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Sample records for carpal tunnel release

  1. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopi...... incision could be found. There were no serious complications in either group. The results indicate that the endoscopic procedure is safe and has the benefit of faster rehabilitation and return to work....

  2. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Martins Roberto S.; Siqueira Mario G.; Simplício Hougelli

    2006-01-01

    This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist imobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26) the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuosly for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26) no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment...

  3. Endoscopic release for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadis, Haris S; Georgoulas, Petros; Shrier, Ian; Salanti, Georgia; Scholten, Rob J P M

    2014-01-31

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common compressive neuropathy of the upper extremity. It is caused by increased pressure on the median nerve between the transverse carpal ligament and the carpal bones. Surgical treatment consists of the release of the nerve by cutting the transverse carpal ligament. This can be done either with an open approach or endoscopically. To assess the effectiveness and safety of the endoscopic techniques of carpal tunnel release compared to any other surgical intervention for the treatment of CTS. More specifically, to evaluate the relative impact of endoscopic techniques in relieving symptoms, producing functional recovery (return to work and return to daily activities) and reducing complication rates. This review fully incorporates the results of searches conducted up to 5 November 2012, when we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. There were no language restrictions. We reviewed the reference lists of relevant articles and contacted trial authors. We also searched trial registers for ongoing trials. We performed a preliminary screen of searches to November 2013 to identify any additional recent publications. We included any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) with any other surgical intervention for the treatment of CTS. We used standard methodological procedures expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. Twenty-eight studies (2586 hands) were included. Twenty-three studies compared ECTR to standard open carpal tunnel release (OCTR), five studies compared ECTR with OCTR using a modified incision, and two studies used a three-arm design to compare ECTR, standard OCTR and modified OCTR.At short-term follow-up (three months or less), only one study provided data for overall improvement. We found no differences on the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) (scale zero to five) (five studies, standardised mean

  4. Outcome of open carpal tunnel release surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Ali, H.; Muhammad, G.; Gul, N.; Zardan, K.K.; Mushtaq, M.; Ali, S.; Bhatti, S.N.; Ali, K.; Rashid, B.; Saboor, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carpel tunnel syndrome is a common compression neuropathy of the median nerve causing pain, numbness and functional dysfunction of the hand. Among the available treatments, surgical release of the nerve is the most effective and acceptable treatment option. The aim of this study was to see the outcomes of surgical release of carpel tunnel using open technique. Method: This descriptive case series was conducted at the Department of neurosurgery, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from April 2013 to March 2014. One hundred consecutive patients with carpel tunnel syndrome were included who underwent open carpel tunnel release surgery. They were followed up at 1, 3 and 6 months. Residual pain, numbness and functional improvement of the hand were the main outcome measures. Results: Out of 100 patients, 19 were males. The age ranged from 32 to 50 years with a mean of 39.29±3.99 years. The duration of symptoms was from 5 to 24 months. In the entire series patient functional outcome and satisfaction was 82 percentage at 1 month, 94 percentage at 3 months and 97 percentage at 6 months. 18 percentage patient had residual pain at 1 month post-operative follow-up, 6percentage at 3 months and 3 percentage at 6 month follow-up. Conclusion: Open carpel tunnel release surgery is an effective procedure for compression neuropathy of the median nerve. It should be offered to all patients with moderate to severe pain and functional disability related to carpel tunnel syndrome. (author)

  5. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Roberto S; Siqueira, Mario G; Simplício, Hougelli

    2006-09-01

    This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist immobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26) the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuously for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26) no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment was done pre-operatively and at 2 weeks follow-up and included the two-point discrimination test at the second finger and two questionnaires as an outcome measurement of symptoms severity and intensity. All the patients presented improvement in the postoperative evaluations in the three analyzed parameters. There was no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcome measurements at the final follow-up. We conclude that wrist immobilization in the immediate post-operative period have no advantages when compared with no immobilization in the end result of carpal tunnel release.

  6. Prospective, randomized evaluation of endoscopic versus open carpal tunnel release in bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome: an interim analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, Brett; Romanowsky, Diane; Hauck, Randy M

    2014-12-01

    Most randomized trials have shown similar results with endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) and open carpal tunnel release (OCTR); however, there are studies suggesting less postoperative pain, faster improvement in grip and pinch strength, and earlier return to work with the endoscopic technique. The goal of this study was to prospectively examine subjective and functional outcomes, satisfaction, and complications after both ECTR and OCTR in the opposite hands of the same patient, serving as their own control. This was a prospective, randomized study in which patients underwent surgery for bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The first carpal tunnel release was performed on the most symptomatic hand-determined by the patient. Operative approach was randomly assigned and, approximately 1 month later, the alternative technique was performed on the contralateral side. Demographic data were obtained, and functional outcomes were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively, including pain score, 2-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, thenar strength, and overall grip strength. The carpal tunnel syndrome-functional status score and carpal tunnel syndrome-symptom severity score were recorded before surgery and at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Overall satisfaction with each technique was recorded at the conclusion of the study. Currently, 25 subjects have completed final visit testing. There were no differences in pain score, 2-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, thenar strength, or overall grip strength at any of the postoperative time points. Carpal tunnel syndrome-symptom severity score and carpal tunnel syndrome-functional status score were not significantly different between groups at any of the evaluations. Overall satisfaction, where patients recorded a number from 0 to 100, was significantly greater in the ECTR group (95.95 vs 91.60, P = 0.04). There were no complications with either technique. This

  7. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  8. Does wrist immobilization following open carpal tunnel release improve functional outcome? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, S M; Okoro, T; Danial, I; Wildin, C

    2010-07-11

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a compressive neuropathy of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy. The surgical management includes dividing the flexor retinaculum to decompress the median nerve. Post-operative mobilization of the wrist is controversial. Some surgeons splint the wrist for 2-4 weeks whilst others encourage early mobilization. The literature has been inconclusive as to which method is most beneficial. The purpose of this study is to review the literature regarding the effectiveness of wrist immobilization following open carpal tunnel decompression. We reviewed all published clinical trials claiming to evaluate the mobility status following open carpal tunnel release. Studies not in the English language as well as those with small number of patients (n immobilization after open carpal tunnel decompression when compared to early mobilization.

  9. Carpal Tunnel Release in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Ebrahimzadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a compression neuropathy that causes paresthesia, pain or numbness in the territory of median nerve. The aim of this study is to compare the open surgery outcome and patients` satisfaction in carpal tunnel syndrome among diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study from April 2011 to June 2012, patients suffered from carpal tunnel syndrome at least 6 months, without response to conservative treatment, who had the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were evaluated by the usage of MHQ and WHOQOL-BREEF tests, one month before surgery and three months after that. Carpal tunnel decompression surgery was performed by two surgeons, experienced in hand surgery, which used the same surgical method. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 19.0. Results: 24 of patient (34.2% were male and 46 (65.8% were female and there was no significant difference between two groups (P>0.05. MHQ total score before and after surgery was respectively 50.22±7.13 and 63.49±11.28 and this difference was significant (P

  10. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS Type II After Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Tunç

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic syndrome characterised with dystrophic changes and neurovascular disordes of bone and skin of extremities. The most common etiological factors are trauma, ischemic heart disease, cerebral lesions, servical region disorders, infections, and surgical treatments. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compressive neuropaty of the upper extremity. There are various surgical and conservative alternatives in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Complex regional pain syndrome has been reported as a complication of surgical carpal tunnel release in 2-5% of patients. In this case report clinical characteristics and rehabilitation outcomes of a patient with complex regional pain syndrome after carpal tunnel release surgery is presented. (Osteoporoz Dünyasından 2010;16:41-3

  11. Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release using a modified application technique of local anesthesia: safety and effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Khayat Jehad

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local anesthesia is widely used for open carpal tunnel release. However, injection of local anesthesia as described by Altissimi and Mancini (1988 can interfere with endoscopic carpal tunnel release, by increasing the bulk of synovial layers and consequently result in worsening of the view. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, efficacy using modified technique for application of local anesthesia. Methods 33 patients suffering from gradual increasing symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients were also asked to evaluate the pain associated with injection as well as tourniquet during surgery using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS (ranging from 0 = no pain to 10 = maximum pain. Results One patient required additionally local anesthesia because of mild pain in the hand. The tourniquet was inflated for 13.00 (2.8 min. The pain score related to injection was 2.5 (0.8 and to tourniquet was 3.6 (0.9. Inflation of the tourniquet was well tolerated by all patients. Postoperative neurological sensory and motor deficits related to surgery and local blocks were not occurred. Conclusion Endoscopic release of the carpal tunnel syndrome in local anesthesia is effective, well tolerated and safe. This kind of application of local anesthesia did not reduce visibility.

  12. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr; Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com [Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre Bachaumont-clinique Blomet RamsayGDS, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr [Gustave Roussy Institute (France); Vigan, Marie, E-mail: marie.vigan@gmail.com [Association pour la recherche en chirurgie de l’épaule et du coude, clinique Drouot (France); Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com [Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre Bachaumont-clinique Blomet RamsayGDS, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2017-04-15

    ObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility and 6 months clinical result of sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve decompression after ultra-minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided percutaneous carpal tunnel release (PCTR) surgery.MethodsConsecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in this descriptive, open-label study. The procedure was performed in the interventional radiology room. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and 1 month. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1, and 6 months.Results129 patients were enrolled. Significant decreases in mean symptom severity scores (3.3 ± 0.7 at baseline, 1.7 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.3 at Month 6) and mean functional status scores (2.6 ± 1.1 at baseline, 1.6 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.5 at Month 6) were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete section of all TCL and nerve decompression in 100% of patients. No complications were identified.ConclusionsUltrasound-guided PCTR was used successfully to section the TCL, decompress the median nerve, and reduce self-reported symptoms.

  13. A prospective study of prognostic factors for duration of sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalsgaard Jesper

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic carpal tunnel release with a single portal technique has been shown to reduce sick leave compared to open carpal tunnel release, claiming to be a less invasive procedure and reducing scar tenderness leading to a more rapid return to work, and the purpose of this study was to identify prognostic factors for prolonged sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release in a group of employed Danish patients. Methods The design was a prospective study including 75 employed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome operated with ECTR at two hospitals. The mean age was 46 years (SD 10.1, the male/female ratio was 0.42, and the mean preoperative duration of symptoms 10 months (range 6-12. Only 21 (28% were unable to work preoperatively and mean sick leave was 4 weeks (range 1-4. At base-line and at the 3-month follow-up, a self-administered questionnaire was collected concerning physical, psychological, and social circumstances in relation to the hand problem. Data from a nerve conduction examination were collected at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Significant prognostic factors were identified through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results After the operation, the mean functional score was reduced from 2.3 to 1.4 (SD 0.8 and the mean symptom score from 2.9 to 1.5 (SD 0.7. The mean sick leave from work after the operation was 19.8 days (SD 14.3. Eighteen patients (24% had more than 21 days of sick leave. Two patients (3% were still unable to work after 3 months. Significant prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis for more than 21 days of postoperative sick leave were preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem and a preoperative distal motor latency. Conclusion Preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem, and a preoperative distal nerve conduction motor latency were prognostic factors for postoperative work absence of more than 21 days. Other factors may be important

  14. Single-Incision Carpal Tunnel Release and Distal Radius Open Reduction and Internal Fixation: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Michael P; Sessions, Blane A; Dudoussat, Bryan S; Kane, Patrick M

    2016-08-01

    The safety of surgical approaches for single- versus double-incision carpal tunnel release in association with distal radius open reduction and internal fixation remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to identify critical structures to determine if a single-incision extension of the standard flexor carpi radialis (FCR) approach can be performed safely. Nine cadaveric arms with were dissected under loupe magnification, utilizing a standard FCR approach. After the distal radius exposure was complete, the distal portion of the FCR incision was extended to allow release of the carpal tunnel. Dissection of critical structures was performed, including the recurrent thenar motor branch of the median nerve, the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBm), the palmar carpal and superficial palmar branches of the radial artery, and proximally the median nerve proper. The anatomic relationship of these structures relative to the surgical approach was recorded. Extension of the standard FCR approach as described in this study did not damage any critical structure in the specimens dissected. The PCBm was noted to arise from the radial side of the median nerve an average of 6.01cm proximal to the proximal edge of the transverse carpal ligament. The PCBm became enveloped in the layers of the antebrachial fascia and the transverse carpal ligament at the incision site, protecting it from injury. The recurrent motor branch of the median nerve, branches of the radial artery and the median nerve proper were not at risk during extension of the FCR approach to release the carpal tunnel. Extension of the standard FCR approach to include carpal tunnel release can be performed with minimal risk to the underlying structures. This exposure may offer benefits in both visualization and extent of carpal tunnel release.

  15. Does routine carpal tunnel release during fixation of distal radius fractures improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Antonio; Meccariello, Luigi; Rollo, Giuseppe; De Nigris, Giancarlo; Mccabe, Steven James; Grubor, Pedrag; Falzarano, Gabriele

    2017-10-01

    This case-control study was designed to test the hypothesis whether carpal tunnel release (CTR) during fixation of distal radius 23-C2 AO fractures improves outcomes. Thirty-five consecutive patients who sustained distal radius fractures of the dominant hand participated in this study. Patients were allocated into two groups: (a) The ORIF + CTR (16 patients (11 males and 5 females)); (b) the ORIF and NOT CTR 19 patients (12 males and 7 females). Patient assessment included visual analogic scale of pain (VAS), the subjective Mayo Wrist Score (MWS), electromyograms (EMG) at 3 month and 6 months from the day of injury and complications. All patients had the same physiotherapy treatment algorithm following surgery. Patient follow up took place at 1 month, 3, 6, and 12 months. A the T12 month follow up point the VAS average was 0.8 (range 0-3) in ORIF + CTR group compared to 1.2 (range 0-3) in the ORIF and NOT CTR. The MWS average was 98.7 (range 95-100) in ORIF + CTR group versus 97.6 (range 95-100) in ORIF no CTR group. There was no statistical significance (p > 0.5) between the two groups during the follow up period. Patients in the sixth month of ORIF + CTR had no suffering of the median nerve, while 31.58% of patients in ORIF and no CTR found to have carpal tunnel syndrome. Routine release of the transverse carpal ligament at the time of fracture fixation may reduce the incidence of postoperative median nerve dysfunction. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Tanner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and rotation of the trapezium, radius, and first metacarpal, before and after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, radius and trapezium, and first metacarpal and trapezium during loading was calculated using rigid body mechanics. Overall stiffness of each specimen was determined. Results. Total construct stiffness following CTR was reduced in all specimens but not significantly. No significant changes were found in adduction, pronation, or dorsiflexion of the trapezium with respect to radius after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, between radius and trapezium, or between first metacarpal and trapezium after open CTR was not decreased significantly. Conclusion. From this data, we cannot determine if releasing the transverse carpal ligament alters kinematics of the CMC joint.

  17. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Search English Español Carpal Tunnel Syndrome KidsHealth / For Kids / Carpal Tunnel Syndrome What's in this article? Where ...

  18. Carpal tunnel release using the radial sided approach compared with the two-incision approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Henry; Tsai, Tsu-Min; Kaufman, Christina

    2014-01-01

    We compared carpal tunnel release using a radial sided approach (RCTR) with a two-incision approach with regards to complications, grip strength, and functional outcomes. Retrospective chart review was done and data was collected pre-operatively, and post-operatively at six weeks and three months. A total of 32 and 26 patients were included in the two-incision and RCTR groups respectively. At six weeks, the RCTR group showed an increased grip strength (+32.24%) while the two-incision group was weaker (-6.75%). Both groups showed an increased strength at three months, RCTR at 98.4% while the two-incision group was significantly lower at 38.6% increase. Both techniques provided improvement in outcome scores, with no statistical difference. RCTR was associated with a significantly earlier return of grip strength and had better grip strength at six weeks and three months post-operatively. Both techniques provided symptom relief and good functional outcome.

  19. Postoperative Pain Management Following Carpal Tunnel Release: A Prospective Cohort Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kim, Nayoung; Zmistowski, Benjamin; Ilyas, Asif M; Matzon, Jonas L

    2017-11-01

    Managing postoperative pain in hand surgery is important for both patients and surgeons. However, there is growing concern over prescription opioid abuse. We hypothesized: (1) that pain medications after carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery are over-prescribed; and (2) that opioids are unnecessary in the majority of patients. We prospectively studied 2 demographically similar patient cohorts receiving either opioid or tramadol for CTR performed by 2 hand surgery fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons over a 1-year period. The first cohort of patients undergoing CTR received opioids pills postoperatively. The second cohort of patients received a standard prescription of 10 tramadol pills postoperatively. Student t tests were performed to evaluate statistically significant differences between the tramadol and opioid cohorts in total pill consumption and number of postoperative days the medication was used. The opioid cohort consisted of 159 patients with a mean opioid consumption of 4.9 pills for 2.3 days. Eleven of these patients declined the use of opioids postoperatively and instead substituted for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and/or acetaminophen. The tramadol cohort consisted of 110 patients with a mean tramadol consumption of 3.3 pills for 1.8 days. Seven of these patients requested opioids postoperatively, and 14 substituted for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or acetaminophen. When comparing the postoperative consumption of opioids and tramadol for CTR, there was a statistically significant difference in total pill consumption based on both intention to treat as well as the medication ultimately prescribed. There was no difference in the duration of postoperative utilization. Following CTR, pain medications are being over-prescribed, with patients receiving more than double the amount of pills than they consume. Tramadol appears to be equally effective in managing postoperative pain compared with opioids.

  20. Preoperative Pain Sensitization Is Associated With Postoperative Pillar Pain After Open Carpal Tunnel Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Kyu Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2018-04-01

    Postoperative pillar pain (deep-seated wrist pain worsened by leaning on the heel of the hand) sometimes occurs after carpal tunnel release (CTR), leading to weakness in the hand and delayed return to work. Increased pain sensitivity has been found to be associated with worse symptoms and poorer treatment response in a number of chronic musculoskeletal conditions, but few studies have investigated the association of pain sensitization with pillar pain after CTR. (1) Is preoperative pain sensitization in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) associated with increased severity of pillar pain after open CTR? (2) What other demographic, electrophysiological, or preoperative clinical characteristics are associated with pillar pain after CTR? Over a 35-month period, one surgeon performed 162 open carpal tunnel releases. Patients were eligible if they had sufficient cognitive and language function to provide informed consent and completed a self-reported questionnaire; they were not eligible if they had nerve entrapment other than CTR or if the surgery was covered by workers compensation insurance. Based on these criteria, 148 (91%) were approached for this study. Of those, 17 (9%) were lost to followup before 12 months, leaving 131 for analysis. Their mean age was 54 years (range, 32-78 years), and 81% (106 of 131) were women; 34% (45 of 131) had less than a high school education. We preoperatively measured pain sensitization by assessing the patients' pressure pain thresholds by stimulating pressure-induced pain in the pain-free volar forearm and administering a self-reported Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire minor subscale, an instrument that assesses pain intensity in daily life situations. We evaluated postoperative pillar pain using the "table test" (having the patient lean on a table with their weight on their hands placed on the table's edge with elbows straight) with an 11-point ordinal scale at 3, 6, and 12 months after their surgical procedures. We conducted

  1. Patients With Limited Health Literacy Have Similar Preferences but Different Perceptions in Surgical Decision-making for Carpal Tunnel Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Kim, Jong Oh; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2018-04-01

    Health literacy is the ability to obtain, process, and understand health information needed to make appropriate health decisions. The proper comprehension by patients regarding a given disease, its treatment, and the physician's instructions plays an important role in shared decision-making. Studies have disagreed over the degree to which differences in health literacy affect patients' preferences for shared decision-making; we therefore sought to evaluate this in the context of shared decision-making about carpal tunnel release. (1) Do patients with limited health literacy have different preferences of shared decision-making for carpal tunnel release than those with greater levels of health literacy? (2) How do patients with limited health literacy retrospectively perceive their role in shared decision-making after carpal tunnel release? Over a 32-month period, one surgeon surgically treated 149 patients for carpal tunnel syndrome. Patients were eligible if they had cognitive and language function to provide informed consent and complete a self-reported questionnaire and were not eligible if they had nerve entrapment other than carpal tunnel release or had workers compensation issues; based on those, 140 (94%) were approached for study. Of those, seven (5%) were lost to followup before 6 months, leaving 133 for analysis here. Their mean age was 55 years (range, 31-76 years), and 83% (111 of 133) were women. Thirty-three percent (44 of 133) of patients had less than a high school education. Health literacy was measured according to the Newest Vital Sign during the initial visit, and a score of ≤ 3 was considered limited health literacy. Forty-four percent of patients had limited health literacy. The Control Preferences Scale was used for patients to indicate their preferred role in surgical decision-making preoperatively and to assess their perceived level of involvement postoperatively. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed to determine whether

  2. A Mobile-Based Surgical Simulation Application: A Comparative Analysis of Efficacy Using a Carpal Tunnel Release Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Kamil M; Mur, Taha; Amer, Kamal; Ilyas, Asif M

    2017-05-01

    The utilization of surgical simulation continues to grow in medical training. The TouchSurgery application (app) is a new interactive virtual reality smartphone- or tablet-based app that offers a step-by-step tutorial and simulation for the execution of various operations. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the app versus traditional teaching modalities utilizing the "Carpal Tunnel Surgery" module. We hypothesized that users of the app would score higher than those using the traditional education medium indicating higher understanding of the steps of surgery. A total of 100 medical students were recruited to participate. The control group (n = 50) consisted of students learning about carpal tunnel release surgery using a video lecture utilizing slides. The study group (n = 50) consisted of students learning the procedure through the app. The content covered was identical in both groups but delivered through the different mediums. Outcome measures included comparison of test scores and overall app satisfaction. Test scores in the study group (89.3%) using the app were significantly higher than those in the control group (75.6%). Students in the study group rated the overall content validity, quality of graphics, ease of use, and usefulness to surgery preparation as very high (4.8 of 5). Students utilizing the app performed better on a standardized test examining the steps of a carpal tunnel release than those using a traditional teaching modality. The study findings lend support for the use of the app for medical students to prepare for and learn the steps for various surgical procedures. This study provides useful information on surgical simulation, which can be utilized to educate trainees for new procedures. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasound Guided Carpal Tunnel Release Using Dynamic Expansion of the Transverse Safe Zone in a Patient with Post-Polio Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Troy; Lueders, Daniel; Chang, Kate; Yang, Lynda

    2018-03-05

    The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) in patients that suffer from post-polio syndrome occurs at a rate of 22%.[1] Irrespective of those with CTS, 74% of post-polio patients weight bear through their arms for ambulation or transfers.[1] As open carpal tunnel release is performed along the weight bearing region of the wrist, their functional independence may be altered while recovering. This case demonstrates that ultrasound guided carpal tunnel release(USCTR) was successfully performed in a patient with post-polio syndrome allowing him to immediately weight bear through his hands after the procedure so he could recover at home. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Carpal tunnel release with a new mini-incision approach versus a conventional approach, a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jiangbo; Kong, Lingde; Zhao, Hongfang; Yu, Kunlun; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Jichun; Tian, Dehu

    2018-02-20

    We have make use of a new method to perform carpal tunnel release (CTR) through a 1.5-2.0 cm long incision The aim of this study is to introduce this method and to compare the effectiveness and safety of this approach to the conventional one. We included consecutive patients diagnosed with primary carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) who had CTR from January 2015 to September 2016. A total of 85 patients were included in our study. Among them, 42 patients with mini-incision approach were enrolled in group A, and the other 43 patients with conventional approach were enrolled in group B. Objective tests and subjective evaluations were performed to compare the outcomes of mini-incision approach with the conventional approach. Postoperative complications after the two approaches were also compared. At the 12-months follow-up, all patients in both groups got recovery. We found no significant differences between the two groups in postoperative pinch strength, grip strength, 2-point discrimination (2-PD), visual analogue scale (VAS) score, Levine score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score (P > 0.05). However, at the one-month follow-up, the percentage of patients with wound pain in group A was significantly lower than that in group B (0.05% vs. 0.23%, P = 0.03). At the 12 months follow-up, the number of patients with persistent wound pain and pillar pain in group B were 2 (4.7%) and 3 (7.0%) respectively, while no patients showed wound pain and pillar pain in group A. Patients with mini-incision approach have satisfactory surgical outcomes, low postoperative complications, and good appearance. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physica...

  6. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physical examination of the patient that may include personal characteristics as well as performing a sensory examination, manual muscle testing of the upper extremity, and provocative and/or discriminatory tests for alternative diagnoses. The physician may obtain electrodiagnostic tests to differentiate among diagnoses. This may be done in the presence of thenar atrophy and/or persistent numbness. The physician should obtain electrodiagnostic tests when clinical and/or provocative tests are positive and surgical management is being considered. If the physician orders electrodiagnostic tests, the testing protocol should follow the American Academy of Neurology/American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine/American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation guidelines for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, the physician should not routinely evaluate patients suspected of having carpal tunnel syndrome with new technology, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and pressure-specified sensorimotor devices in the wrist and hand. This decision was based on an additional nonsystematic literature review following the face-to-face meeting of the work group. PMID:19474448

  7. MR imaging of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.; Lind, J.; Blair, S.; Light, T.; Wisniewski, R.; Moncado, R.

    1987-01-01

    MR is an ideal noninvasive means to image the structures forming the carpal tunnel in both normal and pathologic conditions. The carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered entity caused by compression of the median nerve as it passes through the carpal tunnel. This may result from a variety of conditions including edema from acute chronic trauma, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, degenerative joint disease or soft-tissue masses. This exhibit demonstrates the optimal MR imaging techniques to display the structures of the carpal tunnel. The normal anatomy is reviewed and variations in normal anatomy that may predispose to disease are included. Examples of the morphologic changes demonstrated in 20 patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome are displayed. The exhibit also reviews the findings in 20 postoperative cases

  8. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in handicraft planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancone, C; Leghissa, P; Santini, M; Cologni, G; Bacis, M; Mosconi, G

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a group of bakers and to evaluate the presence of a biomechanical risk for upper limbs in the technological cycle. Health assessment (history, clinical examination, upper limbs electromyography) and risk evaluation through Check List OCRA (Occupational Repetitive Actions - Colombini / Occhipinti) have confirmed the initial hypothesis, placing this profession between those at risk for carpal tunnel syndrome.

  9. The Effect of Moving Carpal Tunnel Releases Out of Hospitals Can on Reducing U.S. Healthcare Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christine; Milstein, Arnold; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Curtin, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To better understand how perioperative care impacts charges for carpal tunnel release (CTR). Methods We developed a cohort using ICD9-DM procedure code 04.43 for CTR in the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery 2006 to test perioperative factors potentially associated with CTR costs. We examined factors that might impact costs including: patient characteristics, payor, surgical time, setting (hospital outpatient department “HOPD” vs. freestanding ambulatory surgery center “ASC”), anesthesia type, anesthesia provider, discharge status, and adverse events. Records were grouped by facility to reduce the impact of surgeon and patient heterogeneity. Facilities were divided into quintiles based on average total facility charges per CTR. This division allowed comparison of factors associated with the lowest and highest quintile of facilities based on average charge per CTR. Results 160,000 CTRs were performed in 2006. Nearly all patients were discharged home without adverse events. Mean charge across facilities was $2572 (SD $2331 to $2813). Patient complexity and intra-operative duration of surgery was similar across quintiles (approximately 13 minutes). Anesthesia techniques were not significantly associated with patient complexity, charges, and total perioperative time. HOPD setting was strongly associated with total charges, with $500 higher charge per CTR. Half of all CTRs were performed in HOPDs. Facilities in the lowest quintile charge group were ASCs. Conclusions Examination of charges for CTR suggests that surgical setting is a large cost driver with the potential opportunity to lower charges for CTRs by approximately 30% if performed in ASCs. Type of Study Economic and Decision Analysis Level of Evidence Level II Retrospective Study PMID:26070229

  10. The Effect of Moving Carpal Tunnel Releases Out of Hospitals on Reducing United States Health Care Charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christine; Milstein, Arnold; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-08-01

    To better understand how perioperative care affects charges for carpal tunnel release (CTR). We developed a cohort using ICD9-CM procedure code 04.43 for CTR in the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery 2006 to test perioperative factors potentially associated with CTR costs. We examined factors that might affect costs, including patient characteristics, payer, surgical time, setting (hospital outpatient department vs. freestanding ambulatory surgery center), anesthesia type, anesthesia provider, discharge status, and adverse events. Records were grouped by facility to reduce the impact of surgeon and patient heterogeneity. Facilities were divided into quintiles based on average total facility charges per CTR. This division allowed comparison of factors associated with the lowest and highest quintile of facilities based on average charge per CTR. A total of 160,000 CTRs were performed in 2006. Nearly all patients were discharged home without adverse events. Mean charge across facilities was $2,572 (SD, $2,331-$2,813). Patient complexity and intraoperative duration of surgery was similar across quintiles (approximately 13 min). Anesthesia techniques were not significantly associated with patient complexity, charges, and total perioperative time. Hospital outpatient department setting was strongly associated with total charges, with $500 higher charge per CTR. Half of all CTRs were performed in hospital outpatient departments. Facilities in the lowest quintile charge group were freestanding ambulatory surgery centers. Examination of charges for CTR suggests that surgical setting is a large cost driver with the potential opportunity to lower charges for CTRs by approximately 30% if performed in ASCs. Economic/decision analysis II. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A randomised controlled trial of absorbable versus non-absorbable sutures for skin closure after open carpal tunnel release.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Theopold, C

    2012-05-01

    We compared the aesthetic outcome of scars after closure of open carpal tunnel incisions with either absorbable 4-0 Vicryl Rapide or non-absorbable 4-0 Novafil. Patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial and scars were scored at 6 weeks using a modified Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Scores demonstrated differences only for pain, vascularity and cross-hatching between both groups, though none of these were statistically significant. The dissolving and falling out of Vicryl Rapide was significantly more comfortable than removal of 4-0 Novafil sutures, assessed on a numerical analogue scale. There was no difference in infection rate between both study groups, supporting overall the use of Vicryl Rapide for the closure of palmar hand incisions, in light of the convenience and cost savings associated with absorbable sutures.

  12. Analysis of Expected Costs of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Treatment Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael T; Karim, Adnan; Klifto, Christopher S; Capo, John T

    2017-11-01

    Over 500 000 carpal tunnel releases costing over $2 billion are performed each year in the United States. The study's purpose is to perform a cost-minimizing analysis to identify the least costly strategy for carpal tunnel syndrome treatment utilizing existing success rates based on previously reported literature. We evaluate the expected cost of various treatment strategies based on the likelihood of further treatments: (1) a single steroid injection followed by surgical release; (2) up to 2 steroid injections before surgical release; (3) 3 steroid injections before surgery, and (4) immediate surgical release. To reflect costs, we use our institution's billing charges to private payers and reimbursements from Medicare. A range of expected steroid injection success rates are employed based on previously published literature. Immediate surgical release is the costliest treatment with an expected cost of $2149 to $9927 per patient. For immediate surgical release to cost less than a single injection attempt, the probability of surgery after injection would need to exceed 80% in the Medicare reimbursement model and 87% in the institutional billing model. A single steroid injection with subsequent surgery, if needed, amounts to a direct cost savings of $359 million annually compared with immediate surgical release. Three injections before surgery, with "high" expected success rates, represent the cost-minimizing scenario. Although many factors must be considered when deciding upon treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome, direct payer cost is an important component, and the initial management with steroid injections minimizes these direct payer costs.

  13. TC study of the carpal tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Gozzoli, L.; Uggetti, C.; Zanlungo, M.; Ferrari, P.; Leddi, G.

    1987-01-01

    The standard technique for CT investigation of the carpal tunnel and its normal anatomy were studied. Ten healty asymptomatic volunteers, age 25-45, underwent wrist CT. The hand is placed in prone position with the third metacarpus in line with radius. Digital radiograph and four axial CT scans are performed respectively: at the distal end of the radius, at the scaphoid tubercle level, at the hamate hook level and at the carpal and metacarpal joint. Standard carpal tunnel diameters are thus available with good reliability and repeatibility when correct technique is adopted. The results permit a morphological description of the osseous walls, transverse ligament, flexor tendons with synovial sheets and median nerve. Gujon's canal and its content can also be investigated

  14. Anomalous Muscles Encountered in the Carpal Tunnel: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxminarayan Bhandari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous muscles are infrequently encountered in carpal tunnel surgery. They are challenging to identify and may mislead the surgeon by obscuring normal anatomy. Hence knowledge of their presence is essential. We report two cases of anomalous muscle encountered in the carpal tunnel during surgery. First case consisted of an anomalous muscle seen in carpal tunnel release surgery. The muscle had proximal tendinous origin at wrist and distal tendinous insertion on index finger. In the second case, we incidentally encountered an anomalous muscle, which originated from the distal end of radius, travelled through the carpal tunnel and fused with the flexor digitorum superficialis of the small finger. Through this case report we have discussed the current concepts regarding anomalous muscle in the carpal tunnel and its management.

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome in patient with hemihypertrophy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoe, Takashi; Taniguchi, Yasunori; Yoshida, Munehito

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition; however, it has not been previously reported in patients with hemihypertrophy. A 67-year-old woman with left-sided hemihypertrophy presented with carpal tunnel syndrome of the left hand. Magnetic resonance imaging showed enlargement of the median nerve proximal to the transverse carpal ligament. Carpal tunnel decompression was performed, and pain was immediately relieved by decompression of the carpal tunnel. At the six-month follow-up examination, the patient experienced relief from numbness and improvement in thenar muscle atrophy was noted.

  16. The magnetic resonance imaging of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. An investigation about the etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Jun; Inagaki, Katsunori; Hirahara, Hirotsune; Miyaoka, Hideyo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Takigawa, Souichirou [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Toyosu Hospital

    2002-10-01

    The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome has not been clarified. We evaluated cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, flexor tendons, median nerve and thickness of transverse carpal ligament by enhanced MRI. Twenty-six patients were tested who has been diagnosed based on electromyogram and clinical symptons as idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. All patients were female and the mean age was 64 years old. The cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, the median nerve, the flexor tendons and synovium around them in carpal tunnel were calculated. And the thickness of the transverse carpal ligament as well. The mean area of the flexor tendons with synovium in carpal tunnel was 110.5{+-}25.5 mm{sup 2} (control group; 79.3{+-}13.8 mm{sup 2}), ratio of flexor tendon area to carpal tunnel area was 51.6{+-}8.9% (control; 40.5{+-}2.4%), and the thickness of the transverse carpal ligament was 3.3{+-}0.5 mm (control; 2.5{+-}0.4 mm) in severe idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. The mean area of the flexor tendons with synovium in severe idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome was significantly greater than that of mild type (p<0.05). In such a process, we could classify these MRI findings into the following four subgroups. Enlargement of cross sectional area of flexor tendons and synovium (n=8; 25.8%), thickened transverse carpal ligament (n=11; 35.5%), combined type (n=7; 22.6%) and impossible to classify (n=5; 16.1%). This classification with enhanced MRI was correlated to clinical course and electrophysiologic severity. In conclusion, we can suggest that to evaluate cross sectional area of the wrist (carpal tunnel) with enhanced MRI is one of the useful assistant method for diagnosing and investigating the etiology of severe idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  17. High resolution sonography of the carpal tunnel syndrome; Ecografia con alta risoluzione nello studio della sindrome del tunnel carpale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Francesco Saverio; Guazzi, Gianni; Belcapo, Luigi; Stefani, Paolo [Siena, Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Scienze Eidologiche e Radiologiche; Della Sala, Luca; Cozza, Sabino [Ospedale di Volterra, Pisa (Italy). Servizio di Radiologia; Mariottini, Aldo; Bolognini, Andrea [Siena, Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Neurochirurgia

    1997-04-01

    They investigated the reliability of some US signs in the diagnosis of the carpal tunnel syndrome. They carried out a single-blind study with 13-MHz high resolution probes and electromyography on 132 patients with clinical evidence of the carpal tunnel syndrome; a control group of 20 asymptomatic patients was also submitted to US. Eighty-six of 107 patients with US signs of the carpal tunnel syndrome were then submitted to surgical decompression while the extant 21 patients underwent conservative treatment and clinical follow-up. To diagnose the carpal tunnel syndrome they considered the following US patterns: median nerve changes palmar bowing of the flexor retinaculum, thickening of the transverse carpal ligament and increased depth of the carpal tunnel, as measured from the apex of the transverse carpal ligament convexity to the underlying carpal bone. Median nerve changes were unreliable signs and were missing in many cases: only 45 of 107 patients exhibited median nerve swelling before and/or its flattening in the carpal tunnel (42 %). Such indirect signs as the thickening of the transverse carpal ligament in chronic cases were demonstrated in 94 of 107 patients with the carpal tunnel syndrome (88 %) and canal depending in all unilateral carpal tunnel syndromes was shown in 92 of 107 patients (87 %); both these signs proved to be much more reliable. The palmar bowling of the flexor retinaculum was also difficult to demonstrate in surgical patients or in those with connective tissue fibrosis within the tunnel: this sign was demonstrated in 80 of 107 patients with the carpal tunnel syndrome confirmed with electromyography (75 %). Tanzer and Rietze reported median nerve changes observed at surgery in 43 % and 66 % of their patients. Recent MR findings in asymptomatic wrists have demonstrated that the normal median nerve has an elliptical shape inside the carpal tunnel. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Trophic ulcers in the carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q.-C. Araújo

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available A patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and trophic ulcers is described. Despite the healing of the ulcers after surgery for CTS, the severe sensory deficit and the electrophysiological tests have not shown any significant improvement. We think these findings argue against the hypothesis of the sensory deficit being responsible for the trophic ulcers. We favor a major role for the sympathetic disturbances as the main cause for those lesions.

  19. Minimally invasive carpal tunnel decompression using the KnifeLight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Peter Y K; Ho, Chi Long

    2007-02-01

    immediately after the surgery. Scar tenderness and incisional pain were mild-to-moderate in the first 2 weeks, and these symptoms disappeared completely 6 months after surgery. Significant postoperative improvements in pain relief, patient satisfaction, hand function, daily activities, and work performance as assessed with the MHQ were noted at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Furthermore, significant improvement in patients' hand grip and pinch strength were observed 6 months after surgery. From a literature review, we found that the mean operation time of KnifeLight carpal tunnel release was the shortest compared with the conventional and endoscopic carpal tunnel release techniques. The median time needed for our patients to return to work was also the shortest among the different techniques. Excellent functional outcomes and satisfaction were achieved using the KnifeLight for carpal tunnel decompression. Our minimally invasive method offers a quick, easy, and effective alternative to conventional or endoscopic carpal tunnel decompression.

  20. High-resolution sonography in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbiati, L.; De Pra, L.; Rizzatto, G.; Derchi, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, caused by the compression on the median nerve under the transverse carpal ligament, has multiple causes and clinical presentations. One hundred eighteen patients with carpal tunnel sydrome underwent high-resolution US which demonstrated unpalpable cystic masses in 25 patients (lobulated stalked synovial cysts in 19 and retrotendinous cysts in six, all confirmed at surgery), and diffuse thickening and decreased echogenicity of the tendon sheaths in 87 patients, suggesting tenosynovitis (confirmed at surgery in 64). In six patients simple encasement of muscle bellies in the carpal tunnel was shown. US can delineate the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, suggest the need for surgery, and aid the surgeon in locating the lesion to be removed

  1. The significance of ultrasonographic carpal tunnel outlet measurements in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csillik, Anita; Bereczki, Dániel; Bora, László; Arányi, Zsuzsanna

    2016-12-01

    A retrospective study to investigate the utility of ultrasonographic carpal tunnel outlet measurements in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). 118 hands of 87 patients with electrophysiologically confirmed CTS and 44 control hands of 23 subjects were assessed. Cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the median nerve were measured at the tunnel inlet, outlet, and forearm. Longitudinal diameters (LAPD) were measured at the inlet, proximal tunnel, distal tunnel, and outlet. CSA at the outlet (median: 18mm 2 ) and its palm-to-forearm-ratio (median: 2.7) were significantly larger than CSA at the inlet (median: 15mm 2 ) and its wrist-to-forearm-ratio (median: 2.2) (poutlet versus 13% only at the inlet. LAPD jump was significantly greater, suggesting relief of higher pressure, at the outlet/distal tunnel versus inlet/proximal tunnel (poutlet than at the inlet. We postulate that this is explained by the progressive increase of pressure within the tunnel from proximal to distal. The addition of CSA outlet measurements to inlet measurements increased CTS ultrasonographic diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy by 15% and 10%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The carpal tunnel syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leti Acciaro, A; Pilla, F; Faldini, C; Adani, R

    2017-12-21

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in children represents a complex challenge for the hand surgeon because of its rarity, poor patient cooperation, frequently associated malformation syndromes and mental retard, atypical symptoms and nuanced and poor sensitivity of instrumental tests. The most frequently associated causes with the CTS in children are rare congenital malformations and diseases, requiring an overall assessment of the young patient and a high degree of suspicion for the potentially associated canalicular syndrome. On the other hand, the associated syndromes may be the main ally for a diagnosis that starts from the knowledge of the literature and the surgeon's suspicion by observing the child wailing. Early diagnosis and decompression treatment is mandatory. The authors report a case series of 26 children and analyze the etiology and diagnostic algorithms. Patient assessment was based on complete clinical examination and medical history collection of these young patients with the involvement of the family and educators. In all 26 patients treated, along an average period of 23 months (minimum 12, maximum 30), no signs of recurrence or persistence of median nerve disturbances were recorded. In conclusion, we believe that anamnesis, a careful physical examination and analysis of instrumental examinations, should be accompanied by a thorough knowledge of rare diseases in the context of congenital malformations. The carpal tunnel syndrome, while well known and treated by each orthopedic surgeon, reveals a mysterious aspect in the context of the "fabulous" world of childhood illnesses, even more difficult than rare congenital diseases.

  3. [Sifting through the results, a proposal for a new concept of outcome measurement. In connection with a series of 72 carpal tunnel endoscopic releases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubert, T; Kamoun, L

    2005-12-01

    We present a new concept in outcome measurement namely "sifting", which we demonstrate in a series of endoscopic carpal tunnel releases on 72 patients. Each patient is evaluated by considering three groups of criteria. The criteria in the first group are evaluated by the patients themselves (self-evaluation), those in the second group are evaluated by a medical observer (clinical examination) and those in the third group are evaluated by the community (socio-professional aspects). We consider that the global outcome result is good only if it is good at the same time from the point of view of the patient himself, from the point of view of the medical observer and from the point of view of the community. The originality of this "sifting" concept consists in sorting the global outcomes according to a principle of elimination. When the global outcome of each patient is passed through the sieve, this total result is considered as "poor" if only one of the three groups is noted as having a bad result. By applying this original principle to our series, we obtained 11 bad self-evaluated results (reduction in the preoperative DASH lower than 10), 6 bad clinical results (persistence of awkward paraesthesiae) and 1 bad socio-professional result (absence of return to work). After sifting all the patients the poor results represented 14 patients (19 %). It seems to us that this sifting principle represents an advance compared to existing evaluation forms, which do not independently consider these three points of view, and which provide a total score by means of arithmetic operations with arbitrary coefficients.

  4. Hand Shape and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neral, Mithun; Winger, Dan; Imbriglia, Joseph; Wollstein, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    The literature evaluating external anatomical measurements and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) remains inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to compare hand- shape measurements of patients with and without (CTS). A retrospective case - control study of participants with suspected CTS (male/female ratio of 0.69) was performed. Nerve conduction tests (NCT) defined 65 involved hands (CTS) and 73 control hands. The relationship between 3 different hand index ratios (measuring palm length and width) and CTS (defined by NCT) was evaluated using Generalized Estimating Equations model (GEE) with the binary outcome of CTS. Palmar Length/Palmar Width index had the strongest and negative association with CTS with greatest sensitivity and specificity to detect CTS. Hands with more square shape had increased tendency to be diagnosed with CTS. Hand indices that include the shape of the palm may help identify patients with greater likelihood of developing CTS for early screening and prevention.

  5. Carpal tunnel syndrome - Part II (treatment,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Chammas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatments for non-deficit forms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS are corticoid infiltration and/or a nighttime immobilization brace. Surgical treatment, which includes sectioning the retinaculum of the flexors (retinaculotomy, is indicated in cases of resistance to conservative treatment in deficit forms or, more frequently, in acute forms. In minimally invasive techniques (endoscopy and mini-open, and even though the learning curve is longer, it seems that functional recovery occurs earlier than in the classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon, patient, severity, etiology and availability of material. The results are satisfactory in close to 90% of the cases. Recovery of strength requires four to six months after regression of the pain of pillar pain type. This surgery has the reputation of being benign and has a complication rate of 0.2–0.5%.

  6. Flexor pollicis longus tenosynovitis in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfield, Laura; Thomas, Mark; Lee, Se Won

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is typically diagnosed from history and physical examination then confirmed with electrodiagnosis. Electrodiagnosis provides only limited anatomic information and evaluation of space-occupying lesions. The authors present two cases in which demonstrated flexor pollicis longus tenosynovitis coexistent with carpal tunnel syndrome was diagnosed with ultrasonography. Ultrasonography is an effective modality that enhances the investigation of diseases in the soft tissues of the wrist and the hand. It can be useful in directing specific treatment by increasing diagnostic accuracy.

  7. Mini transverse versus longitudinal incision in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkmaz, M.; Cepoglu, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of mini-transverse compared with mini-longitudinal incision for carpal tunnel release (CTR) with reference to postoperative functional capacity, symptom severity and complication rate. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Cumhuriyet University Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedics, Tokat State Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Medical Park Tokat Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, from January 2007 to January 2009. Methodology: This study included 93 hands of 79 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), which were operated between 2007 and 2009. Patients were divided according to incision types into Group-1 (undergoing mini-longitudinal incision) and Group-2 (undergoing mini-transverse incision). Patients were evaluated initially and at 3 weeks after treatment according to symptom severity and functional status of Boston Questionnaire (BQ). Demographic and clinical data were analyzed and compared statistically between two groups. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in BQ symptom and functional scores between the pre- and postoperative period (p < 0.0001). BQ symptom and functional scores at postoperative period were better in Group-1 than Group-2 (p = 0.044 and p = 0.023 respectively). The scar hypersensitivity (p = 0.258) and tenderness (p = 1.00) associated with the incision sites were not statistically different. Conclusion: Longitudinal incision is more effective on symptom and functional conditions than transverse incision. However, there was less scar formation with transverse incision. (author)

  8. High-resolution computed tomography of the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merhar, G.L.; Clark, R.A.; Schneider, H.J.; Stern, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    High resolution computed tomography (CT) was used to scan the wrists of 19 patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Thirteen normal volunteers were used as controls. Measurements obtained from the CT images included the cross-sectional area of the carpal tunnel, the relative amount of synovium within the carpal tunnel, the attenuation coefficient of the carpal tunnel, and the thickness of the transverse carpal ligament. No significant difference in any of these measurements was found when comparing the wrists of symptomatic patients with controls. High resolution CT of the wrist does not appear to be of value in the preoperative evaluation of patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

  9. [Results of the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyluk, Andrzej; Strychar, Jarosław

    2005-01-01

    Based on review of the literature, a comprehensive information on the methods and outcomes of the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome is provided. Conservative treatment of the syndrome includes immobilization of the wrist, physiotherapy, drug therapy and steroid injections into carpal tunnel. Effectiveness of the conservative measures is acceptable in short perspective, but not in long term follow-up. The most common treatment in the carpal tunnel syndrome is surgery, which consists in division of the transverse carpal ligament. The advantages and drawbacks of various operative techniques are presented including classical open, endoscopic and limited open techniques with general conclusion that only operative carpal tunnel release warrants permanent recovery. A chronology and sequence of the withdrawal of symptoms of the disease was described: nocturnal pain disappears usually within first week after decompression, sensation improves within 3 months, and grip strength, after immediate post-operative deterioration, improves gradually even up to 2 years after operation. It was outlined that some patients may complain of pain and discomfort relating to the post-operative scar in the wrist, and that may be secondary morbidity, complications and recurrence after surgery. It was concluded that method of operative technique has not significant effect on long-term outcome, but in short perspective mini-invasive measures are favoured by the patients.

  10. Individual finger sensibility in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfar, John C; Yaseen, Zaneb; Stern, Peter J; Kiefhaber, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    Sensibility testing plays a role in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). No single physical examination test has proven to be of critical value in the diagnosis, especially when compared with electrodiagnostic testing (EDX). The purpose of this study was to define which digits are most affected by CTS, both subjectively and with objective sensibility testing. A prospective series of 35 patients (40 hands) with EDX-positive, isolated CTS were evaluated preoperatively using 2 objective sensibility tests: static 2-point discrimination (2PD) and abbreviated Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWMF) testing. Detailed surveys of subjective symptoms were also collected. Patients identified the middle finger as the most symptomatic over all others (51%). Objective 2PD results of each digit mirrored the subjective data, with higher values for the middle finger (mean 6.07 mm, (p thumb > index > small). Correlations failed between EDX, symptoms, and SWMF results or 2PD in the index finger. Positive but weak correlation (p = .002, r = .42) was found between EDX and 2PD only in the middle fingers. The middle finger is the most likely to show changes in 2PD in patients with positive EDX findings for CTS. Middle finger 2PD is best able to correlate with EDX when compared with 2PD of other digits. The SWMF testing also shows the middle digit testing as more sensitive, but this finding may be difficult to use clinically. Diagnostic I. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome reflect reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Holden, Jameson; Lee, Jeungchan; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Im, Jaehyun; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R; Park, Kyungmo; Audette, Joseph; Tommerdahl, Mark; Napadow, Vitaly

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, a median nerve entrapment neuropathy, is characterized by sensorimotor deficits. Recent reports have shown that this syndrome is also characterized by functional and structural neuroplasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex of the brain. However, the linkage between this neuroplasticity and the functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome is unknown. Sixty-three subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome aged 20-60 years and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T while vibrotactile stimulation was delivered to median nerve innervated (second and third) and ulnar nerve innervated (fifth) digits. For each subject, the interdigit cortical separation distance for each digit's contralateral primary somatosensory cortex representation was assessed. We also evaluated fine motor skill performance using a previously validated psychomotor performance test (maximum voluntary contraction and visuomotor pinch/release testing) and tactile discrimination capacity using a four-finger forced choice response test. These biobehavioural and clinical metrics were evaluated and correlated with the second/third interdigit cortical separation distance. Compared with healthy control subjects, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced second/third interdigit cortical separation distance (P somatosensory cortex, corroborating our previous preliminary multi-modal neuroimaging findings. For psychomotor performance testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced maximum voluntary contraction pinch strength (P somatosensory cortex was associated with worse symptomatology (particularly paraesthesia), reduced fine motor skill performance, and worse sensory discrimination accuracy for median nerve innervated digits. In conclusion, primary somatosensory cortex neuroplasticity for median nerve innervated digits in carpal tunnel syndrome is indeed

  12. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in children. About 10 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, A; Perrot, P; Truffandier, M V; Bellier-Waast, F; Duteille, F

    2014-06-01

    The carpal tunnel syndrome is a common peripheral neuropathy in adults but is rare in children. We report a series of 10 carpal tunnel syndromes in children. We have supported five children, two males and three females, with a bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. We studied the clinical history (history, symptoms, stage of disease), therapeutic management and remote development. Three children were diagnosed with a mucopolysaccharidosis, the fourth with VATER association. For the last child, it was a form considered idiopathic. Two children were referred for night pains, the others for under-utilization of their first three fingers, two of which had a thenar atrophy. Four children underwent an electromyogram for diagnostic confirmation. We realized open surgical treatment at one time, by section of the carpal ligament. The average age of our patients was 4years. The average decline in the surgical study was 19 months. Postoperatively, we noted, in all patients, complete regression of the painful symptoms, a sensory improvement and recovery of the opposition of the thumb. The scarcity of carpal tunnel syndrome in children and the atypical symptoms may cause diagnostic delay, with serious consequences. We keep vigilant and ready to access to additional tests (electromyogram). For our team, the therapeutic approach is a systematic open surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome in a patient with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Alistair Ivan William; Howard, Anthony; Kent, Matthew; Banks, Joanne

    2012-07-03

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a rare surgical condition usually resulting from wrist trauma. We present the case of a young haemophilic man who developed acute CTS following trivial injury. The patient was initially managed conservatively but symptom progression resulted in carpal tunnel decompression. A literature review and management approach are presented. This is an important complication of haemophilia to be aware of as prompt conservative management can obviate the need for surgery. This case is useful in (a) highlighting the importance of considering a patient's medical history when formulating differential diagnoses and (b) outlining a management approach to this condition.

  14. The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Evaluation from the viewpoint of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Jun

    2003-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome has not been clarified. A cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, flexor tendons, median nerve, and thickness of transverse carpal ligament were evaluated by MRI. Twenty-six patients who were electrophysiologically diagnosed with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were tested by MRI. All patients were females; the mean age was sixty-four years old. The cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, the median nerve area, the area of the flexor tendons and its synovium in carpal tunnel, and thickness of the transverse carpal ligament were calculated. The following are of a seuere type carpal tunnel syndrome: Mean area of the flexor tendons and its synovium in carpal tunnel, 110.5±25.5 mm 2 (control group; 79.3±13.8 mm 2 ); ratio of flexor tendons and its synovium area to carpal tunnel area, 51.6±8.8% (control; 40.5±2.3%); and thickness of the transverse carpal ligament, 3.3±0.4 mm (control; 2.4±0.4 mm). These mean areas in severe carpal tunnel syndrome were significantly greater than those in mild type (p<0.05 or p<0.01). From the viewpoint of this result, it is possible that tenosynovitis is strongly to the etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. In other words, synovium edema causes chronic high pressure environment in carpal tunnel. Moreover, we classified these MRI findings into the following subgroups: enlargement of cross sectional area of flexor tendon and its synovia (n=8; 25.8%), thickened transverse carpal ligament (n=11; 35.5%), and combined type (n=7; 22.6%). This classification by MRI imaging was related to a clinical course and electro-physiologic severity. The present study suggests that to evaluate the cross sectional, area of an MRI image is useful for diagnosis and cure of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  15. Trapeziohamate Distance in Carpal Tunnel View as a Risk Factor for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Jafari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most frequent entrapment syndrome of the upper limp, which leads to compression of the median nerve at the level of the wrist. Any early diagnosis based on the radiological and clinical findings is essential to find a risk factor preventing permanent nerve damage and functional sequelae. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to evaluate and determine trapeziohamate distance as a risk factor for incident CTS. Patients and Methods: The subjects in this case-control study were patients divided into an experimental group (n = 38 and control group (n = 23. Prospective study was conducted on 33 female and 5 male patients with CTS and 21 females and 2 males in control group. Subjects were selected from patients and their relatives who referred to our hand surgery department. In total, 61 subjects were examined. Gender and age as the personal factors, dominant hand, diabetes mellitus (DM, occupation and trapeziohamate distances were evaluated in all patients and control group. Mean values of trapeziohamate distance as a risk factor for experimental and control groups were measured. Levene’s test and Student’s t test were used to analyse the collected data using Statistical Package for Social Science. Results: The risk of CTS was higher in women and housekeeper. There was a significant difference between the two groups for trapeziohamate distance. The mean of trapeziohamate distance in control group (23.39 was significantly higher than the mean of experimental group (21.02. Conclusions: Our study confirmed that the incidence of CTS is higher in women and housekeeper and trapeziohamate distance is a dependent risk factor for the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  16. Does a carpal tunnel syndrome predict an underlying disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. de Rijk (Maarten); F.H. Vermeij (Frederique); M. Suntjens (Maartje); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCarpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be the presenting symptom of an underlying disease such as diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism or connective tissue disease (CTD). It was investigated whether additional blood tests (glucose level, thyroid-stimulating hormone level and erythrocyte

  17. Tinel′s Sign In Carpal Tunnel Syndrome - Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthy Ambar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified clinical method for eliciting Tine′s sign in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS has been described. This modified method has been found to be more sensitive in eliciting a positive response (93.2% than the standard technique (22.7% in established cases of CTS. This modified method may serve as a useful screening procedure.

