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Sample records for carpal bones

  1. The carpal bones in Poland syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Talia [University of Manitoba, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Reed, Martin [University of Manitoba, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Children' s Hospital, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Elliott, Alison M. [University of Manitoba, Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Children' s Hospital, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Program of Genetics and Metabolism, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    Classical Poland syndrome is represented by unilateral aplasia of the sternocostal head of the pectoralis major muscle and ipsilateral simple syndactyly and brachydactyly. Various classifications of the severity of hand involvement have been proposed. Since its initial description, numerous studies have been made of the bony, soft tissue, organ, and hematological disturbances. However, carpal bone involvement has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the carpal bones in patients with Poland syndrome from a local (Manitoba) cohort as well as those from the literature. Hand radiographs from local patients and cases identified from the literature with confirmed Poland syndrome were examined for evidence of carpal bone involvement. Only cases with radiographs of adequate quality were included in the analysis. Clinical information (including gender and age) was necessary for evaluation of bone maturation. In total, seven local patients and 23 patients from the literature were evaluated. Ethics approval for study of the local patients was obtained by the Research Ethics Board of the University of Manitoba. Of the 23 literature patients, 12 patients (52%) had abnormal findings. Of the abnormal patients, four of 12 (33%) had carpal fusions, eight of 12 (67%) showed disharmonious ossification between the carpal and tubular bones and seven of 12 (58%) showed delay of carpal ossification. Of the local cohort, three patients were too young to characterize carpal involvement. Of the four remaining patients, two (50%) had abnormal carpal morphology, three out of four had disharmonious ossification and all four had delay of ossification of carpal bones. Carpal fusions, particularly of the scaphoid and trapezium, were common in both groups. Carpal bone anomalies (delay, disharmony, and/or fusions) are frequent in Poland syndrome and can occur in patients with either mild or severe hand involvement. Imaging of the unaffected hand is helpful in

  2. The carpal bones in Poland syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical Poland syndrome is represented by unilateral aplasia of the sternocostal head of the pectoralis major muscle and ipsilateral simple syndactyly and brachydactyly. Various classifications of the severity of hand involvement have been proposed. Since its initial description, numerous studies have been made of the bony, soft tissue, organ, and hematological disturbances. However, carpal bone involvement has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the carpal bones in patients with Poland syndrome from a local (Manitoba) cohort as well as those from the literature. Hand radiographs from local patients and cases identified from the literature with confirmed Poland syndrome were examined for evidence of carpal bone involvement. Only cases with radiographs of adequate quality were included in the analysis. Clinical information (including gender and age) was necessary for evaluation of bone maturation. In total, seven local patients and 23 patients from the literature were evaluated. Ethics approval for study of the local patients was obtained by the Research Ethics Board of the University of Manitoba. Of the 23 literature patients, 12 patients (52%) had abnormal findings. Of the abnormal patients, four of 12 (33%) had carpal fusions, eight of 12 (67%) showed disharmonious ossification between the carpal and tubular bones and seven of 12 (58%) showed delay of carpal ossification. Of the local cohort, three patients were too young to characterize carpal involvement. Of the four remaining patients, two (50%) had abnormal carpal morphology, three out of four had disharmonious ossification and all four had delay of ossification of carpal bones. Carpal fusions, particularly of the scaphoid and trapezium, were common in both groups. Carpal bone anomalies (delay, disharmony, and/or fusions) are frequent in Poland syndrome and can occur in patients with either mild or severe hand involvement. Imaging of the unaffected hand is helpful in

  3. RARE PRESENTATION OF MELORHEOSTEOSIS INVOLVING CARPAL BONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Melorheostosis is a rare sclerosing bone dysplasia, known as Leri disease characterized by a “flowing” hyperostosis of the cortex. Classically, melorheostosis affects the long bones of the skeleton, especially those in the lower extremities . Involvement of wrist is rare. The radiographic appearance has been likened to “dripping wax down the side of a candle.” The clinical and the radiographic manifestations of melorheostosis have been encountered in a 12 - year - old male child. Examination revealed limitation of movements of right wrist. Conventional radiographs of right hand showed increase in density of scaphoid, lunate, Triquetrum and Pisiform, skeletal survey showed isolated carpal involvement, 3D CT s canning showed patchy increase of density with cortical dripping appearance of carpal bones

  4. Computerized geometric features of carpal bone for bone age estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Wen Hsieh; Tai-Lang Jong; Yi-Hong Chou; Chui-Mei Tiu

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone age development is one of the significant indicators depicting the growth status of children.However, bone age assessment is an heuristic and tedious work for pediatricians. We developed a computerized bone age estimation system based on the analysis of geometric features of carpal bones.Methods The geometric features of carpals were extracted and analyzed to judge the bone age of children by computerized shape and area description. Four classifiers, linear, nearest neighbor, back-propagation neural network,and radial basis function neural network, were adopted to categorize bone age. Principal component and discriminate analyses were employed to improve assorting accuracy.Results The hand X-ray films of 465 boys and 444 girls served as our database. The features were extracted from carpal bone images, including shape, area, and sequence. The proposed normalization area ratio method was effective in bone age classification by simulation. Besides, features statistics showed similar results between the standard of the Greulich and Pyle atlas and our database.Conclusions The bone area has a higher discriminating power to judge bone age. The ossification sequence of trapezium and trapezoid bones between Taiwanese and the atlas of the GP method is quite different. These results also indicate that carpal bone assessment with classification of neural networks can be correct and practical.

  5. Carpal Tunnel Cross-Sectional Area Affected by Soft Tissues Abutting the Carpal Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-02-01

    The carpal tunnel accommodates free movement of its contents, and the tunnel's cross-sectional area is a useful morphological parameter for the evaluation of the space available for the carpal tunnel contents and of potential nerve compression in the tunnel. The osseous boundary of the carpal bones as the dorsal border of the carpal tunnel is commonly used to determine the tunnel area, but this boundary contains soft tissues such as numerous intercarpal ligaments and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The aims of this study were to quantify the thickness of the soft tissues abutting the carpal bones and to investigate how this soft tissue influences the calculation of the carpal tunnel area. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for eight cadaveric specimens. A medical balloon with a physiological pressure was inserted into an evacuated tunnel to identify the carpal tunnel boundary. The balloon-based (i.e. true carpal tunnel) and osseous-based carpal tunnel boundaries were extracted and divided into regions corresponding to the hamate, capitate, trapezoid, trapezium, and transverse carpal ligament (TCL). From the two boundaries, the overall and regional soft tissue thicknesses and areas were calculated. The soft tissue thickness was significantly greater for the trapezoid (3.1±1.2mm) and trapezium (3.4±1.0mm) regions than for the hamate (0.7±0.3mm) and capitate (1.2±0.5mm) regions. The carpal tunnel area using the osseous boundary (243.0±40.4mm(2)) was significantly larger than the balloon-based area (183.9±29.7mm(2)) with a ratio of 1.32. In other words, the carpal tunnel area can be estimated as 76% (= 1/1.32) of the osseous-based area. The abundance of soft tissue in the trapezoid and trapezium regions can be attributed mainly to the capitate-trapezium ligament and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Inclusion of such soft tissue leads to overestimations of the carpal tunnel area. Correct quantification of the carpal tunnel area aids in examining carpal

  6. A radiographic investigation of third carpal bone injury in 42 racing thoroughbreds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of carpal radiographs from 42 racing thoroughbreds with carpal lameness was performed. Radiographs from 50 carpal examinations were available for review. The radiographic findings pertaining to the third carpal bone were described. Fractures and/or sclerosis occurred almost exclusively within the radial fossa. The occurrence of sclerosis without fracture in 20 of the 50 carpal examinations was higher than anticipated, occurring in both the right and left third carpal bone with equal frequency. The right third carpal bone was more frequently fractured and more severely affected than the left. The sclerotic changes seen in the radial fossa of the third carpal bone may be stress-induced, possibly preceding more serious changes in the joint such as cartilage damage or gross fracture. Earlier recognition of sclerosis of the third carpal bone may help prevent more serious changes from occurring

  7. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Leahy, Richard M.; Wise, Barton L.; Lane, Nancy E; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Joshi, Anand A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric—global point signature (GPS)—that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GP...

  8. A Study of Ossification of Carpal and Tarsal Bones in Normal and Hypothyroid Foals

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    McLaughlin, B. G.; Doige, C E

    1982-01-01

    The degree of ossification of carpal and tarsal bones was determined in normal foals of various ages and in hypothyroid and thyroidectomized foals. In normal foals ossification occurred very rapidly in the last few weeks of gestation and less rapidly from birth to 33 days. The ulnar carpal bone was consistently less ossified than other carpal or tarsal bones. Foals with congenital hyperplastic goitre had retarded ossification of the cuboidal bones, especially the central and third tarsal bone...

  9. Luxation of the radial carpal bone in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of radial carpal bone luxation in the cat and its management is described. Open reduction was performed and surgically maintained, in combination with repair of rupture of the short radial collateral ligament and joint capsule. The carpus was supported for one month following surgery by application of transarticular external fixation. Four months after treatment the cat was sound, despite evidence of degenerative joint disease. The mechanism of luxation appears to be analogous to that seen in the dog

  10. Prevalence and distribution of the first and fifth carpal bones in Standardbred horses as determined by radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a radiographic study of 200 Standardbred horses, a first carpal bone was observed unilaterally in 21 (10.5%) horses and bilaterally in 45 (22.5%) horses. There was no significant effect of sex on the absence or presence of the first carpal bone. No fifth carpal bone was seen in this study

  11. RARE PRESENTATION OF MELORHEOSTEOSIS INVOLVING CARPAL BONES

    OpenAIRE

    Ramana; Srinivas,; Reddy; Harshad; Guruvardhan

    2014-01-01

    Melorheostosis is a rare sclerosing bone dysplasia, known as Leri disease characterized by a “flowing” hyperostosis of the cortex. Classically, melorheostosis affects the long bones of the skeleton, especially those in the lower extremities . Involvement of wrist is rare. The radiographic appearance has been likened to “dripping wax down the side of a candle.” The clinical and the radiographic manifestations of melorheostosis have been encountered in a 12 - year ...

  12. [ Topography of carpal bone - An experimental model for carpal tunnel syndrome ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornek, G V; Rosen, H R; Mohr, W; Firbas, W

    1990-01-01

    By preparing a new experimental model for the carpal tunnel syndrome, the authors evaluated the differences of the human and rabbit carpal tunnels using a comparative anatomical study. A nearly identical situation-regarding the osseous and connective tissue formations in the carpal channel--was found. Therefore, the carpal tunnel of the rabbit is recommended for a model of chronic nerve compression, which is now planned by the authors. PMID:2288184

  13. Small carpal bone surface area, a characteristic of Turner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An abnormality which has received little attention but may be easily recognized on radiographs of the hand of patients with Turner's syndrome is described. Eleven of thirty-one patients (35.5%) with Turner's syndrome were shown on radiographs of the hand to have a visually detectable smallness of the bone surface area of the carpus when compared to the area of the second through fifth metacarpals. Values for the ''C/M'' ratio (the area of the carpals divided by the area of the second through fifth metacarpals) were calculated for films of 31 individuals with gonadal dysgenesis and compared with those from bone age-matched films of seventy-six individuals with normal development of the hand and wrist. A consistent difference with minimal overlap was documented. (orig./WL)

  14. Application of multiple magnification roentgenography for the control of reparative process in carpal bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to the first experience in using direct magnification roentgenography for diagnosis of navicular bone fracture and for evaluation of dynamics of reparative processes in carpal bones. Roentgenograms were made by portable X-ray apparatus REIS-D with 9-fold direct magnification. The use of the given type of roentgenography demonstrated its ample scope for both diagnosis of navicular bone fractures and for evaluation of the process of their adhesion

  15. Surgical treatment of a comminuted articular fracture of the accessory carpal bone in a thoroughbred horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical, radiographic and ultrasonographic findings in a case ofa comminuted articular fracture of the accessory carpal bone of a thoroughbred chaser are described, and its surgical treatment and aftercare are detailed. The horse made an uneventful recovery and successfully returned to racing

  16. Interrelation in the carpal bone index and orthopantomographic dental ages on the Korean children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have taken the x-ray films of carpal bone and orthopantomographs in Korean children to research the degree of ossification of carpal bone, that of calcification of tooth in jaw bone, the eruption rate of tooth, and the completion rate of apical foramen, and have compared the bone age with tooth age. We have gained a series of interesting conclusions to dare to report. 1. The ossification of carpal bone and the growth of tooth had processed proportionally to each other. 2. Both the bone age and tooth age were earlier in the female than in the male. 3. The completion of tooth crown formation and that of tooth root formation had processed proportionally to each other, and the general tendency of process was earliest in the mandibular first molar and the latest in the second molar. 4. The eruption of tooth was earliest in the mandibular first molar. The other teeth had erupted in the following order : the central incisor, the lateral incisor, the first premolar, the second premolar, the canine, and the second molar.

  17. Galloping exercise induces regional changes in bone density within the third and radial carpal bones of Thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis that a localised bone hypertrophy could occur within the subchondral cancellous architecture of the third and radial carpal bones. Using 2 levels of controlled and defined exercise, it was observed that a high intensity treadmill exercise protocol resulted in functional adaptation of the carpal bones. The increase in trabecular thickening and density was seen to be localised to those regions underlying common sites of cartilage degradation, the interface of the thickened trabeculae with the normal architecture in the third carpal hone was coincident with a common site of clinical fractures. The bone changes were determined both qualitatively on examination of slab radiographs and quantified by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The findings from this study are relevant to mechanical factors involved in the pathophysiology of joint degeneration. The potential clinical implications of this study are in relation to changes in the type and duration of exercise regimens used in training of equine athletes. The rapid response of bone to mechanical stimulation has implications in the longer term for localised cartilage degradation. Imaging techniques could be developed to monitor these early bone changes in the specific areas identified in this study and thus allow appropriate changes in training intensity to minimise subsequent damage to the articular surface

  18. Carpal osteoarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brett; Szabo, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    Despite improved understanding of carpal mechanics, increased awareness of intercarpal ligament injuries, and improved techniques for treating carpal instability, post-traumatic intercarpal osteoarthrosis remains a common problem. Osteoarthritis of the carpal bones, including scapholunate advance collapse wrist, scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis, lunotriquetral arthritis, triquetrohamate arthritis, and pisotriquetral arthritis, follows specific unique patterns, but in each, the final common pathway leads to degenerative change. Injury or deformity leads to instability and altered kinematics, producing abnormal joint contact pressures. Cartilage injury and eventual degeneration of the join follow. The etiology, prevalence, and current evaluation and treatment of these conditions are of importance to hand surgeons. PMID:17097471

  19. Sagittal fractures of the third carpal bone in horses: 12 cases (1977-1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Third carpal sagittal fractures were found to be related to racing injuries in 10 of 12 horses. These fractures occurred most commonly on the medial aspect of the bone. A dorsoproximal-dorsodistal view of the carpus was required to visualize the fracture in all cases. Healing of the fracture required periods of rest of up to one year. Conservative management of these fractures resulted in return to function in 7 of 12 horses

  20. Sclerosis of the third carpal bone: a prospective study of its significance in a group of young standardbred trotters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the significance of radiographic signs of sclerosis of the third carpal bone (C3) in young Standardbred trotters in relation to performance, lameness and bone turnover both carpi in 14 Standardbred trotters were radiographically and scintigraphically examined 6 times, from the beginning of speed training until the beginning of racing, between the mean ages of 20 and 42 months. At the end of the study 8 horses had raced in official qualifying races and 14 limbs in 11 horses had been diagnosed with carpal lameness. All horses but 2 developed sclerosis and all but one had increased bone turnover in the C3 area by scintigraphy. C3 sclerosis increased continuously over time and with increased performance. Carpal lameness was significantly associated with progression of sclerosis but in most cases sclerosis developed without concomitant signs of carpal lameness. No association between carpal lameness and increased scintigraphic uptake was found, but horses that had qualified for racing had significantly higher C3 to carpus ratio of radiopharmaceutical uptake. We conclude that there is a continuous increase in C3 radiographic sclerosis with time in young Standardbred trotters in professional training, but radiographic sclerosis appears to be of limited value as an indicator of clinical carpal disease or level of performance in Standardbred trotters

  1. Diagnostic comparison of X-ray plain film and 40-multidetector CT in dislocation of carpal bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the imaging manifestations and detecting rates of dislocation of carpal bones on X- ray plain film and 40-multidetector CT (MDCT), to improve the diagnostic accuracy and to reduce the missed diagnosis and misdiagnosis. Materials and Methods: The X -ray plain films, MDCT, volume rendering (VR) and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) of 21 patients with dislocation of carpal bones were retrospectively studied. 19 cases were male and two were female, mean age 31±7 years old (19-45 years). Dislocation was in left side in 14 cases, in right in seven cases. Result: Eight cases of lunate dislocation, 13 cases of perilunar dislocation, three cases of simple perilunar dislocation, four cases of perilunar dislocation per navicular bone. One case of perilunar dislocation per navicular and triangular bones, three cases of perilunar dislocation per triangular bones, two cases of perilunar dislocation per styloid process of radius. Among the cases with fracture of other carpal bones, the diagnosis of fractures of radial styloid process and navicular bones were correctly detected on X-ray plain film. But in three cases with fracture of triangular bone, the fractures were indetectable or the original place of the bone fragments were unable to determine on X-ray plain film, but could be correctly detected with MDCT and reconstruct technology. Conclusion: Diagnosis of dislocation of carpal bones can be correctly made with X-ray plain film in the most cases. But for the cases with fracture of carpal bones, especially with tiny fracture, X-ray plain film produces high rate of missed diagnosis. MDCT, VR and MPR can accurately show dislocations and fractures in three-dimension having high clinical value. (authors)

  2. Small carpal bone surface area, a characteristic of Turner's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, R.H.; Done, S.; Correia, J.A.; Crawford, J.D.; Kushner, D.C.; Herman, T.E.

