is 911 or a regular phone number, everyone in the family should know it by ... near the phone. Include the local fire department phone number, your full home address and phone number, and ...

  5. Fire Safety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Braces Eating Disorders Mitral Valve Prolapse Arrhythmias Fire Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Fire Safety Print A ... event of a fire emergency in your home. Fire Prevention Of course, the best way to practice ...

  6. Fire Research Enclosure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Simulates submarine fires, enclosed aircraft fires, and fires in enclosures at shore facilities .DESCRIPTION: FIRE I is a pressurizable, 324 cu m(11,400 cu...

  7. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  8. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fire Synthesis - Preparation of Alumina Products. Tanu Mimani. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1324-1332. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1324-1332. Keywords. Alumina; combustion; refractory materials; urea. Author Affiliations. Tanu Mimani1.

  9. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Fire Synthesis - Preparation of Alumina Products. Tanu Mimani. General Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 50-57. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/02/0050-0057 ...

  10. Forest Fires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 11. Forest Fires - Origins and Ecological Paradoxes. K Narendran. General Article Volume 6 Issue 11 November 2001 pp 34-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/11/0034-0041 ...

  11. Fire Behavior (FB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Behavior (FB) method is used to describe the behavior of the fire and the ambient weather and fuel conditions that influence the fire behavior. Fire behavior methods are not plot based and are collected by fire event and time-date. In general, the fire behavior data are used to interpret the fire effects documented in the plot-level sampling. Unlike the other...

  12. Fire Symfonier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Svend Hvidtfelt

    2009-01-01

    sidste fire symfonier. Den er måske snarere at opfatte som et præludium til disse. At påstå, at symfonierne fra Holmboes side er planlagt til at være beslægtede, ville være at gå for vidt. Alene de 26 år, der skiller den 10. fra den 13., gør påstanden - i bedste fald - dubiøs. Når deres udformning...... udkrystallisering som i de sidste små 30 år af hans virke har afkastet disse fire variationer over en grundlæggende central holmboesk fornemmelse for form, melodi, klang og rytme. Denne oplevelse har fået mig til at udforske symfonierne, for at finde til bunds i dette holmboeske fællestræk, som jeg mener her står...

  13. Fire Safety Training Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Dept. of Fire and Rescue Services, Rockville, MD. Div. of Fire Prevention.

    Designed for a community fire education effort, particularly in which local volunteers present general information on fire safety to their fellow citizens, this workbook contains nine lessons. Included are an overview of the household fire problem; instruction in basic chemistry and physics of fire, flammable liquids, portable fire extinguishers,…

  14. Crown Fire Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  15. Fire safety at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over the smoke alarm as needed. Using a fire extinguisher can put out a small fire to keep it from getting out of control. Tips for use include: Keep fire extinguishers in handy locations, at least one on ...

  16. Fire Ant Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching ... across the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or ...

  17. Fire Ant Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Fire ant allergy Share | Fire Ant Allergy This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Fire ants are a stinging insect typically found in ...

  18. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel must be equipped with a self-priming, power driven fire...) If multiple pumps are installed, they may be used for other purposes provided at least one pump is...

  19. Fire and fire ecology: Concepts and principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Cochrane; Kevin C. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Fire has been central to terrestrial life ever since early anaerobic microorganisms poisoned the atmosphere with oxygen and multicellular plant life moved onto land. The combination of fuels, oxygen, and heat gave birth to fire on Earth. Fire is not just another evolutionary challenge that life needed to overcome, it is, in fact, a core ecological process across much...

  20. Vehicle fires and fire safety in tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-20

    Tunnels present what is arguably the most hazardous environment, from the point of view of fire safety, that members of the public ever experience. The fire safety design of tunnels is carried out by tunnel engineers on the basis of a potential fire ...

  1. Fire Service Training. Portable Fire Extinguishers. (Revised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of portable fire extinguishers. Designed to be used with the Robert J. Brady Transparencies and/or the film "Portable Fire Extinguishers" and with the International Fire Service Training Association Manual No. 101,…

  2. Fires, ecological effects of

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Bond; Robert Keane

    2017-01-01

    Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are extremely intolerant of burning and need protection from fire. The properties of a fire...

  3. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  4. Southwestern Oregon's Biscuit Fire: An Analysis of Forest Resources, Fire Severity, and Fire Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Azuma; Glenn A. Christensen

    2005-01-01

    This study compares pre-fire field inventory data (collected from 1993 to 1997) in relation to post-fire mapped fire severity classes and the Fire and Fuels Extension of the Forest Vegetation Simulator growth and yield model measures of fire hazard for the portion of the Siskiyou National Forest in the 2002 Biscuit fire perimeter of southwestern Oregon. Post-fire...

  5. FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System - A program for fire danger rating analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Larry S. Bradshaw

    1997-01-01

    A computer program, FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System, provides methods for evaluating the performance of fire danger rating indexes. The relationship between fire danger indexes and historical fire occurrence and size is examined through logistic regression and percentiles. Historical seasonal trends of fire danger and fire occurrence can be...

  6. A review of fire interactions and mass fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Sara S. McAllister

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire...

  7. United States Fire Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about our courses and how to apply Publication Electronic cigarette fires and explosions in the United States ... unique hazard to users. 62 percent of the electronic cigarette explosion and fire incidents reviewed in this ...

  8. Fire Stations - 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Stations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  9. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  10. Fires and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Fires and Food Safety Fire! Few words can strike such terror. Residential ...

  11. Fire Stations - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Station Locations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed at or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  12. Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rorty, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober......Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober...

  13. National Fire Protection Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or closed List of NFPA codes & standards National Fire Codes® Subscription Service NEC® Online Subscription Free online ... Toggle this sub-menu open or closed The fire risk of exterior walls containing combustible components Resources ...

  14. Seerley Road Fire Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    A barn caught fire at on Seerley Road, Indianapolis. Five storage drums believed to contain metallic potassium were involved in the fire. EPA will perform additional sampling as part of removal operations and safe offsite transportation.

  15. FIRE CHARACTERISTICS FOR ADVANCED MODELLING OF FIRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Dvořák

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the material and fire properties of solid flammable/combustible materials /substances /products, which are used as inputs for the computer numerical fire models. At the same time it gives the test standards for their determination.

  16. A world on fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Olson; David N. Bengston

    2015-01-01

    We live in a world on fire. In just the past few years, major wildland fires have struck at least 13 U.S. states, as well as Indonesia, Australia, China, southern Europe, Russia, Canada, Bolivia, and other parts of the world. Wildland fires are increasing in number, size, and intensity. In particular, there has been an increase in large fire events—megafires—that...

  17. Fire and forest meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    SA Ferguson; T.J. Brown; M. Flannigan

    2005-01-01

    The American Meteorological Society symposia series on Fire and Forest Meteorology provides biennial forums for atmospheric and fire scientists to introduce and discuss the latest and most relevant research on weather, climate and fire. This special issue highlights significant work that was presented at the Fifth Symposium in Orlando, Florida during 16-20 November...

  18. Fire Safety Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Planning and prevention is the best defense against fires in school. This is particularly true in the science laboratory due to the presence of flammable gases, liquids, combustibles, and other potential sources of fire. Teachers can prevent fires from starting by maintaining prudent lab practices when dealing with combustible and flammable…

  19. Fire as Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  20. Fire performance issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. M. Cramer; R. H. White

    1997-01-01

    The worldwide movement toward performance-based building codes is prompting the need for new computational methods to predict fire endurance of wood assemblies. Progress in the past twenty years in understanding fire endurance of individual solid wood components has been achieved in many different countries. The greatest opportunity for major advance in fire research...

  1. Forest fires in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Haines; William A. Main; John S. Crosby

    1973-01-01

    Describes factors that contribute to forest fires on two of the State of Missouri's Protection Districts and the Clark National Forest. Includes an analysis of fire cause, annual distribution, weather, and activity by day of week; also discusses multiple-fire day.

  2. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  3. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  4. A Review of Fire Interactions and Mass Fires

    OpenAIRE

    Finney, Mark A.; McAllister, Sara S.

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire spread where none otherwise existed. Fire-fire interactions occur naturally when spot fires start ahead of the main fire and when...

  5. Fire Protection Program Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  6. Fire retardant formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions where a substrate is liable to catch fire such as bituminous products, paints, carpets or the like. The invention relates to a composition comprising 40-95 weight % of a substrate to be rendered fire resistant such as bituminous material or paint......, carpets which substrate is mixed with 5-60 weight % of a fire retardant component. The invention relates to a fire retardant component comprising or being constituted of attapulgite, and a salt being a source of a blowing or expanding agent, where the attapulgite and the salt are electrostatically...... connected by mixing and subjecting the mixture of the two components to agitation. Also, the invention relates to compositions comprising 40-95 weight % of a substrate to be rendered fire resistant mixed with 5-60 weight % of a fire retardant according to claim 1 or 2, which fire retardant component...

  7. Fire Danger and Fire Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (formerly Weather Bureau) and Forest Service developed a program to track meteorological conditions conducive to forest fires, resulting...

  8. Accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle simulating a soft tissue mass during surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Anastasopoulos, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    During a wrist ganglion excision originating at the tendon sheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle, a soft tissue mass was observed just radial and distal to the surgical field. Dissection of the mass revealed an accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle belly which joined the radial extensor digiti minimi tendon. The surgical impact is discussed.

  9. Overstretching of sarcomeres may not cause cerebral palsy muscle contracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulders, Mark J. C.; Kreulen, Michiel; Hage, J. Joris; Huijing, Peter A.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.

    2004-01-01

    To answer the question whether the muscle contracture in patients with cerebral palsy is caused by overstretching of in-series sarcomeres we studied the active and passive force-length relationship of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) in relation to its operating length range in 14 such patients

  10. Tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients on biologic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Kvien, Tore K; Terslev, Lene

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and tibialis posterior (TP) tendons are often involved in RA and the present aim was to examine by ultrasound (US) their frequency of inflammation and sensitivity to change in comparison to joint involvement as well as clinical examinations. METHODS: US, c...

  11. Presence of Multiple Tendinous Insertions of Palmaris Longus: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Details: We report here a unique case of palmaris longus presenting variation distally as its tendon divides to gain multiple attachments with the fascia covering the abductor pollicis brevis, flexor retinaculum and the tendon of flexor carpi ulnaris. In addition, it also continues as palmar aponeurosis as its normal course.

  12. Restoring wrist extension in obstetric palsy of the brachial plexus by transferring wrist flexors to wrist extensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alphen, N.A.; van Doorn-Loogman, M.H.; Maas, H.; van der Sluijs, J.A.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.

    2013-01-01

    Wrist extension is essential in the development of motor skills in young children. Adequate wrist extension is important for good grip function of the hand, as a slightly extended wrist Results in a better and stronger grip. This retrospective study reviews the transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris

  13. All fired up

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Directorate and their support staff took part in a fire-fighting course organised by the CERN Fire Brigade just before the end-of-year break.  The Bulletin takes a look at the fire-fighting training on offer at CERN.   At CERN the risk of fire can never be under-estimated. In order to train personnel in the use of fire extinguishers, CERN's fire training centre in Prévessin acquired a fire-simulation platform in 2012. On the morning of 17 December 2012, ten members of the CERN directorate and their support staff tried out the platform, following in the footsteps of 400 other members of the CERN community who had already attended the course. The participants were welcomed to the training centre by Gilles Colin, a fire-fighter and instructor, who gave them a 30-minute introduction to general safety and the different types of fire and fire extinguishers, followed by an hour of practical instruction in the simulation facility. There they were able to pract...

  14. Fires in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, Luiz E. O. C.; Anderson, Liana O.; Lima, André; Arai, Egidio

    2016-11-01

    Fire has been used since the first humans arrived in Amazonia; however, it has recently become a widely used instrument for large-scale forest clearance. Patterns of fire incidence in the region have been exacerbated by recent drought events. Understanding temporal and spatial fire patterns as well as their consequences for forest structure, species composition, and the carbon cycle is critical for minimising global change impacts on Amazonian ecosystems and people. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the state of our knowledge on the spatial and temporal patterns of fire incidence in Amazonia, depicting the historical fire usage in the region, their relationship with land use and land cover, and their responses to climate seasonality and droughts. We subsequently focus on the impacts of fire, by quantifying the extent of burnt forests during major droughts and describing the main impacts on forest structure, composition, and carbon stocks. Finally, we present an overview of modelling initiatives for forecasting fire incidence in the region. We conclude by providing a comprehensive view of the processes that influence fire occurrence, potential feedbacks, and impacts in Amazonia. We also highlight how key areas within fire ecology must be improved for a better understanding of the long-term effect of fire on the Amazon forest 'biome'.

  15. Managing wildland fires: integrating weather models into fire projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne M. Rosenthal; Francis Fujioka

    2004-01-01

    Flames from the Old Fire sweep through lands north of San Bernardino during late fall of 2003. Like many Southern California fires, the Old Fire consumed susceptible forests at the urban-wildland interface and spread to nearby city neighborhoods. By incorporating weather models into fire perimeter projections, scientist Francis Fujioka is improving fire modeling as a...

  16. Biomass co-firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized-bed combus......Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized......-bed combustion (FBC) systems, and grate-firing systems, which are employed in about 50%, 40% and 10% of all the co-firing plants, respectively. Their basic principles, process technologies, advantages, and limitations are presented, followed by a brief comparison of these technologies when applied to biomass co...

  17. Chapter 5. Borderlands fire regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot Wilkinson-Kaye; Thomas Swetnam; Christopher R. Baisan

    2006-01-01

    Fire is a keystone process in most natural, terrestrial ecosystems. The vital role that fire plays in controlling the structure of an ecosystem underscores the need for us to increase our knowledge of past and current fire regimes (Morgan and others 1994). Dendrochronological reconstructions of fire histories provide descriptions of past fire regimes across a range of...

  18. Little Bear Fire Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah McCaffrey; Melanie Stidham; Hannah. Brenkert-Smith

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, immediately after the Little Bear Fire burned outside Ruidoso, New Mexico, a team of researchers interviewed fire managers, local personnel, and residents to understand perceptions of the event itself, communication, evacuation, and pre-fire preparedness. The intensity of fire behavior and resulting loss of 242 homes made this a complex fire with a...

  19. Fire management in central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea L. Koonce; Armando González-Cabán

    1992-01-01

    Information on fire management operations in Central America is scant. To evaluate the known level of fire occurrence in seven countries in that area, fire management officers were asked to provide information on their fire control organizations and on any available fire statistics. The seven countries surveyed were Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua,...

  20. The human and fire connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain

    2014-01-01

    We refer to fire as a natural disturbance, but unlike other disturbances such as forest insects and diseases, fire has had an intimate relationship with humans. Fire facilitated human evolution over two million years ago when our ancestors began to use fire to cook. Fire empowered our furbearers to adapt to cold climates, allowing humans to disperse and settle into...

  1. Wildland Fire Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) is written to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) Integrated Safety Management Policy; Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; and Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and Implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes resulting from new policies on the national level as well as significant changes to available resources and other emerging issues, and replaces BNL's Wildland FMP dated 2014.

  2. WebFIRE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Factor Information Retrieval (FIRE) Data System is a database management system containing EPA's recommended emission estimation factors for criteria and...

  3. Fire protection design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  4. National Fire News- Current Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 to 5) Current hours for the National Fire Information Center are (MST) 8:00 am - 4: ... more information. February 9, 2018 Eleven new large fires were reported. States reporting fires include Oklahoma, Arkansas, ...

  5. The fire brigade renovates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The new fire engine at CERN's Fire Station. A shiny brand-new fire engine is now attracting all the attention of the members of CERN's fire brigade. Since the beginning of last week this engine has taken over from an 18-year-old one, which has now been 'retired' from service. This modern vehicle, built in Brescia, Italy, is much lighter and more powerful than the old one and is equipped to allow the fire service to tackle most call-outs without the support of at least one other vehicle, as is currently necessary. The new fire engine is designed to transport six fire-fighters, 2000 litres of water, and is equipped not only for fire fighting actions but also to respond initially to any other kind of call-out, such as traffic accidents, chemical incidents, pollution, lightning, etc. It goes almost without saying that it is provided with the most modern safety measures, a low centre of gravity, as well as a special chassis and a combination pump (low and high pressure), which improve the safety and performance ...

  6. Sanford Prescribed Fire Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Conroy; Jim Saveland; Mark Beighley; John Shive; Joni Ward; Marcus Trujillo; Paul Keller

    2003-01-01

    The Dixie National Forest has a long-standing history of successfully implementing prescribed fire and suppression programs. The Forest's safety record has been exemplary. The Forest is known Region-wide for its aggressive and innovative prescribed fire program. In particular, the Dixie National Forest is recognized for its leadership in introducing landscape-...

  7. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  8. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2006-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  9. Advanced fire information system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Frost, PE

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The South African Advanced Fire Information System (AFIS) is the first near real-time satellite-based fire monitoring system in Africa. It was originally developed for, and funded by, the electrical power utility Eskom, to reduce the impact of wild...

  10. Hot fire, cool soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, C.R.; Moore, D.; Fernandes, P.; Stoorvogel, J.J.; Fernandes, R.; Ferreira, A.J.D.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfires greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events by removing vegetation and changing soils. Fire damage to soil increases with increasing soil temperature, and, for fires where smoldering combustion is absent, the current understanding is that soil temperatures

  11. A Review of Fire Interactions and Mass Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Finney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire spread where none otherwise existed. Fire-fire interactions occur naturally when spot fires start ahead of the main fire and when separate fire events converge in one location. Interactions can be created intentionally during prescribed fires by using spatial ignition patterns. Mass fires are among the most extreme examples of interactive behavior. This paper presents a review of the detailed effects of fire-fire interaction in terms of merging or coalescence criteria, burning rates, flame dimensions, flame temperature, indraft velocity, pulsation, and convection column dynamics. Though relevant in many situations, these changes in fire behavior have yet to be included in any operational-fire models or decision support systems.

  12. Fires in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    On February 5, 2002, the dense smoke from numerous forest fires stretched out over the Pacific Ocean about 400 miles south of Santiago, Chile. This true-color Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows the fires, which are located near the city of Temuco. The fires are indicated with red dots (boxes in the high-resolution imagery). The fires were burning near several national parks and nature reserves in an area of the Chilean Andes where tourism is very popular. Southeast of the fires, the vegetation along the banks of the Rio Negro in Argentina stands out in dark green. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. Fire science at LLNL: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H.K. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    This fire sciences report from LLNL includes topics on: fire spread in trailer complexes, properties of welding blankets, validation of sprinkler systems, fire and smoke detectors, fire modeling, and other fire engineering and safety issues. (JEF)

  14. USFA NFIRS 2006 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2006 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  15. USFA NFIRS 2000 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2000 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  16. USFA NFIRS 2005 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2005 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  17. USFA NFIRS 2007 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2007 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  18. USFA NFIRS 2002 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2002 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  19. USFA NFIRS 2009 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2009 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  20. USFA NFIRS 2008 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2008 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  1. USFA NFIRS 2003 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2003 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  2. USFA NFIRS 2001 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2001 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  3. USFA NFIRS 2004 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2004 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  4. Humans, Fires, and Forests - Social science applied to fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna J. Cortner; Donald R. Field; Pam Jakes; James D. Buthman

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 and 2002 fire seasons resulted in increased political scrutiny of the nation's wildland fire threats, and given the fact that millions of acres of lands are still at high risk for future catastrophic fire events, the issues highlighted by the recent fire seasons are not likely to go away any time soon. Recognizing the magnitude of the problem, the...

  5. The contribution of natural fire management to wilderness fire science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Miller

    2014-01-01

    When the federal agencies established policies in the late 1960s and early 1970s to allow the use of natural fires in wilderness, they launched a natural fire management experiment in a handful of wilderness areas. As a result, wildland fire has played more of its natural role in wilderness than anywhere else. Much of what we understand about fire ecology comes from...

  6. Selection of tendon grafts for distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction and report of a modified technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eugene; Dy, Christopher J; Wolfe, Scott W

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the graft length necessary to complete a distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction and assess the suitability of several tendon graft sources. We measured the graft length needed to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction in 7 fresh-frozen cadaver specimens. The pure tendon lengths of 7 tendon graft sources were measured: palmaris longus, extensor indicis proprius, slips of extensor digiti minimi and abductor pollicis longus, and portions of flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and extensor carpi ulnaris. A modified technique that allows for a shorter length of graft is also described, and the suitability of each graft source for this technique was assessed. The mean graft lengths needed to complete the original and modified reconstructions were 138 mm and 89 mm, respectively. The average length of the tendon graft when measured as pure tendon was: palmaris longus (127 mm), slip of extensor digiti minimi (112 mm), extensor indicis proprius (100 mm), partial flexor carpi radialis (87 mm), slip of abductor pollicis longus (69 mm), partial flexor carpi ulnaris (67 mm), and partial extensor carpi ulnaris (67 mm). The palmaris longus was too short for the original technique in the majority of specimens but was sufficient to complete the modified technique in every specimen that had a palmaris longus. Six specimens also had an extensor indicis proprius of suitable length for the modified technique. The length of donor graft required for the modified reconstruction was significantly less than that needed for the original reconstruction. Three specimens had no donor tendons sufficiently long to complete the original technique if a pure tendon graft were used, whereas the modified technique could be completed in all specimens. Many tendon graft sources in the upper extremity are of insufficient length to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction as described. A modified technique using suture anchors may be a useful

  7. Coal fires in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehouse, Alfred E.; Mulyana, Asep A.S. [Office of Surface Mining/Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources Coal Fire Project, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Agency for Training and Education, Jl. Gatot Subroto, Kav. 49, Jakarta 12950 (Indonesia)

    2004-07-12

    Indonesia's fire and haze problem is increasingly being ascribed to large-scale forest conversion and land clearing activities making way for pulpwood, rubber and oil palm plantations. Fire is the cheapest tool available to small holders and plantation owners to reduce vegetation cover and prepare and fertilize extremely poor soils. Fires that escaped from agricultural burns have ravaged East Kalimantan forests on the island of Borneo during extreme drought periods in 1982-1983, 1987, 1991, 1994 and 1997-1998. Estimates based on satellite data and ground observations are that more than five million hectares were burned in East Kalimantan during the 1997/1998 dry season. Not only were the economic losses and ecological damage from these surface fires enormous, they ignited coal seams exposed at the ground surface along their outcrops.Coal fires now threaten Indonesia's shrinking ecological resources in Kutai National Park and Sungai Wain Nature Reserve. Sungai Wain has one of the last areas of unburned primary rainforest in the Balikpapan-Samarinda area with an extremely rich biodiversity. Although fires in 1997/1998 damaged nearly 50% of this Reserve and ignited 76 coal fires, it remains the most valuable water catchment area in the region and it has been used as a reintroduction site for the endangered orangutan. The Office of Surface Mining provided Indonesia with the capability to take quick action on coal fires that presented threats to public health and safety, infrastructure or the environment. The US Department of State's Southeast Asia Environmental Protection Initiative through the US Agency for International Development funded the project. Technical assistance and training transferred skills in coal fire management through the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resource's Training Agency to the regional offices; giving the regions the long-term capability to manage coal fires. Funding was also included to extinguish coal fires as

  8. Coal-fired generation

    CERN Document Server

    Breeze, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Coal-Fired Generation is a concise, up-to-date and readable guide providing an introduction to this traditional power generation technology. It includes detailed descriptions of coal fired generation systems, demystifies the coal fired technology functions in practice as well as exploring the economic and environmental risk factors. Engineers, managers, policymakers and those involved in planning and delivering energy resources will find this reference a valuable guide, to help establish a reliable power supply address social and economic objectives. Focuses on the evolution of the traditio

  9. Ames T-3 fire test facility - Aircraft crash fire simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    There is a need to characterize the thermal response of materials exposed to aircraft fuel fires. Large scale open fire tests are costly and pollute the local environment. This paper describes the construction and operation of a subscale fire test that simulates the heat flux levels and thermochemistry of typical open pool fires. It has been termed the Ames T-3 Test and has been used extensively by NASA since 1969 to observe the behavior of materials exposed to JP-4 fuel fires.

  10. Laboratory fire behavior measurements of chaparral crown fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Sanpakit; S. Omodan; D. Weise; M Princevac

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, there was an estimated 9,900 wildland fires that claimed more than 577,000 acres of land. That same year, about 542 prescribed fires were used to treat 48,554 acres by several agencies in California. Being able to understand fires using laboratory models can better prepare individuals to combat or use fires. Our research focused on chaparral crown fires....

  11. An 800-year fire history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley G. Kitchen

    2010-01-01

    "Fire in the woods!" The words are a real heart stopper. Yet in spite of its capacity to destroy, fire plays an essential role in shaping plant communities. Knowledge of the patterns of fire over long time periods is critical for understanding this role. Trees often retain evidence of nonlethal fires in the form of injuries or scars in the annual growth rings...

  12. Pine Ridge Fire summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Sarah McCaffrey; Melanie. Stidham

    2013-01-01

    In July 2012, immediately after the Pine Ridge Fire burned outside De Beque, Colorado, a team of researchers interviewed fire managers, local government officials, and residents to understand perceptions of the event itself, communication, evacuation, and pre-fire preparedness in order to identify contributors to success and areas for improvement. Although the fire had...

  13. Fire safety of wood construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2010-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements and related fire performance data are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Because basic data...

  14. FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

    2001-01-22

    The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  15. The economics of fire protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, Ganapathy

    2003-01-01

    This important new book, the first of its kind in the fire safety field, discusses the economic problems faced by decision-makers in the areas of fire safety and fire precautions. The author considers the theoretical aspects of cost-benefit analysis and other relevant economic problems with practical applications to fire protection systems. Clear examples are included to illustrate these techniques in action. The work covers: * the performance and effectiveness of passive fire protection measures such as structural fire resistance and means of escape facilities, and active systems such as sprinklers and detectors * the importance of educating for better understanding and implementation of fire prevention through publicity campaigns and fire brigade operations * cost-benefit analysis of fire protection measures and their combinations, taking into account trade-offs between these measures. The book is essential reading for consultants and academics in construction management, economics and fire safety, as well ...

  16. Fire Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Erie as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses environmental impacts and alternatives...

  17. Forest Fire Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Carol; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a model that integrates high school science with the needs of the local scientific community. Describes how a high school ecology class conducted scientific research in fire ecology that benefited the students and a state park forest ecologist. (MKR)

  18. Fire History Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past fire occurrence from tree rings, charcoal found in lake sediments, and other proxies. Parameter keywords describe what was measured in this data set....

  19. Prescribed Fire Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Bombay Hook as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses environmental impacts and...

  20. Findings From Fire Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — The purpose of this study data is to provide a metric with which to assess the effectiveness of improvements to the U.S. NRC's fire protection regulations in support...

  1. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  2. Fire and smoke retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, M. J.

    Despite a reduction in Federal regulatory activity, research concerned with flame retardancy and smoke suppression in the private sector appears to be increasing. This trend seem related to the increased utilization of plastics for end uses which traditionally have employed metal or wood products. As a result, new markets have appeared for thermally stable and fire resistance thermoplastic materials, and this in turn has spurred research and development activity. In addition, public awareness of the dangers associated with fire has increased as a result of several highly publicized hotel and restaurant fires within the past two years. The consumers recognition of flammability characteristics as important materials property considerations has increased. The current status of fire and smoke retardant chemistry and research are summarized.

  3. RETRO Fires Aggr

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — Within the RETRO project, global gridded data sets for anthropogenic and vegetation fire emissions of several trace gases were generated, covering the period from...

  4. RETRO_FIRES_WCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — Within the RETRO project, global gridded data sets for anthropogenic and vegetation fire emissions of several trace gases were generated, covering the period from...

  5. Fire Management Species Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of the Fire Management Species Profile project is to identify habitat management objectives that are specific, measurable, achievable, clearly...

  6. Fire Perimeters (2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Group, or GeoMAC, is an internet-based mapping tool originally designed for fire managers to access online maps of current...

  7. Future Integrated Fire Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Bonnie W

    2005-01-01

    Future advances in fire control for air and missile defense depend largely on a network-enabled foundation that enables the collaborative use of distributed warfare assets for time-critical operations...

  8. Fire Mapper Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The design of a UAV mounted Fire Mapper system is proposed. The system consists of a multi-band imaging sensor, a data processing system and a data communication...