  18. Is one-stop surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Møller; Piil, Karin; Bashir, Asma

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate one-stop surgery (OSS) for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) regarding symptom relief and patient satisfaction. OSS in our setting means only one visit to the hospital for surgery and no hospital appointments for preassessment or follow-up. We hypothes...

  19. Giant lipoma: an unusual cause of carpal tunnel syndrome | Jalan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, in its idiopathic form, is an extremely common entrapment neuropathy in the clinical practice however secondary compressive causes are rare. Among secondary causes, tumors are even rarer. Although lipomas are the most common soft tissue tumor in the body, <5% of the benign tumors of the ...

  20. Early diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) in Indian patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out for early confirmation of clinically diagnosed patients of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) by electro-diagnostic tests which included motor conduction, sensory conduction studies and F-wave studies. The aim of the study was early confirmation of clinically suspected patients of CTS by motor ...

  1. Amyloid detection in the transverse carpal ligament of patients with hereditary ATTR V30M amyloidosis and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Valdrez, Kátia; Gonçalves, Isabel; Melo Pires, Manuel; Martins da Silva, Ana; Coelho, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a nonspecific manifestation of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis (ATTRm). Amyloid deposition of wild-type TTR (WT-ATTR) has been found in transverse carpal ligament (TCL) in idiopathic CTS. We retrospectively studied a group of patients with ATTRm and CTS submitted to carpal tunnel release surgery (CTRS). From the nerve conduction studies performed in our Clinical Unit dedicated to hereditary amyloidosis between July 2009 and October 2013, we selected patients who fulfilled neurophysiological criteria for CTS, had been submitted to CTRS and whose TCL was available for pathology. Clinical registries were reviewed and amyloid detection in the ligaments was performed using Congo-red staining. We included 16 patients: three males (18.8%), mean age = 46.1 years old, all with V30M mutation. At the time of surgery, four patients were considered asymptomatic and 12 symptomatic carriers, five of them late-onset ATTRm (onset age >50 years old). In all but one patient, the CTS preceded the polyneuropathy. Amyloid detection in the TCL was positive in 14 patients (87.5%). In most patients, CTS preceded or was contemporary to the polyneuropathy and amyloid detection in TCL was positive. The detection of amyloid in TCL may add specificity to CTS as an early manifestation of the disease but more studies are needed.

  2. Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing as a Key Component of the Value Platform: A Pilot Analysis of Colonoscopy, Aortic Valve Replacement and Carpal Tunnel Release Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jacob A; Mayhew, Christopher R; Morris, Amanda J; Bader, Angela M; Tsai, Mitchell H; Urman, Richard D

    2018-04-01

    Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) is a methodology that calculates the costs of healthcare resources consumed as a patient moves along a care process. Limited data exist on the application of TDABC from the perspective of an anesthesia provider. We describe the use of TDABC, a bottom-up costing strategy and financial outcomes for three different medical-surgical procedures. In each case, a multi-disciplinary team created process maps describing the care delivery cycle for a patient encounter using the TDABC methodology. Each step in a process map delineated an activity required for delivery of patient care. The resources (personnel, equipment and supplies) associated with each step were identified. A per minute cost for each resource expended was generated, known as the capacity cost rate, and multiplied by its time requirement. The total cost for an episode of care was obtained by adding the cost of each individual resource consumed as the patient moved along a clinical pathway. We built process maps for colonoscopy in the gastroenterology suite, calculated costs of an aortic valve replacement by comparing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) techniques, and determined the cost of carpal tunnel release in an operating room versus an ambulatory procedure room. TDABC is central to the value-based healthcare platform. Application of TDABC provides a framework to identify process improvements for health care delivery. The first case demonstrates cost-savings and improved wait times by shifting some of the colonoscopies scheduled with an anesthesiologist from the main hospital to the ambulatory facility. In the second case, we show that the deployment of an aortic valve via the transcatheter route front loads the costs compared to traditional, surgical replacement. The last case demonstrates significant cost savings to the healthcare system associated with re-organization of staff required to execute a

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome - Part I (anatomy, physiology, etiology and diagnosis,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Chammas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is defined by compression of the median nerve in the wrist. It is the commonest of the compressive syndromes and its most frequent cause is idiopathic. Even though spontaneous regression is possible, the general rule is that the symptoms will worsen. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, from the symptoms and provocative tests. Elec-troneuromyographic examination may be recommended before the operation or in cases of occupational illnesses.

  4. Risk factors for operated carpal tunnel syndrome: a multicenter population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandes Anna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a socially and economically relevant disease caused by compression or entrapment of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. This population-based case-control study aims to investigate occupational/non-occupational risk factors for surgically treated CTS. Methods Cases (n = 220 aged 18-65 years were randomly drawn from 13 administrative databases of citizens who were surgically treated with carpal tunnel release during 2001. Controls (n = 356 were randomly sampled from National Health Service registry records and were frequency matched by age-gender-specific CTS hospitalization rates. Results At multivariate analysis, risk factors were blue-collar/housewife status, BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, sibling history of CTS and coexistence of trigger finger. Being relatively tall (cut-offs based on tertiles: women ≥165 cm; men ≥175 cm was associated with lower risk. Blue-collar work was a moderate/strong risk factor in both sexes. Raised risks were apparent for combinations of biomechanical risk factors that included frequent repetitivity and sustained force. Conclusion This study strongly underlines the relevance of biomechanical exposures in both non-industrial and industrial work as risk factors for surgically treated CTS.

  5. Risk factors for operated carpal tunnel syndrome: a multicenter population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Stefano; Baldasseroni, Alberto; Bovenzi, Massimo; Curti, Stefania; Cooke, Robin M T; Campo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Pietro G; Ghersi, Rinaldo; Broccoli, Marco; Cancellieri, Maria Pia; Colao, Anna Maria; Dell'omo, Marco; Fateh-Moghadam, Pirous; Franceschini, Flavia; Fucksia, Serenella; Galli, Paolo; Gobba, Fabriziomaria; Lucchini, Roberto; Mandes, Anna; Marras, Teresa; Sgarrella, Carla; Borghesi, Stefano; Fierro, Mauro; Zanardi, Francesca; Mancini, Gianpiero; Violante, Francesco S

    2009-09-16

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a socially and economically relevant disease caused by compression or entrapment of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. This population-based case-control study aims to investigate occupational/non-occupational risk factors for surgically treated CTS. Cases (n = 220) aged 18-65 years were randomly drawn from 13 administrative databases of citizens who were surgically treated with carpal tunnel release during 2001. Controls (n = 356) were randomly sampled from National Health Service registry records and were frequency matched by age-gender-specific CTS hospitalization rates. At multivariate analysis, risk factors were blue-collar/housewife status, BMI > or = 30 kg/m2, sibling history of CTS and coexistence of trigger finger. Being relatively tall (cut-offs based on tertiles: women > or =165 cm; men > or =175 cm) was associated with lower risk. Blue-collar work was a moderate/strong risk factor in both sexes. Raised risks were apparent for combinations of biomechanical risk factors that included frequent repetitivity and sustained force. This study strongly underlines the relevance of biomechanical exposures in both non-industrial and industrial work as risk factors for surgically treated CTS.

  6. Preferences in Sleep Position Correlate With Nighttime Paresthesias in Healthy People Without Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth Bettlach, Carrie L; Hasak, Jessica M; Krauss, Emily M; Yu, Jenny L; Skolnick, Gary B; Bodway, Greta N; Kahn, Lorna C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome has been associated with sleep position preferences. The aim of this study is to assess self-reported nocturnal paresthesias and sleeping position in participants with and without carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis to further clinical knowledge for preventive and therapeutic interventions. A cross-sectional survey study of 396 participants was performed in young adults, healthy volunteers, and a patient population. Participants were surveyed on risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome, nocturnal paresthesias, and sleep preferences. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed comparing participants with rare and frequent nocturnal paresthesias. Subanalyses for participants without carpal tunnel syndrome under and over 21 years of age were performed on all factors significantly associated with subclinical compression neuropathy in the overall population. Thirty-three percent of the study population experienced nocturnal paresthesias at least weekly. Increased body mass index ( P < .001) and sleeping with the wrist flexed ( P = .030) were associated with a higher frequency of nocturnal paresthesias. Side sleeping was associated with less frequent nocturnal symptoms ( P = .003). In participants without carpal tunnel syndrome, subgroup analysis illustrated a relationship between nocturnal paresthesias and wrist position. In participants with carpal tunnel syndrome, sleeping on the side had a significantly reduced frequency of nocturnal paresthesias. This study illustrates nocturnal paresthesias in people without history of carpal tunnel syndrome including people younger than previously reported. In healthy patients with upper extremity subclinical compression neuropathy, sleep position modification may be a useful intervention to reduce the frequency of nocturnal symptoms prior to developing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  7. Bilateral widespread mechanical pain sensitivity in carpal tunnel syndrome: evidence of central processing in unilateral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Cuadrado, María Luz; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether bilateral widespread pressure hypersensitivity exists in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. A total of 20 females with carpal tunnel syndrome (aged 22-60 years), and 20 healthy matched females (aged 21-60 years old) were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds were assessed bilaterally over median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, the carpal tunnel and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. The results showed that pressure pain threshold levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the carpal tunnel, the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, and the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome as compared to healthy controls (all, P < 0.001). Pressure pain threshold was negatively correlated to both hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms (all, P < 0.001). Our findings revealed bilateral widespread pressure hypersensitivity in subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome, which suggest that widespread central sensitization is involved in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The generalized decrease in pressure pain thresholds associated with pain intensity and duration of symptoms supports a role of the peripheral drive to initiate and maintain central sensitization. Nevertheless, both central and peripheral sensitization mechanisms are probably involved at the same time in carpal tunnel syndrome.

  8. Z-Elongation of the transverse carpal ligament vs. complete resection for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Menéndez, M; Pagazaurtundúa-Gómez, S; Pena-Paz, S; Huici-Izco, R; Rodríguez-Casas, N; Montero-Viéites, A

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is treated successfully by surgical release of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL). However, persistent weakness of grip and pain over the thenar and hypothenar ends of this ligament, and "pillar pain", are reported to be common complications. In order to reduce these complications, different ligament reconstruction or lengthening techniques have been proposed. The purpose of this study is compare effectiveness and complications of TCL z-lengthening technique with complete TCL section. A prospective, randomised, intervention trial was conducted on 80 patients. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) complete release of TCL; 2) z-lengthening of TCL according to a modified Simonetta technique. Grip strength, pillar pain and clinical and functional assessment were carried out using the Levine et al. questionnaire. No significant differences were observed (p>.05) in the postoperative reviews between the two groups as regards grip strength loss and pillar pain. There were significant differences between preoperative and postoperative mean Levine scores, but there was no difference in the mean scores of the two procedures at any time. In conclusion, according to the results, TCL z-lengthening is more effective than simple division, but there is no identifiable benefit in z-lengthening for avoiding complications. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Annina B; Kubler, Paul A; Johnston, Venerina; Coppieters, Michel W

    2015-03-01

    Non-neutral wrist positions and external pressure leading to increased carpal tunnel pressure during computer use have been associated with a heightened risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study investigated whether commonly used ergonomic devices reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with CTS. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in twenty-one patients with CTS before, during and after a computer mouse task using a standard mouse, a vertical mouse, a gel mouse pad and a gliding palm support. Carpal tunnel pressure increased while operating a computer mouse. Although the vertical mouse significantly reduced ulnar deviation and the gel mouse pad and gliding palm support decreased wrist extension, none of the ergonomic devices reduced carpal tunnel pressure. The findings of this study do therefore not endorse a strong recommendation for or against any of the ergonomic devices commonly recommended for patients with CTS. Selection of ergonomic devices remains dependent on personal preference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of ultrasonographic measurements of the median nerve in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesildag, A.; Kutluhan, S.; Sengul, N.; Koyuncuoglu, H.R.; Oyar, O.; Guler, K.; Gulsoy, U.K.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The aim of study was to assess the usefulness of ultrasonographic measurements of the median nerve in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-six patients with carpal tunnel syndrome confirmed by electromyography and 45 asymptomatic controls were included in the study and underwent high-resolution ultrasonography of the wrists. The cross-sectional area and flattening ratio at the level of the pisiform bone of the proximal carpal tunnel were measured. Data from the patient group and control group were compared to determine the statistical significance. The accuracy of the ultrasonographic diagnostic criteria for carpal tunnel syndrome was evaluated using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-eight wrists of 86 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and 76 wrists of 45 control patients were examined. All measurements showed significant differences between patients and controls. Increased cross-sectional area of the median nerve was the most predictive measurement of carpal tunnel syndrome. Using the ROC curve, a cut-off value of >10.5 mm 2 at the level of pisiform bone provided a diagnostic sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 94.7% CONCLUSION: The ultrasonographic measurement of the median nerve cross-sectional area is a sensitive, specific and useful non-invasive method for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

  11. Dupuytren’s disease digital radius IV right hand and carpal tunnel syndrome on ipsilateral hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teona Sebe Ioana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren’s contracture is a fibroproliferative disease whose etiology and pathophysiology are unclear and controversial. It is a connective tissue disorder, which takes part in the palmar’s fibromatosis category and has common characteristics with the healing process. Dupuytren’s disease is characterized by the flexion contracture of the hand due to palmar and digital aponevrosis. It generally affects the 4th digital radius, followed by the 5th one. Without surgery, it leads to functional impotence of those digital rays and/or hand. It is associated with other diseases and situational conditions like Peyronie’s disease, the Lederhose disease (plantar fibromatosis, Garrod’s digital knuckle-pads, diabetes, epilepsy, alcoholism, micro traumatisms, stenosing tenosynovitis and not the least with carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel syndrome is a peripheral neuropathy with the incarceration of the median nerve at the ARC level, expressed clinically by sensory and motor disturbances in the distribution territory of the median nerve, which cause functional limitations of daily activities of the patient. After the failure of the nonsurgical treatment or the appearance of the motor deficit, is established the open or endoscopic surgical treatment with the release of the median nerve. Postoperative recovery in both diseases is crucial to the functionality of the affected upper limb and to the quality of the patient’s life. The patient, a 61 years old man, admitted to the clinic for the functional impotence of the right hand, for the permanent flexion contracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP of the 4th finger with extension deficit, for the damage of the thumb pulp clamp of the 4th finger, for nocturnal paresthesia of fingers I-III and pain that radiates into the fingertips. After clinical, paraclinical, imagistic and electrical investigations, surgery is practiced partial aponevrectomy

  12. Trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by hand intramuscular intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan C Dulgeroglu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trigger wrist is a clinical entity characterized by triggering or the crackling of the wrist. Here, a case is reported of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma that caused trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome. This is the only case report where trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by the intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma were developed simultaneously. it is believed that that adhesive tenosynovitis developing in the tendons may have contributed to the triggering and carpal tunnel syndrome in the wrist as a result of inflammation occuring as a consequence of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 107-109

  13. Evaluation of the scratch collapse test for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makanji, H. S.; Becker, S. J. E.; Mudgal, C. S.; Jupiter, J. B.; Ring, D.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective study measured and compared the diagnostic performance characteristics of various clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvres for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), including the scratch collapse test. Eighty-eight adult patients that were prescribed electrophysiological testing

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in an Adolescent With Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kathleen M; Greathouse, David G

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is typically found in adults and may be associated with a variety of metabolic conditions including obesity. Obesity is a growing problem among today's youth, and adult diseases often associated with obesity are now being found in a younger population. This case study describes a young adolescent girl with obesity and CTS. A history and examination were completed before electrophysiologic testing, and the patient had no evidence of any contributory pathology. There was electrophysiologic evidence of bilateral median nerve compromise at the wrist. The patient's diagnosis of CTS may be obesity related. Management of patients with obesity and CTS should also include education about weight management in addition to traditional interventions. This may be even more important for a child or adolescent with obesity and CTS.

  15. Impact of cell therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena Perez, Rafael; Fernandez Delgado, Norma; Garmendia Garcia, Fermin

    2012-01-01

    We present a small series of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who underwent implantation of autologous mononuclear cells from peripheral blood to assess the feasibility and safety of these in the sixth month after that procedure. We included 6 patients treated at the Department of Orthopedic in The Enrique Cabrera General Teaching Hospital. The improvement in symptoms began one week after the procedure. Pain and cramping were the first to disappear, the improvement increased one month after and it was maintained until the sixth month of evaluation. The clinical-neurological manifestations improved in 80.3 % of patients, as well as in the study of motor and sensory conduction. There was no reaction to the implant. The improvement of the clinical manifestations and conduction studies support the mediation of stem cells in inflammatory action, revascularization and remyelination of the median nerve, which is expressed in the positive responses obtained

  16. Electrodiagnostic Testing and Treatment for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Pi Shan, Rodney; Nicolle, Michael; Chan, Ming; Ashworth, Nigel; White, Chris; Winston, Paul; Dukelow, Sean

    2016-01-01

    1) Assess which electrodiagnostic studies Canadian clinicians use to aid in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). 2) Assess whether Canadian clinicians follow the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine/American Academy of Neurology/American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Practice Parameter for Electrodiagnostic Studies in CTS. 3) Assess how Canadian clinicians manage CTS once a diagnosis has been established. In this prospective observational study, an electronic survey was sent to all members of the Canadian Neuromuscular Group (CNMG) and the Canadian Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (CAPM&R) Neuromuscular Special Interest Group. Questions addressed which electrodiagnostic tests were being routinely used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Management recommendations for CTS was also explored. Of the 70 individuals who completed the survey, fourteen different nerve conduction study techniques were reported. Overall, 36/70 (51%) of participants followed the AANEM/AAN/AAPM&R Practice Parameter. The standard followed by the fewest of our respondents with 64% compliance (45/70) was the use of a standard distance of 13 to 14 cm with respect to the median sensory nerve conduction study. Regarding management, 99% would recommend splinting in the case of mild CTS. In moderate CTS, splinting was recommended by 91% of clinicians and 68% would also consider referral for surgery. In severe CTS, most recommended surgery (93%). There is considerable variability in terms of which electrodiagnostic tests Canadian clinicians perform for CTS. Canadian clinicians are encouraged to adhere to the AANEM/AAN/AAPM&R Practice Parameter for Electrodiagnostic Studies in CTS.

  17. Practical approach to electrodiagnosis of the carpal tunnel syndrome: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Basiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being the most common entrapment neuropathy and the most common reason for referral to the electromyography (EMG laboratory, the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS continues to be challenging due to a large number of electrodiagnostic (EDX tests available. We present a flowchart and propose a practical approach to the diagnosis of CTS using the available literature and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM guidelines and the Practice Parameter for Electrodiagnostic Studies in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

  18. Single injection of platelet-rich plasma as a novel treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Alexander Malahias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have confirmed that platelet-rich plasma has therapeutic effects on many neuropathies, but its effects on carpal tunnel syndrome remain poorly understood. We aimed to investigate whether single injection of platelet-rich plasma can improve the clinical symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Fourteen patients presenting with median nerve injury who had suffered from mild carpal tunnel syndrome for over 3 months were included in this study. Under ultrasound guidance, 1-2 mL of platelet-rich plasma was injected into the region around the median nerve at the proximal edge of the carpal tunnel. At 1 month after single injection of platelet-rich plasma, Visual Analogue Scale results showed that pain almost disappeared in eight patients and it was obviously alleviated in three patients. Simultaneously, the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire showed that upper limb function was obviously improved. In addition, no ultrasonographic manifestation of the carpal tunnel syndrome was found in five patients during ultrasonographic measurement of the width of the median nerve. During 3-month follow-up, the pain was not greatly alleviated in three patients. These findings show very encouraging mid-term outcomes regarding use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. Manual Physical Therapy Versus Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las Peñas, César; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de la Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Fahandezh-Saddi Díaz, Homid; Martínez-Martín, Javier; Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado-Pérez, Maria L

    2015-11-01

    This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of surgery compared with physical therapy consisting of manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The setting was a public hospital and 2 physical therapy practices in Madrid, Spain. One hundred twenty women with CTS were enrolled between February 2013 and January 2014, with 1-year follow-up completed in January 2015. Interventions consisted of 3 sessions of manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system (physical therapy group, n = 60) or decompression/release of the carpal tunnel (surgical group, n = 60). The primary outcome was pain intensity (mean pain and the worst pain), and secondary outcomes included functional status and symptoms severity subscales of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and the self-perceived improvement. They were assessed at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months by a blinded assessor. Analysis was by intention to treat. At 12 months, 111 (92%) women completed the follow-up (55/60 physical therapy, 56/60 surgery). Adjusted analyses showed an advantage (all, P physical therapy at 1 and 3 months in mean pain (Δ -2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.8 to -1.2]/-1.3 [95% CI -2.1 to -.6]), the worst pain (Δ -2.9 [-4.0 to -2.0]/-2.0 [-3.0 to -.9]), and function (Δ -.8 [-1.0 to -.6]/-.3 [-.5 to -.1]), respectively. Changes in pain and function were similar between the groups at 6 and 12 months. The 2 groups had similar improvements in the symptoms severity subscale of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire at all follow-ups. In women with CTS, physical therapy may result in similar outcomes on pain and function to surgery. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01789645. This study found that surgery and physical manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system were similarly effective at medium-term and long-term follow-ups for improving pain and

  20. Comparison of symptoms, physical examination and electromyography findings, with the results of surgery of carpal tunnel release, in patients treated between January 2007 and December 2008, at the Hospital Calderon Guardia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavarria Alvarado, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of the preoperative findings was performed in patients with the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, with functional outcomes and postoperative residual pain, using the scale Patient Rate Wrist Evaluation (PRWE). All patients have had clinical history, physical examination and electromyography studies. They were operated by minimally invasive open surgery. The information was collected in an Excel table and patients have located via telephone. 100% of the evaluated patients have engaged in activities that involve trauma or repetitive wrist movements. The physical sign with predicative positive value for suspect of carpal tunnel syndrome has been the Phalen, present in over 70% of cases. The amount of physical signs present preoperatively and postoperative results were found without correlation. The mixed lesion, both sensory and motor has been the most found in electrodiagnostic studies. Patients whose studies have been negative, postoperative results have showed less favorable. Only 69% of patients operated in the orthopedic service of the Hospital Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia (HCG), have had favorable postoperative results. (author) [es

  1. Intraneural blood flow analysis during an intraoperative Phalen's test in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayama, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Awara, Kousuke; Takeno, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Kubota, Masafumi; Negoro, Kohei; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-08-01

    Phalen's test has been one of the most significant of clinical signs when making a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, it is unknown whether intraneural blood flow changes during Phalen's test in patients with CTS. In this study, an intraoperative Phalen's test was conducted in patients with CTS to observe the changes in intraneural blood flow using a laser Doppler flow meter. During Phalen's test, intraneural blood flow showed a sharp decrease, which lasted for 1 min. Intraneural blood flow decreased by 56.7%-100% (average, 78.0%) in the median nerve relative to the blood flow before the test. At 1 min after completing the test, intraneural blood flow returned to the baseline value. After carpal tunnel release, there was no marked decrease in intraneural blood flow. This study demonstrated that the blood flow in the median nerve is reduced when Phalen's test is performed in vivo. Copyright 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Combined Kinesiotaoe and Therapeutic Ultrasound in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, O.G.; Elhafez, H.M.; Alshatoury, H.A.; Refaat, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background : Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy of the upper limb and a significant contributor to hand functional impairment and disability. Hand is an Accepted November 2016 . important part of body to perform the complex daily living activities. Purpose: To find out effect of combined kinesiotape and therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Material and Methods :Thirty Carpal Tunnel Syndrome female patients with positive electro diagnostic findings (MMDL >4.2 ms) participated in this study, their ages ranged between 40 and 50 years. Design of study :They were divided randomly into two equal groups. Group (A) received kinesiotape applicatio n on the affected wrist for 3 days, then day off and then another three days each week for 4 weeks combined with a program of 12 sessions of continuous ultrasound, 3 sessions per week for 5 minute persession in addition nerve and tendon gliding exercise . While, Group (B) received a program of 12 sessions of continuous ultrasound, 3 sessions per week for 5 minute per session in addition tendon and nerve gliding exercise. The treatment program continued for 4 weeks. Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire and median motor distallatency, visual analogue scale and hand grip dynamometer were performed before and after the treatment program for all patients of the two groups. Results : The obtained results showed a highly statistically significant (P< 0.0001) improvement in both groups (A and B) concerning Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire , visual analogue scale and hand grip dynamometer but there was significant improvement in group (A) only concerning median motor distal latency. The improvement was highly significant (P< 0.0001) in group (A) when compared with group (B). Conclusion: It could be concluded that the use of combined kinesiotape and therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome appeared to be effective. Yet the combined effect of kinesiotape with

  3. Ergonomic positioning or equipment for treating carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Denise; Page, Matthew J; Marshall, Shawn C; Massy-Westropp, Nicola

    2012-01-18

    Non-surgical treatment, including ergonomic positioning or equipment, are sometimes offered to people experiencing mild to moderate symptoms from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The effectiveness and duration of benefit from ergonomic positioning or equipment interventions for treating CTS are unknown. To assess the effects of ergonomic positioning or equipment compared with no treatment, a placebo or another non-surgical intervention in people with CTS. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (14 June 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2011, Issue 2, in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2011), EMBASE (1980 to June 2011), CINAHL Plus (1937 to June 2011), and AMED (1985 to June 2011). We also reviewed the reference lists of randomised or quasi-randomised trials identified from the electronic search. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing ergonomic positioning or equipment with no treatment, placebo or another non-surgical intervention in people with CTS. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the primary and secondary outcomes. We pooled results of clinically and statistically homogeneous trials, where possible, to provide estimates of the effect of ergonomic positioning or equipment. We included two trials (105 participants) comparing ergonomic versus placebo keyboards. Neither trial assessed the primary outcome (short-term overall improvement) or adverse effects of interventions. In one small trial (25 participants) an ergonomic keyboard significantly reduced pain after 12 weeks (MD -2.40; 95% CI -4.45 to -0.35) but not six weeks (MD -0.20; 95% CI -1.51 to 1.11). In this same study, there was no difference between ergonomic and standard keyboards in hand function at six or 12 weeks or palm

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome among ewe dairy farmers in Sardinia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrance, John; Marras, Teresa; Murgia, Lelia; Tartaglia, Riccardo; Baldasseroni, Alberto

    2013-08-01

    The region of Sardinia, Italy is known internationally for the production of cheeses made from ewe's milk. Although the use of automated milking equipment is available in ewe dairy operations, traditional hand milking is still performed on many ewe farms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among farmers that manually milk ewes. Worker demographics, upper limb symptoms, and electrophysiologic studies were obtained on 76 ewe farmers recruited from a random sample of 109 in northern Sardinia. Characteristic hand symptoms and electrophysiologic studies were used in the case definition of CTS. Of the 76 farmers evaluated, 42 (55.3%) fit the case definition of CTS in at least one hand. Assuming that all non-respondents did not have CTS, the CTS prevalence ratio would have been 38.5% (42/109) among the randomized sample of ewe farmers. These findings suggest that CTS is a significant occupational health issue for ewe farmers that continue the traditional methods of manual milking. The recent trend in automated ewe milking machines may help reduce the prevalence of CTS among the next generation of Italian ewe farmers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effectiveness of second corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Nigel L; Bland, Jeremy D P

    2013-07-01

    A single local corticosteroid injection is an effective treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome. No study has specifically examined the effectiveness of a second injection on relapse after primary injection. We identified a cohort of patients who had received an initial corticosteroid injection into 1 wrist and then, at a later date, a second injection into the same wrist. We compared the change in the Boston Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) between first and second injections. In 229 patients who received 2 injections the mean improvement on the SSS was 1.2 (SD = 0.8) for the first injection and 1.3 (SD = 0.9) for the second, which was not statistically significant. Improvement in FSS for the first injection was 0.4 (SD = 0.8) and 0.7 (SD = 0.8) for the second, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Second corticosteroid injections appear to be at least as effective as the first. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Antioxidant activity of linalool in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Geun-Hye; Kang, Purum; Lee, Hui Su; Seol, Geun Hee

    2016-02-02

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral neuropathy and ischemic-reperfusion injury. Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of CTS. Linalool, a component of essential oils, has antioxidant activity. This study was designed to determine the effects of linalool inhalation on oxidative stress in patients with CTS. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessed the effects of linalool inhalation on oxidative stress in patients with CTS. Thirty-seven subjects, with and without CTS, were randomized to inhalation of 1% linalool or carrier oil. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, systolic blood pressure (sBP), diastolic blood pressure (dBP) and pulse rate were analyzed. DPPH inhibition was significantly higher in both experimental groups than in their respective controls. Moreover inhalation of linalool reduced sBP, dBP and pulse rate in the CTS group, and pulse rate in the non-CTS group. However, there were no significant differences among the study groups in nitrite levels, sBP, dBP and pulse rate. Inhalation of linalool increases antioxidative activity and reduces blood pressure and pulse rate in patients with CTS.

  7. Distribution of Clinical Symptoms in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouq, F. A.; Ahmed, T. S.; Meo, I. M. U.; Al-Dress, A. M.; Meo, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the distribution of clinical symptoms based on the gender and age of patients with Carpel Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). Study Design: A cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from April 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: Two hundred and twenty seven subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome symptom were recruited. CTS was diagnosed based on the clinical history and examination. For further confirmation of CTS symptoms, nerve conduction studies (NCS) were conducted. Results: There were 67 (29.5%) males and 160 (70.5%) females with mean age of 47.79 A +- 5.53 years. Distributions of symptoms were 34.3% at the level of whole three lateral fingers, 14.9% were at the level of hand and forearm, was common in males compared to females. However, 48.8% symptoms at the level of whole hand, and 11.3% at the tips of the three lateral fingers were common in females compared to males. Distribution of symptoms in the whole three lateral fingers (41.6%) were significantly higher (p = 0.0001) in patients who were more than 50 years of age and symptoms at the level of wrist region (12.7%) were significantly higher (p = 0.001) in patients with age group less than 50 years. Conclusion: The distribution of CTS symptoms at the level of whole of three lateral fingers, hand and forearm were higher in males compared to females, and symptoms at the lateral three tips of the fingers and whole hand were common in females compared to males. Furthermore, the symptoms in whole three lateral fingers were higher in patients with more than 50 years of age and at the level of wrist region were higher in patients with age less than 50 years. (author)

  8. Computer use and carpal tunnel syndrome: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Rahman; Falah-Hassani, Kobra

    2015-02-15

    Studies have reported contradictory results on the role of keyboard or mouse use in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This meta-analysis aimed to assess whether computer use causes CTS. Literature searches were conducted in several databases until May 2014. Twelve studies qualified for a random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. In a meta-analysis of six studies (N=4964) that compared computer workers with the general population or other occupational populations, computer/typewriter use (pooled odds ratio (OR)=0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.90), computer/typewriter use ≥1 vs. computer/typewriter use ≥4 vs. computer/typewriter use (pooled OR=1.34, 95% CI 1.08-1.65), mouse use (OR=1.93, 95% CI 1.43-2.61), frequent computer use (OR=1.89, 95% CI 1.15-3.09), frequent mouse use (OR=1.84, 95% CI 1.18-2.87) and with years of computer work (OR=1.92, 95% CI 1.17-3.17 for long vs. short). There was no evidence of publication bias for both types of studies. Studies that compared computer workers with the general population or several occupational groups did not control their estimates for occupational risk factors. Thus, office workers with no or little computer use are a more appropriate comparison group than the general population or several occupational groups. This meta-analysis suggests that excessive computer use, particularly mouse usage might be a minor occupational risk factor for CTS. Further prospective studies among office workers with objectively assessed keyboard and mouse use, and CTS symptoms or signs confirmed by a nerve conduction study are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Concomitant presentation of carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger

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    Wollstein Ronit A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and trigger finger (TF are common conditions that may occur in the same patient. The etiology of most cases is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of concomitant occurrence of these two conditions at presentation and to compare the concomitant occurrence in normal and diabetic patients. Methods One-hundred and eight consecutive subjects presenting to our hand clinic with CTS and/or TF were evaluated. The existence of both of these conditions was documented through a standard history and physical examination. The definition of trigger finger was determined by tenderness over the A1 pulley, catching, clicking or locking. CTS was defined in the presence of at least two of the following: numbness and tingling in a median nerve distribution, motor and sensory nerve loss (median nerve, a positive Tinel's or Phalen's test and positive electrophysiologic studies. Results The average age of the participants was 62.2 ± 13.6 years. Sixty-seven patients presented with symptoms and signs of CTS (62%, 41 (38% subjects with signs and symptoms of TF. Following further evaluation, 66 patients (61% had evidence of concomitant CTS and TF. Fifty-seven patients (53% of all study patients had diabetes. The rate of subjects with diabetes was similar among the groups (p = 0.8, Chi-square test. Conclusion CTS and TF commonly occur together at presentation though the symptoms of one condition will be more prominent. Our results support a common local mechanism that may be unrelated to the presence of diabetes. We recommend evaluation for both conditions at the time of presentation.

  10. Demographic Characteristics of Our Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Ebru Umay

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Carpal tunnel (CTS is the most common trap neuropathy but, still fully understood the cause of this and effective factors. In this study was aimed to the evaluation demographic features of the cases with CTS admitted to our electroneuromyography (ENMG laboratory. Material and Methods: In the study, 119 patients with CTS to evaluate our ENMG laboratory were received. All patients age, sex, dominant and affected hand, duration of education, marital status, height, weight, additional diseases, occupational, hand and wrist repetitive motion made, use of computer and smoking status was assessed. Patients’ body mass index (BMI was calculated. Results: 102 cases (85.7% females, mean age was 46.32 years ± 12: 18. While in 115 (96.6% cases using the right hand is dominant, in 85 cases (76.6% with bilateral involvement were at hand. While the rate of patient who between five to eight year duration of education had was 47.1%, 84% patients were married. Also, BMI were determined as 29.33± 3.01. According to the state in 22 patients with additional diseases, diabetes mellitus in 22, hypothyroidism in 4, also 1 patient had arthritis. The majority of our patients (70.6% housewives formed. The 67.2% rate of repetetive activities as making crafts, the computer usage at a rate of 11.8% had history. The rate of smoking was 19.3%.  Conclusions:  As a result, CTS, especially in middle-aged housewives and obese is a common syndrome. Despite many reasons to be reported in the etiology of idiopathic 85%. At a rate of 25.4% of women in our society is considered paid work, especially in terms of determining the etiology of the more detailed studies are needed to ousewives.

  11. Thrombosed persistent median artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome associated with bifurcated median nerve: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salter, M.; Sinha, N. R.; Szmigielski, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a sporadically occurring abnormality due to compression of median nerve. It is exceedingly rare for it to be caused by thrombosis of persistent median artery. Case Report: A forty two year old female was referred for ultrasound examination due to ongoing wrist pain, not relived by pain killers and mild paraesthesia on the radial side of the hand. High resolution ultrasound and Doppler revealed a thrombosed persistent median artery and associated bifurcated median nerve. The thrombus resolved on treatment with anticoagulants. Conclusions: Ultrasound examination of the wrist when done for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome should preferably include looking for persistent median artery and its patency. (authors)

  12. DASH (disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand) evaluation of QOL for carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Akimasa; Kawamoto, Masataka; Fujisawa, Kouzou; Tsujii, Masaya; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    The questionnaire on the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand is a region-specific, self-administered outcome instrument that is developed as a measure of self-rate upper extremity disability and symptoms. Last year, the Japanese version of disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) was cross-culturally adapted. The main purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between DASH and clinical assessment (findings of MRI and electrodiagnostic parameters). The subjects comprised 41 patients (6 males and 35 females) with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), except for cases with other upper extremity disorders. These subjects prospectively completed DASH 1 (disability module), DASH 2 (symptom module), and DASH (disability and symptom module) before the release of the open carpal tunnel. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the symptom duration (A: shorter than 3 months, B: 4-11 months, C: longer than 12 months). All patients were preoperatively assessed with regard to sensory conduction velocity (SCV) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP). In addition, all patients underwent MRI in order to evaluate the flexor tenosynovial swelling represented by palmar bowing of the flexor retinaculum (PBFR). The relationships were estimated using the Spearman rank score, unpaired t tests, and Bonferroni tests. DASH 2 scores indicated greater responsiveness than DASH 1, which reflected the character of CTS. DASH 1 scores were higher in patients who were affected in their dominant hand than in those whose nondominant hand was affected. The DASH scores decreased significantly in groups A and B, with the exception of C. However, DASH did not show any correlation either with the parameters, age, or MRI assessment. DASH can be used for the research of preoperative outcomes related to CTS. It also has the advantage of being useful in assessing and comparing the outcome for various other hand disorders. (author)

  13. Carpal tunnel sonography by the rheumatologist versus nerve conduction study by the neurologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swen, WAA; Jacobs, JWG; Bussemaker, FEAM; de Waard, J; Bijlsma, JWJ

    Objective. To determine the value of sonogaphy (SG) performed by the rheumatologist to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods. Sixty-three patients with clinical signs of CTS according to the neurologist. based on patient history and clinical examination, were studied. In the 6 weeks prior

  14. Reliability and Validation of the Greek Version of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougea, Anastasia; Zambelis, Thomas; Voskou, Panagiota; Katsika, Paraskevi Zacharoula; Tzavara, Chara; Kokotis, Panagiotis; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2017-08-01

    The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) is an easy, brief, self-administered questionnaire developed by Levine et al for the assessment of severity of symptoms and functional status of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of our study was to develop and validate the Greek version of BCTQ. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 90 patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. The original English version of BCTQ was adapted into Greek using forward and backward translation. Reliability was assessed by internal consistency (Cronbach α and item-total correlation) and reproducibility. Validity was examined by correlating the Boston Questionnaire scores to Canterbury severity scale for electrodiagnostic severity grading. The Greek version showed high reliability (Cronbach α 0.89 for Symptom Severity Scale and 0.93 for Functional Status Scale) and construct validity (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.53 for Symptom Severity Scale and 0.68 for Functional Status Scale). Test-retest were 0.75 for Symptom Severity Scale and 0.79 for Functional Status Scale ( P Greek version of the BCTQ is a valid, reliable screening tool for assessment in daily practice of symptoms and functional status in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome: An evaluation clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of 350 patients

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    Nermin Tanık

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to define the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients with carpaltunnel syndrome. Methods: The study comprised 350 patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Exclusion criteria were cervical radiculopathy, brachial plexopathy, thoracic outlet syndrome, polyneuropathy, pregnancy and a history of upper extremity trauma. The sociodemographic characteristics of the patients and the clinical characteristics of the carpal tunnel syndrome were recorded. Results: Of the total 350 patients, 86.2% were female, mean age was 52.5 years, 69.7% were obese, bilateral involvement was determined in 72.9% and the duration of symptoms was 3.0±0.9 years. 98.3% of the patients were married, 79.1% were housewives, 80.6% had a moderate income level, 59.6% were educated to primary school level and the most common ccompanying disease was diabetes at a rate of 26.9%. Conclusion: The study results showed that in Central Anatolia, carpal tunnel syndrome was seen in middleaged, obese, married housewives of moderate income and a low educational level. Generally, there was no accompanying disease, bilateral involvement was high and the disease was determined to have become chronic. With the detailed examination of the ociodemographic data of carpal tunnel syndrome patients, a good definition of a profile specific to this society will contribute to the treatment process.

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome. Risk factors and preventive strategies for the dental hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwatowski, L J; McFall, D B; Stach, D J

    1992-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is well recognized as an occupational risk for dental hygienists. The contributing risk factors fall primarily into two categories: medical and occupational. The purposes of this paper are to examine the factors that predispose one to CTS in order to increase awareness among dental hygienists, and to offer preventive strategies that can be incorporated into daily practice.

  17. Does prior local corticosteroid injection prejudice the outcome of subsequent carpal tunnel decompression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, J D P; Ashworth, N L

    2016-02-01

    It has been suggested that treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome by local corticosteroid injection may prejudice the outcome of subsequent surgery. We identified patients who had proceeded directly to carpal tunnel surgery and patients who had initially been treated with one or more injections and then subsequently underwent carpal tunnel surgery on the same hand. Outcomes of surgery were evaluated using pre- and post-operative Boston carpal tunnel syndrome scales and an ordinal scale for overall satisfaction. Multivariate models were created to study the effect of pre-operation injection on the surgical outcome while controlling for demographic and clinical variables. A total of 942 patients were included; 85% of the direct group and 84% of the prior-injection group reported themselves either completely cured or much improved after surgery. Post-operative symptom severity and functional status scores showed no significant difference between the direct-to-surgery and prior-injection groups. Prior local steroid injection does not prejudice the outcome of surgery. IV. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: interobserver reliability of the blinded scratch-collapse test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Robin D.; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Ring, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective

  19. Increased pain sensitivity is not associated with electrodiagnostic findings in women with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Laguarta-Val, Sofia; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-01-01

    To determine the differences in widespread pressure pain and thermal hypersensitivity in women with minimal, moderate, and severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy controls. A total of 72 women with CTS (19 with minimal, 18 with moderate, and 35 with severe) and 19 healthy age-matched women participated. Pressure pain thresholds were bilaterally assessed over the median, ulnar, and radial nerves, the C5 to C6 zygapophyseal joint, the carpal tunnel, and the tibialis anterior muscle. In addition, warm and cold detection thresholds and heat and cold pain thresholds were bilaterally assessed over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence. All outcome parameters were assessed by an assessor blinded to the participant's condition. No significant differences in pain parameters among patients with minimal, moderate, and severe CTS were found. The results showed that PPT were significantly decreased bilaterally over the median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the carpal tunnel, C5 to C6 zygapophyseal joint, and the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS as compared with healthy controls (all, P<0.001). In addition, patients with CTS also showed lower heat pain threshold and reduced cold pain threshold compared with controls (P<0.001). No significant sensory differences between minimal, moderate, or severe CTS were found. The similar widespread pressure and thermal hypersensitivity in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS and pain intensity suggests that increased pain sensitivity is not related to electrodiagnostic findings.

  20. THIRD TRIMESTER OF PREGNANCY: CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME, ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

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    Tupković Emir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study measured the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and the levels of anxietyand depression in the third trimester of healthy pregnant women having regular prenatal visits. The study was performed at the Department of Neurophysiology Health Centre Tuzla in the period of January through April 2006. The group consisted of 40 pregnant women in the third trimester of pregnancy, age range of 25.6 ± 4.9 years. The control group consisted of healthy women, ages 31.1 ± 4.4 years. The electrophysiological parameters n. medians, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI were measured. The diagnosis of CTS is neurophysiologically confirmed in 12 pregnant women (30% and 75% showed clinical signs and symptoms of disease. Pain was measured by subjective pain scale ranked from 0 (absence of pain to 10 (severe pain. The mean value of BAI in control group was 8.6 ± 6.5, while in the group of pregnant women was 12.9 ± 6.9, which was significantly higher (p =0.011. The mean value of BDI in control group was 4.2 ± 4.4 and in the group of pregnant women was 8.7 ± 5.9. which was significantly higher (p = 0.0008, The mean value of BAI in the group of women with CTS was 12.25 ± 6.7 which was not significantly higher than the compared to the control group (p = 0.113. The mean value of BDI in the group of pregnant women with CTS was 7.9 ± 6.4,which was significantly higherwhen compared to the control group (p = 0.037. The subjective assessment of pain in the group of womenwith CTSwas 2.4 ± 2.1. There was a slight correlation between pain intensity and degree of BAI (r = 0.289 and a negative correlation with the level of depression (r = – 0.297. The conclusion is that pregnant women with normal risk shouldmake an extra effort in the treatment of unpleasant conditions such as CTS, anxiety and depression, which may impair the quality of life and have physical and psychological side effects on the future mother.

  1. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study Avaliação prospectiva da imobilização do pulso após descompressão cirúrgica do nervo mediano no túnel do carpo

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    Roberto S. Martins

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist imobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26 the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuosly for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26 no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment was done pre-operatively and at 2 weeks follow-up and included the two-point discrimination test at the second finger and two questionnaires as an outcome measurement of symptoms severity and intensity. All the patients presented improvement in the postoperative evaluations in the three analyzed parameters. There was no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcome measurements at the final follow-up. We conclude that wrist immobilization in the immediate post-operative period have no advantages when compared with no immobilization in the end result of carpal tunnel release.Neste estudo prospectivo avaliamos se há vantagens na imobilização pós-operatória do pulso após a cirurgia para o tratamento da síndrome do túnel do carpo comparando este tratamento com a ausência de imobilização. Cinqüenta e dois pacientes portadores de síndrome do túnel do carpo idiopática foram randomizados em dois grupos após a cirurgia. Em um grupo (grupo A, n=26 os pacientes utilizaram uma tala em posição neutra para imobiliza��ão do pulso por duas semanas. No outro grupo (B, n=26, nenhum tipo de imobilização foi adotada. A avaliação foi realizada antes da cirurgia e repetida após duas semanas e incluiu a mensuração da sensibilidade discriminatória no segundo dedo e dois questionários que avaliaram a gravidade e intensidade dos sintomas. Em todos os pacientes houve melhora nos parâmetros avaliados. Não houve diferen

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome: Assessment of correlation between clinical, neurophysiological and ultrasound characteristics

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    B Hemeshwar Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between symptoms, clinical severity, neurophysiological characteristics with median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA at the level of carpal tunnel inlet at ultrasonography (USG and its utility in diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. Materials and Methods: Prospective study of 30 patients with symptoms of CTS, attending to the Neurology out patient department (OPD at University Teaching Hospital. A multidimensional assessment of CTS was done using historic and objective scale (Hi-Ob scale for clinical severity, Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ for patient-oriented measures, neuro physiologic studies of median nerve at wrist and USG to measure median nerve CSA at carpal tunnel inlet. Results: Thirty patients included in the study (22 women and 8 men. Mean of CSA was 12.69 mm 2 (SD2.67. Association between BCTQ score value and inlet values was assessed by Karl Pearson correlation coefficient ( r = 0.376, P = 0.04. There was positive association with BCTQ scores and CSA of median nerve at carpal tunnel inlet. To compare clinical severity scale (Hi-Ob and USG CSA, analysis of variance was performed (F value and Scheffe′s multiple comparison test was used to find group difference (grades 1 and 2 P < 0.001, grades1 and 2P P < 0.001, grade 2 differs with grade 2P P < 0.006. As the number of patients is less in minimal, mild and severe groups, the difference between neurophysiological groups and mean of CSA was not statistically significant. Conclusion: A positive correlation exists between USG findings and all the conventional measures of CTS severity.

  3. The Effect of Naproxen and Prednisolone in the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    P yazdan panah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome is the entrapment of the median nerve in carpal tunnel of the wrist. Symptoms of this syndrome are numbness, tingling, weakness or pain in the fingers and wrist. Treatment includes rest, avoiding the many activities available, splints, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, oral steroids, steroid injection in wrist and surgery. This study compared the effects of oral prednisolone and naproxen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: In the present clinical-trial study, 44 patients who had mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome were selected and randomly assigned into two treatment groups: group 1(n = 22 received naproxen 1000 mg daily for 4 weeks and the group 2 (n = 22 received oral prednisolone 20 mg, daily, in the first 2 weeks and 10 mg daily for 2 weeks. The 3 persons of the second group dropped out of treatment. Re-evaluation of treatment outcome was performed 2 months later. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. To describe the data, frequency tables were used. Furthermore, the Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results: 36(87.8% of the patients were males and 12.2% were females. The electro diagnostic studies were shown 16 hands (19.5% normal, 19 hands (23.2% had mild and 47 (57.3% had moderate involvement in beginning of treatment. Tingling fingers and pain in the prednisolone group had significantly lower rate than naproxen group (p< 0.05, but the symptoms were not significantly different in the two groups. Conclusion: The effects of treatments, relief of symptoms and the decrease intensity of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients who received prednisolone were more than naproxen.

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated with Oral Bisphosphonates. A Population-Based Cohort Study.

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    Carvajal, Alfonso; Martín Arias, Luis H; Sáinz, María; Escudero, Antonio; Fierro, Inmaculada; Sauzet, Odile; Cornelius, Victoria R; Molokhia, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used to prevent osteoporotic fractures. Some severe musculoskeletal reactions have been described with this medication; among them, some cases of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether bisphosphonates may be associated with this syndrome. A cohort study was conducted to compare exposed to unexposed women; the exposed group was that composed of women having received at least one prescription of an oral bisphosphonate. For the purpose, we used information from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. The outcome of interest was defined as those women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. A survival analysis was performed; the Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and to adjust for identified confounding variables. Out of a sample of 59,475 women older than 51 years, 19,825 were treated with bisphosphonates during the period studied. No differences in age distribution or mean follow-up time were observed between the two groups in comparison. Overall, there were 572 women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome, 242 (1.2%) in the group exposed to bisphosphonates, and 330 (0.8%) in the unexposed. An adjusted hazard ratio of developing carpal tunnel syndrome of 1.38 (95%CI, 1.15-1.64) was found for women exposed to bisphosphonates; no significant changes in the hazard ratios were found when considering different levels of bisphosphonate exposure. An increased risk of carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with the use of bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women.

  5. Bilateral hand/wrist heat and cold hyperalgesia, but not hypoesthesia, in unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Padua, Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate bilaterally warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds over the hand/wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A total of 25 women with strictly unilateral CTS (mean 42 +/- 10 years), and 20 healthy matched women (mean 41 +/- 8 years) were recruited. Warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds were assessed bilaterally over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence in a blinded design. Self-reported measures included both clinical pain history (intensity, location and area) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. No significant differences between groups for both warm and cold detection thresholds in either carpal tunnel or thenar eminence (P > 0.5) were found. Further, significant differences between groups, but not between sides, for both heat and cold pain thresholds in both the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence were found (all P < 0.001). Heat pain thresholds (P < 0.01) were negatively correlated, whereas cold pain thresholds (P < 0.001) were positively correlated with hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms. Our findings revealed bilateral thermal hyperalgesia (lower heat pain and reduced cold pain thresholds) but not hypoesthesia (normal warm/cold detection thresholds) in patients with strictly unilateral CTS when compared to controls. We suggest that bilateral heat and cold hyperalgesia may reflect impairments in central nociceptive processing in patients with unilateral CTS. The bilateral thermal hyperalgesia associated with pain intensity and duration of pain history supports a role of generalized sensitization mechanisms in the initiation, maintenance and spread of pain in CTS.

  6. A Case Report of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Raynaud's Phenomenon Treated by Bee Venom and Carthami Flos Pharmacopuncture

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    Choi Seok-woo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study is to report the effect of Pharmacopuncture therapy on a patient suffering from the pain and cold intolerance of hand caused by Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon. Methods : We had treated the patient diagnosed as Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon by Sweet BV and CF pharmacopuncture. We injected Sweet BV and CF into acupuncture points on both hands - Sweet BV into Baxie (EX-UE9, CF into Naegwan (PC6 and Daereung (PC7.And then we evaluated her symptoms by VAS (Visual Analog Scale. Results : Clinical symptoms about Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon were remarkably improved by Sweet BV and CF Pharmacopuncture. Conclusion : Therefore, we concluded that pharmacopuncture therapy - Sweet BV, CF etc. - may be useful to treat Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon.

  7. Comparative Anatomy of the Subsynovial Connective Tissue in the Carpal Tunnel of the Rat, Rabbit, Dog, Baboon, and Human

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    Ettema, Anke M.; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    The tenosynovium in the human carpal tunnel is connected to the flexor tendons and the median nerve by the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT). The most common histological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a compression neuropathy of the median nerve, is noninflammatory fibrosis of the SSCT. The relationship, if any, between the fibrosis and nerve pathology is unknown, although some have speculated that a change in the SSCT volume or stiffness might be the source of the compression. ...

  8. A randomized, controlled trial of magnetic therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Baute, Vanessa; Keskinyan, Vahakn S; Sweeney, Erica R; Bowden, Kayla D; Gordon, Allison; Hutchens, Janet; Cartwright, Michael S

    2018-03-07

    Magnet therapy has been proposed as a treatment for neurologic conditions. In this this trial we assessed the feasibility and efficacy of a magnet inserted into a wristband for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Twenty-two patients with mild to moderate CTS were randomized to wear a high-dose or low-dose "sham" magnetic wristband for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Secondary measures were nerve conduction studies (NCS), median nerve ultrasound, and compliance. Compliance for both groups was >90%. Improvements in the mean SSS, NCS, and median nerve ultrasound did not reach statistical significance. Magnet therapy via wristband is well-tolerated. Further investigations in larger populations are needed to determine efficacy. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The diagnostic efficacy of clinical findings and electrophysiological studies in carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Buyukkoyuncu Pekel, Nilufer; Nar Senol, Pelin; Yildiz, Demet; Kilic, Ahmet Kasim; Kamaci Sener, Deniz; Seferoglu, Meral; Gunes, Aygul

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between clinical findings, neurological examination and electrophysiological studies in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and share our institutional experience in patients with CTS. Methods. Patients presenting with complaints of pain, paresthesia, and weakness in hands who diagnosed CTS between 2014 and 2015 were examined retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, clinical and neurological examination findings and electrod...