    1985-02-01

    An abnormality which has received little attention but may be easily recognized on radiographs of the hand of patients with Turner's syndrome is described. Eleven of thirty-one patients (35.5%) with Turner's syndrome were shown on radiographs of the hand to have a visually detectable smallness of the bone surface area of the carpus when compared to the area of the second through fifth metacarpals. Values for the ''C/M'' ratio (the area of the carpals divided by the area of the second through fifth metacarpals) were calculated for films of 31 individuals with gonadal dysgenesis and compared with those from bone age-matched films of seventy-six individuals with normal development of the hand and wrist. A consistent difference with minimal overlap was documented.

  3. Carpal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.; Froehner, S.; Coblenz, G.; Christopoulos, G. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    This review addresses the pathoanatomical basics as well as the clinical and radiological presentation of instability patterns of the wrist. Carpal instability mostly follows an injury; however, other diseases, like CPPD arthropathy, can be associated. Instability occurs either if the carpus is unable to sustain physiologic loads (''dyskinetics'') or suffers from abnormal motion of its bones during movement (''dyskinematics''). In the classification of carpal instability, dissociative subcategories (located within proximal carpal row) are differentiated from non-dissociative subcategories (present between the carpal rows) and combined patterns. It is essential to note that the unstable wrist initially does not cause relevant signs in standard radiograms, therefore being ''occult'' for the radiologic assessment. This paper emphasizes the high utility of kinematographic studies, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography for detecting these predynamic and dynamic instability stages. Later in the natural history of carpal instability, static malalignment of the wrist and osteoarthritis will develop, both being associated with significant morbidity and disability. To prevent individual and socio-economic implications, the handsurgeon or orthopedist, as well as the radiologist, is challenged for early and precise diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. 99mTc-MDP combined blood pool and bone phase radionuclide imaging in papain-injected carpal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphic changes, i.e., increased activity, were induced by 1% papain, dissolved in phosphate-buffered physiologic saline (pH 7.4), injected into one antebrachiocarpal joint in each of eight dogs. Scintigraphic evaluation was by the use of combined blood pool and bone phase scintigraphy of affected and normal carpi over a 28-day period. The qualitative and quantitative scintigraphic appearance in injected carpal joints were very similar in both blood pool and bone phases. The clinical use of combined blood pool and bone phase scintigraphy to diagnose early inflammatory joint changes appears limited

  5. Multi-temporal MRI carpal bone volumes analysis by principal axes registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Roberta; Dellepiane, Silvana

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a principal axes registration technique is presented, with the relevant application to segmented volumes. The purpose of the proposed registration is to compare multi-temporal volumes of carpal bones from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) acquisitions. Starting from the study of the second-order moment matrix, the eigenvectors are calculated to allow the rotation of volumes with respect to reference axes. Then the volumes are spatially translated to become perfectly overlapped. A quantitative evaluation of the results obtained is carried out by computing classical indices from the confusion matrix, which depict similarity measures between the volumes of the same organ as extracted from MRI acquisitions executed at different moments. Within the medical field, the way a registration can be used to compare multi-temporal images is of great interest, since it provides the physician with a tool which allows a visual monitoring of a disease evolution. The segmentation method used herein is based on the graph theory and is a robust, unsupervised and parameters independent method. Patients affected by rheumatic diseases have been considered.

  6. Carpal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Jalalshokouhi*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformation, Stickler syndrome, thalidomide embryopathy, Turner syndrome and many other conditions as mentioned in Rubinstein-Taybi's book. Sometimes there is no known causative disease.Diagnosis is usually made by plain X-ray during studying a syndrome or congenital disease or could be an incidental finding like our patients. Hand bone anomalies are more common in syndromes or other congenital or non-hereditary conditions, but polydactyly, syndactyly or oligodactyly and carpal fusions are interesting. X-ray is the modality of choice, but MRI and X-ray CT with multiplanar reconstructions may be used for diagnosis.

  7. High Density Infill in Cracks and Protrusions from the Articular Calcified Cartilage in Osteoarthritis in Standardbred Horse Carpal Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Laverty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied changes in articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB in the third carpal bones (C3 of Standardbred racehorses with naturally-occurring repetitive loading-induced osteoarthritis (OA. Two osteochondral cores were harvested from dorsal sites from each of 15 post-mortem C3 and classified as control or as showing early or advanced OA changes from visual inspection. We re-examined X-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT image sets for the presence of high-density mineral infill (HDMI in ACC cracks and possible high-density mineralized protrusions (HDMP from the ACC mineralizing (tidemark front (MF into hyaline articular cartilage (HAC. We hypothesized and we show that 20-µm µCT resolution in 10-mm diameter samples is sufficient to detect HDMI and HDMP: these are lost upon tissue decalcification for routine paraffin wax histology owing to their predominant mineral content. The findings show that µCT is sufficient to discover HDMI and HDMP, which were seen in 2/10 controls, 6/9 early OA and 8/10 advanced OA cases. This is the first report of HDMI and HDMP in the equine carpus and in the Standardbred breed and the first to rely solely on µCT. HDMP are a candidate cause for mechanical tissue destruction in OA.

  8. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... carried out for the condition of carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a neuropathy where the median nerve gets ... of the hand. The surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome consists of a release of the transverse carpal ...

  9. The role of the transverse carpal ligament in carpal stability: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengrootenhuysen, Mike; van Riet, Roger; Pimontel, Paul; Bortier, Hilde; Van Glabbeek, Francis

    2009-08-01

    A biomechanical in vitro study was performed on 16 fresh frozen cadaver forearms to investigate the role of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) in carpal stability. The distance between the scaphoid and hamate was measured, as a reference for the length of the TCL. Distances were recorded in both loaded and unloaded conditions after gradual sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament, the palmar scapholunate, long radiolunate ligament and radioscapholunate ligament. The largest increase in spread of the carpal bones (55.3% of total spread) was noted after loading with the ligament intact. Thereafter, sectioning of the TCL resulted in a further 32.9% increase in the distance between the scaphoid and the hamate. We conclude that the intact carpal bones-ligament complex displays some elasticity. Progressive sectioning of the TCL ligament under loading further opens the palmar arch. Nevertheless it appears that the carpal arch will still retain reasonable intrinsic stability even without an intact TCL. PMID:19774812

  10. Movement of the Distal Carpal Row during Narrowing and Widening of the Carpal Arch Width

    OpenAIRE

    Gabra, Joseph N.; Domalain, Mathieu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Change in carpal arch width (CAW) is associated with wrist movement, carpal tunnel release, or therapeutic tunnel manipulation. This study investigated the angular rotations of the distal carpal joints as the CAW was adjusted. The CAW was narrowed and widened by 2 and 4 mm in seven cadaveric specimens while the bone positions were tracked by a marker-based motion capture system. The joints mainly pronated during CAW narrowing and supinated during widening. Ranges of motion about the pronation...

  11. Relationship between dorsal ganglion cysts of the wrist and intraosseous ganglion cysts of the carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Dungen, Sophie; Marchesi, Simona; Ezzedine, Rabih; Bindou, David; Lorea, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Soft tissue ganglion cysts are the most common benign tumours of the wrist; their pathogenesis remains controversial. We prospectively screened the radiographic appearance of the wrists of 51 patients presenting to a single surgeon with dorsal wrist ganglions during a one-year period. Postero-anterior and lateral radiographs were systematically performed looking for possible associated intraosseous ganglion cysts. There were 51 dorsal soft tissue ganglion cysts in 51 patients. We detected 29 associated intraosseous ganglia in 24 patients (47%): 16 ganglia in the lunate bone (55%), 5 in the capitate bone, 7 in the scaphoid and 1 in the trapezoid. Mean size of the intraosseous ganglia was 3 mm (range, 2 to 5 mm). This high prevalence of intraosseous ganglia in association with soft tissue ganglia has to our knowledge never been reported previously. A common aetiology for these two types of ganglion cysts may explain this high association rate. PMID:16305077

  12. Carpal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Jalal Jalalshokouhi; Mohammad Hossein Herischi; Shahyar Pashaei; Ali Akbar Ameri

    2012-01-01

    Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformatio...

  13. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... carpal tunnel syndrome. At this point in time, we have the patient under anesthesia. We have the hand prepped. Great. And then, the ... the carpal tunnel, and it’s the ligament that we incise to release the carpal canal. The carpal ...

  14. [Mechanics of the perilunate carpal bones and their injury patterns including post-traumatic instability with reference to rare clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilch, H

    1985-01-01

    There is given a survey of recent findings of the biomechanics of the carpal bones of which the complex of the os scaphoideum, lunatum and capitatum has the key role. The mechanism of injury and posttraumatic instability of the wrist are presented. Rare injuries like subluxation of the os scaphoideum with DISI instability, "scapho-capitate fracture" syndrome, and perilunar dislocation associated with scaphoid fracture (de Quervain) with a proximal fragment of the scaphoid which is turned over about 180 and 90 degrees, are reported in form of clinical cases. In case of subluxation of the os scaphoideum the operation described by Dobyns is recommended, using a split of ECRB tendon for dorsal ligament reconstruction. PMID:3984469

  15. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that is putting pressure on the median nerve. This is the procedure of carpal tunnel syndrome release, ... for the condition of carpal tunnel syndrome. At this point in time, we have the patient under ...

  16. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the lining of the tendons that will sometimes increase in size, giving rise to the increased pressure --. ... incriminating structure in carpal tunnel syndrome. As it increases in size, the pressures within the carpal canal ...

  17. Carpal fractures in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, W B

    2001-01-01

    A review of the literature shows that 3% to 9% of all athletic injuries occur to the hand or wrist. Also, hand and wrist injuries are more common in pubescent and adolescent athletes than adults. Although knee and shoulder injuries are more common athletic injuries, an injury to the hand or wrist significantly can impair the athlete's ability to throw or catch a ball, or swing a bat or racquet. A college football player trains year round for just 11 or 12 hours of playing time. An athletic injury that occurs during the season can have profound consequences for the athlete's career and emotions. When defining a management plan for a particular wrist athletic injury, the time to heal the injury and the time to rehabilitate fully must be considered. The athlete must be informed fully of the length of recovery. The continued advancement of fixation methods and techniques are diminishing fracture morbidity considerably. Small-cannulated compression screws that provide rigid fixation can be inserted with decreased surgical dissection, thus preserving critical vascular supply and promoting accelerated healing and earlier rehabilitation. The arthroscope as a valuable adjunct in the management of wrist fractures was virtually unheard of years ago, but is now common. The ability to arthroscopically guide a cannulated compression screw to stabilize a scaphoid fracture without a formal open volar approach can reduce surgical morbidity significantly and allow the athlete to return to competition more quickly. Mechanisms of injury that cause osseous fractures of the wrist are fairly high energy. A high index of suspicion for associated soft tissue injuries should be kept in mind when fractures of the wrist are identified. The wrist is composed of eight carpal bones tightly interwoven with each other by intrinsic and extrinsic wrist ligaments. The management of carpal fractures depends on prompt diagnosis, stable and anatomic alignment of the involved carpal bone, protective

  18. Biomechanical properties of the transverse carpal ligament under biaxial strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael W R; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P; Keir, Peter J

    2012-05-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) influences carpal stability and carpal tunnel mechanics, yet little is known about its mechanical properties. We investigated the tissue properties of TCLs extracted from eight cadaver arms and divided into six tissue samples from the distal radial, distal middle, distal ulnar, proximal radial, proximal middle, and proximal ulnar regions. The 5% and 15% strains were applied biaxially to each sample at rates of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1%/s. Ligament thickness ranged from 1.22 to 2.90 mm. Samples from the middle of the TCL were thicker proximally than distally (p carpal bone attachments. These properties contribute to the understanding of carpal tunnel mechanics that is critical to understanding disorders of the wrist. PMID:22042748

  19. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of carpal tunnel syndrome. At this point in time, we have the patient under anesthesia. We have ... and is not visible over a period of time. You can barely see a surgical scar. My ...

  20. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... made in the forearm somewhere here, and a second incision is made here, and then through one ... camera inside the carpal canal, and through the second incision you put a knife to cut that ...

  1. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... layer of tissue that comes in from the forearm and it merges into the transverse carpal ligament, ... of the nerve supplies these muscles of the forearm, the base of the forearm. The motor branch ...

  2. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... just going to spread the skin on the tissues. The fibers that are becoming visible now – knife -- ... that you see beneath the ligament is the tissue now within the carpal canal. So, I’ve ...

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Median nerve dysfunction; Median nerve entrapment ... Calandruccio JH. Carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013: ...

  4. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a release of the transverse carpal ligament, and it involves making an incision in the palm of ... the incision in the crease of the hand, it lends itself to faster healing and also it ...

  5. The Advantage of Throwing the First Stone: How Understanding the Evolutionary Demands of Homo sapiens Is Helping Us Understand Carpal Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Rohde, Rachel S.; Crisco, Joseph J.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2010-01-01

    Unlike any other diarthrodial joint in the human body, the “wrist joint” is composed of numerous articulations between eight carpal bones, the distal radius, the distal ulna, and five metacarpal bones. The carpal bones articulate with each other as well as with the distal radius, distal ulna, and the metacarpal bases. Multiple theories explaining intercarpal motion have been proposed; however, controversy exists concerning the degree and direction of motion of the individual carpal bones with...

  6. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L;

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopic...

  7. Movement of the distal carpal row during narrowing and widening of the carpal arch width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabra, Joseph N; Domalain, Mathieu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Change in carpal arch width (CAW) is associated with wrist movement, carpal tunnel release, or therapeutic tunnel manipulation. This study investigated the angular rotations of the distal carpal joints as the CAW was adjusted. The CAW was narrowed and widened by 2 and 4 mm in seven cadaveric specimens while the bone positions were tracked by a marker-based motion capture system. The joints mainly pronated during CAW narrowing and supinated during widening. Ranges of motion about the pronation axis for the hamate-capitate (H-C), capitate-trapezoid (C-Td), and trapezoid-trapezium (Td-Tm) joints were 8.1 ± 2.3 deg, 5.3 ± 1.3 deg, and 5.5 ± 3.5 deg, respectively. Differences between the angular rotations of the joints were found at ΔCAW = -4 mm about the pronation and ulnar-deviation axes. For the pronation axis, angular rotations of the H-C joint were larger than that of the C-Td and Td-Tm joints. Statistical interactions among the factors of joint, rotation axis, and ΔCAW indicated complex joint motion patterns. The complex three-dimensional motion of the bones can be attributed to several anatomical constraints such as bone arrangement, ligament attachments, and articular congruence. The results of this study provide insight into the mechanisms of carpal tunnel adaptations in response to biomechanical alterations of the structural components. PMID:23083195

  8. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. PMID:26617368

  9. Carpal Ligament Anatomy and Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulos, Nicholas; Bozentka, David J

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the ligamentous anatomy of the wrist is critical for any physician attempting to treat carpal instability. The anatomy of the wrist is complex, not only because of the number of named structures and their geometry but also because of the inconsistencies in describing these ligaments. The complex anatomy of the wrist is described through a review of the carpal ligaments and their effect on normal carpal motion. Mastery of this topic facilitates the physician's understanding of the patterns of instability that are seen clinically. PMID:26205699

  10. Electromyography in diagnostic of median nerve lesion in carpal tunnel syndrome of children with mucopolysaccharidoses

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Kurenkov; T. V. Podkletnova; Kuzenkova, L.M.; B. I. Bursagova; S. S. Nikitin; A. K. Gevorkyan; Vashakmadze, N.D.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a frequent syndrome in adults, but is very rare in children. CTS was described in children with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) as condition due to the deformation of carpal bones, deposition of glycosaminoglycans in tendosynovial tissue and connective tissue of flexor retinaculum. Electromyography is essential method for diagnostic CTS in children because typical symptoms of CTS (paresthesia, numbness of hand and fingers, atrophy and paresis of certain muscles) se...