  9. Fire Management Plan 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Erie as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses environmental impacts and alternatives...

  10. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems.The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  11. Fire retardant polyisocyanurate foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Fire retardant properties of low density polymer foam are increased. Foam has pendant nitrile groups which form thermally-stable heterocyclic structures at temperature below degradation temperature of urethane linkages.

  12. Fire characteristics charts for fire behavior and U.S. fire danger rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Pat Andrews

    2010-01-01

    The fire characteristics chart is a graphical method of presenting U.S. National Fire Danger Rating indices or primary surface or crown fire behavior characteristics. A desktop computer application has been developed to produce fire characteristics charts in a format suitable for inclusion in reports and presentations. Many options include change of scales, colors,...

  13. Chaparral and fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2007-01-01

    Large wildfires are an inevitable feature of chaparral. The moderate temperatures during winter promote growth of extensive stands of shrublands with contiguous fuels covering massive portions of the landscape. The summer-fall drought makes these fuels highly flammable over a relatively lengthy portion of the year. Because of widespread human influence, most fires today are anthropogenic; however, in wilderness areas lightning still accounts for some chaparral fires.

  14. Forest fires in Dalmatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šiljković Željka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Every year the Republic of Croatia, especially in its south part in Dalmatia, faces forest fire risks. The weather is exceptionally conducive to fires, so the main period of fire occurrences is between June and October, characterized by long lasting dry and warm weather with temperatures over 30°C. Research carried out by the authors in 1997 and 2012 have pointed to the fact that human impact is the main cause of ignition. This paper presents an overview of the total number of fires in the period from 1998 to 2012, with the emphasis on forest and woodland fires in the Croatian region of Dalmatia. Data on the situation in Dalmatia refer to the situation in the areas of responsibility of four Dalmatian Police Administrations. Analysis is based on official data of the Croatian Ministry of the Interior and the report of the National councillor for managing and controlling forest fires. The authors have analysed the frequency of forest fires in Dalmatia in a period of fourteen years (1998-2012 comparing it with the previous period, 1989-1996. The results that the authors have obtained reveal how forest fires most commonly (2/3 break out during the warm part of a day, from 09.00 until 18.00 hours in the warm period of the year. Particularly vulnerable are the forests of Aleppo pines and maquis being mostly thermal forests, whilst in the south of the country the forests of Holm oak (Quercus ilex and English oak (Quercus robur are at the highest risk. Reforesting of burned areas is very slow and Croatia has been far behind in reforesting in the continental part of the country.

  15. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiere, James

    discipline. It covers thermo chemistry including mixtures and chemical reactions; Introduces combustion to the fire protection student; Discusses premixed flames and spontaneous ignition; Presents conservation laws for control volumes, including the effects of fire; Describes the theoretical bases...... as a visiting professor at BYG.DTU financed by the Larsen and Nielsen Foundation, and is entered to the research database by Kristian Hertz responsible for the visiting professorship....

  16. Sodium fire testing: structural evaluation of sodium fire suppression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-08-01

    This report describes the development and the lessons learned from the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Sodium Fire Testing Program (DRS 26.03). The purpose of this program was to evaluate the behavior of the Sodium Fire Suppression System and validate the analytical techniques used in the calculation of the effects of sodium fires in air-filled cells. This report focuses on the fire suppression capability and the structural integrity of the Fire Suppression System. System features are discussed; the test facility is described and the key results are provided. Modifications to the fire suppression system and the plant made as a result of test experience are also discussed.

  17. Contribution of peat fires to the 2015 Indonesian fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Johannes W.; Heil, Angelika; Wooster, Martin J.; van der Werf, Guido R.

    2016-04-01

    Indonesia experienced widespread fires and severe air quality degradation due to smoke during September and October 2015. The fires are thought to have originated from the combination of El-Niño-induced drought and human activities. Fires ignited for land clearing escaped into drained peatlands and burned until the onset of the monsoonal rain. In addition to the health impact, these fires are thought to have emitted large amounts of greenhouse gases, e.g. more than Japan over the entire year. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) has detected and quantified the fires with the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) and the smoke dispersion with the Chemistry-Integrated Forecasting System (C-IFS) in near real time. GFAS and C-IFS are constrained by satellite-based observations of fire and smoke constituents, respectively. The distinction between peat and above-ground fires is a crucial and difficult step in fire emission estimation as it introduces errors of up to one order of magnitude. Here, we quantify the contribution of peat fires to the total emission flux of the 2015 Indonesian fires by (1) using an improved peat map in GFAS and (2) analysing the observed diurnal cycle of the fire activity as represented in a new development for GFAS. Furthermore, we link the fires occurrence to economic activity by analysing the coincidence with concessions for palm oil plantations and other industrial forest uses.

  18. Global relationship of fire occurrence and fire intensity: A test of intermediate fire occurrence-intensity hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ruisen; Hui, Dafeng; Miao, Ning; Liang, Chuan; Wells, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Fire plays a significant role in global atmosphere and biosphere carbon and nutrient cycles. Globally, there are substantially different distributions and impacts between fire occurrence and fire intensity. It is prominent to have a thorough investigation of global relationship between fire occurrence and fire intensity for future fire prediction and management. In this study, we proposed an intermediate fire occurrence-intensity (IFOI) hypothesis for the global relationship between fire occurrence and fire intensity, suggesting that fire occurrence changes with fire intensity following a humped relationship. We examined this hypothesis via satellite data from January 2001 to December 2013 at a global scale, and in small and large fire intensity zones, respectively. Furthermore, the fire occurrence and fire intensity relationship was developed among different vegetation types to reveal the changes of parameters and strengths. Finally, the environmental factors (including climatic, hydraulic, biological, and anthropogenic variables) underpinning the fire occurrence and intensity pattern were evaluated for the underlying mechanisms. The results supported our IFOI hypothesis and demonstrated that the humped relationship is driven by different causes among vegetation types. Fire occurrence increases with fire intensity in small fire intensity zones due to alleviation of the factors limiting both fire occurrence and intensity. Beyond a certain fire intensity threshold, fire occurrence is constrained, probably due to the limitation of available fuels. The information generated in this study could be helpful for understanding global variation of fire occurrence and fire intensity due to fire-vegetation-climate-human interactions and facilitating future fire management.

  19. FARSITE: a fire area simulator for fire managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney

    1995-01-01

    A fire growth model (FARSITE) has been developed for use on personal computers (PC’s). Because PC’s are commonly used by land and fire managers, this portable platform would be an accustomed means to bring fire growth modeling technology to management applications. The FARSITE model is intended for use in projecting the growth of prescribed natural fires for wilderness...

  20. Returning fire to the land: celebrating traditional knowledge and fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank K. Lake; Vita Wright; Penelope Morgan; Mary McFadzen; Dave McWethy; Camille Stevens-Rumann

    2017-01-01

    North American tribes have traditional knowledge about fire effects on ecosystems, habitats, and resources. For millennia, tribes have used fire to promote valued resources. Sharing our collective understanding of fire, derived from traditional and western knowledge systems, can benefit landscapes and people. We organized two workshops to investigate how traditional...

  1. Rx fire laws: tools to protect fire: the `ecological imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale Wade; Steven Miller; Johnny Stowe; James Brenner

    2006-01-01

    The South is the birthplace of statutes and ordinances that both advocate and protect the cultural heritage of woods burning, which has been practiced in this region uninterrupted for more than 10,000 years. We present a brief overview of fire use in the South and discuss why most southern states recognized early on that periodic fire was necessary to sustain fire...

  2. Quantitative comparison of fire danger index performance using fire activity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steenkamp, KC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available and in logistic planning of fire fighting resources. In this study historical fire activity from remotely sensed data are compared with various FDIs to identify which index has the strongest statistical relationship with fire occurrences and therefore the highest...

  3. Penetrating Fire Extinguisher

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    When Feecon Corporation, a manufacturer of fire protection systems, needed a piercing nozzle for larger aircraft, they were assisted by Kennedy Space Center who provided the company with a fire extinguisher with a hard pointed tip that had been developed in case of an orbiter crash landing. The nozzle can penetrate metal skins of aircraft, trains, etc. Feecon obtained a license and now markets its cobra ram piercing nozzle to airport firefighters. Its primary advantage is that the nozzle can be held in one spot during repeated blows of the ram. *This product has been discontinued and is no longer commercially available.

  4. Fire resistant aircraft seat program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewell, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Foams, textiles, and thermoformable plastics were tested to determine which materials were fire retardant, and safe for aircraft passenger seats. Seat components investigated were the decorative fabric cover, slip covers, fire blocking layer, cushion reinforcement, and the cushioning layer.

  5. Research status of warship fire safety engineering

    OpenAIRE

    LU Shouxiang; CHEN Xiao; WU Xiaowei

    2017-01-01

    The theory of warship fire safety engineering is the basis of damage control engineering. According to the public safety triangle and the characteristics of ship damage protection engineering, this paper proposes a theoretical framework system for ship fire safety engineering, including ship fire development, ship fire damage and ship fire protection. The progress of these three parts are summarized in such aspects as enclosed fire dynamics, open space fire dynamics, fire damage mechanisms fo...

  6. Evidence of fuels management and fire weather influencing fire severity in an extreme fire event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Jamie M; Collins, Brandon M.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Matchett, John R.; Shive, Kristen L.; Povak, Nicholas A.; Kane, Van R.; Smith, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Following changes in vegetation structure and pattern, along with a changing climate, large wildfire incidence has increased in forests throughout the western U.S. Given this increase there is great interest in whether fuels treatments and previous wildfire can alter fire severity patterns in large wildfires. We assessed the relative influence of previous fuels treatments (including wildfire), fire weather, vegetation and water balance on fire severity in the Rim Fire of 2013. We did this at three different spatial scales to investigate whether the influences on fire severity changed across scales. Both fuels treatments and previous low to moderate severity wildfire reduced the prevalence of high severity fire. In general, areas without recent fuels treatments and areas that previously burned at high severity tended to have a greater proportion of high severity fire in the Rim Fire. Areas treated with prescribed fire, especially when combined with thinning, had the lowest proportions of high severity. Proportion of the landscape burned at high severity was most strongly influenced by fire weather and proportional area previously treated for fuels or burned by low to moderate severity wildfire. The proportion treated needed to effectively reduce the amount of high fire severity fire varied by spatial scale of analysis, with smaller spatial scales requiring a greater proportion treated to see an effect on fire severity. When moderate and high severity fire encountered a previously treated area, fire severity was significantly reduced in the treated area relative to the adjacent untreated area. Our results show that fuels treatments and low to moderate severity wildfire can reduce fire severity in a subsequent wildfire, even when burning under fire growth conditions. These results serve as further evidence that both fuels treatments and lower severity wildfire can increase forest resilience.

  7. Pressure management in compartment fires

    OpenAIRE

    Hostikka, Simo; Kallada Janardhan, Rahul

    2017-01-01

    Fire-induced pressure has not been considered a threat for structural or occupant safety in apartment fires. The situation may be changing as the building envelopes are becoming much more air-tight due to the energy efficiency requirements and the construction of high-rise buildings. In this project, we investigated the effects of the building's air-tightness, ventilation configuration and the fire growth rate on the peak overpressures inside the fire compartment and smoke spread within the m...

  8. Early fire history near Papineau lake, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Dey; Richard P. Guyette

    1996-01-01

    Research that defines the role of fire in upland red oak-pine ecosystems in central Ontario is being conducted by the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Silviculture program. Site-specific fire histories are being developed that document fire frequency, fire behavior, fire effects on forest regeneration and grwoth, and the influnce of human activites on fire disturbances. This...

  9. The use of fire in forest restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin C. Hardy; Stephen F. Arno

    1996-01-01

    The 26 papers in this document address the current knowledge of fire as a disturbance agent, fire history and fire regimes, applications of prescribed fire for ecological restoration, and the effects of fire on the various forested ecosystems of the north-western United States. The main body of this document is organized in three sections: Assessing Needs for Fire in...

  10. 14 CFR 29.851 - Fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire extinguishers. 29.851 Section 29.851... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 29.851 Fire extinguishers. (a) Hand fire extinguishers. For hand fire extinguishers the following apply: (1) Each hand fire...

  11. Fire danger rating network density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy M. King; R. William Furman

    1976-01-01

    Conventional statistical techniques are used to answer the question, "What is the necessary station density for a fire danger network?" The Burning Index of the National Fire-Danger Rating System is used as an indicator of fire danger. Results are presented as station spacing in tabular form for each of six regions in the western United States.

  12. Fire effects on noxious weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin Innes

    2012-01-01

    The Fire Effects Information System (FEIS, www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/) has been providing reviews of scientific knowledge about fire effects since 1986. FEIS is an online collection of literature reviews on more than 1,100 species and their relationships with fire. Reviews cover plants and animals throughout the United States, providing a wealth of information for...

  13. Fire Sales and House Prices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    result in fire sale discounts. Discounts increase when the sale is urgent, market conditions are poor, and the seller is financially constrained. Overall, our study identifies when forced sales lead to fire sale discounts, and highlights that fire sales occur even in the absence of temporary demand...

  14. Learning to Control Forest Fires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, M.A.; Dorigo, M.

    1998-01-01

    Forest fires are an important environmental problem. This paper describes a methodology for constructing an intelligent system which aims to support the human expert's decision making in fire control. The idea is based on first implementing a fire spread simulator and on searching for good

  15. Fire and bark beetle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken Gibson; Jose F. Negron

    2009-01-01

    Bark beetle populations are at outbreak conditions in many parts of the western United States and causing extensive tree mortality. Bark beetles interact with other disturbance agents in forest ecosystems, one of the primary being fires. In order to implement appropriate post-fire management of fire-damaged ecosystems, we need a better understanding of...

  16. G-fire station : fire simulation from desktop to grid

    OpenAIRE

    Pina, António Manuel Silva; Marques, Ricardo; Oliveira, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    CROSS-Fire is a research project, funded by the Portuguese NGI and led by UMinho, and focused on topics related to decision making to control forest fires and on the porting to the grid of FireStation - a fire growth simulation application. G-FireStation exploits Grid capabilities in order to have a faster execution, to manage large data input/output files, to create a large data base of simulation results and to allow the interactive control of the simulations through a g...

  17. Indonesia's Fires and Haze

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The fires were exacerbated by the droughts induced in many parts of the world by the most severe El Niño event ever recorded. (The increasing severity and frequency of the El Niño is thought by some climate experts to be a consequence of global warming, itself the cumulative result of human activities that release carbon ...

  18. Boerhaave on Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemente, Damon

    2000-01-01

    In 1741 an English translation of Herman Boerhaave's celebrated textbook Elementa Chemic was published under the title A New Method of Chemistry. True to its time, this book included elaborate discussions of the elements earth, water, air, and fire. This article offers to teachers for classroom use a selection of passages from Boerhaave's chapter on fire. Now, today's teacher of chemistry is apt to feel that little of significance to the modern classroom can be gleaned from a two-and-a-half-centuries-old text, and especially from a topic as old-fashioned as fire. But this view is decidedly shortsighted. Boerhaave offers demonstrations and experiments that can be instructively performed today, quantitative data that can be checked against modern equations, and much theory and hypothesis that can be assessed in light of modern chemical ideas. In the readings presented here I have found material for discussion in class, for investigation in the laboratory, and for a few homework assignments. Modern students are well able to comprehend and paraphrase Boerhaave, to check his results, appreciate his insights, and identify his shortfalls. From him they learn firsthand how painstaking and difficult it was to imagine and develop the concepts of thermochemistry. To read from his chapter on fire is to stand witness to the birth and infancy of thermodynamics as conceived in the mind of a great chemist from the age when coherent chemical theory was just beginning to emerge.

  19. Fire on Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Daly

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The nineteenth century theatre was fire-prone, to say the least. Across the century there were more than 1,100 major conflagrations in the world’s theatres, and countless smaller fires. In Great Britain almost every theatre seems to have burned down at some point. And yet, despite, or perhaps in part because of, this appalling record, fires were a staple feature of stage spectacle. Some plays placed them at the very centre of the entertainment, and as the century went on stage fires became more and more elaborate. Actual or simulated conflagrations were conjured up using a diverse array of technologies, some of them very simple, some depending on the most recent scientific discoveries. Here, I give a short tour of these technologies and their use in the plays of the period, and suggest some of the pleasures that they offered. While onstage flames could draw people in, offering an experience of immersive suspense, for instance, they also interrupted the dramatic flow, reminding audiences that they were seeing a performance, getting something for their money. To this extent, we are reminded that nineteenth-century drama provided something of a mixed and spectacular ‘theatre of attractions’, closer at times to the circus than to the novel.

  20. Tending the Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    City, Elizabeth A.; Dolly, Danique A.

    2017-01-01

    Part of being an effective school leader is helping staff and students deal with situations related to inequity and race--helping the fire of emotion that accompanies such issues energize your school rather than becoming a wildfire. Danique Dolly faced this challenge as principal of Baltimore's City Neighbors High School during the time riots…

  1. Fire, ice, and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of tree injury often begins with a loss assessment. For winter storm injury, percent crow loss or branch breakage is often estimated. For injury from fire or some mechanical source to the lower trunk, the height and width of the killed vascular cambium and resulting scar are often measured. Both crown breakage and stem wounds provide the opportunity for...

  2. De fire dimensioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mihail

    De fire dimensioner er en humanistisk håndbog beregnet især på studerende og vejledere inden for humaniora, men kan også læses af andre med interesse for, hvad humanistisk forskning er og kan. Den er blevet til over et langt livs engageret forskning, uddannelse og formidling på Roskilde Universitet...... og udgør på den måde også et bidrag til universitetets historie, som jeg var med til at grundlægge. De fire dimensioner sætter mennesket i centrum. Men det er et centrum, der peger ud over sig selv; et centrum, hvorfra verden anskues, erfares og forstås. Alle mennesker har en forhistorie og en...... fremtid, og udstrakt mellem disse punkter i tiden tænker og handler de i rummet. Den menneskelige tilværelse omfatter alle fire dimensioner. De fire dimensioner udgør derfor også et forsvar for en almen dannelse, der gennemtrænger og kommer kulturelt til udtryk i vores historie, viden, praksis og kunst....

  3. Motorcoach Fire Safety Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This purpose of this study was to collect and analyze information from Government, industry, and media sources on the causes, frequency, and severity of motorcoach fires in the U.S., and to identify potential risk reduction measures. The Volpe Center...

  4. Fire in the forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Saveland

    1995-01-01

    From ancient philosophies to present day science, the ubiquity of change and the process of transformation are core concepts. The primary focus of a recent white paper on disturbance ecology is summed up by the Greek philosopher Heraclitus who stated, "Nothing is permanent but change." Disturbance processes, such as fire, provide a window into the emerging...

  5. Hiring without Firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Araoz, Claudio

    1999-01-01

    Describes the problems related to the hiring of senior-level positions. Suggests that regardless of the hiring process used, between 30% and 50% of executive-level appointments end in firing or resignation. Discusses the most common mistakes used in hiring. (JOW)

  6. Enhanced Fire Events Database to Support Fire PRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Baranowsky; Ken Canavan; Shawn St. Germain

    2010-06-01

    Abstract: This paper provides a description of the updated and enhanced Fire Events Data Base (FEDB) developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in cooperation with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The FEDB is the principal source of fire incident operational data for use in fire PRAs. It provides a comprehensive and consolidated source of fire incident information for nuclear power plants operating in the U.S. The database classification scheme identifies important attributes of fire incidents to characterize their nature, causal factors, and severity consistent with available data. The database provides sufficient detail to delineate important plant specific attributes of the incidents to the extent practical. A significant enhancement to the updated FEDB is the reorganization and refinement of the database structure and data fields and fire characterization details added to more rigorously capture the nature and magnitude of the fire and damage to the ignition source and nearby equipment and structures

  7. Evidence of fuels management and fire weather influencing fire severity in an extreme fire event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Jamie M; Collins, Brandon M; Brooks, Matthew L; Matchett, John R; Shive, Kristen L; Povak, Nicholas A; Kane, Van R; Smith, Douglas F

    2017-10-01

    Following changes in vegetation structure and pattern, along with a changing climate, large wildfire incidence has increased in forests throughout the western United States. Given this increase, there is great interest in whether fuels treatments and previous wildfire can alter fire severity patterns in large wildfires. We assessed the relative influence of previous fuels treatments (including wildfire), fire weather, vegetation, and water balance on fire-severity in the Rim Fire of 2013. We did this at three different spatial scales to investigate whether the influences on fire severity changed across scales. Both fuels treatments and previous low to moderate-severity wildfire reduced the prevalence of high-severity fire. In general, areas without recent fuels treatments and areas that previously burned at high severity tended to have a greater proportion of high-severity fire in the Rim Fire. Areas treated with prescribed fire, especially when combined with thinning, had the lowest proportions of high severity. The proportion of the landscape burned at high severity was most strongly influenced by fire weather and proportional area previously treated for fuels or burned by low to moderate severity wildfire. The proportion treated needed to effectively reduce the amount of high severity fire varied by spatial scale of analysis, with smaller spatial scales requiring a greater proportion treated to see an effect on fire severity. When moderate and high-severity fire encountered a previously treated area, fire severity was significantly reduced in the treated area relative to the adjacent untreated area. Our results show that fuels treatments and low to moderate-severity wildfire can reduce fire severity in a subsequent wildfire, even when burning under fire growth conditions. These results serve as further evidence that both fuels treatments and lower severity wildfire can increase forest resilience. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Stochastic representation of fire behavior in a wildland fire protection planning model for California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Keith Gilless; Jeremy S. Fried

    1998-01-01

    A fire behavior module was developed for the California Fire Economics Simulator version 2 (CFES2), a stochastic simulation model of initial attack on wildland fire used by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Fire rate of spread (ROS) and fire dispatch level (FDL) for simulated fires "occurring" on the same day are determined by making...

  9. Using the Large Fire Simulator System to map wildland fire potential for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaWen Hollingsworth; James Menakis

    2010-01-01

    This project mapped wildland fire potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States by using the large fire simulation system developed for Fire Program Analysis (FPA) System. The large fire simulation system, referred to here as LFSim, consists of modules for weather generation, fire occurrence, fire suppression, and fire growth modeling. Weather was generated with...

  10. Teach yourself visually Fire tablets

    CERN Document Server

    Marmel, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Expert visual guidance to getting the most out of your Fire tablet Teach Yourself VISUALLY Fire Tablets is the comprehensive guide to getting the most out of your new Fire tablet. Learn to find and read new bestsellers through the Kindle app, browse the app store to find top games, surf the web, send e-mail, shop online, and much more! With expert guidance laid out in a highly visual style, this book is perfect for those new to the Fire tablet, providing all the information you need to get the most out of your device. Abundant screenshots of the Fire tablet graphically rich, touch-based Androi

  11. Elastomer Spacers in Fire Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Paweł

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, fire resistance of linear joints seal made of elastomer spacers under standard fire conditions, and thermal degradation range of EPDM elastomeric spacers are investigated. The geometry of elastomer spacer joints is important not only for their load capacity under normal conditions - thickness, width, and cavity depth can also influence fire resistance performance. Linear joints of different thicknesses and widths have been tested. The fire insulation and fire integrity were verified for various arrangements. Relatively low thermal degradation rates have been measured, given that EPDM is a combustible material.

  12. Elastomer Spacers in Fire Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Paweł; Sędłak, Bartłomiej; Sulik, Paweł

    2017-09-01

    In the paper, fire resistance of linear joints seal made of elastomer spacers under standard fire conditions, and thermal degradation range of EPDM elastomeric spacers are investigated. The geometry of elastomer spacer joints is important not only for their load capacity under normal conditions - thickness, width, and cavity depth can also influence fire resistance performance. Linear joints of different thicknesses and widths have been tested. The fire insulation and fire integrity were verified for various arrangements. Relatively low thermal degradation rates have been measured, given that EPDM is a combustible material.

  13. FIRE PERMIT NOW ON EDH!

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS General Safety Group or

    2001-01-01

    The electronic version of the Fire Permit form is now active. The aim of the Fire Permit procedure is to reduce the risk of fire or explosion. It is mandatory when performing 'hot work' (mainly activities which involve the use of naked flames or other heat sources - e.g. welding, brazing, cutting, grinding, etc.). Its use is explained in the CERN Fire Protection Code E. (Fire Protection) The new electronic form, which is substantially unchanged from the previous authorizing procedure, will be available on the Electronic Document Handling system (https://edh.cern.ch/) as of 1st September 2001. From this date use of the paper version should be discontinued.

  14. Fire detection in warehouse facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dinaburg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Automatic sprinklers systems are the primary fire protection system in warehouse and storage facilities. The effectiveness of this strategy has come into question due to the challenges presented by modern warehouse facilities, including increased storage heights and areas, automated storage retrieval systems (ASRS), limitations on water supplies, and changes in firefighting strategies. The application of fire detection devices used to provide early warning and notification of incipient warehouse fire events is being considered as a component of modern warehouse fire protection.Fire Detection i

  15. Large-scale pool fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhaus Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of research into the burning behavior of large pool fires and fuel spill fires is presented. The features which distinguish such fires from smaller pool fires are mainly associated with the fire dynamics at low source Froude numbers and the radiative interaction with the fire source. In hydrocarbon fires, higher soot levels at increased diameters result in radiation blockage effects around the perimeter of large fire plumes; this yields lower emissive powers and a drastic reduction in the radiative loss fraction; whilst there are simplifying factors with these phenomena, arising from the fact that soot yield can saturate, there are other complications deriving from the intermittency of the behavior, with luminous regions of efficient combustion appearing randomly in the outer surface of the fire according the turbulent fluctuations in the fire plume. Knowledge of the fluid flow instabilities, which lead to the formation of large eddies, is also key to understanding the behavior of large-scale fires. Here modeling tools can be effectively exploited in order to investigate the fluid flow phenomena, including RANS- and LES-based computational fluid dynamics codes. The latter are well-suited to representation of the turbulent motions, but a number of challenges remain with their practical application. Massively-parallel computational resources are likely to be necessary in order to be able to adequately address the complex coupled phenomena to the level of detail that is necessary.

  16. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Fire Safety and Fire Control in the Chemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbraham, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses fire safety and fire control in the chemistry laboratory. The combustion process, extinguishing equipment, extinguisher maintenance and location, and fire safety and practices are included. (HM)

  17. Fire regime in Mediterranean ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Guido; Casula, Paolo; D'Andrea, Mirko; Fiorucci, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of burnt areas time series in Mediterranean regions suggests that ecosystems characterising this area consist primarily of species highly vulnerable to the fire but highly resilient, as characterized by a significant regenerative capacity after the fire spreading. In a few years the area burnt may once again be covered by the same vegetation present before the fire. Similarly, Mediterranean conifer forests, which often refers to plantations made in order to reforest the areas most severely degraded with high erosion risk, regenerate from seed after the fire resulting in high resilience to the fire as well. Only rarely, and usually with negligible damages, fire affects the areas covered by climax species in relation with altitude and soil types (i.e, quercus, fagus, abies). On the basis of these results, this paper shows how the simple Drossel-Schwabl forest fire model is able to reproduce the forest fire regime in terms of number of fires and burned area, describing whit good accuracy the actual fire perimeters. The original Drossel-Schwabl model has been slightly modified in this work by introducing two parameters (probability of propagation and regrowth) specific for each different class of vegetation cover. Using model selection methods based on AIC, the model with the optimal number of classes with different fire behaviour was selected. Two different case studies are presented in this work: Regione Liguria and Regione Sardegna (Italy). Both regions are situated in the center of the Mediterranean and are characterized by a high number of fires and burned area. However, the two regions have very different fire regimes. Sardinia is affected by the fire phenomenon only in summer whilst Liguria is affected by fires also in winter, with higher number of fires and larger burned area. In addition, the two region are very different in vegetation cover. The presence of Mediterranean conifers, (Pinus Pinaster, Pinus Nigra, Pinus halepensis) is quite spread in

  18. Sensitivity Analysis on Fire Modeling of Main Control Board Fire Using Fire Dynamics Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dae Il; Lim, Ho Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, sensitivity analyses for an MCB fire were performed to identify the effects on the MCR forced abandonment time according to the changes of height and number for fire initiation places. Hanul Unit 3 NPP was selected as a reference plant for this study. In this study, sensitivity analyses for an MCB fire were performed to identify the effects on the MCR forced abandonment time according to the changes of height and number of fire initiation places. A main control board (MCB) fire can cause a forced main control room (MCR) abandonment of the operators as well as the function failures or spurious operations of the control and instrumentation-related components. If the MCR cannot be habitable, a safe shutdown from outside the MCR can be achieved and maintained at an alternate shutdown panel independent from the MCR. When the fire modeling for an electrical cabinet such as an MCB was performed, its many input parameters can affect the fire simulation results. This study results showed that the decrease in the height of fire ignition place and the use of single fire ignition place in fire modeling for the propagating fire shortened MCR abandonment time.