  10. Etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype wrist movements

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    Magdalena Lewańska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common neuropathy of upper limbs and a leading cause of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of work exposure, repetitive and forceful exertions of the hand and use of vibrating hand tools. The aim of the study was to evaluate etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype movements in wrist. Material and Methods: We conducted the retrospective analysis of 300 patients (261 women, 39 men, mean age 52 years (standard deviation: ±6.93 hospitalized with the suspicion of occupational CTS. Results: The study revealed high percentage (68.7% of diseases and systemic factors involved in the pathogenesis of CTS in the analyzed population, especially obesity (32%, thyroid diseases (28.7%, hormone replacement therapy and/or oophorectomy (16.3% and diabetes mellitus (12%. In 111 patients the coexistence of at least a couple of potential etiological factors of the neuropathy was recognized. Clinical analysis and occupational exposure allowed to diagnose occupational carpal tunnel syndrome in 18 (6% patients only. The undeniable long-term (20.2±9.3 years occupational exposure to repetitive, forceful movements in the wrist was observed in this group. Conclusion: The results of our study indicated that non-occupational etiological factors of CTS predominated and in 37% of patients at least several factors were found. The analysis showed the high prevalence of CTS in workers employed in various sectors of industry, including so called "blue collar" workers. Our study confirmed the multifactorial etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome, however, occupational agents contributed to only 6% of cases. Med Pr 2014;65(2:261–270

  11. Management of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (ICTS): a survey of rheumatologists' practice and proposed guidelines.

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    Pal, B; Morris, J; Keenan, J; Mangion, P

    1997-12-01

    This questionnaire survey was undertaken to study the approaches to diagnosis and management of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome by rheumatologists. Analysis of the completed questionnaires (81% response) showed variations in availability and referral for electrophysiological tests (EMG), initial choice of treatment (depending on patient's age and occupation, duration of symptoms, severity of clinical and EMG findings) and decompression surgery. This led the authors to propose guidelines in the management of this common condition.

  12. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Lisa A. Zukowski, MA; Jaimie A. Roper, MS; Orit Shechtman, PhD, OTR/L; Dana M. Otzel, PhD; Patty W. Hovis, MSESS; Mark D. Tillman, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury part...

  13. The satisfactory effects of the other operations with carpal tunnel operation of the same hand

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    Atakan Aydin

    2012-08-01

    Conclusion: Comparison of pre- and postoperative DASH scores between the patients who underwent only carpal tunnel surgery and the patients who underwent combined surgery was statistically insignificant different (ANOVA F=0.022, p=0.883 and F=0.471, p=0.496, respectively. In both groups, none of our patients encountered with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, because of extreme sensitivity, desensitisation treatment was applied to 4 patients. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(2.000: 43-48

  14. Multiple Volar Carpometacarpal Dislocations with Associated Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Case Report

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    C Fletcher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare injury involving volar fracture dislocations of the second to fifth carpometacarpal dislocations. Carpometacarpal dislocations are usually dorsally displaced and most commonly only involve the fourth and fifth joints. An associated carpal tunnel syndrome adds another dimension to the complexity and rarity of the injury in this index case. A high index of clinical suspicion and subsequent emergent management is of utmost importance to treat this unusual combination of injuries in order to avoid significant morbidity.

  15. Pronator syndrome and other nerve compressions that mimic carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Lee, Michael J; LaStayo, Paul C

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide a comprehensive review of compressive neuropathies that may mimic carpal tunnel syndrome, provide the clinician with information to differentially diagnose these median nerve compression sites, and provide an evidence-based opinion regarding conservative intervention techniques for the various compression syndromes. While rare in comparison to carpal tunnel syndrome, pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome are proximal median nerve compressions that may be suspected if a patient with carpal tunnel syndrome fails to respond to conservative or surgical intervention. Differential diagnosis is based largely on the symptoms, patterns of paresthesia, and specific patterns of muscle weakness. Due to the relative rarity of pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, few controlled studies exist to determine the most effective treatment techniques. Based on sound anatomical and biomechanical considerations, anecdotal experience, and available research, however, treatment strategies for pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome compression neuropathies can be divided into 4 major categories: (1) rest/immobilization, (2) modalities, (3) nerve gliding, and (4) nonconservative treatment.

  16. Evaluation of surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome using local anesthesia

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    Marco Felipe Francisco Honorato Barros

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and complications from surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome by means of an open route, using a local anesthesia technique comprising use of a solution of lidocaine, epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a cohort study conducted through evaluating the medical files of 16 patients who underwent open surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, with use of local anesthesia consisting of 20 mL of 1% lidocaine, adrenaline at 1:100,000 and 2 mL of sodium bicarbonate. The DASH scores before the operation and six months after the operation were evaluated. Comparisons were made regarding the intensity of pain at the time of applying the anesthetic and during the surgical procedure, and in relation to other types of procedure. RESULTS: The DASH score improved from 65.17 to 16.53 six months after the operation (p < 0.01. In relation to the anesthesia, 75% of the patients reported that this technique was better than or the same as venous puncture and 81% reported that it was better than a dental procedure. Intraoperative pain occurred in two cases. There were no occurrences of ischemia. CONCLUSION: Use of local anesthesia for surgically treating carpal tunnel syndrome is effective for performing the procedure and for the final result.

  17. Effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Michalsen, Andreas; Bock, Silke; Lüdtke, Rainer; Rampp, Thomas; Baecker, Marcus; Bachmann, Jürgen; Langhorst, Jost; Musial, Frauke; Dobos, Gustav J

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of cupping, a traditional method of treating musculoskeletal pain, in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in an open randomized trial. n = 52 outpatients (58.5 +/- 8.0 years) with neurologically confirmed CTS were randomly assigned to either a verum (n = 26) or a control group (n = 26). Verum patients were treated with a single application of wet cupping, and control patients with a single local application of heat within the region overlying the trapezius muscle. Patients were followed up on day 7 after treatment. The primary outcome, severity of CTS symptoms (VAS), was reduced from 61.5 +/- 20.5 to 24.6 +/- 22.7 mm at day 7 in the cupping group and from 67.1 +/- 20.2 to 51.7 +/- 23.9 mm in the control group [group difference -24.5mm (95%CI -36.1; -2.9, P cupping therapy may be effective in relieving the pain and other symptoms related to CTS. The efficacy of cupping in the long-term management of CTS and related mechanisms remains to be clarified. The results of a randomized trial on the clinical effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are presented. Cupping of segmentally related shoulder zones appears to alleviate the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  18. Pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Hiltunen, Jaana; Kirveskari, Erika; Numminen, Jussi; Lindfors, Nina; Goeransson, Harry; Hari, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    To use pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to monitor median nerve integrity in patients suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Diffusivity and anisotropy images along the median nerve were compared among 12 patients, 12 age-matched and 12 young control subjects and correlated with electrophysiological neurography results. Slice-wise DTI parameter values were calculated to focus on local changes. Results of pre-operative patients and age-matched control subjects differed only in the distal nerve. Moreover, pre-operative patients differed significantly from young controls and post-operative patients. The main abnormalities were increased diffusivity and decreased anisotropy in the carpal tunnel and distal median nerve. Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. Slice-wise analysis showed high pre-operative diffusivity at the distal nerve. All groups had relatively large inter-subject variation in both diffusivity and anisotropy. DTI can provide information complementary to clinical examination, electrophysiological recordings and anatomical MRI of diseases and injuries of peripheral nerves. However, similar age-related changes in diffusivity and anisotropy may weaken DTI specificity. Slice-wise analysis is necessary for detection of local changes in nerve integrity. circle Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging provides information complementary to conventional diagnostic methods. circle Age caused similar changes to diffusivity and anisotropy as carpal tunnel syndrome. circle Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. circle Inter-subject variation in diffusivity and anisotropy was considerable. (orig.)

  19. Association of dental practice as a risk factor in the development of carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Borhan Haghighi, A; Khosropanah, H; Vahidnia, F; Esmailzadeh, S; Emami, Z

    2013-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is an important cause of work disability. There is controversy over the relation between carpal tunnel syndrome and occupation. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the time-span of practicing dentistry and the role of dominant hands in the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. In this descriptive cross sectional study, 40 dentists and dental students (15 women and 25 men) undertook the electroneuro-diagnostic test in both hands by an electromyogram (EMG) and they were also evaluated in terms of self- reported clinical symptoms. 17.5% of participants were diagnosed to have decreased nerve conduction velocity while10% had reported clinical symptoms of CTS. Both dominant and non-dominant hands were involved. Within cases who were diagnosed as having median nerve neuropathy, 87.5% worked more than 20 hours per week. 57% had 17-23 years of dental practice experience and 14.2% of cases had10-16 years of practice in dentistry. The high rate of CTS symptoms, in both dominant and non-dominant hand among dental practitioners with more years of dental practice, indicates a prequisite for particular attention, then sufficient education on the major risk factors causing this problem. Early diagnosis of these symptoms may improve the future management of the disease.

  20. Estudo prospectivo comparativo entre a descompressão do canal do carpo pela mini-incisão transversa proximal e a incisão palmar longitudinal convencional Prospective comparative study between the proximal transverse incision and the conventional longitudinal incision for carpal tunnel release

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    Marcelo de Pinho Teixeira Alves

    2010-01-01

    frequent, employing various techniques. The goal of the surgery is to decompress the carpal tunnel, and by sectioning the transverse carpal ligament, releasing the median nerve. This paper's objective is to compare the surgical treatment of CTS by means of two incisions: the first is the classic longitudinal incision over the transverse carpal ligament, and the second is a mini-incision at the wrist crease and near the proximal border of the ligament. The mini-incision technique is a less invasive and equally effective technique for the treatment of CTS, with less morbidity when compared to the classic longitudinal incision.

  1. Ultrasound Evaluation of Patients with Moderate and Severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Ali Moghtaderi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine cut-off points for the crosssectional areas of the median nerve proximal and distal to carpal tunnel in moderate and severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS and compare the results of our study with those available in the literature. Forty-three patients with upper limb pain other than CTS and 36 patients with idiopathic CTS enrolled into the study. The diagnosis and categorization of CTS were based on electrophysiologic criteria of the American Academy of Neurology. Median nerve cross-sectional areas were measured. Arithmetic mean values and standard deviation of each variable were measured. Student t-test and chi-squared test were applied to compare continuous and dichotomous variables between CTS and non-CTS control groups. Ultimately the diagnostic performances of the test characteristics including sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were measured. Mean cross-sectional area of the nerve is higher in moderate than severe CTS proximal and distal to carpal tunnel. We accepted cut-off points of 11.5 mm2 and 13.5 mm2 for cross-sectional areas of the proximal and distal portions of carpal canal respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the proximal inlet are 83%, 90.7%, 65.5% and 55.7%; and for the distal outlet are 36.1%, 93%, 81.2% and 63.4% respectively. We suggest that ultrasound is a good diagnostic modality for patients referred to tertiary care centers which categorized as moderate CTS.

  2. Early response of local steroid injection versus mini incision technique in treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, A.S.; Khan, A.; Afridi, S.A.; Khan, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the commonest peripheral neuropathies which effects mainly middle aged women. Different techniques are being tried to decrease the post-operative pain in patients operated for CTS. The objective of this study was to compare effectiveness of local injection of steroid and mini incision technique in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted at department of Orthopedics and department of Neurosurgery, Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Aug 2011 to Feb 2013. A total of 116 patients of CTS were randomly allocated to either of the two groups. Fifty-eight Patient in Group A were subjected to local steroid injection and the same number of patient in Group B underwent mini incision technique. All patients of were advised to report to the OPD after one month to determine intervention effectiveness in terms of improvement in at least one grade of pain. Results: In this study mean age of the patients was 32.8 ± 5.1 years. Female gender was in dominance with 99 (86.3%) cases. In this study we compared the effectiveness of local steroid injection and mini incision technique in the treatment of carpel tunnel syndrome. We found out that the steroid injection was effective in 69.0% cases while mini incision technique was effective in 56.9% cases. The difference being statistically insignificant with a p-value of 0.17. Conclusion: The difference in pain after 1 month of the intervention was not statistically significant. (author)

  3. Cervical Radiculopathy and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Determination of the Reliability, Diagnostic Accuracy, and Predictive Validity fo Commonly Used Clinical

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-28

    Patients with cervical radiculopathy and carpal tunnel syndrome result in significant medical and occupational costs annually. There is a need to...of diagnostic accuracy. and predictive validity of items of the clinical examination used for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome, syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, and W. Russell Brain: a historical perspective.

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    Boskovski, Marko T; Thomson, J Grant

    2014-09-01

    This article presents the history of the discovery of compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel without an identifiable cause as a distinct clinical entity. By analyzing primary sources, we show that, at the beginning of the twentieth century, physicians described patients with paresthesias and numbness in the hands, most prominent at night, accompanied by bilateral symmetrical atrophy along the radial side of thenar eminence. At the time, the 2 most influential hypotheses regarding etiology were, first, compression of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a cervical or first rib, and second, compression of the thenar branch of the median nerve as it passes beneath the anterior annular ligament of the wrist. The condition was named syndrome of partial thenar atrophy and was considered a distinct clinical entity. In 1946, after extensive analysis, neurologist Walter Russell Brain concluded that both sensory and motor symptoms of the syndrome were caused by "compression neuritis" of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. At his suggestion, surgeon Arthur Dickson Wright performed decompression of the nerve by "an incision of the carpal ligament," with excellent results. Brain presented this work at the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1946 and published his landmark paper in Lancet the following year. In so doing, he established the basis for the disease we know today as idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Unfortunately, in 1947, Brain did not realize that another "condition" with the same clinical picture but without atrophy of the thenar muscles, known as acroparesthesia at the time, was actually the same disease as syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, but of lesser severity. As a result of Brain's influence, 7 other papers were published by 1950. Between 1946 and 1950, there were at least 10 papers that presented, in total, 31 patients (26 women) who exhibited symptoms of compression of the median nerve without an identifiable cause and underwent

  5. Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome with polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (Bioptron light): a preliminary, prospective, open clinical trial.

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    Stasinopoulos, D; Stasinopoulos, I; Johnson, M I

    2005-04-01

    Our aim was to assess the efficacy of polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (Bioptron light) in the treatment of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy, but no satisfactory conservative treatment is available at present. An uncontrolled experimental study was conducted in patients who visited our clinic from mid-2001 to mid-2002. A total of 25 patients (22 women and three men) with unilateral idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome, mild to moderate nocturnal pain, and paraesthesia lasting >3 months participated in the study. The average age of the patients was 47.4 years and the average duration of patients' symptoms was 5.2 months. Polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (Bioptron light) was administered perpendicular to the carpal tunnel area. The irradiation time for each session was 6 min at an operating distance of 5-10 cm from the carpal tunnel area, three times weekly for 4 weeks. Outcome measures used were the participants' global assessments of nocturnal pain and paraesthesia, respectively, at 4 weeks and 6 months. At 4 weeks, two patients (8%) had no change in nocturnal pain, six (24%) were in slightly less nocturnal pain, 12 (48%) were much better in regard to nocturnal pain and five (20%) were pain-free. At 6 months, three patients (12%) were slightly better in regard to nocturnal pain, 13 (52%) were much better regarding nocturnal pain, and nine patients (36%) were pain-free. At 4 weeks, four patients (16%) had no change in paraesthesia, five (20%) were slightly better, 13 patients (52%) were much better, and three patients (12%) were without paraesthesia. At 6 months, two patients (8%) had no change in paraesthesia, two (8%) were slightly better, 14 (56%) were much better, and seven (28%) were without paraesthesia. Nocturnal pain and paraesthesia associated with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome improved during polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (Bioptron light) treatment. Controlled

  6. Randomized clinical trial of surgery versus conservative therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome [ISRCTN84286481

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    Turner Judith A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conservative treatment remains the standard of care for treating mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome despite a small number of well-controlled studies and limited objective evidence to support current treatment options. There is an increasing interest in the usefulness of wrist magnetic resonance imaging could play in predicting who will benefit for various treatments. Method and design Two hundred patients with mild to moderate symptoms will be recruited over 3 1/2 years from neurological surgery, primary care, electrodiagnostic clinics. We will exclude patients with clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of denervation or thenar muscle atrophy. We will randomly assign patients to either a well-defined conservative care protocol or surgery. The conservative care treatment will include visits with a hand therapist, exercises, a self-care booklet, work modification/ activity restriction, B6 therapy, ultrasound and possible steroid injections. The surgical care would be left up to the surgeon (endoscopic vs. open with usual and customary follow-up. All patients will receive a wrist MRI at baseline. Patients will be contacted at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after randomization to complete the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Assessment Questionnaire (CTSAQ. In addition, we will compare disability (activity and work days lost and general well being as measured by the SF-36 version II. We will control for demographics and use psychological measures (SCL-90 somatization and depression scales as well as EDS and MRI predictors of outcomes. Discussion We have designed a randomized controlled trial which will assess the effectiveness of surgery for patients with mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. An important secondary goal is to study the ability of MRI to predict patient outcomes.

  7. Computer keyboarding biomechanics and acute changes in median nerve indicative of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosi, Kevin K; Hogaboom, Nathan S; Oyster, Michelle L; Boninger, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common and costly peripheral neuropathy. Occupations requiring repetitive, forceful motions of the hand and wrist may play a role in the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. Computer keyboarding is one such task, and has been associated with upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorder development. The purpose of this study was to determine whether continuous keyboarding can cause acute changes in the median nerve and whether these changes correlate with wrist biomechanics during keyboarding. A convenience sample of 37 healthy individuals performed a 60-minute typing task. Ultrasound images were collected at baseline, after 30 and 60 min of typing, then after 30 min of rest. Kinematic data were collected during the typing task. Variables of interest were median nerve cross-sectional area, flattening ratio, and swelling ratio at the pisiform; subject characteristics (age, gender, BMI, wrist circumference, typing speed) and wrist joint angles. Cross-sectional area and swelling ratio increased after 30 and 60 min of typing, and then decreased to baseline after 30 min of rest. Peak ulnar deviation contributed to changes in cross-sectional area after 30 min of typing. Results from this study confirmed a typing task causes changes in the median nerve, and changes are influenced by level of ulnar deviation. Furthermore, changes in the median nerve are present until cessation of the activity. While it is unclear if these changes lead to long-term symptoms or nerve injury, their existence adds to the evidence of a possible link between carpal tunnel syndrome and keyboarding. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Identification of Subgroups of Women with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Central Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Muñoz, Juan J; Navarro-Pardo, Esperanza; da-Silva-Pocinho, Ricardo F; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Pareja, Juan A

    2016-09-01

    Identification of subjects with different sensitization mechanisms can help to identify better therapeutic strategies for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The aim of the current study was to identify subgroups of women with CTS with different levels of sensitization. A total of 223 women with CTS were recruited. Self-reported variables included pain intensity, function, disability, and depression. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over median, ulnar, and radial nerves, C5-C6 joint, carpal tunnel, and tibialis anterior to assess widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia. Heat (HPT) and cold (CPT) pain thresholds were also bilaterally assessed over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence to determine thermal pain hyperalgesia. Pinch grip force between the thumb and the remaining fingers was calculated to determine motor assessment. Subgroups were determined according to the status on a previous clinical prediction rule: PPT over the affected C5-C6 joint 66 points. The ANOVA showed that women within group 1 (positive rule, n = 60) exhibited bilateral widespread pressure hyperalgesia (P < 0.001) and bilateral thermal thresholds (P < 0.001) than those within group 2 (negative rule, n = 162). Women in group 1 also exhibited higher depression than those in group 2 (P = 0.023). No differences in self-reported variables were observed. This study showed that a clinical prediction rule originally developed for identifying women with CTS who are likely to respond favorably to manual physical therapy was able to identify women exhibiting higher widespread pressure hyper-sensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. This subgroup of women with CTS exhibiting higher sensitization may need specific therapeutic programs. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Frequency of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftikhar, S.; Javed, M. A.; Kasuri, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Study Design: Case-series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from January to June 2012. Methodology: Seventy-five (64 females and 11 males) patients with clinically diagnosed and electrodiagnostically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome were inducted. Their waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, fasting triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were recorded. Patients were categorized having metabolic syndrome according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, if any 3 were present out of hypertension, elevated fasting triglycerides, reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated fasting blood glucose, and elevated waist circumference. Result: Mean age of the patients was 42.04±9.31 years, mean waist circumference was 95.32±9.03 cm, mean systolic blood pressure was 134.13±13.72 mmHg, mean diastolic blood pressure was 89.13±8.83 mmHg, mean fasting blood glucose was 94.35±21.81 mg/dl, mean fasting triglycerides was 177.48±48.69 mg/dl, and mean high density lipoprotein cholesterol was 41.95±11.17 mg/dl. Metabolic syndrome was found in 54 (72 percentage) patients including 9 (16.7 percentage) males and 45 (83.3 percentage) females. Out of 75 patients, 54 (72 percentage) had elevated waist circumference, 52 (69.3 percentage) had elevated blood pressure, 19 (25.3 percentage) had elevated fasting blood glucose, 53 (70.6 percentage) had elevated fasting triglycerides and 54 (72 percentage) had reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Highest frequency of metabolic syndrome was found in age range of 40 - 49 years in both genders. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is frequently found in the patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  10. Personal risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in female visual display unit workers

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Riccò; Silvia Cattani; Carlo Signorelli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment syndrome, which since the beginning of the seventies has been linked to the keyboard and visual display unit (VDU). The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and personal factors associated with CTS in female VDU workers in Italy. Material and Methods: Participants in this study were female adult subjects, working ≥ 20 h/week (N = 631, mean age 38.14±7.81 years, mean working age 12.9±7.24 years). ...

  11. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in workers dealing with bovine manual milking

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Dartel Ferrari de; Lima, Lohran Anguera

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at evaluating the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among bovine manual milking workers in a city of the countryside of the State of Paraná. METHODS: Sample (n=92) was selected as from medical physiotherapy prescriptions for patients diagnosed with such syndrome, in the period from 2008 to 2010. RESULTS: Participated in the study 80 females with mean age of 47.7±11.3 years, and 12 males with mean age of 43.9±12.6 years. Among patients...

  12. Two-point discrimination and kinesthetic sense disorders in productive age individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Tomasz; Saulicz, Edward; Linek, Paweł; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2016-06-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two-point discrimination (2PD) sense and kinesthetic sense dysfunctions in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients compared with a healthy group. The 2PD sense, muscle force, and kinesthetic differentiation (KD) of strength; the range of motion in radiocarpal articulation; and KD of motion were assessed. The 2PD sense assessment showed significantly higher values in all the examined fingers in the CTS group than in those in the healthy group (pmovement in the radiocarpal articulation (pmovement between CTS patients compared with healthy individuals.

  13. High-resolution MRI predicts steroid injection response in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Oki, Hodaka; Kinoshita, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Korogi, Yukunori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Oshige, Takahisa; Sakai, Akinori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitakyushu (Japan); Matsuyama, Atsushi; Hisaoka, Masanori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Oncology, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    To correlate median nerve T2 signal and shape at the carpal tunnel with steroid injection (SI) response in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. One hundred and sixty-three CTS wrists of 92 consecutive patients who were scheduled to undergo SI were prospectively evaluated with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a nerve conduction study. All patients underwent axial high-resolution T2-weighted MRI (in-plane resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 mm). The CTS wrists were classified into three groups according to the nerve T2 signal and the flattening ratio at the hook of hamate level: group 1, high and oval; group 2, high and flat; group 3, low and flat. Clinical response to SI was evaluated at 6 months after injection. One hundred and thirteen of the 163 wrists (69.3 %) responded well to SI. The percentage of improvement was 81.7 % (49/60) in group 1, 69.9 % (51/73) in group 2, and 43.3 % (13/30) in group 3 (P < 0.01). On stepwise logistic regression analysis high-resolution MRI was the only significant independent factor for SI response in CTS patients (P < 0.01). High-resolution MRI correlates well with SI response in CTS patients and seems useful for predicting SI response. (orig.)

  14. Levels of endocrine hormones and lipids in male patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Uzkeser

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between endocrine hormones, lipid levels and clinical parameters in male patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS.Materials and methods: Fifteen male patients with CTS and 16 healthy controls were included in the study. Serum free T3, free T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were analyzed. Symptom severity and hand function were assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire in clinical examination.Results: Serum free T3, free T4, TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were similar between CTS patients and controls (p> 0.05. Also, there was no statistically significant correlation between laboratory parameters and clinical characteristics in patients with CTS (p> 0.05.Conclusion: The serum free T3, free T4, TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels seem within normal range in male CTS patients. Further studies are needed to investigate association endocrine factors, lipid levels such as triglyceride and total cholesterol with CTS in male and female patients.

  15. Efficacy of paraffin wax bath for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordahan, Banu; Karahan, Ali Yavuz

    2017-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequently diagnosed neuropathy of upper extremity entrapment neuropathies. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of paraffin therapy in patients with CTS. Seventy patients diagnosed with mild or moderate CTS were randomly divided into two groups as splint treatment (during the night and day time as much as possible for 3 weeks) alone and splint (during the night and day time as much as possible for 3 weeks) + paraffin treatment (five consecutive days a week for 3 weeks). Clinical and electrophysiological assessments were performed before and 3 weeks after treatment. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography (ENMG), and Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTSQ). The significant improvement was found in VAS scores in both groups when compared with pretreatment values ( p 0.05), whereas a significant improvement was noted in the BCTQ symptom severity scale score in the splint group ( p 0.05), and the difference in these parameters between the groups was statistically significant ( p Paraffin treatment with splint increases the recovery in functional and electrophysiological parameters.

  16. Meta-analysis: association between wrist posture and carpal tunnel syndrome among workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Doohee; Smith, Allan H; Rempel, David

    2014-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common work-related peripheral neuropathy. In addition to grip force and repetitive hand exertions, wrist posture (hyperextension and hyperflexion) may be a risk factor for CTS among workers. However, findings of studies evaluating the relationship between wrist posture and CTS are inconsistent. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies to evaluate the evidence of the relationship between wrist posture at work and risk of CTS. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched to identify relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. The following search terms were used: "work related", "carpal tunnel syndrome", "wrist posture", and "epidemiology". The studies defined wrist posture as the deviation of the wrist in extension or flexion from a neutral wrist posture. Relative risk (RR) of individual studies for postural risk was pooled to evaluate the overall risk of wrist posture on CTS. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All were cross-sectional or case-control designs and relied on self-report or observer's estimates for wrist posture assessment. The pooled RR of work-related CTS increased with increasing hours of exposure to wrist deviation or extension/flexion [RR = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.646-2.43; p Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures.

  17. The effect of polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Rezaei, Sajad; Sedighipour, Leyla; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Eliaspour, Dariush; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    To study the effects of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. Forty four patients with mild or moderate CTS (confirmed by clinical and electrodiagnostic studies) were assigned randomly into two groups (intervention and control goups). At the beginning of the study, both groups received wrist splinting for 8 weeks. Bioptron light was applied for the intervention group (eight sessions, for 3/weeks). Bioptron was applied perpendicularly to the wrist from a 10 centimeter sdistance. Pain severity and electrodiagnostic measurements were compared from before to 8 weeks after initiating each treatment. Eight weeks after starting the treatments, the mean of pain severity based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores decreased significantly in both groups. Median Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) latency decreased significantly in both groups. However, other electrophysiological findings (median Compound Motor Action Potential (CMAP) latency and amplitude, also SNAP amplitude) did not change after the therapy in both groups. There was no meaningful difference between two groups regarding the changes in the pain severity. Bioptron with the above mentioned parameters led to therapeutic effects equal to splinting alone in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, applying Bioptron with different therapeutic protocols and light parameters other than used in this study, perhaps longer duration of therapy and long term assessment may reveal different results favoring Bioptron therapy.

  18. Efficacy of high frequency ultrasound in postoperative evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kapuścińska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and a frequent cause of sick leave because of work-related hand overload. The main treatment is operation. Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound in the postoperative evaluation of CTS treatment efficacy. Material and methods: Sixty-two patients (50 women and 12 men aged 28–70, mean age 55.2 underwent surgical treatment of CTS. Ultrasound examinations of the wrist in all carpal tunnel sufferers were performed 3 months after the procedure with the use of a high frequency broadband linear array transducer (6–18 MHz, using 18 MHz band of MyLab 70/Esaote. On the basis of the collected data, the author has performed multiple analyses to confirm the usefulness of ultrasound imaging for postoperative evaluation of CTS treatment efficacy. Results: Among all 62 patients, 3 months after surgical median nerve decompression: in 40 patients, CTS symptoms subsided completely, and sonographic evaluation did not show median nerve entrapment signs; in 9 patients, CTS symptoms persisted or exacerbated, and ultrasound proved nerve compression revealing preserved flexor retinaculum fibers; in 13 patients, scar tissue symptoms occurred, and in 5 of them CTS did not subside completely (although ultrasound showed no signs of compression. Conclusions: Ultrasound imaging with the use of a high frequency transducer is a valuable diagnostic tool for postoperative assessment of CTS treatment efficacy.

  19. Correlating nerve conduction studies and clinical outcome measures on carpal tunnel syndrome: lessons from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, Hans M.; Gerritsen, Annette A. M.; Strijers, Rob L. M.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2005-01-01

    The reported relationships between nerve conduction studies (NCS) and outcome measures in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are weak to moderate. However, selection of patients may have confounded nonrandomized studies. NCS have potentially great value in selecting patients for a specific treatment and

  20. Skin closure in carpal tunnel surgery: a prospective comparative study between nylon, polyglactin 910 and stainless steel sutures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, T.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Lindert, E.L. van; Grotenhuis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the cosmetic outcome, pain and tenderness around the operation scar of carpal tunnel syndrome surgery using either nylon, polyglactin 910 or stainless steel sutures for skin closure. METHODS: A randomised clinical trial comparing nylon, polyglactin 910 or stainless steel

  1. The responsiveness of sensibility and strength tests in patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Leanne

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical measures of sensory and motor function are used alongside patient-rated questionnaires to assess outcomes of carpal tunnel decompression. However there is a lack of evidence regarding which clinical tests are most responsive to clinically important change over time. Methods In a prospective cohort study 63 patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression were assessed using standardised clinician-derived and patient reported outcomes before surgery, at 4 and 8 months follow up. Clinical sensory assessments included: touch threshold with monofilaments (WEST, shape-texture identification (STI™ test, static two-point discrimination (Mackinnon-Dellon Disk-Criminator and the locognosia test. Motor assessments included: grip and tripod pinch strength using a digital grip analyser (MIE, manual muscle testing of abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis using the Rotterdam Intrinsic Handheld Myometer (RIHM. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ was used as a patient rated outcome measure. Results Relative responsiveness at 4 months was highest for the BCTQ symptom severity scale with moderate to large effects sizes (ES = -1.43 followed by the BCTQ function scale (ES = -0.71. The WEST and STI™ were the most responsive sensory tests at 4 months showing moderate effect sizes (WEST ES = 0.55, STI ES = 0.52. Grip and pinch strength had a relatively higher responsiveness compared to thenar muscle strength but effect sizes for all motor tests were very small (ES ≤0.10 or negative indicating a decline compared to baseline in some patients. Conclusions For clinical assessment of sensibility touch threshold assessed by monofilaments (WEST and tactile gnosis measured with the STI™ test are the most responsive tests and are recommended for future studies. The use of handheld myometry (RIHM for manual muscle testing, despite more specifically targeting thenar muscles, was less responsive than grip or tripod

  2. The responsiveness of sensibility and strength tests in patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Several clinical measures of sensory and motor function are used alongside patient-rated questionnaires to assess outcomes of carpal tunnel decompression. However there is a lack of evidence regarding which clinical tests are most responsive to clinically important change over time. Methods In a prospective cohort study 63 patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression were assessed using standardised clinician-derived and patient reported outcomes before surgery, at 4 and 8 months follow up. Clinical sensory assessments included: touch threshold with monofilaments (WEST), shape-texture identification (STI™ test), static two-point discrimination (Mackinnon-Dellon Disk-Criminator) and the locognosia test. Motor assessments included: grip and tripod pinch strength using a digital grip analyser (MIE), manual muscle testing of abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis using the Rotterdam Intrinsic Handheld Myometer (RIHM). The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) was used as a patient rated outcome measure. Results Relative responsiveness at 4 months was highest for the BCTQ symptom severity scale with moderate to large effects sizes (ES = -1.43) followed by the BCTQ function scale (ES = -0.71). The WEST and STI™ were the most responsive sensory tests at 4 months showing moderate effect sizes (WEST ES = 0.55, STI ES = 0.52). Grip and pinch strength had a relatively higher responsiveness compared to thenar muscle strength but effect sizes for all motor tests were very small (ES ≤0.10) or negative indicating a decline compared to baseline in some patients. Conclusions For clinical assessment of sensibility touch threshold assessed by monofilaments (WEST) and tactile gnosis measured with the STI™ test are the most responsive tests and are recommended for future studies. The use of handheld myometry (RIHM) for manual muscle testing, despite more specifically targeting thenar muscles, was less responsive than grip or tripod pinch testing using

  3. The Value of Median Nerve Sonography as a Predictor for Short- and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Long-Term Follow-Up Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Marschall

    Full Text Available To investigate the prognostic value of B-mode and Power Doppler (PD ultrasound of the median nerve for the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS.Prospective study of 135 patients with suspected CTS seen 3 times: at baseline, then at short-term (3 months and long-term (15-36 months follow-up. At baseline, the cross-sectional area (CSA of the median nerve was measured with ultrasound at 4 levels on the forearm and wrist. PD signals were graded semi-quantitatively (0-3. Clinical outcomes were evaluated at each visit with the Boston Questionnaire (BQ and the DASH Questionnaire, as well as visual analogue scales for the patient's assessment of pain (painVAS and physician's global assessment (physVAS. The predictive values of baseline CSA and PD for clinical outcomes were determined with multivariate logistic regression models.Short-term and long-term follow-up data were available for 111 (82.2% and 105 (77.8% patients, respectively. There was a final diagnosis of CTS in 84 patients (125 wrists. Regression analysis revealed that the CSA, measured at the carpal tunnel inlet, predicted short-term clinical improvement according to BQ in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery (OR 1.8, p = 0.05, but not in patients treated conservatively. Neither CSA nor PD assessments predicted short-term improvement of painVAS, physVAS or DASH, nor was any of the ultrasound parameters useful for the prediction of long-term clinical outcomes.Ultrasound assessment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet may predict short-term clinical improvement in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel release, but long-term outcomes are unrelated to ultrasound findings.

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with high fibrinogen and fibrinogen deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrobičić, Ivan; Novak, Ivana; Marinović-Terzić, Ivana; Matić, Katarina; Lessel, Davor; Salamunić, Ilza; Babić, Mirna Saraga; Kunac, Nenad; Mešin, Anka Koštić; Kubisch, Christian; Maček, Boris; Terzić, Janoš

    2014-09-01

    Idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (ICTS) is a common entrapment neuropathy. Some cases of ICTS are linked to mutations of the transthyretin gene, whereas others are associated with systemic amyloidosis. The majority of ICTS cases are of unknown etiology. To study molecular mechanisms of ICTS development. A total of 71 ICTS patients and 68 control subjects were included in the study. The fibrinogen level was determined before surgery and its deposition in the transversal carpal ligament (TCL) was detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and mass spectrometry. Fibrinogen interaction with other proteins was studied by immunoprecipitation assay. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory and hemostatic protein fibrinogen are elevated in ICTS patients. Other measured systemic inflammatory markers were not affected, and local inflammatory responses in TCL were absent. ICTS patients have shorter bleeding times, probably because of the elevated plasma levels of fibrinogen. Polymorphisms of the fibrinogen B promoter region were previously associated with increased plasma fibrinogen, but this association was not observed among patients with ICTS. Interestingly, we detected fibrinogen deposits in the TCL, whereas transcriptional activity of the fibrinogen genes was low. Amyloidogenic proteins, including transthyretin and α-synuclein, were also found in the TCL, whereas their local transcriptional activity was rather high. Finally, we demonstrated that fibrinogen interacts with transthyretin and α-synuclein in TCL lysates. Our data indicate that fibrinogen and other aggregation-prone proteins have potentially important roles in the pathogenesis of ICTS.

  5. Consequences of different diagnostic "gold standards" in test accuracy research: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Lucas M; Jüni, Peter; Reichenbach, Stephan; Ziswiler, Hans-Rudolf; Kessels, Alfons G; Vögelin, Esther

    2005-08-01

    Test accuracy studies assume the existence of a well-defined illness definition and clear-cut diagnostic gold standards or reference standards. However, in clinical reality illness definitions may be vague or a mere description of a set of manifestations, mostly clinical signs and symptoms. This can lead to disagreements among experts about the correct classification of an illness and the adequate reference standard. Using data from a diagnostic accuracy study in carpal tunnel syndrome, we explored the impact of different definitions on the estimated test accuracy and found that estimated test performance characteristics varied considerably depending on the chosen reference standard. In situations without a clear-cut illness definition, randomized controlled trials may be preferable to test accuracy studies for the evaluation of a novel test. These studies do not determine the diagnostic accuracy, but the clinical impact of a novel test on patient management and outcome.

  6. Rewiring the primary somatosensory cortex in carpal tunnel syndrome with acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yumi; Kim, Hyungjun; Kettner, Norman; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Ong-Sutherland, Rebecca; Mezzacappa, Pia; Libby, Alexandra; Mawla, Ishtiaq; Morse, Leslie R; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2017-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy, affecting the median nerve at the wrist. Acupuncture is a minimally-invasive and conservative therapeutic option, and while rooted in a complex practice ritual, acupuncture overlaps significantly with many conventional peripherally-focused neuromodulatory therapies. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms by which acupuncture impacts accepted subjective/psychological and objective/physiological outcomes are not well understood. Eligible patients (n = 80, 65 female, age: 49.3 ± 8.6 years) were enrolled and randomized into three intervention arms: (i) verum electro-acupuncture 'local' to the more affected hand; (ii) verum electro-acupuncture at 'distal' body sites, near the ankle contralesional to the more affected hand; and (iii) local sham electro-acupuncture using non-penetrating placebo needles. Acupuncture therapy was provided for 16 sessions over 8 weeks. Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire assessed pain and paraesthesia symptoms at baseline, following therapy and at 3-month follow-up. Nerve conduction studies assessing median nerve sensory latency and brain imaging data were acquired at baseline and following therapy. Functional magnetic resonance imaging assessed somatotopy in the primary somatosensory cortex using vibrotactile stimulation over three digits (2, 3 and 5). While all three acupuncture interventions reduced symptom severity, verum (local and distal) acupuncture was superior to sham in producing improvements in neurophysiological outcomes, both local to the wrist (i.e. median sensory nerve conduction latency) and in the brain (i.e. digit 2/3 cortical separation distance). Moreover, greater improvement in second/third interdigit cortical separation distance following verum acupuncture predicted sustained improvements in symptom severity at 3-month follow-up. We further explored potential differential mechanisms of local versus distal acupuncture using diffusion tensor

  7. Factors influencing return to work after surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kesel, R; Donceel, P; De Smet, L

    2008-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the factors influencing the duration of work incapacity after surgically treated carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). To determine relevant factors related to return to work. Surgical technique, clinical factors, demographic factors, other medical problems, psychosocial factors, work-related and economical factors were reviewed in patients operated on for CTS. Statistical multivariate analyses were performed to identify the baseline factors influencing the work incapacity period. A total of 107 cases were reviewed. Professional exposure to repetitive movements and heavy manual handling activity were associated with a longer return-to-work interval. The duration of work incapacity period was not significantly related to the socioprofessional category of the patient (self-employed or employee) or to the type of the procedure (open versus endoscopic surgery). Work-related features have a more important influence on return to work than personal, pathological or surgical features.

  8. Median nerve penetration by a persistent median artery and vein mimicking carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavros, Kara; Paik, David; Motiwala, Rajeev; Weinberger, Jesse; Zhou, Lan; Shin, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common clinical syndrome seen in the outpatient setting that is easily confirmed by electrodiagnostic testing. We describe the case of a patient who presented with the classic symptoms and neurological examination for CTS, but had a normal nerve conduction study and electromyogram. Neuromuscular ultrasound of the median nerve on the symptomatic side revealed penetration of the nerve by a persistent median artery and vein in the mid-forearm, with a positive sonographic Tinel sign over this spot. This finding is an anatomical variation that has been described sparingly in the literature, mostly in cadavers. It has not been reported previously to be a mimic of CTS. This case demonstrates the diagnostic utility of neuromuscular ultrasound and the importance of considering an anatomical variation involving the median nerve in the differential diagnosis of CTS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of finger motion on transverse median nerve movement in the carpal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2016-10-01

    We used ultrasonography (US) to investigate the effects of finger motion on movement of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and the correlation between these US parameters and CTS severity. Ultrasonographic measures were performed in 23 control wrists and 22 CTS wrists in women. During first through third finger flexion and grip motion, median nerve movements were obtained using US and a tracing program. Nerve movements during third finger flexion in the dorsopalmar axis and grip motion in both axes, and during second finger flexion in the radioulnar axis, differed significantly between the control and CTS groups. US parameters correlated negatively with cross-sectional area. This study shows that transverse median nerve movements decreased during grip using US and correlated negatively with CTS severity. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 54: -, 2016 Muscle Nerve 54: 738-742, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The pneumatic compression test and modified pneumatic compression test in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Tekeoglu, I; Dogan, A; Demir, G; Dolar, E

    2007-12-01

    There are no precise criteria for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS): the history is useful but the value of the various provocative tests is questionable. The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic value of a new provocative test, the 'modified pneumatic compression test' in CTS. The study group consisted of 37 patients with 50 symptomatic CTS hands. A control group of 50 healthy volunteers was recruited. The diagnosis was based on a combination of the history, the clinical findings on examination and electrophysiological criteria. Sensitivity for the pneumatic compression and the modified pneumatic compression tests were 68% and 84%, respectively. Specificities for these tests were 97% and 95%, respectively. The modified pneumatic compression test demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for CTS. This test facilitated the diagnosis and was easy to use. It may reduce referrals for neurophysiology testing, and so reduce costs.

  11. [Assessment of quality of pre- and postoperative information documents about carpal tunnel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, S; Sauleau, E; Robert, E; Gouzou, S; Clavert, P; Liverneaux, P

    2014-02-01

    Before surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome, oral patient information is partially understood and accepted. The objective of this study was to perform a documentation for patients, as recommended by the High Authority in Healthcare (HAS), then to compare the effectiveness of oral information. Our series included 37 patients who received the same information: preoperative shower, pathophysiology, and postoperative instructions. The first 18 (group 1) received only oral information. The following 19 (group 2) received oral, written and visual information. The information in Group 2 followed the methodology of McClune: promoter (Department of Hand Surgery), organizing committee (two teachers from the School of Decorative Arts, two teachers of the School of Medicine), group work (five art students, five medical students), panel of experts (three surgeons, two occupational therapists, one physiotherapist). Four documents were developed: a booklet, a diagram, an animation, a poster. Satisfaction was higher in group 2. Understanding and memorization were better in group 2. Fifty-six percent of patients in group 1 would have liked a paper, 12.5% videos, none went on the Internet. Twelve and a half percent of the patients in group 2 went on the Internet, 18.8% would have liked videos. Our results show that in terms of carpal tunnel syndrome, the written and visual information materials for patients significantly improve the efficacy of oral information. These documents may be extended to other pathologies in Hand Surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced expression of Wnt9a in the flexor tenosynovium in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Menuki, Kunitaka; Zenke, Yukichi; Hirasawa, Hideyuki; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the association between abnormal Wnt signaling and the cause of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (ICTS) and whether an association exists between Wnt signaling and cell proliferation in the flexor tenosynovium. The subjects included nine patients with ICTS; the controls were nine patients with distal radius fractures without any symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. We extracted mRNA from the flexor tenosynovium and compared the expression levels of genes encoding 17 types of Wnt in both subjects and controls via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression levels of factors involved in cell proliferation, such as estrogen-responsive finger protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, heparin binding-epidermal growth factor-like growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also measured using quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, we compared the Wnt and MIB-1 protein expression levels to clarify the effect of Wnt on cell proliferation. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly greater expression of the gene encoding Wnt9a in subjects with ICTS than in controls and also revealed a positive correlation between the expression of genes encoding Wnt9a and VEGF in subjects with ICTS. Quantitative evaluation using immunohistochemical staining also indicated more marked Wnt9a expression in subjects than in controls. However, there was no relationship between the expression of Wnt9a and the cell proliferation index MIB-1. These results indicate that Wnt9a expression is enhanced in ICTS and that Wnt9a may be involved in VEGF expression in ICTS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Conservative treatment in patients with mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: A systematic review.

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    Jiménez Del Barrio, S; Bueno Gracia, E; Hidalgo García, C; Estébanez de Miguel, E; Tricás Moreno, J M; Rodríguez Marco, S; Ceballos Laita, L

    2016-07-22

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy. It is characterised by the compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. CTS presents a high prevalence and it is a disabling condition from the earliest stages. Severe cases are usually treated surgically, while conservative treatment is recommended in mild to moderate cases. The aim of this systematic review is to present the conservative treatments and determine their effectiveness in mild-to-moderate cases of CTS over the last 15 years. A systematic review was performed according to PRISMA criteria. We used the Medline, PEDro, and Cochrane databases to find and select randomised controlled clinical trials evaluating the effects of conservative treatment on the symptoms and functional ability of patients with mild to moderate CTS; 32 clinical trials were included. There is evidence supporting the effectiveness of oral drugs, although injections appear to be more effective. Splinting has been shown to be effective, and it is also associated with use of other non-pharmacological techniques. Assessments of the use of electrotherapy techniques alone have shown no conclusive results about their effectiveness. Other soft tissue techniques have also shown good results but evidence on this topic is limited. Various treatment combinations (drug and non-pharmacological treatments) have been proposed without conclusive results. Several conservative treatments are able to relieve symptoms and improve functional ability of patients with mild-to-moderate CTS. These include splinting, oral drugs, injections, electrotherapy, specific manual techniques, and neural gliding exercises as well as different combinations of the above. We have been unable to describe the best technique or combination of techniques due to the limitations of the studies; therefore, further studies of better methodological quality are needed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S

  14. [The risk of the carpal tunnel syndrome in some work activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldasseroni, A; Tartaglia, R; Carnevale, F

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to generate hypotheses on what could be the ISTAT (National Institute of Statistics) job classes with a major risk of carpal tunnel syndrome in order to plan more specific analytic epidemiology studies and apply more correct ergonomic solutions. A case-control cross-sectional survey without matching was carried out. The source of data were the computerized medical records of a large regional hospital: 833 carpal tunnel syndrome cases (mean age 48, SD 9.33) and 3222 controls (mean age 43.5, SD 13.22) hospitalized for other diseases, were selected. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence limits, controlled for age and gender by a logistic linear regression model, were calculated as measures of association for the comparison between non-exposed managerial/administrative staff and industrial workers. The analysis showed a statistically significant risk for some ISTAT job classes, in particular class 53 (spinners, weavers, dyers and similar jobs) (OR = 2.65; C.L. 1.52-4.62) class 54 (knitters, tailors, hatmakers, upholsterers and similar jobs) (OR = 1.69; C.L. 1.06-2.71), 55 (tanners, shoemakers, leather manufacture workers and similar jobs) (OR = 2.74; C.L. 1.66-4.53) and group 742 (Hotel and restaurant cooks) (OR = 2.99; C.L. 1.45-6.13). Job classes 45 (carpenters, welders and similar jobs). 62 (electricians, electrotechnicians, radio engineers and similar jobs), 63 (gasfitters, plumbers, heating engineers and similar jobs) and 85 (porters and other jobs involving manual handling of loads) showed ORs higher than 2 but without statistical significance. The results are valid for planning further studies, especially in the textile and shoe and leather manufacturing sectors.

  15. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)( n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)( n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0( p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2( p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 ( p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  16. High-frequency ultrasound in carpal tunnel syndrome: assessment of patient eligibility for surgical treatment

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    Katarzyna Kapuścińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and a frequent cause of sick leaves because of work-related hand overload. That is why an early diagnosis and adequate treatment (conservative or surgical are essential for optimal patient management. Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the usefulness of high-frequency ultrasound in CTS for the assessment of patient eligibility for surgical treatment. Material and methods: The study involved 62 patients (50 women and 12 men, aged 28–70, mean age 55.2 with scheduled surgeries of CTS on the basis of clinical symptoms, physical examination performed by a neurosurgeon and a positive result of EMG testing. The ultrasound examinations of the wrist were performed in all these patients. On the basis of the collected data, the author has performed multiple analyses to confi rm the usefulness of ultrasound imaging in assessing patient eligibility for surgical treatment of CTS. Results: US examinations showed evidence of median nerve compression at the level of the carpal tunnel in all of the examined patients. This was further confi rmed during surgical procedures. The mean value of the cross-sectional area at the proximal part of the pisiform bone was 17.45 mm2 (min. 12 mm2 , max. 31 mm2 . Nerve hypoechogenicity proximal to the nerve compression site was visible in all 62 patients (100%. Increased nerve vascularity on the transverse section was present in 50 patients (80.65%. Conclusions: Ultrasonography with the use of high-frequency transducers is a valuable diagnostic tool both for assessing patient eligibility for surgical treatment of CTS, and in postoperative assessment of the treatment efficacy.

  17. A study of interpolation method in diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Alireza Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The low correlation between the patients′ signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and results of electrodiagnostic tests makes the diagnosis challenging in mild cases. Interpolation is a mathematical method for finding median nerve conduction velocity (NCV exactly at carpal tunnel site. Therefore, it may be helpful in diagnosis of CTS in patients with equivocal test results. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate interpolation method as a CTS diagnostic test. Settings and Design: Patients with two or more clinical symptoms and signs of CTS in a median nerve territory with 3.5 ms ≤ distal median sensory latency <4.6 ms from those who came to our electrodiagnostic clinics and also, age matched healthy control subjects were recruited in the study. Materials and Methods: Median compound motor action potential and median sensory nerve action potential latencies were measured by a MEDLEC SYNERGY VIASIS electromyography and conduction velocities were calculated by both routine method and interpolation technique. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Student′s t-test were used for comparing group differences. Cut-off points were calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of 70.8% and 84.7% were obtained for median motor NCV and a sensitivity of 98.3%, specificity of 91.7%, PPV and NPV of 91.9% and 98.2% were obtained for median sensory NCV with interpolation technique. Conclusions: Median motor interpolation method is a good technique, but it has less sensitivity and specificity than median sensory interpolation method.

  18. High-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist. Application of a 5-cm surface coil

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    Maurer, J.; Bleschkowski, A.; Tempka, A.; Felix, R. [Medical Faculty of the Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-07-01

    In order to make a comparative analysis of transversal tomograms obtained by high-resolution MR imaging with frozen cross-sections of an anatomical forearm specimen, twenty-two healthy volunteers were also examined using the same coil system to test for a range of possible clinical applications and for the depiction of morphological and morphometrical values of normal anatomy in vivo. MR images of the carpal tunnel of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained with a 1.5-T whole-body system with a 5-cm surface coil. Measurements were recorded with a field-of-view between 50x50 mm{sup 2} and 60x60 mm{sup 2} in a 256x256 pixel matrix for the T1 sequence. A slice thickness of 2 mm was used. The images were acquired using a T1-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 500/38 ms) and a T2-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 2000/70 ms). Additionally, a formalin-fixed anatomical forearm specimen was imaged for anatomic correlation. The imaged transversal cross-section levels in the specimen were subsequently freeze-sectioned. The anatomical structures of the MR findings were identified and compared with the macroscopical sections of the specimen. Based on the good depiction of details at this coil system with a pixel size in T1 of 0.195x0.195 mm, high-resolution MR imaging enabled identification of the interior structures of the carpal tunnel, as well as delineation of connective tissue. The clinical value of high-resolution MR includes the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and inflammatory disorders of the wrist. Our results support the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist using small surface coils.

  19. High-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist. Application of a 5-cm surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, J.; Bleschkowski, A.; Tempka, A.; Felix, R.

    2000-01-01

    In order to make a comparative analysis of transversal tomograms obtained by high-resolution MR imaging with frozen cross-sections of an anatomical forearm specimen, twenty-two healthy volunteers were also examined using the same coil system to test for a range of possible clinical applications and for the depiction of morphological and morphometrical values of normal anatomy in vivo. MR images of the carpal tunnel of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained with a 1.5-T whole-body system with a 5-cm surface coil. Measurements were recorded with a field-of-view between 50x50 mm 2 and 60x60 mm 2 in a 256x256 pixel matrix for the T1 sequence. A slice thickness of 2 mm was used. The images were acquired using a T1-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 500/38 ms) and a T2-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 2000/70 ms). Additionally, a formalin-fixed anatomical forearm specimen was imaged for anatomic correlation. The imaged transversal cross-section levels in the specimen were subsequently freeze-sectioned. The anatomical structures of the MR findings were identified and compared with the macroscopical sections of the specimen. Based on the good depiction of details at this coil system with a pixel size in T1 of 0.195x0.195 mm, high-resolution MR imaging enabled identification of the interior structures of the carpal tunnel, as well as delineation of connective tissue. The clinical value of high-resolution MR includes the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and inflammatory disorders of the wrist. Our results support the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist using small surface coils

  20. Comparison of the Effects between Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

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    Ji-young Ku

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Methods : From February to September 2010, the number of patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome who volunteered for this clinical study was 16 and 7 out of 16 patients complained both hands. Total 23 cases of hands were randomly divided by 2 groups. We injected Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture on PC7(Daereung twice a week for 4weeks for experimental group(n=11, and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture with the same methods for control group(n=12. One case was dropped out due to itchiness of allergic response in the experimental group. Improvement of the symptoms was evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale, Pain Rating Scale, Tinel’s sign, Phalen’s sign and Nerve Conduction Velocity. Nerve Conduction Velocity was checked at baseline and the end of the trial and others were checked at baseline, after 2 and 4 weeks. Results : Both groups showed significant improvement in Visual Analogue Scale, Pain Rating Scale, but no significant difference between two groups. Only the control group showed significant reduction of the‘ poitive response’in the Tinel’s sign and Phalen’s sign. However, no groups improved in Nerve Conduction Velocity. Conclusions : These results showed that Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture could decrease the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Further studies will be required to examine more cases for the long period and use more various concentration and amount pharmacopuncture for the effect on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

  1. Development of a kinematic model to predict finger flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue displacement in the carpal tunnel.