  11. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  12. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS Type II After Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Tunç

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic syndrome characterised with dystrophic changes and neurovascular disordes of bone and skin of extremities. The most common etiological factors are trauma, ischemic heart disease, cerebral lesions, servical region disorders, infections, and surgical treatments. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compressive neuropaty of the upper extremity. There are various surgical and conservative alternatives in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Complex regional pain syndrome has been reported as a complication of surgical carpal tunnel release in 2-5% of patients. In this case report clinical characteristics and rehabilitation outcomes of a patient with complex regional pain syndrome after carpal tunnel release surgery is presented. (Osteoporoz Dünyasından 2010;16:41-3

  13. Pressure-morphology relationship of a released carpal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hee; Marquardt, Tamara L; Gabra, Joseph N; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-04-01

    We investigated morphological changes of a released carpal tunnel in response to variations of carpal tunnel pressure. Pressure within the carpal tunnel is known to be elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and dependent on wrist posture. Previously, increased carpal tunnel pressure was shown to affect the morphology of the carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament (TCL). However, the pressure-morphology relationship of the carpal tunnel after release of the TCL has not been investigated. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) was performed endoscopically on cadaveric hands and the carpal tunnel pressure was dynamically increased from 10 to 120 mmHg. Simultaneously, carpal tunnel cross-sectional images were captured by an ultrasound system, and pressure measurements were recorded by a pressure transducer. Carpal tunnel pressure significantly affected carpal arch area (p 62 mm(2) at 120 mmHg. Carpal arch height, length, and width also significantly changed with carpal tunnel pressure (p < 0.05). As carpal tunnel pressure increased, carpal arch height and length increased, but the carpal arch width decreased. Analyses of the pressure-morphology relationship for a released carpal tunnel revealed a nine times greater compliance than that previously reported for a carpal tunnel with an intact TCL. This change of structural properties as a result of transecting the TCL helps explain the reduction of carpal tunnel pressure and relief of symptoms for patients after CTR surgery. PMID:23184493

  14. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 min of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p 1234-1240, 2016. PMID:26662276

  15. Incidence of Recurrent and Persistent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome following Open Transverse Carpal Ligament Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Yazdanpanah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is entrapment of the median nerve in carpal tunnel of the wrist. In severe cases of carpal tunnel syndrome, or those refractory to conservative treatment, surgery is performed. The main aim of this research was to determine the incidence of recurrent and persistent rates of carpal tunnel syndrome following open surgery. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was performed on 105 patients having open carpal tunnel release in the range of 5 to 60 months ago. These cases were operated at Shahid Beheshti hospital in Yasuj, Iran. Assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome after open surgical release of the median nerve was done by electrodiagnostic studies and MRI. If symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome maintain after surgery, this condition is persistent and if reappearance of the syndrome 3 months or more following surgery this is recurrent. In cases of observing changes from severe to lower stages of the disease in electrodiagnostic studies, treatment is considered successful. Results: All of 58.1% of patients had right severe carpal tunnel syndrome and 41.9 % had left severe carpal tunnel syndrome prior to surgery. The incidence of recurrent and persistent carpal tunnel syndrome following open transverse carpal release was 12.4% and 10.4%, respectively. Conclusion: The incidence of persistent and recurrent rates of carpal tunnel syndrome following open transverse carpal release was higher than the expected rate. These rates were dependant to the appropriate patient, the correct diagnosis and duration of symptoms before surgery.

  16. Reference values of differences between TW3-C RUS and TW3-C Carpal bone ages of children from five cities of China%中国五城市儿童手腕部桡、尺、掌指骨骨龄与腕骨骨龄差异参考值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绍岩; 刘丽娟; 韩一三; 刘刚; 马振国; 沈勋章; 许瑞龙; 花纪青

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察中国城市儿童手腕部桡、尺、掌指骨骨龄与腕骨骨龄差异,为临床应用提供参考.方法 抽取上海、广州、温州、大连、石家庄5城市汉族健康儿童9408名,男5066名,女4342名,年龄1.5~13.5岁.采用桡、尺、掌指骨(BUS)骨龄标准(TW3-C RUS)和腕骨(Carpal)骨龄标准(TW3-C Carpal),分别评价儿童的桡、尺、掌指骨骨龄和腕骨骨龄.采用Box-Cox幂指数分布模型(Box-Cox power exponential distribution,BCPE)建立TW3-CRUS与TW3-C Carpal骨龄差值的Z分值曲线评价图表,以Q检验和拟合的百分位数曲线下样本例数的百分数检验BCPE模型的拟合优度.结果男2.0~13.5岁、女1.5~11.5岁,各年龄组TW3-CBUS与TW3-C Carpal骨龄差值的平均数均接近于零,男童平均数范围在-0.19~0.17岁,女童平均数范围在-0.12~0.13岁;男童年龄组骨龄差值的标准差在0.47~1.01岁之间,达最大标准差时4.5岁;女童骨龄差值的标准差在0.49~0.82岁之间,达最大标准差时3.5岁.经Q检验,选择出了男女儿童骨龄差值BCPE模型,所拟合的百分位数曲线下样本例数的百分数与其理论百分位相差很小,除女第90百分位数相差1.00%外,均在0.66%以下.结论 男女儿童TW3-C RUS与TW3-CCarpal骨龄差值随年龄而增加,分别在男4.5岁和女3.5岁左右达到最大,其后逐渐下降至腕骨发育成熟.但变异程度存在性别差异,男性大于女性,10岁后性别差异减小.%Objective The determination of skeletal maturity has an important role in pediatricclinical practice, especially in relation to endocrinological problems and growth disorders, and it is frequentlyuseful in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. It has been suggested that the difference between radius, ulnaand short bonse (RUS) and carpal may be of differential diagnostic significance. However, no data oncomparison among bone ages of Chinese children are available. The differences between TW3-Chinese RUS(TW3-C BUS) and

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma S; Sharma Nalini; Yeolekar M

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel, caused by cysticercosis. Nerve conduction studies revealed severe CTS. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested an inflammatory mass compressing the median nerve in carpal tunnel. The histological diagnosis was consistent with cysticercosis. The case resolved with conservative treatment. Such solitary presentation of entrapment median neuropathy as CTS caused by cysticercosis is extr...

  18. Carpal conformation in relation to carpal chip fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An objective radiological method of assessing the degree to which horses are conformationally 'back at the knee' (hyper-extended) is described. The effects on the measurements of variations in the direction of the incident X-ray beam and variations in weight bearing by the horse were assessed. A change from a lateromedial projection towards a plamaro-lateral-dorsomedial oblique projection consistently tended to reduce the observed degree of hyperextension of the carpus. Raising the contralateral limb to increase the load on the carpus had little effect on the measurements. The carpi of 21 thoroughbred racehorses with carpal chip fractures were not significantly more hyperextended than those of 10 thoroughbred racehorses with normal carpi. Back at the knee conformation was unlikely to have played a major role in the aetiopathogenesis of the carpal injuries

  19. Narrowing carpal arch width to increase cross-sectional area of carpal tunnel – a cadaveric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zong-Ming; Gabra, Joseph N.; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Kim, Dong Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel morphology plays an essential role in the etiology and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological changes of the carpal tunnel as a result of carpal arch width narrowing. It was hypothesized carpal arch width narrowing would result in increased height and area of the carpal arch. Methods The carpal arch width of eight cadaveric hands was narrowed by a custom apparatus and cross-sectional ultrasound images were acquired. The carpal arch height and area were quantified as the carpal arch width was narrowed. Correlation and regression analyses were performed for the carpal arch height and area with respect to the carpal arch width. Findings The carpal tunnel became more convex as the carpal arch width was narrowed. The initial carpal arch width, height, and area were 25.7 (SD 1.9) mm, 4.1 (SD 0.6) mm, and 68.5 (SD 14.0) mm2, respectively. The carpal arch height and area negatively correlated with the carpal arch width, with correlation coefficients of −0.974 (SD 0.018) and −0.925 (SD 0.034), respectively. Linear regression analyses showed a 1 mm narrowing of the carpal arch width resulted in proportional increases of 0.40 (SD 0.14) mm in the carpal arch height and 4.0 (SD 2.2) mm2 in the carpal arch area. Interpretation This study demonstrates that carpal arch width narrowing leads to increased carpal arch height and area, a potential mechanism to reduce the mechanical insult to the median nerve and relieve symptoms associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:23583095

  20. Chronic Synovitis after Open Carpal Tunnel Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Justin; Chan, Patrick; Rahdon, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Open carpal tunnel decompression is a common procedure with potential long-term complications such as scar tenderness, pillar pain and neuroma. We present the case of a 65 year-old male with chronic lipomatous hypertrophy of the wrist and chronic flexor tenosynovitis after open carpal tunnel release for its rarity and severity of symptoms that required further surgery. PMID:27454645

  1. Condroblastoma de escafoides carpiano Chondroblastoma of the carpal scaphoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Repáraz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El condroblastoma es un tumor benigno de origen cartilaginoso que representa menos del 1% de todos los tumores óseos primarios. Se localiza típicamente en la epífisis de los huesos largos. Un 10% de los condroblastomas afectan a huesos del pie y de la mano. El asiento de esta lesión en el carpo es extraordinariamente raro. Se presenta un caso de condroblastoma del escafoides del carpo que fue tratado mediante curetaje de la lesión y relleno con injerto óseo autólogo de cresta iliaca.A chondroblastoma is a benign tumour of cartilaginous origin which represents less than 1% of all primary osseous tumours. It is typically localised in the epiphysis of the long bones. Some 10% of chondroblastomas affect the bones of the foot and the hand. It is extremely rare for the seat of this lesion to be in the carpal bones. We present a case of chondroblastoma of the carpal scaphoids that was treated through curretage of the lesion and filling with autologous osseous graft from the iliac crest.

  2. Carpal Tunnel Release: Do We Understand the Biomechanical Consequences?

    OpenAIRE

    Morrell, Nathan T.; Harris, Andrew; Skjong, Christian; Akelman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel release is a very common procedure performed in the United States. While the procedure is often curative, some patients experience postoperative scar sensitivity, pillar pain, grip weakness, or recurrent median nerve symptoms. Release of the carpal tunnel has an effect on carpal anatomy and biomechanics, including increases in carpal arch width and carpal tunnel volume and changes in muscle and tendon mechanics. Our understanding of how these biomechanical changes contribute to ...

  3. Partial carpal arthrodesis for multiple carpal fractures and subluxation in a pony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpal fractures in horses may occur as a result of external trauma or during athletic activity. The management of individual carpal fractures has received considerable attention in the equine orthopaedic literature (Ordidge 1980; Mcllwraith et a/. 1987; Martin et a/. 1988; Schneider et a/. 1988; Barr et a/. 1990). However, there are relatively few reports on the management of multiple carpal injuries by either primary reconstruction or arthrodesis procedures (Auer et a/. 1986; Bertone et a/. 1989). This report documents the treatment of a pony with a complex traumatic carpometacarpal injury by partial carpal arthrodesis

  4. Studying primate carpal kinematics in three dimensions using a computed-tomography-based markerless registration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caley M; Leventhal, Evan L; Chivers, Spencer F; Marzke, Mary W; Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J

    2010-04-01

    The functional morphology of the wrist pertains to a number of important questions in primate evolutionary biology, including that of hominins. Reconstructing locomotor and manipulative capabilities of the wrist in extinct species requires a detailed understanding of wrist biomechanics in extant primates and the relationship between carpal form and function. The kinematics of carpal movement, and the role individual joints play in providing mobility and stability of the wrist, is central to such efforts. However, there have been few detailed biomechanical studies of the nonhuman primate wrist. This is largely because of the complexity of wrist morphology and the considerable technical challenges involved in tracking the movements of the many small bones that compose the carpus. The purpose of this article is to introduce and outline a method adapted from human clinical studies of three-dimensional (3D) carpal kinematics for use in a comparative context. The method employs computed tomography of primate cadaver forelimbs in increments throughout the wrist's range of motion, coupled with markerless registration of 3D polygon models based on inertial properties of each bone. The 3D kinematic principles involved in extracting motion axis parameters that describe bone movement are reviewed. In addition, a set of anatomically based coordinate systems embedded in the radius, capitate, hamate, lunate, and scaphoid is presented for the benefit of other primate functional morphologists interested in studying carpal kinematics. Finally, a brief demonstration of how the application of these methods can elucidate the mechanics of the wrist in primates illustrates the closer-packing of carpals in chimpanzees than in orangutans, which may help to stabilize the midcarpus and produce a more rigid wrist beneficial for efficient hand posturing during knuckle-walking locomotion. PMID:20235325

  5. Carpal tunnel release: do we understand the biomechanical consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Harris, Andrew; Skjong, Christian; Akelman, Edward

    2014-11-01

    Carpal tunnel release is a very common procedure performed in the United States. While the procedure is often curative, some patients experience postoperative scar sensitivity, pillar pain, grip weakness, or recurrent median nerve symptoms. Release of the carpal tunnel has an effect on carpal anatomy and biomechanics, including increases in carpal arch width and carpal tunnel volume and changes in muscle and tendon mechanics. Our understanding of how these biomechanical changes contribute to postoperative symptoms is still evolving. We review the relevant morphometric and biomechanical changes that occur following release of the transverse carpal ligament. PMID:25364635

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome: an unusual presentation of brachial hypertrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy, K T; Saha, P. K.; Ravindran, M

    1980-01-01

    A patient with carpal tunnel syndrome in association with congenital hypertrophy of right upper limb is described. The median nerve also showed hypertrophy. The symptoms were relieved by decompression of the carpal tunnel.

  7. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Ultrasound versus electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D; van Holsbeeck, M T; Janevski, P K; Ganos, D L; Ditmars, D M; Darian, V B

    1999-07-01

    This article presents a new technique for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome using ultrasound. The ultrasound characteristics of the normal and abnormal median nerve are discussed in relation to carpal tunnel syndrome. The development of ultrasound as a new diagnostic modality for carpal tunnel syndrome is presented in a three-part study correlating the ultrasound measurements of the median nerve and electromyogram of the median nerve. A new algorithm for evaluating patients with carpal tunnel syndrome is presented. PMID:10442084

  8. The asymmetry of the carpal joint and the evolution of wing folding in maniraptoran theropod dinosaurs

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Corwin; Hone, David W. E.; Xu, Xing; Zhang, Fucheng

    2010-01-01

    In extant birds, the hand is permanently abducted towards the ulna, and the wrist joint can bend extensively in this direction to fold the wing when not in use. Anatomically, this asymmetric mobility of the wrist results from the wedge-like shape of one carpal bone, the radiale, and from the well-developed convexity of the trochlea at the proximal end of the carpometacarpus. Among the theropod precursors of birds, a strongly convex trochlea is characteristic of Coelurosauria, a clade includin...

  9. Carpal ligamentous disruptions and negative ulnar variance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negative ulnar variance is a condition in which the ulna is relatively shorter than the radius at the carpus. It was found in 21% of 203 normal wrists. We have observed an increased incidence (49%) of this anomaly in patients with carpal ligamentous instabilities (dorsiflexion instability, palmar flexion instability, scapholunate dissociation with rotary luxation of the scaphoid, and lunate and perilunate dislocations). While the reasons for this association have yet to be adequately delineated, the presence of a negative ulnar variant may serve as an impartial clue to the presence of ligamentous instability. Many carpal instabilities present with subtle radiographic findings requiring careful evaluation of radiographs. Patients with negative ulnar variance and histories suggestive of ligamentous instability should undergo careful radiologic evaluation to assure early diagnosis of carpal disruption. (orig.)

  10. Ganglion cysts and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, J J; Bertoni, J M; Jaeger, S H

    1988-09-01

    We review 12 cases of ganglion cyst with carpal tunnel syndrome in 11 patients seen at the Hand Rehabilitation Center. Mean age was 42 years (range, 28 to 60 years). One half of the cysts were associated with direct trauma, usually with wrist hyperextension. Symptoms usually developed after the appearance or sudden growth of the cyst. Motor conduction or distal sensory latency was abnormal in seven of eight studied cases. Tinel's sign on tapping the cyst may be pathognomonic for this syndrome. Cyst removal and incision of the flexor retinaculum relieved the symptoms in 11 cases. The other case had total resolution after spontaneous cyst rupture. This syndrome is successfully treated with cyst decompression with release of the carpal canal and has an excellent prognosis. To our knowledge this represents the largest operative series of carpal tunnel syndrome and ganglion cyst. PMID:3241055

  11. TC study of the carpal tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard technique for CT investigation of the carpal tunnel and its normal anatomy were studied. Ten healty asymptomatic volunteers, age 25-45, underwent wrist CT. The hand is placed in prone position with the third metacarpus in line with radius. Digital radiograph and four axial CT scans are performed respectively: at the distal end of the radius, at the scaphoid tubercle level, at the hamate hook level and at the carpal and metacarpal joint. Standard carpal tunnel diameters are thus available with good reliability and repeatibility when correct technique is adopted. The results permit a morphological description of the osseous walls, transverse ligament, flexor tendons with synovial sheets and median nerve. Gujon's canal and its content can also be investigated

  12. The magnetic resonance imaging of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. An investigation about the etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Jun; Inagaki, Katsunori; Hirahara, Hirotsune; Miyaoka, Hideyo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Takigawa, Souichirou [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Toyosu Hospital

    2002-10-01

    The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome has not been clarified. We evaluated cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, flexor tendons, median nerve and thickness of transverse carpal ligament by enhanced MRI. Twenty-six patients were tested who has been diagnosed based on electromyogram and clinical symptons as idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. All patients were female and the mean age was 64 years old. The cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, the median nerve, the flexor tendons and synovium around them in carpal tunnel were calculated. And the thickness of the transverse carpal ligament as well. The mean area of the flexor tendons with synovium in carpal tunnel was 110.5{+-}25.5 mm{sup 2} (control group; 79.3{+-}13.8 mm{sup 2}), ratio of flexor tendon area to carpal tunnel area was 51.6{+-}8.9% (control; 40.5{+-}2.4%), and the thickness of the transverse carpal ligament was 3.3{+-}0.5 mm (control; 2.5{+-}0.4 mm) in severe idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. The mean area of the flexor tendons with synovium in severe idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome was significantly greater than that of mild type (p<0.05). In such a process, we could classify these MRI findings into the following four subgroups. Enlargement of cross sectional area of flexor tendons and synovium (n=8; 25.8%), thickened transverse carpal ligament (n=11; 35.5%), combined type (n=7; 22.6%) and impossible to classify (n=5; 16.1%). This classification with enhanced MRI was correlated to clinical course and electrophysiologic severity. In conclusion, we can suggest that to evaluate cross sectional area of the wrist (carpal tunnel) with enhanced MRI is one of the useful assistant method for diagnosing and investigating the etiology of severe idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  13. Three-dimensional computed tomography of the carpal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Viegas, Steven F

    2009-03-01

    This article details a current perspective and accurate anatomical three-dimensional descriptions of the ligaments of the wrist. The carpometacarpal ligaments, the intercarpal ligaments, and the radiocarpal ligaments are described and illustrated using a unique combination of detailed dissection, computed tomography, and a three-dimensional digitization technique. Detailed information is also provided about the ligamentous attachments of the carpometacarpal joints, the carpal bones, and the distal radius. This study improves knowledge and understanding of the normal anatomy and mechanics of the radiocarpal and intercarpal ligaments and the carpometacarpal joints, and it should help in the assessment of radiographic images and treatment of various injuries and degenerative changes seen in the wrist. The knowledge of the ligaments will further serve as a foundation for understanding the anatomy of the ligaments, the biomechanics of the wrist, and the function of the individual ligaments and their roles in joint motion and stability. PMID:19235667

  14. Three-dimensional imaging of the carpal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Patterson, Rita M; Viegas, Steven F

    2006-11-01

    This article provides a new perspective and detailed anatomic description of the attachments of the carpometacarpal (CMC) ligaments, intercarpal ligaments, and radiocarpal ligaments, which are described and illustrated using a unique combination of detailed dissection, CT imaging, and three-dimensional digitization. Detailed information is also provided about the ligamentous attachments of the CMC joints, carpal bones, and distal radius. This information advances the current knowledge and understanding of the normal anatomy and its impact on the mechanics of the radiocarpal intercarpal ligaments and the CMC joints, and should help surgeons to assess and treat injuries and degenerative changes seen in the wrist and CMC joints. Furthermore, this additional knowledge of the ligaments will help to further understand wrist kinematics and, more precisely, the function of the individual ligaments and their roles in joint motion and stability and injuries. PMID:17097462

  15. Understanding carpal instability: a radiographic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kani, Kimia Khalatbari; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Chew, Felix S

    2016-08-01

    The wrist is disposed to a variety of instability patterns owing to its complex anatomical and biomechanical properties. Various classification schemes have been proposed to describe the different patterns of carpal instability, of which the Mayo classification is the most commonly used. Understanding the concepts and pertinent terminology of this classification scheme is important for the correct interpretation of images and optimal communication with referring physicians. Standard wrist radiographs are the first line of imaging in carpal instability. Additional information may be obtained with the use of stress radiographs and other imaging modalities. PMID:27085694

  16. Dorsal wrist mass: the carpal boss

    OpenAIRE

    Boggess, Blake; Berkoff, David

    2011-01-01

    The carpal boss is an osseous overgrowth that is occasionally mistaken for a ganglion cyst. This report highlights the case a 36-year-old patient who was originally diagnosed by his primary care physician with a ganglion cyst and was sent to an orthopaedist for aspiration. Upon further evaluation with a plain radiograph, the dorsal wrist mass was found to be a carpal boss. The patient was treated with rest and a wrist brace, and was informed that a corticosteroid injection or surgical excisio...