  19. Fighting fires... with science

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2016-01-01

    CERN firefighters are working with a research centre in the United States to develop more effective firefighting techniques.   One of the UL FSRI’s model houses is set alight... in the interest of science. (Photo: ©UL FSRI) For around ten years, the Underwriters Laboratories Firefighter Safety Research Institute (UL FSRI) has been carrying out scientific research on the various techniques used by firefighters in the United States and around the world. This research has focused on evaluating the effectiveness and safety of current practices worldwide with the aim of developing even better techniques. In many cases the research has shown that a combination of techniques gives the best results. The interiors of the model houses are fully furnished. (Photo: ©UL FSRI) Art Arnalich, who has worked with fire brigades in the United States and Europe and is now a member of CERN’s Fire Brigade, has actively participated in this research since 2013. His knowledge of ...

  20. Joint Fire Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    trajectory. The rule of thumb minimum ceiling for Hellfire employment is 500 ft AGL. (3) Cannon Launched Guided Projectile - Copperhead (a... Copperhead is a 155-millimeter, cannon-launched, guided projectile with a shaped-charge warhead and a laser seeker. When fired at a moving or...stationary hard point target, Copperhead homes in on laser energy reflected from the target during the final part of its trajectory. A remote laser

  1. Fire Protection Informational Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (C02); 2. Methane {CH4 ); 3. Nitrous oxide (N20); 4...Hydrofluorocarbons 4% Hydrofluorocarbons 8% Methane 17% Methane 7°1. Black Carbon 19% Black Carbon 78% Carbon Dioxide (a) 1 00-year and (b) 20-Year Global... Methanol Pool Fi 60 50 ~ 40 ::J 8 30 20 • First experiments conducted in methanol fire • Nonsooting fuel is simpler starting point for

  2. Grizzly Gulch Fire, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Burning next door to the South Dakota towns of Deadwood and Lead, the Grizzly Gulch fire forced the evacuation of many residents in the first week of July, 2002. In addition, smoke closed many of the roads in the area. At the time the fire's behavior was extreme, with 'torching, spotting, and running.' In other words, the fire was primarily burning along the ground, with entire trees occasionally erupting into flame (torching). At the same time, burning embers were being thrown ahead of the fire (spotting). In some areas the fire was spreading from the crown of one tree to another (running). (This glossary of fire terms has a good list of definitions) The above image shows the fire on the morning of July 1, 2002. Actively burning areas, concentrated on the east (right) side of the fire, are colored red and orange. Dark red areas indicate burn scars, while forest and other vegetation appears green. The exposed rock of the Homestake gold mine, now the National Underground Science Laboratory, is pinkish-brown. The total extent of the fire is oulined in yellow. The image was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. More news about current wildfires in the United States is available from the National Fire Information Center. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  3. Fire weather conditions and fire-atmosphere interactions observed during low-intensity prescribed fires - RxCADRE 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig B. Clements; Neil P. Lareau; Daisuke Seto; Jonathan Contezac; Braniff Davis; Casey Teske; Thomas J. Zajkowski; Andrew T. Hudak; Benjamin C. Bright; Matthew B. Dickinson; Bret W. Butler; Daniel Jimenez; J. Kevin. Hiers

    2016-01-01

    The role of fire-atmosphere coupling on fire behaviour is not well established, and to date few field observations have been made to investigate the interactions between fire spread and fire-induced winds. Therefore, comprehensive field observations are needed to better understand micrometeorological aspects of fire spread. To address this need, meteorological...

  4. Structural fire risk of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Joana; Pereira, Mário

    2017-04-01

    Portugal is on the top of the European countries most affected by vegetation fires which underlines the importance of the existence of an updated and coherent fire risk map. This map represent a valuable supporting tool for forest and fire management decisions, focus prevention activities, improve the efficiency of fire detection systems, manage resources and actions of fire fighting with greater effectiveness. Therefore this study proposed a structural fire risk map of the vegetated area of Portugal using a deterministic approach based on the concept of fire risk currently accepted by the scientific community which consists in the combination of the fire hazard and the potential economic damage. The existing fire susceptibility map for Portugal based on the slope, land cover and fire probability, was adopted and updated by the use of a higher resolution digital terrain model, longer burnt area perimeter dataset (1975 - 2013) and the entire set of Corine land cover inventories. Five susceptibility classes were mapped to be in accordance with the Portuguese law and the results confirms the good performance of this model not only in terms of the favourability scores but also in the predictive values. Considering three different scenarios of (maximum, mean, and minimum annual) burnt area, fire hazard were estimate. The vulnerability scores and monetary values of species defined in the literature and by law were used to calculate the potential economic damage. The result was a fire risk map that identifies the areas more prone to be affected by fires in the future and provides an estimate of the economic damage of the fire which will be a valuable tool for forest and fire managers and to minimize the economic and environmental consequences of vegetation fires in Portugal. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by: (i) the project Interact - Integrative Research in Environment,Agro-Chain and Technology, NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-000017, research line BEST, cofinanced by

  5. Research status of warship fire safety engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Shouxiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The theory of warship fire safety engineering is the basis of damage control engineering. According to the public safety triangle and the characteristics of ship damage protection engineering, this paper proposes a theoretical framework system for ship fire safety engineering, including ship fire development, ship fire damage and ship fire protection. The progress of these three parts are summarized in such aspects as enclosed fire dynamics, open space fire dynamics, fire damage mechanisms for personnel, equipment and structures, fire smoke control, fire elimination technology and new fire extinguishing technology. By optimizing the theoretical system of warship fire safety engineering and improving fire prevention and control technology, the survivability of warships will be enhanced.

  6. Standpipe systems for fire protection

    CERN Document Server

    Isman, Kenneth E

    2017-01-01

    This important new manual goes beyond the published NFPA standards on installation of standpipe systems to include the rules in the International Building Code, municipal fire codes, the National Fire Code of Canada, and information on inspection, testing, and maintenance of standpipe systems. Also covered are the interactions between standpipe and sprinkler systems, since these important fire protection systems are so frequently installed together. Illustrated with design examples and practical applications to reinforce the learning experience, this is the go-to reference for engineers, architects, design technicians, building inspectors, fire inspectors, and anyone that inspects, tests or maintains fire protection systems. Fire marshals and plan review authorities that have the responsibility for reviewing and accepting plans and hydraulic calculations for standpipe systems are also an important audience, as are firefighters who actually use standpipe systems. As a member of the committees responsible for s...

  7. Resonate-and-fire neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, E M

    2001-01-01

    We suggest a simple spiking model-resonate-and-fire neuron, which is similar to the integrate-and-fire neuron except that the state variable is complex. The model provides geometric illustrations to many interesting phenomena occurring in biological neurons having subthreshold damped oscillations of membrane potential. For example, such neurons prefer a certain resonant frequency of the input that is nearly equal to their eigenfrequency, they can be excited or inhibited by a doublet (two pulses) depending on its interspike interval, and they can fire in response to an inhibitory input. All these properties could be observed in Hodgkin-Huxley-type models. We use the resonate-and-fire model to illustrate possible sensitivity of biological neurons to the fine temporal structure of the input spike train. Being an analogue of the integrate-and-fire model, the resonate-and-fire model is computationally efficient and suitable for simulations of large networks of spiking neurons.

  8. Fires. September-December 07

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    GermAny 4-319 Fires (105 T) (173 IBCT (Abn)) VILSeCk, GermAny 5 Fires Sqdn (155 T) (2 SCR) wurzBurG, GermAny 69 ADA BDE (V Corps) IDAr OBerSTeIn...Corps) IDAr OBerSTeIn, GermAny 1-94 Fires (MLRS) (EAB) BAumHOLDer, GermAny 4-27 Fires (155 SP) (2-1 AD HBCT) rAmSTeIn AFB, GermAny 19 BCD OSAn AFB...173 IBCT (Abn)) VILSeCk, GermAny 5 Fires Sqdn (155 T) (2 SCR) wurzBurG, GermAny 69 ADA Bde (V Corps) IDAr OBerSTeIn, GermAny 1-94 Fires (MLRS) (EAB

  9. Fire-related medical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Douglas R.

    1987-01-01

    Spacecraft fire safety may be improved by the use of a fire-retardant atmosphere in occupied spaces. Low concentrations of oxygen can protect humans from fire damage by reducing the rate and spread of combustion, but care must be taken to avoid the hypoxic effects of oxygen-lean atmospheres. Crews can live and work in 11 percent oxygen if barometric pressure were adjusted to maintain the partial pressure of oxygen above 16 kPa. Eleven percent oxygen should prevent most types of fires, since 15 percent oxygen retards the combustion of paper and 13 percent oxygen extinguishes pentane flames. Test results indicate that seated humans can perform mental tasks in atmospheres containing 11.5 percent oxygen. Although this strategy of fire safety is under consideration for submarines, it could be adapted to spacecraft once operational procedures define a maximum hyperbaric pressure and fire research defines the effects of reduced oxygen concentrations on combustion in low gravity environments.

  10. Tendon palpation during agonist contraction and antagonist co-contraction to assess wrist flexor and extensor muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, J A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate direct tendon palpation during agonist contraction and antagonist co-contraction as a method to assess wrist flexor and extensor muscle function in cases of upper limb paralysis. On one occasion, five doctors examined 17 patients with partial paralysis of the upper limb resulting from brachial plexus or cervical spinal cord injury. We asked examiners to determine if the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) were paralyzed, weak or strong in each patient. Examiners tested flexion - extension and radial - ulnar deviation against resistance and palpated wrist motor tendons. While palpating tendons, co-contractions were encouraged by soliciting finger extension to evaluate the FCU, thumb extension to evaluate the ECU, and finger flexion to evaluate the ECRB. Kappa values were 0.8 for the ECRL, 0.7 for the ECRB, 0.5 for the ECU, 0.8 for the FCR, 0.6 for the PL, and 0.8 for the FCU, indicating moderate to almost perfect agreement between examiners. Tendon palpation during muscle examination was adequate to identify complete paralysis, as well as weak and strong muscle contractions. This assessment helps to identify muscles that could be used during nerve or tendon transfer for reconstruction of extensive upper limb paralysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. A national cohesive wildland fire management strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture; Office of Wildland Fire Coordination. Department of the Interior

    2011-01-01

    Addressing wildfire is not simply a fire management, fire operations, or wildland-urban interface problem - it is a larger, more complex land management and societal issue. The vision for the next century is to: Safely and effectively extinguish fire, when needed; use fire where allowable; manage our natural resources; and as a Nation, live with wildland fire. Three...

  12. Sherborne Missile Fire Frequency with Unconstraint Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shaquan

    2018-01-01

    For the modeling problem of shipborne missile fire frequency, the fire frequency models with unconstant parameters were proposed, including maximum fire frequency models with unconstant parameters, and actual fire frequency models with unconstant parameters, which can be used to calculate the missile fire frequency with unconstant parameters.

  13. Decision modeling for analyzing fire action outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald MacGregor; Armando Gonzalez-Caban

    2008-01-01

    A methodology for incident decomposition and reconstruction is developed based on the concept of an "event-frame model." The event-frame model characterizes a fire incident in terms of (a) environmental events that pertain to the fire and the fire context (e.g., fire behavior, weather, fuels) and (b) management events that represent responses to the fire...

  14. 14 CFR 25.851 - Fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire extinguishers. 25.851 Section 25.851... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25.851 Fire extinguishers. (a) Hand fire extinguishers. (1) The following minimum number of hand fire extinguishers must be...

  15. Fire behavior modeling-a decision tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Cohen; Bill Bradshaw

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of an analytical model as a fire management decision tool is determined by the correspondence of its descriptive capability to the specific decision context. Fire managers must determine the usefulness of fire models as a decision tool when applied to varied situations. Because the wildland fire phenomenon is complex, analytical fire spread models will...

  16. Fire Management/Suppression Systems/Concepts Relating to Aircraft Cabin Fire Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    crash fires, fire detection, fire suppression, fire compart- mentation, smoke control , fire barriers, evacuation. . 19 etity Cleself. (of thi ’etul 30...gating and sensitivity to provide reliability under the wide range of operating environments encountered. Smoke control for in-flight fires is directed...toward smoke containment accompanied by rapid fire suppression, followed by smoke removal. Smoke control in the post-crash fire scenario is defined as

  17. Fire Service Emergency Management Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    may be a matter of an hour or days. Helicopters or small planes are effective in evaluating the dimensions and direction of the fire problem...Assistance and Welfare Regulations Statehouse Boise, ID 83720 (208) 334-4107 Illinois Palatine Fire Department Aviation Accidents 39 East Col fax Palatine ...February 1983. TRANSPORTATION DISASTERS Abriel, Warren W. "Albany Plane Crash - Disaster on Our Hands!" Fire Command, May 1972, p. 14. Collins, Charles

  18. Fire Support: 1995 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-05

    world politics in the early 1990s dictate that issues surrounding our Fire Support systems and structure be critically examined to ensure they can continue to meet our worldwide contingencies. This study will examine the current application of Fire Support within the U.S. Army and recommend doctrinal and structural issues needing resolution to facilitate successful future evolution. Modern technology, geopolitical conditions, and evolving doctrine of AirLand Battle-Future indicate broadening roles and changing emphasis for Fire Support. At

  19. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to the development, testing, and installation of hydrogen fire detectors based on ultraviolet, near-infrared, mid-infrared, andor far-infrared flame emission bands. Yet, there is no intensity calibrated hydrogen-air flame spectrum over this range in the literature and consequently, it can be difficult to compare the merits of different radiation-based hydrogen fire detectors.

  20. Stenosing tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillemin, V.; Guerini, H.; Bard, H.; Morvan, G.

    2012-01-01

    Tenosynovitis refers to an inflammatory condition involving the synovial sheath of a tendon. Stenosing tenosynovitis is a peculiar entity caused by multiple factors, including local anatomy, mechanical factors, and hormonal factors. The main forms include de Quervain tendinopathy; trigger finger (stenosing tenosynovitis involving the flexor digitorum tendons); stenosing tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, or extensor comunis tendons; stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis tendon; and stenosing tenosynovitis of the peroneal tendons. The cardinal finding on ultrasonography is the presence of a thickened retinaculum or pulley that constricts the osseofibrous tunnel through which the tendon runs. PMID:23396894

  1. FIRE_AX_SFC_FUNCHAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia e Geofisica (INMG) Funchal Sounding...

  2. FIRE_AX_CSU_WNDPRFS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Colorado State University (CSU) Wind Profiler Data in Native format...

  3. 46 CFR 95.05-15 - Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire... Equipment, Where Required § 95.05-15 Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems. (a) Approved hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems shall...

  4. 46 CFR 193.05-15 - Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire... Equipment, Where Required § 193.05-15 Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems. (a) Approved hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems shall...

  5. 46 CFR 76.05-25 - Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire... Required § 76.05-25 Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems. (a) Approved hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems shall be installed on...

  6. Fire weather and behavior of the Little Sioux fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney W. Sando; Donald A. Haines

    1972-01-01

    In mid-May 1971, a northern Minnesota fire burned almost 15,000 acres of forest land. The extreme fire behavior it exhibited was the product of a number of described features. This paper documents the attendant fuel and weather conditions.

  7. How to increase fire safety in buildings: Fire safety engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van R.A.P. (Ruud)

    2011-01-01

    Fire means beside direct (financial)damage often far more indirect costs caused by interruption of operations and loss in sales, market share, property and,in the worst case people can get injured or even get killed (on average around80 persons a year). Fire in buildings is clearly a disaster and

  8. Filicide by Fire

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler, Nichola; Barnoux, Magali F.L.

    2016-01-01

    Filicide is the killing of a child by their own parents(s) (biological, adoptive or step-parent; Flynn, Windfuhr, & Shaw, 2009); infanticide and neonaticide are defined as the killing of an infant under 1 year (Flynn, Shaw, & Abel, 2007) and 24 hours old respectively (Resnick, 1969). Although filicide is rare, estimated at 1.92 cases per 100,000 inhabitants for girls and 2.93 for boys under the age of 18 (Pinheiro, 2006), it is not a recent phenomenon (Langer, 1974). Causing death by fire is ...

  9. Witch Wildland Fire, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The October wildfires that plagued southern California were some of the worst on record. One of these, the Witch Wildland fire, burned 198,000 acres north of San Diego, destroying 1125 homes, commercial structures, and outbuildings. Over 3,000 firefighters finally contained the fire two weeks after it started on October 21. Now begins the huge task of planning and implementing mitigation measures to replant and reseed the burned areas. This ASTER image depicts the area after the fire, on November 6; vegetation is green, burned areas are dark red, and urban areas are blue. On the burn severity index image, calculated using infrared and visible bands, red areas are the most severely burned, followed by green and blue. This information can help the US Forest Service to plan post-fire activities. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The

  10. Fire safety in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jomaas, Grunde; Torero, Jose L.; Eigenbrod, Christian

    2015-01-01

    An international research team has been assembled to reduce the uncertainty and risk in the design of spacecraft fire safety systems by testing material samples in a series of flight experiments (Saffire 1, 2, and-3) to be conducted in an Orbital Science Corporation Cygnus vehicle after it has...... towers (about 5 s) and parabolic flights (about 20 s). In contrast to sounding rockets, the experiments offer a much larger volume, and the reduction in the oxygen concentration during the Saffire experiments will be minimal. The selection of the experimental settings for the first three Saffire...

  11. Vulcan god of fire

    CERN Document Server

    McLelland, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Vulcan: God of Fire is a historical account of Britain's nuclear deterrent force, the development of atomic/thermonuclear weapons and the bombers. It includes a description of the design, development and manufacture of the Vulcan, the flight testing programme and entry into RAF service. There is also a full account of the Vulcan's career, including its primary role as a nuclear bomber and as a key participant in the 1982 Falklands conflict. Further coverage includes the use of the Vulcan as a refuelling tanker and reconnaissance platform, and the recent project to restore a Vulcan to flyi

  12. Forwardly-placed firearm fire control assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frickey, Steven J. (Rigby, ID)

    2001-12-22

    A firearm fire control assembly for disposition in a forwardly placed support-hand operative relationship within a firearm having a combination of a firing pin and a firearm hammer adapted to engage and fire a cartridge, a sear assembly to alternately engage and disengage the combination of the firearm hammer and firing pin, and a trigger assembly including a movable trigger mechanism that is operable to engage the sear assembly to cause the firearm hammer firing pin combination to fire the firearm, a fire control assembly including a fire control depression member and a fire control rod operably connected to the depression member, and being positioned in a forward disposition disposed within a forestock of the firearm, and the depression member adapted to be operably engaged and depressed by the user's conventional forwardly placed support hand to maneuver the fire control rod to provide firing control of the firing of the firearm.

  13. Forwardly-placed firearm fire control assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickey, Steven J.

    2001-12-22

    A firearm fire control assembly for disposition in a forwardly placed support-hand operative relationship within a firearm having a combination of a firing pin and a firearm hammer adapted to engage and fire a cartridge, a sear assembly to alternately engage and disengage the combination of the firearm hammer and firing pin, and a trigger assembly including a movable trigger mechanism that is operable to engage the sear assembly to cause the firearm hammer firing pin combination to fire the firearm, a fire control assembly including a fire control depression member and a fire control rod operably connected to the depression member, and being positioned in a forward disposition disposed within a forestock of the firearm, and the depression member adapted to be operably engaged and depressed by the user's conventional forwardly placed support hand to maneuver the fire control rod to provide firing control of the firing of the firearm.

  14. Can Charcoal Provide Information About Fire Effects and Fire Severity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Claire; Hudpsith, Victoria; Doerr, Stefan; Santin, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Building an understanding of the impact of a wildfire is critical to the management of ecosystems. Aspects of fire severity such as the amount of soil heating, can relate to post-fire ecosystem recovery. Yet, there is no quantitative measure of this in current post-burn fire severity assessments, which are mostly qualitative ground-based visual assessments of organic matter loss, and as such can be subjective and variable between ecosystems. In order to develop a unifying fire severity assessment we explore the use of charcoal produced during a wildfire, as a tool. Charcoal has been suggested to retain some information about the nature of the fire in which it was created and one such physical property of charcoal that can be measured post-fire is its ability to reflect light when studied under oil using reflectance microscopy. The amount of light reflected varies between charcoals and is thought to be explained by the differential ordering of graphite-like phases within the char however, to what aspects of a fire's nature this alteration pertains is unknown. We have explored the formation of charcoal reflectance in 1) laboratory-based experiments using an iCone calorimeter and in 2) experimental forest scale and natural wildland fires occurring in Canada in spring 2015. In our laboratory experiments we assessed the formation and evolution of charcoal reflectance during pre-ignition heating, peak fire intensity through to the end of flaming and the transition to oxidative/smoldering heating regimes. In the prescribed and natural wildland fires we positioned the same woods used in our laboratory experiments, rigged with thermocouples in the path of oncoming fires in order to assess the resulting charcoal reflectance in response to the heating regime imposed by the fire on the samples. In this presentation we will outline our approach, findings and discuss the potential for charcoal reflectance to provide a tool in post-fire assessments seeking to determine levels of

  15. Operator performance and localized muscle fatigue in a simulated space vehicle control task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Fourier transforms in a special purpose computer were utilized to obtain power spectral density functions from electromyograms of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, brachioradialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, brachialis, and pronator teres in eight subjects performing isometric tracking tasks in two directions utilizing a prototype spacecraft rotational hand controller. Analysis of these spectra in general purpose computers aided in defining muscles involved in performing the task, and yielded a derived measure potentially useful in predicting task termination. The triceps was the only muscle to show significant differences in all possible tests for simple effects in both tasks and, overall, was the most consistently involved of the six muscles. The total power monitored for triceps, biceps, and brachialis dropped to minimal levels across all subjects earlier than for other muscles. However, smaller variances existed for the biceps, brachioradialis, brachialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles and could provide longer predictive times due to smaller standard deviations for a greater population range.

  16. Regulatory aspects of fire toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G L

    1987-12-01

    Fire creates a complex toxic environment involving flame, heat, oxygen depletion, smoke, and toxic gases. The nature of that environment is dependent upon not only the materials present but on the fire event, that is, the fire scenario. Materials have different toxic gas profiles under different conditions; therefore, toxic fire gas generation is not intrinsic to any one material. Large fires in buildings constitute a severe toxic threat regardless of the materials being burned. In the past, building codes in the United States included the phrase, "no more toxic than wood," in reference to fire gases from building materials. Such phrases have recently been deleted, because of the lack of either an accepted definition or test methodology to assess toxicity. While several states have attempted regulatory activity, the most recent approach (taken by the state of New York) has been the establishment of a data bank on toxic potency of building and furnishing materials. The utility of such a data bank without available hazard analysis methodology is open to discussion, since toxic potency data are not directly applicable to toxic hazard assessment. A number of small-scale animal exposure tests have been developed to assess the potency of the toxic combustion products from combustible materials. Criticism of these tests relates to the relevance of the combustion module (a smoke generation apparatus) and the appropriateness of the animal model, particularly for irritant gases. Recent data from more than 2000 fire fatality cases and carbon monoxide exposure cases are discussed in this paper to help put small-scale laboratory test results into perspective. Toxicity is only one of the several fire properties related to materials. All fire parameters are interrelated, that is, they are not independent variables. Thus, predicting the toxicity of burning materials is a problem without a comprehensive solution. Measures have been taken, however, to reduce the number of fires and

  17. Leading preparedness for local fire agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Goble, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In the post-9/11 world, the role of the fire service in the homeland security space is not clearly defined. The fire service has provided America’s emergency response since the days of Benjamin Franklin and the Union Fire Company. Neighborhood fire stations have expanded since those early days as the threats and hazards have evolved. Fire departments remain firmly entrenched in communities delivering traditional services, such as fire ...

  18. WRF-Fire Applied in Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrinkova, Nina; Jordanov, Georgi; Mandel, Jan

    2010-01-01

    WRF-Fire consists of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) coupled with a fire spread model, based on the level-set method. We describe a preliminary application of WRF-Fire to a forest fire in Bulgaria, oportunities for research of forest fire models for Bulgaria, and plans for the development of an Environmental Decision Support Systems which includes computational modeling of fire behavior.

  19. Smoke production in fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarvaranta, L.; Kokkala, M. [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland). Building Physics, Building Services and Fire Technology

    1995-12-31

    Characterization of smoke, factors influencing smoke production and experimental methods for measuring smoke production are discussed in this literature review. Recent test-based correlation models are also discussed. Despite the large number of laboratories using different fire testing methods, published smoke data have been scarce. Most technical literature on smoke production from building materials is about experimental results in small scale tests. Compilations from cone calorimeter tests have been published for a few materials, e.g. upholstered furniture materials and some building products. Mass optical density data and compilations of gravimetric soot data are available for various materials as well as a number of smoke obscuration values. For a given material often a wide range of values of smoke output can be found in the literature and care should be exercised in applying the appropriate value in each case. In laboratory experiments, the production of smoke and its optical properties are often measured simultaneously with other fire properties as heat release and flame spread. The measurements are usually dynamic in full scale, i.e. they are performed in a flow-through system. In small scale they may be either dynamic, as in the cone calorimeter, or static, i.e. the smoke is accumulated in a closed box. Small-scale tests are necessary as practical tools. Full-scale tests are generally considered to be more reliable and are needed to validitate the small-scale tests

  20. Simulating Building Fires for Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ricardo C.; Johnson, Randall P.

    1987-01-01

    Fire scenes for cinematography staged at relatively low cost in method that combines several existing techniques. Nearly realistic scenes, suitable for firefighter training, produced with little specialized equipment. Sequences of scenes set up quickly and easily, without compromising safety because model not burned. Images of fire, steam, and smoke superimposed on image of building to simulate burning of building.

  1. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the second of two papers, describing probe measurements of deposit buildup and removal (shedding), conducted in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, firing straw and wood. Investigations of deposit buildup and shedding have been made by use of an advanced online deposit probe and a s...

  2. Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 3: Effects of fuel treatments on fire severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erik Martinson; Phillip N. Omi; Wayne Shepperd

    2003-01-01

    The role played by the fuel conditions within the Hayman Fire severity was complex and does not lend itself to a single conclusion or simple summary. Uncertainties in the original treatment prescription, its implementation, discerning the coverage, extent, and condition at the time of the fire made it difficult for us to clearly determine treatment effects and relate...

  3. Smoking and Home Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter MP4 1.9 MB Stock photography Use our free high-resolution photos to customize your materials and help spread the word in your community about smoking and fire safety. Fire Prevention and Public Education Exchange The Exchange is a collection of national, state ...

  4. CERN Fire Brigade rescue simulation

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Fire Brigade is made up of experienced firemen from all of the 20 Member States. In these images they are seen at a 'Discovery Monday' held at the Microcosm exhibition. Here visitors learn how the Fire Brigade deal with various situations, including a simulated cave rescue performed by the Hazardous Environments Response Team.

  5. Fighting forest fires in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Carlos Mendes de Morais

    2013-01-01

    Fire has been used in Brazil for many years, but the increased use of this tool, combined with natural events and the presence of large forest and agricultural areas, has led to a significant jump in the number of forest fires, most of them caused by accident. To optimize existing resources and to cope with growing demand, action levels were adopted according to the...

  6. The 1988 Fires in Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, Abby

    2008-01-01

    The 1988 fires at Yellowstone National Park burned 1.4 million acres in the tri-state areas of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho--encompassing the greater Yellowstone area--and burned some 800,000 acres within the park itself (Franke 2000). This article discusses this extraordinary fire event and contains helpful resources for bringing the science of…

  7. Probability model for analyzing fire management alternatives: theory and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick W. Bratten

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical probability model has been developed for analyzing program alternatives in fire management. It includes submodels or modules for predicting probabilities of fire behavior, fire occurrence, fire suppression, effects of fire on land resources, and financial effects of fire. Generalized "fire management situations" are used to represent actual fire...