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    Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Finger flexor tendinopathies and carpal tunnel syndrome are histologically characterised by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel, which is indicative of excessive and repetitive shear forces between the finger flexor tendons and SSCT. We assessed flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon and adjacent SSCT displacements with colour Doppler ultrasound as 16 healthy participants completed long finger flexion/extension movements captured by a motion capture system. FDS tendon displacements fit a second-order regression model based on metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint flexion angles (R(2) = 0.92 ± 0.01). SSCT displacements were 33.6 ± 1.7% smaller than FDS tendon displacements and also fit a second-order regression model (R(2) = 0.89 ± 0.01). FDS tendon and SSCT displacement both correlated with finger joint thickness, enabling participant-specific anthropometric scaling. We propose the current regression models as an ergonomic method to determine relative displacements between the finger flexor tendons and SSCT. Relative displacements between the finger flexor tendons and SSCT provide insight into gliding and friction in the carpal tunnel. Our regression models represent a move towards mechanistic-based ergonomic risk assessment of the wrist/hand. This is a natural evolution of ergonomic methods based on tendon-joint interaction.

  2. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Prevalence and Characteristics among Administrative Staff at Dr.Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung

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    Andrian Andrian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a neurologic disease affecting hands, which is closely related to work, and is the most prevalent nerve compression disease. The incidence of CTS quite often occur in people working with their hands, for instance the administrative staff, especially in a busy workplace such as Dr.Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. CTS causes reduction in work productivity, and consequently degrading family welfare and the quality of public service. For that very reason, the prevalence and characteristics of CTS among administrative staff at Dr.HasanSadikin General Hospital Bandung needed to be revealed. Methods: This quantitative descriptive study involved 94 administrative staff in the Medical record department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital using the Carpal-tunnel.net questionnaire and further examinations by neurologists. Variables involved in this study were the subject characteristics. Results: Out of the 90 subjects, 22 stated having symptoms related to CTS (prevalence, 24.4%. On further clinical examination, 3 were diagnosed of suffering from CTS (prevalence, 3.3%. Conclusions: Carpal tunnel syndrome is found among the administrative staff at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung  and the prevalence is lower than in the general population. A further study is required to reveal ther specific division in the hospital with the most prevalent CTS case. DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1077

  3. A comparison of wrist function, range of motion and pain between sports and non sports wheelchair-dependent persons with carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Farshad Okhovatian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome is common among handicapped people using wheelchair, and repeated wrist movements increase the risk of incidence of this syndrome. In present study, performance, pain and range of motion of wrist were compared between the athletes and non-athlete handicapped people suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. Materials and Methods : In this descriptive study, all members of handicapped basketball team in Tehran (35 persons and 33 wheelchair-bound non-athlete handicapped persons residing in Tehran sanitariums were studied (similar with respect to age, weight, height, years of using wheelchair and level of disability.In this study, Clinical Questionnaire and Nerve Conduction Study were used for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome, VAS Scale for measuring pain, Goniometer for measuring range of motion of wrist, and Self-Administered Questionnaire for investigating severity of symptoms and performance.Results: The finings of this study indicated that there was no significant difference between two athlete and non-athlete handicapped groups with carpal tunnel syndrome in prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome, severity of pain, performance and range of motion of wrist (p>0.05. Among 35 athletes, 6 persons (mean age: 36±3.11, mean weight: 68±4.74 and mean height: 172±7 and among 33 non-athletes, 5 persons (mean age: 41±7.1, mean weight: 73±3 and mean height: 173±5 had carpal tunnel syndrome.Conclusion : Unlike what is supposed, repeated movements of wrist is not the only factor predisposing the athlete handicapped people to carpal tunnel syndrome, So other influencing factors should be considered.

  4. Diagnostic Value of Ultrasound Compared to Electro Diagnosis in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Seyed Mansour Rayegani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS is one of the main causes of disability. The diagnosis of CTS confirm by electrodiagnostic tests. Sonography is an alternative method for diagnosis of CTS that can investigate anatomy and probable pathology. The aim of this study is to investigate the multiple sonographic diagnostic criteria and compare its diagnostic value with electrodiagnosis. Materials and Methods:In this descriptive-cross sectional study, 84 wrists (42 patients with CTS and 42 individuals without any clinical signs in upper limb were investigated. Symptomatic patients underwent clinical examination, standard electrodiagnostic evaluation of upper limb and sonographic investigation of median nerve in forearm and wrist. The control group underwent sonographic investigation. Results: Cross Sectional Area (CSA of Median nerve at distal wrist crease, at the level of Hamate hook and Trapezium, the amount of flexor retinaculum bowing, ratio of CSA at the forearm to distal wrist crease and ratio of CSA at the Pisiform level to distal wrist crease had significant difference in the case group compared to the control group (P-value

  5. Pre-surgery Disability Compensation Predicts Long-Term Disability among Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, June T.; Turner, Judith A.; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Franklin, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to identify early risk factors for work disability compensation prior to and after carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) surgery, and to determine whether pre-surgery disability compensation is associated with long-term disability. Methods Washington State workers’ compensation administrative data and data from interviews with workers 18 days (median) after submitting new workers’ compensation claims for CTS were examined. Baseline risk factors for pre-surgery disability compensation and for long-term disability (≥365 days of work disability compensation prior to two years after claim filing) were evaluated for workers who underwent CTS surgery and had at least one day of disability compensation (N=670). Results After adjustment for baseline long-term disability risk factors, workers with pre-surgery disability compensation had over five times the odds of long-term disability. Baseline factors in multiple domains, including job, psychosocial, clinical, and worker pain and function, were associated with both pre-surgery disability compensation and long-term disability. Conclusions Risk factors for work disability prior to and after CTS surgery are similar, and early work disability is a risk factor for long-term CTS-related disability. An integrated approach to CTS-related disability prevention could include identifying and addressing combined risk factors soon after claim filing, more efficient use of conservative treatments and appropriate work modifications to minimize early work loss, and, when indicated, timely surgical intervention. PMID:22392804

  6. Body mass index as predictor of carpal tunnel syndrome among garment workers

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    Lie T. Merijanti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Of the nerve entrapment syndromes the most well-known is the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS involving the median nerve. In the field of occupational medicine this condition is categorized as an occupational disease, for which industrial workers may claim compensation if the CTS occurs as a consequence of their job. However, although several occupational risk factors have been suggested as causing the development of CTS, a definitive role of work activities as the central cause of CTS is unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate both non-occupational and occupational factors associated with CTS in garment home-industry workers. A cross-sectional study was performed from April to June 2008 in the garment home industry in North Jakarta. A total of 99 workers, consisting of 45 males and 54 females were included in this study. Historical data were obtained from a self-administered detailed questionnaire, while anthropometric and provocative median nerve test variables were measured directly. The results showed that body mass index (BMI was a significant predictor of CTS in male workers (p=0.031, while the risk of CTS was three-fold higher in female workers using hormonal contraceptives (Prevalence Ratio/PR = 3.3 ; 95% Confidence of Interval/CI = 1.0 – 10.5. In conclusion it appears that BMI and hormonal contraceptive use were CTS predictors.

  7. Body mass index as predictor of carpal tunnel syndrome among garment workers

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    Lie T Merijanti S.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Of the nerve entrapment syndromes the most well-known is the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS involving the median nerve. In the field of occupational medicine this condition is categorized as an occupational disease, for which industrial workers may claim compensation if the CTS occurs as a consequence of their job. However, although several occupational risk factors have been suggested as causing the development of CTS, a definitive role of work activities as the central cause of CTS is unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate both non-occupational and occupational factors associated with CTS in garment home-industry workers. A cross-sectional study was performed from April to June 2008 in the garment home industry in North Jakarta. A total of 99 workers, consisting of 45 males and 54 females were included in this study. Historical data were obtained from a self-administered detailed questionnaire, while anthropometric and provocative median nerve test variables were measured directly. The results showed that body mass index (BMI was a significant predictor of CTS in male workers (p=0.031, while the risk of CTS was three-fold higher in female workers using hormonal contraceptives (Prevalence Ratio/PR = 3.3 ; 95% Confidence of Interval/CI = 1.0 – 10.5. In conclusion it appears that BMI and hormonal contraceptive use were CTS predictors.

  8. Facilitatory and inhibitory pain mechanisms are altered in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Benjamin Soon

    Full Text Available Preliminary evidence from studies using quantitative sensory testing suggests the presence of central mechanisms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS as apparent by widespread hyperalgesia. Hallmarks of central mechanisms after nerve injuries include nociceptive facilitation and reduced endogenous pain inhibition. Methods to study nociceptive facilitation in CTS so far have been limited to quantitative sensory testing and the integrity of endogenous inhibition remains unexamined. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate changes in facilitatory and inhibitory processing in patients with CTS by studying hypersensitivity following experimentally induced pain (facilitatory mechanisms and the efficacy of conditioned pain modulation (CPM, inhibitory mechanisms. Twenty-five patients with mild to moderate CTS and 25 age and sex matched control participants without CTS were recruited. Increased pain facilitation was evaluated via injection of hypertonic saline into the upper trapezius. Altered pain inhibition through CPM was investigated through cold water immersion of the foot as the conditioning stimulus and pressure pain threshold over the thenar and hypothenar eminence bilaterally as the test stimulus. The results demonstrated that patients with CTS showed a greater duration (p = 0.047, intensity (p = 0.044 and area (p = 0.012 of pain in response to experimentally induced pain in the upper trapezius and impaired CPM compared to the control participants (p = 0.006. Although typically considered to be driven by peripheral mechanisms, these findings indicate that CTS demonstrates characteristics of altered central processing with increased pain facilitation and reduced endogenous pain inhibition.

  9. Psychosocial Risk Factors and the Association With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Michael; Thacker, Michael; Sandford, Fiona

    2017-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper limb. Research has shown that associative factors for CTS include occupational and biomechanical elements, gender, and age. To date, no systematic review has been undertaken to determine specifically whether there are any psychosocial risk factors in developing CTS. The objective is to determine whether psychosocial factors are associated with and/or predict the development of CTS. A systematic review was conducted including searches of PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, and CINAHL from inception to May 30, 2017. Quantitative studies must have investigated a minimum of 1 or more psychosocial factors-cognitive, affective, behavioral, vocational, or interpersonal processes (eg, social support)-and include a point or risk estimate. One reviewer conducted the search and 2 reviewers independently assessed eligibility and completed methodological quality assessment using a modified Downs and Black checklist. Data were analyzed narratively. Six moderate- to high-quality studies were included in the final review. Five studies reported a positive association between psychosocial factors and CTS, where psychosocial factors were more in those who reported CTS. One study reported no positive or negative association with CTS development. Four studies reported a negative association between psychosocial factors and CTS, where psychosocial factors were less in those who reported CTS. There is limited evidence for a positive association between psychosocial factors and CTS. However, this was not a consistent finding across all included studies. Further research is indicated in standardizing CTS diagnostic criteria and investigating other working environments.

  10. Quantitative vibration threshold testing in carpal tunnel syndrome: analysis strategies for optimizing reliability.

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    Hubbard, Mark C; MacDermid, Joy C; Kramer, John F; Birmingham, Trevor B

    2004-01-01

    Tuning forks and electronic vibrometers have been used to quantify vibration sensation thresholds, which are thought to be affected early in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The purpose of this study was to identify a reliable testing procedure for a newly designed, computer-controlled vibrometer (PCV50; Ztech, Salt Lake City, UT). Fifty-two patients (mean age 48+/-8 years) with electromyographically confirmed CTS were tested on one occasion. The computer-controlled vibrometer, with a fixed frequency of 50 Hz, used stepwise changes in amplitude to determine vibration sensation threshold. Each patient had three vibrometer measures (trials) taken on the pulp of the third digit of their right and left hands during the first test session and were retested by a single repetition 40 to 60 minutes later (retest). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to examine several data analysis strategies. The strategy that generated the highest ICCs for both the right and left hands assumed that the first trial was a learning or practice attempt, and compared the average of the second and third trials with the score from the second session (ICC=0.86 and 0.89, respectively). The computer-controlled vibrometer offered an easily administered, quantitative, and comfortable means to assess median nerve function. Using this reliable testing procedure will allow for additional investigations to determine its usefulness in the early detection and accurate quantification of CTS-related impairment.

  11. Effect of hand volume and other anthropometric measurements on carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Arslan, Yıldız; Bülbül, İsmail; Öcek, Levent; Şener, Ufuk; Zorlu, Yaşar

    2017-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), majority of cases are considered to be idiopathic, is the most commonly encountered peripheral neuropathy causing disability. We asserted that thick and big hands may more prone to idiopathic CTS (ICTS) than others. The study included 165 subjects admitted to our electrophysiology lab with pre-diagnosis of CTS between May 2014 and April 2015. Eighty-five of the subjects were diagnosed as ICTS. The parameters analyzed were: age, gender, occupation, BMI, hand dominance, grade of ICTS, wrist circumference, proximal/distal width of palm, hand/palm length, hand volume and palm length/proximal palm width. Female gender was significantly higher in both groups. The mean age of study group was 44.02 ± 9.11 years, and control group was 41.25 ± 9.94 years. BMI, wrist circumference and hand volume were significantly higher in the study group (p ICTS. Higher hand volume, wrist circumference and lower palm length/prox. palm width ratio can also be anthropometric risk factors. Large hand volumes, big and coarse hands are more prone to ICTS.

  12. Epithelioid Sarcoma of the Forearm Arising from Perineural Sheath of Median Nerve Mimicking Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Hiromasa Fujii

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of epithelioid sarcoma in the forearm of a 33-year-old male presenting with symptoms and signs of carpal tunnel syndrome originating from the direct involvement of the median nerve. Due to the slow growing of the tumor, the patient noticed the presence of tumor mass in his forearm after several months from the initial onset of the symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an 8×4 cm mass involving the median nerve in the middle part of the forearm, and histological analysis of the biopsy specimen revealed the diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma. Radical surgical resection was performed in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy. The function of the flexors were restored by the multiple tendon transfers (EIP→FDS; ECRL→FDP; BrR→FPL; EDM→opponens with superficial cutaneous branch of radial nerve transfer to the resected median nerve. The function of the affected hand showed excellent with the DASH disability/symptom score of 22.5, and both the grasp power and sensory of the median nerve area has recovered up to 50% of the normal side. The patient returned to his original vocation and alive with continuous disease free at 3.5-year follow-up since initial treatment.

  13. Predictive factors associated with severity of carpal tunnel syndrome in multiethnic Asian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, W.A.W.; Sumon, S.H.; Kee, H.F.; Lim, S.M.S.; Said, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the commonest entrapment neuropathy referred for electro diagnostic evaluation. The objective of this study is to evaluate the risk factors associated with CTS and their relationship with the severity in nerve conduction abnormality. Methodology: This study was based on the retrospective data analysis of patients who were electro-physiologically diagnosed as CTS in a tertiary neurophysiology service. Patients were divided into 2 groups; non-severe and severe CTS. Factors, which include age, gender, ethnicity, laterality of CTS, symptoms and diabetes mellitus were analyzed separately and compared with severity of CTS based on NCS. Results: We analyzed 144 patients with age ranging from 18 to 76 years. Patients with bilateral CTS were 4 times more likely at risk to developed severe CTS while diabetes mellitus patients are 2.5 times more likely. There was no significant association found between age, gender, ethnicity and symptomatic patients with the CTS severity. Conclusion: This study shows that patients with bilateral CTS and diabetes mellitus are at higher risk in developing severe CTS. Therefore, early screening with NCS is recommended in these groups of patients. (author)

  14. A prospective study of carpal tunnel syndrome: workplace and individual risk factors

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    Burt, Susan; Deddens, James A; Crombie, Ken; Jin, Yan; Wurzelbacher, Steve; Ramsey, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the risk for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) from workplace physical factors, particularly hand activity level and forceful exertion, while taking into account individual factors including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and pre-existing medical conditions. Methods Three healthcare and manufacturing workplaces were selected for inclusion on the basis of range of exposure to hand activity level and forceful exertion represented by their jobs. Each study participants job tasks were observed and evaluated ’ onsite and videotaped for further analysis, including frequency and duration of exertion and postural deviation. Individual health assessment entailed electrodiagnostic testing of median and ulnar nerves, physical examination and questionnaires at baseline with annual follow-up for 2 years. Results The incidence of dominant hand CTS during the study was 5.11 per 100 person-years (29 cases). Adjusted HRs for dominant hand CTS were as follows: working with forceful exertion ≥20% but job strain. Conclusions Workplace and individual risk factors both contribute to the risk for CTS. Time spent in forceful exertion can be a greater risk for CTS than obesity if the job exposure is high. Preventive workplace efforts should target forceful exertions. PMID:23788614

  15. Usefulness of ultrasound assessment of median nerve mobility in carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Seok, Jung Im; Park, Dong-Soon; Cho, Hee Kyung

    2018-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Recently, dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging has shown differences in median nerve mobility between the affected and unaffected sides in CTS. Purpose The present study was performed to compare the median nerve mobility between patients with CTS and healthy individuals, and to correlate median nerve mobility with the severity of CTS. Material and Methods A total of 101 patients (128 wrists) with CTS and 43 healthy individuals (70 wrists) were evaluated. Electrodiagnostic studies were initially conducted to determine the neurophysiological grading scale (NGS). The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve and the grade of median nerve mobility were measured using US. Results The mean grade of median nerve mobility in the CTS group (1.9) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.6; P mobility and distal motor latency of the median nerve (r = -0.218, P = 0.015), NGS (r = -0.207, P = 0.020) and CSA of the median nerve (r = -0.196, P = 0.028). Conclusion The grade of median nerve mobility was negatively correlated with the severity of CTS. US assessment of median nerve mobility may be useful in diagnosing and determining the severity of CTS.

  16. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among employees at a poultry processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolin, Kristin; Ramsey, Jessica G; Wassell, James T; Hard, David L

    2014-11-01

    To determine prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among poultry processing employees while taking into account non-occupational factors and assess any association between CTS prevalence and exposure groups. Performed a cross-sectional survey to assess CTS (n = 318). A CTS case was defined as an employee with self-reported CTS symptoms, an abnormal hand symptom diagram, and an abnormal nerve conduction study (NCS). Log-binomial regression was used to estimate prevalence ratios. Three hundred and one participants had sufficient symptom information or NCS data to be classified. 126 (42%) of 301 participants had evidence of CTS. In the adjusted analysis, the highest exposure group had CTS prevalence that was significantly higher than that for the lower exposure group [PR: 1.61; 95% CI = (1.20, 2.17)]. Increasing levels of hand activity and force were associated with increased CTS prevalence among participants. Recommendations were provided to reduce exposure to these risk factors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Self-reported physical work exposures and incident carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Dale, Ann Marie; Gardner, Bethany T.; Zeringue, Angelique; Strickland, Jaime; Descatha, Alexis; Franzblau, Alfred; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Background To prospectively evaluate associations between self-reported physical work exposures and incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Newly employed workers (n=1,107) underwent repeated nerve conduction studies (NCS), and periodic surveys on hand symptoms and physical work exposures including average daily duration of wrist bending, forearm rotation, finger pinching, using vibrating tools, finger/thumb pressing, forceful gripping, and lifting >2 pounds. Multiple logistic regression models examined relationships between peak, most recent, and time-weighted average exposures and incident CTS, adjusting for age, gender, and body mass index. Results 710 subjects (64.1%) completed follow-up NCS; 31 incident cases of CTS occurred over 3 year follow-up. All models describing lifting or forceful gripping exposures predicted future CTS. Vibrating tool use was predictive in some models. Conclusions Self-reported exposures showed consistent risks across different exposure models in this prospective study. Workers’ self-reported job demands can provide useful information for targeting work interventions. PMID:25223617

  18. [Etiological factors for developing carpal tunnel syndrome in people who work with computers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewańska, Magdalena; Wagrowska-Koski, Ewa; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequent mononeuropathy of upper extremities. From the early 1990's it has been suggested that intensive work with computers can result in CTS development, however, this relationship has not as yet been proved. The aim of the study was to evaluate occupational and non-occupational risk factors for developing CTS in the population of computer-users. The study group comprised 60 patients (58 women and 2 men; mean age: 53.8 +/- 6.35 years) working with computers and suspected of occupational CTS. A survey as well as both median and ulnar nerve conduction examination (NCS) were performed in all the subjects. The patients worked with use of computer for 6.43 +/- 1.71 h per day. The mean latency between the beginning of employment and the occurrence of first CTS symptoms was 12.09 +/- 5.94 years. All patients met the clinical and electrophysiological diagnostic criteria of CTS. In the majority of patients etiological factors for developing CTS were non-occupational: obesity, hypothyroidism, oophorectomy, past hysterectomy, hormonal replacement therapy or oral contraceptives, recent menopause, diabetes, tendovaginitis. In 7 computer-users etiological factors were not identified. The results of our study show that CTS is usually generated by different causes not related with using computers at work.

  19. The best cutoff point for median nerve cross sectional area at the level of carpal tunnel inlet.

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    Payam Sarraf

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy. It accounts 90% of all entrapment neuropathies all over the world. Ultrasound is a non-invasive, cost effective and available para-clinical method which could be applied for CTS diagnosis. Cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the level of the inlet is considered as a diagnostic criterion in CTS cases. In this study, thirty-eight patients with electrophysiologically confirmed idiopathic CTS and 22 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventy-one affected nerves and 42 unaffected nerves were evaluated within 14 days after electrophysiological examination. The largest cross-sectional area (CSA was measured at the level of the carpal tunnel inlet and the maximum nerve perimeter was also recorded by means of the software. Mean CSA and perimeter were 14.02 ± 4.5 mm2 and 1.7±0.28m in all patients and 8.2±2.1 mm2, 1.3±0.19 m in controls (P<0.001, P<0.001. Mean CSA and Perimeter were significantly different between patient's groups and control. The best cut off point for CSA of the tunnel inlet was 10.5 mm2 with sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 76% (AUC (Area under the Curve = 0.9, P<0.001. The best cut off point for inlet perimeter was 1.44 m with sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 77 % (AUC=0.87, P<0.001. Our findings showed that median nerve CSA at carpal tunnel inlet could be used as the diagnostic criteria for CTS.

  20. Pulsed magnetic field versus ultrasound in the treatment of postnatal carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled trial in the women of an Egyptian population

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    Dalia M. Kamel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field versus pulsed ultrasound in treating patients with postnatal carpal tunnel syndrome. The study was a randomized, double-blinded trial. Forty postnatal female patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were divided randomly into two equal groups. One group received pulsed electromagnetic field, with nerve and tendon gliding exercises for the wrist, three times per week for four weeks. The other group received pulsed ultrasound and the same wrist exercises. Pain level, sensory and motor distal latencies and conduction velocities of the median nerve, functional status scale and hand grip strength were assessed pre- and post-treatment. There was a significant decrease (P  0.05. In conclusion, while the symptoms were alleviated in both groups, pulsed electromagnetic field was more effective than pulsed ultrasound in treating postnatal carpal tunnel syndrome.

  1. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

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    Barbosa Rafael Inácio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184

  2. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec) - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184 PMID:23237204

  3. Comparative study on the effectiveness of a corticosteroid injection for carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with and without Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a corticosteroid injection for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in patients with and without Raynaud's phenomenon. In a prospective study, 139 patients with CTS were treated with a corticosteroid injection (10 mg triamcinolone acetonide); 34 had Raynaud's phenomenon and 105 did not (control group). Grip strength, perception of touch with a Semmes-Weinstein monofilament and the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaires (BCTQ) were assessed at baseline and at six, 12 and 24 weeks after the injection. The Cold Intolerance Severity Score (CISS) questionnaire was also assessed at baseline and 24 weeks after the injection. The two groups had similar baseline BCTQ scores, but the scores in the Raynaud's phenomenon group were significantly higher than those in the control group at 12 and 24 weeks after the injection. Throughout the 24-week follow-up, there were no significant differences in the mean grip strength between the groups, whereas the mean Semmes-Weinstein monofilament sensory index for the control group was significantly higher than that of the Raynaud's phenomenon group. The mean CISSs were not significantly different between the groups at baseline and at 24 weeks. After 24 weeks, 11 patients (32%) in the Raynaud's phenomenon group and 16 (15%) in the control group required carpal tunnel decompression (p = 0.028). Multivariable analysis indicated that concurrent Raynaud's phenomenon (odds ratio (OR) 2.6) and severe electrophysiological grade (OR 2.1) were independently associated with a failure of treatment after a corticosteroid injection. Although considerable improvements in symptoms will probably occur in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon who have CTS, they have higher risk of poor functional outcomes and failure of treatment than those without Raynaud's phenomenon. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1637-42. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Can widespread hypersensitivity in carpal tunnel syndrome be substantiated if neck and arm pain are absent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, A B; Soon, B T C; Wasner, G; Coppieters, M W

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) have signs of thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in extra-median territories suggesting an involvement of central pain mechanisms. As previous studies included patients with shoulder/arm symptoms or neck pain, a potential influence of these coexisting disorders cannot be excluded. This study therefore evaluated whether widespread sensory changes (hypoesthesia or hyperalgesia) are present in patients with unilateral CTS in the absence of coexisting disorders. Twenty-six patients with unilateral CTS with symptoms localised to their hand and 26 healthy controls participated in the study. A comprehensive quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol including thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds was performed over the hands (median, ulnar and radial innervation area), lateral elbows, neck and tibialis anterior muscle. Patients with CTS demonstrated thermal and mechanical hypoesthesia in the hand but not at distant sites. Thermal or mechanical hyperalgesia was not identified at any location with traditional QST threshold testing. However, patients with CTS rated the pain during thermal pain testing significantly higher than healthy participants. This was especially apparent for heat pain ratings which were elevated not only in the affected hand but also in the neck and tibialis anterior muscle. In conclusion, CTS alone in the absence of coexisting neck and arm pain does not account for sensory changes outside the affected hand as determined by traditional QST threshold testing. Elevated pain ratings may however be an early indication of central pain mechanisms. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  5. Subjective symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome correlate more with psychological factors than electrophysiological severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Firosh; Shehna, Abdulkhader; Ramesh, Sivaramakrishnan; Sandhya, Kakkassery Sankaran; Paul, Reji

    2017-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is one of the most common requests for electrodiagnosis. We aimed to note the relationship of subjective symptom severity of CTS, with objective electrophysiological severity and psychological status of patients. One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients of CTS referred to neurophysiology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital over 1 year were prospectively studied. Boston CTS Assessment Questionnaire (BCTSAQ) and visual analog scale (VAS) were used to assess subjective symptom severity. Psychological status was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Electrophysiological severity of CTS was estimated by median motor distal latency and median to ulnar peak sensory latency difference across the wrist. Each parameter in both hands was scored from 0 to 3 depending on the severity grade, and a composite electrophysiological severity score (CEPSS) was calculated for each patient by summing up the scores in both hands. Statistical analysis was done by Spearman's rank correlation test. There was significant correlation of BCTSAQ with VAS ( P = 0.001), HADS anxiety score ( P < 0.001), and HADS depression score ( P = 0.01). CEPSS had no significant correlation with VAS ( P = 0.103), HADS anxiety score ( P = 0.211), or HADS depression score ( P = 0.55). CEPSS had a borderline correlation with BCTSAQ ( P = 0.048). While the subjective symptoms of CTS are well correlated with psychological factors, their correlation with objective electrophysiological severity is weak. Hence, prompt treatment of psychological comorbidity is important in symptomatic management of CTS; decision about surgical intervention should be based on electrophysiological severity rather than symptom severity.

  6. Personal risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in female visual display unit workers

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    Matteo Riccò

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common nerve entrapment syndrome, which since the beginning of the seventies has been linked to the keyboard and visual display unit (VDU. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and personal factors associated with CTS in female VDU workers in Italy. Material and Methods: Participants in this study were female adult subjects, working ≥ 20 h/week (N = 631, mean age 38.14±7.81 years, mean working age 12.9±7.24 years. Signs and symptoms were collected during compulsory occupational medical surveillance. The binary logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for the factors of interest. Results: Diagnosis of CTS was reported in 48 cases (7.6%, 11 of them or 1.7% after a surgical correction for the incidence of 5.94/1000 person-years. In general, signs and symptoms of CTS were associated with the following demographic factors: previous trauma of upper limb (adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 8.093, 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.347–27.904, history (> 5 years of oral contraceptives therapy/hormone replacement therapy (ORa = 3.77, 95% CI: 1.701–8.354 and cervical spine signs/symptoms (ORa = 4.565, 95% CI: 2.281–9.136. Conclusions: The prevalence of CTS was similar to the estimates for the general population of Italy. Among personal risk factors, hormone therapy, previous trauma of the upper limb and signs/symptoms of the cervical spine appeared to be associated with a higher risk of CTS syndrome. Eventually, the results reinforce interpretation of CTS in VDU workers as a work-related musculoskeletal disorder rather than a classical occupational disease. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(6:927–936

  7. Increased forward head posture and restricted cervical range of motion in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Cleland, Joshua A

    2009-09-01

    Case control study. To compare the amount of forward head posture (FHP) and cervical range of motion between patients with moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy controls. We also sought to assess the relationships among FHP, cervical range of motion, and clinical variables related to the intensity and temporal profile of pain due to CTS. It is plausible that the cervical spine may be involved in patients with CTS. No studies have investigated the possible associations among FHP, cervical range of motion, and symptoms related to CTS. FHP and cervical range of motion were assessed in 25 women with CTS and 25 matched healthy women. Side-view pictures were taken in both relaxed-sitting and standing positions to measure the craniovertebral angle. A CROM device was used to assess cervical range of motion. Posture and mobility measurements were performed by an experienced therapist blinded to the subjects' condition. Differences in cervical range of motion were examined using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test. A 2-way mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate differences in FHP between groups and positions. The ANOVA revealed significant differences between groups (F = 30.4; Pmotion in all directions when compared to controls (Pmotion was identified in both groups: the smaller the craniovertebral angle (reflective of a greater FHP), the smaller the range of motion (r values between 0.27 and 0.45; Pmotion and FHP were negatively associated with age in the control group but not in the group with CTS. Patients with mild/moderate CTS exhibited a greater FHP and less cervical range of motion, as compared to healthy controls. Additionally, a greater FHP was associated with a reduction in cervical range of motion. However, a cause-and-effect relationship cannot be inferred from this study. Future research should investigate if FHP and restricted cervical range of motion is a consequence or a causative factor of CTS and related symptoms (eg

  8. Altered brain morphometry in carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with median nerve pathology☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Sheehan, James; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R.; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Objective Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common median nerve entrapment neuropathy characterized by pain, paresthesias, diminished peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and maladaptive functional brain neuroplasticity. We evaluated structural reorganization in brain gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) and whether such plasticity is linked to altered median nerve function in CTS. Methods We performed NCV testing, T1-weighted structural MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 28 CTS and 28 age-matched healthy controls (HC). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) contrasted regional GM volume for CTS versus HC. Significant clusters were correlated with clinical metrics and served as seeds to define associated WM tracts using DTI data and probabilistic tractography. Within these WM tracts, fractional anisotropy (FA), axial (AD) and radial (RD) diffusivity were evaluated for group differences and correlations with clinical metrics. Results For CTS subjects, GM volume was significantly reduced in contralesional S1 (hand-area), pulvinar and frontal pole. GM volume in contralesional S1 correlated with median NCV. NCV was also correlated with RD and was negatively correlated with FA within U-fiber cortico-cortical association tracts identified from the contralesional S1 VBM seed. Conclusions Our study identified clear morphometric changes in the CTS brain. This central morphometric change is likely secondary to peripheral nerve pathology and altered somatosensory afference. Enhanced axonal coherence and myelination within cortico-cortical tracts connecting primary somatosensory and motor areas may accompany peripheral nerve deafferentation. As structural plasticity was correlated with NCV and not symptomatology, the former may be a better determinant of appropriate clinical intervention for CTS, including surgery. PMID:23799199

  9. Individual Finger Sensibility in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Which Digits to Keep and Which to Eliminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfar, John C; Yaseen, Zaneb; Stern, Peter J; Kiefhaber, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sensibility testing plays a role in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). No single physical test has proven to be of critical value in the diagnosis especially when compared to electrodiagnostic studies (EDX). Correlations between individual tests and both symptoms and EDX have been elusive. Notably, previous literature has not documented differences between individual digits when examined with standard diagnostic tests and there is no suggestion that any digit should be systematically excluded from evaluation in CTS. Methods A prospective series of patients with EDX positive, isolated CTS patients were tested immediately preoperatively to evaluate individual digits with static two point discrimination (2PD) and abbreviated Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament (SWMF) tests. Detailed surveys of symptom density in the entire upper extremity were collected in addition to subjective perceptions of the most affected digit. Results Patients favored the middle finger over all others (51%) when asked which was the most affected by CTS. Objective 2PD results of each digit mirrored the subjective data, with higher values for the middle (mean 6.07mm, Pthumb>index>small) but suffered from lack of continuously assessable sensibility. Correlations failed between EDX, symptoms, complaints, monofilament results or 2PD in the index. Positive correlation (P=.002, r=.42, weak) was found between EDX and 2PD of the middle in isolation. Conclusions The middle finger is the most likely to show changes in 2PD in patients with positive EDX findings. Middle finger 2PD is best able to correlate (weakly) with EDX when compared to 2PD of other fingers and SWMF testing. Monfilaments alone are capable of showing the middle as more sensitive but application of this result is hampered by unavailable monofilaments. PMID:21050964

  10. Subjective symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome correlate more with psychological factors than electrophysiological severity

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    Firosh Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is one of the most common requests for electrodiagnosis. We aimed to note the relationship of subjective symptom severity of CTS, with objective electrophysiological severity and psychological status of patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients of CTS referred to neurophysiology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital over 1 year were prospectively studied. Boston CTS Assessment Questionnaire (BCTSAQ and visual analog scale (VAS were used to assess subjective symptom severity. Psychological status was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Electrophysiological severity of CTS was estimated by median motor distal latency and median to ulnar peak sensory latency difference across the wrist. Each parameter in both hands was scored from 0 to 3 depending on the severity grade, and a composite electrophysiological severity score (CEPSS was calculated for each patient by summing up the scores in both hands. Statistical analysis was done by Spearman's rank correlation test. Results: There was significant correlation of BCTSAQ with VAS (P = 0.001, HADS anxiety score (P < 0.001, and HADS depression score (P = 0.01. CEPSS had no significant correlation with VAS (P = 0.103, HADS anxiety score (P = 0.211, or HADS depression score (P = 0.55. CEPSS had a borderline correlation with BCTSAQ (P = 0.048. Conclusions: While the subjective symptoms of CTS are well correlated with psychological factors, their correlation with objective electrophysiological severity is weak. Hence, prompt treatment of psychological comorbidity is important in symptomatic management of CTS; decision about surgical intervention should be based on electrophysiological severity rather than symptom severity.

  11. Sensory-Motor Index is Useful Parameter in Electroneurographical Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Zoran Perić

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available It was performed electroneurographic (ENG studies with surface electrodes and examined nervus medianus (NM in 60 patients (38 females, average age of 50,28 years (X+/-SD=50,28+/-11, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and at least one border or discrete abnormal value of conventional electrophysiological tests. It was also examined 57 healthy individuals (33 females as control group, average age of 45,65 years (X+/-SD=45,65+/-9,68. The sensitivity and specificity of sensory-motor index (SMI, terminal latency index(TLI and residual latency (RL were calculated and compared. SMI is determinate by using following formula: distal distance (DD (in cm/distal motor latency (DML (in ms + sensory conduction velocity (SCV (in m/s/motor conduction velocity (MCV (in m/s of NM. SCV of NM was measured by antidromic technique in segment wrist-index finger and MCV of NM in forearm segment above wrist. SMI mean value of control group was 3,45 (X+/-SD=3,45+/-0,45 with lower limit of normal value 2,82 and in patients with CTS 2,13 (X+/-SD=2,13 +/-0,37. The sensitivity of SMI in patients with CTS was 98,51%. SMI is useful parameter in electroneurographical diagnosis of CTS and it's determination is easy and fast and specially important in cases with border or discrete abnormal values of other NM electrophysiological parameters, when SMI values can indicate incipient phase of CTS evolution. In rare cases (about 1% of CTS with selective NM motor axons affection, SMI may have normal value (false negative result, but DML is always prolonged in this cases. SMI is not dependent on age and DD values in patients with CTS and control subjects.

  12. The Influence of Insurance Type on Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: An Analysis of Nationwide Practice Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Erika D; Swiatek, Peter R; Hou, Hechuan; Chung, Kevin C

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of insurance type on use of diagnostic testing, treatments, and the efficiency of care for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The 2009 to 2013 Truven MarketScan Databases were used to identify adult patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Insurance type was categorized as fee-for-service versus capitated managed care. Multivariable regression models were created to evaluate the relationship between insurance type and costs, number of visits, treatment, and electrodiagnostic study use, and controlling for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. The cohort included 233,572 patients, of which 86 percent carried fee-for-service insurance. Predicted probabilities were clinically similar between the capitated and fee-for-service insurance types for therapy (0.23 versus 0.24), steroid injection (0.07 versus 0.09), and electrodiagnostic study use (0.44 versus 0.47). The difference in predicted probabilities between the insurance groups was greatest for surgery use (0.22 versus 0.28 for managed care and fee-for-service, respectively). The mean number of visits was similar between the two groups (2.1 versus 2.0 visits). In the controlled analysis, managed care was associated with a 10 percent decrease in cost compared to patients with fee-for-service (p trends with increased implementation of bundled payment reimbursement. Routine collection of validated patient outcomes measures is critical to assess patient outcomes associated with anticipated reduction of surgical services. Risk, II.

  13. Carpal tunnel syndrome and computer exposure at work in two large complementary cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediouni, Z; Bodin, J; Dale, A M; Herquelot, E; Carton, M; Leclerc, A; Fouquet, N; Dumontier, C; Roquelaure, Y; Evanoff, B A; Descatha, A

    2015-09-09

    The boom in computer use and concurrent high rates in musculoskeletal complaints and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among users have led to a controversy about a possible link. Most studies have used cross-sectional designs and shown no association. The present study used longitudinal data from two large complementary cohorts to evaluate a possible relationship between CTS and the performance of computer work. The Cosali cohort is a representative sample of a French working population that evaluated CTS using standardised clinical examinations and assessed self-reported computer use. The PrediCTS cohort study enrolled newly hired clerical, service and construction workers in several industries in the USA, evaluated CTS using symptoms and nerve conduction studies (NCS), and estimated exposures to computer work using a job exposure matrix. During a follow-up of 3-5 years, the association between new cases of CTS and computer work was calculated using logistic regression models adjusting for sex, age, obesity and relevant associated disorders. In the Cosali study, 1551 workers (41.8%) completed follow-up physical examinations; 36 (2.3%) participants were diagnosed with CTS. In the PrediCTS study, 711 workers (64.2%) completed follow-up evaluations, whereas 31 (4.3%) had new cases of CTS. The adjusted OR for the group with the highest exposure to computer use was 0.39 (0.17; 0.89) in the Cosali cohort and 0.16 (0.05; 0.59) in the PrediCTS cohort. Data from two large cohorts in two different countries showed no association between computer work and new cases of CTS among workers in diverse jobs with varying job exposures. CTS is far more common among workers in non-computer related jobs; prevention efforts and work-related compensation programmes should focus on workers performing forceful hand exertion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Hypercholesterolemia Is Associated with the Subjective Evaluation of Postoperative Outcomes in Patients with Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Who Undergo Surgery: A Multivariate Analysis.

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    Yano, Koichi; Kawabata, Akira; Ikeda, Mikinori; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kaneshiro, Yasunori; Egi, Takeshi

    2018-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist; its symptoms include neuropathic pain and sensory and motor disturbance distributed by the median nerve. Carpal tunnel syndrome and hypercholesterolemia have similar backgrounds, but the effect of these similarities on postoperative outcomes has not been reported. Using multivariate analysis, the authors analyzed the relationship between prognostic factors, including the presence of hypercholesterolemia, and subjective postoperative outcomes of patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Of 168 hands with carpal tunnel syndrome that were treated surgically, 141 that were followed up and assessed 1 year postoperatively or thereafter were included. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 40.8 months. Surgery was performed through a small palmar skin incision under local anesthesia. The outcomes were postoperative symptoms, including pain and numbness, and overall Kelly assessment. Preoperative numbness and pain resolved and alleviated in 94 of 141 hands and was diminished in 59 of 64 hands. Univariate analysis showed that postoperative numbness and Kelly assessment were significantly associated with hypercholesterolemia. Multivariate analysis showed that postoperative numbness was significantly associated with smoking and hypercholesterolemia, and Kelly assessment was significantly associated with smoking (adjusted OR, 3.3; 95 percent CI, 1.1 to 10; p = 0.04) and hypercholesterolemia (adjusted OR, 2.9; 95 percent CI, 1.4 to 6.3; p = 0.01). Hypercholesterolemia, usually a systemic condition in sites other than the hand, is associated with the subjective evaluation of postoperative symptoms in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Risk, III.

  15. The role of neoangiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor in the development of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deger, A N; Deger, H; Taser, F

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is an entrapment neuropathy which is caused by the disruption of blood supply in the median nerve under transverse carpal ligament. Systemic factors facilitate the formation of the syndrome. In this study, neovascularization in the subsynovial tissue and proliferative activity in the stroma are analyzed within the cases of diabetic and idiopathic CTS. Subsynovial connective tissue samples of 30 diabetes mellitus patients with CTS and 30 patients with idiopathic CTS were evaluated. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD31, CD34, Factor VIII-related antigen, and smooth muscle actin (SMA) was used to make a comparative study of neovascularization. Proliferative index was assessed using anti-Ki-67 antibody. As a result of the proliferation of endothelial elements, de novo blood vessel formations in the subsynovial tissue were assessed by vascular markers. Significant neovascularization was seen in diabetic group for VEGF, CD31, SMA (P diabetic CTS group against idiopathic CTS group. Significantly high proliferative index in subsynovial connective tissue with Ki-67 was observed the diabetic group (P damage, neoangiogenesis, and VEGF expression has an important role frequently CTS occurrence in diabetic patients. Our study supports enhancement in VEGF expression similar to changes in diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy in the neovascularization within the subsynovial connective tissue in the cases of diabetes.

  16. Pain, depression and sleep disorders in patients with diabetic and nondiabetic carpal tunnel syndrome: a vicious cycle

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    Nermin Tanik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a condition involving nerve entrapment that often leads to chronic neuropathic pain. We aimed to evaluate sleep quality and related parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic CTS patients. Method This study included a total of 366 patients with chronic CTS. These patients’ sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. The severity of neuropathic pain was evaluated using the Douleur Neuropathique-4 (DN4 questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS. Results In the non-diabetic patient group, the total PSQI score was found to affect BDI and VAS, while in the diabetic patient group, the duration of symptoms affected VAS, BDI and fasting glucose levels. Conclusion For diabetic patients, hyperglycemia depression and chronification of neuropathic pain may lead to deterioration of sleep quality. Therefore, consideration of these parameters in the treatment may break a vicious cycle.

  17. [Electroneurographic monitoring during the test of artificial compression as a method of early diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahtereva, E V; Shirokov, V A; Leiderman, E L; Varaksin, A N; Panov, V G

    To develop the algorithm of early diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) at the stage of functional neurological disturbances by expanding diagnostic possibilities of electroneuromyography using artificial compression test. Parameters of conductivity of the median nerve in 54 patients with finger numbness were analyzed during 3 months before and after compression of the forearm (blood pressure was measured for 1 min). An increase in the latency in motor fibers and a decrease in the amplitude of sensory response were identified in patients with CTS signs and normal electroneuromyographical parameters at baseline. The use of additional electroneuromyographical monitoring during the provocative artificial compression test expands the possibilities of this method and improves early diagnosis of CTS.

  18. Epidemiological survey of patients with a carpal tunnel syndrome referred to Sina Hospital in Hamedan during 2014-2016

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    Masoud Ghiasian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common mono-neuropathy with various causes. This study aimed at evaluating the epidemiology of patients with the carpal tunnel syndrome referred to Sina Hospital in Hamedan City, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study, 300 patients (600 hands suffering from paresthesia, pain and weakness of the first to third finger were studied. Diagnosis and severity of the disease was evaluated according to history, examination and electro-diagnostic studies. Afterall the data were collected. Results: This study was conducted on 230 (76.7% females and 70 (23.3% males with the mean ages of 47.3±17.4 and 49.1±20.2 years, respectively (P=0.224. Sixteen of them were left-handed and the rest were right-handed. Also, 113 of the patients had risk factors such as diabetes with the prevalence of 18.1% and hypothyroidism with 6.4% as the most common ones. The most common occupations were carpet weaving and milking with prevalence rates of 19.4% and 13.3%, respectively. In electro-diagnostic findings, 57% of the patients had moderate involvement and 16.6% had severe involvement. The Phalen and Tinel test was positive in 32.2% of the patients and negative in 32.2% of the cases. There was a relationship between the severity of involvement and probability of a positive Phalen and Tinel test. Conclusion: Considering that 76% of the cases were women and among jobs, after housekeeping, carpet weaving and milking are the most common ones, paying more attention to these people and designing the proper work tools (especially carpet weaving and milking tools as well as training of the housewives are recommended to prevent this syndrome.

  19. The Use of Neurodynamic Techniques in the Conservative Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome - a Critical Appraisal of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Tomasz

    2017-10-31

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy, characterized by the presence of many sensory and motor abnormalities. In the physiotherapy of patients with CTS, neurodynamic tech-niques are very common, while the scientific literature does not show clear evidence of beneficial effects obtained by using these techniques. Therefore, the aim of this work was to critically evaluate the use of neurodynamic techniques in the conservative treatment of CTS. Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS and POL-index) and Google Scholar were queried to find articles. The search terms were combinations of words (in Polish, English and German) contain-ing abbreviated and full versions of the following expressions: carpal tunnel syndrome, CTS, neuromobilization, neurodynamic techniques and manual therapy. Sixteen research papers met the conditions for inclusion in this review. Most of them used different methodologies of therapeutic intervention, making it difficult to interpret the results of individual works. Fourteen studies were randomized trials, one a case-control retrospective study and one was a clinical study without a control group. The most common evaluation variables were pain, nerve conduction, subjective symptoms and function, grip strength, sensation and range of motion. The therapy used neurodynamic techniques carried out by the patient or passive mobilization by the physiotherapist. 1. A review of existing studies evaluating the effec-tiveness of neurodynamic techniques in the treat-ment of CTS shows that most of them produced beneficial therapeutic effects. 2. Due to a considerable heteroge-n-ei--ty of the parti-cipants, study design and metho-do-logy of thera-peutic interventions, it is difficult to for-mulate a general conclusion. 3. Hence the need arises for further research to assess the effectiveness of neu-ro-dynamic techniques in conservative therapy of CTS based on a similar therapeutic methodology.

  20. Activation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and sympathetic nervous system in women with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Valverde-Herreros, Lis; Martínez-Martín, Javier; Pareja, Juan A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the differences in salivary cortisol (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical [HPA] axis), α-amylase activity (sympathetic nervous system [SNS]), and immunoglobulin A (IgA; immune system) concentrations between women with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy women. A cross-sectional study. Activation of HPA, SNS, and immune system in CTS has not been clearly determined. One hundred two women (age: 45 ± 7 years) with electrodiagnostic and clinical diagnosis of CTS and 102 matched healthy women. The intensity of the pain was assessed with a Numerical Pain Rating Scale (0-10), and disability was determined with Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Salivary cortisol concentration, α-amylase activity, salivary flow rate, and IgA concentration were collected from nonstimulated saliva. Women with CTS exhibited lower salivary flow rate (P  0.2) were found between groups as a total. Women with severe CTS exhibited lower salivary flow rate (P < 0.001), higher α-amylase activity (P = 0.002), and higher cortisol concentration (P = 0.03) than healthy women and than those with minimal/moderate CTS (P < 0.05). Within women with CTS, significant positive associations between α-amylase activity and the intensity of pain were found: the highest the level of pain, the higher the α-amylase activity, i.e., higher SNS activation. These results suggest that women with severe CTS exhibit changes in activation in the HPA axis and SNS but not in the humoral immune system. Activation of the SNS was associated with the intensity of pain. Future studies are needed to elucidate the direction of this relationship. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Surgical Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome through a Minimal Incision on the Distal Wrist Crease: An Anatomical and Clinical Study

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    Hye Mi Yoo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAn anatomical analysis of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL and the surrounding structures might help in identifying effective measures to minimize complications. Here, we present a surgical technique based on an anatomical study that was successfully applied in clinical settings.MethodsUsing 13 hands from 8 formalin-fixed cadavers, we measured the TCL length and thickness, correlation between the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL, and distance between the distal end of the TCL and the palmar arch; the TCL cross sections and the thickest parts were also examined. Clinically, fasciotomy was performed on the relevant parts of 15 hands from 13 patients by making a minimally invasive incision on the distal wrist crease. Postoperatively, a two-point discrimination check was conducted in which the sensations of the first, second, and third fingertips and the palmar cutaneous branch injuries were monitored (average duration, 7 months.ResultsIn the 13 cadaveric hands, the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL were placed in the same location. The average length of the TCL and the distance from the distal TCL to the superficial palmar arch were 35.30±2.59 mm and 9.50±2.13 mm, respectively. The thickest part of the TCL was a region 25 mm distal to the distal wrist crease (average thickness, 4.00±0.57 mm. The 13 surgeries performed in the clinical settings yielded satisfactory results.ConclusionsThis peri-TCL anatomical study confirmed the safety of fasciotomy with a minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease. The clinical application of the technique indicated that the minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease was efficacious in the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  2. Establishing and validating the fluorescent amyloid ligand h-FTAA (heptamer formyl thiophene acetic acid) to identify transthyretin amyloid deposits in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Katharina; Nilsson, K Peter R; Hammarström, Per; Urban, Peter; Meliss, Rolf Rüdiger; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Krüger, Sandra; Röcken, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Transthyretin-derived (ATTR) amyloidosis is a frequent finding in carpal tunnel syndrome. We tested the following hypotheses: the novel fluorescent amyloid ligand heptameric formic thiophene acetic acid (h-FTAA) has a superior sensitivity for the detection of amyloid compared with Congo red-staining; Amyloid load correlates with patient gender and/or patient age. We retrieved 208 resection specimens obtained from 184 patients with ATTR amyloid in the carpal tunnel. Serial sections were stained with Congo red, h-FTAA and an antibody directed against transthyretin (TTR). Stained sections were digitalized and forwarded to computational analyses. The amount of amyloid was correlated with patient demographics. Amyloid stained intensely with h-FTAA and an anti-TTR-antibody. Congo red-staining combined with fluorescence microscopy was significantly less sensitive than h-FTAA-fluorescence and TTR-immunostaining: the highest percentage area was found in TTR-immunostained sections, followed by h-FTAA and Congo red. The Pearson correlation coefficient was .8 (Congo red vs. h-FTAA) and .9 (TTR vs. h-FTAA). Amyloid load correlated with patient gender, anatomical site and patient age. h-FTAA is a highly sensitive method to detect even small amounts of ATTR amyloid in the carpal tunnel. The staining protocol is easy and h-FTAA may be a much more sensitive procedure to detect amyloid at an earlier stage.

  3. A pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial on topical chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) oil for severe carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Lari, Zeinab Nasiri; Ghoreishi, Parissa Sadat; Daneshfard, Babak; Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Homayouni, Kaynoosh; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effectiveness of standardized topical Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) oil in patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome, as a complementary treatment. A pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted. Twenty six patients with documented severe carpal tunnel syndrome were treated in two parallel groups with a night splint plus topical chamomile oil or placebo. They were instructed to use their prescribed oil for 4 weeks, twice daily. Symptomatic and functional status of the patients and their electrodiagnostic parameters were evaluated when enrolled and after the trial period, as our outcome measures. A significant improvement of symptomatic and functional status of patients in the chamomile oil group was observed (p = 0.019 and 0.016, respectively) compared with those in the placebo group. However, electrodiagnostic parameters showed no significant changes between the two groups. Chamomile oil improved symptomatic and functional status of patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in pregnancy with Polarized Polychromatic Non-coherent Light (Bioptron Light): A Preliminary, Prospective, Open Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos; Stasinopoulos, Loannis

    2017-12-31

    The aim of this trial was to assess the efficacy of polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (Bioptron light) in the treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) in pregnancy. An uncontrolled experimental study was conducted in pregnant patients with CTS who visited our clinic from January 2006 to January 2010. Bioptron light (480-3400 nm; 95% polarization; 40 mW/cm 2 ; and 2.4 J/cm 2 ) was administered perpendicular to the carpal tunnel area. The irradiation time for each session was 6 min at an operating distance of 5-10 cm from the carpal tunnel area, twice each day, five days per week for 2 weeks. Pain and paraesthesia using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and finger pinch strength were evaluated at the end of treatment (week 2) and 1-month (week 6) after the end of treatment. The Student'sttest was used and p values Bioptron light is a reliable, safe, and effective treatment option in pregnant patients with CTS. Controlled clinical trials are needed to establish the absolute and relative effectiveness of this intervention.

  5. Personal and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in meat processing industry workers in Northern Italy

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    Matteo Riccò

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a musculoskeletal condition that often impairs the fitness to work. Our aim is to retrospectively evaluate the association between physical exposures in meat processing industry in Northern Italy and the CTS, taking into account non-occupational factors. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed to include 434 workers (236 males, 198 females, 37.0±10.6 years old, working age: 12.6±10.8 years from meat processing industries. Signs and symptoms were collected at the compulsory occupational medical surveillance. Occupational risk factors were assessed through a questionnaire and direct assessment by investigators. Adjusted odds ratios (ORadj for factors of interest were estimated through binary logistic regression. Results: Diagnosis of the CTS was reported for 61 out of 434 subjects (14.1% for an incidence of 11.3/1000 person- years. In general, signs and symptoms for the CTS were associated with the following demographic factors: smoking history (OR = 1.909, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.107–3.293, previous traumas of the upper limb (OR = 3.533, 95% CI: 1.743–7.165, hypothyroidism status (OR = 7.897, 95% CI: 2.917–21.38 and, in the case of female participants only, previous pregnancies (OR = 2.807, 95% CI: 1.200–6.566 as well as a personal history of oral contraceptive therapy and/or steroidal replacement therapy (OR = 11.57, 95% CI: 4.689–28.56. The carpal tunnel syndrome cases were associated with the following occupational factors (> 4 h/day: forceful hand exertion (ORadj = 3.548, 95% CI: 1.379–9.131, repeated trauma of the hand (ORadj = 3.602, 95% CI: 1.248– 10.395, repeated movements of the wrist (ORadj = 2.561, 95% CI: 1.100–5.960. Conclusions: Increasing levels of hand activity and force were associated with the increased CTS prevalence among participants. Recommendations have to be provided in order to reduce occupational exposure to these risk factors and

  6. Effects of placebo-controlled continuous and pulsed ultrasound treatments on carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized trial

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    Onur Armagan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the effects of pulsed and continuous ultrasound treatments combined with splint therapy on patients with mild and moderate idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. METHODS: The study included 46 carpal tunnel syndrome patients who were randomly divided into 3 groups. The first group (n = 15 received a 0 W/cm2 ultrasound treatment (placebo; the second group (n = 16 received a 1.0 W/cm2 continuous ultrasound treatment and the third group (n = 15 received a 1.0 W/cm2 1:4 pulsed ultrasound treatment 5 days a week for a total of 15 sessions. All patients also wore night splints during treatment period. Pre-treatment and post-treatment Visual Analogue Scale, Symptom Severity Scale and Functional Status Scale scores, median nerve motor conduction velocity and distal latency and sensory conduction velocities of the median nerve in the 2nd finger and palm were compared. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02054247. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in all groups in terms of the post-treatment Functional Status Scale score (p<0.05 for all groups, Symptom Severity Scale score (first group: p<0.05, second group: p<0.01, third group: p<0.001 and Visual Analogue Scale score (first and third groups: p<0.01, second group: p<0.001. Sensory conduction velocities improved in the second and third groups (p<0.01. Distal latency in the 2nd finger showed improvement only in the third group (p<0.01 and action potential latency in the palm improved only in the second group (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that splinting therapy combined with placebo and pulsed or continuous ultrasound have similar effects on clinical improvement. Patients treated with continuous and pulsed ultrasound showed electrophysiological improvement; however, the results were not superior to those of the placebo.