  17. Dorsal wrist mass: the carpal boss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, Blake; Berkoff, David

    2011-01-01

    The carpal boss is an osseous overgrowth that is occasionally mistaken for a ganglion cyst. This report highlights the case a 36-year-old patient who was originally diagnosed by his primary care physician with a ganglion cyst and was sent to an orthopaedist for aspiration. Upon further evaluation with a plain radiograph, the dorsal wrist mass was found to be a carpal boss. The patient was treated with rest and a wrist brace, and was informed that a corticosteroid injection or surgical excision would be necessary if conservative treatment failed. The patient was asymptomatic on follow-up and invasive procedures were not necessary. PMID:22707539

  18. Biomechanical Role of the Transverse Carpal Ligament in Carpal Tunnel Compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zong-Ming; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) is a significant constituent of the wrist structure and forms the volar boundary of the carpal tunnel. It serves biomechanical and physiological functions, acting as a pulley for the flexor tendons, anchoring the thenar and hypothenar muscles, stabilizing the bony structure, and providing wrist proprioception. This article mainly describes and reviews our recent studies regarding the biomechanical role of the TCL in the compliant characteristics of the car...

  19. Nutrient vessel canals. Differential diagnosis of zystoid carpal lesions on MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To find and describe potential MRI criteria of nutrient vessel canals of carpal bones. Methods and material: 16 wrists of 13 patients with pain and radiographic depiction of cystic changes within the lunate were examined. The MRI protocol included coronal and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted SE sequences (4 mm slices, 120 FOV, 256x256 matrix) as well as coronal STIR images. Final diagnosis was confirmed by surgery (n=5) and follow up. 10 cadaveric ossa lunata were studied to describe size, number, location and shape of nutrient vessel canals. Results: Ganglion cysts (n=6) showed characteristic signs. In ulnar impaction syndrome (n=1) small cystic lesions in the lunate were surrounded by a sclerotic rim and located near the proximal ulnar surface. In Kienboeck's disease (n=3) cystic components were irregular and surrounded by bone marrow edema. Nutrient vessel canals (n=7) imaged as 1 to 3 small cystic lesions within the palmar or dorsal subchondral region. Conclusion: MRI can aid in differential diagnosis of cystic carpal lesions. Nutrient vessel canals may not be mistaken for pathologic cystic lesions. Carpal ganglion cysts show distinct diagnostic patterns. (orig.)

  20. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hospital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rheumatology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2015-12-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  1. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  2. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCKWAVE THERAPY FOR POST BURN CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Hesham Galal Mahran; Ashraf Hassan Mohammed; Shimaa Nabil Aboelazm

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is considered the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. It may lead to work disability and functional impairment. Burns are associated with swelling and eschar which forms a tight band constricting the circulation distally. Purpose: To investigate the effect of shockwave therapy on the carpal tunnel syndrome post burn. Subjects: Thirty male and female patients selected with manifestation of carpal tunnel syndrome post burn evaluated by e...

  3. Carpal ligamentous laxity with bilateral perilunate dislocation in Marfan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of persistent bilateral perilunate dislocation unrelated to trauma in a patient with Marfan syndrome is discussed. This finding is believed to be a manifestation of the generalized ligamentous laxity occurring in this disorder. Radiographs of eight additional Marfan syndrome patients failed to demonstrate similar carpal instability. Because some carpal derangements are dynamic events, stress views or wrist fluoroscopy may be necessary to demonstrate unsuspected carpal instability in Marfan patients. (orig.)

  4. Carpal ligamentous laxity with bilateral perilunate dislocation in Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennes, D.R.; Braunstein, E.M.; Shirazi, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    A case of persistent bilateral perilunate dislocation unrelated to trauma in a patient with Marfan syndrome is discussed. This finding is believed to be a manifestation of the generalized ligamentous laxity occurring in this disorder. Radiographs of eight additional Marfan syndrome patients failed to demonstrate similar carpal instability. Because some carpal derangements are dynamic events, stress views or wrist fluoroscopy may be necessary to demonstrate unsuspected carpal instability in Marfan patients.

  5. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome associated with interleukin 2 therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Heys, S. D.; Mills, K. L.; Eremin, O.

    1992-01-01

    We report the development of synchronous bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a woman with metastatic colorectal cancer, undergoing treatment with recombinant interleukin 2. A carpal tunnel decompression was carried out on the hand which was more severely affected, with a gradual recovery in median nerve function. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of carpal tunnel syndrome in association with recombinant interleukin 2.

  6. Changes in carpal tunnel compliance with incremental flexor retinaculum release

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnaparkhi, Rubina; Xiu, Kaihua; Guo, Xin; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Flexor retinaculum transection is a routine surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome, yet the biomechanical and clinical sequelae of the procedure remain unclear. We investigated the effects of flexor retinaculum release on carpal tunnel structural compliance using cadaveric hands. Methods The flexor retinaculum was incrementally and sequentially released with transections of 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of the transverse carpal ligament, followed by the distal aponeurosis and then t...

  7. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one pa...

  8. Carpal arthrodesis in cats. Long-term functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, I; Farrell, M; Chase, D; Aisa, J; Rayward, R; Carmichael, S

    2009-01-01

    Pancarpal and partial carpal arthrodesis were performed in 22 carpi (20 cats) using various surgical methods. Short and long-term outcomes were assessed using a retrospective review of the case notes and via owner questionnaires. Carpal arthrodesis was associated with complications that did not affect the functional outcome, and in most cases, did not necessitate major revision surgery. Following arthrodesis, the cats did not jump as high, and showed a reduction in their willingness to jump and climb. Based on our results, carpal arthrodesis is a suitable salvage surgery to treat severe carpal injuries in the cat. PMID:19876518

  9. The relationship among five common carpal tunnel syndrome tests and the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priganc, Victoria W; Henry, Sharon M

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship among clinical carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) tests and the severity of CTS. A total of 66 subjects with electrodiagnostically confirmed CTS were tested on five CTS tests, then classified according to the severity of CTS. An association was found between testing positive on Phalen's test and the severity of CTS (p Katz-Stirrat hand diagram, or carpal tunnel outcomes assessment tool. The more severe the CTS, the more likely one is to test positive on Phalen's test. Tinel's sign and the mCCT are not influenced by the severity of CTS. This study suggests that Tinel's sign and mCCT may not be useful in assessing the effectiveness of treatment. The Katz-Stirrat hand diagram and the carpal tunnel outcomes assessment tool are not influenced by the severity of CTS, indicating that numerous factors can influence a patient's response on subjective questionnaires. PMID:12943125

  10. Optimal management of carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shimpei Ono; Clapham, Philip J; Chung, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Shimpei Ono, Philip J Clapham, Kevin C ChungSection of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: In order to improve health care efficiency and effectiveness, treatments should provide disease improvement or resolution at a reasonable cost. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) published a guideline for treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in 2009 based on review of the literature up to April 6, 2007. We have no...

  11. Carpal tunnel syndrome and vitamin B6

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan-Harshman, Milly; Aldoori, Walid

    2007-01-01

    QUESTION A 42-year-old woman with carpal tunnel syndrome tells you she has started taking a vitamin B6 supplement to relieve her symptoms. Her work in an automotive parts department involves both lifting moderately heavy packages and typing at a computer terminal. What does the research indicate about vitamin B6 as a treatment option, and what health issues should you discuss with this patient?

  12. Subclinical Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroosh Dabiri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is the first cause of morbidity all around the world. Entrapment neuropathies are a known complication of stroke. The objective of this study is to assess the frequency of subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in the healthy and paretic hands of stroke patients.Methods: The authors performed nerve conduction study in the first three days after admission in 39 stroke patients without subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome and 30 days after admission. Electrophysiological studies were done in both paretic and non-paretic hands. Both ulnar and median nerves were studied.Results: After one month we found subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in 16 paretic hands and 13 healthy hands. We did not find any difference in the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome in two sides.Conclusion: The authors suggest that simultaneous different mechanisms may act in inducing carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands of hemiparetic patients.

  13. Bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scanning provides information on the extent of primary bone tumors, on possible metastatic disease, on the presence of osteomyelitis prior to observation of roentgenographic changes so that earlier therapy is possible, on the presence of collagen diseases, on the presence of fractures not disclosed by x-ray films, and on the evaluation of aseptic necrosis. However, the total effect and contribution of bone scanning to the diagnosis, treatment, and ultimate prognosis of pediatric skeletal diseases is, as yet, unknown. (auth)

  14. Carpal pseudoerosions: a plain X-ray interpretation pitfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawer, Richard [Univ. Catholique de Lille (France). Service d' Imagerie Medicale; Budzik, Jean Francois [Univ. Catholique de Lille (France). Service d' Imagerie Medicale; Univ. Nord de France, Boulogne sur Mer (France). Unite de Recherche EA 4490, Physiopathologie des Maladies Osseuses Inflammatoires; Demondion, Xavier [Univ. Lille 2 (France). Service d' Imagerie Musculosquelettique; CHRU Lille (France). Lab. d' Anatomie; Forzy, Gerard [Univ. Catholique de Lille, Lomme (France). Lab. de Biologie; Cotten, Anne [Univ. Lille 2 (France). Service d' Imagerie Musculosquelettique; Univ. Nord de France, Boulogne sur Mer (France). Unite de Recherche EA 4490, Physiopathologie des Maladies Osseuses Inflammatoires

    2014-10-15

    To examine in detail images of pseudoerosion of the wrist and hand on plain radiographs. The study was conducted with 28 cadaver wrists. During a single imaging session three techniques - plain radiography, tomosynthesis, and computed tomography - were used to visualize the wrist and hand specimens. For each technique, 20 radio-ulno-carpo-metacarpal sites known to present bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis were analyzed by two radiologists using a standard system to score the cortical bone: normal, pseudoerosion, true erosion, or other pathology. Cohen's concordance analysis was performed to determine inter-observer and intra-observer (for the senior radiologist) agreement by site and by technique. Serial sections of two cadaver specimens were examined to determine the anatomical correlation of the pseudoerosions. On the plain radiographs, the radiologists scored many images as pseudoerosion (7.3 %), particularly in the distal ulnar portion of the capitate, the distal radial portion of the hamate, the proximal ulnar portion of the base of the third metacarpal, the proximal radial portion of the base of the fourth metacarpal, the distal ulnar portion of the hamate, and the proximal portion of the base of the fifth metacarpal. The computed tomography scan revealed that none of these doubtful images corresponded to true erosions. The anatomical correlation study showed that these images could probably be attributed to ligament insertions, thinner lamina, and enhanced cortical bone transparency. Knowledge of the anatomical carpal localizations where pseudoerosions commonly occur is a necessary prerequisite for analysis of plain radiographs performed to diagnose or monitor rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  15. Carpal pseudoerosions: a plain X-ray interpretation pitfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine in detail images of pseudoerosion of the wrist and hand on plain radiographs. The study was conducted with 28 cadaver wrists. During a single imaging session three techniques - plain radiography, tomosynthesis, and computed tomography - were used to visualize the wrist and hand specimens. For each technique, 20 radio-ulno-carpo-metacarpal sites known to present bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis were analyzed by two radiologists using a standard system to score the cortical bone: normal, pseudoerosion, true erosion, or other pathology. Cohen's concordance analysis was performed to determine inter-observer and intra-observer (for the senior radiologist) agreement by site and by technique. Serial sections of two cadaver specimens were examined to determine the anatomical correlation of the pseudoerosions. On the plain radiographs, the radiologists scored many images as pseudoerosion (7.3 %), particularly in the distal ulnar portion of the capitate, the distal radial portion of the hamate, the proximal ulnar portion of the base of the third metacarpal, the proximal radial portion of the base of the fourth metacarpal, the distal ulnar portion of the hamate, and the proximal portion of the base of the fifth metacarpal. The computed tomography scan revealed that none of these doubtful images corresponded to true erosions. The anatomical correlation study showed that these images could probably be attributed to ligament insertions, thinner lamina, and enhanced cortical bone transparency. Knowledge of the anatomical carpal localizations where pseudoerosions commonly occur is a necessary prerequisite for analysis of plain radiographs performed to diagnose or monitor rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  16. Axonal degeneration of the ulnar nerve secondary to carpal tunnel syndrome: fact or fiction?☆

    OpenAIRE

    Azmy, Radwa Mahmoud; Labib, Amira Ahmed; Elkholy, Saly Hassan

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of sensory symptoms in carpal tunnel syndrome is strongly dependent on the degree of electrophysiological dysfunction of the median nerve. The association between carpal tunnel syndrome and ulnar nerve entrapment is still unclear. In this study, we measured ulnar nerve function in 82 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients were divided into group I with minimal carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 35) and group II with mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 47) accord...

  17. Ultrasound assessment of posttraumatic pseudoarthrosis of the carpal scaphoid; Valoracion ecografica de la seudoartrosis postraumatica del escafoides carpiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarria, L.; Garcia, S.; Cozcolluela, R.; Martinez-Berganza, T.; Villacampa, V. [Hospital Reina Sofia. Tudela Navarra (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    to evaluate the utility of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of posttraumatic pseudoarthrosis of the carpal scaphoid, describing the ultrasound findings observed in the patients. Eleven patients diagnosed as having pseudoarthrosis of the carpal scaphoid were studied using a 7.5-MHz probe. The features assessed were irregularity of the cortical surface, presence of a gap in its continuity and swelling of periscaphoid soft tissue, the vascularity of which was studied by means of color Doppler. The findings were compared with those observed in the contralateral hand. Cortical irregularity was observed in all the patients and six presented a gap in the cortex of the palmar surface of the scaphoid. Ten had soft tissue swelling with increased vascularity. One patient with an ununited fracture showed no gap or soft tissue swelling: the bone cortex was found to be intact intraoperatively. Ultrasound is useful in the diagnosis of pseudoarthrosis of the carpal scaphoid. Swelling of the periscaphoid soft tissue with increased vascularity in patients whose fracture occured more than 6 to 8 weeks earlier suggests nonunion of the injured bone. (Author) 13 refs.

  18. [Treatment of pseudoarthrosis of the carpal scaphoid with fibrin glue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozzi, S

    1983-08-01

    The author think that "Fibrin Seal Glue" and mechanical syntesis is an opimal method for osteosintesis of the Carpal scaphoid. He speaks about 5 patients treated with optimal results in 50 days mean. PMID:6395974

  19. CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME PADA PEKERJA GARMEN DI JAKARTA

    OpenAIRE

    Lusianawaty Tana; FX Suharyanto Halim; Delima Delima; Woro Ryadina

    2012-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a disorder caused by medianus nerve entrapment in carpal tunnel in the wrist and gives many symptoms as painfully, numbness, hyperesthesia at nerve medianus area. The objective of this study was to asses CTS in garment factory workers and determine the prevalence of CTS, CTS relation to age, sex, workhour, and repeated biomechanical pressure in hand/wrist. A cross sectional design was used in the study conducted in Jakarta in 2002, to 814 person sample with sim...