  8. Does Yellowstone need large fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romme, W.H. (Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO (United States)); Turner, M.G.; Gardner, R.H.; Hargrove, W.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States))

    1994-06-01

    This paper synthesizes several studies initiated after the 1988 Yellowstone fires, to address the question whether the ecological effects of large fires differ qualitatively as well as quantitatively from small fires. Large burn patches had greater dominance and contagion of burn severity classes, and a higher proportion of crown fire. Burned aspen stands resprouted vigorously over an extensive area, but heavy ungulate browsing prevented establishment of new tree-sized stems. A burst of sexual reproduction occurred in forest herbs that usually reproduce vegetatively, and new aspen clones became established from seed - a rare event in this region. We conclude that the effects of large fires are qualitatively different, but less dramatically so than expected.

  9. Decreasing Fires in Mediterranean Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Turco

    Full Text Available Forest fires are a serious environmental hazard in southern Europe. Quantitative assessment of recent trends in fire statistics is important for assessing the possible shifts induced by climate and other environmental/socioeconomic changes in this area. Here we analyse recent fire trends in Portugal, Spain, southern France, Italy and Greece, building on a homogenized fire database integrating official fire statistics provided by several national/EU agencies. During the period 1985-2011, the total annual burned area (BA displayed a general decreasing trend, with the exception of Portugal, where a heterogeneous signal was found. Considering all countries globally, we found that BA decreased by about 3020 km2 over the 27-year-long study period (i.e. about -66% of the mean historical value. These results are consistent with those obtained on longer time scales when data were available, also yielding predominantly negative trends in Spain and France (1974-2011 and a mixed trend in Portugal (1980-2011. Similar overall results were found for the annual number of fires (NF, which globally decreased by about 12600 in the study period (about -59%, except for Spain where, excluding the provinces along the Mediterranean coast, an upward trend was found for the longer period. We argue that the negative trends can be explained, at least in part, by an increased effort in fire management and prevention after the big fires of the 1980's, while positive trends may be related to recent socioeconomic transformations leading to more hazardous landscape configurations, as well as to the observed warming of recent decades. We stress the importance of fire data homogenization prior to analysis, in order to alleviate spurious effects associated with non-stationarities in the data due to temporal variations in fire detection efforts.

  10. Cable fire tests in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2000-05-01

    Modifications are being carried out in all French nuclear power plants to improve fire safety. These modifications are based on a three level defense in depth concept: fire preventing, fire containing and fire controlling. Fire containing requires many modifications such as protection of cable races and assessment of fire propagation which both need R and D development. On one hand, cable wraps made with mineral wool were tested in all configurations including effect of aging, overheating and fire and qualified for the use as protection from common failure modes. On the other hand, cables races in scale one were subject to gas burner or solvent pool fire to simulate ignition and fire propagation between trays and flash over situations. These tests have been performed under several typical lay out conditions. The results of the tests can be used as input data in computer modelling for validation of fire protection measures. (orig.) [German] Modifikationen werden in allen franzoesischen Kernkraftwerken durchgefuehrt, um die Brandschutzsicherung zu verbessern. Die Modifikationen sind auf einem Dreistufenkonzept begruendet: brandvorbeugende Massnahmen, begrenzter Brandschutz und Brandkontrolle. Begrenzter Brandschutz verlangt viele Modifikationen wie Brandschutz von Kabelanlagen und Kenntnisse ueber Feuerentwicklung, die Forschung und Entwicklung brauchen. Einerseits werden die aus Mineralwolle hergestellten Kabelhuellen fuer alle moeglichen Faelle geprueft, einschliesslich der Auswirkung von Alterung, Ueberhitzung und Feuer, um so die Huellen als Schutz zu nutzen. Andererseits werden Kabelanlagen der Stufe eins mit Gas und Loesungsmitteln entzuendet, um Entzuendung, Feuerentwicklung und Feueruebersprung zu simulieren. Diese Versuche werden unter unterschiedlichen Anlagenbedingungen durchgefuehrt. Die Ergebnisse koennen fuer Computermodelle zur Pruefung von Brandschutztechniken benutzt werden. (orig.)

  11. MODIS NDVI Response Following Fires in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, G.; Kovacs, K.; Kharuk, V. I.

    2003-01-01

    The Siberian boreal forest is considered a carbon sink but may become an important source of carbon dioxide if climatic warming predictions are correct. The forest is continually changing through various disturbance mechanisms such as insects, logging, mineral exploitation, and especially fires. Patterns of disturbance and forest recovery processes are important factors regulating carbon flux in this area. NASA's Terra MODIS provides useful information for assessing location of fires and post fire changes in forests. MODIS fire (MOD14), and NDVI (MOD13) products were used to examine fire occurrence and post fire variability in vegetation cover as indicated by NDVI. Results were interpreted for various post fire outcomes, such as decreased NDVI after fire, no change in NDVI after fire and positive NDVI change after fire. The fire frequency data were also evaluated in terms of proximity to population centers, and transportation networks.

  12. Comparison of crown fire modeling systems used in three fire management applications

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    The relative behavior of surface-crown fire spread rate modeling systems used in three fire management applications—CFIS (Crown Fire Initiation and Spread), FlamMap and NEXUS— is compared using fire environment characteristics derived from a dataset of destructively measured canopy fuel and associated stand characteristics. Although the surface-crown modeling systems predict the same basic fire behavior characteristics (type of fire, spread rate) using the same basic fire environment characte...

  13. Holocene fire dynamics in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clear, Jennifer; Seppa, Heikki; Kuosmanen, Niina; Molinari, Chiara; Lehsten, Veiko; Allen, Katherine; Bradshaw, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Prescribed burning is advocated in Fennoscandia to promote regeneration and to encourage biodiversity. This method of forest management is based on the perception that fire was much more frequent in the recent past and over a century of active fire suppression has created a boreal forest ecosystem almost free of natural fire. The absence of fire is thought to have contributed to the widespread dominance of Picea abies (Norway spruce) with the successive spruce dominated forest further reducing fire ignition potential. However, humans have altered the natural fire dynamics of Fennoscandia since the early- to mid-Holocene and disentangling the anthropogenic driven fire dynamics from the natural fire dynamics is challenging. Through palaeoecology and sedimentary charcoal deposits we are able to explore the Holocene spatial and temporal variability and changing drivers of fire and vegetation dynamics in Fennoscandia. At the local-scale, two forest hollow environments (analysed for high resolution macroscopic charcoal and pollen analysis and their fire and vegetation history are compared to identify unique and mutual changes in disturbance history. Pollen derived quantitative reconstruction of vegetation at both the local- and regional-scale identifies local-scale disturbance dynamics and large-scale ecosystem response. Spatio-temporal heterogeneity and variability in biomass burning is explored throughout Fennoscandia and Denmark to identify the changing drives of fire dynamics throughout the Holocene. Palaeo-vegetation reconstructions are compared to process-based, climate driven dynamic vegetation model output to test the significance of fire frequency as a driver of vegetation composition and dynamics. Early-Holocene fire regimes in Fennoscandia are driven by natural climate variations and fuel availability. The establishment and spread of Norway spruce is driven by an increase in continentality of climate, but local natural and anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance

  14. Assessing fire risk in Portugal during the summer fire season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacamara, C. C.; Pereira, M. G.; Trigo, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Since 1998, Instituto de Meteorologia, the Portuguese Weather Service has relied on the Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI) System (van Wagner, 1987) to produce daily forecasts of fire risk. The FWI System consists of six components that account for the effects of fuel moisture and wind on fire behavior. The first three components, i.e. the Fine Fuel Moisture Code (FFMC), the Duff Moisture Code (DMC) and the Drought Code (DC) respectively rate the average moisture content of surface litter, decomposing litter, and organic (humus) layers of the soil. Wind effects are then added to FFMC leading to the Initial Spread Index (ISI) that rates fire spread. The remaining two fuel moisture codes (DMC and DC) are in turn combined to produce the Buildup Index (BUI) that is a rating of the total amount of fuel available for combustion. BUI is finally combined with ISI to produce the Fire Weather Index (FWI) that represents the rate of fire intensity. Classes of fire danger and levels of preparedness are commonly defined on an empirical way for a given region by calibrating the FWI System against wildfire activity as defined by the recorded number of events and by the observed burned area over a given period of time (Bovio and Camia, 1998). It is also a well established fact that distributions of burned areas are heavily skewed to the right and tend to follow distributions of the exponential-type (Cumming, 2001). Based on the described context, a new procedure is presented for calibrating the FWI System during the summer fire season in Portugal. Two datasets were used covering a 28-year period (1980-2007); i) the official Portuguese wildfire database which contains detailed information on fire events occurred in the 18 districts of Continental Portugal and ii) daily values of the six components of the FWI System as derived from reanalyses (Uppala et al., 2005) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Calibration of the FWI System is then performed in two

  15. 46 CFR 107.235 - Servicing of hand portable fire extinguishers, semi-portable fire extinguishers and fixed fire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Servicing of hand portable fire extinguishers, semi-portable fire extinguishers and fixed fire-extinguishing systems. 107.235 Section 107.235 Shipping COAST... CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.235 Servicing of hand portable fire extinguishers, semi...

  16. The Immortal Fire Within

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, William

    2007-12-01

    Preface; Key to abbreviations in notes; 1. Through rugged ways; 2. Ardent and faithful work with a telescope; 3. Mars; his moons and his heavens; 4. A seeker of comets; 5. Vanderbilt astronomer; 6. In the realm of the nebulae; 7. Go west, young man!; 8. Hanging fire; 9. On Mt. Hamilton; 10. A year of wonders; 11. The young rebel; 12. 'I am tired here'; 13. Immortality; 14. Travels and travails; 15. Barnard and Mars; 16. Nature's true artisan; 17. A tide in his affairs; 18. Yerkes observatory; 19. Disappointments and triumphs; 20. The comet and Milky Way photographs; 21. Comet tales; 22. Observer of all that shines - or obscures; 23. Eclipse and decline; 24. Ad astra; Index.

  17. Mass Fire Model Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-31

    t A PIE MCCL. U.S Us911L.WW Ul 1" Doa 1111 S n S *IILJn ]a "M 00 DO c ..,NII N , W ,M. -aP I %t Nt 54. N iN As 1, I...fire, abient wind *40 rn/s. 306 *1t14t4 terpC cotr Arco " 4110R WINOW" COPt*11 IJfAM PINE M6DL UNWM rim MODEL awlwlmn lul.ll l mD. lO 0 .in mwuwa,,vrus.l...Soc., A24, pp 1-23, 1956. 28. Tarifa, Carlos S., P. Perez del Notario, and F. Garciai Mbreno, "On the Flight Paths and Lifetimes of Burning

  18. The immediate effects of tension of counterforce forearm brace on neuromuscular performance of wrist extensor muscles in subjects with lateral humeral epicondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, G Y F; Chan, H L

    2004-02-01

    Within-subject repeated-measures study. To examine the immediate effects of counterforce forearm brace on isokinetic strenght stretch reflex, passive stretching pain threshold of the wrist extensors, and proprioception of the wrist in subjects with lateral humeral epicondylosis for different strap tensions of a forearm brace. Counterforce forearm bracing has been used for treating lateral humeral epicondylosis, but the effect of brace tension has not been well reported. Fifteen subjects diagnosed with lateral humeral epicondylosis on their dominant arm were tested under 4 randomized conditions: (1) no brace, (2) brace with minimal tension, (3) brace with 25-N tension, and (4) brace with 50-N tension. The tests included isokinetic wrist extensors strength, passive stretching force in wrist flexion to elicit pain in the wrist extensors, wrist proprioception, and stretch reflex latency of the extensor carpi ulnari. A repeated-measures MANOVA was used to analyze the data and significant results were further analyzed with post hoc linear contrasts (alpha = .05). Among the 4 conditions, significant differences were found in wrist proprioception P = .032) and pain threshold to passive stretching of the wrist extensors (P = .05), but were not found in wrist extension isokinetic strength and stretch reflex latency of the extensor carpi ulnaris. A forearm counterforce brace, as applied in this study, affects wrist joint proprioception and increases the pain threshold to passive stretching of the wrist extensors in subjects with lateral humeral epicondylosis, but it has no effect on wrist extensor strength and stretch reflex latency of the extensor carpi ulnaris.

  19. Cool echidnas survive the fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Julia; Cooper, Christine Elizabeth; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fires have occurred throughout history, including those associated with the meteoroid impact at the Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–Pg) boundary that eliminated many vertebrate species. To evaluate the recent hypothesis that the survival of the K–Pg fires by ancestral mammals was dependent on their ability to use energy-conserving torpor, we studied body temperature fluctuations and activity of an egg-laying mammal, the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), often considered to be a ‘living fossil’, before, during and after a prescribed burn. All but one study animal survived the fire in the prescribed burn area and echidnas remained inactive during the day(s) following the fire and substantially reduced body temperature during bouts of torpor. For weeks after the fire, all individuals remained in their original territories and compensated for changes in their habitat with a decrease in mean body temperature and activity. Our data suggest that heterothermy enables mammals to outlast the conditions during and after a fire by reducing energy expenditure, permitting periods of extended inactivity. Therefore, torpor facilitates survival in a fire-scorched landscape and consequently may have been of functional significance for mammalian survival at the K–Pg boundary. PMID:27075255

  20. Kindle Fire HDX for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Muir, Nancy C

    2013-01-01

    Spark your interest in Kindle Fire HDX and start burning through books, movies, music, and more with this bestselling guide! The Kindle Fire HDX is Amazon's premiere tablet. With its new, more powerful Android operating system, this latest version has some exciting bells and whistles along with the features that have made the Fire a tablet fan favorite: access to the amazing Amazon Appstore, online music storage, a large music and video store, a huge e-book library, and easy one-step ordering from Amazon. This full-color, For Dummies guide shows you how to take advantage of all the Kindle Fi

  1. News from the Fire Brigade

    CERN Multimedia

    Gunther Schoenwerth

    2010-01-01

    During the two weeks before the Christmas shutdown, the members of the Fire Brigade’s Social Club managed to sell nearly 900 Fire Brigade calendars for 2010. We would like to thank all of you who bought one. Thanks to your generosity, we will be able to donate about 5000 Swiss francs to the children of Kanji, one of the Staff Association’s long-term fund-raising projects. Thank you again for your support, and best wishes for 2010. President of the CERN Fire Brigade Social Club

  2. Review of vortices in wildland fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason M. Forthofer; Scott L. Goodrick

    2011-01-01

    Vortices are almost always present in the wildland fire environment and can sometimes interact with the fire in unpredictable ways, causing extreme fire behavior and safety concerns. In this paper, the current state of knowledge of the interaction of wildland fire and vortices is examined and reviewed. A basic introduction to vorticity is given, and the two common...

  3. 46 CFR 118.600 - Fire axe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire axe. 118.600 Section 118.600 Shipping COAST GUARD... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 118.600 Fire axe. A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must have at least one fire axe...

  4. 36 CFR 261.52 - Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire. 261.52 Section 261.52... in Areas Designated by Order § 261.52 Fire. When provided by an order, the following are prohibited: (a) Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire, or stove fire. (b) Using an explosive...

  5. Lab Fire Extinguishers: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    When renovations or new construction occur, fire extinguishers sometimes get lost in the mix. Unfortunately, whether to save money or because the fire code is misinterpreted, some schools do not install fire extinguishers in laboratories and other areas of the building. Let's set the record straight! If flammables are present, the fire code…

  6. 36 CFR 261.5 - Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire. 261.5 Section 261.5... Prohibitions § 261.5 Fire. The following are prohibited: (a) Carelessly or negligently throwing or placing any ignited substance or other substance that may cause a fire. (b) Firing any tracer bullet or incendiary...

  7. 24 CFR 3280.209 - Fire testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fire testing. 3280.209 Section 3280... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Fire Safety § 3280.209 Fire testing. All fire testing conducted in accordance with this subpart shall be performed by nationally recognized testing...

  8. Cross-scale analysis of fire regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Falk; Carol Miller; Donald McKenzie; Anne E. Black

    2007-01-01

    Cross-scale spatial and temporal perspectives are important for studying contagious landscape disturbances such as fire, which are controlled by myriad processes operating at different scales. We examine fire regimes in forests of western North America, focusing on how observed patterns of fire frequency change across spatial scales. To quantify changes in fire...

  9. 14 CFR 23.851 - Fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire extinguishers. 23.851 Section 23.851... Protection § 23.851 Fire extinguishers. (a) There must be at least one hand fire extinguisher for use in the... least one hand fire extinguisher located conveniently in the passenger compartment— (1) Of each airplane...

  10. Integrated fire science in the Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotliar, Natasha B.

    2005-01-01

    Fire is an important ecological process that has helped shape western landscapes. Wildfire suppression and other management practices may have altered historic fire regimes in ecosystems adapted to frequent, low-severity fires. Compounding this problem is the encroachment of homes into fire-prone areas.

  11. WRF-Fire: coupled weather-wildland fire modeling with the weather research and forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice L. Coen; Marques Cameron; John Michalakes; Edward G. Patton; Philip J. Riggan; Kara M. Yedinak

    2012-01-01

    A wildland fire behavior module (WRF-Fire) was integrated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) public domain numerical weather prediction model. The fire module is a surface fire behavior model that is two-way coupled with the atmospheric model. Near-surface winds from the atmospheric model are interpolated to a finer fire grid and used, with fuel properties...

  12. How to generate and interpret fire characteristics charts for surface and crown fire behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Faith Ann Heinsch; Luke Schelvan

    2011-01-01

    A fire characteristics chart is a graph that presents primary related fire behavior characteristics-rate of spread, flame length, fireline intensity, and heat per unit area. It helps communicate and interpret modeled or observed fire behavior. The Fire Characteristics Chart computer program plots either observed fire behavior or values that have been calculated by...

  13. 34 CFR 668.49 - Institutional fire safety policies and fire statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Institutional fire safety policies and fire statistics... fire statistics. (a) Additional definitions that apply to this section. Cause of fire: The factor or...; however, it does not include indirect loss, such as business interruption. (b) Annual fire safety report...

  14. The Pictorial Fire Stroop: A Measure of Processing Bias for Fire-Related Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Duffy, Joanne; MacKay, Sherri; Duffy, Jim; Sullivan-Thomas, Meara; Peterson-Badali, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Fire interest is a risk factor for firesetting. This study tested whether a fire-specific emotional Stroop task can effectively measure an information-processing bias for fire-related stimuli. Clinic-referred and nonreferred adolescents (aged 13-16 years) completed a pictorial "Fire Stroop," as well as a self-report fire interest questionnaire and…

  15. Linking 3D spatial models of fuels and fire: Effects of spatial heterogeneity on fire behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons; William E. Mell; Peter McCauley

    2011-01-01

    Crownfire endangers fire fighters and can have severe ecological consequences. Prediction of fire behavior in tree crowns is essential to informed decisions in fire management. Current methods used in fire management do not address variability in crown fuels. New mechanistic physics-based fire models address convective heat transfer with computational fluid dynamics (...

  16. Fire danger and fire behavior modeling systems in Australia, Europe, and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis M. Fujioka; A. Malcolm Gill; Domingos X. Viegas; B. Mike Wotton

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fire occurrence and behavior are complex phenomena involving essentially fuel (vegetation), topography, and weather. Fire managers around the world use a variety of systems to track and predict fire danger and fire behavior, at spatial scales that span from local to global extents, and temporal scales ranging from minutes to seasons. The fire management...

  17. Fire Problems in High-Rise Buildings. California Fire Service Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

    Resulting from a conference concerned with high-rise fire problems, this manual has been prepared as a fire department training manual and as a reference for students enrolled in fire service training courses. Information is provided for topics dealing with: (1) Typical Fire Problems in High-Rise Buildings, (2) Heat, (3) Smoke and Fire Gases, (4)…

  18. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water systems...

  19. Risk assessment of main control board fire using fire dynamics simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dae Il, E-mail: dikang@kaeri.re.kr [KAERI, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kilyoo; Jang, Seung-Cheol [KAERI, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seong Yeon [Chungnam National University, 79, Daehagro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A decision tree for evaluating the risk of a main control board (MCB) fire was proposed to systematically determine the MCB fire scenarios. • Fire simulations using fire dynamics simulator (FDS) were performed to estimate the time to MCR abandonment. • Non-propagating and propagating fire scenarios were considered for fire simulations. • The current study indicates that the quantification of the MCB fire risk should address the propagating fire and non-propagating fire scenarios if the MCB has no internal barriers between the panels. - Abstract: This paper presents the process and results of a risk assessment for a main control board (MCB) fire using fire dynamics simulator (FDS). A decision tree for evaluating the risk of a MCB fire was proposed to systematically determine the MCB fire scenarios, and fire simulations using FDS were performed to estimate the time to MCR abandonment. As a reference NPP for this study, Hanul unit 3 in Korea was selected and its core damage frequency (CDF) owing to the MCB fire was quantified. Two types of fire scenarios were considered for fire simulations: non-propagating fire scenarios occurring within a single MCB panel and propagating fire scenarios spreading from one control panel to the adjacent panels. Further, the fire scenarios were classified into fires with and without a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system (HVACS). The fire simulation results showed that the major factor causing the MCR evacuation was the optical density irrelevant to the availability of the HVACS. The risk assessment results showed that the abandonment fire scenario risk was less than the non-abandonment fire scenario risk and the propagating fire scenario risk was greater than the non-propagating fire scenario risk.

  20. Biomechanic comparison of 3 tendon transfers for supination of the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Tahseen A; Firoozbakhsh, Keikhosrow; De Carvalho, Alex F; Mercer, Deana

    2006-12-01

    Flexion-pronation of the hand and the forearm is a common deformity when the upper extremity is affected by cerebral palsy. Solutions used to improve the pronation deformity and increase supination include transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris to the extensor carpi radialis brevis, pronator teres rerouting, and brachioradialis rerouting. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanic efficacy of these 3 tendon transfers in simulated supination in cadaveric forearms. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric above-elbow upper extremities were used. In each specimen the 3 tendon transfers were performed sequentially in random order and were loaded in increments of 4 N (1 lb) to a maximum of 36 N (8 lb). Measurements were recorded from the starting point of 90 degrees of pronation. Statistical analysis of the data included the Student t test with the Bonferoni correction. For all transfers, supination increased in a nonlinear manner as the load was increased in a nonlinear manner. For the flexor carpi ulnaris transfer, the forearm reached its neutral position at a load of 9 N (2 lb). The forearm continued to rotate to up to 84 degrees of supination with 36 N (8 lb) of load. With the brachioradialis transfer, the forearm reached its neutral position at 13 N (3 lb) of load and continued to rotate to up to 33 degrees of supination with 36 N of load. With the pronator teres transfer, the forearm never reached the neutral position. Under a maximum load of 36 N, only 55 degrees of rotation from full pronation was obtained. Transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris to the extensor carpi radialis brevis proved to be the most effective transfer for producing supination in cadavers. The brachioradialis transfer was second best. The pronator teres rerouting was the least effective transfer in effecting simulated supination in this experiment.

  1. Fire Emulator/Detector Evaluator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The fire emulator/detector evaluator (FE/DE) is a computer-controlled flow tunnel used to re-create the environments surrounding detectors in the early...

  2. Human Caused Fire and Acres

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Number of wildland fires and acres burned as a result of human causes, from 2001 through 2008 (updated annually). Displayed by the eleven Geographic Areas used by...

  3. Fire in a contaminated area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-28

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Fire in Contaminated Area. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  4. The National Fire Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Fire Research Laboratory (NFRL) is adding a unique facility that will serve as a center of excellence for fireperformance of structures ranging in size...

  5. Computer Calculation of Fire Danger

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Main

    1969-01-01

    This paper describes a computer program that calculates National Fire Danger Rating Indexes. fuel moisture, buildup index, and drying factor are also available. The program is written in FORTRAN and is usable on even the smallest compiler.

  6. Fire Control and Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Claire

    1978-01-01

    Briefly outlines some aspects of the discovery of fire control by primitive people, such as the preadaptation for speech, the evolution of the human brain, and natural selection for human nakedness or loss of hair. (CS)

  7. Fire management and invasive plants- A handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Lusk, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Fire management can help maintain natural habitats, increase forage for wildlife, reduce fuel loads that might otherwise lead to catastrophic wildfire, and maintain natural succession. Today, there is an emerging challenge that fire managers need to be aware of: invasive plants. Fire management activities can create ideal opportunities for invasions by nonnative plants, potentially undermining the benefits of fire management actions. This manual provides practical guidelines that fire managers should consider with respect to invasive plants.

  8. FIRE EVACUATION FROM HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Korol'chenko Aleksandr Yakovlevich; Dinh Cong Hung Dinh Cong Hung

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that no collapse of structures is likely in the event of a fire emergency in multistoried buildings, rather, other fire-related factors may endanger the lives of people inside high-rise buildings exposed to the fire emergency, including open fire, sparks, high ambient temperature, smoke and toxic combustion products, reduced concentration of oxygen, and combined influence of various factors. In case of fire, the temperature inside buildings reaches 1100 °С. It exceeds th...

  9. Catastrophic fires in Russian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. I. Sukhinin; D. J. McRae; B. J. Stocks; S. G. Conard; WeiMin Hao; A. J. Soja; D. Cahoon

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the contribution of catastrophic fires to the total burned area and the amount of tree mortality in Russia since the 1970’s. Such fires occurred in the central regions of European Russia (1972, 1976, 1989, 2002, 2010), Khabarovsk krai (1976, 1988, 1998), Amur region (1997-2002), Republics of Yakutia and Tuva (2002), Magadan and Kamchatka oblast (1984, 2001...

  10. Development of a Compact Wireless Laplacian Electrode Module for Electromyograms and Its Human Interface Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ichikawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a compact wireless Laplacian electrode module for electromyograms (EMGs. One of the advantages of the Laplacian electrode configuration is that EMGs obtained with it are expected to be sensitive to the firing of the muscle directly beneath the measurement site. The performance of the developed electrode module was investigated in two human interface applications: character-input interface and detection of finger movement during finger Braille typing. In the former application, the electrode module was combined with an EMG-mouse click converter circuit. In the latter, four electrode modules were used for detection of finger movements during finger Braille typing. Investigation on the character-input interface indicated that characters could be input stably by contraction of (a the masseter, (b trapezius, (c anterior tibialis and (d flexor carpi ulnaris muscles. This wide applicability is desirable when the interface is applied to persons with physical disabilities because the disability differs one to another. The investigation also demonstrated that the electrode module can work properly without any skin preparation. Finger movement detection experiments showed that each finger movement was more clearly detectable when comparing to EMGs recorded with conventional electrodes, suggesting that the Laplacian electrode module is more suitable for detecting the timing of finger movement during typing. This could be because the Laplacian configuration enables us to record EMGs just beneath the electrode. These results demonstrate the advantages of the Laplacian electrode module.

  11. BehavePlus fire modeling system: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    2007-01-01

    Use of mathematical fire models to predict fire behavior and fire effects plays an important supporting role in wildland fire management. When used in conjunction with personal fire experience and a basic understanding of the fire models, predictions can be successfully applied to a range of fire management activities including wildfire behavior prediction, prescribed...

  12. Trial by Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covault, Craig

    2005-01-01

    The NASa/ATK Thiokol space shuttle solid rocket motor program has doubled ground test firings and enhanced manufacturing quality and process control to increase safety for Discovery's return to flight. There are a number of places where we've strengthened our engineering and our processes, says Mike Kahn, ATK Thiokol vice president of space launch systems. Protecting the booster against corrosion in the humid Florida environment is one area that has been addressed. Since the loss of Columbia, ATK Thiokol and the Marshall Space Flight Center have completely reevaluated the shuttle solid rocket motor's design certification and found no major problems, Kahn said. The Thiokol solid motors did not play a role in the 2003 Columbia accident, but the motor's older field joint design (since replaced) was the primary cause of the 1986 Challenger accident that killed seven astronauts. The 129 X 12-ft. ATK Thiokol reusable solid rocket motor forms the core of the shuttle's two solid rocket boosters (SRBs). United Space Alliance (USA) has overall responsibility for the booster's nose-mounted systems such as recovery parachutes and aft-mounted thrust vector control systems that increase the length to 149 ft. USA and its subcontractors have also reaffirmed quality control on systems such as the booster's Hamilton Sundstrand hydraulic power units for critical thrust vector control. And to ensure greater safeguards against booster debris jeopardizing the orbiter, a bolt-catcher system to restrain the large bolts, severed at booster separation, was also redesigned.