  7. Movement of the distal carpal row during narrowing and widening of the carpal arch width.

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    Gabra, Joseph N; Domalain, Mathieu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Change in carpal arch width (CAW) is associated with wrist movement, carpal tunnel release, or therapeutic tunnel manipulation. This study investigated the angular rotations of the distal carpal joints as the CAW was adjusted. The CAW was narrowed and widened by 2 and 4 mm in seven cadaveric specimens while the bone positions were tracked by a marker-based motion capture system. The joints mainly pronated during CAW narrowing and supinated during widening. Ranges of motion about the pronation axis for the hamate-capitate (H-C), capitate-trapezoid (C-Td), and trapezoid-trapezium (Td-Tm) joints were 8.1 ± 2.3 deg, 5.3 ± 1.3 deg, and 5.5 ± 3.5 deg, respectively. Differences between the angular rotations of the joints were found at ΔCAW = -4 mm about the pronation and ulnar-deviation axes. For the pronation axis, angular rotations of the H-C joint were larger than that of the C-Td and Td-Tm joints. Statistical interactions among the factors of joint, rotation axis, and ΔCAW indicated complex joint motion patterns. The complex three-dimensional motion of the bones can be attributed to several anatomical constraints such as bone arrangement, ligament attachments, and articular congruence. The results of this study provide insight into the mechanisms of carpal tunnel adaptations in response to biomechanical alterations of the structural components.

  8. An ergonomics study on the evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome among Chikan embroidery workers of West Bengal, India.

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    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Banerjee, Sunetra

    2015-01-01

    Chikan embroidery is a popular handicraft in India that involves hand-intensive stitching while seated in a static posture with the upper back curved and the head bent over the fabric. Women perform most Chikan embroidery. The aim of this study was to analyze the repetitive nature of this work among female Chikan embroiderers by measuring the prevalence of upper extremity discomfort and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to analyze the extent of upper extremity pain symptomology. The repetitive nature of Chikan embroidery work was evaluated using the Assessment of Repetitive Tasks of the upper limbs tool (ART). Motor nerve conduction studies of median and ulnar nerves were performed with embroidery workers and a control group to determine the risk of CTS. Among embroidery workers, the prevalence of wrist pain was 68% and forearm pain was 60%. The embroiderers also commonly reported Tingling and numbness in the hands and fingertips. The ART analysis found that Chikan embroidery is a highly repetitive task and nerve conduction studies showed that the embroidery workers were more likely to experience CTS than women in the control group. Chikan embroidery is a hand-intensive occupation involving repetitive use of hands and wrists and this study population is at risk of experiencing CTS. Future research should explore the potential benefits of ergonomics measures including incorporating breaks, stretching exercises, and the use of wrist splints to reduce repetitive strain and the probability of developing CTS.

  9. Acupuncture-Evoked Response in Somatosensory and Prefrontal Cortices Predicts Immediate Pain Reduction in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Yumi Maeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The linkage between brain response to acupuncture and subsequent analgesia remains poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate this linkage in chronic pain patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. Brain response to electroacupuncture (EA was evaluated with functional MRI. Subjects were randomized to 3 groups: (1 EA applied at local acupoints on the affected wrist (PC-7 to TW-5, (2 EA at distal acupoints (contralateral ankle, SP-6 to LV-4, and (3 sham EA at nonacupoint locations on the affected wrist. Symptom ratings were evaluated prior to and following the scan. Subjects in the local and distal groups reported reduced pain. Verum EA produced greater reduction of paresthesia compared to sham. Compared to sham EA, local EA produced greater activation in insula and S2 and greater deactivation in ipsilateral S1, while distal EA produced greater activation in S2 and deactivation in posterior cingulate cortex. Brain response to distal EA in prefrontal cortex (PFC and brain response to verum EA in S1, SMA, and PFC were correlated with pain reduction following stimulation. Thus, while greater activation to verum acupuncture in these regions may predict subsequent analgesia, PFC activation may specifically mediate reduced pain when stimulating distal acupoints.

  10. A carpal tunnel grading system including combined sensory index-diagnosed mild cases: Relation to presenting features and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Pandey, Dilip K

    2018-01-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated superiority of the combined sensory index (CSI) algorithm in diagnosing mild carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and have compared presenting symptoms to CTS grade. However, CTS symptoms, signs, and outcomes, including CSI-diagnosed cases, have not been compared with CTS grade. We retrospectively studied 294 CTS hands from 2010 to 2013; stratified them into mild, moderate, and severe grades; and analyzed the association between CTS grade and presenting symptoms/signs and outcomes. Sensorimotor symptoms (P = 0.017) and signs (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with CTS grade. Regardless of CTS grade, 94% of hands improved with surgery compared with 42% with conservative treatment (P < 0.001). Even in mild CTS, 100% improved with surgery vs. 33% with conservative management (P = 0.011). These results corroborate prior studies that compared symptoms to CTS grade and suggest that more objective signs associate even better. CTS grades associate with outcomes, but additional studies are required. Muscle Nerve 57: 45-48, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Pattern of severity on the basis of elecro-diagonostic studies in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Akhlaque, U.; Waheed, A.; Ali, W.L.; Afzal, S.

    2014-01-01

    To study the pattern of severity in patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) presented at electro-diagnostic clinic at Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of study: Elctro-diagnostic Department of Armed Forces Institute of rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi for 6 months from 1st July 2012 to 31st Dec 2012. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and fifty hands from 96 patients, both male and female were sampled according to inclusion criteria by non-probability purposive sampling. Never conduction studies (both motor and sensory studies) were performed using Xeltec electrodiagnostic machine. In patients with normal standard testing but with positive clinical features comparison testing was performed. Results were interpreted and graded according to severity. Results: Out of total 150 hands, 38 hands (25.3%) had minimal CTS, (20.7%) had mild, 56 (37.3%) had moderate, while 21 (14%) severe CTS. Four 2.7%) patients had extensive lesion. Out of all 96 patients 54 (56.25%) had bilateral disease and rest 42 (43.75%) had unilateral disease. Conclusion: The study showed that the most frequent grade at the time of presentation to electro diagnostic clinic is moderate followed by minimal. Since in a large fraction of symptomatic population standard tests were normal, comparison testing is important for early diagnosis. (author)

  12. Prevalence of low back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome among dental practitioners in Dakshina Kannada and Coorg District

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    D Anupama Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental practitioners who usually have to work for long durations in a particular fixed posture are more prone to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs, particularly those involving the hand and wrist and also of the lower back. Aims: To study the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and low back pain (LBP among dental practitioners and to correlate the symptoms with the duration of practice. Subjects and Methods: A closed-end questionnaire was distributed to 100 dental practitioners from Dakshina Kannada and Coorg districts of Karnataka, India. Statistical Analysis Used: Analyses were carried out using Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: The study found that 86% of the total population of dentists practicing for more than 5 years showed symptoms of CTS and 54.0% experienced LBP. Conclusion: Symptoms of MSDs related to hands, wrists, and low back is widely prevalent among the dentists, which severely impact their work efficiency. Precautionary measures early in the clinical practice such as proper ergonomics in the operating field and few strengthening exercises as described in this study can reduce the onset and progression of the symptoms.

  13. Prevalence of low back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome among dental practitioners in Dakshina Kannada and Coorg District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, D Anupama; Appachu, Drithi; Kamath, Vinayak; Prasad, D Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Dental practitioners who usually have to work for long durations in a particular fixed posture are more prone to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), particularly those involving the hand and wrist and also of the lower back. To study the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and low back pain (LBP) among dental practitioners and to correlate the symptoms with the duration of practice. A closed-end questionnaire was distributed to 100 dental practitioners from Dakshina Kannada and Coorg districts of Karnataka, India. Analyses were carried out using Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. The study found that 86% of the total population of dentists practicing for more than 5 years showed symptoms of CTS and 54.0% experienced LBP. Symptoms of MSDs related to hands, wrists, and low back is widely prevalent among the dentists, which severely impact their work efficiency. Precautionary measures early in the clinical practice such as proper ergonomics in the operating field and few strengthening exercises as described in this study can reduce the onset and progression of the symptoms.

  14. An ergonomics study on the evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome among Chikan embroidery workers of West Bengal, India

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    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Banerjee, Sunetra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chikan embroidery is a popular handicraft in India that involves hand-intensive stitching while seated in a static posture with the upper back curved and the head bent over the fabric. Women perform most Chikan embroidery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the repetitive nature of this work among female Chikan embroiderers by measuring the prevalence of upper extremity discomfort and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to analyze the extent of upper extremity pain symptomology. The repetitive nature of Chikan embroidery work was evaluated using the Assessment of Repetitive Tasks of the upper limbs tool (ART). Motor nerve conduction studies of median and ulnar nerves were performed with embroidery workers and a control group to determine the risk of CTS. Results: Among embroidery workers, the prevalence of wrist pain was 68% and forearm pain was 60%. The embroiderers also commonly reported Tingling and numbness in the hands and fingertips. The ART analysis found that Chikan embroidery is a highly repetitive task and nerve conduction studies showed that the embroidery workers were more likely to experience CTS than women in the control group. Conclusions: Chikan embroidery is a hand-intensive occupation involving repetitive use of hands and wrists and this study population is at risk of experiencing CTS. Future research should explore the potential benefits of ergonomics measures including incorporating breaks, stretching exercises, and the use of wrist splints to reduce repetitive strain and the probability of developing CTS. PMID:25658674

  15. Association between the catechol-o-methyltransferase val158met polymorphism with susceptibility and severity of carpal tunnel syndrome

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    Erkol İnal E

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity. In this study, we aimed to clarify the relationships between the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene Val158Met (rs4680 polymorphism and development, functional and clinical status of CTS. Ninety-five women with electro diagnostically confirmed CTS and 95 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The functional and clinical status of the patients was measured by the Turkish version of the Boston Questionnaire and intensity of pain related to the past 2 weeks was evaluated on a visual analog scale (VAS. The Val158Met polymorphism was determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP, method. We divided patients according to the genotypes of the Val158Met polymorphism as Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met. There were not any significant differences in terms of Val158Met polymorphisms between patients and healthy controls (p >0.05. We also did not find any relationships between the Val158Met polymorphism and CTS (p >0.05. In conclusion, although we did not find any relationships between CTS and the Val158Met polymorphism, we could not generalize this result to the general population. Future studies are warranted to conclude precise associations.

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome: diagnosis by means of median nerve elasticity--improved diagnostic accuracy of US with sonoelastography.

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    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Halpern, Ethan J; Kastlunger, Martin; Gabl, Markus; Arora, Rohit; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Feuchtner, Gudrun M; Jaschke, Werner R; Klauser, Andrea S

    2014-02-01

    To compare the elasticity of the median nerve (MN) between healthy volunteers and patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and to evaluate the diagnostic utility of sonoelastographic measurements of the elasticity of the MN. This study was performed with institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all participants. Hands in 22 healthy volunteers and in 31 patients with symptomatic CTS were studied. The cross-sectional area (CSA) and the elasticity of the MN, which was measured as the acoustic coupler (AC)/MN strain ratio, were evaluated. Both hands in 22 healthy volunteers (three men [mean age, 52.7 years; age range, 41-65 years]; 19 women [mean age, 62.2 years; age range, 40-88 years]) and 43 hands in 31 patients with symptomatic CTS (three men [mean age, 69.0 years; age range, 46-88 years]; 28 women [mean age, 61.2 years; age range, 39-92 years]) were studied. Both the AC/MN strain ratio and the CSA in the patients with CTS were significantly higher than those in the healthy volunteers (P accuracy for CTS, with an AUC of 0.91 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.97; P accuracy of the ultrasonographic assessment of CTS. © RSNA, 2013.

  17. Central sensitization does not identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who are likely to achieve short-term success with physical therapy.

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    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de-la-Llave-Rincon, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify whether hyperexcitability of the central nervous system is a prognostic factor for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) likely to experience rapid and clinical self-reported improvement following a physical therapy program including soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic interventions. Women presenting with clinical and electrophysiological findings of CTS were involved in a prospective single-arm trial. Participants underwent a standardized examination and then a physical therapy session. The physical therapy sessions included both soft tissue mobilization directed at the anatomical sites of potential median nerve entrapment and a passive nerve slider neurodynamic technique targeted to the median nerve. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the median, radial and ulnar nerves, C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, carpal tunnel and tibialis anterior muscle were assessed bilaterally. Additionally, thermal detection and pain thresholds were measured over the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence bilaterally to evaluate central nervous system excitability. Subjects were classified as responders (having achieved a successful outcome) or non-responders based on self-perceived recovery. Variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate variables for determining prognosis. Data from 72 women were included in the analysis, of which 35 experienced a successful outcome (48.6%). Three variables including PPT over the C5-C6 joint affected side 66 points were identified. If 2 out of 3 variables were present (LR + 14.8), the likelihood of success increased from 48.6 to 93.3%. We identified 3 factors that may be associated with a rapid clinical response to both soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic techniques targeted to the median nerve in women presenting with CTS. Our results support that widespread central sensitization may not be present in women with CTS who

  18. Association Between Manual Loading and Newly Developed Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Subjects With Physical Disabilities: A Follow-Up Study.

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    Lin, Yen-Nung; Chiu, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Wen-Yen; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chen, Yi-Wen; Chang, Kwang-Hwa

    2017-10-01

    To identify the association between body composition and newly developed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and to search for the best probabilistic cutoff value of associated factors to predict subjects with physical disabilities developing new CTS. Longitudinal. University-affiliated medical center. Subjects with physical disabilities (N=47; mean age ± SD, 42.1±7.7y). Not applicable. Median and ulnar sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) were measured at the initial and follow-up tests (interval >2y). Total and regional body composition were measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at the initial test. Leg lean tissue percentage was calculated to delineate each participant's manual loading degree during locomotion. Leg lean tissue percentage is the lean tissue mass of both legs divided by body weight. Based on median SNCV changes, we divided all participants into 3 groups: subjects with bilateral CTS (median SNCV value normative ulnar SNCV value >37.8m/s) in the initial test (n=10), subjects with newly developed CTS in the follow-up test (n=8), and subjects without additional CTS in the follow-up test (n=27). Eight of 35 subjects not having bilateral CTS initially developed new CTS (8.8% per year; mean follow-up period, 2.6y). Leg lean tissue percentage was associated with the probability of newly developed CTS (adjusted odds ratio, .64; P12% were less likely to have developed new CTS at the follow-up test (sensitivity, .75; specificity, .85; area under the curve, .88; Pphysical disabilities. Therefore, a preventive program for those subjects at risk can start early. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Incidence rates of in-hospital carpal tunnel syndrome in the general population and possible associations with marital status

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    Melani Carla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a socially relevant condition associated with biomechanical risk factors. We evaluated age-sex-specific incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS in central/northern Italy and explored relations with marital status. Methods Seven regions were considered (overall population, 14.9 million over 3–6-year periods between 1997 and 2002 (when out-of-hospital CTS surgery was extremely rare. Incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS were estimated based on 1 codified demographic, diagnostic and intervention data in obligatory discharge records from all Italian public/private hospitals, archived (according to residence on regional databases; 2 demographic general population data for each region. We compared (using the χscore test age-sex-specific rates between married, unmarried, divorced and widowed subsets of the general population. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for married/unmarried men and women. Results Age-standardized incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years of in-hospital cases of CTS were 166 in women and 44 in men (106 overall. Married subjects of both sexes showed higher age-specific rates with respect to unmarried men/women. SIRs were calculated comparing married vs unmarried rates of both sexes: 1.59 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.57–1.60 in women, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.40–1.45 in men. As compared with married women/men, widows/widowers both showed 2–3-fold higher incidence peaks during the fourth decade of life (beyond 50 years of age, widowed subjects showed similar trends to unmarried counterparts. Conclusion This large population-based study illustrates distinct age-related trends in men and women, and also raises the question whether marital status could be associated with CTS in the general population.

  20. Biomechanical and psychosocial exposures are independent risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome: assessment of confounding using causal diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Eisen, Ellen A; Neophytou, Andreas; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Hegmann, Kurt T; Thiese, Matthew S; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Gerr, Fred; Burt, Susan; Rempel, David

    2016-11-01

    Between 2001 and 2010, six research groups conducted coordinated prospective studies of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence among US workers from various industries to estimate exposure-response relationships. This analysis examined the presence and magnitude of confounding between biomechanical and workplace psychosocial factors and incidence of dominant-hand CTS. 1605 participants, without CTS at enrolment, were followed for up to 3.5 years (2471 person-years). Demographic information, medical history and workplace psychosocial stress measures were collected at baseline. Individual workplace biomechanical exposures were collected for each task and combined across the workweek using time-weighted averaging (TWA). CTS case criteria were based on symptoms and results of electrophysiological testing. HRs were estimated with Cox proportional hazard models. Confounding was assessed using causal diagrams and an empirical criterion of 10% or greater change in effect estimate magnitude. There were 109 incident CTS cases (IR=4.41/100 person-years; 6.7% cumulative incidence). The relationships between CTS and forceful repetition rate, % time forceful hand exertion and the Threshold Limit Value for Hand Activity Level (TLV-HAL) were slightly confounded by decision latitude with effect estimates being attenuated towards the null (10-14% change) after adjustment. The risk of CTS among participants reporting high job strain was attenuated towards the null by 14% after adjusting for the HAL Scale or the % time forceful hand exertions. Although attenuation of the relationships between CTS and some biomechanical and work psychosocial exposures was observed after adjusting for confounding, the magnitudes were small and confirmed biomechanical and work psychosocial exposures as independent risk factors for incident CTS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. The investigation of association between IL-1Ra and ACE I/D polymorphisms in carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Cevik, Betul; Tekcan, Akin; Inanir, Ahmet; Kurt, Semiha Gulsum; Yigit, Serbulent

    2018-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common neurologic impairment caused by injury on the median nerve in the wrist, characterized by pain and loss of sensory. CTS usually occurs through three factors, such as a mechanical pressure on median nerve, immunologic changes, and oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphisms on the susceptibility of patients to the CTS. One hundred fifty-eight patients with CTS and 151 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Each patient was analyzed according to diseases symptoms, such as gender, a positive Tinel's sign, a positive Phalen maneuver, disease sides, EMG findings, and clinical stage. We applied the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine the polymorphisms of IL-1Ra and ACE I/D. The statistically significant relation was not found between IL-1Ra, ACE I/D polymorphisms and CTS (respectively, P>.05; P>.05, OR: 1.51, CI: 0.82-1.61). Additionally, in the result of the statistical analysis compared with gene polymorphisms and clinical characteristics, we did not find any correlation (P>.05). Our findings showed that there are no associations of IL-1Ra and ACE I/D polymorphisms with susceptibility of a person for the development of CTS. So, it means that these polymorphisms do not create a risk for the development of CTS. Further studies with larger populations will be required to confirm these findings in different study populations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Effectiveness of Oral Pain Medication and Corticosteroid Injections for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome-A Systematic Review.

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    Huisstede, Bionka Ma; Randsdorp, Manon S; van den Brink, Janneke; Franke, Thierry Pc; Koes, Bart W; Hoogvliet, Peter

    2018-04-04

    To present an evidence-based overview of the effectiveness of oral pain medication and corticosteroid injections to treat carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PEDro were searched for relevant systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted the data on pain (VAS), function or recovery and assessed the methodological quality. A best-evidence synthesis was performed to summarize the results of the included studies. Four reviews and nine RCTs were included. For oral pain medication strong and moderate evidence was found for the effectiveness of oral steroids versus placebo in the short-term. Moderate evidence was found in favor of oral steroids versus splinting in the short-term. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of oral steroids in the long-term. For corticosteroid injections, strong evidence was found in favor of a corticosteroid injection versus a placebo injection and moderate evidence was found in favor of corticosteroid injection versus oral steroids in the short-term. Also in short-term, moderate evidence was found in favor of a local versus a systematic corticosteroid injection. Higher doses of corticosteroid injections seem to be more effective in the midterm, however the benefits of corticosteroid injections were not maintained in the long-term. The reviewed evidence supports that oral steroids and corticosteroid injections benefit patient with CTS particular in the short-term. Although a higher dose of steroid injections seems to be more effective in the midterm, the benefits of oral pain medication and corticosteroid injections were not maintained in the long-term. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Effectiveness of Physical Therapy and Electrophysical Modalities. An Updated Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

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    Huisstede, Bionka M; Hoogvliet, Peter; Franke, Thierry P; Randsdorp, Manon S; Koes, Bart W

    2017-09-20

    To review scientific literature studying the effectiveness of physical therapy and electrophysical modalities for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database. Two reviewers independently applied the inclusion criteria to select potential eligible studies. Two reviewers independently extracted the data and assessed the methodologic quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. A best-evidence synthesis was performed to summarize the results of the included studies (2 reviews and 22 randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). For physical therapy, moderate evidence was found for myofascial massage therapy versus ischemic compression on latent, or active, trigger points or low-level laser therapy in the short term. For several electrophysical modalities, moderate evidence was found in the short term (ultrasound vs placebo, ultrasound as single intervention vs other nonsurgical interventions, ultrasound vs corticosteroid injection plus a neutral wrist splint, local microwave hyperthermia vs placebo, iontophoresis vs phonophoresis, pulsed radiofrequency added to wrist splint, continuous vs pulsed vs placebo shortwave diathermy, and interferential current vs transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation vs a night-only wrist splint). In the midterm, moderate evidence was found in favor of radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) added to a neutral wrist splint, in favor of ESWT versus ultrasound, or cryo-ultrasound, and in favor of ultrasound versus placebo. For all other interventions studied, only limited, conflicting, or no evidence was found. No RCTs investigating the long-term effects of physical therapy and electrophysical modalities were found. Because of heterogeneity in the treatment parameters used in the included RCTs, optimal treatment parameters could not be identified. Moderate evidence was found for several physical therapy and electrophysical modalities for CTS in the short term and midterm

  4. Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on adaptation of multi-digit forces to object weight for whole-hand manipulation.

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    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available The delicate tuning of digit forces to object properties can be disrupted by a number of neurological and musculoskeletal diseases. One such condition is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve that causes sensory and motor deficits in a subset of digits in the hand. Whereas the effects of CTS on median nerve physiology are well understood, the extent to which it affects whole-hand manipulation remains to be addressed. CTS affects only the lateral three and a half digits, which raises the question of how the central nervous system integrates sensory feedback from affected and unaffected digits to plan and execute whole-hand object manipulation. We addressed this question by asking CTS patients and healthy controls to grasp, lift, and hold a grip device (445, 545, or 745 g for several consecutive trials. We found that CTS patients were able to successfully adapt grip force to object weight. However, multi-digit force coordination in patients was characterized by lower discrimination of force modulation to lighter object weights, higher across-trial digit force variability, the consistent use of excessively large digit forces across consecutive trials, and a lower ability to minimize net moments on the object. Importantly, the mechanical requirement of attaining equilibrium of forces and torques caused CTS patients to exert excessive forces at both CTS-affected digits and digits with intact sensorimotor capabilities. These findings suggest that CTS-induced deficits in tactile sensitivity interfere with the formation of accurate sensorimotor memories of previous manipulations. Consequently, CTS patients use compensatory strategies to maximize grasp stability at the expense of exerting consistently larger multi-digit forces than controls. These behavioral deficits might be particularly detrimental for tasks that require fine regulation of fingertip forces for manipulating light or fragile objects.

  5. Pressure pain sensitivity topographical maps reveal bilateral hyperalgesia of the hands in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Madeleine, Pascal; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Pareja, Juan A

    2010-08-01

    To assess topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps of the hand in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as compared with healthy subjects. A total of 20 women with CTS (ages 32-52 years) and 20 healthy matched women (ages 32-51 years) were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured bilaterally over 30 locations of the palm of each hand by an assessor blinded to the subjects' conditions. Patients showed lower PPTs in both hands in all of the measurement points as compared with controls (P < 0.001 for all). PPTs were lower in those points over the proximal phalanx of the fingers and the thenar eminency as compared with those points located over the distal phalanx of the fingers (P < 0.001). CTS patients showed lower PPT levels in dermatomes C6, C7, and C8 when compared with healthy controls (P < 0.001 for all), but without differences between dermatomes (P = 0.4). PPT was negatively correlated with both hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms (P < 0.001 for all). Our findings revealed bilateral generalized pressure pain hyperalgesia in unilateral CTS because lower PPT levels were found in all of the points. The pressure pain hyperalgesia was not uniformly distributed since PPTs were lower in points over the proximal phalanx of the fingers and the thenar eminency as compared with those points located over the distal phalanx of the fingers. The decrease in PPT levels was associated with the intensity and the duration of the pain symptoms, supporting a role of both peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in this pain condition.

  6. Prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries and their association with carpal tunnel syndrome in a sample of Latino poultry processors and other manual workers.

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    Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S; Blocker, Jill N; Arcury, Thomas A; Suk, Jung I M; Chen, Haiying; Schulz, Mark R; Schultz, Mark R; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries, their co-occurrence, and their relationship to carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are only understood partially. We screened 1026 wrists of 513 Latino manual laborers in North Carolina for bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries using electrodiagnosis and ultrasound. A total of 8.6% of wrists had a bifid median nerve, and 3.7% of wrists had a persistent median artery independent of subgroup ethnicity, age, gender, or type of work. An association with definite carpal tunnel syndrome was not found. The presence of either anatomic variant was associated with a high likelihood of co-occurrence of another variant in the same or the contralateral wrist. The occurrence of median anatomic variants can be determined in field studies using ultrasound. Persistent median arteries and bifid median nerves tend to co-occur but do not put manual laborers at additional risk of developing CTS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neuroconduccion of the medium nerve in the carpal tunnel in data-entry personnel of two companies of telecommunications. Medellín. October-November 2005

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    Luis F. De Subiría

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: This study was carried out in order to know the comportment of the median nerve’s impulse speed at the carpal tunnel associated to the exposure time to the fingers’ repetitive motion risk factor. Methodology: This study was applied to data-entry personnel at two companies in the city of Medellin, Colombia, during October and November of 2005. Age, gender, labour exposure time, dominant hand and pathological antecedents associated to the carpal tunnel syndrome variables were investigated. Clinical test and a median nerve conduction test were applied to the workers. Discussion: 55 data-entry workers were evaluated, for a total of 110 hands. The survey included ages between 19 and 40 years old and an average age of 28; 86% of the studied subjects were women; 91% of surveyed subjects declared themselves as right-handed and 60% had a normal weight. Subjects had worked between 12 and 180 months as data-entry personnel with an average time of 83 months, working 48 hours a week. No relevant statistical link was found between labour exposure time and median nerve conduction. Results suggest that doing repetitive movements at work as the only risk factor is not a cause of nerve conduction disorder in the median nerve.

  8. Feasibility of a novel functional sensibility test as an assisted examination for determining precision pinch performance in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Po-Ting; Su, Fong-Chin

    2013-01-01

    To understand the feasibility of a novel functional sensibility test for determining precision pinch performance in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, this study investigates the validity, sensitivity and specificity of functional sensibility derived from a pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test. Participants include 70 clinically defined carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients with 119 involved hands and 70 age- and gender-matched controls. To examine the discriminating ability of the functional sensibility test, the differences in the ability of pinch force adjustments to the inertial load of handling object between CTS and control subjects are analyzed. The results of functional sensibility are correlated with the severity of CTS to establish concurrent validity. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is constructed to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed test. The functional sensibility score significantly discriminates the patients and control groups (respectively, 12.94±1.72 vs. 11.51±1.15N in peak pinch force (FPPeak), psensibility tests (touch-pressure threshold and two-point discrimination test). In addition, there is a statistical difference in the results of functional sensibility (psensibility test. The areas under the ROC curve are 0.85 and 0.80 for the force ratio and FPPeak, respectively. In conclusion, the functional sensibility test could be feasibly used as a clinical tool for determining both the sensibility and precision pinch performance of hands for the patients with CTS.

  9. Feasibility of a Novel Functional Sensibility Test as an Assisted Examination for Determining Precision Pinch Performance in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Po-Ting; Su, Fong-Chin

    2013-01-01

    To understand the feasibility of a novel functional sensibility test for determining precision pinch performance in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, this study investigates the validity, sensitivity and specificity of functional sensibility derived from a pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test. Participants include 70 clinically defined carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients with 119 involved hands and 70 age- and gender-matched controls. To examine the discriminating ability of the functional sensibility test, the differences in the ability of pinch force adjustments to the inertial load of handling object between CTS and control subjects are analyzed. The results of functional sensibility are correlated with the severity of CTS to establish concurrent validity. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is constructed to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed test. The functional sensibility score significantly discriminates the patients and control groups (respectively, 12.94±1.72 vs. 11.51±1.15N in peak pinch force (FPPeak), psensibility tests (touch-pressure threshold and two-point discrimination test). In addition, there is a statistical difference in the results of functional sensibility (psensibility test. The areas under the ROC curve are 0.85 and 0.80 for the force ratio and FPPeak, respectively. In conclusion, the functional sensibility test could be feasibly used as a clinical tool for determining both the sensibility and precision pinch performance of hands for the patients with CTS. PMID:23977209

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Versus Landmark-Guided Local Corticosteroid Injection for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Forogh, Bijan; Moeini-Taba, Seyed-Mohammad; Abedini, Amin; Kadkhodaie, Mona; Jahanjoo, Fateme; Eftekharsadat, Bina

    2018-04-01

    To review the literature and assess the comparative effectiveness of ultrasound-guided versus landmark-guided local corticosteroid injections in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase (Ovid), and Web of Science (from inception to February 1, 2017). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ultrasound-guided injection with landmark-guided injection in patients with CTS were included. Two authors independently screened abstracts and full texts. The outcomes of interest were Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) scores of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and 4 electrodiagnostic parameters, including compound muscle action potential (CMAP), sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), distal motor latency (DML), and distal sensory latency (DSL). Overall, 569 abstracts were retrieved and checked for eligibility; finally, 3 RCTs were included (181 injected hands). Pooled analysis showed that ultrasound-guided injection was more effective in SSS improvement (mean difference [MD], -.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.59 to -.32; P.99), DML (MD, .05; 95% CI, -.30 to .39; P=.80), or DSL (MD, .00; 95% CI, -.65 to .65; P>.99). This review suggested that ultrasound-guided injection was more effective than landmark-guided injection in symptom severity improvement in patients with CTS; however, no significant differences were observed in functional status or electrodiagnostic improvements between the 2 methods. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carpal tunnel syndrome and musculoskeletal symptoms in postmenopausal women with early breast cancer treated with exemestane or tamoxifen after 2-3 years of tamoxifen: a retrospective analysis of the Intergroup Exemestane Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieog, J. Sven D.; Morden, James P.; Bliss, Judith M.; Coombes, R. Charles; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Delozier, T.; Veronesi, A.; Vrdoljak, E.; Monnier, A.; Coombes, C.; Nagykalnai, T.; Roumen, R. M. H.; Utracka-Hutka, B.; Pluzanska, A.; Porpiglia, M.; Genta, F.; Benedetto, C.; Sozzani, P.; Steiner, M.; Rubinov, R.; Leviov, M.; Semiglazov, V.; Fox, J.; Mayordomo, J. I.; Cervek, J.; Sleeboom, H. P.; Jassem, J.; Hinton, C. P.; Paulsen, T. H.; Guleng, R. J.; Fein, L.; Gutulescu, N.; Florián, J.; Rosso, R.; Rutgers, E. J.; Krzakowski, M.; Pienkowski, T.; Krajina, Z.; Siffnerova, H.; Pawlicki, M.; Drosik, K.; Wagnerowa, M.; Brunt, M.; Vukelja, S.; Mitrowic, L.; Cataliotti, L.; Karnicka-Mlodkowska, H.; Bonnefoi, H.; Tilch, G.; Chollet, P.; Patel, A.; Kamby, C.; Giustini, L.; Acito, L.; Mouridsen, H.; Roche, H.; de Lafontan, B.; Tomczak, P.; Petruzelka, L.; Lortholary, A.; Pacquola, M. G.; Skene, A.; Rici, S.; Michelotti, A.; Ghilezan, N.; Stewart, A.; Beauduin, M.; Andersen, J.; Vassilaros, S.; Celio, Luigi; Bajetta, E.; Bastús, R.; Marsland, T.; Paridaens, R.; Tzekova, V.; Lichtenegger, W.; Piersma, H.; Jones, S.; Holmberg, S.; Verhoeven, D.; Hill, A.; Porcile, G.; Bruno, M. F.; Chernozemski, I.; Coleman, R.; Jadeja, J.; Cohn, A.; Merlano, M.; Perroni, D.; Di Costanzo, F.; van Bochove, A.; Gerrits, M. A. N.; Malec, V.; Balil, A.; Mendiola, C.; Dodwell, D.; Knox, R.; Horgan, K.; Joannides, T.; Leonard, R. C. F.; Cawthorn, S. J.; Ghosh, C.; Cantrell, J.; Campos, D.; Orti, R.; Diedrich, K.; Aas, H.; Barnadas, A.; Vila, M. M.; Makris, A.; Anderson, T.; Chittor, S.; Michel, J.; Philip, P.; Redmond, P.; Mastboom, W. J. B.; Nordenskjöld, B.; Simmonds, P.; Grieve, R. J.; Tomova, A.; Piot, G.; Borea, G.; Ucci, G.; Einarsson, E.; Nicholson, S.; Gardiol, E. A.; Kerger, J.; Schlosser, J.; Namer, M.; Pinotti, G.; Rutten, H. T. J.; Iversen, T.; Nejim, A.; Dudov, A.; Grundtvig, P.; Lang, I.; Massidda, B.; van de Velde, C. H. J.; Gervasio, M. H.; Tengrup, I.; Tennvall, L.; Goodman, S.; Modgill, V. K.; Vorobiof, D. A.; Mickiewicz, E.; Chirgwin, J.; Focan, C.; Albin, N.; Contu, A. A.; Svensson, J. H.; Borghede, G.; Källström, A.-C.; Forbes, J. F.; Hurtz, H. J.; Tubiana-Hulin, M.; Viens, P.; Scanni, A.; Arnoldi, E.; Nastasi, G.; Bottini, A.; Alquati, P.; Muscat, V.; Brincat, S.; Holmen, K.; Amaral, N.; Moreno, I.; Trask, C.; Robinson, A.; Mcintyre, K.; Otsuka, A.; Hohaus, B.; Hoefig, G.; Georgoulias, V.; Salvagni, S.; Bidin, L.; Artioli, F.; Engan, T.; Benedikstsson, K. P.; Campbell, I.; Harvey, V.; Zimbler, H.; Mrsic-Krmpotic, Z.; Canon, J. L.; Tchilingirov, P. V.; Buser, K.; Bolanca, A.; Reztke, U.; Rhein, U.; Jouve, M.; Mullins, G.; Vesentini, L.; Gallo, L.; Merlini, L.; Decensi, A.; Carreca, I.; van Tienhoven, G.; Börjesson, B.; Hansen, J.; Koza, I.; Arcusa, A.; Inoriza, A.; Pelegri, A.; Eremin, O.; Modiano, M. R.; Anthony, S.; Donat, D.; Richardet, E.; Kochli, O.; Zeißig, P.; Gauch, G.; Aabo, K.; Fumoleau, P.; Erdkamp, F. L. G.; Lovén, L.; Jönsson, P.-E.; Perren, T.; Stuart, N.; Galindo, E.; Marek, B. J.; Salmon, J. P.; Dohollou, N.; Thompson, R.; Folco, U.; Rosa, A.; Tonato, M.; Heijmans, G. J.; Koralewski, P.; Bång, H.; Lescure, A. R.; Carrato, A.; Martin, M.; Neave, F.; Howell, T.; Savin, M.; Loesch, D.; Hannois, A.; Mohr, A.; Laube, T.; Omar, S.; Bonneterre, J.; Servent, V.; Danese, S.; Sertoli, M. R.; Butzelaar, R. M. J. M.; Steller, E. Ph; Gomez, H.; Skoog, P.; Alvarez, I.; Aguilar, E. Aranda; Giner, J. Lizón; Yosef, H. M. A.; Barrett- Lee, P.; Buzdar, A. U.; George, T.; Olivaires, J.; Vsianska, M.; Köhler, U.; Lindeløv, B.; Toftdahl, D. B.; Nielsen, E. B.; Veyret, C.; Castera, D.; Kerbrat, P.; Vassilaros, P.; Yeo, W.; Boni, C.; Aitini, E.; Luporini, G.; Herben, M. G.; Espelid, H.; Dahl, S.; Ingvar, C.; Meana, A.; Pico, C.; Garcia, A. M.; Agrawal, R. K.; Gruenberg, D.; Nunez de Pierro, A.; Gill, G.; Nogaret, J. M.; Honhon, B.; Wassenaar, H.; Nielander, Rik; Warnier, Ph; Sessa, C.; Padrik, P.; Guastalla, J. P.; Serin, D.; Jaubert, D.; Dank, M.; Given, F. H.; Mascia, V.; de Fraia, E.; Silingardi, V.; Conte, P. F.; Labianca, R.; Tondini, C.; Bagnulo, A.; Gardani, G.; Wils, J.; Liem, G. S.; Nuytinck, J. K. S.; Formoe, E.; Ambré, T.; Alés, J.; Aramburo, P.; Mansi, J.; Graham, J.; Joffe, J.; Sainsbury, J.; Stone, J.; Good, R. H.; Cartwright, T.; Werner, I. D.; Murray, E.; Beith, J.; Tigges, F. J.; Bojko, P.; Sandberg, E.; Jensen, B.; Lotz, J. P.; Carney, D.; Shapira, J.; Neumann, A.; Goldhirsch, A.; Dicato, M.; de Graaf, H.; Maartense, E.; Burghouts, J.; Cassinello, J.; Jones, A.; Gaffney, C.; Blum, R.; Abdi, E.; Becquart, D.; Dirix, L.; Janssens, J.; NMarschner, N.; Blaska-Jaulerry, B.; Prevot, G.; Mirah Lev, L.; Shani, A.; Baruch, N. B.; Peretz, T.; Gips, M.; Cognetti, F.; Carlini, P.; Nortier, J. W. R.; ten B Huinink, D.; Roussel, J. G. J.; Unneberg, K.; Kylberg, F.; Hovind, H.; Nestvold, T.; Fogelkvist, R.; Due, J.; Muller, S.; Gilligan, D.; Russel, S.; Mcaleer, J.; Yiangou, C.; Foote, L.; Schottstaedt, M.; Holmes, F. A.; Wainstein, R.; Contreras, O.; Martinez, J.; Della-Fiorentina, S.; Beslija, S.; Vermorken, J. B.; Thirion, M.; Fraikin, J.; Castiglione, M.; Jäger, W.; Fasching, P.; Fabriz, H.; Neis, K.; Kirschbaum, M.; Labat, J. P.; Dupuis, O.; Bernard, Jean; Datchary, J.; Provencal, J.; Allain, P.; Clerico, M.; Lopez, M.; Nalli, G.; Aspevik, R.; Fràguas, A.; Curescu, S.; Cuevas, J. M.; Oltra, A.; Bradley, C.; Kapoor, R.; Akbain, S.; Croghan, M. K.; Modiano, M.; Taetle, R.; Beale, P.; Gobert, P.; Bondue, H.; Böhm, R.; Møller, K. A.; Brettes, J. P.; Netter, G.; Grogan, L.; Klein, B.; Botta, M.; Barni, S.; van Meerwijk, I.; Kåresen, R.; Godes, J.; Aramburo, A.; Jara, C.; Zanger, B.; Fleagle, J. T.; Greenspan, A.; Marschke, R.; Medgyesy, D. C.; Garbo, L.

    2012-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors are more effective than is tamoxifen in prevention of breast-cancer recurrence, but at the expense of increased musculoskeletal side-effects, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess risk factors and the prognostic value of musculoskeletal symptoms

  12. Effectiveness of Lavendula stoechas essential oil in treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Torabi, Shervin; Heshmati-Afshar, Fariba; Jahanjoo, Fatemeh; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash

    2017-08-10

    Randomized controlled trial. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity. To date, no previous study has evaluated the efficacy of topical Lavendula stoechas (Lavender) oil in CTS patients. To investigate the effectiveness of topical Lavender essential oil in pain intensity, isometric pinch strength, electrophysiological features, and functional status of patients with mild to moderate CTS. Forty eight patients with mild to moderate CTS were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial. Group A was treated with night wrist orthotic and topical lavender oil ointment. Group B was treated with night wrist orthotic and a placebo ointment. Patients were evaluated at baseline, and after 40 days of intervention with Boston CTS questionnaire (BCTQ), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, pinch grip strength, power grip, median compound motor action potential latency, and median sensory nerve action potential latency. At the end of the study period, both groups improved significantly in terms of BCTQ, VAS, isometric pinch powers, and electrodiagnosis study parameters. However, group A showed significantly greater improvements in BCTQ (mean difference, 0.39 ± 0.31 vs 0.6 ± 0.35; P = .03), VAS (3.37 ± 1.86 vs 1.33 ± 2.07; P = .001), and pinch grip strength (0.73 ± 0.63 vs 0.27 ± 0.54; P = .01) than group B. No significant differences in power grip, median compound motor action potential latency, and median sensory nerve action potential latency were seen between the 2 groups. This study was the first trial of topical lavender oil used in patients with CTS. Wrist orthotic combined with topical lavender oil was more effective than orthotic and placebo in treatment of mild to moderate CTS. 1b. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A randomized sham-controlled trial of a neurodynamic technique in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Price, Don D; Robinson, Michael E; Vincent, Kevin R; George, Steven Z

    2009-10-01

    Randomized, controlled trial. To assess the believability of a novel sham intervention for a neurodynamic technique (NDT) in participants with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Additionally, we wished to assess a potential mechanism of NDT (hypoalgesia) and to compare outcomes related to clinical pain and upper extremity disability between NDT and a sham intervention. Preliminary evidence suggests that NDT is effective in the treatment of CTS. A sham-controlled study is lacking from the literature and could provide insight to the efficacy of NDT, as well as the corresponding mechanisms. Participants with signs and symptoms consistent with CTS provided baseline measures of expectation, clinical pain intensity, upper extremity disability, and experimental pain sensitivity. Participants were then randomly assigned to receive either a NDT known to anatomically stress the median nerve or a sham technique intended to minimize stress to the median nerve. Following brief exposure to the assigned technique, expectation was reassessed to observe for group-dependent changes. Participants received the assigned intervention over 3 weeks. Additionally, all participants received a prefabricated wrist splint for their involved hands, with instructions to sleep in the splint and to wear it during painful activities when awake. Following 3 weeks of the assigned intervention and splint wear, baseline measures were reassessed and participants were asked which intervention they believed they had received. Forty females agreed to participate. Expectations for pain relief and perceived group assignment were similar between the groups. Within-session decreases in clinical pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity were observed independent of group assignment. Reduction of temporal summation was observed only in participants receiving NDT. Significant improvements in clinical pain intensity and upper extremity disability were observed at 3 weeks, independent of group

  14. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on adaptation of multi-digit forces to object mass distribution for whole-hand manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a compression neuropathy of the median nerve that results in sensorimotor deficits in the hand. Until recently, the effects of CTS on hand function have been studied using mostly two-digit grip tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of multi-digit forces as a function of object center of mass (CM during whole-hand grasping. Methods Fourteen CTS patients and age- and gender-matched controls were instructed to grasp, lift, hold, and release a grip device with five digits for seven consecutive lifts while maintaining its vertical orientation. The object CM was changed by adding a mass at different locations at the base of the object. We measured forces and torques exerted by each digit and object kinematics and analyzed modulation of these variables to object CM at object lift onset and during object hold. Our task requires a modulation of digit forces at and after object lift onset to generate a compensatory moment to counteract the external moment caused by the added mass and to minimize object tilt. Results We found that CTS patients learned to generate a compensatory moment and minimized object roll to the same extent as controls. However, controls fully exploited the available degrees of freedom (DoF in coordinating their multi-digit forces to generate a compensatory moment, i.e., digit normal forces, tangential forces, and the net center of pressure on the finger side of the device at object lift onset and during object hold. In contrast, patients modulated only one of these DoFs (the net center of pressure to object CM by modulating individual normal forces at object lift onset. During object hold, however, CTS patients were able to modulate digit tangential force distribution to object CM. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, although CTS did not affect patients’ ability to perform our manipulation task, it interfered with the modulation of specific grasp

  15. A Bayesian network meta-analysis: Comparing the clinical effectiveness of local corticosteroid injections using different treatment strategies for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Chuang, Ching-Hui; Tu, Yu-Kang; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Liaw, Mei- Yun

    2015-11-19

    Local corticosteroid injections are commonly used to improve the short-term symptomatic severity and the functional status of the hands affected by carpal tunnel syndrome. We conducted a systematic review and Bayesian network-meta-analysis to compare the clinical effectiveness of local corticosteroid injections using different injection approaches. Electronic literature in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and other sources were searched to identify clinical studies comparing different injection approaches with each other or placebo for carpal tunnel syndrome. Two review authors conducted selection of studies, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias independently. Random-effects models were used to conduct the pairwise meta-analysis and the Bayesian network meta-analysis. Overall, 10 studies with 633 patients were included in the systematic review. Among the injection approaches, local corticosteroid injections using the ultrasound-guided in-plane injection (Ulnar-I) approach was the best treatment strategy for clinical response (median OR versus placebo 128.30, 95% CrI 9.76 to 2299.00), change in symptom severity scale (median MD versus placebo -1.16, 95% CrI -1.95 to -0.38) , and change in functional status scale (median MD versus placebo -0.74, 95% CrI -2.00 to 0.52) at short-term follow-up period in the network meta-analysis. Local corticosteroid injections using other injection approaches were better than placebo for clinical response (for the PI approach, median OR versus placebo 8.85, 95% CrI 3.00 to 33.15; for the DI approach, median OR versus placebo 7.00, 95% CrI 0.53 to 118.80) , change in symptom severity scale (for the Ulnar-O approach, median MD versus placebo -0.78, 95% CrI -1.43 to -0.16; for the PI approach, median MD versus placebo -0.58, 95% CrI -0.95 to -0.22), and change in functional status scale (for the Ulnar-O approach, median MD versus placebo -0.63, 95% CrI -1.67 to 0

  16. Diagnosis from functional perspectives: usefulness of a manual tactile test for predicting precision pinch performance and disease severity in subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Jou, I-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Kuo, Li-Chieh

    2014-04-01

    To investigate how the severity levels revealed in a nerve conduction study (NCS) affect the results of the Manual Tactile Test (MTT) for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and to examine the relationships between the results of the MTT and precision pinch performance. Case-control studies. Hospital and local community. Patients with CTS (N=70) with 119 affected hands were studied. A control group matched by age, sex, and hand dominance was also recruited. Not applicable. CTS severity was determined based on NCS findings. The MTT, traditional sensory tests, and precision pinch performance were used to examine the functional sensory status of the hand from different perspectives. The patients with CTS exhibited deterioration in all of the sensibility tests (Psensibility and prehensile pinch performance in patients with CTS. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound-guided perineural injection with platelet-rich plasma improved the neurophysiological parameters of carpal tunnel syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ying-Chen; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Lin-Fen

    2017-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common and sometimes challenging condition, which causes pain; paresthesia; tingling of the thumb, index and long fingers; and even thenar weakness in the hands. The effectiveness of corticosteroid injections seems to be transient, and there is a lack of information around long-term effects in previous studies. In recent years, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has proven to bean alternative as it encourages tissue regeneration. We hereby describe a patient with CTS showing significant improvements in electrophysiological parameters after receiving PRP injections. The results revealed significant improvements in the distal motor and sensory latencies as well as the sensory nerve action potential and compound muscle action potential amplitudes of the both median nerves. In summary, if patients are refractory to conservative treatments-such as splinting, oral medication, and corticosteroid injection-PRP may be used as an alternative before surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. Individuals should consult a qualified health care provider for professional medical advice, diagnosis and treatment of a medical ...

  19. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worker's wrist to maintain a natural position during work. Jobs can be rotated among workers. Employers can develop programs in ergonomics, the process of adapting workplace conditions and job ...

  20. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better and help relieve symptoms. Massage, yoga, ultrasound, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture are just a few such options that have been found to be helpful. You should talk with your doctor before trying these alternative treatments. Surgery. CTS surgery is ...

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome assessment with ultrasonography: value of inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio in patients versus healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Fu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio (IOR in patients with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS.Forty-six wrists in 46 consecutive patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of CTS and forty-four wrists in 44 healthy volunteers were examined with ultrasonography. The cross-sectional area (CSA of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel inlet (the level of scaphoid-pisiform and outlet (the level of the hook of the hamate, and the IOR was calculated for each wrist. Ultrasonography and electrodiagnostic tests were performed under blinded conditions. Electrodiagnostic testing combined with clinical symptoms were considered to be the gold standard test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic value between the inlet CSA and IOR.The study population included 16 men and 30 women (mean age, 45.3 years; range, 18-83 years. The control population included 18 men and 26 women (mean age, 50.4 years; range, 18-79 years. The mean inlet CSA was 8.7 mm2 in healthy controls and 14.6mm2 in CTS group (P<0.001. The mean IOR in healthy volunteers (1.0 was smaller than that in patients (1.6, P<0.001. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed a diagnostic advantage to using the IOR rather than the inlet CSA (P<0.01. An IOR cutoff value of ≥ 1.3 would yield 93% specificity and 91% sensitivity in the diagnosis of CTS.The IOR of median nerve area promises to be an effective means in the diagnosis of CTS. A large-scale, randomized controlled trial is required to determine how and when this parameter will be used.

  2. Tunneling and reflection in unimolecular reaction kinetic energy release distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetic energy release distributions in unimolecular reactions is calculated with detailed balance theory, taking into account the tunneling and the reflection coefficient in three different types of transition states; (i) a saddle point corresponding to a standard RRKM-type theory, (ii) an attachment Langevin cross section, and (iii) an absorbing sphere potential at short range, without long range interactions. Corrections are significant in the one dimensional saddle point states. Very light and lightly bound absorbing systems will show measurable effects in decays from the absorbing sphere, whereas the Langevin cross section is essentially unchanged.

  3. Clinical Usefulness of Oral Supplementation with Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Curcumin Phytosome, and B-Group Vitamins in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pajardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS, scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n=60 served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n=60 received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation. Patients in Group C (n=60 received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05. Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen’s tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P<0.05. We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve.

  4. Surgery is more cost-effective than splinting for carpal tunnel syndrome in the Netherlands: results of an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adèr Herman J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a common disorder, often treated with surgery or wrist splinting. The objective of this economic evaluation alongside a randomized trial was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of splinting and surgery for patients with CTS. Methods Patients at 13 neurological outpatient clinics with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed idiopathic CTS were randomly allocated to splinting (n = 89 or surgery (n = 87. Clinical outcome measures included number of nights waking up due to symptoms, general improvement, severity of the main complaint, paraesthesia at night and during the day, and utility. The economic evaluation was performed from a societal perspective and involved all relevant costs. Results There were no differences in costs. The mean total costs per patient were in the surgery group EURO 2,126 compared to EURO 2,111 in the splint group. After 12 months, the success rate in the surgery group (92% was significantly higher than in the splint group (72%. The acceptability curve showed that at a relatively low ceiling ratio of EURO 2,500 per patient there is a 90% probability that surgery is cost-effective. Conclusion In the Netherlands, surgery is more cost-effective compared with splinting, and recommended as the preferred method of treatment for patients with CTS.

  5. Acute Effect of Topical Menthol on Chronic Pain in Slaughterhouse Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Triple-Blind, Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Sundstrup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical menthol gels are classified “topical analgesics” and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10 participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze or placebo (gel with a menthol scent during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design. Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during the last hour of work (scale 0–10 immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P=0.026 and P=0.044, resp.. Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by −1.2 (CI 95%: −1.7 to −0.6 following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers with CTS and should be considered as an effective nonsystemic alternative to regular analgesics in the workplace management of chronic and neuropathic pain.

  6. Efficacy of topical chamomile oil for mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Daneshfard, Babak; Ghoreishi, Parissa Sadat; Lari, Zeinab Nasiri; Homayouni, Kaynoosh; Zargaran, Arman

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of topical chamomile oil in patients with mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Eighty six patients with electrodiagnostic criteria of mild and moderate CTS were enrolled in this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial and received wrist splint plus topical chamomile oil or placebo for 4 weeks. They were evaluated at the baseline and end of the study regarding functional and symptomatic scores, dynamometry, and electrodiagnostic indexes. Dynamometry, functionality, and symptom severity scores of the patients were significantly improved in the chamomile oil group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.040, P = 0.0001, P = 0.017, respectively). Additionally, compound latency of the median nerve in the chamomile oil group significantly decreased (P = 0.035) compared to the placebo group. Other electerodiagnostic measurements did not change significantly. Complementary treatment with topical chamomile oil may have some benefits for patients with mild and moderate CTS, both subjectively and objectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Carpal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Froehner, S.; Coblenz, G.; Christopoulos, G.