  20. Association between wrist angle and carpal tunnel syndrome among workers

    OpenAIRE

    You, Doohee

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Association between wrist angle and carpal tunnel syndrome among workersbyDoohee YouDoctor of Philosophy in Environmental Health Science University of California, Berkeley Professor David Rempel, Chair IntroductionCarpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common work-related peripheral neuropathy among workers who perform hand-intensive tasks. It has a greater impact on time away from work and disability than almost all other workplace injuries. For prevention, the National Institute ...

  1. Electromyography in diagnostic of median nerve lesion in carpal tunnel syndrome of children with mucopolysaccharidoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kurenkov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a frequent syndrome in adults, but is very rare in children. CTS was described in children with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS as condition due to the deformation of carpal bones, deposition of glycosaminoglycans in tendosynovial tissue and connective tissue of flexor retinaculum. Electromyography is essential method for diagnostic CTS in children because typical symptoms of CTS (paresthesia, numbness of hand and fingers, atrophy and paresis of certain muscles seen in adults are absent or not realized by children with MPS because of cognitive deficit despite the presence of nerve involvement. EMG results from 40 children with different types of MPS (age 1 year 8 months to 18 years are presented. Neurophysiologic abnormalities related to CTS were found in every child with MPS I, in 80,9 % of cases – with MPS II and in every case – with MPS VI; no EMG signs of median nerve lesions incarpal channel were detected in patients with MPS III and MPS IV. CTS was bilateral in children with MPS I, II and VI, but usuallythere was an asymmetry of changes. We revealed CTS in one patient with MPS II as early as at the age 2 years 11 months. All children with MPS II had already CTS at the age of 4 years except one patient. Children with MPS I and MPS VI were not investigate before the age 4 years old, but one child 4 years old with MPS I had severe CTS. In children with MPS atrophy of thenar eminence muscles developed rapidly as complication of CTS. Therefore we recommend repeating of EMG regularly to identify earliest signs of median nerve disturbance in carpal channel and opportune surgical decompression of the entrapped nerve. It allows preserving normal function of hand that it is very important for adequate child development and quality of life.

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome - Part II (treatment,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Chammas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatments for non-deficit forms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS are corticoid infiltration and/or a nighttime immobilization brace. Surgical treatment, which includes sectioning the retinaculum of the flexors (retinaculotomy, is indicated in cases of resistance to conservative treatment in deficit forms or, more frequently, in acute forms. In minimally invasive techniques (endoscopy and mini-open, and even though the learning curve is longer, it seems that functional recovery occurs earlier than in the classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon, patient, severity, etiology and availability of material. The results are satisfactory in close to 90% of the cases. Recovery of strength requires four to six months after regression of the pain of pillar pain type. This surgery has the reputation of being benign and has a complication rate of 0.2–0.5%.

  3. Medical history of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Heidi; Posner, Martin A

    2002-05-01

    The anatomical configuration of the carpal tunnel is that of an inelastic channel. Consequently, any increase in its volume or alteration in shape will usually result in a significant increase in interstitial pressure. At a pressure threshold of 20 mm Hg to 30 mm Hg, epineurial blood flow is compromised. When that pressure is sustained, the symptoms and physical findings associated with CTS appear. Typically, patients present with intermittent pain and paresthesias in all or part of the median nerve distribution of their hand(s). As weeks and months pass, symptoms progressively increase in frequency and severity. Eventually, thenar muscle weakness develops that initially manifests itself as "fatigue," or "tiredness." The progressive increase in symptoms and physical findings, usually accompanied by a progressive deterioration in electrodiagnostic studies, facilitates the classification of the condition into early, intermediate, and advanced stages. The increase in interstitial pressure in the carpal tunnel is in the vast majority of cases idiopathic (spontaneous). It can also be caused by a myriad of other conditions that can be classified into three other categories: intrinsic factors that increase the volume of the tunnel (outside and inside the nerve), extrinsic factors that alter the contour of the tunnel, and repetitive/overuse conditions. In addition, there is another category of neuropathic factors that affect the nerve without increasing interstitial pressure. In rare situations CTS can present as an acute problem. Far less common than the chronic form of the condition, it can follow acute wrist trauma, rheumatologic disorders, hemorrhagic problems, vascular disorders affecting a patent median artery, and high pressure injection injuries. Prompt recognition is important, followed in most cases by urgent surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:12371028

  4. Optimal management of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei Ono

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Shimpei Ono, Philip J Clapham, Kevin C ChungSection of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: In order to improve health care efficiency and effectiveness, treatments should provide disease improvement or resolution at a reasonable cost. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS published a guideline for treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS in 2009 based on review of the literature up to April 6, 2007. We have now reviewed the material published since then. Through reviewing evidence-based articles published during this period, this paper examines the current options and trends for treating CTS. We performed a systematic review of the randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines to present the outcomes of current treatments for this disease. Twenty-five studies met our inclusion criteria. Thirteen randomized, controlled trials and 12 systematic reviews, including three Cochrane database systematic reviews, were retrieved. Our review revealed that most of the recent studies support the AAOS guideline. However, the recent literature demonstrates a trend towards recommending early surgery for CTS cases with or without median nerve denervation, although the AAOS guideline recommends early surgical treatment only for cases with denervation. The usefulness of splinting and steroids as initial treatments for improving patients’ symptoms are also supported by the recent literature, but these effects are temporary. The evidence level for ultrasound treatment is still low, and further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of this treatment. Finally, our review revealed a paucity of articles comparing the costs of CTS diagnosis and treatment. With the recent focus on health care reform and rising costs, attention to the direct and indirect costs of health care is important for all conditions. Future well designed studies

  5. Ultrasound Assessment of Transverse Carpal Ligament Thickness: A Validity and Reliability Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) forms the palmar boundary of the carpal tunnel and plays an important role in carpal tunnel mechanics. TCL hypertrophy has been observed for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and postulated as a potential etiological factor. Ultrasound is particularly advantageous for TCL imaging because of its capability of detecting the interfaces between the TCL and other tissues. The purposes of this study were to develop an ultrasound based method to measu...

  6. Volar/Dorsal Compressive Mechanical Behavior of the Transverse Carpal Ligament

    OpenAIRE

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Baer, Thomas E.; Klocke, Noelle F; Thomas D. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical insult to the median nerve caused by contact with the digital flexor tendons and/or carpal tunnel boundaries may contribute to the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. Since the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) comprises the volar boundary of the carpal tunnel, its mechanics in part govern the potential insult to the median nerve. Using unconfined compression testing in combination with a finite element-based optimization process, nominal stiffness measurements and first-order Og...

  7. Magnetic resonance neurography of median neuropathies proximal to the carpal tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thawait, Gaurav K. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Subhawong, Ty K.; Eng, John; Carrino, John A.; Chhabra, Avneesh [Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Thawait, Shrey K. [Yale University, Bridgeport Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Belzberg, Alan J. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-06-15

    This review provides magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) imaging appearances of median neuropathy proximal to the carpal tunnel. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and its imaging have been extensively described in the literature; however, there is a relative paucity of information on the MR imaging appearances of different pathologies of the median nerve proximal to the carpal tunnel. (orig.)

  8. Traumatic Carpal Axial Instability in a Professional Football Player: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, Lance; Rettig, Arthur; Cleland, Kirk

    2016-05-01

    This is a case of traumatic carpal axial instability in a professional football player. Traumatic carpal axial instability characteristically involves longitudinal separation of the ulnar or radial distal carpal row along with intermetacarpal injury. Rarely, pancarpal ligament disruption occurs, as in this case. Early diagnosis and treatment of unstable wrist injuries is important in achieving a satisfactory outcome. PMID:26502186

  9. Transverse Carpal Ligament and Forearm Fascia Release for the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Change the Entrance Angle of Flexor Tendons to the A1 Pulley: The Relationship between Carpal Tunnel Surgery and Trigger Finger Occurence

    OpenAIRE

    Nazım Karalezli; Harun Kütahya; Ali Güleç; Serdar Toker; Hakan Karabörk; Ogun, Tunc C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The appearance of trigger finger after decompression of the carpal tunnel without a preexisting symptom has been reported in a few articles. Although, the cause is not clear yet, the loss of pulley action of the transverse carpal ligament has been accused mostly. In this study, we planned a biomechanical approach to fresh cadavers. Methods. The study was performed on 10 fresh amputees of the arm. The angles were measured with (1) the transverse carpal ligament and the distal forearm ...

  10. The carpal boss: a review of different sonographic findings*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Carlos Frederico

    2014-01-01

    Carpal boss is an uncommon condition whose incidence is underestimated and that is frequently confused with other causes of development of tumor-like lesions on the dorsum of the wrist. From the clinical point of view, the main obstacle to its recognition is the nonspecificity of symptoms, frequently attributed to dorsal ganglion cysts, since both conditions share a similar location on the dorsum of the wrist. The assessment by ultrasonography allows for a correct diagnosis and appropriate management, with better chances of resolution of the clinical complaint and lower probability of iatrogenic worsening of the lesion. The present review is aimed at describing the different sonographic findings of carpal boss. PMID:25741059

  11. The carpal boss: a review of different sonographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Carlos Frederico

    2014-01-01

    Carpal boss is an uncommon condition whose incidence is underestimated and that is frequently confused with other causes of development of tumor-like lesions on the dorsum of the wrist. From the clinical point of view, the main obstacle to its recognition is the nonspecificity of symptoms, frequently attributed to dorsal ganglion cysts, since both conditions share a similar location on the dorsum of the wrist. The assessment by ultrasonography allows for a correct diagnosis and appropriate management, with better chances of resolution of the clinical complaint and lower probability of iatrogenic worsening of the lesion. The present review is aimed at describing the different sonographic findings of carpal boss. PMID:25741059

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome assessed with diffusion tensor imaging: Comparison with electrophysiological studies of patients and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chien-Kuo, E-mail: n044206@mail.hosp.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Jou, I-Ming, E-mail: jming@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Orthopedics, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Huang, Han-Wei, E-mail: veivei@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Neurology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Yin, E-mail: chenpeiyin@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital Dou-Liou Branch, 345 Zhuangjing Road, Douliu City, Yunlin County 640, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Hong-Ming, E-mail: sjfhmt@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Sheng, E-mail: sanderz@ms60.url.com.tw [Department of Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chou-Ching K., E-mail: cxl45@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Neurology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-15

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the applicability of parameters derived from diffusion tension imaging (DTI) in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Forty subjects were recruited, of which 19 were normal controls and 21 belonged to the CTS group. DTI of median nerves evaluated at 4 levels of the wrist (distal radius, pisiform bone, middle portion of the carpal tunnel, and hamate bone) and conventional MRI of the wrist was performed in normal and CTS subjects in two finger postures (extension and flexion). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were derived from DTI, and parameters related to abnormal hyperintensity of the median nerve were derived from conventional MRI. Electrophysiological tests, including nerve conduction velocity and F wave were also performed for comparison. The results of FA and ADC measurements did not depend on the measuring location and finger posture. Mean FA was decreased while mean ADC was increased by CTS. FA and ADC at the middle portion of the carpal tunnel was 0.47 {+-} 0.05 and 1.37 {+-} 0.12 ( Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for the control group and 0.42 {+-} 0.04 and 1.50 {+-} 0.15 ( Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for the CTS group, respectively. The linear correlations of FA and ADC versus electrophysiological indicators of CTS were significant (R{sup 2} ranged from 0.09 to 0.36), indicating FA and ADC from DTI had significant correlation with the existence and severity of CTS.

  13. Dextrose-Induced Subsynovial Connective Tissue Fibrosis in the Rabbit Carpal Tunnel: A Potential Model to Study Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In this pilot study, hypertonic dextrose solution was used to induce fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) and create an animal model of potential use in the study of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The SSCT of the carpal tunnel in 15 New Zealand white rabbits were injected with 0.05 ml of 10% dextrose solution in 1 paw and 0.05 ml of saline in the contralateral paw, to serve as a control. The animals were killed at 1, 2, 4, 8, or 12 weeks. While the saline side showed minimal ch...

  14. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCKWAVE THERAPY FOR POST BURN CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Galal Mahran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is considered the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. It may lead to work disability and functional impairment. Burns are associated with swelling and eschar which forms a tight band constricting the circulation distally. Purpose: To investigate the effect of shockwave therapy on the carpal tunnel syndrome post burn. Subjects: Thirty male and female patients selected with manifestation of carpal tunnel syndrome post burn evaluated by electromyography, patients were divided randomly into two equal groups (A & B; group (A received shockwave therapy plus traditional physical therapy, while group (B received only traditional physical therapy (heating and stretching; Shock wave therapy protocol was two sessions per week for 12 weeks. Traditional physiotherapy was applied for both groups, 20 min for session 3times per week for 12 weeks. Evaluation: Electro diagnostic evaluation was done before treatment, one and three months post treatment. Results: There were improvement and significant increase in motor and sensory conduction velocities in shockwave group compared to those in the control group (p<0.05, also there were improvement and significant decrease in motor and sensory latencies in shockwave group compared to those in control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Extracorporeal shockwave therapy provided a non-invasive, satisfied treatment option for carpal tunnel syndrome post burn.

  15. Carpal Tunnel Release in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Ebrahimzadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a compression neuropathy that causes paresthesia, pain or numbness in the territory of median nerve. The aim of this study is to compare the open surgery outcome and patients` satisfaction in carpal tunnel syndrome among diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study from April 2011 to June 2012, patients suffered from carpal tunnel syndrome at least 6 months, without response to conservative treatment, who had the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were evaluated by the usage of MHQ and WHOQOL-BREEF tests, one month before surgery and three months after that. Carpal tunnel decompression surgery was performed by two surgeons, experienced in hand surgery, which used the same surgical method. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 19.0. Results: 24 of patient (34.2% were male and 46 (65.8% were female and there was no significant difference between two groups (P>0.05. MHQ total score before and after surgery was respectively 50.22±7.13 and 63.49±11.28 and this difference was significant (P

  16. A distinct subtype of ''metatropic dysplasia variant'' characterised by advanced carpal skeletal age and subluxation of the radial heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. ''Metatropic dysplasia variants'' are a group of bone dysplasias whose skeletal abnormalities are similar to, but milder than, those of classical metatropic dysplasia. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity has not been thoroughly elucidated. Objective. The objective was to designate a distinct subtype of these metatropic dysplasia variants. Materials and methods. The subjects were four Japanese patients, two sporadic cases and two siblings, who all had identical skeletal changes. The radiological features in these patients were compared with those of previously reported metatropic dysplasia variants. Results. Moderate platyspondyly with pear-shaped and/or anterior-tongued vertebral bodies, halberd pelvis, and dumbbell deformity of the tubular bones were regarded as hallmarks of metatropic dysplasia variants. The peculiar skeletal change in our patients was advanced carpal skeletal age in childhood, unlike most patients reported as metatropic dysplasia variants who manifest delayed carpal ossification. Another hallmark was congenital dislocation of the radial heads. A description of a patient with similar skeletal changes was found in the literature. Conclusion. These patients are considered to represent a distinct subgroup of metatropic dysplasia variants. It remains unknown whether the present siblings represent an autosomal recessive trait or an autosomal dominant trait with germinal mosaicism related to increased paternal age. (orig.)

  17. Sonographic diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: a study in 200 hospital workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adham do Amaral e Castro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To describe the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a sample of 200 healthy hospital workers, establishing the respective epidemiological associations.Materials and Methods:Two hundred individuals were submitted to wrist ultrasonography to measure the median nerve area. They were questioned and examined for epidemiological data, body mass index, carpal tunnel syndrome signs and symptoms, and submitted to the Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ to evaluate the carpal tunnel syndrome severity. A median nerve area ≥ 9 mm2 was considered to be diagnostic of carpal tunnel syndrome.Results:Carpal tunnel syndrome was diagnosed by ultrasonography in 34% of the sample. It was observed the association of carpal tunnel syndrome with age (p < 0.0001, paresthesia (p < 0.0001, Tinel's test (p < 0.0001, Phalen's test (p< 0.0001, BCTQ score (p < 0.0001, and years of formal education (p < 0.0001. Years of formal education was the only variable identified as an independent risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.24.Conclusion:The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a population of hospital workers was of 34%. The number of years of formal education was the only independent risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome.

  18. Intraosseous ganglion in the first metacarpal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraosseous ganglia occur most frequently in the long bones of the lower limbs, particularly in the medial malleolus of the tibia. They usually appear as radiographically well circumscribed juxta-articular cystic lesions, containing myxoid fibrous tissue histologically. Intraosseous ganglia in the hand are very rare. Most reported cases have involved the carpal bones, in particular the lunate and scaphoid. To our knowledge, the present case is the third report of an intraosseous ganglion appearing in the first metacarpal bone; it arose in a patient who had been on dialysis for 25 years, mimicking amyloidosis of bone. (orig.)

  19. [Arthroscopic distal ulna resection after post traumatic ulno carpal abutment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathoulin, C; Pagnotta, A

    2006-11-01

    Ulno carpal abutments secondary to the sequels of a fracture of the radius are often due to the inversion of the distal radio ulnar index by shortening relative to the radius. This positive ulnar variance eventually leads to an abutment between the head of the ulnar and the proximal articular face of the lunate with alteration of the cartilaginous carpal surfaces. The wrist arthroscopy makes diagnosis and treatment possible in a less invasive way. The patients are operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthetic using a pneumatic tourniquet. The arthroscope is positioned using the 3-4 radio carpal opening permitting exploration of the joint. The surgical treatment is performed by arthroscopy using a burr and going in through the 6R radio carpal opening. In this way we use the technique of partial resection of the distal ulna. We have a series of 62 patients who have benefited from the technique of partial resection of the ulnar head by arthroscopy. There were 30 men and 32 women. The average age was 66 years old (between 45 and 82). Our average follow-up is 32 months (between 12 and 60 months). Recovery of mobility was immediate in all cases with persistent pain in the radio ulnar joint in 8 cases. Arthroscopic treatment of ulno carpal abutment has proved itself effective and innocuous. It should nevertheless be reserved for operations on small sized inversions of the distal radio ulnar index (less than 5 mm). In the event of larger ulnar variances we prefer ulnar shortening osteotomy. The other techniques will be restricted to cases where the distal radio ulnar joint has been impaired. PMID:17361890

  20. Biomechanical interaction between the transverse carpal ligament and the thenar muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) serves as the origin of the thenar muscles and is integral to thenar muscle contraction anatomically and biomechanically. TCL hypertrophy has been observed in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and is potentially caused by repetitive hand use. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical interaction between the TCL and the thenar muscles. Specifically, the morphological changes of the carpal arch, formed by the TCL, in response to thena...