  13. 46 CFR 25.30-10 - Hand-portable fire extinguishers and semi-portable fire-extinguishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-portable fire extinguishers and semi-portable fire... UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS Fire Extinguishing Equipment § 25.30-10 Hand-portable fire extinguishers and semi-portable fire-extinguishing systems. (a) Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire...

  14. How Fire History, Fire Suppression Practices and Climate Change Affect Wildfire Regimes in Mediterranean Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotons, Lluís; Aquilué, Núria; de Cáceres, Miquel; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Fall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Available data show that future changes in global change drivers may lead to an increasing impact of fires on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Yet, fire regime changes in highly humanised fire-prone regions are difficult to predict because fire effects may be heavily mediated by human activities We investigated the role of fire suppression strategies in synergy with climate change on the resulting fire regimes in Catalonia (north-eastern Spain). We used a spatially-explicit fire-succession model at the landscape level to test whether the use of different firefighting opportunities related to observed reductions in fire spread rates and effective fire sizes, and hence changes in the fire regime. We calibrated this model with data from a period with weak firefighting and later assess the potential for suppression strategies to modify fire regimes expected under different levels of climate change. When comparing simulations with observed fire statistics from an eleven-year period with firefighting strategies in place, our results showed that, at least in two of the three sub-regions analysed, the observed fire regime could not be reproduced unless taking into account the effects of fire suppression. Fire regime descriptors were highly dependent on climate change scenarios, with a general trend, under baseline scenarios without fire suppression, to large-scale increases in area burnt. Fire suppression strategies had a strong capacity to compensate for climate change effects. However, strong active fire suppression was necessary to accomplish such compensation, while more opportunistic fire suppression strategies derived from recent fire history only had a variable, but generally weak, potential for compensation of enhanced fire impacts under climate change. The concept of fire regime in the Mediterranean is probably better interpreted as a highly dynamic process in which the main determinants of fire are rapidly modified by changes in landscape, climate and

  15. How fire history, fire suppression practices and climate change affect wildfire regimes in Mediterranean landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Brotons

    Full Text Available Available data show that future changes in global change drivers may lead to an increasing impact of fires on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Yet, fire regime changes in highly humanised fire-prone regions are difficult to predict because fire effects may be heavily mediated by human activities We investigated the role of fire suppression strategies in synergy with climate change on the resulting fire regimes in Catalonia (north-eastern Spain. We used a spatially-explicit fire-succession model at the landscape level to test whether the use of different firefighting opportunities related to observed reductions in fire spread rates and effective fire sizes, and hence changes in the fire regime. We calibrated this model with data from a period with weak firefighting and later assess the potential for suppression strategies to modify fire regimes expected under different levels of climate change. When comparing simulations with observed fire statistics from an eleven-year period with firefighting strategies in place, our results showed that, at least in two of the three sub-regions analysed, the observed fire regime could not be reproduced unless taking into account the effects of fire suppression. Fire regime descriptors were highly dependent on climate change scenarios, with a general trend, under baseline scenarios without fire suppression, to large-scale increases in area burnt. Fire suppression strategies had a strong capacity to compensate for climate change effects. However, strong active fire suppression was necessary to accomplish such compensation, while more opportunistic fire suppression strategies derived from recent fire history only had a variable, but generally weak, potential for compensation of enhanced fire impacts under climate change. The concept of fire regime in the Mediterranean is probably better interpreted as a highly dynamic process in which the main determinants of fire are rapidly modified by changes in landscape

  16. Overview of the 2013 FireFlux II grass fire field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.B. Clements; B. Davis; D. Seto; J. Contezac; A. Kochanski; J.-B. Fillipi; N. Lareau; B. Barboni; B. Butler; S. Krueger; R. Ottmar; R. Vihnanek; W.E. Heilman; J. Flynn; M.A. Jenkins; J. Mandel; C. Teske; D. Jimenez; J. O' Brien; B. Lefer

    2014-01-01

    In order to better understand the dynamics of fire-atmosphere interactions and the role of micrometeorology on fire behaviour the FireFlux campaign was conducted in 2006 on a coastal tall-grass prairie in southeast Texas, USA. The FireFlux campaign dataset has become the international standard for evaluating coupled fire-atmosphere model systems. While FireFlux is one...

  17. Oak woodlands and forests fire consortium: A regional view of fire science sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Keith W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Marschall, Joseph M.; Abadir, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Fire Science Program established 14 regional fire science knowledge exchange consortia to improve the delivery of fire science information and communication among fire managers and researchers. Consortia were developed regionally to ensure that fire science information is tailored to meet regional needs. In this paper, emphasis was placed on the Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium to provide an inside view of how one regional consortium is organized and its experiences in sharing fire science through various social media, conference, and workshop-based fire science events.

  18. Characterization of fire regime in Sardinia (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciu, V. M.; Salis, M.; Mastinu, S.; Masala, F.; Sirca, C.; Spano, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades, a number of Authors highlighted the crucial role of forest fires within Mediterranean ecosystems, with impacts both negative and positive on all biosphere components and with reverberations on different scales. Fire determines the landscape structure and plant composition, but it is also the cause of enormous economic and ecological damages, beside the loss of human life. In Sardinia (Italy), the second largest island of the Mediterranean Basin, forest fires are perceived as one of the main environmental and social problems, and data are showing that the situation is worsening especially within the rural-urban peripheries and the increasing number of very large forest fires. The need for information concerning forest fire regime has been pointed out by several Authors (e.g. Rollins et al., 2002), who also emphasized the importance of understanding the factors (such as weather/climate, socio-economic, and land use) that determine spatial and temporal fire patterns. These would be used not only as a baseline to predict the climate change effect on forest fires, but also as a fire management and mitigation strategy. The main aim of this paper is, thus, to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of fire occurrence in Sardinia (Italy) during the last three decades (1980-2010). For the analyzed period, fire statistics were provided by the Sardinian Forest Service (CFVA - Corpo Forestale e di Vigilanza Ambientale), while weather data for eight weather stations were obtained from the web site www.tutiempo.it. For each station, daily series of precipitation, mean, maximum and minimum temperature, relative humidity and wind speed were available. The present study firstly analyzed fire statistics (burned area and number of fires) according to the main fire regime characteristics (seasonality, fire return interval, fire incidence, fire size distribution). Then, fire and weather daily values were averaged to obtain monthly, seasonal and annual values, and

  19. Fire structures pine serotiny at different scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Serrano, Ana; Verdú, Miguel; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Pausas, Juli G

    2013-12-01

    Serotiny (delayed seed release with the consequent accumulation of a canopy seedbank) confers fitness benefits in environments with crown-fire regimes. Thus, we predicted that serotiny level should be higher in populations recurrently subjected to crown-fires than in populations where crown-fires are rare. In addition, under a high frequency of fires, space and resources are recurrently available, permitting recruitment around each mother to follow the seed rain shadow. Thus, we also predicted spatial aggregation of serotiny within populations. We compared serotiny, considering both the proportion and the age of serotinous cones, in populations living in contrasting fire regimes for two iconic Mediterranean pine species (Pinus halepensis, P. pinaster). We framed our results by quantitatively comparing the strength of the fire-serotiny relationship with previous studies worldwide. For the two species, populations living under high crown-fire recurrence regimes had a higher serotiny level than those populations where the recurrence of crown-fires was low. For P. halepensis (the species with higher serotiny), populations in high fire recurrence regimes had higher fine-scale spatial aggregation of serotiny than those inhabiting low fire recurrence systems. The strength of the observed fire-serotiny relationship in P. halepensis is among the highest in published literature. Fire regime shapes serotiny level among populations, and in populations with high serotiny, recurrent fires maintain a significant spatial structure for this trait. Consequently, fire has long-term evolutionary implications at different scales, emphasizing its prominent role in shaping the ecology of pines.

  20. Fire Hazard Analysis for Turbine Building of NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Jun [KMENT, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jun Hyun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In order to prove fire safety of operating nuclear power plants, plant-specific fire hazard analysis should be performed. Furthermore the effect of design changes on fire safety should be reviewed periodically. At the estimating fire vulnerability stage, the factors that influence fire vulnerability include ignition sources, combustibles, fire barriers, fire protection features such as detection, alarm, suppression, evacuation are investigated. At the stage of fire hazard assessment, ignition and propagation hazard, passive and active fire protection features, and fire protection program such as pre-fire plan and related procedures are investigated. Based on the result of fire hazard analysis, reasonable improvement plan for fire protection can be established. This paper describes the result of fire hazard analysis classified by fire area for turbine building of which fire hazards and fire frequencies are relatively high in operating nuclear power plant.

  1. Cyber Friendly Fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2011-09-01

    Cyber friendly fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, a fundamental need in avoiding cyber FF is to maintain situation awareness (SA). We suggest that cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system (and that populate the nodes), the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive (and offensive) countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. A training implication is to raise awareness and understanding of these critical knowledge units; an approach to decision aids and/or visualizations is to focus on supporting these critical knowledge units. To study cyber FF, we developed an unclassified security test range comprising a combination of virtual and physical devices that present a closed network for testing, simulation, and evaluation. This network offers services found on a production network without the associated costs of a real production network. Containing enough detail to appear realistic, this virtual and physical environment can be customized to represent different configurations. For our purposes, the test range was configured to appear as an Internet-connected Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering specialized web applications to the general public

  2. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C.; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2–3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future. PMID:27486664

  3. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2-3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future.

  4. [Tremor Suppression on Multi-DoF Wrist Joint Based on Functional Electrical Stimulation: A Simulation Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dingguo; Liu, Jianrong

    2015-04-01

    An automatic control system was designed to suppress pathological tremor on wrist joint with two degrees of freedom (DoF) using functional electrical stimulation (FES). The tremor occurring in the wrist flexion-extension and adduction-abduction was expected to be suppressed. A musculoskeletal model of wrist joint was developed to serve as the control plant, which covered four main muscles (extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris). A second-order mechanical impedance model was used to describe the wrist skeletal dynamics. The core work was to design the controller and a hybrid control strategy was proposed, which combined inverse model based on feed forward control and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control. Performance of the system was tested under different input conditions (step signal, sinusoidal signal, and real data of a patient)., The results indicated that the proposed hybrid controller could attenuate over 94% of the tremor amplitude on multi-DoF wrist joint.

  5. Comparison of EMG during passive stretching and shortening phases of each muscle for the investigation of parkinsonian rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yuri; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Ji-Sun; Koh, Seong-Beom; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis in the literature that torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity is the difference between the independent contributions of stretched and shortened muscles. The hypothesis was tested using muscle-specific stretch-shortening (MSSS) EMG ratio in this study. Nineteen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 18 healthy subjects (the mean age comparable to that of patients) participated in this study. The EMG activity was measured in the four muscles involved in wrist joint movement, i.e. flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis and extensor carpi ulnaris. The passive flexion-extension movement with a range of ±30∘ was applied at wrist joint. Root mean squared (RMS) mean was calculated from the envelope of the EMG for each of stretching and shortening phases. MSSS EMG ratio was defined as the ratio of RMS EMG of stretching phase and RMS EMG of shortening phase of a single muscle, and it was calculated for each muscle. MSSS EMG ratios were smaller than one in all muscles. These results indicate that all wrist muscles generate greater mean EMG during shortening than during stretching. Therefore, the torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity cannot be explained as the simple summation of independent antagonistic torque pair.

  6. Perceived Severity of Visually Accessible Fires

    OpenAIRE

    Fridolf, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of past fires suggest that building occupants faced with a fire have problems defining the severity of it, especially in the early stages of the fire. An experiment was therefore carried out to study people’s ability to estimate fire growth, and their perceived ability to extinguish a fire using a portable fire extinguisher. A total of 535 persons, namely 304 men and 231 women, were asked to fill out a questionnaire that was divided into three parts. In the first part the test ...

  7. Noise exposure among federal wildland fire fighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyles, George; Butler, Corey R; Kardous, Chucri A

    2017-02-01

    Wildland fire fighters use many tools and equipment that produce noise levels that may be considered hazardous to hearing. This study evaluated 174 personal dosimetry measurements on 156 wildland fire fighters conducting various training and fire suppression tasks. Noise exposures often exceeded occupational exposure limits and suggest that wildland fire fighters may be at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss, particularly those operating chainsaws, chippers, and masticators. The authors recommend a comprehensive approach to protecting these fire fighters that includes purchasing quieter equipment, noise and administrative controls, and enrolling these fire fighters into a hearing conservation program.

  8. Manual fire fighting tactics at Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Moon Hak; Moon, Chan Kook [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The general requirements of fire protection at nuclear power plant (NPP) are fire protection program, fire hazard analysis, and fire prevention features. In addition, specific fire protection requirements such as water supplies, fire detection, fire protection of safe related equipment, and safe shutdown capabilities must be provided. Particularly, manual fire fighting is required as specific requirements with the provisions to secure manual fire suppression, fire brigade and its training, and administrative controls for manual fire fighting. If a fire is alarmed and confirmed to be a real fire, the fire brigade must take manual fire fighting activities as requested at fire protection program. According to the present requirements in itself, there is not any specific manual fire fighting ways or practical strategies. In general, fire zones or compartments at NPPs are built in a confined condition. In theory, the fire condition will change from a combustible-controlled fire to a ventilation-governing fire with the time duration. In case of pool fire with the abundant oxygen and flammable liquid, it can take just a few minutes for the flash-over to occur. For the well-confined fire zone, it will change from a flame fire to a smoldering state before the entrance door is opened by the fire brigade. In this context, the manual fire fighting activities must be based on a quantitative analysis and a fire risk evaluation. At this paper, it was suggested that the fire zones at NPPs should be grouped on the inherent functions and fire characteristics. Based on the fire risk characteristics and the fire zone grouping, the manual fire fighting tactics are suggested as an advanced fire fighting solution

  9. ESA fire_cci product assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Angelika; Yue, Chao; Mouillot, Florent; Storm, Thomas; Chuvieco, Emilio; Ramo Sanchez, Ruben; Kaiser, Johannes W.

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation fires are a major disturbance in the Earth System. Fires change the biophysical properties and dynamics of ecosystems and alter terrestrial carbon pools. By altering the atmosphere's composition, fire emissions exert a significant climate forcing. To realistically model past and future changes of the Earth System, fire disturbances must be taken into account. Related modelling efforts require consistent global burned area observations covering at least 10 to 20 years. Guided by the specific requirements of a wide range of end users, the ESA fire_cci project has computed a new global burned area dataset. It applies a newly developed spectral change detection algorithm upon the ENVISAT-MERIS archive. The algorithm relies on MODIS active fire information as "seed". It comprises a pixel burned area product (spatial resolution of 333 m) with date detection information and a biweekly grid product at 0.25 degree spatial resolution. We compare fire_cci burned area with other global burned area products (MCD64 Collection 6, MCD45, GFED4, GFED4s and GEOLAND) and a set of active fires data (hotspots from MODIS, TRMM, AATSR and fire radiative power from GFAS). The analysis of patterns of agreement and disagreement between fire_cci and other products provides a better understanding of product characteristics and uncertainties. The intercomparison of the 2005-2011 fire_cci time series shows a close agreement with GFED4 data in terms of global burned area and the general spatial and temporal patterns. Pronounced differences, however, emerge for specific regions or fire events. Burned area mapped by fire_cci tends to be notably higher in regions where small agricultural fires predominate. The improved detection of small agricultural fires by fire_cci can be related to the increased spatial resolution of the MERIS sensor (333 m compared to 500 in MODIS). This is illustrated in detail using the example of the extreme 2006 spring fires in Eastern Europe.

  10. Fire ecology of western Montana forest habitat types

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Fischer; Anne F. Bradley

    1987-01-01

    Provides information on fire as an ecological factor for forest habitat types in western Montana. Identifies Fire Groups of habitat types based on fire's role in forest succession. Describes forest fuels and suggests considerations for fire management.

  11. Assessment of factors affecting fire performance of mattresses: a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nazaré, Shonali; Davis, Rick D; Butler, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of U.S. residential fire statistics shows that although the total number of fires and deaths due to mattress fires has dropped as a result of several regulatory approaches, the mattress/bedding fires...

  12. Fire Sales and House Prices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    We exploit a natural experiment in Denmark to investigate when forced sales lead to fire sale discounts. Forced sales result from sudden deaths of house owners in an institutional environment in which beneficiaries are forced to settle the estate, and hence sell the house, within 12 months. We...... identify 6,329 forced sales by suddenly deceased house owners, and find that forced sales bring in lower prices than do comparable houses as the deadline winds down: We find no discounts for sales long before the deadline, and discounts of 12.5% for sales shortly before the deadline. Market conditions...... and the urgency of the sale also affect the average discount: Discounts are larger when house prices contract, in thin markets where demand is lower, and when the sale is more likely to be a fire sale because of financial or liquidity constraints. Late fire sales are more likely when the house price...

  13. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  14. Parametric Fires for Structural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The authorities, the construction association, and a number of companies in Denmark have supported the author writing a guide for design of building structures for parametric fires. The guide is published by the ministry as a supplement to the building regulations. However, consultants and contra......The authorities, the construction association, and a number of companies in Denmark have supported the author writing a guide for design of building structures for parametric fires. The guide is published by the ministry as a supplement to the building regulations. However, consultants...... and contractors have asked for a reference in English in order to make the guide-lines and the background for them available internationally. The paper therefore presents recommendations from the design guide especially concerning how to assess parametric design fires based on the opening factor method for large...

  15. Wildland fire management. Volume 2: Wildland fire control 1985-1995. [satellite information system for California fire problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveker, D. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary design of a satellite plus computer earth resources information system is proposed for potential uses in fire prevention and control in the wildland fire community. Suggested are satellite characteristics, sensor characteristics, discrimination algorithms, data communication techniques, data processing requirements, display characteristics, and costs in achieving the integrated wildland fire information system.

  16. Disse fire typer bruger steroider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anders Schmidt; Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2017-01-01

    Vi render i motionscentret som aldrig før, og ønsket om at forbedre sin krop lokker nogle ud i at bruge steroider. Brugerne kan inddeles i fire typer – fra den eksperimenterende YOLO-type til de, der gerne vil være klar til stranden.......Vi render i motionscentret som aldrig før, og ønsket om at forbedre sin krop lokker nogle ud i at bruge steroider. Brugerne kan inddeles i fire typer – fra den eksperimenterende YOLO-type til de, der gerne vil være klar til stranden....

  17. An introduction to fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Drysdale, Dougal

    2011-01-01

    "Drysdale's book is by far the most comprehensive - everyone in the office has a copy...now including me. It holds just about everything you need to know about fire science."(Review of An Introduction to Fire Dynamics, 2nd Edition) After 25 years as a bestseller, Dougal Drysdale's classic introduction has been brought up-to-date and expanded to incorporate the latest research and experimental data.  Homework problems are included, with solutions, and others are available on the accompanying website at www.wiley.com/go/drysdale. Essential reading for all involved in the field from undergraduate

  18. The fire at Cocoanut Grove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Camille L

    2015-01-01

    On November 28, 1942, a fire broke out at The Cocoanut Grove Nightclub, in Boston, Massachusetts. The fire claimed the lives of hundreds, and injured 170 patients who were treated at either Boston City Hospital or the Massachusetts General Hospital. With extraordinary leadership and scientific focus, this tragedy led to many important advances in burn management, including improvements in burn wound care, the first descriptions of inhalation injury, formulas to guide fluid resuscitation, and the initial studies of antimicrobial therapy with burns. This overview describes the treatment of the Cocoanut Gove victims, and how it transformed the management of burns forever.

  19. Advanced Fire Detector for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable and efficient fire detection is a precondition for safe spaceflight. The threat of onboard fire is constant and requires early, fast and unfailing...

  20. Consequences of Fire: The Killing Fumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forum Mobile integrated healthcare/Community paramedicine NFPA and sustainability Expand sub-navigation Fire safety in a sustainable ... crowded with strangers, perhaps a movie theater or restaurant. But of the 10 deadliest fires through 1999, ...

  1. 76 FR 63801 - Fire Prevention Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... help of local safety officials, families can work together to protect their neighborhood with a... all from fire, and we reaffirm the need for Americans to practice fire safety throughout the year...

  2. Arming and firing system for DISTANT RUNNER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skenandore, L.H.; Johnson, J.P.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia A and F systems Division 1132 provided arming and firing support for the DISTANT RUNNER Test Program at White Sands Missile Range. This report describes the field support and the firing system that was used.

  3. SPIV study of two interactive fire whirls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Katherine; Smits, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Fire whirls are buoyancy-driven standing vortex structures that often form in forest fires. Capable of lifting and ejecting flaming debris, fire whirls can hasten the spread of fire lines and start fires in new places. Here we study the interaction of two jets in an externally applied circulation as an introduction to the study of two interacting fire whirls. To study this interaction we use two burner flames supplied with DME and induce swirl by entraining air through a split cylinder that surrounds both burners. Three components of velocity are measured using Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry both inside and outside the fire whirl core, at the base, midsection, and above the top of the fire whirls. The effects on the height and circulation on the distance between the burners, the rate of fuel supplied to the burners, and the gap size, are examined.

  4. HSIP Fire Stations in New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Fire Stations in New Mexico Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  5. Fire Island National Seashore : alternative transportation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    As part of its General Management Plan (GMP) process, Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) seeks to develop a long-term management model to protect Fire Islands resources, while facilitating a safe, rewarding, and relevant experience for the publi...

  6. Solid waste drum array fire performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Haecker, C.F. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States); Beitel, J.J.; Gottuck, D.T.; Rhodes, B.T.; Bayier, C.L. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Fire hazards associated with drum storage of radioactively contaminated waste are a major concern in DOE waste storage facilities. This report is the second of two reports on fire testing designed to provide data relative to the propagation of a fire among storage drum arrays. The first report covers testing of individual drums subjected to an initiating fire and the development of the analytical methodology to predict fire propagation among storage drum arrays. This report is the second report, which documents the results of drum array fire tests. The purpose of the array tests was to confirm the analytical methodology developed by Phase I fire testing. These tests provide conclusive evidence that fire will not propagate from drum to drum unless an continuous fuel source other than drum contents is provided.

  7. SFPE handbook of fire protection engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Gottuk, Daniel; Jr, John; Harada, Kazunori; Kuligowski, Erica; Puchovsky, Milosh; Torero, Jose´; Jr, John; WIECZOREK, CHRISTOPHER

    2016-01-01

    Revised and significantly expanded, the fifth edition of this classic work offers both new and substantially updated information. As the definitive reference on fire protection engineering, this book provides thorough treatment of the current best practices in fire protection engineering and performance-based fire safety. Over 130 eminent fire engineers and researchers contributed chapters to the book, representing universities and professional organizations around the world. It remains the indispensible source for reliable coverage of fire safety engineering fundamentals, fire dynamics, hazard calculations, fire risk analysis, modeling and more. With seventeen new chapters and over 1,800 figures, the this new edition contains: • Step-by-step equations that explain engineering calculations • Comprehensive revision of the coverage of human behavior in fire, including several new chapters on egress system design, occupant evacuation scenarios, combustion toxicity and data for human behavior analysis • Rev...

  8. Fire-Resistant Materials: Research Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the research being conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to develop fire safe cabin materials for commercial aircraft. The objective of the Fire-Resistant Materials program is to eliminate burning ...

  9. Epicormic resprouting in fire-prone ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausas, Juli G.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Many plants resprout from basal buds after disturbance, and this is common in shrublands subjected to high-intensity fires. However, resprouting after fire from epicormic (stem) buds is globally far less common. Unlike basal resprouting, post-fire epicormic resprouting is a key plant adaptation for retention of the arborescent skeleton after fire, allowing rapid recovery of the forest or woodland and leading to greater ecosystem resilience under recurrent high-intensity fires. Here we review the biogeography of epicormic resprouting, the mechanisms of protection, the fire regimes where it occurs, and the evolutionary drivers that shaped this trait. We propose that epicormic resprouting is adaptive in ecosystems with high fire frequency and relatively high productivity, at moderate–high fire intensities.

  10. National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) is a reporting standard that fire departments use to uniformly report on the full range of their activities, from...

  11. Consequences of Fire: The Killing Fumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Operation Phase 1 Research Program Impact of Fire Extinguisher Agents on Cultural Resource Materials Impact of Sprinklers ... Operation Phase 1 Research Program Impact of Fire Extinguisher Agents on Cultural Resource Materials Impact of Sprinklers ...

  12. Experimental study of fire barriers preventing vertical fire spread in ETISs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Huang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the external thermal insulation system (ETIS has been applied increasingly in a large amount of buildings for energy conservation purpose. However, the increase use of combustible insulation materials in the ETIS has raised serious fire safety problems. Fires involving this type of ETIS have caused severe damage and loss. In order to improve its fire safety, fire barriers were suggested to be installed. This paper introduces fire experiments that have been done to study the effects of fire barriers on preventing vertical fire spread along the ETIS. The experiments were performed according to BS 8414-1:2002 “Fire performance of external cladding systems – Part 1: Test method for non-loadbearing external cladding systems applied to the face of the building”. The test facility consists of a 9 m high wall. The fire sources were wood cribs with a fire size of 3 ± 0.5 MW. The insulation materials were expanded polystyrene foam (EPS. The fire barrier was a horizontal strip of rockwool with a width of 300 mm. Thermocouples were used to measure temperatures outside and inside the ETIS. A series of experiments with different fire scenarios were done: no fire barrier, two fire barriers and three fire barriers at different heights. Test results were compared. The results show that the ETIS using EPS without fire barriers almost burned out, while the ETIS with fire barriers performed well in preventing fire spread. The temperatures above the fire barrier were much lower than those below the fire barrier, and most of the insulation materials above the top fire barrier stayed in place.

  13. Interactions among wildland fires in a long-established Sierra Nevada natural fire area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B.M.; Miller, J.D.; Thode, A.E.; Kelly, M.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Stephens, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate interactions between successive naturally occurring fires, and assess to what extent the environments in which fires burn influence these interactions. Using mapped fire perimeters and satellite-based estimates of post-fire effects (referred to hereafter as fire severity) for 19 fires burning relatively freely over a 31-year period, we demonstrate that fire as a landscape process can exhibit self-limiting characteristics in an upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest. We use the term 'self-limiting' to refer to recurring fire as a process over time (that is, fire regime) consuming fuel and ultimately constraining the spatial extent and lessening fire-induced effects of subsequent fires. When the amount of time between successive adjacent fires is under 9 years, and when fire weather is not extreme (burning index fire burning into the previous fire area is extremely low. Analysis of fire severity data by 10-year periods revealed a fair degree of stability in the proportion of area burned among fire severity classes (unchanged, low, moderate, high). This is in contrast to a recent study demonstrating increasing high-severity burning throughout the Sierra Nevada from 1984 to 2006, which suggests freely burning fires over time in upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests can regulate fire-induced effects across the landscape. This information can help managers better anticipate short- and long-term effects of allowing naturally ignited fires to burn, and ultimately, improve their ability to implement Wildland Fire Use programs in similar forest types. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. Chaparral & Fire Ecology: Role of Fire in Seed Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Nancy L. C.; Keeley, Jon E.

    1991-01-01

    An activity that incorporates the concepts of plant structure and function and ecology is described. Students investigate the reasons why some California chaparral seeds germinate only after a fire has burned the surrounding chaparral. The procedure, discussion and analysis questions, expected results, potential problems, and additional activities…

  15. New and revised fire effects tools for fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Greg Dillon; Stacy Drury; Robin Innes; Penny Morgan; Duncan Lutes; Susan J. Prichard; Jane Smith; Eva Strand

    2014-01-01

    Announcing the release of new software packages for application in wildland fire science and management, two fields that are already fully saturated with computer technology, may seem a bit too much to many managers. However, there have been some recent releases of new computer programs and revisions of existing software and information tools that deserve mention...

  16. Biomass Co-Firing in Suspension-Fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Hvid, Søren Lovmand; Baxter, Larry

    The objective of the project is to investigate critical issues associated with cofiring with low-NOx burners and cofiring in advanced suspension-fired plants with for example high-temperature steam cycles. Experience has been gained using biofuels for cofiring in older power plant units. However,...