    2006-01-01

    This review addresses the pathoanatomical basics as well as the clinical and radiological presentation of instability patterns of the wrist. Carpal instability mostly follows an injury; however, other diseases, like CPPD arthropathy, can be associated. Instability occurs either if the carpus is unable to sustain physiologic loads (''dyskinetics'') or suffers from abnormal motion of its bones during movement (''dyskinematics''). In the classification of carpal instability, dissociative subcategories (located within proximal carpal row) are differentiated from non-dissociative subcategories (present between the carpal rows) and combined patterns. It is essential to note that the unstable wrist initially does not cause relevant signs in standard radiograms, therefore being ''occult'' for the radiologic assessment. This paper emphasizes the high utility of kinematographic studies, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography for detecting these predynamic and dynamic instability stages. Later in the natural history of carpal instability, static malalignment of the wrist and osteoarthritis will develop, both being associated with significant morbidity and disability. To prevent individual and socio-economic implications, the handsurgeon or orthopedist, as well as the radiologist, is challenged for early and precise diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of the effectiveness of interferential current therapy and TENS in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Irfan; Boyaci, Ahmet; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Ucar, Mehmet; Kocaturk, Ozcan

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of interferential current (IFC) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapies in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) compared with splint therapy, a standard treatment modality for CTS. This was a prospective, single-blinded, single-center, randomized, three-group parallel intervention study of 3 weeks duration. Efficacy was examined in the third week after the end of treatments. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of three groups: group I patients received splint therapy, group II patients received TENS applied on the palmar surface of the hand and the carpal tunnel, and group III patients underwent IFC therapy applied on the palmar surface of the hand and the volar surface of the forearm. TENS and ICF treatments were applied five times weekly for a total of 15 sessions. Group 1 patients were stabilized with volar wrist splints for 3 weeks. The efficacy of the therapies was assessed before initiation of therapy and at 3 weeks after completion of therapy using a visual analog scale (VAS), a symptom severity scale, the functional capacity scale of the BCTQ, and measurement of median nerve motor distal latency (mMDL) and median sensory nerve conduction velocity (mSNCV). Groups were compared pairwise using the Mann-Whitney U test to identify the source of differences between groups. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze changes in variables over time within a group. In the VAS, BCTQ, MDL, and mSNCV, no significant difference was observed between the groups (p > 0.05). In the VAS, BCTQ, and mSNCV, statistically significant improvements were detected in all groups (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between TENS and splint therapy with respect to improvement in clinical scores, whereas IFC therapy provided a significantly greater improvement in VAS, mMDL, and mSNCV values than splint therapy (VAS: 4.80 ± 1.18 and 6.37 ± 1.18; p = 0.001, mMDL: 3.89 ± 0.88 and 4.06 ± 0.61; p = 0

  9. Validity of F-wave minimal latency of median and ulnar nerves for diagnosis and severity assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome in type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Habib, S.S.; Omar, S.A.; Drees, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a common problem and is sometimes associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) due to compression of median nerve at wrist. Electrophysiological tests are frequently used for its diagnosis. In this work, F-wave minimal latency (FWML) difference between median and ulnar nerve and F-ratio is used to facilitate the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Thirty control cases were selected who were physically fit for normal electrophysiological values. Thirty-two patients with a long history of type II diabetes mellitus were studied for electro-diagnostic tests. All patients had clinical evidence of CTS. Among all diabetics about 20 cases had poor glycaemic control (HbA1c>7.5). F-wave minimal latency (FWML) were measured in median and ulnar nerves and F-ratio of median nerve were also noted. The mean values in different groups were compared using t-test and p greater or equal to 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In control group, the ulnar FWML was either equal or slightly longer that the median FWML value. In CTS group with type II diabetes mellitus the FWML value of median nerve were significantly longer than FWML of the ulnar nerve. Moreover, in uncontrolled diabetic patients the FWML values was very much longer than controlled group. Similarly the F-ratio of median nerve was significantly low. Conclusion: In addition to the specific criteria for CTS diagnosis, the parameters like FWML difference in median and ulnar nerve with reduced F-ratio of median nerve can be useful in establishing the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus. (author)

  10. Effects of chronic flexed wrist posture on the elasticity and crosssectional area of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel among chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Hulya; Analan, Pinar Doruk

    2018-02-04

    To investigate the effects of chronic flexed wrist posture following spasticity on the elasticity and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel among chronic stroke patients. This prospective study included 24 consecutive patients (mean age, 56.5±11.56 years) with unilateral wrist spasticity following a stroke in a chronic phase. The CSA of the median nerve was measured by ultrasound (US). The elasticity was measured by Virtual Touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). SWV and CSA of the median nerves of the affected and unaffected sides for each patient were compared. The correlations between duration of time since the stroke, SWV and CSA of the median nerve were assessed. The interobserver agreement was assessed. The CSA of the median nerve at the affected side was significantly lower than that of the unaffected side (p = 0.03). The SWV of the median nerve at the affected side was significantly higher than that on the unaffected side (p < 0.001). The interobserver agreement was excellent for both CSA and SWV measurements. There was a negatively fair correlation between CSA at the affected side and duration of time since stroke (r = -0.58, p < 0.05). The SWV of the median nerve at the affected side was not correlated with the duration of time since stroke (r ≤ 0.3, p ≥ 0.05). These results suggest that chronic flexed wrist posture may cause atrophy of the median nerve due to chronic compression after stroke and increase in the stiffness of the median nerve.

  11. Bilateral deficits in fine motor control and pinch grip force are not associated with electrodiagnostic findings in women with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Pérez-de-Heredia-Torres, Marta; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-06-01

    : The aim of this study was to analyze the differences in deficits in fine motor control and pinch grip force between patients with minimal, moderate/mild, or severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy age- and hand dominance-matched controls. : A case-control study was conducted. The subtests of the Purdue Pegboard Test (one-hand and bilateral pin placements and assemblies) and pinch grip force between the thumb and the remaining four fingers of the hand were bilaterally evaluated in 66 women with minimal (n = 16), moderate (n = 16), or severe (n = 34) CTS and in 20 age- and hand-matched healthy women. The differences among the groups were analyzed using different mixed models of analysis of variance. : A two-way mixed analysis of variance revealed significant differences between groups, not depending on the presence of unilateral or bilateral symptoms (side), for the one-hand pin placement subtest: patients showed bilateral lower scores compared with controls (P < 0.001), without differences among those with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS (P = 0.946). The patients also exhibited lower scores in bilateral pin placement (P < 0.001) and assembly (P < 0.001) subtests, without differences among them. The three-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences among groups (P < 0.001) and fingers (P < 0.001), not depending on the presence of unilateral/bilateral symptoms (P = 0.684), for pinch grip force: patients showed bilateral lower pinch grip force in all fingers compared with healthy controls, without differences among those with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS. : The current study revealed similar bilateral deficits in fine motor control and pinch grip force in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS, supporting that fine motor control deficits are a common feature of CTS not associated with electrodiagnostic findings.

  12. Construct validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Thai version of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire (DASH-TH) in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntragulpoontawee, Montana; Phutrit, Suphatha; Tongprasert, Siam; Wongpakaran, Tinakon; Khunachiva, Jeeranan

    2018-03-27

    This study evaluated additional psychometric properties of the Thai version of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire (DASH-TH) which included, test-retest reliability, construct validity, internal consistency of in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. As for determining construct validity, the Thai EuroQOL questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L) was also administered in order to examine convergent and divergent validity. Fifty patients completed both questionnaires. The DASH-TH showed excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.811) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.911). The exploratory factor analysis yielded a six-factor solution while the confirmatory factor analysis denoted that the hypothesized model adequately fit the data with a comparative fit index of 0.967 and a Tucker-Lewis index of 0.964. The related subscales between the DASH-TH and the Thai EQ-5D-5L were significantly correlated, indicating the DASH-TH's convergent and discriminant validity. The DASH-TH demonstrated good reliability, internal consistency construct validity, and multidimensionality, in assessing the upper extremity function in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

  13. Power grip, pinch grip, manual muscle testing or thenar atrophy – which should be assessed as a motor outcome after carpal tunnel decompression? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale Swati

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective assessment of motor function is frequently used to evaluate outcome after surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. However a range of outcome measures are used and there appears to be no consensus on which measure of motor function effectively captures change. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the methods used to assess motor function in randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for CTS. A secondary aim was to evaluate which instruments reflect clinical change and are psychometrically robust. Methods The bibliographic databases Medline, AMED and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for CTS. Data on instruments used, methods of assessment and results of tests of motor function was extracted by two independent reviewers. Results Twenty-two studies were retrieved which included performance based assessments of motor function. Nineteen studies assessed power grip dynamometry, fourteen studies used both power and pinch grip dynamometry, eight used manual muscle testing and five assessed the presence or absence of thenar atrophy. Several studies used multiple tests of motor function. Two studies included both power and pinch strength and reported descriptive statistics enabling calculation of effect sizes to compare the relative responsiveness of grip and pinch strength within study samples. The study findings suggest that tip pinch is more responsive than lateral pinch or power grip up to 12 weeks following surgery for CTS. Conclusion Although used most frequently and known to be reliable, power and key pinch dynamometry are not the most valid or responsive tools for assessing motor outcome up to 12 weeks following surgery for CTS. Tip pinch dynamometry more specifically targets the thenar musculature and appears to be more responsive. Manual muscle testing, which in theory is most specific to the thenar musculature, may be more

  14. An experimental system for release simulation of internal stores in a supersonic wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic parameters obtained from separation experiments of internal stores in a wind tunnel are significant in aircraft designs. Accurate wind tunnel tests can help to improve the release stability of the stores and in-flight safety of the aircrafts in supersonic environments. A simulative system for free drop experiments of internal stores based on a practical project is provided in this paper. The system contains a store release mechanism, a control system and an attitude measurement system. The release mechanism adopts a six-bar linkage driven by a cylinder, which ensures the release stability. The structure and initial aerodynamic parameters of the stores are also designed and adjusted. A high speed vision measurement system for high speed rolling targets is utilized to measure the pose parameters of the internal store models and an optimizing method for the coordinates of markers is presented based on a priori model. The experimental results show excellent repeatability of the system, and indicate that the position measurement precision is less than 0.13 mm, and the attitude measurement precision for pitch and yaw angles is less than 0.126°, satisfying the requirements of practical wind tunnel tests. A separation experiment for the internal stores is also conducted in the FL-3 wind tunnel of China Aerodynamics Research Institute.

  15. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shawnee Mission, KS, 3/05/2014) Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release (Bon Secours ... Hospital, Norfolk, VA, 5/08/2008) Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release (Bon Secours ...

  16. Modelling of motorway tunnels scenario for utilization of conditionally released radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrncir, Tomas; Panik, Michal; Necas, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Considerable amount of solid radioactive waste with radioactivity slightly above the limits for unconditional release is generated during the decommissioning of the nuclear installations. Conditional release deals with precisely this type of materials with activity slightly above limits in order to save considerable financial resources, which would be otherwise spend on treatment, conditioning and disposal of these materials at appropriate repository. The basic principles of conditional release as well as possibilities of reusing of the conditionally released materials are described. One of these possibilities of the reusing was chosen and application proposal of conditional release of metal waste - steel reinforcement in the concrete, which could be used for construction of motorway tunnels, was created. The computer code Visiplan 4.0 3D ALARA planning tool software was used for the calculation of effective individual dose for personnel constructing the tunnel and for critical group related to scenario. Particular models for individual scenarios of conditional release have been developed within the scope of this software code. The aim of the paper is to determine a level of the radioactivity of conditional released materials to avoid over exceeding the value of annual individual effective dose 10μSv/year established by international recommendations. (author)

  17. Touch pressure and sensory density after tarsal tunnel release in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondring, William H; Tarun, Prashant K; Trepman, Elly

    2012-12-01

    Limited quantitative information is available about the improvement of protective sensation after tarsal tunnel release in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Prospective, non-blinded, non-randomized case series of 10 feet in 8 diabetic patients and 24 feet in 22 non-diabetic patients who had tarsal tunnel release. Preoperative and postoperative (average, 8-9 months) anatomic, quantitative sensory testing was done with touch pressure 1-point threshold (Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments) and 2-point discrimination. There was marked, significant postoperative improvement of mean touch pressure 1-point threshold, compared with preoperative values, for medial calcaneal, medial plantar, and lateral plantar nerves in both non-diabetic and diabetic patients. There was minimal improvement in 2-point discrimination only for the medial calcaneal nerve in non-diabetic, but not in diabetic, patients. Nerve entrapment at the tarsal tunnel is an important component of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tarsal tunnel decompression may improve sensory impairment and restore protective sensation. Copyright © 2012 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ABERRANT ABDUCTOR DIGITI MINIMI MUSCLE FOUND DURING OPEN SURGICAL DECOMPRESSION OF THE CARPAL TUNNEL: CASE REPORT. Músculo abductor digiti minimi aberrante hallado durante una cirugía abierta descompresiva del tunel carpiano: reporte de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav A Slavchev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo reportamos un caso interesante de músculo hipotenar aberrante encontrado durante una descompresión del túnel carpiano. La variante muscular surgía de la fascia antebraquial voloradial, y pasaba sobre la arteria y el nervio ulnar en el canal de Guyón, y se insertaba en la cara ulnar hipotenar. La tensión en el vientre muscular produjo ligera abducción de la quinta articulación metacarpofa-lángica, lo que confirmó que el músculo era abductor digiti minimi aberrante. Observamos asimismo las diferentes variaciones de este músculo y ponemos énfasis en su potencial implicancia clínica. Herein, we present an interesting case of an aberrant hypothenar muscle found during carpal tunnel decompression. The variant muscle arised from the voloradial antebrachial fascia and coursed over the ulnar artery and nerve in the Guyon canal, and inserted into the ulnar aspect of the hypothenar. Tension on the muscle belly provided slight abduction of the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint, which confirmed it to be an aberrant abductor digiti minimi muscle. We also discuss different variations of this muscle and emphasize its potential clinical implications.

  19. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb – excluding carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-trau‑ matic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assess‑ ment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology – both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrap‑ ment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tun‑ nel syndrome, Guyon’s canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg’s disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonog‑ raphy 2012; 12 (49: 120–163 – Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the exam‑ ple of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles. The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established – echogenicity and

  20. Síndrome do túnel do carpo: estudo comparativo entre a medição ultrassonográfica e cirúrgica do nervo mediano nos casos moderados e severos da doença Carpal tunnel syndrome: comparative study between sonographic and surgical measurements of the median nerve in moderate and severe cases of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Pinho Teixeira Alves

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os perímetros ultrassonográfico e cirúrgico do nervo mediano, avaliar o diagnóstico da síndrome do túnel do carpo pela área seccional do nervo mediano, verificar associação entre área seccional do nervo mediano e gravidade da síndrome do túnel do carpo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo de 30 pacientes com síndrome do túnel do carpo. Mediram-se a área seccional e o perímetro ultrassonográfico do nervo mediano. Avaliaram-se correlação clínica-ultrassonográfica e associação com a gravidade da doença. Compararam-se os perímetros ultrassonográfico e cirúrgico. Compararam-se classificação clínica com perímetro cirúrgico, área seccional e perímetro ultrassonográfico. RESULTADOS: Cinco perdas, 25 pacientes estudados; 60% dos pacientes com doença moderada, 60% de casos graves ultrassonográficos (área seccional > 0,15 cm². Distribuição não normal de perímetro cirúrgico (p = 0,5, distribuição normal de perímetro ultrassonográfico (p = 0. Diferença significativa entre perímetros (teste-t de amostras pareadas; p 0,09 cm² em todos os pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: Não houve associação entre perímetro ultrassonográfico e perímetro cirúrgico do nervo mediano. Área seccional do nervo mediano > 0,09 cm² foi válida para o diagnóstico. Não houve associação entre área seccional e gravidade da doença.OBJECTIVE: To compare sonographic and surgical measured perimeters of the median nerve; to evaluate the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome by median nerve cross-sectional area; to verify the association between cross-sectional area of the median nerve and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients with established carpal tunnel syndrome were studied. Cross-sectional area and sonographic perimeter of the median nerve were measured. The correlation between clinical and sonographic findings and association with carpal tunnel syndrome severity were evaluated. Sonographic

  1. A systematic review of outcomes assessed in randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF as a reference tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite José

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of outcomes have been assessed in trials of interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS, however there appears to be little consensus on what constitutes the most relevant outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the outcomes assessed in randomized clinical trials of surgical interventions for CTS and to compare these to the concepts contained in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF. Methods The bibliographic databases Medline, AMED and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials of surgical treatment for CTS. The outcomes assessed in these trials were identified, classified and linked to the different domains of the ICF. Results Twenty-eight studies were retrieved which met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently assessed outcomes were self-reported symptom resolution, grip or pinch strength and return to work. The majority of outcome measures employed assessed impairment of body function and body structure and a small number of studies used measures of activity and participation. Conclusion The ICF provides a useful framework for identifying the concepts contained in outcome measures employed to date in trials of surgical intervention for CTS and may help in the selection of the most appropriate domains to be assessed, especially where studies are designed to capture the impact of the intervention at individual and societal level. Comparison of results from different studies and meta-analysis would be facilitated through the use of a core set of standardised outcome measures which cross all domains of the ICF. Further work on developing consensus on such a core set is needed.

  2. Is epineurectomy necessary in the surgical management of carpal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... Background: In this study, it was aimed to determine whether median nerve epineurectomy is beneficial in the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and Methods: The study enrolled 72 patients including 34 patients without epineurectomy (Group A) and. 38 patients with ...

  3. Untangling the effects of predator releases and transient natural enemies on pest populations in strawberry high tunnels in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluating the effectiveness of augmentative releases of natural enemies is crucial to providing convincing evidence that pests can be managed in lieu of pesticides. Separating the contribution of released natural enemies from those that invade high tunnel greenhouses in search of prey/hosts, is cha...

  4. Ultrasonographic median nerve cross-section areas measured by 8-point 'inching test' for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: a correlation of nerve conduction study severity and duration of clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-01-01

    Incremental palmar stimulation of the median nerve sensory conduction at the wrist, the 'inching test', provides an assessment with reference to segments proximal and distal to the entrapment. This study used high-resolution ultrasonography (US) to measure the median nerve's cross-section areas (CSAs) like the 'inching test' and to correlate with the nerve conduction study (NCS) severity and duration of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Two hundred and twelve (212) 'CTS-hands' from 135 CTS patients and 50 asymptomatic hands ('A-hands') from 25 control individuals were enrolled. The median nerve CSAs were measured at the 8-point marked as i4, i3, i2, i1, w, o1, o2, and 03 in inching test. The NCS severities were classified into six groups based on motor and sensory responses (i.e., negative, minimal, mild, moderate, severe, and extreme). Results of US studies were compared in terms of NCS severity and duration of clinical CTS symptoms. There was significantly larger CSA of the NCS negative group of 'CTS-hands' than of 'A-hands'. The cut-off values of the CSAs of the NCS negative CTS group were 12.5 mm 2 , 11.5 mm 2 and 10.1 mm 2 at the inlet, wrist crease, and outlet, respectively. Of the 212 'CTS-hands', 32 were NCS negative while 40 had minimal, 43 mild, 85 moderate, 10 severe, and two extreme NCS severities. The CSAs of 'CTS-hands' positively correlated with different NCS severities and with the duration of CTS symptoms. By duration of clinical symptoms, 12 of the 212 'CTS-hands' were in the 1 month group; 82 in >1 month and ≤12 months group, and 118 in >12 months group. In 'inching test', segments i4-i3 and i3-i2 were the most common 'positive-site'. The corresponding CSAs measured at i4 and i3, but not at i2, were significantly larger than those measured at points that were not 'positive-site'. Using the 8-point measurement of the median

  5. Carpal tunnel syndrome: treatment with small transverse incision Utilização de técnica de incisão transversal mínima no tratamento da síndrome do túnel do carpo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roland Kaleff

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the application of a limited transverse incision technique to treat the carpal tunnel syndrome, with concern to its safety and efficacy in the opening of the flexor retinaculum (FR. METHOD: A prospective analysis of thirty FR release procedures performed on twenty-eight patients subjected to the proposed incision technique. Safety and total opening of the FR were evaluated through a questionnaire and an endoscopic inspection respectively. RESULTS: No major complications were observed. Two cases presented small local hematoma. One patient presented with transient neuropraxia of digital branch. In two of the first five cases, incomplete FR opening was identified during endoscopic revision with need of complementary opening. All patients reported relief of paresthesias and nocturnal pain symptoms. CONCLUSION: The technique was safely performed on the prospection group, no major complications were detected and the opening of FR was observed in the majority of the patients.OBJETIVO: Avaliação de técnica de incisão limitada no tratamento da síndrome do túnel do carpo, quanto à segurança clínica e efetividade na abertura do Retináculo Flexor (RF. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo de trinta procedimentos realizados em vinte e oito pacientes submetidos a técnica com incisão transversa mínima. A segurança da técnica e a abertura total do RF foram avaliadas através de questionário baseado em observações clinicas e inspeção endoscópica, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Não foram observadas complicações maiores. Um único paciente apresentou neuropraxia de nervo interdigital. Dois pacientes apresentaram hematoma local pequeno. Em dois dos cinco primeiros casos observou-se uma abertura incompleta do RF, sendo necessária abertura complementar. Todos os pacientes apresentaram melhora do quadro clínico de dor noturna e parestesias. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica foi executada com segurança no grupo analisado, sem a ocorrência de

  6. Comparative study between endoscopic technique by a proximal port and mini palmary incision in the surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome Estudo comparativo entre a técnica endoscópica pelo portal proximal e a técnica de mini-incisão palmar no tratamento cirúrgico da síndrome do túnel do carpo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A.R. Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a prospective study comparing two surgical techniques for carpal tunnel release. A minimal - incision open decompression(3 is compared with an endoscopic release(2, that utilizes only a single proximal portal. There were operated on, 28 wrists in 28 patients, with clinical signs and EMG changes consistent on idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome, that failed under previous conservative treatment. They were randomized into two groups , undertaken surgical treatment, either by endoscopic release or by open decompression. Grip strength (measured by dynamometric, sensitivity (measured by Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, presence of pain and paresthesia, date of return to activities of daily living and complications were evaluated pre-operative and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 weeks after surgery. After 12 months average follow up, the results indicated that this proximal portal endoscopic technique can be safely performed, showing advantages over open conventional method, in terms of sooner return of grip strength, date of return to activities of daily living, and less incidence of pillar pain. No differences in paresthesia resolution, sensibility improvement or complications incidence were found.Os autores apresentam estudo prospectivo onde comparam duas técnicas cirúrgicas empregadas no tratamento de pacientes acometidos pela síndrome do túnel do carpo. A técnica de descompressão por via aberta, através de mini-incisão palmar(3, é analisada em relação à técnica por via endoscópica, descrita por Agee et al.(2, que utiliza apenas um único portal proximal. Foram operados, de forma randomizada, 28 punhos em 28 pacientes com o diagnóstico clínico e eletromiográfico de síndrome do túnel do carpo idiopático, e que não obtiveram melhora com o tratamento conservador prévio. Os seguintes parâmetros, foram analisados no pré-operatório e na primeira, segunda, quarta, sexta e décima segunda semanas de pós-operatório: força de

  7. The prevalence of hand pain in Ibadan – implications for the carpal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From earlier work on the predictive value of BPN for the carpal tunnel syndrome we conservatively estimate that between 20% to 30% of individuals in our study group will suffer from ... La douleur à la main ou brachialgie para-esthétique nocturne (BPN) est des series de symptoms décrit comme (DeKrom et al, 1992).

  8. Adaptation of the Transverse Carpal Ligament Associated with Repetitive Hand Use in Pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhanna, Christiane; Marquardt, Tamara L; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) plays a critical role in carpal tunnel biomechanics through interactions with its surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo adaptations of the TCL's mechanical properties in response to repetitive hand use in pianists using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. It was hypothesized that pianists, in comparison to non-pianists, would have a stiffer TCL as indicated by an increased acoustic shear wave velocity (SWV). ARFI imagining was performed for 10 female pianists and 10 female non-pianists. The median SWV values of the TCL were determined for the entire TCL, as well as for its radial and ulnar portions, rTCL and uTCL, respectively. The TCL SWV was significantly increased in pianists relative to non-pianists (p pianist and non-pianist groups (p pianists was 22.2% greater than that of the non-pianists (p < 0.001). This localized increase of TCL SWV, i.e. stiffening, may be primarily attributable to focal biomechanical interactions that occur at the radial TCL aspect where the thenar muscles are anchored. Progressive stiffening of the TCL may become constraining to the carpal tunnel, leading to median nerve compression in the tunnel. TCL maladaptation helps explain why populations who repeatedly use their hands are at an increased risk of developing musculoskeletal pathologies, e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome.

  9. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patheja, Pooja, E-mail: pooja.patheja8@gmail.com [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Sahu, Khageswar [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  10. [Chondroblastoma of the carpal scaphoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repáraz, F J; Garbayo, J; Arrechea, M A; Corchuelo, C; Tejero, A; Ayala, H

    2008-01-01

    A chondroblastoma is a benign tumour of cartilaginous origin which represents less than 1% of all primary osseous tumours. It is typically localised in the epiphysis of the long bones. Some 10% of chondroblastomas affect the bones of the foot and the hand. It is extremely rare for the seat of this lesion to be in the carpal bones. We present a case of chondroblastoma of the carpal scaphoids that was treated through curretage of the lesion and filling with autologous osseous graft from the iliac crest.

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 481: Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 481 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard. CAU 481 is located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 12-42-05, Housekeeping Waste. CAU 481 closure activities were conducted by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency from August 2007 through July 2008 according to the FFACO and Revision 3 of the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites. Closure activities included removal and disposal of construction debris and low-level waste. Drained fluids, steel, and lead was recycled as appropriate. Waste generated during closure activities was appropriately managed and disposed.

  12. Carpal conformation in relation to carpal chip fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, A.R.S.

    1994-01-01

    An objective radiological method of assessing the degree to which horses are conformationally 'back at the knee' (hyper-extended) is described. The effects on the measurements of variations in the direction of the incident X-ray beam and variations in weight bearing by the horse were assessed. A change from a lateromedial projection towards a plamaro-lateral-dorsomedial oblique projection consistently tended to reduce the observed degree of hyperextension of the carpus. Raising the contralateral limb to increase the load on the carpus had little effect on the measurements. The carpi of 21 thoroughbred racehorses with carpal chip fractures were not significantly more hyperextended than those of 10 thoroughbred racehorses with normal carpi. Back at the knee conformation was unlikely to have played a major role in the aetiopathogenesis of the carpal injuries

  13. Topographic anatomy of the ulnar tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Young-Chun; Shin, Kang-Jae; Lee, Ju-Young; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin; Song, Wu-Chul; Koh, Ki-Seok

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the definition of the anterior wall of the ulnar tunnel and to reveal the topographical characteristics of the various components of the ulnar tunnel. Twenty-two forearms from 11 embalmed cadavers (7 males, 4 females; mean age, 67.8 years) were carefully dissected. In all cases, the anterior wall of the ulnar tunnel comprised the hypothenar fascia, which originated from the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle. The palmar carpal ligament, the distal extent of the antebrachial fascia, was located deep to the anterior wall and formed only the anterior boundary of the proximal hiatus of the ulnar tunnel. The hypothenar fascia was attached to the flexor retinaculum at 15.2 mm lateral to the pisiform bone. However, the palmar carpal ligament was attached to the flexor retinaculum just lateral to the ulnar artery; the distance between the attachment of the palmar carpal ligament and the pisiform bone was 8.7 mm. Anatomical variations potentially associated with ulnar nerve compression were observed. The accessory abductor digiti minimi muscle and the fibrous band crossing the ulnar nerve in the ulnar tunnel were found in 27 and 23 % of forearms, respectively. A more detailed description of the anterior wall of the ulnar tunnel than was previously available is presented herein, and topographic and metric data regarding each structure of the tunnel are reported.

  14. Relação entre tensão neural adversa e estudos de condução nervosa em pacientes com sintomas da sídrome do túnel do carpo Relationship between adverse neural tension and nerve conduction studies in patients with symptoms of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud Ahmad Ismail Mahmud

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo foi avaliar, através de uma série de casos, a relação entre tensão neural adversa do nervo mediano (TNAm e o parâmetro eletrofisiológico em 38 pacientes com sintomas da síndrome do túnel do carpo (STC, submetidos a estudos de condução nervosa (ECN. As principais medidas foram a TNAm obtida no teste de provocação de tensão neural (TPTN e parâmetros dos ECN, dividindo-se os braços avaliados em três grupos: normal, com alteração eletrofisiológica sem gravidade e com alteração eletrofisiológica grave. Correlação significante entre TNAm e parâmetros dos ECN foram encontrados (pThe purpose of this study was to evaluate, through a series of cases, the relationship between the adverse neural tension of median nerve (ANTm and the electrophysiological involvement in 38 patients with symptoms of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS, submitted to nerve conduction studies (NCS. The main measures had been ANTm (in degrees obtained through the test of neural tension provocation (TNTP and parameters of the NCS, divided into three groups: normal, without severe electrophysiological alteration and with severe electrophysiological alteration. Significant correlations were found between ANTm and parameters of the NCS (p<0.05, as well as between ANTm and the three groups defined by the electrophysiologic alteration (r s=+0.437, p=0.002. The TNAm values were significantly higher in the arms with electrophysiologic diagnoses (p=0.007. It is suggested that the ANTm does have a participation in the physiopathology of the CTS, and the useof therapeutical procedures that diminish the development of neural tension.

  15. Adaptation of the Transverse Carpal Ligament Associated with Repetitive Hand Use in Pianists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Mhanna

    Full Text Available The transverse carpal ligament (TCL plays a critical role in carpal tunnel biomechanics through interactions with its surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo adaptations of the TCL's mechanical properties in response to repetitive hand use in pianists using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI imaging. It was hypothesized that pianists, in comparison to non-pianists, would have a stiffer TCL as indicated by an increased acoustic shear wave velocity (SWV. ARFI imagining was performed for 10 female pianists and 10 female non-pianists. The median SWV values of the TCL were determined for the entire TCL, as well as for its radial and ulnar portions, rTCL and uTCL, respectively. The TCL SWV was significantly increased in pianists relative to non-pianists (p < 0.05. Additionally, the increased SWV was location dependent for both pianist and non-pianist groups (p < 0.05, with the rTCL having a significantly greater SWV than the uTCL. Between groups, the rTCL SWV of pianists was 22.2% greater than that of the non-pianists (p < 0.001. This localized increase of TCL SWV, i.e. stiffening, may be primarily attributable to focal biomechanical interactions that occur at the radial TCL aspect where the thenar muscles are anchored. Progressive stiffening of the TCL may become constraining to the carpal tunnel, leading to median nerve compression in the tunnel. TCL maladaptation helps explain why populations who repeatedly use their hands are at an increased risk of developing musculoskeletal pathologies, e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome.

  16. Residence time of contaminants released in surface coal mines: A wind-tunnel study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R.S.

    1993-08-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments direct the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate and modify, as required, existing dispersion models for the prediction of dispersion of dust from surface coal mines. The application of mathematical air pollution dispersion models to the dispersion of dust from surface coal mines requires knowledge of not only the amount of dust generated in the mine, but the fraction of that generated that actually escapes from the mine. The escape fraction can be related to the residence time that released material will remain, on average, within the mine. The concentration in the mine was found to follow an exponential decay function from which an exponential decay time constant (or residence time) was computed for each case. A semi-empirical formula was found that related the residence time to the mine geometry and wind direction quite well. This formula can be used to estimate escape fraction in determining the source strength for the application of mathematical dispersion models.

  17. Partial carpal arthrodesis for multiple carpal fractures and subluxation in a pony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, A.R.S.; Hillyer, M.H.; Richardson, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal fractures in horses may occur as a result of external trauma or during athletic activity. The management of individual carpal fractures has received considerable attention in the equine orthopaedic literature (Ordidge 1980; Mcllwraith et a/. 1987; Martin et a/. 1988; Schneider et a/. 1988; Barr et a/. 1990). However, there are relatively few reports on the management of multiple carpal injuries by either primary reconstruction or arthrodesis procedures (Auer et a/. 1986; Bertone et a/. 1989). This report documents the treatment of a pony with a complex traumatic carpometacarpal injury by partial carpal arthrodesis

  18. Perilunar carpal dislocations treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagała, Jacek; Tarczyńska, Marta; Kosior, Piotr

    2006-06-30

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyze late outcomes of perilunar carpal dislocations, depending on the type of the injury, time of the diagnosis and the treatment methods. Material and methods. The material is constituted by 37 patients treated in our department between 1981-2004 because of perilunar dislocation. In group were 2 women and 35 men, aged 19-56 (mean 31 years). All patients were asked for control visit. DASH and Mayo score were used to evaluate the outcome. Range of wrist motion, its stability, grip strength and X-ray pictures were analyzed. Results. Better follow-up results were observed in persons with early diagnosed dislocations of the wrist. The best outcomes were observed in group with perilunar early diagnosed dislocations, which were treated by open reduction. Posttraumatic wrist instability often was diagnosed in patients with dislocation of lunar bone and late-diagnosed transscaphoid perilunar carpal dislocations. Conclusions. The data we obtained show, that the consequences of late-diagnosed and late-treated injuries of the wrist are instability, pain, decrease in range of motion and hand skills.

  19. Comparison of nerve conduction techniques in 95 mild carpal tunnel syndrome hands Síndrome do túnel do carpo leve: comparação de técnicas de condução nervosa em 95 mãos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOAO ARIS KOUYOUMDJIAN

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS were prospectively studied in 95 hands. The following techniques were studied in all hands and when at least one abnormal value was found (onset-measured, it was included on results: 1. wrist-index finger latency (WIF, abnormal > or = 2.8 ms, 140 mm; 2. palm-wrist latency (PW, abnormal > or = 1.8 ms, 80 mm; 3. comparison median/ulnar palm-wrist latency (CPW, abnormal > or = 0.4 ms; 4. comparison median/ulnar latency, wrist-ring finger (CMU, abnormal > or = 0.5 ms, 140 mm; 5. comparison median/radial latency, wrist-thumb (CMR, abnormal > or = 0.4 ms, 100 mm. All 95 CTS hands selected have the WIF Eletrodiagnóstico da síndrome do túnel do carpo (STC foi estudado prospectivamente em 95 mãos sintomáticas. As técnicas estudadas foram realizadas em todas mãos com latência medida no ínicio dos potenciais e pelo menos uma delas estava anormal dentro dos limites descritos: 1. Latência punho- II dedo (PD, anormal > ou = 2,8 ms, 140 mm; 2. Latência palma-punho (PP, anormal > ou = 1,8 ms, 80 mm; 3. Comparação de latência palma-punho mediano-ulnar (CP, anormal > ou = 0,4 ms, 80 mm; 4. Comparação de latência mediano-ulnar, punho- IV dedo (CMU, anormal > ou = 0,5 ms, 140 mm; 5. Comparação de latência mediano-radial, punho- I dedo (CMR, anormal > ou = 0,4 ms, 100 mm. Todas 95 mãos selecionadas tiveram PD <= 3,5 ms (STC leve. Concluiu-se que a CMR foi a técnica mais sensível para STC leve (97,8% e o único método comparativo com todos potenciais de ação obtidos; seguiram-se CP (88,4%, PP (84,2%, CMU (72,6% e PD (68,4%.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ankle (tarsal bones). In tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome , the carpal bones fuse together, as do the tarsal bones, which causes stiffness and immobility of the hands and feet. Symptoms of the ...

  1. Joint release rate estimation and measurement-by-measurement model correction for atmospheric radionuclide emission in nuclear accidents: An application to wind tunnel experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinpeng; Li, Hong; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Sheng

    2018-03-05

    The release rate of atmospheric radionuclide emissions is a critical factor in the emergency response to nuclear accidents. However, there are unavoidable biases in radionuclide transport models, leading to inaccurate estimates. In this study, a method that simultaneously corrects these biases and estimates the release rate is developed. Our approach provides a more complete measurement-by-measurement correction of the biases with a coefficient matrix that considers both deterministic and stochastic deviations. This matrix and the release rate are jointly solved by the alternating minimization algorithm. The proposed method is generic because it does not rely on specific features of transport models or scenarios. It is validated against wind tunnel experiments that simulate accidental releases in a heterogonous and densely built nuclear power plant site. The sensitivities to the position, number, and quality of measurements and extendibility of the method are also investigated. The results demonstrate that this method effectively corrects the model biases, and therefore outperforms Tikhonov's method in both release rate estimation and model prediction. The proposed approach is robust to uncertainties and extendible with various center estimators, thus providing a flexible framework for robust source inversion in real accidents, even if large uncertainties exist in multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The second lumbrical-interossei latency difference in carpal tunnel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All were subjected to routine median motor nerve conduction study with stimulation at midpalm, wrist and elbow, median-versus-radial sensory comparison study and Second lumbrical-versus-interosseus (2L-INT) motor comparison study. Results: The results showed that the most sensitive tests were the median-radial ...

  3. The second lumbrical-interossei latency difference in carpal tunnel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eman A. Tawfik

    2012-12-06

    Dec 6, 2012 ... Results: The results showed that the most sensitive tests were the median-radial sensory test and the 2LINT test and that both were correlated suggesting that the motor fibers of the median nerve can be compressed as early as ... nerve at the wrist resulting in mechanical compression and lo- cal ischemia1.

  4. Hour glass constriction in advanced carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dehghani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: We recommend epineurolysis for mild to moderate constriction and also end-to-end repair may be needed if extensive and severe constriction was found. It means that if we manage mild to moderate constriction sooner, it can prevent the need for further surgical procedure because of sever constriction.

  5. Carpal alignment in distal radial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Pankaj

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal malalignment following the malunited distal radial fracture is described to develop as an adaptation to realign the hand to the malunion. It worsens gradually after healing of the fracture due to continued loading of the wrist. It is also reported to develop during the immobilization itself rather than after fracture healing. The present work was aimed to study the natural course and the quantitative assessment of such adaptive carpal realignment following distal radial fracture. Methods In a prospective study, 118 distal radial fractures treated with different modalities were followed-up with serial radiographs for a year for assessment of various radiological parameters. Results Two patterns of carpal malalignment were identified depending upon the effective radio-lunate flexion (ERLF measured on pre-reduction radiographs. The midcarpal malalignment was seen in 98 radial fractures (83% with the lunate following the dorsiflexed fracture fragment and a measured ERLF of less than 25°. The second pattern of radio-carpal malalignment showed the fracture fragment to dorsiflex without taking the lunate with a measured ERLF of more than 25°. The scaphoid did not follow the fracture fragment in both the patterns of malalignment. Conclusion It is better to assess distal radial fractures for any wrist ligamentous injury on the post-reduction film with the restored radial anatomy than on the pre-reduction film since most carpal malalignments get corrected with the reduction of the fracture. Similar carpal malalignment reappear with the redisplacement of the fracture as seen in pre-reduction radiographs and develops during the immobilization rather than as a later compensatory mechanism for the malunion.

  6. [Carpal malalignment following distal radius fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulet, B; Gauci, M-O; Lazerges, C; Chammas, M

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive carpal malalignment is the consequence of malunion of the distal radius. Since the radial metaphysis and capitate have to be aligned, any disorientation of the radial epiphysis will force the proximal carpal row to adapt, as it is the only mobile element. There are two types of adaptation depending where the compensative occurs: (1) midcarpal - leading to flexion between the lunate and capitate, with the lunate maintaining a normal relationship with the radial epiphysis axis; (2) radiocarpal - combining flexion and dorsal displacement of the lunate relative to the axis of the radial epiphysis, with the midcarpal joint remaining aligned. Clinically, adaptive carpal malalignment is not the first reason for consultation in cases of distal radius malunion. It occurs in cases of moderate deformity with preserved pronation-supination in a young patient who has good mobility. It generates dorsal pain that may be associated with a snapping sensation. The diagnosis requires strict lateral X-ray views. Over time, the wrist becomes stiff but analgesic and is often well tolerated functionally. This type of deformity has not been shown to lead to osteoarthritis. Osteotomy to correct the malunion is the only way to treat adaptive carpal malalignment in active young patients who have a mobile but painful wrist. Copyright © 2016 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  8. Homologies and homeotic transformation of the theropod 'semilunate' carpal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Han, Fenglu; Zhao, Qi

    2014-08-13

    The homology of the 'semilunate' carpal, an important structure linking non-avian and avian dinosaurs, has been controversial. Here we describe the morphology of some theropod wrists, demonstrating that the 'semilunate' carpal is not formed by the same carpal elements in all theropods possessing this feature and that the involvement of the lateralmost distal carpal in forming the 'semilunate' carpal of birds is an inheritance from their non-avian theropod ancestors. Optimization of relevant morphological features indicates that these features evolved in an incremental way and the 'semilunate' structure underwent a lateral shift in position during theropod evolution, possibly as a result of selection for foldable wings in birds and their close theropod relatives. We propose that homeotic transformation was involved in the evolution of the 'semilunate' carpal. In combination with developmental data on avian wing digits, this suggests that homeosis played a significant role in theropod hand evolution in general.

  9. Carpal ligamentous laxity with bilateral perilunate dislocation in Marfan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennes, D.R.; Braunstein, E.M.; Shirazi, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    A case of persistent bilateral perilunate dislocation unrelated to trauma in a patient with Marfan syndrome is discussed. This finding is believed to be a manifestation of the generalized ligamentous laxity occurring in this disorder. Radiographs of eight additional Marfan syndrome patients failed to demonstrate similar carpal instability. Because some carpal derangements are dynamic events, stress views or wrist fluoroscopy may be necessary to demonstrate unsuspected carpal instability in Marfan patients. (orig.)

  10. Carpal ligamentous laxity with bilateral perilunate dislocation in Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennes, D.R.; Braunstein, E.M.; Shirazi, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    A case of persistent bilateral perilunate dislocation unrelated to trauma in a patient with Marfan syndrome is discussed. This finding is believed to be a manifestation of the generalized ligamentous laxity occurring in this disorder. Radiographs of eight additional Marfan syndrome patients failed to demonstrate similar carpal instability. Because some carpal derangements are dynamic events, stress views or wrist fluoroscopy may be necessary to demonstrate unsuspected carpal instability in Marfan patients.

  11. MR imaging of avascular necrosis of carpal bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yasunori; Funaoka, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Munehito; Iwahashi, Toshiyuki; Egawa, Hiromitsu; Shima, Kimihiro; Tamaoki, Tetsuya.

    1991-01-01

    The usefulness of MRI in carpal avascular necrosis was investigated in 20 cases, 16 in lunates, 3 in scaphoids and 1 in triquetrum, with T1 and T2 weighted images of the spin echo and T2 weighted images of the field echo. Early diagnosis of carpal bone necrosis was possible when the T1 weighted image showed a moderate low intensity signal. A high intensity signal in the T2 weighted image indicated the onset of revascularization, and a favorable prognosis. A normal signal indicated healing of carpal avascular necrosis. MRI was found to be very useful in establishing the diagnosis and in determining the prognosis of carpal osteonecrosis. (author)

  12. Seasonal distribution and demographical characteristics of carpal tunnel syndrome in 1039 patients Distribuição sazonal e características demográficas da síndrome do túnel do carpo em 1039 pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irênio Gomes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the demographic characteristics of gender, age, and presence of repetitive movements, intake of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatories (NSAI, medical specialties that referred patients to nerve conduction studies and electromyography (NCS-EMG, school attainment, and seasonal distribution in patients with a neurophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. METHOD: A series of 1039 patients (1549 hands with neurophysiologically defined CTS was studied. Patients were referred for NCS-EMG in 3 universities and 2 private services, from August 2001 to January 2003. All patients completed a questionnaire containing demographic information. The diagnosis of CTS was established following a pre-established protocol, with defined diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: Around one fourth of patients had already performed NCS-EMG; the greatest frequency of CTS was observed in women (5.6:1 and in patients above the age of 40. Most patients reported performing repetitive movements in their daily routine (69.7%; 12.9% reported use of NSAI and 14.9% regular intake of alcoholic beverages. A greater frequency of CTS was observed in the months of July and August, when compared to the other months of the year. Around 2/3 of the study population had completed at least secondary school. Most requests of nerve conduction studies did not provide a diagnostic hypothesis (59.9% and neurophysiologic studies were requested mostly by traumatology/orthopedics (71.1%. CONCLUSION: We have concluded that, in our environment, CTS shows some demographical characteristics that are similar to what the literature describes. Also, we have found that most of our sample concluded at least secondary school, and was referred to neurophysiologic studies by orthopedists. To be pointed out is the seasonal distribution of CTS, which demonstrates a significant association with winter months.OBJETIVO: Descrever as caracter

  13. Carpal hygroma in one sheep - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geórgia Camargo Góss

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Góss G.C., Duarte C.A., Leite C.T., Cogo A.B., Pereira E.P., Döwich G. & da Rosa L.R. [Carpal hygroma in one sheep - Case report.] Higroma carpal em ovino - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária 38(4:445-448, 2016. Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal do Pampa, BR 472, Km 592, Caixa Postal 118, Uruguaiana, RS 97508-000, Brasil. E-mail: georgia_goss@hotmail.com The carpal hygroma is characterized by an abnormal fluid accumulation in a dorsal surface of this region, that is presented with soft consistency, painless and doesn’t lead to lameness. The main cause of hygroma is a constant local trauma. This is a commom disease in horses who live in hard surface sites and, it can also affect ruminants. The diagnosis is achieved by clinical signs and additional tests such as cytological analysis, radiographic and sonographic. The early diagnosis is important because the therapeutic options vary with the degree of evolution of the disease. The treatment may vary from hygroma drainage, with or without application of corticosteroids, followed by compressive bandages to the surgical ablation of this. The objective of this case report is to account the occurrence of a carpal hygroma in sheep. This report is important because the sheeps are being widely created in intensive systems and diseases like hygroma are becoming common, because this is a fundamental supply subsidy to the clinicians, in the literature, to assist in their daily routine.

  14. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  15. A radiographic investigation of third carpal bone injury in 42 racing thoroughbreds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Haan, C.E.; O'Brien, T.R.; Koblik, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective study of carpal radiographs from 42 racing thoroughbreds with carpal lameness was performed. Radiographs from 50 carpal examinations were available for review. The radiographic findings pertaining to the third carpal bone were described. Fractures and/or sclerosis occurred almost exclusively within the radial fossa. The occurrence of sclerosis without fracture in 20 of the 50 carpal examinations was higher than anticipated, occurring in both the right and left third carpal bone with equal frequency. The right third carpal bone was more frequently fractured and more severely affected than the left. The sclerotic changes seen in the radial fossa of the third carpal bone may be stress-induced, possibly preceding more serious changes in the joint such as cartilage damage or gross fracture. Earlier recognition of sclerosis of the third carpal bone may help prevent more serious changes from occurring

  16. Measuring fire size in tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qihui

    2013-01-01

    A new measure of fire size Q′ has been introduced in longitudinally ventilated tunnel as the ratio of flame height to the height of tunnel. The analysis in this article has shown that Q′ controls both the critical velocity and the maximum ceiling temperature in the tunnel. Before the fire flame reaches tunnel ceiling (Q′ 1.0), Fr approaches a constant value. This is also a well-known phenomenon in large tunnel fires. Tunnel ceiling temperature shows the opposite trend. Before the fire flame reaches the ceiling, it increases very slowly with the fire size. Once the flame has hit the ceiling of tunnel, temperature rises rapidly with Q′. The good agreement between the current prediction and three different sets of experimental data has demonstrated that the theory has correctly modelled the relation among the heat release rate of fire, ventilation flow and the height of tunnel. From design point of view, the theoretical maximum of critical velocity for a given tunnel can help to prevent oversized ventilation system. -- Highlights: • Fire sizing is an important safety measure in tunnel design. • New measure of fire size a function of HRR of fire, tunnel height and ventilation. • The measure can identify large and small fires. • The characteristics of different fire are consistent with observation in real fires

  17. The role of proprioception and neuromuscular stability in carpal instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, E; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-01-01

    Carpal stability has traditionally been defined as dependent on the articular congruity of joint surfaces, the static stability maintained by intact ligaments, and the dynamic stability caused by muscle contractions resulting in a compression of joint surfaces. In the past decade, a fourth factor in carpal stability has been proposed, involving the neuromuscular and proprioceptive control of joints. The proprioception of the wrist originates from afferent signals elicited by sensory end organs (mechanoreceptors) in ligaments and joint capsules that elicit spinal reflexes for immediate joint stability, as well as higher order neuromuscular influx to the cerebellum and sensorimotor cortices for planning and executing joint control. The aim of this review is to provide an understanding of the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in carpal instabilities by delineating the sensory innervation and the neuromuscular control of the carpus, as well as descriptions of clinical applications of proprioception in carpal instabilities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Badawi, Ramsey D; Leahy, Richard M; Joshi, Anand A; Wise, Barton L; Lane, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric—global point signature (GPS)—that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GPS representation—such as stability, a standard Euclidean (ℓ 2 ) metric definition, and invariance to scaling, translation and rotation—to perform shape analysis of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed GPS representation to provide a means for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations. (paper)

  19. Avaliação do questionário de Boston aplicado no pós-operatório tardio da síndrome do tunel do carpo operados pela técnica de retinaculótomo de paine por via palmar Evaluation of Boston questionnaire applied at late pos-operative period of carpal tunnel syndrome operated with the paine retinaculatome through palmar port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Miyamoto Meirelles

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Entre os anos de 1995 e 1998, foram realizadas 112 cirurgias para tratamento da Síndrome do Túnel do Carpo (STC pela técnica de incisão palmar e utilização do retináculo de Paine. Com o objetivo de avaliar os resultados em longo prazo, os pacientes foram convocados. Houve o retorno de 44 pacientes. Deste total, três pacientes, por terem doenças associadas, foram excluídos, resultando, um total de 53 mãos analisadas. Apresentaremos os resultados da avaliação subjetiva, obtidos através da aplicação de um teste de auto-avaliação chamado de questionário de Boston. Este questionário consiste em perguntas que avaliam a gravidade dos sintomas e o estado funcional no momento da aplicação do mesmo. Através da aplicação do referido questionário encontramos um escore de 1,41 ± 0,57 para gravidade dos sintomas e 1,59 ± 0,93 para o estado funcional. Como este questionário não foi aplicado no pré-operatório deste grupo de pacientes analisados, comparou-se a pontuação obtida com as encontradas na literatura pertinente. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que as pontuações pós-operatórias são similares àquelas existentes na literatura, mesmo sendo referidas a tempos diferentes de seguimento pós-operatórios, concluindo que havendo uma melhora dos sintomas, o questionário de Boston é sensível a esta mudança clínica.Between the years of 1995 and 1998, 112 surgeries were performed for treating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS using the technique of palmar incision employing the Paine retinaculum. With the objective of analyzing results in the long-term, the patients were called for review. Forty four patients returned. From these, three patients were excluded due to associated diseases, thus resulting in a total of 53 hands assessed. Here we present the results of the subjective evaluation achieved by applying a self-assessment test called Boston questionnaire. This questionnaire consists of questions evaluating symptoms

  20. Frontal plane fractures of the accessory carpal bone and implications for the carpal sheath of the digital flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, G J; Wright, I M

    2014-09-01

    Accurate radiological and ultrasonographic descriptions of frontal plane fractures of the accessory carpal bone (ACB) are lacking, and implications of these fractures for the carpal sheath and its contents have not previously been reported. Aims were as follows: 1) to describe the location and radiological features of frontal plane fractures of the ACB; 2) to document communication of displaced fractures with the carpal sheath and consequent injury to the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT); 3) to describe ultrasonographic identification of lesions; and 4) to report tenoscopic evaluation and treatment. Retrospective case series. Analysis of frontal plane fractures of the ACB referred to a single hospital between 2006 and 2012, including review of radiographic, ultrasonographic and tenoscopic images. Nine fractures were identified, of which 8 displaced fractures all communicated with the carpal sheath. Comminuted fragments and/or protruding fracture margins lacerated the lateral margin of the enclosed DDFT. This was identifiable ultrasonographically and confirmed at tenoscopy in 7 cases. Treatment in these horses consisted of removal of torn tendon tissue together with fragmentation and protuberant fracture edges, and 7 of 7 cases returned to work. One horse with a nondisplaced fracture was managed with immobilisation; the fracture healed, and the horse returned to work. One horse with a displaced fracture was retired to stud. Frontal plane fractures of the ACB occur palmar to the groove in its lateral margin for the tendon of insertion of ulnaris lateralis. Comminuted fragments can displace distally within the carpal sheath to a mid-metacarpal level or abaxially to lie extrathecally, lateral to the parent bone. Displaced fractures communicate with the carpal sheath and traumatise the DDFT. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  2. Recognition tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Sankey, Otto [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 1862 53, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-02

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  3. Adverse events of open A1 pulley release for idiopathic trigger finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnzeel, Hanneke; Neuhaus, Valentin; Fostvedt, Sigrid; Jupiter, Jesse B; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Ring, David C

    2012-08-01

    To classify and report adverse events of trigger finger release in a large cohort of patients. We retrospectively reviewed 1,598 trigger finger releases performed by 12 surgeons in 984 patients between 2001 and 2011. Adverse events were classified based on a system derived from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria and clinical experience. Risk factors for various adverse events were sought in bivariate and multivariable statistical analysis. At the latest follow-up, 66 patients (7%), or 84 operated trigger digits (5%), experienced a documented adverse event. The most common adverse events were recovery issues in 46 patients (3%) (such as postoperative symptoms treated with steroid injection or slow recovery of motion treated with hand therapy), wound problems in 30 patients (2%) (consisting of suture abscess, superficial infection, or wound separation), persistent postoperative triggering in 10 patients (0.6%), and recurrent triggering in 4 patients (0.3%). Diabetes mellitus was associated with wound problems, slow recovery of motion, and recurrence. Concomitant carpal tunnel release on the same side was associated with slow recovery. Fourteen patients, less than 1%, in this cohort experienced an adverse event, such as persistent or recurrent triggering, requiring secondary surgery. No nerve injury or deep infection occurred in our cohort. One in 15 patients experienced a minor transient or treatable adverse event, and patients with diabetes were at greater risk. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The carpal boss: surgical treatment and etiological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuono, C B; Watson, H K

    1979-01-01

    We report on 30 symptomatic cases of carpal boss which were treated surgically. The condition represents a highly localized degenerative arthritis at the base of the middle metacarpal, and is seen primarily in relatively young patients. Symptomatic relief was obtained by excision of degenerated tissue in all these patients.