  1. Area and shape changes of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zong-Ming; Masters, Tamara L.; Mondello, Tracy A.

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel mechanics is relevant to our understanding of median nerve compression in the tunnel. The compliant characteristics of the tunnel strongly influence its mechanical environment. We investigated the distensibility of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure. A custom balloon device was designed to apply controlled pressure. Tunnel cross sections were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to derive the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and morphological ...

  2. Area and shape changes of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zong-Ming; Masters, Tamara L; Mondello, Tracy A

    2011-12-01

    Carpal tunnel mechanics is relevant to our understanding of median nerve compression in the tunnel. The compliant characteristics of the tunnel strongly influence its mechanical environment. We investigated the distensibility of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure. A custom balloon device was designed to apply controlled pressure. Tunnel cross sections were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging to derive the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and morphological parameters at the hook of hamate. The results showed that the cross-sectional area (CSA) at the level of the hook of hamate increased, on average, by 9.2% and 14.8% at 100 and 200 mmHg, respectively. The increased CSA was attained by a shape change of the cross section, displaying increased circularity. The increase in CSA was mainly attributable to the increase of area in the carpal arch region formed by the transverse carpal ligament. The narrowing of the carpal arch width was associated with an increase in the carpal arch. We concluded that the carpal tunnel is compliant to accommodate physiological variations of the carpal tunnel pressure, and that the increase in tunnel CSA is achieved by increasing the circularity of the cross section. PMID:21608024

  3. Statistical Modeling of Shape and Motion of the Wrist Bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Giessen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability occurs when the wrist bones assume a pathological posture, e.g. due to ligament rupture as a result of trauma. Ligament rupture cannot be diagnosed reliably directly, as current medical imaging modalities do not provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast (X-ray, CT) or lack a suffici

  4. The carpal boss: a review of different sonographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Frederico Arend

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Carpal boss is an uncommon condition whose incidence is underestimated and that is frequently confused with other causes of development of tumor-like lesions on the dorsum of the wrist. From the clinical point of view, the main obstacle to its recognition is the nonspecificity of symptoms, frequently attributed to dorsal ganglion cysts, since both conditions share a similar location on the dorsum of the wrist. The assessment by ultrasonography allows for a correct diagnosis and appropriate management, with better chances of resolution of the clinical complaint and lower probability of iatrogenic worsening of the lesion. The present review is aimed at describing the different sonographic findings of carpal boss.

  5. Unifying model of carpal mechanics based on computationally derived isometric constraints and rules-based motion - the stable central column theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandow, M J; Fisher, T J; Howard, C Q; Papas, S

    2014-05-01

    This study was part of a larger project to develop a (kinetic) theory of carpal motion based on computationally derived isometric constraints. Three-dimensional models were created from computed tomography scans of the wrists of ten normal subjects and carpal spatial relationships at physiological motion extremes were assessed. Specific points on the surface of the various carpal bones and the radius that remained isometric through range of movement were identified. Analysis of the isometric constraints and intercarpal motion suggests that the carpus functions as a stable central column (lunate-capitate-hamate-trapezoid-trapezium) with a supporting lateral column (scaphoid), which behaves as a 'two gear four bar linkage'. The triquetrum functions as an ulnar translation restraint, as well as controlling lunate flexion. The 'trapezoid'-shaped trapezoid places the trapezium anterior to the transverse plane of the radius and ulna, and thus rotates the principal axis of the central column to correspond to that used in the 'dart thrower's motion'. This study presents a forward kinematic analysis of the carpus that provides the basis for the development of a unifying kinetic theory of wrist motion based on isometric constraints and rules-based motion. PMID:24072199

  6. Current options for nonsurgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Hans; Colbert, Agatha; Frydl, Jennifer; Arnall, Elizabeth; Elliot, Molly; Carlson, Nels

    2010-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common of the entrapment neuropathies. Surgical decompression is commonly performed and has traditionally been considered the defnitive treatment for CTS. Conservative treatment options include physical therapy, bracing, steroid injections and alternative medicine. While CTS is often progressive, patients may get better without formal treatment. The resolution of symptoms is not necessarily related to the severity of the clinical findings and self-limi...

  7. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF CARPAL TUNNEL SUBSYNOVIAL CONNECTIVE TISSUE UNDER COMPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz, Jessica E; Baer, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a fluid-permeated loose connective tissue that occupies the majority of the space in the carpal tunnel not occupied by the digital flexor tendons or the median nerve. It is arranged in layers around these more discrete structures, presumably to assist with tendon gliding. As a result of this arrangement, the compressive behavior and the fluid permeability of this tissue may substantially affect the stresses in the median nerve resulting from contact wit...

  8. Electrophysiological evaluation of ulnar nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impairment of ulnar nerve and its relationship with sensory symptoms in the ulnar territory in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS)through electrophysiological approach.Methods We retrospectively reviewed 55 cases with CTS admitted in our hospital from January 2012 to February 2013.Patients with CTS were graded as mild-moderate(35 cases)andsevere(20 cases)according to Stevens standard and were divided into symptomatic and non-symptomatic group according

  9. Mechanical behavior of carpal tunnel subsynovial connective tissue under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Jessica E; Baer, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a fluid-permeated loose connective tissue that occupies the majority of the space in the carpal tunnel not occupied by the digital flexor tendons or the median nerve. It is arranged in layers around these more discrete structures, presumably to assist with tendon gliding. As a result of this arrangement, the compressive behavior and the fluid permeability of this tissue may substantially affect the stresses in the median nerve resulting from contact with its neighboring tendons or with the walls of the tunnel itself. These stresses may contribute to damage of the median nerve and the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. In this study, the fluid permeability and the compressive behavior of the SSCT were investigated to better understand the mechanics of this tissue and how it may mediate mechanical insult to the median nerve. A custom experimental apparatus was built to allow simultaneous measurement of tissue compression and fluid flow. Using Darcy's law, the average SSCT fluid permeability was 8.78×10(15) m(4)/Ns. The compressive behavior of the SSCT demonstrated time dependence, with an initial modulus of 395kPa gradually decreasing to a value of 285kPa. These baseline tissue data may serve as a mechanical norm (toward which pathological tissue might be returned, therapeutically) and may serve as essential properties to include in future mechanical models of the carpal tunnel. PMID:22096431

  10. CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME PADA PEKERJA GARMEN DI JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusianawaty Tana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a disorder caused by medianus nerve entrapment in carpal tunnel in the wrist and gives many symptoms as painfully, numbness, hyperesthesia at nerve medianus area. The objective of this study was to asses CTS in garment factory workers and determine the prevalence of CTS, CTS relation to age, sex, workhour, and repeated biomechanical pressure in hand/wrist. A cross sectional design was used in the study conducted in Jakarta in 2002, to 814 person sample with simple random sampling method. Data collection was done through interviews, inspections, and examinations. The study found that prevalence of CTS was 20.3% (n= 814 in work unit. Workers who worked with high repeated biomechanical pressure in right hand/wrist was 74.1%, in left hand/wrist were 65.5%. Carpal tunnel syndrome in female higher than CTS in male (p=0.04. There was 110 significant correlation between increased of age, workhour, repeated biomechanical pressure in hand/wrist and increased of CTS. For confirmation 10% cases CTS were examined by electroneurography and electromyography, and found that CTS was 35,3%.

  11. Transverse Carpal Ligament and Forearm Fascia Release for the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Change the Entrance Angle of Flexor Tendons to the A1 Pulley: The Relationship between Carpal Tunnel Surgery and Trigger Finger Occurence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım Karalezli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The appearance of trigger finger after decompression of the carpal tunnel without a preexisting symptom has been reported in a few articles. Although, the cause is not clear yet, the loss of pulley action of the transverse carpal ligament has been accused mostly. In this study, we planned a biomechanical approach to fresh cadavers. Methods. The study was performed on 10 fresh amputees of the arm. The angles were measured with (1 the transverse carpal ligament and the distal forearm fascia intact, (2 only the transverse carpal ligament incised, (3 the distal forearm fascia incised to the point 3 cm proximal from the most proximal part of the transverse carpal ligament in addition to the transverse carpal ligament. The changes between the angles produced at all three conditions were compared to each other. Results. We saw that the entrance angle increased in all of five fingers in an increasing manner from procedure 1 to 3, and it was seen that the maximal increase is detected in the middle finger from procedure 1 to procedure 2 and the minimal increase is detected in little finger. Discussion. Our results support that transverse carpal ligament and forearm fascia release may be a predisposing factor for the development of trigger finger by the effect of changing the enterance angle to the A1 pulley and consequently increase the friction in this anatomic area. Clinical Relevance. This study is a cadaveric study which is directly investigating the effect of a transverse carpal ligament release on the enterance angle of flexor tendons to A1 pulleys in the hand.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  15. Nutrient vessel canals. Differential diagnosis of zystoid carpal lesions on MRI?; Nutritialgefaesskanaele. Magnetresonanztomographische Differentialdiagnose karpaler zystischer Laesionen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.; Schild, H.H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Brueser, P. [Malteser Krankenhaus, Bonn (Germany). Hand- und Mikrochirurgische Abt.; Schmidt, H.M. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Anatomisches Inst.

    2000-05-01

    Purpose: To find and describe potential MRI criteria of nutrient vessel canals of carpal bones. Methods and material: 16 wrists of 13 patients with pain and radiographic depiction of cystic changes within the lunate were examined. The MRI protocol included coronal and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted SE sequences (4 mm slices, 120 FOV, 256x256 matrix) as well as coronal STIR images. Final diagnosis was confirmed by surgery (n=5) and follow up. 10 cadaveric ossa lunata were studied to describe size, number, location and shape of nutrient vessel canals. Results: Ganglion cysts (n=6) showed characteristic signs. In ulnar impaction syndrome (n=1) small cystic lesions in the lunate were surrounded by a sclerotic rim and located near the proximal ulnar surface. In Kienboeck's disease (n=3) cystic components were irregular and surrounded by bone marrow edema. Nutrient vessel canals (n=7) imaged as 1 to 3 small cystic lesions within the palmar or dorsal subchondral region. Conclusion: MRI can aid in differential diagnosis of cystic carpal lesions. Nutrient vessel canals may not be mistaken for pathologic cystic lesions. Carpal ganglion cysts show distinct diagnostic patterns. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung: Sind karpale Nutritialgefaesskanaele auf MRI Bildern sichtbar und welche differentialdiagnostischen Kriterien lassen sich finden. Material und Methode. In 16 Faellen lagen bei 13 Patienten roentgenologisch wenige mm bis 2 cm grosse zystische Laesionen im OS lunatum vor. Das MRT-Protokoll umfasste koronare und sagittale T1- und T2-gewichtete SE-Sequenzen mit 4 mm Schichtdicke, 120 mm Messfeld und 256{sup 2} Matrix sowie koronare STIR-Sequenzen. Die Diagnosesicherung erfolgte durch Operation in 5 Faellen sowie Verlaufskontrollen. 10 mazerierte Ossa lunata wurden auf Form, Lokalisation, Anzahl und Groesse der Nutritialgefaesskanaele untersucht. Ergebnisse: Ganglien (n=6) wiesen typische Zeichen auf. Im Falle eines Ulnaimpaktionssyndroms bei Ulna-Nullvariante wurden

  16. Supracubital perineurioma misdiagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schols Ludger

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perineuriomas have been defined as tumorous lesions of the peripheral nerves which derive from perineurial cell proliferation and may be associated with abnormalities on chromosome 22. Case presentation Three years after a painful cubital vein procaine injection, a 33 year-old man developed a median nerve lesion, initially diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome. Symptoms progressed despite appropriate surgery. Clinical and electrophysiological re-evaluation revealed a fusiform mass at the distal upper arm, confirmed by MRI. Immunohistochemical studies classified the tumor as a mixed perineurioma and neuroma. Conclusions Perineurioma mixed with neuroma may potentially caused by the previous trauma or cytotoxic effects of procaine.

  17. 武术功力运动对腕骨角结构影响的螺旋CT分析%A spiral CT-image study on the effects of stress induced by Wushu power on carpal angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鸿宇; 贾素素; 张杰; 陈雁卉; 宋晓霞

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the specific structure of carped angle undergoing various exercise stress suchas Wushu by use of the spiral CT. Methods Eight male athletes of Wushu power were selected from the national game, whose skills were to strike off bricks with their hands. There were 12 sports enthusiasts in the control group. All of their hands were scanned by the spiral CT. The two-dimensional images were filtered, screening reduced, enlarged, enhanced, splited, etc. And then the carpal angle was measured. Results The carpal angles were (131.55±7.35)° (right hand) and (133.30±5.68)° (left hand) in the wushu power group, and (136.99±7.22)° (right hand) and (137.38±6.80)° (left hand) in the control. The carpal angle in wushu power was less than that in the control (P < 0.05). Conclusion The stress from the different exercise may induce the different stimuli on the morphology and structure of carpal bones. The Wushu power may lead to a decrease of carpal angle and a contraction of volume and row to human carpal bones.%目的 观测武术功力运动产生的应力对腕骨角结构的影响.方法 选择全国武术功力大赛(单掌断砖项目)男性运动员8人、普通体育运动者12人.用螺旋CT扫描受试者腕骨,对其二维图像进行过滤、筛减、放大、增强、分割等处理,然后测量腕骨角.结果 功力运动员腕骨角为右手(131.55±7.35)°、左手为(133.30±5.68)°;对照组运动员右手为(136.99±7.22)°、左手为(137.38±6.80)°,功力运动员腕骨角小于普通人(P<0.05).结论 不同运动方式对腕骨形态结构产生不同的应力刺激,功力运动可引起腕骨角减小,腕骨体积和排列发生紧缩.

  18. Mini transverse versus longitudinal incision in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of mini-transverse compared with mini-longitudinal incision for carpal tunnel release (CTR) with reference to postoperative functional capacity, symptom severity and complication rate. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Cumhuriyet University Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedics, Tokat State Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Medical Park Tokat Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, from January 2007 to January 2009. Methodology: This study included 93 hands of 79 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), which were operated between 2007 and 2009. Patients were divided according to incision types into Group-1 (undergoing mini-longitudinal incision) and Group-2 (undergoing mini-transverse incision). Patients were evaluated initially and at 3 weeks after treatment according to symptom severity and functional status of Boston Questionnaire (BQ). Demographic and clinical data were analyzed and compared statistically between two groups. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in BQ symptom and functional scores between the pre- and postoperative period (p < 0.0001). BQ symptom and functional scores at postoperative period were better in Group-1 than Group-2 (p = 0.044 and p = 0.023 respectively). The scar hypersensitivity (p = 0.258) and tenderness (p = 1.00) associated with the incision sites were not statistically different. Conclusion: Longitudinal incision is more effective on symptom and functional conditions than transverse incision. However, there was less scar formation with transverse incision. (author)

  19. Radiographic imaging and possible causes of a carpal varus deformity in an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulfers, Carola; Geburek, Florian; Feige, Karsten; Knieriem, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    The carpal region of an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) with a clinically obvious varus deformity of the carpus was examined radiographically with a standard portable x-ray unit. Several dorsopalmar radiographs were taken at a short source-to-image distance, moving the beam center along the carpus. To obtain a single image of the carpal region, radiographs were assembled digitally using a composite technique. Radiographs revealed a deviation of the limb's axis of approximately 25 degrees in the region of distal physis of the radius and ulna and a wedge-shaped epiphysis of the ulna. Healed physitis due to trauma and subluxation of the middle carpal joint are discussed as possible causes of the deformity. The radiographic technique described proved to be helpful to evaluate a relatively large anatomic area in the carpal region of an adult Asian elephant with a varus deformity and may be an alternative tool to previously described single image radiography. PMID:21370652

  20. Does wrist immobilization following open carpal tunnel release improve functional outcome? A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, S. M.; Okoro, T.; Danial, I.; Wildin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a compressive neuropathy of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy. The surgical management includes dividing the flexor retinaculum to decompress the median nerve. Post-operative mobilization of the wrist is controversial. Some surgeons splint the wrist for 2–4 weeks whilst others encourage early mobilization. The literature has been inconclusive as to which method is most beneficial. The purpose of this s...

  1. Distal Row Carpectomy—A Possible Salvage Procedure of Severe Carpal Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Brodbeck, Rebekka; Horch, Raymund E.; Arkudas, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Complex fracture dislocations of the wrist often result in posttraumatic arthrosis. In trying to avoid total arthrodesis, alternative treatment strategies have been investigated. For this purpose, we present the case of a 56-year-old male patient who sustained a direct trauma during a circular saw accident, resulting in the destruction of the distal carpal row among other things. However, the proximal carpal row was found completely intact. We indicated an emergency distal row carpec...