  17. Remote sensing of vegetation fires and its contribution to a fire management information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane P. Flasse; Simon N. Trigg; Pietro N. Ceccato; Anita H. Perryman; Andrew T. Hudak; Mark W. Thompson; Bruce H. Brockett; Moussa Drame; Tim Ntabeni; Philip E. Frost; Tobias Landmann; Johan L. le Roux

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade, research has proven that remote sensing can provide very useful support to fire managers. This chapter provides an overview of the types of information remote sensing can provide to the fire community. First, it considers fire management information needs in the context of a fire management information system. An introduction to remote sensing then...

  18. Restoring surface fire stabilizes forest carbon under extreme fire weather in the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Krofcheck; Matthew D. Hurteau; Robert M. Scheller; E. Louise Loudermilk

    2017-01-01

    Climate change in the western United States has increased the frequency of extreme fire weather events and is projected to increase the area burned by wildfire in the coming decades. This changing fire regime, coupled with increased high-severity fire risk from a legacy of fire exclusion, could destabilize forest carbon (C), decrease net ecosystem exchange (...

  19. The Wildland Fire Decision Support System: Integrating science, technology, and fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Pence; Tom Zimmerman

    2011-01-01

    Federal agency policy requires documentation and analysis of all wildland fire response decisions. In the past, planning and decision documentation for fires were completed using multiple unconnected processes, yielding many limitations. In response, interagency fire management executives chartered the development of the Wildland Fire Decision Support System (WFDSS)....

  20. Ecological fire use for ecological fire management: Managing large wildfires by design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy Ingalsbee

    2015-01-01

    Past fire exclusion policies and fire suppression actions have led to a historic "fire deficit" on public wildlands. These sociocultural actions have led to unprecedented environmental changes that have created conditions conducive to more frequent large-scale wildfires. Politicians, the newsmedia, and agency officials portray large wildland fires as...

  1. New fire diurnal cycle characterizations to improve fire radiative energy assessments made from MODIS observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andela, N.; Kaiser, J.; van der Werf, G.R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate near real time fire emissions estimates are required for air quality forecasts. To date, most approaches are based on satellite-derived estimates of fire radiative power (FRP), which can be converted to fire radiative energy (FRE) which is directly related to fire emissions. Uncertainties

  2. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on soils and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary; Kevin C. Ryan; Leonard F. DeBano

    2005-01-01

    This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on soils and water can assist land and fire managers with information on the physical, chemical, and biological effects of fire needed to successfully conduct ecosystem management, and effectively inform others about the role and impacts of wildland fire. Chapter topics include the soil resource, soil physical...

  3. Remote sensing techniques to assess active fire characteristics and post-fire effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh B. Lentile; Zachary A. Holden; Alistair M. S. Smith; Michael J. Falkowski; Andrew T. Hudak; Penelope Morgan; Sarah A. Lewis; Paul E. Gessler; Nate C. Benson

    2006-01-01

    Space and airborne sensors have been used to map area burned, assess characteristics of active fires, and characterize post-fire ecological effects. Confusion about fire intensity, fire severity, burn severity, and related terms can result in the potential misuse of the inferred information by land managers and remote sensing practitioners who require unambiguous...

  4. Post-fire regeneration across a fire severity gradient in the southern Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin Crotteau; Morgan Varner; Martin Ritchie

    2012-01-01

    Large scale, high-severity fires are increasing in the western United States. Despite this trend, there have been few studies investigating post-fire tree regeneration. We established a study in the footprint of the 2000 Storrie Fire, a 23,000 ha wildfire that occurred in northern California, USA. We used a stratified sampling design to quantify post-fire vegetation...

  5. Introduction-2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: The fire environment-innovations, management, and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Cook; Bret W. Butler

    2007-01-01

    The 2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fire Environment -- Innovations, Management and Policy was held in Destin, FL, March 26-30, 2007. Following on the success of the 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference, this conference was initiated in response to the needs of the National Wildfire Coordinating Group -- Fire Environment Working Team.

  6. Fire Behavior System for the Full Range of Fire Management Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Rothermel; Patricia L. Andrews

    1987-01-01

    An "integrated fire behavior/fire danger rating system" should be "seamless" to avoid requiring choices among alternate, independent systems. Descriptions of fuel moisture, fuels, and fire behavior should be standardized, permitting information to flow easily through the spectrum of fire management needs. The level of resolution depends on the...

  7. Post-fire tree stress and growth following smoldering duff fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Varner; Francis E. Putz; Robert J. Mitchell; J. Kevin Hiers; Joseph J. O’Brien; Doria R. Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the proximate causes of post-fire conifer mortality due to smoldering duff fires is essential to the restoration and management of coniferous forests throughout North America. To better understand duff fire-caused mortality, we investigated tree stress and radial growth following experimental fires in a long-unburned forest on deep sands in northern...

  8. Assessing the accuracy of wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA) fire size and suppression cost estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Peter. Noordijk

    2005-01-01

    To determine the optimal suppression strategy for escaped wildfires, federal land managers are requiredto conduct a wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA). As part of the WFSA process, fire managers estimate final fire size and suppression costs. Estimates from 58 WFSAs conducted during the 2002 fire season are compared to actual outcomes. Results indicate that...

  9. Climate Change and Wildland Fire Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, M.; Wotton, M.; Marshall, G.

    2016-12-01

    Wildland fires are a frequent occurrence in many regions of the world. These fires are the result of interactions between climate/weather, fuels, and people. Our climate and associated day-to-day weather may be changing rapidly due to human activities that may have dramatic and unexpected impacts on regional and global fire activity. A warmer world means longer fire seasons, more lightning activity, and most importantly drier fuels. Existing studies suggest a general overall increase in fire occurrence and area burned although there is significant temporal and spatial variability. Future trends in fire severity and intensity are more difficult to project due to the complex and non-linear interactions between weather, vegetation and people. However, there are indications that fire severity and intensity are increasing. In this study we examine future fire intensity in Canada. We use 3 GCMs and 3 RCP scenarios to estimate potential fire intensity, fuel consumption and number of significant spread days throughout the boreal forest. We examine not only absolute change in fireline intensity and consumption, but also changing frequency of exceeding intensity thresholds used today to inform fire management decisions about resource effectiveness. We find that potential fuel consumption increases more than 25% in the most extreme scenarios for the majority of the boreal by the end of the century. Similarly, we observe an absolute increase in the number of days that could support significant fire spread by up to 50 days per year and a greater than threefold increase in the potential number of days where head fire intensity exceeds 10000kW/m in the most extreme cases. While fire severity increases in general, it is these changes in the exceedance of certain critical threshold for fire suppression effectiveness that have the potential to significantly impact fire operations. Fire management will be even more challenging in a warmer world.

  10. Characterization of flame radiosity in shrubland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel G. Cruz; Bret W. Butler; Domingos X. Viegas; Pedro Palheiro

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at quantifying the flame radiosity vertical profile and gas temperature in moderate to high intensity spreading fires in shrubland fuels. We report on the results from 11 experimental fires conducted over a range of fire rate of spread and frontal fire intensity varying respectively between 0.04-0.35ms-1 and 468-14,973kWm-1. Flame radiosity,...

  11. Børnehaven De fire Elementer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hanne Værum

    I projektet undersøges og beskrives arbejdet i børnehaven De fire Elementer, med særligt fokus på kønsopdelingen fire formiddage om ugen.......I projektet undersøges og beskrives arbejdet i børnehaven De fire Elementer, med særligt fokus på kønsopdelingen fire formiddage om ugen....

  12. A Drought Index for Forest Fire Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Keetch; George M. Byram

    1968-01-01

    The moisture content of the upper soil, as well as that of the covering layer of duff, has an important effect on the fire suppression effort in forest and wildland areas. In certain forested areas of the United States, fires in deep duff fuels are of particular concern to the fire control manager. When these fuels are dry, fires burn deeply, dam-age is excessive, and...

  13. Southern African advanced fire information system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McFerren, G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available datasets South Africa Protected Areas OGC WMS/WFS South African Protected Areas of various kinds, curated by South African National Biodiversity Institute Wind speed and direction OGC WMS/WFS Wind conditions last observed and reported by Weather... wherever fire threatens infrastructure. An important priority is the positioning of AFIS as a system for assisting in fire monitoring in protected areas. Here, fire management is key to ensuring preservation of ecosystem health, so fire managers require...

  14. Fire behavior in Mediterranean shrub species (Maquis) | Saglam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prediction of fire behavior in fire prone ecosystems is of vital importance in all phases of fire management including fire prevention, presuppression, suppression and fire use. This paper deals with an experimental burning exercise conducted in the Mediterranean region in Turkey. A series of 18 experimental fires were ...

  15. Firing probability and mean firing rates of human muscle vasoconstrictor neurones are elevated during chronic asphyxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashley, Cynthia; Burton, Danielle; Sverrisdottir, Yrsa B

    2010-01-01

    are chronically asphyxic. We tested the hypothesis that this elevated chemical drive would shift the firing pattern from that seen in healthy subjects to that seen in OSAS. The mean firing probability (52%) and mean firing rate (0.92 Hz) of 17 muscle vasoconstrictor neurones recorded in COPD were comparable...... in the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with an increase in firing probability and mean firing rate, and an increase in multiple within-burst firing. Here we characterize the firing properties of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), who...... in the healthy group (78%). Conversely, single neurones fired twice in 25% of cardiac intervals, similar to OSAS (27%), but significantly higher than in the healthy group (18%). We conclude that the chronic asphyxia associated with COPD results in an increase in the firing probability and mean firing frequency...

  16. Fire resistance of structural composite lumber products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2006-01-01

    Use of structural composite lumber products is increasing. In applications requiring a fire resistance rating, calculation procedures are used to obtain the fire resistance rating of exposed structural wood products. A critical factor in the calculation procedures is char rate for ASTM E 119 fire exposure. In this study, we tested 14 structural composite lumber...

  17. Fire and the endangered Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Michael J. Lacki; Daniel R. Cox

    2009-01-01

    Fire and Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) have coexisted for millennia in the central hardwoods region, yet past declines in populations of this endangered species, and the imperative of fire use in oak silviculture and ecosystem conservation, call for an analysis of both the risks and opportunities associated with using fires on landscapes in...

  18. Economic Impact of Fire Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don Gunasekera; Graham Mills; Mark Williams

    2006-01-01

    Southeastern Australia, where the State of Victoria is located is regarded as one of the most fire prone areas in the world. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology provides fire weather services in Victoria as part of a national framework for the provision of such services. These services range from fire weather warnings to special forecasts for hazard reduction burns....

  19. Fire for restoration of communities and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald I. Dickmann; Jeanette L. Rollinger

    1998-01-01

    The exclusion of fire from ecosystems to which it was a frequent visitor has produced profound alterations in historic ecological conditions; therefore, fire must be an integral component of ecosystem management. That was the overwhelming message conveyed by speakers at the symposium, Fire for Restoration of Communities and Ecosystems. Speakers from land management...

  20. Barriers to community-directed fire restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Bruce Hull; Bruce E. Goldstein

    2006-01-01

    Wild fire disasters create novel situations and challenges for natural resource managers, including working with emergent community groups that have a great deal of motivation for change, little familiarity with agency protocol, and strong preferences for the goals and methods of forest fire restoration, some of which may run counter to agency norms. After a fire,...

  1. Forecasting distribution of numbers of large fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Preisler, Haiganoush K.; Howard, Stephen; Burgan, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Systems to estimate forest fire potential commonly utilize one or more indexes that relate to expected fire behavior; however they indicate neither the chance that a large fire will occur, nor the expected number of large fires. That is, they do not quantify the probabilistic nature of fire danger. In this work we use large fire occurrence information from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project, and satellite and surface observations of fuel conditions in the form of the Fire Potential Index, to estimate two aspects of fire danger: 1) the probability that a 1 acre ignition will result in a 100+ acre fire, and 2) the probabilities of having at least 1, 2, 3, or 4 large fires within a Predictive Services Area in the forthcoming week. These statistical processes are the main thrust of the paper and are used to produce two daily national forecasts that are available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center and via the Wildland Fire Assessment System. A validation study of our forecasts for the 2013 fire season demonstrated good agreement between observed and forecasted values.

  2. 29 CFR 1926.151 - Fire prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire prevention. 1926.151 Section 1926.151 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Fire Protection and Prevention § 1926.151 Fire prevention. (a) Ignition hazards. (1) Electrical wiring and equipment for light, heat, or power purposes...

  3. 46 CFR 131.899 - Fire dampers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire dampers. 131.899 Section 131.899 Shipping COAST... Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.899 Fire dampers. Each fire damper installed within the boundary of... whether the damper is open or closed and must be marked with red letters at least 13 millimeters (1/2-inch...

  4. Fire behavior in Mediterranean shrub species (Maquis)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... Fire behavior in Mediterranean shrub species (Maquis). Bülent Sağlam1*, Ertuğrul Bilgili1, Ömer ... an experimental burning exercise conducted in the Mediterranean region in Turkey. A series of 18 experimental fires were ...... In Flammable Australia: The fire regime and biodiversity of a continent, eds.

  5. 46 CFR 181.600 - Fire axe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire axe. 181.600 Section 181.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.600 Fire axe. A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length...

  6. 36 CFR 13.976 - Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire. 13.976 Section 13.976 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... (fda) § 13.976 Fire. Lighting or maintaining a fire is prohibited in the FDA except— (a) In established...

  7. Systems thinking and wildland fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Thompson; Christopher J. Dunn; David E. Calkin

    2017-01-01

    A changing climate, changing development and land use patterns, and increasing pressures on ecosystem services raise global concerns over growing losses associated with wildland fires. New management paradigms acknowledge that fire is inevitable and often uncontrollable, and focus on living with fire rather than attempting to eliminate it from the landscape. A notable...

  8. Dynamics of an Anthropogenic Fire Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. P. Guyette; R. M. Muzika; D. C. Dey

    2002-01-01

    Human interaction with fire and vegetation occurs at many levels of human population density and cultural development, from subsistence cultures to highly technological societies. The dynamics of these interactions with respect to wildland fire are often difficult to understand and identify at short temporal scales. Dendrochronological fire histories from the Missouri...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.156 - Fire brigades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection § 1910.156 Fire brigades. (a) Scope and application—(1... equipment of fire brigades whenever they are established by an employer. (2) Application. The requirements... seconds at 4 psi (28 kPa) pressure. (ii) Exterior materials of gloves shall be flame resistant and shall...

  10. Factors influencing large wildland fire suppression expenditures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingjing Liang; Dave E. Calkin; Krista M. Gebert; Tyron J. Venn; Robin P. Silverstein

    2008-01-01

    There is an urgent and immediate need to address the excessive cost of large fires. Here, we studied large wildland fire suppression expenditures by the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Among 16 potential nonmanagerial factors, which represented fire size and shape, private properties, public land attributes, forest and fuel conditions, and geographic...

  11. Thermodynamics and heat transfer in fire fighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, P. N.; Koshmarov, Y. A.; Bashkirtsev, M. P.

    1985-05-01

    The book presents the fundamental principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer with particular reference to their application in problems related to fire prevention. Special attention is given to the study of unsteady heat transfer, radiant heat transfer (including radiation from flames to the surrounding), thermodynamic analysis of the growth of fires and theoretical modeling of fires in building.

  12. Estimating fire properties by remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Riggan; J. Hoffman; J. Brass

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary knowledge of the role of fire in the global environment is limited by inadequate measurements of the extent and impact of individual fires. Observations by operational polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites provide an indication of fire occurrence but are ill-suited for estimating the temperature, area, or radiant emissions of active wildland and...

  13. Turbulence spectra measured during fire front passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisuke Seto; Craig B. Clements; Warren E. Heilman

    2013-01-01

    Four field experiments were conducted over various fuel and terrain to investigate turbulence generation during the passage of wildland fire fronts. Our results indicate an increase in horizontal mean winds and friction velocity, horizontal and vertical velocity variances as well as a decreased degree of anisotropy in TKE during fire front passage (FFP) due to fire-...

  14. Seasonal fire danger forecasts for the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Roads; F. Fujioka; S. Chen; R. Burgan

    2005-01-01

    The Scripps Experimental Climate Prediction Center has been making experimental, near-real-time, weekly to seasonal fire danger forecasts for the past 5 years. US fire danger forecasts and validations are based on standard indices from the National Fire Danger Rating System (DFDRS), which include the ignition component (IC), energy release component (ER), burning...

  15. A method for ensemble wildland fire simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Isaac C. Grenfell; Charles W. McHugh; Robert C. Seli; Diane Trethewey; Richard D. Stratton; Stuart Brittain

    2011-01-01

    An ensemble simulation system that accounts for uncertainty in long-range weather conditions and two-dimensional wildland fire spread is described. Fuel moisture is expressed based on the energy release component, a US fire danger rating index, and its variation throughout the fire season is modeled using time series analysis of historical weather data. This analysis...

  16. 30 CFR 36.31 - Fire extinguisher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire extinguisher. 36.31 Section 36.31 Mineral... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.31 Fire extinguisher. Each unit of mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment shall be fitted with a fire extinguisher carried in a location easily accessible to the...

  17. 49 CFR 173.309 - Fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire extinguishers. 173.309 Section 173.309... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.309 Fire extinguishers. (a) Fire extinguishers charged with a limited quantity of compressed gas to not more than 1660 kPa (241 psig) at 21 °C...

  18. 49 CFR 397.11 - Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PARKING RULES General § 397.11 Fires. (a) A motor vehicle containing hazardous materials must not be operated near an open fire unless its driver has first taken precautions to ascertain that the vehicle can safely pass the fire without stopping. (b) A motor vehicle containing hazardous materials must not be...

  19. Predicting fire frequency with chemistry and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard P. Guyette; Michael C. Stambaugh; Daniel C. Dey; Rose-Marie. Muzika

    2012-01-01

    A predictive equation for estimating fire frequency was developed from theories and data in physical chemistry, ecosystem ecology, and climatology. We refer to this equation as the Physical Chemistry Fire Frequency Model (PC2FM). The equation was calibrated and validated with North American fire data (170 sites) prior to widespread industrial influences (before ...

  20. Fire Support For Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Copperhead , Sense and Destroy Armor (SADARM), and Excalibur.107 106“105 mm Projectiles.” Military...artillery systems was the Copperhead projectile. Copperhead rounds were fired in a specific trajectory towards the target and approximately 30...seconds before impact, was guided by a coded laser beam sent by the forward observer to the target. When properly coordinated, Copperhead rounds were

  1. Women of Ice and Fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The anthology offers 11 original contributions about the women in GoT, the transmedial universe of George R.R. Martin's book series A Song of Ice and Fire, the HBO TV series Game of Thrones, computer games and online fan activities. The anthology examines the representation of women, and activity...

  2. Fired? Here's an exit strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, M M

    2000-01-01

    Who gets fired in a boom job market? People are fired more often for things they failed to do than for mistakes they made. The new rules of engagement are: There is no probationary period; resistance to technology is a quick ticket out; a lack of emotional commitment to the role you're hired to play is usually fatal; personality defects that keep others from producing are not tolerated. The most common reason for being fired, however, is lack of fit. Whether you're laid off or fired, don't ask for explanations. The fact is, the people with the power to get rid of you don't want you to stay. What matters is maximizing what they'll do for you on departure. To get the most favorable terms with the least financial and ego damage, here's a game plan: (1) Get a favorable reference--in writing--from your boss; (2) gather work samples and good performance appraisals you've received; (3) negotiate for as much severance pay as possible; (4) negotiate for outplacement assistance; (5) gather contact names from co-workers; and (6) leave in style.

  3. Vulnerability of bridges to fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Crosti, C.; Gentili, F.

    2012-01-01

    Even if recent effort in developing methodology and measures for design structures against fire and explosions has been mostly focused on buildings, bridges can also be very sensitive to those actions, as witnesses by some recent bridge accidents, which caused major economic losses and also endan...

  4. How to generate and interpret fire characteristics charts for the U.S. fire danger rating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Patricia L. Andrews; Deb Tirmenstein

    2017-01-01

    The fire characteristics chart is a graphical method of presenting U.S. National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) indexes and components as well as primary surface or crown fire behavior characteristics. Computer software has been developed to produce fire characteristics charts for both fire danger and fire behavior in a format suitable for inclusion in reports and...

  5. Fire and forest history at Mount Rushmore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter M; Wienk, Cody L; Symstad, Amy J

    2008-12-01

    Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota is known worldwide for its massive sculpture of four of the United States' most respected presidents. The Memorial landscape also is covered by extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest that has not burned in over a century. We compiled dendroecological and forest structural data from 29 plots across the 517-ha Memorial and used fire behavior modeling to reconstruct the historical fire regime and forest structure and compare them to current conditions. The historical fire regime is best characterized as one of low-severity surface fires with occasional (> 100 years) patches (fire. We estimate that only approximately 3.3% of the landscape burned as crown fire during 22 landscape fire years (recorded at > or = 25% of plots) between 1529 and 1893. The last landscape fire was in 1893. Mean fire intervals before 1893 varied depending on spatial scale, from 34 years based on scar-to-scar intervals on individual trees to 16 years between landscape fire years. Modal fire intervals were 11-15 years and did not vary with scale. Fire rotation (the time to burn an area the size of the study area) was estimated to be 30 years for surface fire and 800+ years for crown fire. The current forest is denser and contains more small trees, fewer large trees, lower canopy base heights, and greater canopy bulk density than a reconstructed historical (1870) forest. Fire behavior modeling using the NEXUS program suggests that surface fires would have dominated fire behavior in the 1870 forest during both moderate and severe weather conditions, while crown fire would dominate in the current forest especially under severe weather. Changes in the fire regime and forest structure at Mount Rushmore parallel those seen in ponderosa pine forests from the southwestern United States. Shifts from historical to current forest structure and the increased likelihood of crown fire justify the need for forest restoration before a

  6. Seasonality of Fire Weather Strongly Influences Fire Regimes in South Florida Savanna-Grassland Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, William J.; Orzell, Steve L.; Slocum, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature). We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993–2009) data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture) to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires) over a 13-year period with fire records (1997–2009). Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with timing of

  7. Seasonality of fire weather strongly influences fire regimes in South Florida savanna-grassland landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Platt

    Full Text Available Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature. We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993-2009 data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires over a 13-year period with fire records (1997-2009. Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with

  8. Seasonality of fire weather strongly influences fire regimes in South Florida savanna-grassland landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, William J; Orzell, Steve L; Slocum, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature). We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993-2009) data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture) to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires) over a 13-year period with fire records (1997-2009). Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with timing of

  9. Sweat Farm Road Fire in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Dense plumes of blue-white smoke billowed from the Sweat Farm Road Fire in southern Georgia on April 19, 2007, when the Landsat 5 satellite captured this detailed image. The fire started on April 16, when a tree fell on a power line and, fanned by strong winds, quickly exploded into a major fire. By April 19, the fire had forced officials to close several roads, including U.S. Highway 1, and to evacuate hundreds of people from the perimeter of the city of Waycross, the silver cluster along the top edge of the image. The nearness of the fire is evident in the dark brown, charred land just south of the city. The active fire front is along the south edge of the burned area, where the flames are eating into the dark green hardwood forests, pine plantations, and shrubs in Okefenokee Swamp. Because of the difficult terrain, the fire and the adjoining Big Turnaround Complex fire are expected to burn until significant rain falls, said the morning report issued by the Southern Area Coordination Center on May 4. 'In the long term, the burning of the swamp will ultimately benefit the swamp wilderness habitat, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem,' said a press release issued from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on May 4. Such ecosystems require fire to remain healthy. In the case of southern pine forests, many pine species need fire to remove litter from the ground and release soil nutrients so that new seedlings can grow.

  10. Predicting fire impact from plant traits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Ottink, Roos; Zylstra, Philip; Cornelissen, Hans; Fernandes, Paulo

    2017-04-01

    Fire can considerably increase the landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion, which is in part caused by fire-induced soil heating, vegetation removal and resulting hydrological changes. While the magnitude of these fire effects and ecosystem responses is frequently studied, there is still little attention for the fundamental mechanisms that drive these changes. One example is on the effect of plants: while it is known that plants can alter the fire environment, there is a major knowledge gap regarding the fundamental mechanisms by which vegetation mediates fire impact on soil and hydrology. Essential to identifying these mechanisms is consideration of the effects of vegetation on flammability and fire behaviour, which are studied both in ecology and traditional fire science. Here we discuss the challenges of integrating these very distinct fields and the potential benefits of this integration for improved understanding of fire effects on soil and hydrology. We furthermore present results of a study in which we assessed the spatial drivers controlling the proportion of live and dead fuel in a natural park in northern Portugal, and evaluated the impacts on the spatial variability of fire behaviour and potential soil heating using BehavePlus modeling. Better understanding of the role of (spatial variability in) plant traits on fire impact can facilitate the development of risk maps to ultimately help predict and mitigate fire risk and impact across landscapes.

  11. Evidence of fuels management and fire weather influencing fire severity in an extreme fire event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamie M. Lydersen; Brandon M. Collins; Matthew L. Brooks; John R. Matchett; Kristen L. Shive; Nicholas A. Povak; Van R. Kane; Douglas F. Smith

    2017-01-01

    Following changes in vegetation structure and pattern, along with a changing climate, large wildfire incidence has increased in forests throughout the western U.S. Given this increase there is great interest in whether fuels treatments and previous wildfire can alter fire severity patterns in large wildfires. We assessed the relative influence of previous fuels...

  12. Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Roberta Bartlette; Larry Bradshaw; Kelly Close; Brandon M. Collins; Paul Gleason; Wei Min Hao; Paul Langowski; John McGinely; Charles W. McHugh; Erik Martinson; Phillip N. Omi; Wayne Shepperd; Karl Zeller

    2003-01-01

    The Hayman Fire started on June 8, 2002, about 1.5 miles southwest of Tappan Mountain on the south side of County Highway 77, in Park County, Colorado (fig. 1). It was first reported at about 1 acre in size at approximately 1655 hours (appendix C). An aggressive initial attack response consisted of air tankers, helicopters, engines, and ground crews, but they were...

  13. Fuels and predicted fire behavior in the southern Appalachian Mountains and fire and fire surrogate treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Waldrop; Ross J. Phillips; Dean A. Simon

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the success of fuel reduction treatments for mitigating wildfire behavior in an area that has had little previous research on fire, the southern Appalachian Mountains. A secondary objective of treatments was to restore the community to an open woodland condition. Three blocks of four treatments were installed in a mature hardwood forest in western...

  14. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Kubicek

    2001-09-07

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  15. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard C. Logan

    2002-03-28

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  16. Fire hazard analysis for fusion energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvares, N.J.; Hasegawa, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The 2XIIB mirror fusion facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) was used to evaluate the fire safety of state-of-the-art fusion energy experiments. The primary objective of this evaluation was to ensure the parallel development of fire safety and fusion energy technology. Through fault-tree analysis, we obtained a detailed engineering description of the 2XIIB fire protection system. This information helped us establish an optimum level of fire protection for experimental fusion energy facilities as well as evaluate the level of protection provided by various systems. Concurrently, we analyzed the fire hazard inherent to the facility using techniques that relate the probability of ignition to the flame spread and heat-release potential of construction materials, electrical and thermal insulations, and dielectric fluids. A comparison of the results of both analyses revealed that the existing fire protection system should be modified to accommodate the range of fire hazards inherent to the 2XIIB facility.