  5. Carpal myxosarcoma and forelimb amputation in a ferret

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeland, Y.R.A.; Hernandez-Divers, S.J.; Blasier, M.W.; Vila-Garcia, G.; Delong, D.; Stedman, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Vet Rec. 2006 Dec 2;159(23):782-5. Carpal myxosarcoma and forelimb amputation in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo). van Zeeland YR, Hernandez-Divers SJ, Blasier MW, Vila-Garcia G, Delong D, Stedman NL. Department of Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Utrecht,

  6. Vascularized bone grafting in a canine carpal avascular necrosis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Wouter F.; Alberton, Gregory M.; Bishop, Allen T.; Kremer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Limited experimental research has been performed on the treatment of avascular necrosis (AVN) by vascularized bone grafting. A new model simulating carpal AVN was created to investigate surgical revascularization of necrotic bone. In seven mongrel dogs, AVN was induced by removal of the radial

  7. Tunnel fire testing and modeling the Morgex North tunnel experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borghetti, Fabio; Gandini, Paolo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Tavelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to cast light on all aspects of tunnel fires, based on experimental activities and theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. In particular, the authors describe a transient full-scale fire test (~15 MW), explaining how they designed and performed the experimental activity inside the Morgex North tunnel in Italy. The entire organization of the experiment is described, from preliminary evaluations to the solutions found for management of operational difficulties and safety issues. This fire test allowed the collection of different measurements (temperature, air velocity, smoke composition, pollutant species) useful for validating and improving CFD codes and for testing the real behavior of the tunnel and its safety systems during a diesel oil fire with a significant heat release rate. Finally, the fire dynamics are compared with empirical correlations, CFD simulations, and literature measurements obtained in other similar tunnel fire tests. This book will be of interest to all ...

  8. Luxation of the radial carpal bone in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, G.D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A case of radial carpal bone luxation in the cat and its management is described. Open reduction was performed and surgically maintained, in combination with repair of rupture of the short radial collateral ligament and joint capsule. The carpus was supported for one month following surgery by application of transarticular external fixation. Four months after treatment the cat was sound, despite evidence of degenerative joint disease. The mechanism of luxation appears to be analogous to that seen in the dog

  9. Incidence of carpal boss and osseous coalition: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemohammad, Amir M; Nakamura, Koji; El-Sheneway, Maged; Viegas, Steven F

    2009-01-01

    To determine the incidence of a clinically evident carpal boss (bony prominence on the dorsal aspect of the second and/or third carpometacarpal joint) and by means of dissection to determine the incidence of osseous coalitions and any abnormality or absence of associated ligament anatomy in the second through fifth carpometacarpal joints in a cadaver population. The area of the second through fifth carpometacarpal joints was dissected in 202 cadaver wrists. Thirty-nine of the wrists had a bony prominence and partial osseous coalition between 2 or more of the capitate, trapezoid, second metacarpal, and third metacarpal bones. When an osseous coalition was present it was incomplete, located at the dorsal aspect of the joint, and there was an absence of the normal dorsal ligaments at that joint. Ten of the 87 pairs of wrists were found to have bilateral carpal bosses with partial dorsal osseous coalition. The most common location of the osseous partial coalition was between the second metacarpal and the trapezoid. There were no osseous coalitions or absence of the normal dorsal ligaments at the fourth and/or fifth carpometacarpal joints. This study showed that there was a high percentage of partial osseous coalitions with an associated prominence of the skeletal anatomy in the general cadaver population. The etiology of the carpal boss remains unclear.

  10. A digital database of wrist bone anatomy and carpal kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Douglas C; Crisco, Joseph J; Trafton, Theodore G; Leventhal, Evan L

    2007-01-01

    The skeletal wrist consists of eight small, intricately shaped carpal bones. The motion of these bones is complex, occurs in three dimensions, and remains incompletely defined. Our previous efforts have been focused on determining the in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) kinematics of the normal and abnormal carpus. In so doing we have developed an extensive database of carpal bone anatomy and kinematics from a large number of healthy subjects. The purpose of this paper is to describe that database and to make it available to other researchers. CT volume images of both wrists from 30 healthy volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were acquired in multiple wrist positions throughout the normal range of wrist motion. The outer cortical surfaces of the carpal bones, radius and ulna, and proximal metacarpals were segmented and the 3-D motion of each bone was calculated for each wrist position. The database was constructed to include high-resolution surface models, measures of bone volume and shape, and the 3-D kinematics of each segmented bone. The database does not include soft tissues of the wrist. While there are numerous digital anatomical databases, this one is unique in that it includes a large number of subjects and it contains in vivo kinematic data as well as the bony anatomy.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a one...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a one...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a one-piece...

  14. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite | Sbai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead ...

  15. An Association between Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Migraine Headaches—National Health Interview Survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huay-Zong Law, MD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate an association between CTS and migraine headache. Longitudinal and genetic studies with physician verification of migraine headaches and CTS are needed to further define this association.

  16. New role for insulin injection in the treatment of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Eldessouki Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Local insulin injection effectively reduced the symptoms of CTS and improved electrophysiological findings in the present study. Our findings suggest that local insulin injection may be of great benefit in improving nerve functions in patients with mild to moderate idiopathic CTS. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings and to compare local insulin injection with conventional approaches for the treatment of CTS.

  17. Patient-Reported Disability Measures Do Not Correlate with Electrodiagnostic Severity in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob E. Tulipan, MD

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions:. Electrodiagnostic severity grades do not correlate with patient-reported disability, including the DASH and MCS–12 surveys. There is a counterintuitive correlation between more-severe electrodiagnostic findings and decreased physical disability. These findings indicate that disability may not correlate with electrodiagnostic severity of median neuropathy in CTS.

  18. Needle electromyography in carpal tunnel syndrome: is it valuable or predictable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa S El-Emary

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion It can be concluded that median nerve CMAP amplitudes are the most powerful predictors of the occurrence of spontaneous EMG activity. However, EMG examination is still valuable in some CTS patients and NCS cannot completely replace needle EMG examination in these patients.

  19. Meta-Analysis: Association Between Wrist Posture and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doohee You

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: We found evidence that prolonged exposure to non-neutral wrist postures is associated with a twofold increased risk for CTS compared with low hours of exposure to non-neutral wrist postures. Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures.

  20. A prog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldgaard, Anette; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Dalsgaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic carpal tunnel release with a single portal technique has been shown to reduce sick leave compared to open carpal tunnel release, claiming to be a less invasive procedure and reducing scar tenderness leading to a more rapid return to work, and the purpose of this study was t...

  1. Arthroscopic removal of discrete palmar carpal osteochondral fragments in horses: 25 cases (1999-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hayley M; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-05-01

    To characterize discrete palmar carpal osteochondral fragmentation in horses and to document the effect of osteoarthritis and surgical removal of these fragments on functional outcome. Retrospective case series. 25 horses. Medical records and radiographic views were reviewed to identify horses that had radiographic evidence of palmar carpal fragmentation, which was subsequently treated by arthroscopic removal. Information collected included cause of fracture, initial and long-term clinical and radiographic findings, and functional outcome. Palmar carpal fragmentation of 30 carpal bones was identified in 25 unilaterally affected horses. A known traumatic event was reported to cause the fragmentation in 17 of the 25 (68%) horses. Of the 25 horses, 17 (68%) had fragmentation involving the antebrachiocarpal joint, 7 (28%) had fragmentation involving the middle carpal joint, and 1 (4%) had fragmentation involving the carpometacarpal joint. The proximal aspect of the radial carpal bone was the most commonly affected site (12/30 fragments), followed by the accessory carpal bone (6/30). Of the 25 horses, 19 (76%) were not lame (sound) after surgery and returned to their intended use, 4 (16%) were considered pasture sound, and 2 were euthanized (because of severe postoperative osteoarthritis or long bone fracture during recovery from anesthesia). Eight of the 14 horses with preoperative evidence of osteoarthritis returned to function after surgery. Twelve of 17 horses with antebrachiocarpal joint fragments and 6 of 7 horses with middle carpal joint fragments returned to their previous use. Results indicated that the prognosis for horses after arthroscopic removal of palmar carpal osteochondral fragments is good. Early intervention, before the development of osteoarthritis, is recommended.

  2. DNS Tunneling Detection Method Based on Multilabel Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Almusawi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available DNS tunneling is a method used by malicious users who intend to bypass the firewall to send or receive commands and data. This has a significant impact on revealing or releasing classified information. Several researchers have examined the use of machine learning in terms of detecting DNS tunneling. However, these studies have treated the problem of DNS tunneling as a binary classification where the class label is either legitimate or tunnel. In fact, there are different types of DNS tunneling such as FTP-DNS tunneling, HTTP-DNS tunneling, HTTPS-DNS tunneling, and POP3-DNS tunneling. Therefore, there is a vital demand to not only detect the DNS tunneling but rather classify such tunnel. This study aims to propose a multilabel support vector machine in order to detect and classify the DNS tunneling. The proposed method has been evaluated using a benchmark dataset that contains numerous DNS queries and is compared with a multilabel Bayesian classifier based on the number of corrected classified DNS tunneling instances. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed SVM classification method by obtaining an f-measure of 0.80.

  3. ANATOMICAL DISPOSITION OF CARPAL BONES OF GOLDEN RETRIEVER DOG BY X-RAY EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mandal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to know the general disposition of bones in carpal region of experimental dogs by X-ray study with an objective that the findings will facilitate to have an in-depth knowledge about the proper positioning of the carpal bones for surgical management of fractures and different types of bone deformities in dogs. In the present study, the anatomical disposition and arrangement pattern of carpal bones playing a pivotal role in providing the structural conformity in the limbs of Golden Retriever dog has been thoroughly confirmed by Xray exposure.

  4. A Top Pilot Tunnel Preconditioning Method for the Prevention of Extremely Intense Rockbursts in Deep Tunnels Excavated by TBMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanqing; Feng, Xiating; Zhou, Hui; Qiu, Shili; Wu, Wenping

    2012-05-01

    The headrace tunnels at the Jinping II Hydropower Station cross the Jinping Mountain with a maximum overburden depth of 2,525 m, where 80% of the strata along the tunnels consist of marble. A number of extremely intense rockbursts occurred during the excavation of the auxiliary tunnels and the drainage tunnel. In particular, a tunnel boring machine (TBM) was destroyed by an extremely intense rockburst in a 7.2-m-diameter drainage tunnel. Two of the four subsequent 12.4-m-diameter headrace tunnels will be excavated with larger size TBMs, where a high risk of extremely intense rockbursts exists. Herein, a top pilot tunnel preconditioning method is proposed to minimize this risk, in which a drilling and blasting method is first recommended for the top pilot tunnel excavation and support, and then the TBM excavation of the main tunnel is conducted. In order to evaluate the mechanical effectiveness of this method, numerical simulation analyses using the failure approaching index, energy release rate, and excess shear stress indices are carried out. Its construction feasibility is discussed as well. Moreover, a microseismic monitoring technique is used in the experimental tunnel section for the real-time monitoring of the microseismic activities of the rock mass in TBM excavation and for assessing the effect of the top pilot tunnel excavation in reducing the risk of rockbursts. This method is applied to two tunnel sections prone to extremely intense rockbursts and leads to a reduction in the risk of rockbursts in TBM excavation.

  5. [The ordinal localization of multiple mono-type carpal bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Zamiatina, A O

    2003-01-01

    The case study was based on the osteologic collection of the chair for anthropology, State Moscow University, including the male carpal bones (67) and female carpal bones (13), aged above 18 to 20. Four measurements were made according to Martin's scheme for metacarpal bones and finger phalanxes. A diagnostic method was worked out on the bases of the discriminative analysis, with such method enabling the remodeling of the ordinal localization of metacarpal bones as well as of main, medium and distal phalanxes. The maximally accurate classification was ensured for metacarpal bones, ranging from 81.5% to 100%; and the minimally accurate one was achieved for distal phalanxes, ranging from 20% to 95%. The discriminative analysis results were checked for distal phalanxes by Neklyudov's series (male--100, female--85); they were described according to 7 sizes. However, an attempt to enhance the accuracy of the classification of these phalanxes failed. The offered method should be applied in combination with the traditional anatomic-and-morphological method; besides, if possible, it is necessary to check the congruence of joint surfaces in the metacarpal interphalangeal joints.

  6. COBRA-Bee Carpal-Wrist Gimbal for Astrobee, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes to develop a carpal-wrist gimbal payload for the Astrobee free-flier, called 'COBRA-Bee' to satisfy Astrobee mission needs for a lightweight, integrated...

  7. Global spectral graph wavelet signature for surface analysis of carpal bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Majid; Rezaei, Mahsa; Ben Hamza, A.

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative shape comparison is a fundamental problem in computer vision, geometry processing and medical imaging. In this paper, we present a spectral graph wavelet approach for shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We employ spectral graph wavelets to represent the cortical surface of a carpal bone via the spectral geometric analysis of the Laplace-Beltrami operator in the discrete domain. We propose global spectral graph wavelet (GSGW) descriptor that is isometric invariant, efficient to compute, and combines the advantages of both low-pass and band-pass filters. We perform experiments on shapes of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database of wrist bones. Using one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and permutation testing, we show through extensive experiments that the proposed GSGW framework gives a much better performance compared to the global point signature embedding approach for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations.

  8. Evaluation of application of a carpal brace as a treatment for carpal ligament instability in dogs: 14 cases (2008-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Julia E; Manfredi, Jane M

    2014-02-15

    To determine whether carpal brace application is a viable treatment for dogs with unilateral carpal ligament instability. Retrospective case series. 14 client-owned athletic dogs. Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs treated with a brace for unilateral carpal valgus or varus instability between August 2008 and August 2011. Treatment included passive motion and isometric strengthening exercises during brace application. Of the 14 dogs, 11 were considered to have returned to normal function; 11 of 12 dogs returned to agility competition. Carpal measurements before treatment indicated the affected limb had significantly greater valgus measurements (median, 30°; range, 30° to 35°), significantly greater varus measurements (median, 15°; range, 15° to 25°), and significantly less flexion (median, 37.5°; range, 30° to 45°), compared with results for the contralateral carpus. Long-term monitoring revealed no differences in measurements between affected and contralateral limbs. Valgus measurements of the affected carpus at brace removal (median, 15°; range, 15° to 20°) and at the end of long-term monitoring (median, 15°; range, 15° to 20°) were significantly lower than measurements before treatment (median, 30°; range, 30° to 35°). Dogs had significantly lower lameness scores (assessed on a scale of 0 to 5) at brace removal (median, 0; range, 0) and at the end of monitoring (median, 0; range, 0 to 2), compared with scores before treatment (median, 3; range, 1 to 3). Application of a carpal brace resulted in improved stability and resolution or reduction in lameness in dogs with carpal ligament instability.

  9. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  10. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  11. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  12. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  13. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hospital, Norfolk, VA, 5/08/2008) Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release (Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital, Greenville, SC, 4/20/2012) Genetic Brain Disorders Treating Moyamoya Disease (Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Sciatica ...

  14. Major SSC tunneling begins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    In Texas, work has been completed on the first on the Superconducting Supercollider's major shafts. Now a boring machine has started driving the fifty-four mile elliptical accelerator tunnel. To date, contracts let for the tunnel have come in far below preliminary estimates. Five of the main fourteen foot diameter tunnel contracts have been awarded for a total of 107.4 million dollars, about forty million dollars below estimates. These contracts represent %60 percent of the total tunneling project

  15. [Occupational risk factors for radial tunnel syndrome in factory workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquelaure, Y; Raimbeau, G; Saint-Cast, Y; Martin, Y H; Pelier-Cady, M C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the professional and extraprofessional risk factors for radial tunnel syndrome (RTS) in employees of three large companies. Twenty-one cases of RTS were compared to 21 controls, matched for age, sex, and activity. In nine cases, RTS was associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. The analysis considered medical history, extraprofessional activity, and the ergonomic and organisational aspects of work. The study demonstrated three risk factors of RTS related to work conditions. The regular use of a force of at least 1 kg (OR = 9.1 (1.4-56.9)) more than 10 times per hour is the main biomechanical risk factor. Static work (OR = 5.9 (1.2-29.9)) as well as work with the elbow constantly extended 0 degree to 45 degrees, is strongly associated with an increased risk of RTS (OR = 4.9 (1.0-25.0)). Complete extension of the elbow associated with pronation and supination of the forearm may cause trauma to the radial nerve in the radial tunnel. On the other hand, we found no personal factors and no extraprofessional activities which were associated with an increased risk of RTS. This study shows that motions of the forearm requiring intense effort and performed with the elbow in extension and the forearm in pronation and supination increase the risk of RTS.

  16. Fire analyses in central and disposal tunnels by APROS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltokorpi, L.; Kukkola, T.; Nieminen, J.

    2012-12-01

    The central tunnels and the disposal tunnels on the north-east disposal area are the target areas of the fire studies. Target is to maintain under pressure in the fire zone in case of a fire. In the central tunnels a fire of a drilling jumbo with moderate fire propagation is used as heat release rate. In the disposal tunnel the heat release rate of a canister transfer and installation vehicle fire received as a result of the pyrolysis analyze as well as an average heat release rate of a van fire are used. Inlet air is to be conducted to the back end of the fire zone and the exhaust is to be lead out from the beginning of the fire zone. The worst location of the fire is in the beginning of the fire zone just below of the exhaust air clap valve. The size of the fire zone does not have big impact on pressure. In all analyzed cases the fire zone remains too long time over pressurized. Inlet air flow of a 30 m 3 /s is too much. The rotation controlled booster blowers will solve the pressure problems of the fire zone in fire cases. The rotation is controlled by the fire zone pressure. The fire of the canister transfer and installation vehicle in the central tunnel will not cause problems. The disposal tunnel fire door should be kept open, if the canister transfer and installation vehicle or the bentonite blocks transfer and installation vehicle is driven into the disposal tunnel. If a fire is caught in the disposal tunnel then the fire zone in the central tunnel is to be closed and the pressure is controlled by the rotation controlled booster blowers. If a personnel car or a van is driven into the disposal tunnel, then fire door of the disposal is to be kept closed against fires in the central tunnel. (orig.)

  17. [Reflections on 4 cases of ante-lunar carpal luxations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichard, P; Tropet, Y; Balmat, P; Brientini, J M; Pem, R

    1991-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, 4 cases of ante-lunate carpal dislocation have been treated in the Traumatology and Orthopaedics Department of Besançon. During this same period, 61 cases of retro-lunate dislocation have also been treated. Ante-lunate dislocations are very rare lesions as confirmed by a review of the literature. Our cases do not illustrate the mechanisms of such injuries since 3 cases involved patients with multiple injuries Clinical symptoms may be very minor in children in whom such injuries may easily be overlooked. A thorough interpretation of X-rays is necessary for diagnosis in adults. All 4 cases showed a fracture of the lunate in a frontal plane (factor of instability). Such an instable lesion justifies either internal osteosynthesis or percutaneous trans-articular pinning when rigid internal fixation is impossible. However, in all cases in which the lesion was treated surgically, the capsular plane was not disrupted. Retrospectively, such a finding contraindicates an open surgical approach. Relationships between such dislocations and isolated fractures of the lunate are discussed. The prognosis is mainly determined by early diagnosis and management rather than the type of treatment itself.

  18. Complex transradial carpal dislocation in a Professional Pianist: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzini, Alessio; Paterlini, Marco; Pompili, Massimo; Tocco, Silvio; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2014-08-20

    Carpal fracture-dislocation associated to distal radius fractures is an uncommon injury of the wrist. Clinical assessment, instrumental diagnosis and treatment are all challenges for the surgeon. In addition, the prognosis in high-functioning patients is nearly always poor. The authors describe an early diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation and joint capsule tear associated with radial styloid and triquetral fractures in a 39-year-old professional piano player. A dorsal approach was used to reduce and fixate the fracture with k-wires, and to repair soft-tissue injuries with a Titanium micro-anchor. Early controlled mobilization was prescribed post-operatively. No other similar investigations were found because of the various associated fractures in the current case study, which normally excludes subjects from retrospective outcome studies on wrist ligament repair. Early diagnosis and surgical management associated with early controlled mobilization resulted in excellent clinical outcomes, according to radiograph imaging, the Italian version of the DASH score (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand), goniometry and dynamometry.

  19. Current Concepts of the Carpal Boss: Pathophysiology, Symptoms, Clinical or Imaging Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrino, Jack; Maloney, Ezekiel; Chew, Felix S

    2015-01-01

    The carpal boss reflects an osseous protuberance at the level of the dorsal base of the second or third metacarpal, variably present in the general population. There are numerous theories as to the etiology of the bony excrescence; however, the exact cause remains uncertain. The abnormality can result in dorsal wrist pain and swelling. The diagnosis is typically established based on clinical examination and imaging, including radiography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. We review the proposed theories of how the carpal boss develops, explain the clinical manifestations, demonstrate the imaging appearance, and address treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Alvaro G; Santschi, Elizabeth M

    2015-02-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging.

  1. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Alvaro G.; Santschi, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging. PMID:25694665

  2. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  3. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  4. Carpal pseudoerosions: a plain X-ray interpretation pitfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawer, Richard [Univ. Catholique de Lille (France). Service d' Imagerie Medicale; Budzik, Jean Francois [Univ. Catholique de Lille (France). Service d' Imagerie Medicale; Univ. Nord de France, Boulogne sur Mer (France). Unite de Recherche EA 4490, Physiopathologie des Maladies Osseuses Inflammatoires; Demondion, Xavier [Univ. Lille 2 (France). Service d' Imagerie Musculosquelettique; CHRU Lille (France). Lab. d' Anatomie; Forzy, Gerard [Univ. Catholique de Lille, Lomme (France). Lab. de Biologie; Cotten, Anne [Univ. Lille 2 (France). Service d' Imagerie Musculosquelettique; Univ. Nord de France, Boulogne sur Mer (France). Unite de Recherche EA 4490, Physiopathologie des Maladies Osseuses Inflammatoires

    2014-10-15

    To examine in detail images of pseudoerosion of the wrist and hand on plain radiographs. The study was conducted with 28 cadaver wrists. During a single imaging session three techniques - plain radiography, tomosynthesis, and computed tomography - were used to visualize the wrist and hand specimens. For each technique, 20 radio-ulno-carpo-metacarpal sites known to present bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis were analyzed by two radiologists using a standard system to score the cortical bone: normal, pseudoerosion, true erosion, or other pathology. Cohen's concordance analysis was performed to determine inter-observer and intra-observer (for the senior radiologist) agreement by site and by technique. Serial sections of two cadaver specimens were examined to determine the anatomical correlation of the pseudoerosions. On the plain radiographs, the radiologists scored many images as pseudoerosion (7.3 %), particularly in the distal ulnar portion of the capitate, the distal radial portion of the hamate, the proximal ulnar portion of the base of the third metacarpal, the proximal radial portion of the base of the fourth metacarpal, the distal ulnar portion of the hamate, and the proximal portion of the base of the fifth metacarpal. The computed tomography scan revealed that none of these doubtful images corresponded to true erosions. The anatomical correlation study showed that these images could probably be attributed to ligament insertions, thinner lamina, and enhanced cortical bone transparency. Knowledge of the anatomical carpal localizations where pseudoerosions commonly occur is a necessary prerequisite for analysis of plain radiographs performed to diagnose or monitor rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  5. The value of SPECT/CT in carpal boss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhure, Ujwal; Huellner, Martin W.; Gruenig, Hannes; Zander, Andrea; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Strobel, Klaus [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Hug, Urs [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    To assess the value of SPECT/CT in patients with carpal boss (CB). In 24 wrists with CB (18 right-sided, 6 left-sided) in 21 patients, planar images and SPECT/CT images were obtained. Three patients had bilateral CB. The grade of uptake (0 absent, 1 low, 2 moderate, 3 high) on planar imaging and SPECT/CT was assessed and compared with CT findings, clinical symptoms and follow-up findings. CB affected carpometacarpal joint II in 4 wrists, carpometacarpal joint III in 17 wrists and both carpometacarpal joints II and III in 3 wrists. Of the 24 CB, 12 (50 %) were active (i.e. increased radionuclide uptake) on planar images and 18 (75 %) on SPECT/CT images. Of the 17 symptomatic CB, 10 (59 %) were active on planar images and 14 (82 %) were active (mean grade 1.9, range 1 - 3) on SPECT/CT images. Of the 7 asymptomatic CB, 2 were active on planar images and 4 were active (mean grade 1.25, range 1 - 2) on SPECT/CT images. CT alone showed CB in all patients and an accessory ossicle (os styloideum) in 8 wrists. MR imaging was available in 7 patients and positive for CB in 5 (sensitivity 71 %). Plain radiographs were available in 17 patients and positive in 10 (59 %). Therapeutic infiltration of the CB was performed in 9 patients, and resection of the CB in 7 patients. SPECT/CT provides important morphological and metabolic information for the clinical assessment of CB, but because SPECT/CT tends to overestimate the clinical importance of CB, we recommend that planar images should still be obtained. (orig.)

  6. Characterization and Epidemiology of the Carpal Boss Utilizing Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiney, Christopher; Porrino, Jack; Richardson, Michael L; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Chew, Felix S

    2017-02-01

    Background  The carpal boss is an osseous protuberance occurring variably along the dorsum of the second or third metacarpal base, lacking a standardized definition. Aim  We sought to characterize the dorsal second and third carpometacarpal joints in the general population on computed tomography (CT) to better define this variant anatomy. Patients and Methods  A total of 129 wrist CT studies were reviewed. Note was made of the dorsal second/third carpometacarpal osseous anatomy, the presence of regional bursitis or tenosynovitis, and relationship of the extensor carpi radialis brevis attachment to the base of the third metacarpal. Results  Out of the 129 wrists, 106 (82.2%) demonstrated a dorsal protuberance arising from the base of the third metacarpal, in isolation. Out of the 129 wrists, 14 (10.9%) lacked a dorsal protuberance or nonunited ossicle at the level of the second or third carpometacarpal joint. Out of the 129 wrists, 9 (7%) wrists demonstrated more complex anatomy-8 wrists (6.2%) with a dorsal protuberance at the base of the third metacarpal seen in combination with an adjacent nonunited ossicle and/or dorsal protuberance arising from the capitate, and 1 wrist (0.8%) with an isolated ossicle at the base of the third metacarpal. Of these nine wrists, eight (6.2%) demonstrated arthritis at the resultant pseudoarticulation(s). Conclusion  The majority of wrists demonstrated an isolated protuberance arising from the dorsal base of the third metacarpal, with a small minority with a nonunited ossicle at this level and/or dorsal protuberance of the capitate. The presence of secondary arthritis (8 out of 129 wrists, 6.2%) may reflect a pain generator. Level of Evidence  Cross-sectional study; level 2.

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  8. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  9. Second carpal bone slab fracture and subluxation of the middle carpal joint in a horse subsequent to arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Angela V; Panizzi, Luca; Sparks, Holly D; Barber, Spencer M

    2015-02-01

    To report complications of arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint using a drilling technique in an adult horse. Case report. Horse (n = 1). A 12-year-old Quarter Horse mare with CMC osteoarthritis (CMC-OA) had arthrodesis under general anesthesia in right lateral recumbency. Under fluoroscopic guidance, a 4.5 mm drill bit was inserted at 3 drilling sites 5-6 cm into the CMC joint and was fanned 30-45° in the plane of the joint and 5-10° in the long axis of the limb to destroy articular cartilage and expose the subchondral bone. The horse presented 2 weeks after surgery for severe lameness of the operated limb. A slab fracture of the 2nd carpal bone (C2) and subluxation of the middle carpal (MC) joint was diagnosed. The horse was humanely euthanatized due to poor prognosis. The fanning technique of arthrodesis of the CMC joint may lead to fracture of carpal bones, joint instability, and MC joint subluxation. A balance between articular surface destruction and maintenance of joint stability should be achieved when using this technique. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Multi-elemental characterization of tunnel and road dusts in Houston, Texas using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry: Evidence for the release of platinum group and anthropogenic metals from motor vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spada, Nicholas; Bozlaker, Ayse; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical method for PGEs, main group, transition and rare earth metals developed. ► Comprehensive characterization of road and tunnel dust samples was accomplished. ► PGEs in dusts arise from autocatalyst attrition. ► Mobile sources also contributed to Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. ► All other elements, including rare earths arose from crustal sources. - Abstract: Platinum group elements (PGEs) including Rh, Pd, and Pt are important tracers for vehicular emissions, though their measurement is often challenging and difficult to replicate in environmental campaigns. These challenges arise from sample preparation steps required for PGE quantitation, which often cause severe isobaric interferences and spectral overlaps from polyatomic species of other anthropogenically emitted metals. Consequently, most previous road dust studies have either only quantified PGEs or included a small number of anthropogenic elements. Therefore a novel analytical method was developed to simultaneously measure PGEs, lanthanoids, transition and main group elements to comprehensively characterize the elemental composition of urban road and tunnel dusts. Dust samples collected from the vicinity of high-traffic roadways and a busy underwater tunnel restricted to single-axle (predominantly gasoline-driven) vehicles in Houston, TX were analyzed for 45 metals with the newly developed method using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (DRC-q-ICP–MS). Average Rh, Pd and Pt concentrations were 152 ± 52, 770 ± 208 and 529 ± 130 ng g −1 respectively in tunnel dusts while they varied between 6 and 8 ng g −1 , 10 and 88 ng g −1 and 35 and 131 ng g −1 in surface road dusts. Elemental ratios and enrichment factors demonstrated that PGEs in dusts originated from autocatalyst attrition/abrasion. Strong evidence is also presented for mobile source emissions of Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. However

  11. Surgical treatment of a comminuted articular fracture of the accessory carpal bone in a thoroughbred horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munroe, G.A.; Cauvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic and ultrasonographic findings in a case ofa comminuted articular fracture of the accessory carpal bone of a thoroughbred chaser are described, and its surgical treatment and aftercare are detailed. The horse made an uneventful recovery and successfully returned to racing

  12. A rare case of massive carpal osteoblastoma requiring complex reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunda, S E; Kauczok, J; Demir, E; Braunschweig, T; Pallua, N

    2013-07-01

    An osteoblastoma is a rare, commonly benign, osteoid-producing neoplasm of the bone with an incidence of 2% of all primary bone tumours. We present a case of a 54-year-old patient with persisting carpal pain and massive swelling of the hand for a period of 4 years. Incision biopsies revealed the histopathological finding of a carpal osteoblastoma. After complete tumour excision, including the carpal and, in parts, metacarpal bones, reconstructive surgery was performed with a free osteocutaneous iliac crest flap to obtain a natural hand contour and the best possible hand function. Follow-up revealed improvement of the hand function in terms of flexion, extension and strength without discomfort or further pain. Thus, ongoing carpal pain should lead to an intensive search with further diagnostic measures such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan as well as biopsies, if necessary, to obtain the correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of tendon loading on in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foumani, M.; Blankevoort, L.; Stekelenburg, C.; Strackee, S. D.; Carelsen, B.; Jonges, R.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist provide valuable biomechanical data. Tendon loading is often applied during cadaver experiments to simulate natural stabilizing joint compression in the wrist joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tendon loading on

  14. Airborne asbestos fibres monitoring in tunnel excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Laura; Sanguineti, Elisa; Yus González, Adrián; Militello, Gaia Maria; Scuderi, Alberto; Parisi, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    Tunnelling across ophiolitic formation with Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) can release fibres into the environment, exposing workers, and the population, if fibres spread outside the tunnel, leading to increased risk of developing asbestos-related disease. Therefore, a careful plan of environmental monitoring is carried out during Terzo Valico tunnel excavation. In the present study, data of 1571 samples of airborne dust, collected between 2014 and 2016 inside the tunnels, and analyzed by SEM-EDS for quantification of workers exposure, are discussed. In particular, the engineering and monitoring management of 100 m tunnelling excavation across a serpentinite lens (Cravasco adit), intercalated within calcschists, is reported. At this chrysotile occurrence, 84% of 128 analyzed samples (from the zone closer to the front rock) were above 2 ff/l. However, thanks to safety measures implemented and tunnel compartmentation in zones, the asbestos fibre concentration did not exceed the Italian standard of occupational exposure (100 ff/l) and 100% of samples collected in the outdoor square were below 1 ff/l. During excavation under normal working conditions, asbestos concentrations were below 2 ff/l in 97.4% of the 668 analyzed samples. Our results showed that air monitoring can objectively confirm the presence of asbestos minerals at a rock front in relative short time and provide information about the nature of the lithology at the front. The present dataset, the engineering measures described and the operative conclusions are liable to support the improvement of legislation on workers exposure to asbestos referred to the tunnelling sector, lacking at present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  16. Flexible MgO Barrier Magnetic Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Li Ming; Lee, Wonho; Qiu, Xuepeng; Yang, Ping; Kawai, Hiroyo; Saeys, Mark; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-07-01

    Flexible MgO barrier magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices are fabricated using a transfer printing process. The flexible MTJ devices yield significantly enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance of ≈300% and improved abruptness of switching, as residual strain in the MTJ structure is released during the transfer process. This approach could be useful for flexible electronic systems that require high-performance memory components. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Data Quality Objectives Report for the 115-B Gas Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.G.

    1998-05-01

    This workbook assisted the Data Quality Objectives Team in implementing the Data Quality Objectives Process through the use of a template which lists the important elements of the DQO. The completion of this workbook is a required element of the BHI-EE-01, Procedure 1.2, 'Data Quality Objectives.' The objective of this project is to define the sampling and analysis requirements for isolation and decontamination and decommissioning release of the 115- B Gas Tunnel. The 115-B Gas Tunnel is an underground concrete pipe tunnel that houses piping used to recirculate helium gas between the 105-B Reactor Building and the 115-B/C Gas Recirculation System

  18. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  19. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  20. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  1. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  2. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  3. Case report 401: Idiopathic carpal/tarsal osteolysis (ICTO) associated with nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vichi, G.F.; Falcini, F.; Pierattelli, M.; Jenuso, R.; Ceruso, M.; Florence Univ.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have described a case of carpal and tarsal idiopathic osteolysis (CTIO) linked with renal disease in a six year old child. Radiological studies demonstrated progressively osteolysis of the bones of both wrists and to a much lesser extent the bones of each tarsus. Biopsy showed the presence of chronic, disseminated disease of the kidney. A biopsy from carpal bones was normal. A review of the clinical aspects of the cases described in the literature is appended and a discussion of the differential diagnostic radiological and pathological features is contained in this report. A tabular summary of 14 cases of ICTO (including the present case) is included and a new classification of osteolysis is appended. (orig.)

  4. ′Cuff Sign′ a new maneuver for decision-making in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Basiri

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Considering the fact that cooperation of the patients is not necessary and the double effects of direct pressure and ischemia over the proximal parts of the median nerve leads to prolonged latencies, this test is a useful method for decision-making in patients with severe symptoms of CTS, despite the mild electrodiagnostic findings.

  5. Tunneling magnetoresistance and electroresistance in Fe/PbTiO3/Fe multiferroic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    We perform first-principles electronic structure and spin-dependent transport calculations for a Fe/PbTiO 3 /Fe multiferroic tunnel junction with asymmetric TiO 2 - and PbO-terminated interfaces. We demonstrate that the interfacial electronic reconstruction driven by the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization, in conjunction with the intricate complex band structure of barrier, play a decisive role in controlling the spin-dependent tunneling. Reversal of ferroelectric polarization results in a transition from insulating to half-metal-like conducting state for the interfacial Pb 6p z orbitals, which acts as an atomic-scale spin-valve by releasing the tunneling current in antiparallel magnetization configuration as the ferroelectric polarization pointing to the PbO-terminated interface. This effect produces large change in tunneling conductance. Our results open an attractive avenue in designing multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performance by exploiting the interfacial electronic reconstruction originated from the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization.

  6. Sagittal fractures of the third carpal bone in horses: 12 cases (1977-1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A.T. Jr.; Stover, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Third carpal sagittal fractures were found to be related to racing injuries in 10 of 12 horses. These fractures occurred most commonly on the medial aspect of the bone. A dorsoproximal-dorsodistal view of the carpus was required to visualize the fracture in all cases. Healing of the fracture required periods of rest of up to one year. Conservative management of these fractures resulted in return to function in 7 of 12 horses

  7. Sex assessment from carpals bones: discriminant function analysis in a contemporary Mexican sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Paola; De Luca, Stefano; Sánchez-Mejorada, Gabriela

    2011-06-15

    Sex assessment is one of the first essential steps in human identification, in both medico-legal cases and bio-archaeological contexts. Fragmentary human remains compromised by different types of burial or physical insults may frustrate the use of the traditional sex estimation methods, such as the analysis of the skull and pelvis. Currently, the application of discriminant functions to sex unidentified skeletal remains is steadily increasing. However, several studies have demonstrated that, due to variation in size and patterns of sexual dimorphism, discriminant functions are population-specific. In this study, in order to improve sex assessment from skeletal remains and to establish population-specific discriminant functions, the diagnostic values of the carpal bones were considered. A sample of 136 individuals (78 males, 58 females) of known sex and age was analyzed. They belong to a contemporary identified collection from the Laboratory of Physical Anthropology, Faculty of Medicine, UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City). The age of the individuals ranged between 25 and 85 years. Between four and nine measurements of each carpal bone were taken. Independent t-tests confirm that all carpals are sexually dimorphic. Univariate measurements produce accuracy levels that range from 61.8% to 90.8%. Classification accuracies ranged between 81.3% and 92.3% in the multivariate stepwise discriminant analysis. In addition, intra- and inter-observer error tests were performed. These indicated that replication of measurements was satisfactory for the same observer over time and between observers. These results suggest that carpal bones can be used for assessing sex in both forensic and bio-archaeological identification procedures and that bone dimensions are population specific. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. WRIST: A WRist Image Segmentation Toolkit for carpal bone delineation from MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Brent; Joshi, Anand A; Borgese, Marissa; Abdelhafez, Yasser; Boutin, Robert D; Chaudhari, Abhijit J

    2018-01-01

    Segmentation of the carpal bones from 3D imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is commonly performed for in vivo analysis of wrist morphology, kinematics, and biomechanics. This crucial task is typically carried out manually and is labor intensive, time consuming, subject to high inter- and intra-observer variability, and may result in topologically incorrect surfaces. We present a method, WRist Image Segmentation Toolkit (WRIST), for 3D semi-automated, rapid segmentation of the carpal bones of the wrist from MRI. In our method, the boundary of the bones were iteratively found using prior known anatomical constraints and a shape-detection level set. The parameters of the method were optimized using a training dataset of 48 manually segmented carpal bones and evaluated on 112 carpal bones which included both healthy participants without known wrist conditions and participants with thumb basilar osteoarthritis (OA). Manual segmentation by two expert human observers was considered as a reference. On the healthy subject dataset we obtained a Dice overlap of 93.0 ± 3.8, Jaccard Index of 87.3 ± 6.2, and a Hausdorff distance of 2.7 ± 3.4 mm, while on the OA dataset we obtained a Dice overlap of 90.7 ± 8.6, Jaccard Index of 83.0 ± 10.6, and a Hausdorff distance of 4.0 ± 4.4 mm. The short computational time of 20.8 s per bone (or 5.1 s per bone in the parallelized version) and the high agreement with the expert observers gives WRIST the potential to be utilized in musculoskeletal research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  10. The asymmetry of the carpal joint and the evolution of wing folding in maniraptoran theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Corwin; Hone, David W. E.; Xu, Xing; Zhang, Fucheng

    2010-01-01

    In extant birds, the hand is permanently abducted towards the ulna, and the wrist joint can bend extensively in this direction to fold the wing when not in use. Anatomically, this asymmetric mobility of the wrist results from the wedge-like shape of one carpal bone, the radiale, and from the well-developed convexity of the trochlea at the proximal end of the carpometacarpus. Among the theropod precursors of birds, a strongly convex trochlea is characteristic of Coelurosauria, a clade including the highly derived Maniraptora in addition to tyrannosaurs and compsognathids. The shape of the radiale can be quantified using a ‘radiale angle’ between the proximal and distal articular surfaces. Measurement of the radiale angle and reconstruction of ancestral states using squared-change parsimony shows that the angle was small (15°) in primitive coelurosaurs but considerably larger (25°) in primitive maniraptorans, indicating that the radiale was more wedge-shaped and the carpal joint more asymmetric. The radiale angle progressively increased still further within Maniraptora, with concurrent elongation of the forelimb feathers and the forelimb itself. Carpal asymmetry would have permitted avian-like folding of the forelimb in order to protect the plumage, an early advantage of the flexible, asymmetric wrist inherited by birds. PMID:20200032

  11. Carpal boss: effect of wedge excision depth on third carpometacarpal joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, G M; de With, M C J; Bleys, R L A W; Schuurman, A H

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that carpal-metacarpal (CMC) instability after carpal boss wedge excision is not caused only by damage to the dorsal ligament but mainly depends on the depth of the bony resection. To test our hypothesis, this study analyzes the effect of wedge excisions with different depths (0, 15%, 35%, 55% of the third CMC joint) and the effect of different forces (0, 50, 100 N.m) on the stability (measured as the passive flexion) of the third CMC joint using 12 fresh-frozen human cadaver wrists. The passive flexion is defined as the increase in angular motion of the third CMC joint and represents change in stability during flexion of the joint. The results show that the mean passive flexion measured in the wedge excisions of 15% and 35% of the joint did not differ from that of neutral controls. Joints analyzed after a 55% wedge excision showed a significant increase in angular motion (increased passive flexion). This relates to the 50 N.m as well as the 100 N.m loaded test position. This study shows that a wedge excision of clinically applicable depth of 35% does not create instability during flexion of the third CMC joint when loaded with physiologically relevant forces. Yet an extended and hardly clinically relevant 55% wedge excision results in a change in stability of the joint. To prevent instability when performing a wedge excision for symptomatic carpal boss, care must be taken to avoid excisions that exceed 35% of the third CMC joint.

  12. Scaphoid and lunate movement in different ranges of carpal radioulnar deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin Bo; Xu, Jing; Xie, Ren Guo

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to investigate scaphoid and lunate movement in radial deviation and in slight and moderate ulnar deviation ranges in vivo. We obtained computed tomography scans of the right wrists from 20° radial deviation to 40° ulnar deviation in 20° increments in 6 volunteers. The 3-dimensional bony structures of the wrist, including the distal radius and ulna, were reconstructed with customized software. The changes in position of the scaphoid and lunate along flexion-extension motion (FEM), radioulnar deviation (RUD), and supination-pronation axes in 3 parts--radial deviation and slight and moderate ulnar deviation--of the carpal RUD were calculated and analyzed. During carpal RUD, scaphoid and lunate motion along 3 axes--FEM, RUD, and supination-pronation--were the greatest in the middle third of the measured RUD (from neutral position to 20° ulnar deviation) and the smallest in radial deviation. Scaphoid motion along the FEM, RUD, and supination-pronation axes in the middle third was about half that in the entire motion range. In the middle motion range, lunate movement along the FEM and RUD axes was also the greatest. During carpal RUD, the greatest scaphoid and lunate movement occurs in the middle of the arc--slight ulnar deviation--which the wrist frequently adopts to accomplish major hand actions. At radial deviation, scaphoid and lunate motion is the smallest. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction between groundwater and TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) excavated tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Font Capó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    A number of problems, e.g. sudden inflows are encountered during tunneling under the piezometric level, especially when the excavation crosses high transmissivity areas. These inflows may drag materials when the tunnel crosses low competent layers, resulting in subsidence, chimney formation and collapses. Moreover, inflows can lead to a decrease in head level because of aquifer drainage. Tunnels can be drilled by a tunnel boring machine (TBM) to minimize inflows and groundwater impacts, restr...

  14. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  15. Seepage into PEP tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, H.

    1990-01-01

    The current rate of seepage into the PEP tunnel in the vicinity of IR-10 is very low compared to previous years. Adequate means of handling this low flow are in place. It is not clear whether the reduction in the flow is temporary, perhaps due to three consecutive dry years, or permanent due to drainage of a perched water table. During PEP construction a large amount of effort was expended in attempts to seal the tunnel, with no immediate effect. The efforts to ''manage'' the water flow are deemed to be successful. By covering equipment to protect it from dripping water and channeling seepage into the drainage gutters, the seepage has been reduced to a tolerable nuisance. There is no sure, safe procedure for sealing a leaky shotcreted tunnel

  16. LEP tunnel monorail

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    A monorail from CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP, for short). It ran around the 27km tunnel, transporting equipment and personnel. With its 27-kilometre circumference, LEP was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built and ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel.

  17. Excavating a transfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The transfer tunnel being dug here will take the 450 GeV beam from the SPS and inject it into the LHC where the beam energies will be increased to 7 TeV. In order to transfer this beam from the SPS to the LHC, two transfer tunnels are used to circulate the beams in opposite directions. When excavated, the accelerator components, including magnets, beam pipes and cryogenics will be installed and connected to both the SPS and LHC ready for operation to begin in 2008.

  18. Carpal spasm in a girl as initial presentation of celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramosaj-Morina, Atifete; Keka-Sylaj, A; Hasbahta, V; Baloku-Zejnullahu, A; Azemi, M; Zunec, R

    2017-09-04

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder elicited by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible persons. This disorder is characterized by specific histological changes of the small intestine mucosa resulting in malabsorption. This case was written up as it was an unusual and dramatic presentation of celiac disease. We report the case of a 3-year-old Albanian girl who presented at our clinic with carpal spasms and hand paresthesia. A physical examination at admission revealed a relatively good general condition and body weight of 10.5 kg (10 percentile). Carpal spasms and paresthesias of her extremities were present. Neuromuscular irritability was demonstrated by positive Chvostek and Trousseau signs. Blood tests showed severe hypocalcemia with a total serum calcium of 1.2 mmol/L (normal range 2.12 to 2.55 mmol/L), ionized calcium of 0.87 (normal range 1.11 to 1.30 mmol/L), and 24-hour urine calcium excretion of 9.16 mmol (normal range female celiac disease was performed: antigliadin immunoglobulin A, anti-tissue transglutaminase, and anti-endomysial immunoglobulin A antibodies were positive. A duodenal biopsy revealed lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy compatible with celiac disease grade IIIb according to the Marsh classification. Following the diagnosis of celiac disease, human leukocyte antigen typing was performed, giving a definite diagnosis of celiac disease. She was started on a gluten-free diet. Due to failure to follow a gluten-free diet, episodes of carpal spasms appeared again. Unfortunately, at the age of 7 years she presents with delayed psychophysical development. Although hypocalcemia is a common finding in celiac disease, hypocalcemic carpal spasm is a rare initial manifestation of the disease. Therefore, the possibility of celiac disease should be considered in patients with repeated carpal spasms that seem unduly difficult to treat. This should be evaluated even in the absence of gastrointestinal

  19. Breaking through the tranfer tunnel

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the tunnel boring machine breaking through the transfer tunnel into the LHC tunnel. Proton beams will be transferred from the SPS pre-accelerator to the LHC at 450 GeV through two specially constructed transfer tunnels. From left to right: LHC Project Director, Lyn Evans; CERN Director-General (at the time), Luciano Maiani, and Director for Accelerators, Kurt Hubner.

  20. Gap anisotropy and tunneling currents. [MPS3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarides, N.; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to......The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to...

  1. Unstable Semiclassical Trajectories in Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Levkov, D G; Sibiryakov, S M

    2007-01-01

    Some tunneling phenomena are described, in the semiclassical approximation, by unstable complex trajectories. We develop a systematic procedure to stabilize the trajectories and to calculate the tunneling probability, including both the suppression exponent and prefactor. We find that the instability of tunneling solutions modifies the power-law dependence of the prefactor on h as compared to the case of stable solutions.

  2. The use of small (2.7 mm) screws for arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I M; Smith, M R W

    2011-05-01

    Removal of large chip fractures of the carpal bones and the osteochondral deficits that result, have been associated with a worse prognosis than removal of small fragments in similar locations. Reducing the articular defects by repair of large osteochondral fragments may have advantages over removal. Horses with osteochondral chip fractures that were of sufficient size and infrastructure to be repaired with small (2.7 mm diameter) AO/ASIF cortex screws were identified and repair effected by arthroscopically guided internal fixation. Thirty-three horses underwent surgery to repair 35 fractures of the dorsodistal radial carpal bone (n = 25), the dorsal margin of the radial facet of the third carpal bone (n = 9) and the intermediate facet of the distal radius (n = 1). There were no surgical complications and fractures healed satisfactorily in 26 of 28 horses and 23 horses returned to racing performance. Arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures with small diameter cortex screws is technically feasible and experiences with 33 cases suggest that this may have advantages over fragment removal in managing such cases. Surgeons treating horses with large chip fractures of the carpal bones should consider arthroscopically guided internal fixation as an alternative to removal. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  3. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoldi, S. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) (Italy); Tanaka, T., E-mail: tanaka@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  4. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    OpenAIRE

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. Here we discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in literature.

  5. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 2. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry: Molecules in the Strange Quantum World. Sharmistha Karmakar Deepthi Jose Ayan Datta. General Article Volume 19 Issue 2 February 2014 pp 160-174 ...

  6. INCAS SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu STOICA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The INCAS Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a closed circuit, continuous, atmospheric pressure facility with a maximum speed of 110 m/s. The test section is octagonal ,of 2.5 m wide, 2.0 m high and 4 m long. The tunnel is powered by a 1200 kW, air cooled variable speed DC motor which drives a 12 blade, 3.5 m diameter fan and is equipped with a six component pyramidal type external mechanical balance with a 700 Kgf maximum lift capacity.The angle of attack range is between -45º and +45º while the yaw angle range is between -140º and +216º .The data acquisition system has been modified recently to allow the recording of all test data on a PC - type computer using LABVIEW and a PXI – type chassis containing specialized data acquisition modules.The tunnel is equipped with a variable frequency electrical supply system for powered models and a 10 bar compressed air supply for pneumatic flow control applications.In the recent years the subsonic wind tunnel has been intensively used for tests within several European projects (AVERT, CESAR and others.

  7. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ⎜ ARTICLE. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry. Molecules in the Strange Quantum World. Sharmistha Karmakar, Deepthi Jose and Ayan Datta. (left) Sharmistha Karmakar is doing her PhD in the group of. Ayan Datta, IACS,. Kolkata. Her research interests are modelling molecules with strong optical absorbtion and.

  8. The Channel Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The

  9. Monitoring pilot projects on bored tunnelling : The Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.; De Boer, F.; Admiraal, J.B.M.; Van Jaarsveld, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    Two pilot projects for bored tunnelling in soft soil have been undertaken in the Netherlands. The monitoring was commissioned under the authority of the Centre for Underground Construction (COB). A description of the research related to the Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel will be

  10. Tunneling features in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseev, P. I.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Maslova, N. S.; Panov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    The most telling scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) data available on the influence of nonequilibrium tunneling effects and electronic spectra reconstruction are reviewed and theoretically explained by self-consistently accounting for nonequilibrium electron distribution and the change (due to the tunneling current) in the electron density of states near the tunneling junction. The paper discusses the basic ideas of the self-consistent tunneling theory, which forms the basis for experimental research and which allows many effects observed in STM/STS experiments to be explained and new phenomena to be predicted.

  11. Fire analyses in central and disposal tunnels by APROS; Keskus- ja loppusijoitustunneleiden palotarkasteluja APROSilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltokorpi, L.; Kukkola, T.; Nieminen, J. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    The central tunnels and the disposal tunnels on the north-east disposal area are the target areas of the fire studies. Target is to maintain under pressure in the fire zone in case of a fire. In the central tunnels a fire of a drilling jumbo with moderate fire propagation is used as heat release rate. In the disposal tunnel the heat release rate of a canister transfer and installation vehicle fire received as a result of the pyrolysis analyze as well as an average heat release rate of a van fire are used. Inlet air is to be conducted to the back end of the fire zone and the exhaust is to be lead out from the beginning of the fire zone. The worst location of the fire is in the beginning of the fire zone just below of the exhaust air clap valve. The size of the fire zone does not have big impact on pressure. In all analyzed cases the fire zone remains too long time over pressurized. Inlet air flow of a 30 m{sup 3}/s is too much. The rotation controlled booster blowers will solve the pressure problems of the fire zone in fire cases. The rotation is controlled by the fire zone pressure. The fire of the canister transfer and installation vehicle in the central tunnel will not cause problems. The disposal tunnel fire door should be kept open, if the canister transfer and installation vehicle or the bentonite blocks transfer and installation vehicle is driven into the disposal tunnel. If a fire is caught in the disposal tunnel then the fire zone in the central tunnel is to be closed and the pressure is controlled by the rotation controlled booster blowers. If a personnel car or a van is driven into the disposal tunnel, then fire door of the disposal is to be kept closed against fires in the central tunnel. (orig.)

  12. Radiographic Evaluation of Cervical Vertebrae, Carpal Metacarpal bones and mandibular third, molar during adolescence and in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa L Raut

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the exact age of a person can be a critical factor in many criminal or civil legal proceedings. This study aimed at estimating radiographic reliability of dental and skeletal hard tissues in determination of age and their interrelationship. Cervical vertebrae, carpal-metacarpal bones and mandibular third molar were utilized for estimation of age. Mandibular third molars was found to be most reliable as compared to cervical vertebrae and carpal-metacarpal bones. The height and length (size of the cervical vertebrae derived in this study may be useful for age estimation in central Indian population. No significant correlation was observed between dental and skeletal age.

  13. Radiographical survey of carpal joints with ulcerous lesions of articular cartilage in Japanese black cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taura, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Sasaki, N.; Takeuchi, A.; Usui, K.

    1989-01-01

    For the purpose of investigating a different feeding factor in the outbreak of ulcerous lesions of articular cartilage, a radiographical survey of carpal joints was carried out, using Japanese Black cattle at Yamanashi prefecture, and the following results were obtained. 1) The samples for this study were obtained from farms in which using different feeding systems were adopted, such as fattening in drylot (A) : 12 steers (7-32 months old, 221-643 kg body weight), rearing in pasture (B) : 10 steers (7-12 months old, 124-210 kg body weight) and fattening in drylot after rearing in pasture (C) : 5 steers (11-14 months old, 238-271 kg body weight). 2) The radiographic lesions of the carpometacarpal joint were classified into the following five grades, normal (0), slight (I, II), moderate (III) and severe (IV), using a high contrast radiogram. 3) In group A, the lesions were observed in all the metacarpal bone III and carpal bone II@@@III. In the former case, incidence of radiographic lesions was 100%, in which 67% were severe and the remaining 33% consisted of moderate (25%) and slight changes (8%), which was higher than the others. 4) In group B, the incidence of the radiographic lesions of metacarpal bone III was 90%, but in which all of those were of slight changes (I and II). 5) In group C, the incidence of radiographic lesions of the metacarpal bone III was 80%, in which 20% were severe and the remaining 60% were slight ones. 6) No lesions were observed in any lateral half of the joint (carpal bone IV and metacarpal bone IV). 7) Although only the 7 months old steers of group A had very severe radiographic changes, the 10-12 months old steers of the group B showed no clear changes

  14. Nanowire resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, M. T.; Ohlsson, B. J.; Thelander, C.; Persson, A. I.; Deppert, K.; Wallenberg, L. R.; Samuelson, L.

    2002-12-01

    Semiconductor heterostructures and their implementation into electronic and photonic devices have had tremendous impact on science and technology. In the development of quantum nanoelectronics, one-dimensional (1D) heterostructure devices are receiving a lot of interest. We report here functional 1D resonant tunneling diodes obtained via bottom-up assembly of designed segments of different semiconductor materials in III/V nanowires. The emitter, collector, and the central quantum dot are made from InAs and the barrier material from InP. Ideal resonant tunneling behavior, with peak-to-valley ratios of up to 50:1 and current densities of 1 nA/μm2 was observed at low temperatures.