  2. Distal Row Carpectomy—A Possible Salvage Procedure of Severe Carpal Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Brodbeck, Rebekka; Horch, Raymund E.; Arkudas, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Complex fracture dislocations of the wrist often result in posttraumatic arthrosis. In trying to avoid total arthrodesis, alternative treatment strategies have been investigated. For this purpose, we present the case of a 56-year-old male patient who sustained a direct trauma during a circular saw accident, resulting in the destruction of the distal carpal row among other things. However, the proximal carpal row was found completely intact. We indicated an emergency distal row carpectomy. Eig...

  3. The Diagnostic Assessment of Hand Elevation Test in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Hyunjin; Kim, Insoo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to establish the value of hand elevation test as a reproducible provocative test for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We had a prospective study of 45 hands of 38 patients diagnosed with CTS between April 2005 and February 2009. The diagnosis of CTS was based on the American Academy of Neurology clinical diagnostic criteria. Experimental and control group patients underwent Tinel's test, Phalen's test, carpal compression test and hand e...

  4. The sectional anatomy of the carpal tunnel and its related neurovascular structures studied by using plastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sora, M-C; Genser-Strobl, B

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology of the carpal tunnel and its related neurovascular structures. A slice anatomy study was performed on 12 right wrists of unfixed human cadavers by using the plastination technique. The measurements were performed at the level of the pisiform, hook of the hamate and in the middle between these structures. The diameters of the carpal tunnel and the median nerve were measured at the level of the hook of the hamate. The median nerve can be predicted to be 18 +/- 1.6 mm radial to the pisiform and the ulnar neurovascular bundle 6.8 +/- 1.4 mm radial to the pisiform. Between those structures there will be at least a 9-mm area, localized 8 mm radial to the pisiform, where the incision of the transverse carpal ligament could be performed risk-free. At the hamate hook the median nerve can be predicted at 9.24 +/- 1.18 mm and the ulnar artery lies usually 1.26 +/- 2.5 mm radial to the hook. An understanding of the contents and their positions, and relationships to each other allows an accurate identification of neurovascular structures in the carpal tunnel. Our findings can be used as anatomic landmarks of the carpal tunnel and could be helpful to physicians performing carpal tunnel investigations. PMID:15804269

  5. Single injection of platelet-rich plasma as a novel treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Alexander Malahias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have confirmed that platelet-rich plasma has therapeutic effects on many neuropathies, but its effects on carpal tunnel syndrome remain poorly understood. We aimed to investigate whether single injection of platelet-rich plasma can improve the clinical symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Fourteen patients presenting with median nerve injury who had suffered from mild carpal tunnel syndrome for over 3 months were included in this study. Under ultrasound guidance, 1-2 mL of platelet-rich plasma was injected into the region around the median nerve at the proximal edge of the carpal tunnel. At 1 month after single injection of platelet-rich plasma, Visual Analogue Scale results showed that pain almost disappeared in eight patients and it was obviously alleviated in three patients. Simultaneously, the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire showed that upper limb function was obviously improved. In addition, no ultrasonographic manifestation of the carpal tunnel syndrome was found in five patients during ultrasonographic measurement of the width of the median nerve. During 3-month follow-up, the pain was not greatly alleviated in three patients. These findings show very encouraging mid-term outcomes regarding use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  6. Carpal valgus in llamas and alpacas: Retrospective evaluation of patient characteristics, radiographic features and outcomes following surgical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Barbara; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F.; Huber, Michael J.; Parker, Jill E.; Semevolos, Stacy A.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of surgical treatment for carpal valgus in New World camelids and correlated successful outcome (absence of carpal valgus determined by a veterinarian) with patient characteristics and radiographic features. Univariable and multivariable analyses of retrospective case data in 19 camelids (33 limbs) treated for carpal valgus between 1987 and 2010 revealed that procedures incorporating a distal radial transphyseal bridge were more likely (P = 0.03) to result in suc...

  7. In-continuity neuroma of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Depaoli, R.; Coscia, D.R.; Alessandrino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome resulting in the formation of a neuroma are rare. We present here the case of two patients, one with a bifid median nerve, showing in-continuity neuroma after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients reported persistent post-operative pain and showing symptoms. In both cases, ultrasound showed an in-continuity neuroma with a hypoechoic and enlarged median nerve at the carpal tunnel. The ...

  8. Impact of cell therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a small series of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who underwent implantation of autologous mononuclear cells from peripheral blood to assess the feasibility and safety of these in the sixth month after that procedure. We included 6 patients treated at the Department of Orthopedic in The Enrique Cabrera General Teaching Hospital. The improvement in symptoms began one week after the procedure. Pain and cramping were the first to disappear, the improvement increased one month after and it was maintained until the sixth month of evaluation. The clinical-neurological manifestations improved in 80.3 % of patients, as well as in the study of motor and sensory conduction. There was no reaction to the implant. The improvement of the clinical manifestations and conduction studies support the mediation of stem cells in inflammatory action, revascularization and remyelination of the median nerve, which is expressed in the positive responses obtained

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many reports, the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is evaluated by subjective symptoms and nerve conduction findings of the median nerve. However, nerve conduction studies are complicated and the patients occasionally experience pain. In this report, we quantified a morphological change in the median nerve by using MRI, and reviewed a new noninvasive method of CTS evaluation. The survey was carried out on 55 idiopathic CTS patients (45 females and 10 males). The affected areas were 33 right hands and 22 left hands. The average age of the patients was 59 years. We used Philips Gyroscan Intera 1.5 Tesla MRI. T2 weighted axial image of the carpal canal sliced by width of 1 mm was used to measure a minimum axis/maximum axis (median nerve compression rate; MNCR). Simultaneously, we measured the nerve conduction velocity and terminal latency of the motor and sensory nerves; we evaluated the thumb motor disturbance by Hamada's classification and sensory disturbance by Semmes-Weinstein test. The statistical correlations between these items and MNCR were analyzed. MNCR had a significant correlation with all items, particularly with motor nerve conduction velocity and latency, and Hamada's classification. There have been some trials regarding the application of MRI findings for CTS evaluation. In these reports, they measured the cross section of the median nerve or brightness of the median nerve, flexor tendon, or intrinsic muscle. However, it is difficult to measure an MRI cross section or brightness in common practice. MNCR has a statistical correlation with the nerve conduction study, is easy to measure, and noninvasive. MNCR is useful as an objective evaluation method of CTS severity. (author)

  10. Median nerve cross-sectional area and MRI diffusion characteristics: normative values at the carpal tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lawrence; Gai, Neville [Clinical Center, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Enlargement of the median nerve is an objective potential imaging sign of carpal tunnel syndrome. Diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) may provide additional structural information that may prove useful in characterizing median neuropathy. This study further examines normal values for median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA). Twenty-three wrists in 17 healthy volunteers underwent MRI of the wrist at 3 T. In 13 subjects, DTI was performed at a B value of 600 mm{sup 2}/s. Median nerve CSA, ADC, and FA were analyzed at standardized anatomic levels. Mean (SD) median nerve CSA within the proximal carpal tunnel was 10.0 (3.4) mm{sup 2}. The mean (SD) FA of the median nerve was 0.71 (0.06) and 0.70 (0.13) proximal to and within the carpal tunnel, respectively. There was a significant difference between nerve CSA and ADC, but not FA, at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel. Nerve CSA, ADC, and FA did not differ between men and women or between dominant and non-dominant wrists. Nerve CSA at the proximal carpal tunnel was positively correlated with subject age and body mass index. Our results suggest a 90% upper confidence limit for normal median nerve CSA of 14.4 mm{sup 2} at the proximal carpal tunnel, higher than normal limits reported by many ultrasound studies. We observed a difference between the CSA and ADC, but not the FA, of the median nerve at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel levels. (orig.)

  11. Median nerve cross-sectional area and MRI diffusion characteristics: normative values at the carpal tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enlargement of the median nerve is an objective potential imaging sign of carpal tunnel syndrome. Diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) may provide additional structural information that may prove useful in characterizing median neuropathy. This study further examines normal values for median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA). Twenty-three wrists in 17 healthy volunteers underwent MRI of the wrist at 3 T. In 13 subjects, DTI was performed at a B value of 600 mm2/s. Median nerve CSA, ADC, and FA were analyzed at standardized anatomic levels. Mean (SD) median nerve CSA within the proximal carpal tunnel was 10.0 (3.4) mm2. The mean (SD) FA of the median nerve was 0.71 (0.06) and 0.70 (0.13) proximal to and within the carpal tunnel, respectively. There was a significant difference between nerve CSA and ADC, but not FA, at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel. Nerve CSA, ADC, and FA did not differ between men and women or between dominant and non-dominant wrists. Nerve CSA at the proximal carpal tunnel was positively correlated with subject age and body mass index. Our results suggest a 90% upper confidence limit for normal median nerve CSA of 14.4 mm2 at the proximal carpal tunnel, higher than normal limits reported by many ultrasound studies. We observed a difference between the CSA and ADC, but not the FA, of the median nerve at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel levels. (orig.)

  12. Effectiveness of low-level laser on carpal tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Hua-Feng; Ma, Xin-Long; Tian, Peng; Huang, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been applied in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) for an extended period of time without definitive consensus on its effectiveness. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser in the treatment of mild to moderate CTS using a Cochrane systematic review. Methods: We conducted electronic searches of PubMed (1966–2015.10), Medline (1966–2015.10), Embase (1980–2015.10), and ScienceDirect (1985–2015.10), using the terms “carpal tunnel syndrome” and “laser” according to the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Relevant journals or conference proceedings were searched manually to identify studies that might have been missed in the database search. Only randomized clinical trials were included, and the quality assessments were performed according to the Cochrane systematic review method. The data extraction and analyses from the included studies were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. The results were expressed as the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the continuous outcomes. Results: Seven randomized clinical trials met the inclusion criteria; there were 270 wrists in the laser group and 261 wrists in the control group. High heterogeneity existed when the analysis was conducted. Hand grip (at 12 weeks) was stronger in the LLLT group than in the control group (MD = 2.04; 95% CI: 0.08–3.99; P = 0.04; I2 = 62%), and there was better improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) (at 12 weeks) in the LLLT group (MD = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.84–1.11; P 95% in the calculation of these 3 parameters. There were no statistically significant differences in the other parameters between the 2 groups. Conclusion: This study revealed that low-level laser improve hand grip, VAS, and SNAP after 3 months of follow-up for mild to moderate CTS. More high-quality studies using the same laser intervention protocol are needed to

  13. High resolution ultrasonography in the diagnosis of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. Our purpose was to evaluate the role of high-resolution ultrasonography (US), performed with a 10-13 MHz probe, in the detection of morpho volumetric changes of the median nerve to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Materials and Methods. Fifty healthily volunteers were examined firstly US; subsequently we studied 294 wrists in 186 symptomatic patients, calculating the cross-sectional area of the median nerve at three levels: before the median nerve enters the carpal tunnel, at the carpal tunnel in let and at the outlet. US was considered diagnostic for CTS when the median nerve area increased at the inlet or flattening was present along the carpal tunnel. Results. Ultrasonography showed pathologic findings in 267 wrists: in 261 cases morpho volumetric changes of the median nerve were found; in six cases anatomic variant of the median nerve was detected. Surgery was performed in 277 cases and all patients became symptom-free. The sensitivity of US was 96.3 % . Confusions. Our study confirms that quantitative ultrasonographic assessment is a useful support in confirming the clinical diagnosis of CTS

  14. Changes in the carpal tunnel while wearing the Manu® soft hand brace: a sonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manente, G; Melchionda, D; Staniscia, T; D'Archivio, C; Mazzone, V; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effect of the Manu(®) soft hand brace, which has been designed to relieve median nerve entrapment in carpal tunnel syndrome. An observational, controlled study was conducted in 10 participants, five with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and five controls, using sonography to study changes in the dimensions of the carpal tunnel before and while wearing the brace. An increase in transverse diameter, thinning of the flexor retinaculum, and displacement of the proximal insertion of the lumbrical muscle to the middle finger from the edge of the carpal tunnel were observed in patients while wearing the brace. The changes in the morphology of the carpal tunnel while wearing the Manu(®) support its use as an alternative to a night wrist splint. PMID:22640934

  15. Improved inching method for the diagnosis and prognosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, H; Yorifuji, S; Takahashi, M; Nakamura, Y; Kitaguchi, M; Tarui, S

    1992-03-01

    A modified sensory "inching" method for the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is described. The median nerve as stimulated at the cubital portion, with 8 channel recording electrodes placed along the nerve across the carpal tunnel. In most of the CTS cases, there was a conductive abnormality from 3 to 4.5 cm distal to the proximal ending of the flexor retinaculum. Subjects' values, obtained by subtracting the theoretical latency from the measured latency, which were more than 0.6 ms, could not be improved by conservative therapy. As we could determine from subtle change at the short span of nerve conduction, below the electrodes from the proximal to the affected site of the carpal tunnel, this method provides high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of CTS. PMID:1557079

  16. Segmentation of bone pixels from EROI Image using clustering method for bone age assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakthula, Rajitha; Agarwal, Suneeta

    2016-03-01

    The bone age of a human can be identified using carpal and epiphysis bones ossification, which is limited to teen age. The accurate age estimation depends on best separation of bone pixels and soft tissue pixels in the ROI image. The traditional approaches like canny, sobel, clustering, region growing and watershed can be applied, but these methods requires proper pre-processing and accurate initial seed point estimation to provide accurate results. Therefore this paper proposes new approach to segment the bone from soft tissue and background pixels. First pixels are enhanced using BPE and the edges are identified by HIPI. Later a K-Means clustering is applied for segmentation. The performance of the proposed approach has been evaluated and compared with the existing methods.

  17. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil for carpal tunnel syndrome patients. Morphological changes in the carpal canal during finger motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thickening of the flexor tendon synovium has been considered as the cause of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome; however, this pathogenesis has not been clarified. We investigated the dynamic morphological changes in the carpal canal during finger motion by using high-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil. We examined 11 wrists of 10 patients. They were diagnosed with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome based on clinical symptoms and electrophysiological examination, and they finally underwent carpal canal release surgery. The patients were all females and the mean age was 59.1 years. As a control group, 9 wrists of 9 asymptomatic individuals were also examined. The control group consisted of 6 males and 3 females, and the mean age was 33.4 years. A 1.5T MR system (Philips) and a 47-mm microscopy surface coil were used. Axial sections of 2.0 mm thickness with a spacing of 0.2 mm were obtained by T1-weighted and T2-weighted fast spin echo and T2-weighted fast field echo. The field of view (F.O.V.) was 50 mm. We evaluated the cross-sectional area of the flexor tendons that included their surrounding flexor tendon synovium and the median nerve in both the finger-extended and finger-flexed positions. The structures in the carpal canal were clearly revealed on the MR images. The cross-sectional area of the flexor tendons, including the flexor tendon synovium, in patients was significantly enlarged in the finger-flexed position as compared with the finger-extended position. In the finger-flexed position, the median nerve was compressed in the radiovolar direction because of the enlarged flexor tendon synovium around the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons, which covered the entire ulnar side of the central carpal canal. In the control group, these changes were negligible. Therefore, we suggest that repeated mechanical stress of the flexor tendons with the thickening of the flexor tendon synovium can result in median nerve neuropathy. (author)

  18. Thrombosed persistent median artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome associated with bifurcated median nerve: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a sporadically occurring abnormality due to compression of median nerve. It is exceedingly rare for it to be caused by thrombosis of persistent median artery. Case Report: A forty two year old female was referred for ultrasound examination due to ongoing wrist pain, not relived by pain killers and mild paraesthesia on the radial side of the hand. High resolution ultrasound and Doppler revealed a thrombosed persistent median artery and associated bifurcated median nerve. The thrombus resolved on treatment with anticoagulants. Conclusions: Ultrasound examination of the wrist when done for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome should preferably include looking for persistent median artery and its patency. (authors)

  19. Technical Tip for Proximal Release During Open Carpal Tunnel Release Using a Subcutaneous Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhah, Dariush; Sadr, Amir H; Akhavani, Mohammed Ali

    2016-06-01

    Technical steps to avoid incomplete proximal release of the carpal tunnel are described. Local anaesthesia is infiltrated as a subcutaneous bleb over the distal wrist crease and extending 2-3 cm over the forearm fascia. Tumescence of local anaesthesia into the subcutaneous plane helps create a pocket between the forearm fascia and subcutaneous tissues. Intraoperatively a subcutaneous pocket is made above the transverse carpal ligament and antebrachial fascia with blunt dissection. A retractor is placed under the pocket, which facilitates optimal visualization to allow reliable complete proximal release of compression.The authors have found that this technique is reproducible and reliable across their collective experience. PMID:27454649

  20. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  1. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some ...

  2. Demographic Characteristics of Our Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Umay

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Carpal tunnel (CTS is the most common trap neuropathy but, still fully understood the cause of this and effective factors. In this study was aimed to the evaluation demographic features of the cases with CTS admitted to our electroneuromyography (ENMG laboratory. Material and Methods: In the study, 119 patients with CTS to evaluate our ENMG laboratory were received. All patients age, sex, dominant and affected hand, duration of education, marital status, height, weight, additional diseases, occupational, hand and wrist repetitive motion made, use of computer and smoking status was assessed. Patients’ body mass index (BMI was calculated. Results: 102 cases (85.7% females, mean age was 46.32 years ± 12: 18. While in 115 (96.6% cases using the right hand is dominant, in 85 cases (76.6% with bilateral involvement were at hand. While the rate of patient who between five to eight year duration of education had was 47.1%, 84% patients were married. Also, BMI were determined as 29.33± 3.01. According to the state in 22 patients with additional diseases, diabetes mellitus in 22, hypothyroidism in 4, also 1 patient had arthritis. The majority of our patients (70.6% housewives formed. The 67.2% rate of repetetive activities as making crafts, the computer usage at a rate of 11.8% had history. The rate of smoking was 19.3%.  Conclusions:  As a result, CTS, especially in middle-aged housewives and obese is a common syndrome. Despite many reasons to be reported in the etiology of idiopathic 85%. At a rate of 25.4% of women in our society is considered paid work, especially in terms of determining the etiology of the more detailed studies are needed to ousewives.