  17. PERSPECTIVE: Fire on the fringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Stephen J.

    2009-09-01

    Stephen J Pyne For the past two decades fire agencies have grappled with a seemingly new and intractable problem. Like the return of smallpox or polio, an issue they thought had vanished reappeared in virulent form. Year by year, the unthinkable became the undeniable: all across many industrial nations settlements began to burn. The earliest formal study followed the 1983 Ash Wednesday fires that swept through southeastern Australia [1]. That report remains definitive: nearly every subsequent inquiry has reaffirmed its conclusions about how houses actually burn and what remedial measures could counter the destruction [2, 3]. In many respects these insights simply adapted to nominal `wildlands' the lessons long learned for urban fire protection. Ban combustible roofing. Plug openings where embers might enter buildings. Establish defensible spaces. Provide firefighters. The larger concern was that wild landscapes and cityscapes were being intermixed in dangerous and unprecedented ways, like some kind of environmental matter and anti-matter. That mingling assumed two different forms. One was typical of developed nations with extensive wildlands in which suburban (or exurban) sprawl pushed against reserved landscapes. In 1987 researchers with the US Forest Service coined a name for this variant, the awkwardly labeled `wildland/urban interface' (WUI) or I-zone [4]. The second pattern found its best expression in Mediterranean Europe. Here agricultural lands were being abandoned, and then partially reclaimed by exurbanites [5]. The upshot for both was an explosion of fuels, houses (and communities) not built according to standard fire codes, and the absence of formal fire brigades [6]. The solution seemed obvious: install standard fire protection measures. More broadly, remove the houses or remove the wildlands. The apparitional fires would vanish as had urban conflagrations before them. In effect, define the problem as one that existing engineering, or techniques

  18. Fire effects in Pinus uncinata Ram plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Cardil Forradellas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Understanding fire ecology of main forest species is essential for a sound, scientifically based on managing of wildlands and also to assess likely implications due to changes in fire regime under a global change scenario. Few references can be found about fire ecology of Pinus uncinata Ram. (PU. PU species grows in the Central Pyrenees where large, severe wildland fires did not occur frequently in the past. However, several fires with extreme fire behavior have affected PU stands in last years and they might disturb other PU forest in the future.Area of study: Cabdella fire (February 2012, in Lleida province, is one of the several wildland fires occurred in 2012 (winter season in the Central Pyrenees. Fire affected a large PU plantation (102 ha located at 1.800-2,100 meters above the sea.Material and methods: We have analyzed first order fire effects in three fireline intensity thresholds along three years in terms of mortality ratio, scorched height, percentage of scorched crown volume and bark char height.Main results: PU seems to be a very tolerant species to low and medium fire line intensity but fire effects were very significant when fire line intensity was high. In medium fireline intensity sites, probability of mortality ranged from 15 to 30% and the dead trees had the highest values on scorched height and percentage of scorched crown volume.Research highlights: Results from this work supports that prescribed burning might be used to efficiently decrease fuel load and fuel vertical continuity while avoiding considerable PU mortality. It also displayed that when fuel management has been implemented, PU mortality might be limited even under extreme fire behavior.Abbreviations used: PU: Pinus uncinata Ram.

  19. Fire effects in Pinus uncinata Ram plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardil Forradellas, A.; Molina Terrén, D.M.; Oliveres, J.; Castellnou, M.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of study: Understanding fire ecology of main forest species is essential for a sound, scientifically based on managing of wildlands and also to assess likely implications due to changes in fire regime under a global change scenario. Few references can be found about fire ecology of Pinus uncinata Ram. (PU). PU species grows in the Central Pyrenees where large, severe wildland fires did not occur frequently in the past. However, several fires with extreme fire behavior have affected PU stands in last years and they might disturb other PU forest in the future. Area of study: Cabdella fire (February 2012), in Lleida province, is one of the several wildland fires occurred in 2012 (winter season) in the Central Pyrenees. Fire affected a large PU plantation (102 ha) located at 1.800-2,100 meters above the sea. Material and methods: We have analyzed first order fire effects in three fireline intensity thresholds along three years in terms of mortality ratio, scorched height, percentage of scorched crown volume and bark char height. Main results: PU seems to be a very tolerant species to low and medium fire line intensity but fire effects were very significant when fire line intensity was high. In medium fireline intensity sites, probability of mortality ranged from 15 to 30% and the dead trees had the highest values on scorched height and percentage of scorched crown volume. Research highlights: Results from this work supports that prescribed burning might be used to efficiently decrease fuel load and fuel vertical continuity while avoiding considerable PU mortality. It also displayed that when fuel management has been implemented, PU mortality might be limited even under extreme fire behavior. (Author)

  20. Controls on fire activity over the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloster, S.; Brucher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Wilkenskjeld, S.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in fire activity over the last 8000 years are simulated with a global fire model driven by changes in climate and vegetation cover. The changes were separated into those caused through variations in fuel availability, fuel moisture or wind speed, which react differently to changes in climate. Disentangling these controlling factors helps in understanding the overall climate control on fire activity over the Holocene. Globally the burned area is simulated to increase by 2.5% between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, with larger regional changes compensating nearly evening out on a global scale. Despite the absence of anthropogenic fire ignitions, the simulated trends in fire activity agree reasonably well with continental-scale reconstructions from charcoal records, with the exception of Europe. For some regions the change in fire activity is predominantly controlled through changes in fuel availability (Australia monsoon, Central America tropics/subtropics). For other regions changes in fuel moisture are more important for the overall trend in fire activity (North America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia monsoon). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, changes in fuel moisture alone lead to an increase in fire activity between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, while changes in fuel availability lead to a decrease. Overall, the fuel moisture control is dominating the simulated fire activity for Sub-Saharan Africa. The simulations clearly demonstrate that both changes in fuel availability and changes in fuel moisture are important drivers for the fire activity over the Holocene. Fuel availability and fuel moisture do, however, have different climate controls. As such, observed changes in fire activity cannot be related to single climate parameters such as precipitation or temperature alone. Fire models, as applied in this study, in combination with observational records can help in understanding the climate control on fire activity, which is essential to project future fire

  1. Manual Fire Suppression Methods on Typical Machinery Space Spray Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-31

    48 4.3.2 Suppression Results .......... . 64 4.3.3 Analysis of Suppression Effects. 66 5. Discussion ...... .................. .. 67 6. Summary and...Extinguishing System (TAFES) performed satisfactorily, but not as well as the AFFF hand line in conjunction with a PKP portable extinguisher. No cualitative ...Further testing and analysis are necessary to verify the effects of spray fires and methods of extinguishment. A major limitation of the tests

  2. Assessing the influence of small fires on trends in fire regime features at mainland Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ruano, Adrián; Rodrigues Mimbrero, Marcos; de la Riva Fernández, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Small fires, i.e. fires smaller than 1 Ha, represent a huge proportion of total wildfire occurrence in the Mediterranean region. In the case of Spain, around 53% of fires in the period 1988-2013 fall into this category according to the Spanish EGIF statistics. However, the proportion of small fires is not stationary over time. Small fires are usually excluded from most analysis, given the chance of introducing or falling into temporal bias, being almost mandatory in those assessments using data before the 90s. Inconsistences and inhomogeneity problems related to the diversity of criteria and/or registration procedures among Autonomous Regions are found before that date, although it is widely agreed that small fires are consistently registered starting from 1988. Nevertheless, in terms of fire regimen characterization it is important to know to what extent small fires contribute to the overall fire behaviour. The aim of this study is to analyse spatial-temporal trends of several fire features such as total number of fires and burned area, number and burned area of natural and human fires, and the proportion of natural/human cause in the period 1988-2013 at province level (NUTS3). The analysis is conducted at the mainland Spain at annual and seasonal time scales. We are mainly interested in exploring differences in spatial-temporal trends including or excluding small fires and dealing with them separately as well. This allows determining the extent to which small fires may affect fire regime characterization. We employed a Mann-Kendall test for trend detection and Sen's slope to evaluate the magnitude of the change. Both tests were applied for each fire feature aggregated at NUTS3 level for both autumn-winter and spring-summer seasons. Our results show significant changes in the evolution of annual wildfire frequency; especially strong when small fires are accounted for. A similar outcome was observed in natural and human number fires during the spring-summer season

  3. Fire Extinguisher Training for Fire Watch and Designated Workers, Course 9893

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jimmy D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-19

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), all workers must be aware of LANL fire protection policies and be trained on what to do in the event of a fire. This course, Fire Extinguisher Training for Fire Watch and Designated Workers (#9893), provides awareness-level and hands-on training for fire watch personnel and designated workers. Fire watch personnel and designated workers are appointed by line management and must receive both awareness-level training and hands-on training in the use of portable fire extinguishers to extinguish an incipient-stage fire. This training meets the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 29 CFR 1910.157, Portable Fire Extinguishers, and Procedure (P) 101-26, Welding, Cutting, and Other Spark-/Flame-Producing Operations.

  4. Fire Extinguisher Designated Worker and Fire Watch: Self-Study Course 15672

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jimmy D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-08

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), all workers must be aware of LANL fire protection policies and be trained on what to do in the event of a fire. This course, Fire Extinguisher Training for Fire Watch and Designated Workers (#9893), provides awareness-level and hands-on training for fire watch personnel and designated workers. Fire watch personnel and designated workers are appointed by line management and must receive both awareness-level training and hands-on training in the use of portable fire extinguishers to extinguish an incipient-stage fire. This training meets the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 29 CFR 1910.157, Portable Fire Extinguishers, and Procedure (P) 101-26, Welding, Cutting, and Other Spark-/Flame-Producing Operations.

  5. Fire protection program fiscal year 1997 site support program plan - Hanford fire department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fires Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford Site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. this includes response to surrounding fire department districts under mutual aids agreements and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site. the fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing, and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention and education.

  6. Fire Protection Program fiscal year 1996, site support program plan Hanford Fire Department. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E.

    1995-09-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under a mutual aid agreement and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System). The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, self-contained breathing apparatus maintenance, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This report gives a program overview, technical program baselines, and cost and schedule baseline.

  7. Temperate and boreal forest mega-fires: characteristics and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Scott L.; Burrows, Neil; Buyantuyev, Alexander; Gray, Robert W.; Keane, Robert E.; Kubian, Rick; Liu, Shirong; Seijo, Francisco; Shu, Lifu; Tolhurst, Kevin G.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    Mega-fires are often defined according to their size and intensity but are more accurately described by their socioeconomic impacts. Three factors – climate change, fire exclusion, and antecedent disturbance, collectively referred to as the “mega-fire triangle” – likely contribute to today's mega-fires. Some characteristics of mega-fires may emulate historical fire regimes and can therefore sustain healthy fire-prone ecosystems, but other attributes decrease ecosystem resiliency. A good example of a program that seeks to mitigate mega-fires is located in Western Australia, where prescribed burning reduces wildfire intensity while conserving ecosystems. Crown-fire-adapted ecosystems are likely at higher risk of frequent mega-fires as a result of climate change, as compared with other ecosystems once subject to frequent less severe fires. Fire and forest managers should recognize that mega-fires will be a part of future wildland fire regimes and should develop strategies to reduce their undesired impacts.

  8. Review of UCN 5,6 Fire PSA Model based on ANS Fire PRA Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Joon Eon; Lee, Yoon Hwan

    2006-12-15

    Recently, under the de-regulation environment, nuclear industry has attempted various approaches to improve the economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). This approach uses the fire risk and performance information to manage the resources effectively and efficiently that are used in the operation of NPP. In fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation, fire PSA quality is one of the most important things. The nuclear industry and regulatory body of U.S.A have developed a measure to evaluate the quality of fire PSA. ANS (American Nuclear Society) has developed a guidance called 'ANS Fire PRA Methodology Standard'. However, in Korea, there have been no attempts to evaluate the quality of fire PSA model itself. Therefore, we cannot be sure about the quality of fire PSA whether or not the present fire PSA model can be used for the risk-informed applications such as mentioned above. We can say that the evaluation of fire PSA model quality is the basis for the fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation. In this report, we have evaluated the quality of fire PSA model for Ulchin 5 and 6 units based on the ANS Fire PRA Standard. We, also, have derived what items are to be improved to upgrade the quality of fire PSA model and how it can be improved. This report can be used as the base of the fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation work in Korea.

  9. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  10. Underground fires involving conveyor systems, 1958-78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, D.P.; Currie, J.L.

    1979-12-01

    Discusses the emergence of fire resistant conveyor belts for use in British mines, following the fires at Creswell and Whitfield Collieries, and the development of fire tests. The principle tests for belting are described and their relevance to the real fire situation is shown. The role of the conveyor as a cause of fire, and the effects of fire on conveyors, are identified from the fire statistics for the past 21 years.

  11. Bark Beetle-Fire Associations in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    OpenAIRE

    Amman, Gene D

    1991-01-01

    The large forest fires in and around Yellowstone National Park in 1988 bring up many ecological questions, including the role of bark beetles. Bark beetles may contribute to fuel buildup over the years preceding a fire, resulting in stand replacement fires. Fire is important to the survival of seral tree species and bark beetles that reproduce in them. Without fire, seral species are ultimately replaced by climax species. Following fire, bark- and wood-boring beetles respond to fire-injured t...

  12. Topographic and fire weather controls of fire refugia in forested ecosystems of northwestern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawchuk, Meg A; Haire, Sandra L; Coop, Jonathan D.; Parisien, Marc-Andre; Whitman, Ellen; Chong, Geneva W.; Miller, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Fire refugia, sometimes referred to as fire islands, shadows, skips, residuals, or fire remnants, are an important element of the burn mosaic, but we lack a quantitative framework that links observations of fire refugia from different environmental contexts. Here, we develop and test a conceptual model for how predictability of fire refugia varies according to topographic complexity and fire weather conditions. Refugia were quantified as areas unburned or burned at comparatively low severity based on remotely sensed burn severity data. We assessed the relationship between refugia and a suite of terrain-related explanatory metrics by fitting a collection of boosted regression tree models. The models were developed

  13. Vision Enhancement for Fire Fighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-30

    Watts, in conjunction with an ongoing evaluation of smoke control and removal techniques using the ship’s ventilation system [151. Figure 29 shows...aboard A. E. Watts [21]. The primary purpose of this test series was to evaluate new concepts in smoke control and removal for the collective...the fire alarm sounded, zone one ventilation was reconfigured to test various smoke control options. In phase II, 65 HOOVER, LEPPLE, AND LEONARD CPS

  14. A Framework for Assessment of Intentional Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Mohammadfam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : It is not possible to live without using fire. However, fire could destruct human properties in a short time. One of the most important types of fire is intentional fire. This type of fire has become a great problem for insurance companies, fire departments, industries, government and business in the recent years. This study aimed to provide a framework for risk assessment of intentional fires . Methods: In the present study, risk assessment and management model for protecting critical properties and security vulnerability assessment model were used to develop a comprehensive framework for risk assessment of intentional fires. The framework was examined in an automotive industry . Results : The designed framework contained five steps as 1 asset inventory and prioritizing them according to their importance, 2 invasion assessment, 3 vulnerability assessment, 4 risk assessment and design and 5 implementation and evaluating the effectiveness of corrective/preventive actions. Thirty different scenarios for intentional fires were identified by implementing the designed framework in an automotive company, and then the associated risk of each scenario was quantitatively determined. Conclusion : Compared to seven models, the proposed framework represents its comprehension. Development of safety and security standards and a central security information bank to reduce security risks, including the risk of intentional fires is recommended .

  15. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  16. Temperature of Steel Columns under Natural Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wald

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Current fire design models for time-temperature development within structural elements as well as for structural behaviour are based on isolated member tests subjected to standard fire regimes, which serve as a reference heating, but do not model natural fire. Only tests on a real structure under a natural fire can evaluate future models of the temperature developments in a fire compartment, of the transfer of heat into the structure and of the overall structural behaviour under fire.To study overall structural behaviour, a research project was conducted on an eight storey steel frame building at the  Cardington Building Research Establishment laboratory on January 16, 2003. A fire compartment 11×7 m was prepared on the fourth floor. A fire load of 40 kg/m2 was applied with 100 % permanent mechanical load and 65 % of imposed load. The paper summarises the experimental programme and shows the temperature development of the gas in the fire compartment and of the fire protected columns bearing the unprotected floors.

  17. The Effects of Vegetative Type, Edges, Fire History, Rainfall and Management in Fire-Maintained Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breininger, David R.; Foster, Tammy E.; Carter, Geoffrey M.; Duncan, Brean W.; Stolen, Eric D.; Lyon, James E.

    2017-01-01

    The combined effects of repeated fires, climate, and landscape features (e.g., edges) need greater focus in fire ecology studies, which usually emphasize characteristics of the most recent fire and not fire history. Florida scrub-jays are an imperiled, territorial species that prefer medium (1.2-1.7 m) shrub heights. We measured short, medium, and tall habitat quality states annually within 10 ha grid cells that represented potential territories because frequent fires and vegetative recovery cause annual variation in habitat quality. We used multistate models and model selection to test competing hypotheses about how transition probabilities between states varied annually as functions of environmental covariates. Covariates included vegetative type, edges, precipitation, openings (gaps between shrubs), mechanical cutting, and fire characteristics. Fire characteristics not only included an annual presenceabsence of fire covariate, but also fire history covariates: time since the previous fire, the maximum fire-free interval, and the number of repeated fires. Statistical models with support included many covariates for each transition probability, often including fire history, interactions and nonlinear relationships. Tall territories resulted from 28 years of fire suppression and habitat fragmentation that reduced the spread of fires across landscapes. Despite 35 years of habitat restoration and prescribed fires, half the territories remained tall suggesting a regime shift to a less desirable habitat condition. Measuring territory quality states and environmental covariates each year combined with multistate modeling provided a useful empirical approach to quantify the effects of repeated fire in combinations with environmental variables on transition probabilities that drive management strategies and ecosystem change.

  18. Fire characteristics associated with firefighter injury on large federal wildland fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Carla; Lynch, Charles F; Torner, James; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2013-02-01

    Wildland fires present many injury hazards to firefighters. We estimate injury rates and identify fire-related factors associated with injury. Data from the National Interagency Fire Center from 2003 to 2007 provided the number of injuries in which the firefighter could not return to his or her job assignment, person-days worked, and fire characteristics (year, region, season, cause, fuel type, resistance to control, and structures destroyed). We assessed fire-level risk factors of having at least one reported injury using logistic regression. Negative binomial regression was used to examine incidence rate ratios associated with fire-level risk factors. Of 867 fires, 9.5% required the most complex management and 24.7% required the next-highest level of management. Fires most often occurred in the western United States (82.8%), during the summer (69.6%), caused by lightening (54.9%). Timber was the most frequent fuel source (40.2%). Peak incident management level, person-days of exposure, and the fire's resistance to control were significantly related to the odds of a fire having at least one reported injury. However, the most complex fires had a lower injury incidence rate than less complex fires. Although fire complexity and the number of firefighters were associated with the risk for at least one reported injury, the more experienced and specialized firefighting teams had lower injury incidence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combined use of weather forecasting and satellite remote sensing information for fire risk, fire and fire impact monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Knorr; Ioannis Pytharoulis; George P. Petropoulos, et al.

    2011-01-01

    The restoration of fire-affected forest areas needs to be combined with their future protection from renewed catastrophic fires, such as those that occurred in Greece during the 2007 summer season. The present work demonstrates that the use of various sources of satellite data in conjunction with weather forecast information is capable of providing valuable information for the characterization of fire danger with the purpose of protecting the Greek national forest areas. This study shows that...

  20. Fire-safety engineering and performance-based codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    project administrators, etc. The book deals with the following topics: • Historical presentation on the subject of fire • Legislation and building project administration • European fire standardization • Passive and active fire protection • Performance-based Codes • Fire-safety Engineering • Fundamental...... thermodynamics • Heat exchange during the fire process • Skin burns • Burning rate, energy release rate and design fires • Proposal to Risk-based design fires • Proposal to a Fire scale • Material ignition and flame spread • Fire dynamics in buildings • Combustion products and toxic gases • Smoke inhalation...

  1. Development of Two Courses-of-Fire: Night Fire with Aiming Lights and Combat Field Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    TEA ) (Dyer, Reeves & Wampler, 1998; Dyer, 1999b), were that all Soldiers qualified with the CCO (day) and the TWS (night) on the M4 carbine, but...they tried to conserve ammunition. Soldiers who indicated they were not aware they would run out of ammunition were those classified as Unqualified...or decide not to fire, conserving rounds for another target or 35 array. In either case, the number of hits declines because of marksmanship

  2. On the fluid mechanics of fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-29

    Fluid mechanics research related to fire is reviewed with focus on canonical flows, multiphysics coupling aspects, experimental and numerical techniques. Fire is a low-speed, chemically-reacting, flow in which buoyancy plans an important role. Fire research has focused on two canonical flows, the reacting boundary-layer and the reacting free plume. There is rich, multi-lateral, bi-directional, coupling among fluid mechanics and scalar transport, combustion, and radiation. There is only a limited experimental fluid-mechanics database for fire due to measurement difficulties in the harsh environment, and the focus within the fire community on thermal/chemical consequences. Increasingly, computational fluid dynamics techniques are being used to provide engineering guidance on thermal/chemical consequences and to study fire phenomenology.

  3. Fatality During Servicing of Fire Extinguisher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Ambade, Vipul Namdeorao; Dixit, Pradeep Gangadhar

    2018-01-01

    Fire extinguisher is an integral part of emergency responses to small fires. Different types of fire extinguisher exists; cartridge-based fire extinguisher is commonly used. Despite their intended use for safety, such devices can become dangerous if not properly handled or maintained. This case report describes the death of a soldier from the explosion of a cartridge-based fire extinguisher during routine servicing. The case is the first reported in the medical literature. A safety device like fire extinguisher can become dangerous if not handled with care and due steps should be taken for the maintenance of such devices before being operated in the public domain. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Fire ecology of the forest habitat types of northern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane Kapler Smith; William C. Fischer

    1997-01-01

    Provides information on fire ecology in forest habitat and community types occurring in northern Idaho. Identifies fire groups based on presettlement fire regimes and patterns of succession and stand development after fire. Describes forest fuels and suggests considerations for fire management.

  5. Climatic and weather factors affecting fire occurrence and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall P. Benson; John O. Roads; David R. Weise

    2009-01-01

    Weather and climate have a profound influence on wildland fire ignition potential, fire behavior, and fire severity. Local weather and climate are affected by large-scale patterns of winds over the hemispheres that predispose wildland fuels to fire. The characteristics of wildland fuels, especially the moisture content, ultimately determine fire behavior and the impact...

  6. Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, B.H.

    1999-08-19

    This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

  7. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program: 2013 Research accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Robin J. Innes; Colin C. Hardy; Kristine M. Lee

    2014-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support staff in...

  8. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Program: 2014 Research Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Robin J. Innes; Colin C. Hardy; Kristine M. Lee

    2015-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support staff in FFS...

  9. 46 CFR 116.415 - Fire control boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire control boundaries. 116.415 Section 116.415... ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.415 Fire control boundaries. (a) Type and construction of fire control... Class 0 minutes (iv) Penetrations in B-Class fire control boundaries for electrical cables, pipes...

  10. Fire history from three species on a central Appalachian ridgetop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy E. Hessl; Tom Saladyga; Thomas Schuler; Peter Clark; Joshua. Wixom

    2011-01-01

    The impact of settlement era fires on Appalachian forests was substantial, but whether these fires affected the extent of fire-adapted ridgetop plant communities is poorly understood. Here we present fire history and stand structure of an Appalachian ridgetop (Pike Knob, West Virginia) based on fire scars from three species (Pinus pungens Lamb.,

  11. 46 CFR 95.50-20 - Semiportable fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Semiportable fire extinguishers. 95.50-20 Section 95.50... FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Hand Portable Fire Extinguishers and Semiportable Fire Extinguishing Systems, Arrangements and Details § 95.50-20 Semiportable fire extinguishers. (a) The frame or support of each size III...

  12. 46 CFR 132.240 - Stowage of semiportable fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of semiportable fire extinguishers. 132.240... FIRE-PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Fire Extinguishers § 132.240 Stowage of semiportable fire extinguishers. The frame or support of each semiportable fire extinguisher of size III, IV...

  13. 46 CFR 193.50-20 - Semiportable fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Semiportable fire extinguishers. 193.50-20 Section 193... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Hand Portable Fire Extinguishers and Semiportable Fire Extinguishing Systems, Arrangements and Details § 193.50-20 Semiportable fire extinguishers. (a) The frame or support of...

  14. Shift in fire-ecosystems and weather changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongani Finiza

    2013-01-01

    During recent decades too much focus fell on fire suppression and fire engineering methods. Little attention has been given to understanding the shift in the changing fire weather resulting from the global change in weather patterns. Weather change have gradually changed the way vegetation cover respond to fire occurrence and brought about changes in fire behavior and...

  15. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program 2015 Research Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Charles W. McHugh; Colin C. Hardy

    2016-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support...

  16. Fire and EMS Districts - MDC_CountywideClostFireStationArea

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade County Fire Rescue Countywide Closest Fire Station Areas. The "Countywide" name is to indicate that the whole of Miami-Dade...

  17. Bison and fire: Landscape analysis of ungulate response to Yellowstone`s fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, L.L. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology; Turner, M.G.; Wu, Yegang [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Romme, W.H. [Fort Lewis Coll., Durango, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1993-10-01

    A simulation model of bison survival under different scenarios of winter severity, fire size, fire pattern and population size was run. Previous work had shown the model to be realistic. The overriding factor influencing bison winter survival in the model was winter severity. This factor had significant interactions with fire size and population size as well, further reducing survival in all cases. Increasing fire size reduced survival the first year after a simulated fire, but increased survival two years after the fire. This was due to enhanced forage production in burned areas the second year. A threshold effect on survival was noted at fire sizes greater than 60% of the simulated landscape, a number which is critical in disturbance propagation in landscapes. There was no biologically important effect of fire pattern (random vs. clumped) on survival.

  18. Live Fire Evaluation of the Expeditionary Fire Suppression System (EFSS); Phase I

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalberer, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    .... The system uses AFFF-based compressed air foam and PKP dry chemical. Phase I evaluated the effectiveness of the modified-commercially available EFSS on live fires on static pool and running fuel fires...

  19. Alternative approach for fire suppression of class A, B and C fires in gloveboxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberger, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tsiagkouris, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-02-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Orders and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards require fire suppression in gloveboxes. Several potential solutions have been and are currently being considered at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective is to provide reliable, minimally invasive, and seismically robust fire suppression capable of extinguishing Class A, B, and C fires; achieve compliance with DOE and NFPA requirements; and provide value-added improvements to fire safety in gloveboxes. This report provides a brief summary of current approaches and also documents the successful fire tests conducted to prove that one approach, specifically Fire Foe{trademark} tubes, is capable of achieving the requirement to provide reliable fire protection in gloveboxes in a cost-effective manner.

  20. East Baton Rouge Fire Stations, UTM15 NAD83, LAGIC (2002) [ebr_fire_stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This dataset consists of twenty-nine (29) geocoded points representing fire stations in East Baton Rouge parish, Louisiana. Thirty (30) fire station, disctrict, and...

  1. Stratifying Tropical Fires by Land Cover: Insights into Amazonian Fires, Aerosol Loading, and Regional Deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenHoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes changes in the number of fires detected on forest, grass, and transition lands during the 2002-2009 biomass burning seasons using fire detection data and co-located land cover classifications from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the total number of detected fires correlates well with MODIS mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) from year to year, in accord with other studies. However, we also show that the ratio of forest to savanna fires varies substantially from year to year. Forest fires have trended downward, on average, since the beginning of 2006 despite a modest increase in 2007. Our study suggests that high particulate matter loading detected in 2007 was likely due to a large number of savanna/agricultural fires that year. Finally, we illustrate that the correlation between annual Brazilian deforestation estimates and MODIS fires is considerably higher when fires are stratified by MODIS-derived land cover classifications.

  2. Burns Interagency Fire Zone : Fire Danger Operating and Preparedness Plan 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Fire Danger Operating and Preparedness Plan for the Burns Interagency Fire Zone. This plan provides a method to calculate the preparedness and dispatch...