  15. Hawking Radiation As Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, Maulik K.; Wilczek, Frank

    2000-01-01

    We present a short and direct derivation of Hawking radiation as a tunneling process, based on particles in a dynamical geometry. The imaginary part of the action for the classically forbidden process is related to the Boltzmann factor for emission at the Hawking temperature. Because the derivation respects conservation laws, the exact spectrum is not precisely thermal. We compare and contrast the problem of spontaneous emission of charged particles from a charged conductor

  16. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  17. Tunnel blasting - recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.E.

    1999-05-01

    While tunnelling machines are more efficient than previously, there are still areas where blasting is a more efficient method of advance. Drilling and design methods are increasingly sophisticated, as is choice of explosive. Explosive deployment must be carefully calculated so as to avoid desensitisation. Nitroglycerine may be used as slurries; bulk mixing on site of ANFO is also practised in mining in the UK. Electric detonators, Nonel tubes, and electronic detonators are also increasingly employed.

  18. [A single metastasis in the carpal bones as the first clinical manifestation of a hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales Pinzón, R; Alonso Sánchez, J M; de la Mano González, S; El Karzazi Tarazona, K

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumor of the liver. Spreading outside the liver usually takes place in advanced stages of the disease, and bone is the third most common site of metastases. We present a case of hepatocellular carcinoma in which the first clinical manifestation was a single metastasis to the carpal bones. The interest of this case lies in the way this hepatocellular carcinoma manifested as well as in the unusual site of the metastasis. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  20. Reduction of the A-Frame Angle of Incline does not Change the Maximum Carpal Joint Extension Angle in Agility Dogs Entering the A-Frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelgrein, Carla; Glyde, Mark R; Hosgood, Giselle; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Wickham, Sarah

    2018-02-01

     This article aims to investigate the effect of a decrease in the A-frame angle of incline on the highest carpal extension angle in agility dogs.  Kinematic gait analysis (two-dimensional) measuring carpal extension was performed on 40 dogs entering the A-frame at 3 angles of incline: 40° (standard), 35° and 30°. The highest carpal extension angle from three trials at each incline was examined for a significant effect of A-frame angle with height, body weight and velocity included as covariates.  There was no significant effect of A-frame angle on the highest carpal joint extension angle for the first or second limb. The adjusted mean carpal extension angle for the first limb at 40° was 64° [95% confidence interval (CI), 60-68), at 35° was 61° (95% CI, 57-65) and at 30° was 62° (95% CI, 59-65). The raw mean carpal extension angle for all dogs across all A-frame angles for the first limb was 62° (95% CI, 60-64) and the second limb was 61° (95% CI, 59-63).  Decreasing the A-frame angle of incline from 40° to 30° did not result in reduced carpal extension angles. The failure to find a difference and the narrow CI of the carpal angles may indicate that the physiologic limits of carpal extension were reached at all A-frame angles. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  1. Quantum dissipation, scattering and tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleuterio, S.M.; Vilela Mendes, R.

    1984-01-01

    A quantization technique for dissipative systems is used to discuss one dimensional problems including tunneling with dissipation, capture in dissipative potential wells and quantum coherence. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of rockburst in tunnels subjected to static and dynamic loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Manouchehrian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of geological structures such as faults, joints, and dykes has been observed near excavation boundaries in many rockburst case histories. In this paper, the role of discontinuities around tunnels in rockburst occurrence was studied. For this purpose, the Abaqus explicit code was used to simulate dynamic rock failure in deep tunnels. Material heterogeneity was considered using Python scripting in Abaqus. Rockbursts near fault regions in deep tunnels under static and dynamic loads were studied. Several tunnel models with and without faults were built and static and dynamic loads were used to simulate rock failure. The velocity and the released kinetic energy of failed rocks, the failure zone around the tunnel, and the deformed mesh were studied to identify stable and unstable rock failures. Compared with models without discontinuities, the results showed that the velocity and the released kinetic energy of failed rocks were higher, the failure zone around the tunnel was larger, and the mesh was more deformed in the models with discontinuities, indicating that rock failure in the models with discontinuities was more violent. The modeling results confirm that the presence of geological structures in the vicinity of deep excavations could be one of the major influence factors for the occurrence of rockburst. It can explain localized rockburst occurrence in civil tunnels and mining drifts. The presented methodology in this paper for rockburst analysis can be useful for rockburst anticipation and control during mining and tunneling in highly stressed ground.

  3. Thermovoltages in vacuum tunneling investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D. H.; Rettenberger, Armin; Grand, Jean Yves; Läuger, K.; Leiderer, Paul; Dransfeld, Klaus; Möller, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    By heating the tunneling tip of a scanning tunneling microscope the thermoelectric properties of a variable vacuum barrier have been investigated. The lateral variation of the observed thermovoltage will be discussed for polycrystalline gold, stepped surfaces of silver, as well as for copper islands on silver.

  4. Reduced resistance drift in tunnel junctions using confined tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowski, Z. S.; Pomeroy, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions with the aluminum oxide tunnel barriers confined between cobalt electrodes exhibit less resistance drift over time than junctions that utilize a thick, unconfined aluminum electrode. The improved long time stability is attributed to better initial oxide quality achieved through confinement (use of a potential energy well for the oxygen) and plasma oxidation. In this work, Co/AlOx/Co and Co/Al/AlOx/Co tunnel junction aging is compared over a period of approximately 9 months using transport measurements and Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) based modelling. The Co/AlOx/Co (confined) tunnel junction resistance increased by (32 ± 6) % over 5400 h, while Co/Al/AlOx/Co (unconfined) tunnel junction resistance increased by (85 ± 23) % over 5200 h. Fit parameters for the tunnel barrier width and potential energy barriers were extracted using WKB transport modelling. These values change only a small amount in the confined Co/AlOx/Co tunnel junction but show a significant drift in the unconfined Co/AlOx/Co tunnel junction.

  5. Fundamental visual problems in tunnels : sumposium on tunnel lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    2018-01-01

    Tunnels and underpasses are likely to play a greater part in our future road network. Daytime lighting for tunnel entrances represents a considerable proportion of their total running costs and it is important that the right solution should be found. Guidance is given in CIE Publication No. 26

  6. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  7. Counter Tunnel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    DSP-3000 fiber - optic gyro , MicroStrain 3DM-GX2 IMU, with USB and Ethernet connec- tors. Small enough to fit into all the tunnels that were explored...frame arms were sufficient for de- ployment of the RDC. Gigabit multi-mode fiber - optic communication and 48 VDC power were passed to the RDC through...with AcuAMP ACT050 current sensors. The control box monitoring all of the information, as well as the source of the 48 VDC and fiber - optic cable to

  8. Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  9. Hawking temperature from tunnelling formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, P.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the attempt to understand Hawking radiation as tunnelling across black hole horizons produces a Hawking temperature double the standard value. It is explained here how one can obtain the standard value in the same tunnelling approach.

  10. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the ...

  11. Tunneling in thin MOS structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results on tunneling in thin MOS structures are described. Thermally grown SiO2 films in the thickness range of 22-40 A have been shown to be effectively uniform on an atomic scale and exhibit an extremely abrupt oxide-silicon interface. Resonant reflections are observed at this interface for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and are shown to agree with the exact theory for a trapezoidal barrier. Tunneling at lower fields is consistent with elastic tunneling into the silicon direct conduction band and, at still lower fields, inelastic tunneling into the indirect conduction band. Approximate dispersion relations are obtained over portions of the silicon-dioxide energy gap and conduction band.

  12. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Poh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2 nd and/or 3 rd carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the 2 nd carpometacarpal (metacarpal-trapezoid joint and highlight the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of carpal boss impingement and secondary osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature describing the imaging findings of partial osseous coalition and degenerative osteoarthritis in relation to carpal boss.

  13. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2(nd) and/or 3(rd) carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the 2(nd) carpometacarpal (metacarpal-trapezoid) joint and highlight the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of carpal boss impingement and secondary osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature describing the imaging findings of partial osseous coalition and degenerative osteoarthritis in relation to carpal boss.

  14. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings

    OpenAIRE

    Poh, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2 nd and/or 3 rd carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the...

  15. Modeling of Turbidity Variation in Two Reservoirs Connected by a Water Transfer Tunnel in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Chung Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Andong and Imha reservoirs in South Korea are connected by a water transfer tunnel. The turbidity of the Imha reservoir is much higher than that of the Andong reservoir. Thus, it is necessary to examine the movement of turbidity between the two reservoirs via the water transfer tunnel. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the water transfer tunnel on the turbidity behavior of the two connecting reservoirs and to further understand the effect of reservoir turbidity distribution as a function of the selective withdrawal depth. This study applied the CE-QUAL-W2, a water quality and 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model, for simulating the hydrodynamic processes of the two reservoirs. Results indicate that, in the Andong reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was similar to that without the tunnel. However, in the Imha reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was lower than that without the tunnel. This can be attributed to the higher capacity of the Andong reservoir, which has double the storage of the Imha reservoir. Withdrawal turbidity in the Imha reservoir was investigated using the water transfer tunnel. This study applied three withdrawal selections as elevation (EL. 141.0 m, 146.5 m, and 152.0 m. The highest withdrawal turbidity resulted in EL. 141.0 m, which indicates that the high turbidity current is located at a vertical depth of about 20–30 m because of the density difference. These results will be helpful for understanding the release and selective withdrawal turbidity behaviors for a water transfer tunnel between two reservoirs.

  16. Carpal boss: destabilization of the third carpometacarpal joint after a wedge excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citteur, J M; Ritt, M J; Bos, K E

    1998-02-01

    In a standard carpal boss procedure, the dorsal ligament of the involved carpometacarpal joint is cut in the process of performing a wedge excision. We studied the effect of such a dorsal ligament sectioning on the joint between the capitate and middle metacarpal bone in ten fresh-frozen wrist specimens. The passive range of motion of this joint was measured with the joint loaded into flexion and extension and in the unloaded neutral position. After the dorsal ligament of the carpometacarpal joint was cut, simulating a dorsal wedge excision, the passive range of motion was measured again. Analysis indicated that this simulated wedge excision approximately doubled the passive range of motion of the carpometacarpal joint. This study shows that such a procedure disturbs the normal anatomy and creates instability of the involved joint.

  17. Post Traumatic Avascular Necrosis of the Proximal Carpal Row--A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Ruben; Sebastin, Sandeep Jacob; Puhaindran, Mark Edward

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of avascular necrosis of the scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum in a young 21-year-old patient, after a purely ligamentous peri-lunate dislocation of the wrist. He presented with a Mayfield III peri-lunate dislocation after a road traffic accident and underwent an open reduction and internal fixation. Post-operatively, the scapho-lunate gap widened after removal of the temporary K-wires, and he gradually developed avascular necrosis of the scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum, and osteoarthritis of his wrist. We present this unusual case of simultaneous avascular necrosis of multiple carpal bones and discuss the possible risk factors and subsequent management plans for this complex injury. Our patient has no identifiable contributing factors to developing avascular necrosis. We suspect that the violence of the injury and surgery may have compromised the circulation, and advise caution when treating and counseling these patients pre-operatively.

  18. KAERI underground research tunnel (KURT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki; Park, Jeong Hwa; Choi, Jong Won

    2007-01-01

    An underground research tunnel is essential to validate the integrity of a high-level waste disposal system, and the safety of geological disposal. In this study, KAERI underground research tunnel (KURT) was constructed in the site of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). The results of the site investigation and the design of underground tunnel were presented. The procedure for the construction permits and the construction of KURT were described briefly. The in-situ experiments being carried out at KURT were also introduced

  19. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  20. Role of Wind Tunnels in Aircraft Design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large wind tunnels simulating the actual flight conditions as nearly as possible. Often, several wind tunnels ... wind tunnel tests can be 'scaled' to the actual velocity and actual body size using suitable scaling laws. A typical wind tunnel consists ofa test section ... tion and control positions. Some of this instrumentation like six.

  1. 78 FR 46117 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... busiest vehicular tunnel in the world. The Fort McHenry Tunnel handles a daily traffic volume of more than... vehicular, transit, and rail tunnels in the New York City metropolitan area. Although it is still too early... congestion along alternative routes, and save users both dollars and fuel. If these tunnels were closed due...

  2. HELB Analysis for ESBWR Reactor Building and Main Steam Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguera Oliva, O.

    2011-07-01

    The Reactor Building compartments and tbe Main Steam Tunnel are modeled using GOTHIC 7.2a. These models are based on Control Volumes (Rooms/Compartments/Regions), Flow Paths (junctions such as vent path or any opening) and Boundary Conditions (Mass and energy releases and outside conditions). Due to the different break locations, four models are built to analyze the short-term pressurization response. Are shown the cases analyzed, the results obtained and the models used for this purpose.

  3. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation

  4. Destructive quantum interference in spin tunneling problems

    OpenAIRE

    von Delft, Jan; Henley, Christopher L.

    1992-01-01

    In some spin tunneling problems, there are several different but symmetry-related tunneling paths that connect the same initial and final configurations. The topological phase factors of the corresponding tunneling amplitudes can lead to destructive interference between the different paths, so that the total tunneling amplitude is zero. In the study of tunneling between different ground state configurations of the Kagom\\'{e}-lattice quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, this occurs when the spi...

  5. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  6. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  7. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  8. CEBAF: Injector tunnel in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    On 28 October, a 100 kV DC electron beam was generated in the injector tunnel at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) being constructed at Newport News, Virginia. In this first tunnel operation, the beam was transported from the electron gun via the room-temperature section to the injector's first superconducting section (5 MeV). The gun and beam steering subsystems behaved as designed, under control from the main control centre

  9. Quantum resonances in physical tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.; Truax, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    It has recently been emphasized that the probability of quantum tunneling is a critical function of the shape of the potential. Applying this observation to physical systems, we point out that in principal information on potential surfaces can be obtained by studying tunneling rates. This is especially true in cases where only spectral data is known, since many potentials yield the same spectrum. 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  10. Symptomatic non-union of the carpal scaphoid: Matti-Russe bone grafting versus Herbert screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, R W; Hodgkinson, J P; Hargadon, E J

    1989-05-01

    We have reviewed 19 patients who have had Matti-Russe bone grafting and 16 patients who have had Herbert screw fixation for symptomatic non-union of the carpal scaphoid. The success rate in both groups was similar, 74 per cent in the Matti-Russe group and 71 per cent in the Herbert screw group. Only five patients in the Herbert screw group had bone grafts. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods of treatment are discussed.

  11. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hospital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rheumatology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2015-12-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  12. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boavida, Peter; Lambot-Juhan, Karen; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  13. Galloping exercise induces regional changes in bone density within the third and radial carpal bones of Thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, E.C.; Delahunt, J.; Wichtel, J.W.; Birch, H.L.; Goodship, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis that a localised bone hypertrophy could occur within the subchondral cancellous architecture of the third and radial carpal bones. Using 2 levels of controlled and defined exercise, it was observed that a high intensity treadmill exercise protocol resulted in functional adaptation of the carpal bones. The increase in trabecular thickening and density was seen to be localised to those regions underlying common sites of cartilage degradation, the interface of the thickened trabeculae with the normal architecture in the third carpal hone was coincident with a common site of clinical fractures. The bone changes were determined both qualitatively on examination of slab radiographs and quantified by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The findings from this study are relevant to mechanical factors involved in the pathophysiology of joint degeneration. The potential clinical implications of this study are in relation to changes in the type and duration of exercise regimens used in training of equine athletes. The rapid response of bone to mechanical stimulation has implications in the longer term for localised cartilage degradation. Imaging techniques could be developed to monitor these early bone changes in the specific areas identified in this study and thus allow appropriate changes in training intensity to minimise subsequent damage to the articular surface

  14. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  15. Theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    When a tunneling barrier is nearly transparent, the standard tunneling (or transfer) Hamiltonian approximation fails. The author describes the theory which is necessary for calculating the tunneling current in these cases, and illustrate it by comparing theory and experiment on superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) junctions have ultra-thin tunnel barriers. This theory accurately explains the subgap structure which appears in the dynamical resistance of such SIS junctions, including many observed details which no previous theory has reproduced. The expression for the current through an SIS junction with an ultrathin barrier is given by I(t) = Re{Sigma/sub n/ J/sub n/ (omega/sub o/)e/sup in omega/o/sup t/} where omega/sub o/ = 2eV/h is the Josephson frequency, V is the bias voltage, and the J/sub n/ are voltage dependent coefficients, one for each positive or negative integer, n, and n=0. The relative sign of the terms involving cos(n omega/sub o/t) and sin(n omega/sub o/t) agrees with experiment, in contrast to previous theories of Josephson tunneling

  16. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobara H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hideki Kobara,1 Hirohito Mori,1 Kazi Rafiq,2 Shintaro Fujihara,1 Noriko Nishiyama,1 Maki Ayaki,1 Tatsuo Yachida,1 Tae Matsunaga,1 Johji Tani,1 Hisaaki Miyoshi,1 Hirohito Yoneyama,1 Asahiro Morishita,1 Makoto Oryu,1 Hisakazu Iwama,3 Tsutomu Masaki1 1Department of Gastroenterology and Neurology, 2Department of Pharmacology, 3Life Science Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Miki-cho, Kita-Gun, Kagawa, Japan Abstract: Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments. Keywords: submucosal endoscopy, submucosal tunneling method, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, peroral endoscopic myotomy, gastrointestinal subepithelial tumor, functional and motility disorders

  17. Typical Underwater Tunnels in the Mainland of China and Related Tunneling Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairong Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many underwater tunnels have been constructed in the mainland of China, and great progress has been made in related tunneling technologies. This paper presents the history and state of the art of underwater tunnels in the mainland of China in terms of shield-bored tunnels, drill-and-blast tunnels, and immersed tunnels. Typical underwater tunnels of these types in the mainland of China are described, along with innovative technologies regarding comprehensive geological prediction, grouting-based consolidation, the design and construction of large cross-sectional tunnels with shallow cover in weak strata, cutting tool replacement under limited drainage and reduced pressure conditions, the detection and treatment of boulders, the construction of underwater tunnels in areas with high seismic intensity, and the treatment of serious sedimentation in a foundation channel of immersed tunnels. Some suggestions are made regarding the three potential great strait-crossing tunnels—the Qiongzhou Strait-Crossing Tunnel, Bohai Strait-Crossing Tunnel, and Taiwan Strait-Crossing Tunnel—and issues related to these great strait-crossing tunnels that need further study are proposed. Keywords: Underwater tunnel, Strait-crossing tunnel, Shield-bored tunnel, Immersed tunnel, Drill and blast

  18. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, R.G.; Paterson, J.L.; Kaplan, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The dc current through an S 1 -S 2 tunnel junction, with Δ 2 greater than Δ 1 , when biased with eV 1 +Δ 2 , will lower the energy in S 1 . This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π* approx. Δ 1 /e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power P/sub c/, the electrical power P/sub e/ supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency eta=P/sub c//P/sub e/. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV= +- (Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) and t 1 =T 1 /T/sub c/1 approx. 0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T 2 -T 1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al 2 O 3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency eta approx. = Δ 1 /(Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of eta=T 1 /(T 2 -T 1 ). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the A1 2 O 3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems

  19. TunnelVision: LHC Tunnel Photogrammetry System for Structural Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Fallas, William

    2014-01-01

    In this document an algorithm to detect deformations in the LHC Tunnel of CERN is presented. It is based on two images, one represents the ideal state of the tunnel and the other one the actual state. To find the differences between both, the algorithm is divided in three steps. First, an image enhancement is applied to make easier the detection. Second, two different approaches to reduce noise are applied to one or both images. And third, it is defined a group of characteristics about the type of deformation desired to detect. Finally, the conclusions show the effectiveness of the algorithm in the experimental results.

  20. Surgical Treatment of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Trends and the Influence of Patient and Surgeon Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkinson, Joshua M; Zhong, Lin; Aliu, Oluseyi; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-09-01

    To examine trends in and determinants of the use of different procedures for treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Florida State Ambulatory Surgery Database for 2005 to 2012. We selected all patients who underwent in situ decompression, transposition, or other surgical treatments for cubital tunnel syndrome. We tested trends in the use of these techniques and performed a multivariable analysis to examine associations among patient characteristics, surgeon case volume, and the use of different techniques. Of the 26,164 patients who underwent surgery for cubital tunnel syndrome, 80% underwent in situ decompression, 16% underwent transposition, and 4% underwent other surgical treatment. Over the study period, there was a statistically significant increase in the use of in situ release and a decrease in the use of transposition. Women and patients treated by surgeons with a higher cubital tunnel surgery case volume underwent in situ release with a statistically higher incidence than other techniques. In Florida, surgeon practice reflected the widespread adoption of in situ release as the primary treatment for cubital tunnel syndrome, and its relative incidence increased during the study period. Patient demographics and surgeon-level factors influenced procedure selection. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Probing electronic interactions using electron tunneling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pratap

    The scanning tunneling microscope: Principle d. eI. Tunneling Current. Topography by tracking current: Constant height mode. Tracking the height: Constant current mode. NbSe. 2 single crystal. (Grown by P. Shirage and A. Thamizhavel) ...

  2. Proposal for Marshmallow Tunnel Stemming Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-01-01

    Discussion of findings after the shot in the tunnel and instructions for a deeper drilling below the tunnel using radiation probes to help define the cavity shape and documentary photography of the findings.

  3. Quantum mechanical tunneling in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanical tunneling plays important roles in a wide range of natural sciences, from nuclear and solid-state physics to proton transfer and chemical reactions in chemistry and biology. Responding to the need for further understanding of multidimensional tunneling, the authors have recently developed practical methods that can be applied to multidimensional systems. Quantum Mechanical Tunneling in Chemical Physics presents basic theories, as well as original ones developed by the authors. It also provides methodologies and numerical applications to real molecular systems. The book offers information so readers can understand the basic concepts and dynamics of multidimensional tunneling phenomena and use the described methods for various molecular spectroscopy and chemical dynamics problems. The text focuses on three tunneling phenomena: (1) energy splitting, or tunneling splitting, in symmetric double well potential, (2) decay of metastable state through tunneling, and (3) tunneling effects in chemical...

  4. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  5. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  6. Watertightness of concrete tunnel structures

    OpenAIRE

    Glerum, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Netherlands are situated in the delta. of the rivers Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt. Therefore the ground mainly consists.of sediments, such as sand, clay and silt. In certain regions peat layers of varying thickness are found. The high permeability of some of these materials and the fact that the groundwater table is generally only 1 m below ground level, make an adequate watertightness one of the main features of tunnel engineering in the Netherlands. Tunnels in Holland are both of the immers...

  7. Spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Mryasov, Oleg N; LeClair, Patrick R

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of electron tunnelling has been known since the advent of quantum mechanics, but continues to enrich our understanding of many fields of physics, as well as creating sub-fields on its own. Spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has recently aroused enormous interest and has developed in a vigorous field of research. The large tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) observed in MTJs garnered much attention due to possible applications in non-volatile random-access memories and next-generation magnetic field sensors. This led to a number of fundamental questions regarding the phenomenon of SDT. In this review article we present an overview of this field of research. We discuss various factors that control the spin polarization and magnetoresistance in MTJs. Starting from early experiments on SDT and their interpretation, we consider thereafter recent experiments and models which highlight the role of the electronic structure of the ferromagnets, the insulating layer, and the ferromagnet/insulator interfaces. We also discuss the role of disorder in the barrier and in the ferromagnetic electrodes and their influence on TMR. (topical review)

  8. Quasi-bound states, resonance tunnelling, and tunnelling times ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scattering and decay of unstable nuclei via alpha decay, proton emission etc. as evident from refs [14–19]. A detailed procedure exists for the study of such states in ...... for the case of transmission across equispaced multiple barriers generating well-separated QB states. 3. The variation of total tunnelling time Tq shows ...

  9. Tunneling in high-K isomeric decays

    CERN Document Server

    Shizuma, T; Shimizu, Y R

    2002-01-01

    We have systematically investigated highly-K-forbidden transitions observed in the Hf, W and Os region, using the gamma-tunneling model in which low-K and high-k states interact through a process of quantum tunneling. The measured hindrance factors are compared with the values calculated using the gamma-tunneling model. Isotope dependences of gamma-tunneling probabilities particularly for neutron-rich nuclei and the relation to stimulated decays of isomers are discussed. (author)

  10. Theoretical distribution of load in the radius and ulna carpal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Florez, Kalenia; Vergara-Amador, Enrique; de Las Casas, Estevam Barbosa; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate a model for the analysis of the load distribution through the wrist joint, subjected to forces on the axes of the metacarpals from distal to proximal for two different mesh densities. To this end, the Rigid Body Spring Model (RBSM) method was used on a three-dimensional model of the wrist joint, simulating the conditions when making a grip handle. The cartilage and ligaments were simulated as springs acting under compression and tension, respectively, while the bones were considered as rigid bodies. At the proximal end of the ulna the movement was completely restricted, and the radius was allowed to move only in the lateral/medial direction. With these models, we found the load distributions on each carpal articular surface of radius. Additionally, the results show that the percentage of the applied load transmitted through the radius was about 86% for one mesh and 88% for the coarser one; for the ulna it was 21% for one mesh and 18% for the coarser. The obtained results are comparable with previous outcomes reported in prior studies. The latter allows concluding that, in theory, the methodology can be used to describe the changes in load distribution in the wrist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Test of Sex Estimation Equations on Carpal Bones in a Northeastern Thai Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laowatthanaphong, S; Das, S; Phatsara, M; Tuamsuk, P; Mahakkanukrauh, P

    2016-01-01

    Sex assessment is an essential step in person identification, both in forensic and anthropological contexts. Many parts of skeletal remains such as skull, pelvis and long bones have been proven to be useful in determining sex. However, literature has shown that short bones such as carpal bones are also sexually dimorphic. In the last few years, there was an unpublished study using lunate, scaphoid and hamate from bone collection in Northern Thailand to create 6 discriminant equations to assess sex. The objective of this study was to investigate the application of those equations in the sample from other parts of Thailand. A sample of 50 individuals (25 males and 25 females), kindly supplied by Department of Anatomy, Khonkaen University, Khon-kaen, Thailand, was examined. The age of the individuals ranged from 48-87 years old for males and 38-87 years old for females. The classification accuracies ranged from 82%-98% with right hamate yielding the highest accuracy. These results proved the applicability of those 6 discriminant equations in a population from Northeastern Thailand. Further studies should include population from other parts of Thailand.

  12. Modified Carpal Box Technique in the Diagnosis of Suspected Scaphoid Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, F.; Mester, S.; Cseh, G.; Bener, A.; Nyarady, J.; Lovasz, G. [Pecs Univ. (Hungary). Medical School

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To establish and test the clinical efficacy of a new diagnostic algorithm with the extensive utilization of modified carpal box radiography (mX-CB) in the detection of scaphoid fractures. Material and Methods: Initial and early follow-up radiographic evaluation of 146 suspected scaphoid fractures were carried out by mX-CB. Patients with unconfirmed diagnosis were referred to CT. Patients were followed for 1 year after injury. Sensitivity, specificity and interobserver agreement of reading mX-CB images were determined statistically. Results: No non-union or avascular necrosis was seen at 1 year after the injury. 90% of the fractures were diagnosed by mX-CB, only 6.8% of the patients needed referral to CT. Sensitivity of mX-CB at initial presentation was 81.6%. Interobserver agreement was very high among evaluators of mX-CB images. Conclusion: Extensive utilization of mX-CB as primary and early follow-up investigation resulted in high initial diagnostic accuracy and low referral rate to a more expensive diagnostic modality.

  13. Hydrogen tunneling links protein dynamics to enzyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinman, Judith P; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between protein dynamics and function is a subject of considerable contemporary interest. Although protein motions are frequently observed during ligand binding and release steps, the contribution of protein motions to the catalysis of bond making/breaking processes is more difficult to probe and verify. Here, we show how the quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling associated with enzymatic C-H bond cleavage provides a unique window into the necessity of protein dynamics for achieving optimal catalysis. Experimental findings support a hierarchy of thermodynamically equilibrated motions that control the H-donor and -acceptor distance and active-site electrostatics, creating an ensemble of conformations suitable for H-tunneling. A possible extension of this view to methyl transfer and other catalyzed reactions is also presented. The impact of understanding these dynamics on the conceptual framework for enzyme activity, inhibitor/drug design, and biomimetic catalyst design is likely to be substantial.

  14. Materials Handling for Urban Tunneling in Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    An examination of prior forecasts of tunnel construction provides an estimate of 2.4 million feet of rock tunnel to be constructed during the 1976-2000 period. Tunnel projects for the near term (1980+) and far term (1990+) periods are defined for stu...

  15. 75 FR 42643 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... title 23 Federal funds that are located on public roads and tunnels on Federal-aid highways. The agency... the fatal July 2006 suspended ceiling collapse in the Central Artery Tunnel in Boston, [[Page 42644... located on public roads and tunnels on Federal-aid highways. The NTIS are needed to ensure that all...

  16. Contrastwaarnemingen in tunnels : een meetmethode.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The entrance to a long road tunnel can present itself to an approaching driver as a 'black hole' during the daytime, with no possibility for observing any details. In contrast to traditional symmetrical lighting, counter beam lighting aims the light in the opposite direction to incoming traffic.

  17. Travelling inside the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The golf cart proved to be a very useful form of transport around the 7 km circumference of the machine. It could carry four passengers and pull light equipment in its trailer. Here Peter Zettwoch is the driver along a mock-up tunnel for installation tests. (see photo 7401011X and Photo Archive 7401018)

  18. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however...

  19. A Seamless Ubiquitous Telehealthcare Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sao-Jie Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields.

  20. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spin tunnelling; spin path integrals; discrete phase integral method; diabolical points. ... technologies. Our purpose in this article is rather different. The molecular systems have total spin of the order of 10, and magnetocrystalline anisotropies of few tens of Kelvin ...... The point С' is of this new type, and here it may be said to.

  1. Rotational tunnelling spectroscopy with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Prager, M.

    1993-04-01

    Neutron tunnelling spectroscopy has been a very fruitful field for almost two decades and is still expanding into new areas, both experimentally and theoretically. The development of the topic is reviewed from the theoretical point of view, highlighting new approaches, and selected examples of more recent experimental work are presented. A brief discussion of instrument performance and experimental requirements is given. (author)

  2. Installation in the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The SPS tunnel is 6910 m in circumference and has a cross section of 4 m inner diameter. It is situated at an elevation of 400 m above sea level at a depth below the surface varying between 23 and 65 m. Its walls are lined with a concrete shell of about 30 cm thickness. See also 7410043X

  3. Time tunnels meet warped passages

    CERN Multimedia

    Kushner, David

    2006-01-01

    "Just in time for its 40th anniversary, the classic sci-fi television show "The time tunnel" is out on DVD. The conceit is something every engineer can relate to: a pulled plug. Scientists in an underground lab are working on a secret government experiment in time travel. (1 page)

  4. Earth Pressure on Tunnel Crown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    Two different analyses have been carried out in order to find the vertical earth pressure, or overburden pressure, at the crown of a tunnel going through a dike. Firstly, a hand calculation is performed using a simple dispersion of the stresses over depth. Secondly, the finite‐element program...

  5. Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch...... waveguide. The measurements show that the probe works as a transient voltage detector in contact and a capacitively coupled transient field detector in tunneling mode. We do not measure the transient voltage change in the ohmic tunneling current. In this sense, the spatial resolution for propagating...

  6. Tunnel widening in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clatworthy, M G; Annear, P; Bulow, J U

    1999-01-01

    We report a prospective series evaluating the incidence and degree of tunnel widening in a well-matched series of patients receiving a hamstring or patella tendon graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. We correlated tunnel widening with clinical factors, knee scores, KT-1000...... in the degree of tunnel widening between the two groups. The mean increase in femoral tunnel area in the hamstring group was 100.4% compared with a decrease of 25% in the patella tendon group (P = hamstring group was 73.9% compared with a decrease of 2.......1% in the patella tendon group (P = hamstring group. Tunnel widening does not correlate with instability...

  7. Tunneling Flight Time, Chemistry, and Special Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli

    2017-09-07

    Attosecond ionization experiments have not resolved the question "What is the tunneling time?". Different definitions of tunneling time lead to different results. Second, a zero tunneling time for a material particle suggests that the nonrelativistic theory includes speeds greater than the speed of light. Chemical reactions, occurring via tunneling, should then not be considered in terms of a nonrelativistic quantum theory calling into question quantum dynamics computations on tunneling reactions. To answer these questions, we define a new experimentally measurable paradigm, the tunneling flight time, and show that it vanishes for scattering through an Eckart or a square barrier, irrespective of barrier length or height, generalizing the Hartman effect. We explain why this result does not lead to experimental measurement of speeds greater than the speed of light. We show that this tunneling is an incoherent process by comparing a classical Wigner theory with exact quantum mechanical computations.

  8. Automated Boundary Conditions for Wind Tunnel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2018-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of models tested in wind tunnels require a high level of fidelity and accuracy particularly for the purposes of CFD validation efforts. Considerable effort is required to ensure the proper characterization of both the physical geometry of the wind tunnel and recreating the correct flow conditions inside the wind tunnel. The typical trial-and-error effort used for determining the boundary condition values for a particular tunnel configuration are time and computer resource intensive. This paper describes a method for calculating and updating the back pressure boundary condition in wind tunnel simulations by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The controller methodology and equations are discussed, and simulations using the controller to set a tunnel Mach number in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are demonstrated.

  9. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-08-09

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the left FML and right FMR ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients for components of the spin-dependent current, and TMR are calculated as a function of the applied voltage. As a result, we found a high resonant TMR. Thus, DMTJ can serve as highly effective magnetic nanosensor for biological applications, or as magnetic memory cells by switching the magnetization of the inner ferromagnetic layer FMW.© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

  10. The Third Quantization: To Tunnel or Not to Tunnel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Bouhmadi-López

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the third quantization, we consider the possibility that an initially recollapsing baby universe can enter a stage of near de Sitter inflation by tunnelling through a Euclidean wormhole that connects the recollapsing and inflationary geometries. We present the solutions for the evolution of the scale factor in the Lorentzian and Euclidean regions as well as the probability that the baby universe indeed crosses the wormhole when it reaches its maximum size.

  11. Automatic MPST-cut for segmentation of carpal bones from MR volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemme, Laura; Nardotto, Sonia; Dellepiane, Silvana G

    2017-08-01

    In the context of rheumatic diseases, several studies suggest that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) allows the detection of the three main signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) at higher sensitivities than available through conventional radiology. The rapid, accurate segmentation of bones is an essential preliminary step for quantitative diagnosis, erosion evaluation, and multi-temporal data fusion. In the present paper, a new, semi-automatic, 3D graph-based segmentation method to extract carpal bone data is proposed. The method is unsupervised, does not employ any a priori model or knowledge, and is adaptive to the individual variability of the acquired data. After selecting one source point inside the Region of Interest (ROI), a segmentation process is initiated, which consists of two automatic stages: a cost-labeling phase and a graph-cutting phase. The algorithm finds optimal paths based on a new cost function by creating a Minimum Path Spanning Tree (MPST). To extract the region, a cut of the obtained tree is necessary. A new criterion of the MPST-cut based on compactness shape factor was conceived and developed. The proposed approach is applied to a large database of 96 T1-weighted MR bone volumes. Performance quality is evaluated by comparing the results with gold-standard bone volumes manually defined by rheumatologists through the computation of metrics extracted from the confusion matrix. Furthermore, comparisons with the existing literature are carried out. The results show that this method is efficient and provides satisfactory performance for bone segmentation on low-field MR volumes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Gabrielle C; Carregaro, Adriano B; Gehrcke, Martielo I; De La Côrte, Flávio D; Lara, Valéria M; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies.

  13. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI of the fractured carpal scaphoid: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.J.; Janzen, D.; Connell, D.G.; Poon, P.Y.; Struk, D.; Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.; Janzen, D.L.; Connell, D.G.; Poon, P.Y.; Struk, D.; Munk, P.L.; Janzen, D.L.; Favero, K.J.; Poon, P.Y.; Vellet, A.D.; Logan, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate the vascularity of fracture fragments of the fractured carpal scaphoid in the acute ( 3 months) phases using a gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI sequence. Eight patients with acute scaphoid fractures, six patients with chronic scaphoid fractures, and three control patients without fractures were evaluated using a T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition (fSPGR) sequence with gadolinium-DTPA enhancement (0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight). Signal intensity over time plots were obtained using region of interest measurements from both fracture fragments. Enhancement factors (EF) were then calculated from the plots. No enhancement of the scaphoid was seen in control subjects (EF: distal scaphoid pole 1.04 + 0.01, proximal pole 1.07 + 0.08). In acute fracture patients, enhancement of the distal pole was greater than that of the proximal in all cases but one in which the two poles enhanced in a similar fashion (EF: distal 1.99 + 0.77, proximal 1.43 + 0.99). In chronic fracture patients the enhancement pattern was reversed, as the proximal pole enhanced to a greater degree than the distal with the exception of one case where both poles enhanced equally (EF: distal 1.74 + 0.52, proximal 2.64 + 0.50). Using a two-tailed non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test, the difference in enhancement of the proximal poles between the acute and chronic groups was found to be highly significant (P < 0.003). Dynamic contrast- enhanced (fSPGR) MRI demonstrates significant differences in the enhancement patterns of the scaphoid when chronic and acute fractures are compared. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Carpal angles as measured on CT and MRI: can we simply translate radiographic measurements?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Stephanie; Ghumman, Simranjit S.; Moser, Thomas P.; Ladouceur, Martin

    2014-01-01

    To determine the reliability of carpal angles measured on CT and MRI compared to radiography and assess if these measurements are interchangeable. Our institutional ethic research committee approved this study. For this retrospective study, two independent observers measured the scapholunate (SL), capitolunate (CL), radiolunate (RL), and radioscaphoid (RS) angles on 21 sets of exams, with each set including a radiograph, CT, and MRI of the same wrist. Inter- and intra-observer agreements were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Linear mixed models and two-way contingency tables were used to determine if the angles measured on cross-sectional modalities were significantly different from those obtained on radiography. Inter-observer agreement was strong (ICC >0.8) for all angles, except for the RL angle measured on MRI (ICC 0.68). Intra-observer agreement was also strong for all angles, except for the CL angle measured on CT (ICC 0.66). SL angles measured on CT and MRI were not statistically different from those measured on radiographs (p = 0.37 and 0.36, respectively), unlike CL, RL, and RS angles (p < 0.05). Accuracy between modalities varied between 76 and 86 % for the SL angle and ranged between 43 and 76 % for the other angles. CL, RL, and RS angles showed large intermodality variability. Therefore, their measurements on CT or MRI could potentially lead to miscategorization. Conversely, our data showing no significant difference between modalities, SL angle could be measured on CT and MRI to assess wrist instability with a lower risk of error. (orig.)

  15. Study on Hot Gases Flow in Case of Fire in a Road Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Król

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of hot smoke tests, which were conducted in a real road tunnel. The tunnel is located within the expressway S69 in southern Poland between cities Żywiec and Zwardoń. Its common name is Laliki tunnel. It is a bidirectional non-urban tunnel. The length of the tunnel is 678 m and it is inclined by 4%. It is equipped with the longitudinal ventilation system. Two hot smoke tests have been carried out according to Australian Standard AS 4391-1999. Hot smoke tests corresponded to a Heat Release Rate (HRR equal to respectively 750 kW and 1500 kW. The fire source was located in the middle of the road lane imitating an initial phase of a car fire (respectively 150 m and 265 m from S portal. The temperature distribution was recorded during both tests using a set of fourteen thermocouples that were mounted at two stand poles located at the main axis of the tunnel on windward. The stand poles were placed at distances of 5 m and 10 m. The recorded data were applied to validate a numerical model, which was built and solved using Ansys Fluent. The calculated temperature distribution matched the measured values.

  16. Physical model for recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstić, Predrag; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recognition tunneling (RT) identifies target molecules trapped between tunneling electrodes functionalized with recognition molecules that serve as specific chemical linkages between the metal electrodes and the trapped target molecule. Possible applications include single molecule DNA and protein sequencing. This paper addresses several fundamental aspects of RT by multiscale theory, applying both all-atom and coarse-grained DNA models: (1) we show that the magnitude of the observed currents are consistent with the results of non-equilibrium Green’s function calculations carried out on a solvated all-atom model. (2) Brownian fluctuations in hydrogen bond-lengths lead to current spikes that are similar to what is observed experimentally. (3) The frequency characteristics of these fluctuations can be used to identify the trapped molecules with a machine-learning algorithm, giving a theoretical underpinning to this new method of identifying single molecule signals. (paper)

  17. Underwater piercing of a tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvik, O.

    1984-11-01

    Norwegian consultants and contractors have been confronted with the task of blasting a final penetrating passage that will open the way for the water in a reservoir to flow through the hydropower turbines. Norway has almost certainly led in this area because of its special topographical and geological conditions. The glacial activities have created a number of natural and very deep lakes forming cheap reservoirs. Piercings at depths up to about 100 m have been performed. Problems tend to increase with depth, but unsuccessful penetration can occur at any depth. Secondary effects to consider include the danger of slides when the water level is lowered, wave erosion along the lowered new shoreline, erosion at all streams and rivers flowing into the lake and groundwater erosion in the newly exposed dry shoreline. Methods of penetration can be roughly divided into two categories: penetration against the open tunnel shaft (open system); and penetration against the closed tunnel shaft (closed system). 6 figures.

  18. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  19. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  20. Tunneling of a coupled system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishai, Y.

    1985-01-01

    We consider tunneling through a potential barrier V(x) in the presence of a coupling term W(x,y). Let H(y) be the internal Hamiltonian associated with the coordinate y and let E 0 (x) be the ground state energy of the operator H(x;y) = H(y) + W(x,y) in which x is a parameter. Our result for the tunneling probability (in the WKB approximation) is P = exp(2i ∫ k 0 (x)dx) where, at energy E, k 0 (x) = [E-E 0 (x)-V(x)]sup(1/2)/(h/2π) is the local wave number in the presence of coupling. (orig.)

  1. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  2. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  3. Acute effect of topical menthol on chronic pain in slaughterhouse workers with carpal tunnel syndrome: triple-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze) or placebo (gel with a menthol scent) during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design). Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during...... the last hour of work (scale 0-10) immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC) in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P = 0.......026 and P = 0.044, resp.). Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by -1.2 (CI 95%: -1.7 to -0.6) following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers...

  4. Prevalence of Mucopolysaccharidosis Types I, II, and VI in the Pediatric and Adult Population with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). Retrospective and Prospective Analysis of Patients Treated for CTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Mette Borch; Kjaer, Nanna; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2017-01-01

    a filter paper blood spot sample taken that was subsequently analyzed enzymatically for MPS I, II, and VI. RESULTS: 425 patients were included. 402 patients tested negative in the first test. 23 had inconclusive result whereof 18 was negative in a second test. The remaining five patients had two...

  5. Trends in incidence of occupational asthma, contact dermatitis, noise-induced hearing loss, carpal tunnel syndrome and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in European countries from 2000 to 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stocks, S. Jill; McNamee, Roseanne; van der Molen, Henk F.; Paris, Christophe; Urban, Pavel; Campo, Giuseppe; Sauni, Riitta; Martínez Jarreta, Begoña; Valenty, Madeleine; Godderis, Lode; Miedinger, David; Jacquetin, Pascal; Gravseth, Hans M.; Bonneterre, Vincent; Telle-Lamberton, Maylis; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Faye, Serge; Mylle, Godewina; Wannag, Axel; Samant, Yogindra; Pal, Teake; Scholz-Odermatt, Stefan; Papale, Adriano; Schouteden, Martijn; Colosio, Claudio; Mattioli, Stefano; Agius, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The European Union (EU) strategy for health and safety at work underlines the need to reduce the incidence of occupational diseases (OD), but European statistics to evaluate this common goal are scarce. We aim to estimate and compare changes in incidence over time for occupational asthma, contact

  6. Treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with diabetic neuropathy using low level laser therapy versus ultrasound controlled comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama F. Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Results & discussion: The results of our study showed that there were no statistical significance differences (P > 0.05 were observed between the two groups. It was concluded that both low level laser (20 mW power, 904 nm Wavelength and ultrasound (1.0 w/cm2 power, 1 MHz frequency are effective in the treatment of mild and moderate CTS patients.

  7. Digging the CNGS decay tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Products of the collision between a proton beam and a graphite target will pass through a horn containing an electric field that will produce a focused beam. These particles will decay into muon neutrinos within the tunnel that is being constructed in these images. The neutrinos will then travel 730 km to Gran Sasso in Italy where huge detectors will observe the beam to study a process called neutrino oscillation.

  8. Dissipative Effect and Tunneling Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samyadeb Bhattacharya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Langevin equation has been studied for dissipative system using the approach of Ford et al. Here, we have considered the inverted harmonic oscillator potential and calculated the effect of dissipation on tunneling time, group delay, and the self-interference term. A critical value of the friction coefficient has been determined for which the self-interference term vanishes. This approach sheds new light on understanding the ion transport at nanoscale.

  9. Tunnel Cost-Estimating Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Mayo, R. S., Barrett, J. E., and Jenny, R. J. 1976. "Tunneling: The State of the Industry ," Report No. DOT-TSC-OST-76-29, Department of Transporta...as a... C *YPAUS CHECK FOR HOTAL INPUT 1F(ELNJL.GT.-1s.Eag.AND.ELNPR.GT.-Ig.E29) GO TO St *OSS3@ *I00 WRITEILO,1031) NTSEG.NREACH 04540 MI ISTOP-i

  10. Surgical and nonsurgical management of sagittal slab fractures of the third carpal bone in racehorses: 32 cases (1991-2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Beth M; Ross, Michael W; Boston, Raymond C

    2005-03-15

    To compare results (ie, return to racing and earnings per race start) of surgical versus nonsurgical management of sagittal slab fractures of the third carpal bone in racehorses. Retrospective study. 32 racehorses (19 Thoroughbreds, 11 Standardbreds, and 2 Arabians). Medical records and radiographs were reviewed to obtain information regarding signalment and treatment. Follow-up information was obtained from race records. Robust regression analysis was performed to evaluate earnings per start in horses that raced at least once before and after injury. 22 (69%) horses raced at least once after treatment of the fracture. All 7 horses treated by means of interfragmentary compression raced after treatment, and horses that underwent interfragmentary compression had significantly higher earnings per start after the injury than did horses treated without surgery. Eight of 9 horses treated by means of arthroscopic debridement of the damaged cartilage and bone raced after treatment, but only 7 of 16 horses treated without surgery (ie, stall rest) were able to return to racing after treatment. Results suggest that racehorses with sagittal slab fractures of the third carpal bone have a favorable prognosis for return to racing after treatment. Horses treated surgically were more likely to race after treatment than were horses treated without surgery.

  11. A distinct subtype of ``metatropic dysplasia variant`` characterised by advanced carpal skeletal age and subluxation of the radial heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, G. [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi-ken 321-02 (Japan); Satoh, Masato [Department of Orthopedics, Saitama Children`s Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Aihara, Toshinori [Department of Radiology, Saitama Children`s Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Aida, Noriko [Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children`s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Yamamoto, Takehisa [Department of Pediatrics, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ozono, Keiichi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Osaka Medical Center and Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Background. ``Metatropic dysplasia variants`` are a group of bone dysplasias whose skeletal abnormalities are similar to, but milder than, those of classical metatropic dysplasia. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity has not been thoroughly elucidated. Objective. The objective was to designate a distinct subtype of these metatropic dysplasia variants. Materials and methods. The subjects were four Japanese patients, two sporadic cases and two siblings, who all had identical skeletal changes. The radiological features in these patients were compared with those of previously reported metatropic dysplasia variants. Results. Moderate platyspondyly with pear-shaped and/or anterior-tongued vertebral bodies, halberd pelvis, and dumbbell deformity of the tubular bones were regarded as hallmarks of metatropic dysplasia variants. The peculiar skeletal change in our patients was advanced carpal skeletal age in childhood, unlike most patients reported as metatropic dysplasia variants who manifest delayed carpal ossification. Another hallmark was congenital dislocation of the radial heads. A description of a patient with similar skeletal changes was found in the literature. Conclusion. These patients are considered to represent a distinct subgroup of metatropic dysplasia variants. It remains unknown whether the present siblings represent an autosomal recessive trait or an autosomal dominant trait with germinal mosaicism related to increased paternal age. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  12. Detection of the carpal bone contours from 3-D MR images of the wrist using a planar radial scale-space snake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J. G.; Venema, H. W.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problems encountered when applying snake models to detect the contours of the carpal bones in 3-D MR images of the wrist. In order to improve the performance of the original snake model introduced by Kass [1], we propose a new image force based on one-dimensional (1-D)

  13. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  14. Tunneling beyond the Fermilab site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.; Elwyn, A.; Lach, J.; Read, A.

    1983-01-01

    An accelerator that crosses the Fermilab site boundary must have a minimum effect on the surrounding environment and the people residing in the area. Unobstructed public access should be allowed above the ring except in relatively few areas such as the injection, dump, and experimental regions. The accelerator should be a benign and unobtrusive neighbor not only when it is completed but also in the construction period. For these reasons underground tunneling for all or most of the ring seems attractive. In this note we look into some questions raised by tunneling beyond the Fermilab site. Most of our discussion is of general applicability. However, we will use as examples two specific ring configurations. The examples have not been optimized from the point of view of physics output or accelerator technology but are just specific examples which allow us to study questions of tunneling. One is a ring of 5 km radius (5 TeV) tangent to the Tevatron and entirely east of the Fox River and fed by a beam from the Tevatron which crosses under the river. We assume that each of these machines will have 100 beam fills per year and we scale the maximum intensities with the accelerator radii. Thus we assume that there will be 1.0 E14 protons in each beam of the 20 TeV machine and 2.5 E13 for the 5 TeV machine

  15. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here.

  16. Variability in ACL tunnel placement: observational clinical study of surgeon ACL tunnel variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Wright, Rick W; Brophy, Robert H; McCarty, Eric C; Vidal, Armando R; Parker, Richard D; Andrish, Jack T; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-06-01

    Multicenter and multisurgeon cohort studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are becoming more common. Minimal information exists on intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to analyze intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement in a series of The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) ACL reconstruction patients and in a clinical cohort of ACL reconstruction patients. The hypothesis was that there would be minimal variability between surgeons in ACL tunnel placement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventy-eight patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by 8 surgeons had postoperative imaging with computed tomography, and ACL tunnel location and angulation were analyzed using 3-dimensional surface processing and measurement. Intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement was analyzed. For intersurgeon variability, the range in mean ACL femoral tunnel depth between surgeons was 22%. For femoral tunnel height, there was a 19% range. Tibial tunnel location from anterior to posterior on the plateau had a 16% range in mean results. There was only a small range of 4% for mean tibial tunnel location from the medial to lateral dimension. For intrasurgeon variability, femoral tunnel depth demonstrated the largest ranges, and tibial tunnel location from medial to lateral on the plateau demonstrated the least variability. Overall, surgeons were relatively consistent within their own cases. Using applied measurement criteria, 85% of femoral tunnels and 90% of tibial tunnels fell within applied literature-based guidelines. Ninety-one percent of the axes of the femoral tunnels fell within the boundaries of the femoral footprint. The data demonstrate that surgeons performing ACL reconstructions are relatively consistent between each other. There is, however, variability of average tunnel placement up to 22% of mean condylar depth

  17. New vision of magnetic tunnelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Jonathan R. [Amherst College, Amhurst, MA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments support the idea that crystal defects may be responsible for the quantum tunnelling of magnetic moments in molecular magnets at low temperatures. The magnetic moment of a typical bar magnet will never spontaneously reverse direction. However, thermal fluctuations can flip the moment of a magnetic particle just a few nanometres across. The particle can be cooled to nearly absolute zero to suppress this process, but the moment may still find a way to reverse via quantum tunnelling. Quantum tunnelling of magnetization has been the subject of decades of research. Until a few years ago, however, there had only been circumstantial evidence for the phenomenon. This is because most systems of small magnetic particles are hard to characterize - the particles have a variety of shapes, sizes and other properties, making it difficult to compare data with theory. Some real progress was made a few years ago through research into high-spin single-molecule magnets. With dimensions of about a nanometre, these magnets are usually composed of a magnetic core that is surrounded by organic complexes. When they crystallize into a regular lattice, the organic ions keep neighbouring magnets well separated so that they interact only weakly. Ideally all the molecules are identical because they have been built chemically, which means that they can be characterized precisely and that any data can be analysed quantitatively. The most studied of these molecules is manganese-12 acetate (Mn{sub 12}). Within each molecule, the spins of the eight Mn{sup 3+} ions (each with S=2) are antiparallel to the spins of the four Mn{sup 4+} ions (each with S=3/2), giving Mn{sub 12} a total spin of S=10. Or, to put it another way, the magnetic moment of Mn{sub 12} is 20 times larger than that of the electron. Now Eugene Chudnovsky of Lehman College in New York and Dmitry Garanin of the University of Mainz in Germany have suggested a new mechanism for producing tunnelling in Mn{sub 12

  18. Tunneling decay of false domain walls: The silence of the lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberichter, Mareike, E-mail: M.Haberichter@kent.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NF (United Kingdom); MacKenzie, Richard, E-mail: richard.mackenzie@umontreal.ca; Ung, Yvan, E-mail: klingon-ecology@hotmail.com [Groupe de Physique des Particules, Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Paranjape, M. B., E-mail: paranj@lps.umontreal.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Groupe de Physique des Particules, Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); St. John’s College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TP (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    We study the decay of “false” domain walls, that is, metastable states of the quantum theory where the true vacuum is trapped inside the wall with the false vacuum outside. We consider a theory with two scalar fields, a shepherd field and a field of sheep. The shepherd field serves to herd the solitons of the sheep field so that they are nicely bunched together. However, quantum tunnelling of the shepherd field releases the sheep to spread out uncontrollably. We show how to calculate the tunnelling amplitude for such a disintegration.

  19. Tunneling decay of false domain walls: The silence of the lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberichter, Mareike; MacKenzie, Richard; Ung, Yvan; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay of “false” domain walls, that is, metastable states of the quantum theory where the true vacuum is trapped inside the wall with the false vacuum outside. We consider a theory with two scalar fields, a shepherd field and a field of sheep. The shepherd field serves to herd the solitons of the sheep field so that they are nicely bunched together. However, quantum tunnelling of the shepherd field releases the sheep to spread out uncontrollably. We show how to calculate the tunnelling amplitude for such a disintegration.

  20. Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecora, Louis M.; Wu Dongho; Lee, Hoshik; Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.