  3. Vegetation responses to season of fire in an aseasonal, fire-prone fynbos shrubland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaij, Tineke; Cowling, Richard M; van Wilgen, Brian W; Rikhotso, Diba R; Difford, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Season of fire has marked effects on floristic composition in fire-prone Mediterranean-climate shrublands. In these winter-rainfall systems, summer-autumn fires lead to optimal recruitment of overstorey proteoid shrubs (non-sprouting, slow-maturing, serotinous Proteaceae) which are important to the conservation of floral diversity. We explored whether fire season has similar effects on early establishment of five proteoid species in the eastern coastal part of the Cape Floral Kingdom (South Africa) where rainfall occurs year-round and where weather conducive to fire and the actual incidence of fire are largely aseasonal. We surveyed recruitment success (ratio of post-fire recruits to pre-fire parents) of proteoids after fires in different seasons. We also planted proteoid seeds into exclosures, designed to prevent predation by small mammals and birds, in cleared (intended to simulate fire) fynbos shrublands at different sites in each of four seasons and monitored their germination and survival to one year post-planting (hereafter termed 'recruitment'). Factors (in decreasing order of importance) affecting recruitment success in the post-fire surveys were species, pre-fire parent density, post-fire age of the vegetation at the time of assessment, and fire season, whereas rainfall (for six months post-fire) and fire return interval (>7 years) had little effect. In the seed-planting experiment, germination occurred during the cooler months and mostly within two months of planting, except for summer-plantings, which took 2-3 months longer to germinate. Although recruitment success differed significantly among planting seasons, sites and species, significant interactions occurred among the experimental factors. In both the post-fire surveys and seed planting experiment, recruitment success in relation to fire- or planting season varied greatly within and among species and sites. Results of these two datasets were furthermore inconsistent, suggesting that proteoid

  4. Vegetation responses to season of fire in an aseasonal, fire-prone fynbos shrubland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineke Kraaij

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Season of fire has marked effects on floristic composition in fire-prone Mediterranean-climate shrublands. In these winter-rainfall systems, summer-autumn fires lead to optimal recruitment of overstorey proteoid shrubs (non-sprouting, slow-maturing, serotinous Proteaceae which are important to the conservation of floral diversity. We explored whether fire season has similar effects on early establishment of five proteoid species in the eastern coastal part of the Cape Floral Kingdom (South Africa where rainfall occurs year-round and where weather conducive to fire and the actual incidence of fire are largely aseasonal. We surveyed recruitment success (ratio of post-fire recruits to pre-fire parents of proteoids after fires in different seasons. We also planted proteoid seeds into exclosures, designed to prevent predation by small mammals and birds, in cleared (intended to simulate fire fynbos shrublands at different sites in each of four seasons and monitored their germination and survival to one year post-planting (hereafter termed ‘recruitment’. Factors (in decreasing order of importance affecting recruitment success in the post-fire surveys were species, pre-fire parent density, post-fire age of the vegetation at the time of assessment, and fire season, whereas rainfall (for six months post-fire and fire return interval (>7 years had little effect. In the seed-planting experiment, germination occurred during the cooler months and mostly within two months of planting, except for summer-plantings, which took 2–3 months longer to germinate. Although recruitment success differed significantly among planting seasons, sites and species, significant interactions occurred among the experimental factors. In both the post-fire surveys and seed planting experiment, recruitment success in relation to fire- or planting season varied greatly within and among species and sites. Results of these two datasets were furthermore inconsistent, suggesting

  5. Solution of Fire Protection in Historic Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iringová Agnes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces optimization of the functional use of renovated spaces in historic buildings in terms of fire risk. It brings assessment of fire protection in the folk house Habánsky Dvor, situated in the village of Veľké Leváre, whose function was changed into the museum. It goes into static analysis of existing load-bearing structures and assessment of their fire resistance according to Eurocodes.

  6. Fire behavior in masticated fuels: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse K. Kreye; Nolan W. Brewer; Penelope Morgan; J. Morgan Varner; Alistair M.S. Smith; Chad M. Hoffman; Roger D. Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    Mastication is an increasingly common fuels treatment that redistributes ‘‘ladder’’ fuels to the forest floor to reduce vertical fuel continuity, crown fire potential, and fireline intensity, but fuel models do not exist for predicting fire behavior in these fuel types. Recent fires burning in masticated fuels have behaved in unexpected and contradictory ways, likely...

  7. Hornby's principles of fire control planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. T. Gisborne

    1939-01-01

    On August 27, 1937, Lloyd G. Hornby died of heart failure on the Toboggan Creek forest fire in the Clearwater National Forest. Few if any men in or out of the U.S. Forest Service have made a greater contribution to fire control planning than did he. In the following article, H. T. Gisborne outlines the principles of fire control planning developed by Mr. Hornby,...

  8. Forest fires in the insular Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, A Marcus J; Eckelmann, Claus-Martin; Quiñones, Maya

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a summary of the forest fire reports in the insular Caribbean derived from both management reports and an analysis of publicly available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrodiometer (MODIS) satellite active fire products from the region. A vast difference between the amount of fires reported by land managers and fire points in the MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System data can be observed. Future research is recommended to better understand the nature of these differences. While there is a general lack of available statistical data on forest fires in the Caribbean, a few general observations can be made: Forest fires occur mainly in dry forest types (500 to 1000 mm of mean annual rainfall). These are also the areas where most human settlements are located. Lowland high forests and montane forests with higher rainfall (1000 and more mm y(-1)) are less susceptible to forest fire, but they can burn in exceptionally dry years. Most of the dry forest ecosystems in the Caribbean can be considered to be fire-sensitive ecosystems, while the pine forests in the Caribbean (Cuba, Dominican Republic, and the Bahamas) are maintained by wildfires. In fire-sensitive ecosystems, uncontrolled burning often encourages the spread of alien invasive species. A Caribbean Fire Management Cooperation Strategy was developed between 2005 and 2006 under auspices of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. This regional strategy aims to strengthen Caribbean fire management networking by encouraging closer collaboration among countries with similar ecological conditions. The strategy for the Caribbean identifies a number of research, training, and management activities to improve wildfire management capacity in the Caribbean.

  9. The aspects of fire safety at landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshina Tat'yana Anatol'evna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting with 2008 and till 2013 there have been alarm messages about fires occurring at landfill places in Russia. Landfill fires are especially dangerous as they emit dangerous fumes from the combustion of the wide range of materials within the landfill. Subsurface landfill fires, unlike typical fires, cannot be put out with water. The article includes the analysis of the sources and causes of conflagrations at landfills. There maintains the necessity to eliminate the reasons, which cause the fires. There are quantification indices of environmental, social and economic effects of fires at landfills all over Russia. Surface fires generally burn at relatively low temperatures and are characterized by the emission of dense white smoke and the products of incomplete combustion. The smoke includes irritating agents, such as organic acids and other compounds. Higher temperature fires can cause the breakdown of volatile compounds, which emit dense black smoke. Surface fires are classified as either accidental or deliberate. For the ecologic security there is a need in the execution of proper hygienic requirements to the content of the places as well as international recommendations. In addition to the burning and explosion hazards posed by landfill fires, smoke and other by-products of landfill fires also present a health risk to firefighters and others exposed to them. Smoke from landfill fires generally contains particulate matter (the products of incomplete combustion of the fuel source, which can aggravate pre-existing pulmonary conditions or cause respiratory distress and damage ecosystem. The monitoring of conducting preventive inflamings and transition to alternative, environment friendly methods of waste disposal is needed.

  10. Analysis of NASA JP-4 fire tests data and development of a simple fire model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, P.

    1980-01-01

    The temperature, velocity and species concentration data obtained during the NASA fire tests (3m, 7.5m and 15m diameter JP-4 fires) were analyzed. Utilizing the data analysis, a sample theoretical model was formulated to predict the temperature and velocity profiles in JP-4 fires. The theoretical model, which does not take into account the detailed chemistry of combustion, is capable of predicting the extent of necking of the fire near its base.

  11. How a new fire-suppression policy can abruptly reshape the fire-weather relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffault, J.; Mouillot, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the interactions between anthropogenic and biophysical factors control fire regimes is increasingly becoming a major concern in a context of climate, economic and social changes. On a short time scale, fire activity is mainly driven by the variations in weather conditions. But while the assessment of this fire-weather relationship is an essential step towards fire hazard estimations, reconstructions or projections, still little is known about the impact of human practices on...

  12. Foam fire extinguishing agent. Awa shokazai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, M. (Fire Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-10-20

    This paper describes state of the art of foam fire extinguishing agents and explains the details of each foam. The fire-fighting foam are made by mixing aqueous solution of foam agent with air or inert gas mechanically, and so they are classified into three types according to the expansion ratio by air, such as low, medium, and high expansion-type foams. In general, low expansion-type foams are applied to liquid fuel tank fires. To large scale oil spill fires, low, medium, and high expansion foams are applied, and to liquefied gas fuel fires, LPG or LNG, high expansion ones are suitable. As for sorts of foams, fluoroprotein foams, fluorinated surfactant foams, and synthetic surfactant foams have been developed one after another, although there are still the conventional hydrolized keratin-protein foams available. In the case of water soluble liquid fires, such as alcohol or else, fire-fighting foams mentioned above applied to petroleum based oil fires are not available, because defoaming takes place when they are poured on such fires. Foam extinguishing agents for such application are also being developed. 59 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Analyses of Concrete Structures Exposed to Fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    The text book contains the data and methods necessary for fire safety design of concrete constructions. The methods relate to standard fire as well as to any time of any other fire course.Material data are presented for concretes exposed to fire, and calculation methods are given for the ultimate...... bending capacity of beams and slabs, the ultimate shear capacity of beams, for the instability of columns and walls and for the deflection of prestressed and non-prestressed beams, slabs, walls and columns.All methods have been derived and compared to tests by Kristian Hertz....

  14. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  15. FIRE_AX_UW_GERB_1HZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) University of Washington C-131A Aircraft Cloud Microphysics Data (1...

  16. FIRE_AX_UW_GERB_10HZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) University of Washington C-131A Aircraft Cloud Microphysics Data (10...

  17. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  18. Optimal fire histories for biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Luke T; Bennett, Andrew F; Clarke, Michael F; McCarthy, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Fire is used as a management tool for biodiversity conservation worldwide. A common objective is to avoid population extinctions due to inappropriate fire regimes. However, in many ecosystems, it is unclear what mix of fire histories will achieve this goal. We determined the optimal fire history of a given area for biological conservation with a method that links tools from 3 fields of research: species distribution modeling, composite indices of biodiversity, and decision science. We based our case study on extensive field surveys of birds, reptiles, and mammals in fire-prone semi-arid Australia. First, we developed statistical models of species' responses to fire history. Second, we determined the optimal allocation of successional states in a given area, based on the geometric mean of species relative abundance. Finally, we showed how conservation targets based on this index can be incorporated into a decision-making framework for fire management. Pyrodiversity per se did not necessarily promote vertebrate biodiversity. Maximizing pyrodiversity by having an even allocation of successional states did not maximize the geometric mean abundance of bird species. Older vegetation was disproportionately important for the conservation of birds, reptiles, and small mammals. Because our method defines fire management objectives based on the habitat requirements of multiple species in the community, it could be used widely to maximize biodiversity in fire-prone ecosystems. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Analysis of Fire Data in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Al-Jabri

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to illustrate the problem of fire accidents in the Sultanate of Oman and their causes in order to find out how the existing data could be used as a base to improve fire resistance, to detect the weak points (vulnerability to fire in existing structures, and to minimize fire occurrences in places where it is high. This will also provide useful recommendations with regard to fire safety including causes, people’s awareness and education, etc.  Fire data in Oman were collected from two sources: The Directorate General of Civil Defence (Public Relations Department and Sultan Qaboos University library. The collected data represent the number of fires in Oman during the last decade.  It also includes fire distribution by type and averages.  The analysis shows that there is a linear increase in the number of fire accidents in the last decade with time.  Many factors are included as potential sources, which are explained in the paper, and suggestions are made for possible control.

  20. Ecology: human role in Russian wild fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollicone, Danilo; Eva, Hugh D; Achard, Frédéric

    2006-03-23

    Anomalies in temperature and precipitation in northern Russia over the past few years have been viewed as manifestations of anthropogenic climate change, prompting suggestions that this may also account for exceptional forest fires in the region. Here we examine the number of forest-fire events across the boreal Russian Federation for the period 2002 to 2005 in 'intact' forests, where human influence is limited, and in 'non-intact' forests, which have been shaped by human activity. Our results show that there were more fires in years during which the weather was anomalous, but that more than 87% of fires in boreal Russia were started by people.

  1. Avian community responses to post-fire forest structure: implications for fire management in mixed conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela White; Patricia Manley; Gina Tarbill; T. W. Richardson; R. E. Russell; H. D. Safford; S. Z. Dobrowski

    2016-01-01

    Fire is a natural process and the dominant disturbance shaping plant and animal communities in many coniferous forests of the western US. Given that fire size and severity are predicted to increase in the future, it has become increasingly important to understand how wildlife responds to fire and post-fire management. The Angora Fire...

  2. Effectiveness of Fire and Fire Surrogate Treatments For Controlling Wildfire Behavior in Piedmont Forests: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helen H. Mohr; Thomas A. Waldrop; Sandra Rideout; Ross J. Phillips; Charles T. Flint

    2004-01-01

    The need for fuel reduction has increased in United States forests due to decades of fire exclusion. Excessive fuel buildup has led to uncharacteristically severe fires in areas with historically short-interval, low-to-moderate-intensity fire regimes. The National Fire and Fire Surrogate (NFFS) Study compared the impacts of three fuel-reduction treatments on numerous...

  3. Beyond "fire temperatures": calibrating thermocouple probes and modeling their response to surface fires in hardwood fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Bova; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2008-01-01

    The maximum temperatures of thermocouples, temperature-sensitive paints, and calorimeters exposed to flames in wildland fires are often called "fire temperatures" but are determined as much by the properties and deployment of the measurement devices as by the fires themselves. Rather than report device temperatures that are not generally comparable among...

  4. Standard fire behavior fuel models: a comprehensive set for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe H. Scott; Robert E. Burgan

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a new set of standard fire behavior fuel models for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model and the relationship of the new set to the original set of 13 fire behavior fuel models. To assist with transition to using the new fuel models, a fuel model selection guide, fuel model crosswalk, and set of fuel model photos are provided.

  5. Weather, fuels, fire behavior, plumes, and smoke - the nexus of fire meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott L. Goodrick; Timothy J. Brown; W. Matt Jolly

    2017-01-01

    In a pair of review papers, Potter (2012a, 2012b) summarized the significant fire weather research findings over about the past hundred years. Our scientific understanding of wildland fire-atmosphere interactions has evolved: from simple correlations supporting the notion that hot, dry, and windy conditions lead to more intense fires, we have moved towards more...

  6. Econometric analysis of fire suppression production functions for large wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Holmes; David E. Calkin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we use operational data collected for large wildland fires to estimate the parameters of economic production functions that relate the rate of fireline construction with the level of fire suppression inputs (handcrews, dozers, engines and helicopters). These parameter estimates are then used to evaluate whether the productivity of fire suppression inputs...

  7. Relating fire-caused change in forest structure to remotely sensed estimates of fire severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamie M. Lydersen; Brandon M. Collins; Jay D. Miller; Danny L. Fry; Scott L. Stephens

    2016-01-01

    Fire severity maps are an important tool for understanding fire effects on a landscape. The relative differenced normalized burn ratio (RdNBR) is a commonly used severity index in California forests, and is typically divided into four categories: unchanged, low, moderate, and high. RdNBR is often calculated twice--from images collected the year of the fire (initial...

  8. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin C. Ryan; Ann Trinkle Jones; Cassandra L. Koerner; Kristine M. Lee

    2012-01-01

    This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire. The goal of the volume is twofold: (1) to provide cultural resource/archaeological professionals and policy makers...

  9. Synthesis of knowledge of extreme fire behavior: volume I for fire managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Werth; Brian E. Potter; Craig B. Clements; Mark A. Finney; Scott L. Goodrick; Martin E. Alexander; Miguel G. Cruz; Jason A. Forthofer; Sara S. McAllister

    2011-01-01

    The National Wildfire Coordinating Group definition of extreme fire behavior (EFB) indicates a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high rate of spread, prolific crowning/spotting, presence of fire whirls, and strong convection column. Predictability is...

  10. Synthesis of knowledge of extreme fire behavior: volume 2 for fire behavior specialists, researchers, and meteorologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Werth; Brian E. Potter; Martin E. Alexander; Craig B. Clements; Miguel G. Cruz; Mark A. Finney; Jason M. Forthofer; Scott L. Goodrick; Chad Hoffman; W. Matt Jolly; Sara S. McAllister; Roger D. Ottmar; Russell A. Parsons

    2016-01-01

    The National Wildfire Coordinating Group’s definition of extreme fire behavior indicates a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high rate of spread, prolific crowning/ spotting, presence of fire whirls, and strong convection column. Predictability is...

  11. Performance of fire behavior fuel models developed for the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Ziel; W. Matt Jolly

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 40 new fire behavior fuel models were published for use with the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model. These new models are intended to augment the original 13 developed in 1972 and 1976. As a compiled set of quantitative fuel descriptions that serve as input to the Rothermel model, the selected fire behavior fuel model has always been critical to the resulting...

  12. Fire history and fire management implications in the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. A. Drury; P. J. Grissom

    2008-01-01

    We conducted this investigation in response to criticisms that the current Alaska Interagency Fire Management Plans are allowing too much of the landscape in interior Alaska to burn annually. To address this issue, we analyzed fire history patterns within the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, interior Alaska. We dated 40 fires on 27 landscape points within the...

  13. 75 FR 221 - Airworthiness Directives; Fire Fighting Enterprises Limited Portable Halon 1211 Fire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ...-01-03] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Fire Fighting Enterprises Limited Portable Halon 1211 Fire Extinguishers as Installed on Various Transport Airplanes, Small Airplanes, and Rotorcraft AGENCY... the required specification, have been supplied to the aviation industry for use in fire extinguishing...

  14. Historical fire regime and forest variability on two eastern Great Basin fire-sheds (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley G. Kitchen

    2012-01-01

    Proper management of naturally forested landscapes requires knowledge of key disturbance processes and their effects on species composition and structure. Spatially-intensive fire and forest histories provide valuable information about how fire and vegetation may vary and interact on heterogeneous landscapes. I constructed 800-year fire and tree recruitment...

  15. Modern fire regime resembles historical fire regime in a ponderosa pine forest on Native American land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda B. Stan; Peter Z. Fule; Kathryn B. Ireland; Jamie S. Sanderlin

    2014-01-01

    Forests on tribal lands in the western United States have seen the return of low-intensity surface fires for several decades longer than forests on non-tribal lands. We examined the surface fire regime in a ponderosa pinedominated (Pinus ponderosa) forest on the Hualapai tribal lands in the south-western United States. Using fire-scarred trees, we inferred temporal (...

  16. Recent fire history of the Table Mountain National Park and implications for fire management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forsyth, GG

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an assessment of fire regimes in the Table Mountain National Park over the past four decades. The authors compiled a GIS database of all fires between 1970 and 2007 and analysed the fire regime in terms of the frequency, season...

  17. A preliminary study of wildland fire pattern indicator reliability following an experimental fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert Simeoni; Zachary C. Owens; Erik W. Christiansen; Abid Kemal; Michael Gallagher; Kenneth L. Clark; Nicholas Skowronski; Eric V. Mueller; Jan C. Thomas; Simon Santamaria; Rory M. Hadden

    2017-01-01

    An experimental fire was conducted in 2016, in the Pinelands National Reserve of New Jersey, to assess the reliability of the fire pattern indicators used in wildland fire investigation. Objects were planted in the burn area to support the creation of the indicators. Fuel properties and environmental data were recorded. Video and infrared cameras were used to document...

  18. Modeling impacts of fire severity on successional trajectories and future fire behavior in Alaskan boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill F. Johnstone; T. Scott Rupp; Mark Olson; David. Verbyla

    2011-01-01

    Much of the boreal forest in western North America and Alaska experiences frequent, stand-replacing wildfires. Secondary succession after fire initiates most forest stands and variations in fire characteristics can have strong effects on pathways of succession. Variations in surface fire severity that influence whether regenerating forests are dominated by coniferous...

  19. Post fire indicators of fire intensity at indigenous forest margins in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fire intensity was correlated to Virgilia divaricata seedling density, species richness, the width of the Virgilia divaricata strip and the width of the burnt forest margin. These easy to measure parameters could in future be used as practical field indicators of post fire intensity. Fire intensity could then be correlated to changes in ...

  20. The Fire Effects Information System - serving managers since before the Yellowstone fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane Kapler Smith; Janet L. Fryer; Kristin Zouhar

    2009-01-01

    This presentation will describe the current status of the Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) and explore lessons learned from this 23-yearold project about the application of science to fire management issues. FEIS contains literature reviews covering biology and fire ecology for approximately 1,100 species in North America: plants and animals, native and nonnative...

  1. Modeling regional-scale wildland fire emissions with the wildland fire emissions information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy H.F. French; Donald McKenzie; Tyler Erickson; Benjamin Koziol; Michael Billmire; K. Endsley; Naomi K.Y. Scheinerman; Liza Jenkins; Mary E. Miller; Roger Ottmar; Susan Prichard

    2014-01-01

    As carbon modeling tools become more comprehensive, spatial data are needed to improve quantitative maps of carbon emissions from fire. The Wildland Fire Emissions Information System (WFEIS) provides mapped estimates of carbon emissions from historical forest fires in the United States through a web browser. WFEIS improves access to data and provides a consistent...

  2. Forest fire laboratory at Riverside and fire research in California: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl C. Wilson; James B. Davis

    1988-01-01

    The need for protection from uncontrolled fire in California was identified by Abbott Kinney, Chairman of the State Board of Forestry, more than 75 years before the construction of the Riverside Forest Fire Laboratory. With the organization of the USDA Forest Service the need for an effective fire protection organization became apparent. In response, a...

  3. Forest fire weather and computed fire occurrence in western Oregon and western Washington in 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen P. Cramer

    1960-01-01

    Fire season severity in 1960 was about average in western Washington but was very high in western Oregon. Severity of the entire season in both States was slightly greater than in 1959. Although spring was less severe, both summer and fall were slightly more severe than comparable parts of the previous fire season. Spring fire danger in western Washington was as low as...

  4. Accelerated weathering of fire-retardant-treated wood for fire testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2009-01-01

    Fire-retardant-treated products for exterior applications must be subjected to actual or accelerated weathering prior to fire testing. For fire-retardant-treated wood, the two accelerated weathering methods have been Method A and B of ASTM D 2898. The rain test is Method A of ASTM D 2898. Method B includes exposures to ultraviolet (UV) sunlamps in addition to water...

  5. Making fire and fire surrogate science available: a summary of regional workshops with clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Youngblood; Heidi Bigler-Cole; Christopher J. Fettig; Carl Fiedler; Eric E. Knapp; John F. Lehmkuhl; Kenneth W. Outcalt; Carl N. Skinner; Scott L. Stephens; Thomas A. Waldrop

    2007-01-01

    Operational-scale experiments that evaluate the consequences of fire and mechanical "surrogates" for natural disturbance events are essential to better understand strategies for reducing the incidence and severity of wildfire. The national Fire and Fire Surrogate (FFS) study was initiated in 1999 to establish an integrated network of long-term studies...

  6. Fire scars and tree vigor following prescribed fires in Missouri Ozark upland forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron P. Stevenson; Rose-Marie Muzika; Richard P. Guyette

    2008-01-01

    The goal of our project was to examine basal fire scars caused by prescribed fires and tree vigor in upland forests of the Missouri Ozarks. Fire scar data were collected in 100 plots from black oak (Quercus velutina Lam.), scarlet oak (Q. coccinea Muench.), Shumard oak (Q. shumardii Buckl.), post oak (Q...

  7. Fire behavior, weather, and burn severity of the 2007 Anaktuvuk River tundra fire, North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin M. Jones; Crystal A. Kolden; Randi Jandt; John T. Abatzoglu; Frank Urban; Christopher D. Arp

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) became the largest recorded tundra fire on the North Slope of Alaska. The ARF burned for nearly three months, consuming more than 100,000 ha. At its peak in early September, the ARF burned at a rate of 7000 ha d-1. The conditions potentially responsible for this large tundra fire include modeled record high...

  8. Soils under fire: soils research and the Joint Fire Science Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather E. Erickson; Rachel. White

    2008-01-01

    Soils are fundamental to a healthy and functioning ecosystem. Therefore, forest land managers can greatly benefit from a more thorough understanding of the ecological impacts of fire and fuel management activities on the vital services soils provide. We present a summary of new research on fire effects and soils made possible through the Joint Fire Science Program and...

  9. Effects of fire retardants on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of flat-pressed WPCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2012-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (10% by weight) at different levels of wood flour (WF) content, 40, 50, or 60 wt%, were investigated. The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP), and fire retardant (FR) powders with maleic anhydride-grafted PP (2...

  10. Historical and cultural fires, tribal management and research issue in Northern California: Trails, fires and tribulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank K. Lake

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous people’s detailed traditional knowledge about fire, although superficially referenced in various writings, has not for the most part been analyzed in detail or simulated by resource managers, wildlife biologists, and ecologists. . . . Instead, scientists have developed the principles and theories of fire ecology, fire behavior and effects models, and...

  11. An empirical machine learning method for predicting potential fire control locations for pre-fire planning and operational fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher D. O' Connor; David E. Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson

    2017-01-01

    During active fire incidents, decisions regarding where and how to safely and effectively deploy resources to meet management objectives are often made under rapidly evolving conditions, with limited time to assess management strategies or for development of backup plans if initial efforts prove unsuccessful. Under all but the most extreme fire weather conditions,...

  12. Mixed severity fire effects within the Rim fire: Relative importance of local climate, fire weather, topography, and forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van R. Kane; C. Alina Cansler; Nicholas A. Povak; Jonathan T. Kane; Robert J. McGaughey; James A. Lutz; Derek J. Churchill; Malcolm P. North

    2015-01-01

    Recent and projected increases in the frequency and severity of large wildfires in the western U.S. makes understanding the factors that strongly affect landscape fire patterns a management priority for optimizing treatment location. We compared the influence of variations in the local environment on burn severity patterns on the large 2013 Rim fire that burned under...

  13. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  14. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  15. Ice & Fire: the Burning Question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    With the Arctic opening up to new shipping routes and increased oil exploration and production due to climate change, the risk of an Arctic oil spill is increasing. Of the classic oil spill response methods (mechanical recovery, dispersants and in-situ burning), in-situ burning is considered...... to be particularly a suitable response method in the Arctic. In-situ burning aims to remove the oil from the marine environment by burning it from the water surface. A recent Ph.D. thesis from the Technical University of Denmark has provided some new insights with respect to the fire science behind this response...

  16. Behavior of reinforced concrete short columns exposed to fire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamed Bikhiet, M; El-Shafey, Nasser F; El-Hashimy, Hany M

    2014-01-01

    Fire could dramatically reduce strength of reinforced concrete columns. The objective of this work is to study columns exposed to fire under axial load and to evaluate reduction in column compressive capacity after fire...

  17. Wildland fire management plan Modoc National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan is written to provide guidelines for appropriate wildland fire suppression and prescribed fire programs. Prescribed fires may be used to reduce hazard...

  18. Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge Fire Management Plan 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Department of the Interior fire management policy requires that all national wildlife refuges with vegetation that can sustain fire have a Fire Management Plan...

  19. Fighting with Fires: Decentralize Control to Increase Responsiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Robert

    2001-01-01

    .... The examination of theory explains how the Army's centralized control of fires to facilitate massing of fires, coupled with a poorly developed digital fire control system are the root causes of failure...

  20. Passive fire protection role and evolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerosky, Tristan [NUVIA (France); Perdrix, Johan [NUVIA Protection (France)

    2015-12-15

    Major incidents associated with nuclear power plants often invoke a re-examination of key safety barriers. Fire hazard, in particular, is a key concern for safe operation of nuclear power plants given its propensity to damage safety systems which could ultimately lead to radioactive release into the atmosphere. In the recent past, events such as the Fukushima disaster have led to an industry-wide push to improve nuclear safety arrangements. As part of these measures, upgrading of fire safety systems has received significant attention. In addition to the inherent intricacies associated with such a complex undertaking, factors such as frequent changes in the national and European fire regulations also require due attention while formulating a fire protection strategy. This paper will highlight some salient aspects underpinning an effective fire protection strategy. This will involve: A) A comprehensive introduction to the different aspects of fire safety (namely prevention, containment and mitigation) supported by a review of the development of the RCC-I from 1993 to 1997 editions and the ETC-F (AFCEN codes used by EDF in France). B) Development of the fire risk analysis methodology and the different functions of passive fire protection within this method involving confinement and protection of safety-related equipment. C) A review of the benefits of an effective passive fire protection strategy, alongside other arrangements (such as active fire protection) to a nuclear operator in term of safety and cost savings. It is expected that the paper will provide nuclear operators useful guidelines for strengthening existing fire protection systems.