  3. Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome with alpha-lipoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Geronimo, G; Caccese, A Fonzone; Caruso, L; Soldati, A; Passaretti, U

    2009-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral mononeuropathy; its symptoms and functional limitations significantly penalize the daily activities and quality of life of many people. While surgery is reserved to most severe cases, the earlier stages of disease may be controlled by a pharmacological treatment aimed to "neuroprotection", i.e. to limiting and correcting the nerve damage. Our study was aimed to compare the efficacy of a fixed association of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) 600 mg/die and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) 360 mg/die, and a multivitamin B preparation (Vit B6 150 mg, Vit B1 100 mg, Vit B12 500 microg daily) for 90 days in 112 subjects with moderately severe CTS. Demographic, case-history and treatment efficacy data were collected; the Boston questionnaire was administered and the patients were evaluated by Hi-Ob scale and electro-myography. A significant reduction in both symptoms scores and functional impairment (Boston questionnaire) was observed in ALA/GLA group, while the multivitamin group experienced a slight improvement of symptoms and a deterioration of functional scores. Electromyography showed a statistically significant improvement with ALA/GLA, but not with the multivitamin product. The Hi-Ob scale showed significant efficacy of ALA/GLA in improving symptoms and functional impairment, while in the multivitamin group the improvement was significant, but less marked than in the ALA/GLA group. In conclusion, the fixed association of ALA and GLA proved to be a useful tool and may be proposed for controlling symptoms and improving the evolution of CTS, especially in the earlier stages of disease. PMID:19499849

  4. The value of SPECT/CT in carpal boss

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    Bhure, Ujwal; Huellner, Martin W.; Gruenig, Hannes; Zander, Andrea; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Strobel, Klaus [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Hug, Urs [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    To assess the value of SPECT/CT in patients with carpal boss (CB). In 24 wrists with CB (18 right-sided, 6 left-sided) in 21 patients, planar images and SPECT/CT images were obtained. Three patients had bilateral CB. The grade of uptake (0 absent, 1 low, 2 moderate, 3 high) on planar imaging and SPECT/CT was assessed and compared with CT findings, clinical symptoms and follow-up findings. CB affected carpometacarpal joint II in 4 wrists, carpometacarpal joint III in 17 wrists and both carpometacarpal joints II and III in 3 wrists. Of the 24 CB, 12 (50 %) were active (i.e. increased radionuclide uptake) on planar images and 18 (75 %) on SPECT/CT images. Of the 17 symptomatic CB, 10 (59 %) were active on planar images and 14 (82 %) were active (mean grade 1.9, range 1 - 3) on SPECT/CT images. Of the 7 asymptomatic CB, 2 were active on planar images and 4 were active (mean grade 1.25, range 1 - 2) on SPECT/CT images. CT alone showed CB in all patients and an accessory ossicle (os styloideum) in 8 wrists. MR imaging was available in 7 patients and positive for CB in 5 (sensitivity 71 %). Plain radiographs were available in 17 patients and positive in 10 (59 %). Therapeutic infiltration of the CB was performed in 9 patients, and resection of the CB in 7 patients. SPECT/CT provides important morphological and metabolic information for the clinical assessment of CB, but because SPECT/CT tends to overestimate the clinical importance of CB, we recommend that planar images should still be obtained. (orig.)

  5. Pulsed CO2 laser for intra-articular cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Alan J.; Roth, Jerry E.; Krook, Lennart P.

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, euthanatized and the joints examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intraarticular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  6. Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release using a modified application technique of local anesthesia: safety and effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Khayat Jehad

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local anesthesia is widely used for open carpal tunnel release. However, injection of local anesthesia as described by Altissimi and Mancini (1988 can interfere with endoscopic carpal tunnel release, by increasing the bulk of synovial layers and consequently result in worsening of the view. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, efficacy using modified technique for application of local anesthesia. Methods 33 patients suffering from gradual increasing symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients were also asked to evaluate the pain associated with injection as well as tourniquet during surgery using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS (ranging from 0 = no pain to 10 = maximum pain. Results One patient required additionally local anesthesia because of mild pain in the hand. The tourniquet was inflated for 13.00 (2.8 min. The pain score related to injection was 2.5 (0.8 and to tourniquet was 3.6 (0.9. Inflation of the tourniquet was well tolerated by all patients. Postoperative neurological sensory and motor deficits related to surgery and local blocks were not occurred. Conclusion Endoscopic release of the carpal tunnel syndrome in local anesthesia is effective, well tolerated and safe. This kind of application of local anesthesia did not reduce visibility.

  7. Adaptation of the Transverse Carpal Ligament Associated with Repetitive Hand Use in Pianists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhanna, Christiane; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) plays a critical role in carpal tunnel biomechanics through interactions with its surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo adaptations of the TCL’s mechanical properties in response to repetitive hand use in pianists using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. It was hypothesized that pianists, in comparison to non-pianists, would have a stiffer TCL as indicated by an increased acoustic shear wave velocity (SWV). ARFI imagining was performed for 10 female pianists and 10 female non-pianists. The median SWV values of the TCL were determined for the entire TCL, as well as for its radial and ulnar portions, rTCL and uTCL, respectively. The TCL SWV was significantly increased in pianists relative to non-pianists (p carpal tunnel, leading to median nerve compression in the tunnel. TCL maladaptation helps explain why populations who repeatedly use their hands are at an increased risk of developing musculoskeletal pathologies, e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26953892

  8. Median nerve deformation and displacement in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doesburg, Margriet H M; Yoshii, Yuichi; Villarraga, Hector R; Henderson, Jacqueline; Cha, Stephen S; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion, using ultrasound. Thirty wrists from 15 asymptomatic volunteers were evaluated. Cross-sectional images during motion from full extension to flexion of the index finger and thumb were recorded. On the initial and final frames, the median nerve, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and index finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendons were outlined. Coordinate data were recorded and median nerve cross-sectional area, perimeter, aspect ratio of the minimal-enclosing rectangle, and circularity in extension and flexion positions were calculated. During index finger flexion, the tendon moves volarly while the nerve moves radially. With thumb flexion, the tendon moves volarly, but the median nerve moves toward the ulnar side. In both motions, the area and perimeter of the median nerve in flexion were smaller than in extension. Thus, during index finger or thumb flexion, the median nerve in a healthy human subject shifts away from the index finger FDS and FPL tendons while being compressed between the tendons and the flexor retinaculum in the carpal tunnel. We are planning to compare these data with measurements in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and believe that these parameters may be useful tools for the assessment of CTS and carpal tunnel mechanics with ultrasound in the future. PMID:20225286

  9. Sonographic Wrist Measurements and Detection of Anatomical Features in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Vögelin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study compares anatomical findings at wrist level in patients with known carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and controls by ultrasonography (US. Material and Methods. Wrist-US investigations of 28 consecutive patients with 38 diagnosed, idiopathic CTS were compared to 49 healthy volunteers without history of CTS. Internal wrists dimensions, the presence of flexor muscle bellies in the carpal tunnel, and cross-sectional area of the median nerve were analyzed. The findings were correlated to gender, age, and BMI. Results. US demonstrated a square internal carpal tunnel configuration in CTS patients compared to controls (P<0.001. Patients with CTS showed a trend towards the presence of flexor muscles bellies in the carpal tunnel (odds ratio 1.77, 95% CI 0.337–8.33. CTS was present in women with higher BMI (P=0.015. Conclusion. US allowed detection of specific anatomical features at wrist level in CTS patients. This observation may enable—following confirmation in larger prospective studies—risk evaluation for CTS development.

  10. Yoga Asanas for the Relief and Prevention of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleu, Steve

    This collection of yoga asanas (exercises) can help relieve the pain of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and help prevent CTS among people who work on computer terminals. For maximum benefit, the exercises should be practiced daily or on as regular a schedule as possible. They are not intended to replace surgery or a physician's prescribed care. They…

  11. Three-phase bone scintigraphic analysis of radial osteotomy for Kienboeck's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-phase bone scintigraphy was performed before and after radial wedge osteotomy on 11 joints. All 11 patients were suffering from Kienboeck's disease. We analized the relations between the change of those images and the clinical courses. On blood pool images that were performed before radial wedge osteotomy, we observed decreased accumulation in the lunate bone in 4 of 9 patients in Lichtman's stage II or IIIA. Intensive accumulation in the carpal area that seemed to represent the activity of Kienboeck's disease were seen in all patients. Delayed image showed accumulation demonstrating osteoarthritic changes. Accumulation in the lunte bone on blood pool images was confirmed in all patients 6 to 12 months after operation. This appeared to suggest the increase of blood flow into the lunate bone. Compared with preoperative blood pool images, accumulation in the carpal area decreased in 8 patients who followed good postoperative course and their clinical symptoms improved relatively quickly. In the other 3 patients no decrease in this accumulation was confirmed by the initial postoperative scintigraphy. The improvement in their symptoms was delayed. The postoperative change of delayed images was visualized less sensitively than that of blood pool images. The decreased accumulation in the carpal area on blood pool images allows prediction of the subsequent clinical course prior to improvement in clinical symptoms. We consider this finding to be useful clinically. (author)

  12. Volar/dorsal compressive mechanical behavior of the transverse carpal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Baer, Thomas E; Klocke, Noelle F; Brown, Thomas D

    2012-04-30

    Mechanical insult to the median nerve caused by contact with the digital flexor tendons and/or carpal tunnel boundaries may contribute to the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. Since the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) comprises the volar boundary of the carpal tunnel, its mechanics in part govern the potential insult to the median nerve. Using unconfined compression testing in combination with a finite element-based optimization process, nominal stiffness measurements and first-order Ogden hyperelastic material coefficients (μ and α ) were determined to describe the volar/dorsal compressive behavior of the TCL. Five different locations on the TCL were tested, three of which were deep to the origins of the thenar and hypothenar muscles. The average (± standard deviation) low-strain and high-strain TCL stiffness values in compression sites outside the muscle attachment region were 3.6 N/mm (±2.7) and 28.0 N/mm (±20.2), respectively. The average stiffness values at compression sites with muscle attachments were notably lower, with low-strain and high-strain stiffness values of 1.2 N/mm (±0.5) and 9.7 N/mm (±4.8), respectively. The average Ogden coefficients for the muscle attachment region were 51.6 kPa (±16.5) for μ and 16.5 (±2.0) for α, while coefficients for the non-muscle attachment region were 117.8 kPa (±86.8) for μ and 17.2 (±1.6) for α. These TCL compressive mechanical properties can help inprove computational models, which can be used to provide insight into the mechanisms of median nerve injury leading to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms. PMID:22381735

  13. Thrombosis of the persistent median artery as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome - case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepecka-Wejs, Ludomira; Multan, Aleksandra; Konarzewska, Aleksandra

    2012-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent neuropathy of the upper extremity, that mainly occurs in manual workers and individuals, whose wrist is overloaded by performing repetitive precise tasks. In the past it was common among of typists, seamstresses and mechanics, but nowadays it is often caused by long hours of computer keyboard use. The patient usually complains of pain, hypersensitivity and paresthesia of his hand and fingers in the median nerve distribution. The symptoms often increase at night. In further course of the disease atrophy of thenar muscles is observed. In the past the diagnosis was usually confirmed in nerve conduction studies. Nowadays a magnetic resonance scan or an ultrasound scan can be used to differentiate the cause of the symptoms. The carpal tunnel syndrome is usually caused by compression of the median nerve passing under the flexor retinaculum due to the presence of structures reducing carpal tunnel area, such as an effusion in the flexor tendons sheaths (due to overload or in the course of rheumatoid diseases), bony anomalies, muscle and tendon variants, ganglion cysts or tumors. In some cases diseases of upper extremity vessels including abnormalities of the persistent median artery may also result in carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case of symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome caused by thrombosis of the persistent median artery which was diagnosed in ultrasound examination. The ultrasound scan enabled for differential diagnosis and resulted in an immediate referral to clinician, who recommended instant commencement on anticoagulant treatment. The follow-up observation revealed nearly complete remission of clinical symptoms and partial recanalization of the persistent median artery. PMID:26676173

  14. Carpal tunnel syndrome, syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, and W. Russell Brain: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskovski, Marko T; Thomson, J Grant

    2014-09-01

    This article presents the history of the discovery of compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel without an identifiable cause as a distinct clinical entity. By analyzing primary sources, we show that, at the beginning of the twentieth century, physicians described patients with paresthesias and numbness in the hands, most prominent at night, accompanied by bilateral symmetrical atrophy along the radial side of thenar eminence. At the time, the 2 most influential hypotheses regarding etiology were, first, compression of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a cervical or first rib, and second, compression of the thenar branch of the median nerve as it passes beneath the anterior annular ligament of the wrist. The condition was named syndrome of partial thenar atrophy and was considered a distinct clinical entity. In 1946, after extensive analysis, neurologist Walter Russell Brain concluded that both sensory and motor symptoms of the syndrome were caused by "compression neuritis" of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. At his suggestion, surgeon Arthur Dickson Wright performed decompression of the nerve by "an incision of the carpal ligament," with excellent results. Brain presented this work at the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1946 and published his landmark paper in Lancet the following year. In so doing, he established the basis for the disease we know today as idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Unfortunately, in 1947, Brain did not realize that another "condition" with the same clinical picture but without atrophy of the thenar muscles, known as acroparesthesia at the time, was actually the same disease as syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, but of lesser severity. As a result of Brain's influence, 7 other papers were published by 1950. Between 1946 and 1950, there were at least 10 papers that presented, in total, 31 patients (26 women) who exhibited symptoms of compression of the median nerve without an identifiable cause and underwent

  15. The Effect of Naproxen and Prednisolone in the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P yazdan panah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome is the entrapment of the median nerve in carpal tunnel of the wrist. Symptoms of this syndrome are numbness, tingling, weakness or pain in the fingers and wrist. Treatment includes rest, avoiding the many activities available, splints, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, oral steroids, steroid injection in wrist and surgery. This study compared the effects of oral prednisolone and naproxen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: In the present clinical-trial study, 44 patients who had mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome were selected and randomly assigned into two treatment groups: group 1(n = 22 received naproxen 1000 mg daily for 4 weeks and the group 2 (n = 22 received oral prednisolone 20 mg, daily, in the first 2 weeks and 10 mg daily for 2 weeks. The 3 persons of the second group dropped out of treatment. Re-evaluation of treatment outcome was performed 2 months later. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. To describe the data, frequency tables were used. Furthermore, the Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results: 36(87.8% of the patients were males and 12.2% were females. The electro diagnostic studies were shown 16 hands (19.5% normal, 19 hands (23.2% had mild and 47 (57.3% had moderate involvement in beginning of treatment. Tingling fingers and pain in the prednisolone group had significantly lower rate than naproxen group (p< 0.05, but the symptoms were not significantly different in the two groups. Conclusion: The effects of treatments, relief of symptoms and the decrease intensity of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients who received prednisolone were more than naproxen.

  16. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  17. Value of ultrasonography in diagnosing the occult dorsal carpal ganglion%隐性腕背腱鞘囊肿的超声诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高岩; 陈涛

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨隐性腕背腱鞘囊肿的超声特性,评价超声检查隐性腕背腱鞘囊肿的应用价值.方法 对16例慢性腕背疼痛患者行超声检查,其中11例患者采用手术治疗,将超声图像与手术结果进行分析,术后随访1~8个月.结果 隐性腕背腱鞘囊肿的超声特性为:①腕背舟骨、月骨骨皮质连续未见明破坏;②腕背舟月间隙附近可见一卵圆形的无回声区,边界尚清晰.囊壁尚光滑,伴侧方声影及后方回声增强,③彩色多普勒血流显像示病灶内部及周边均未见明显血流信号.结论 超声检查对于隐性腕背腱鞘囊肿的定性和定位有重要意义,可作为慢性腕关节背侧疼痛患者x线检查后首选检查方法.%Objective To evaluate the value of uhrasonography in diagnosing the occult dorsal carpal ganglion. Methods Sixteen patients with chronic dorsal wrist pain received ultrasound examination. Eleven ofthem were treated with surgical therapy. And they were followed up for 1-8 months. Results The ultrasound characteristics of oecuh dorsal carpal ganglion were depicted as follows;①The dorsal cortical bone of scaphoid and lunate was continued and without damage. ② An oval anecho lesion with clear boundany, smooth ganglion wall, lateral shandowing and posterior enhancement could be detected in the dorsal part of scapholunate joint. ③Color Doppler flow imaging showed there was not obvious blood flow signals inside and around the ganglion. Conclusions Uhrasonography could be acted as a routine examination technique after the X-ray examintion in the diagnosis of the the occult dorsal carpal ganglion.

  18. Local anesthetics and nuclear medical bone images of the equine fore limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of two local anesthetic agents on the diagnostic quality of nuclear medical bone images (NMBIs) of distal parts of the equine fore limb were investigated. Local effects on bone uptake of technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) 4 and 24 hours after perineural and intraarticular injection of mepivacaine hydrochloride and bupivacaine hydrochloride were evaluated in the carpal and metacarpophalangeal regions of 12 horses and ponies. Neither mepivacaine hydrochloride nor bupivacaine hydrochloride significantly altered the diagnostic quality of the NMBIs. The injection and subsequent action of local anesthetics do not appear to influence local bone uptake of 99mTc-MDP significantly

  19. Pain Levels after Local Anaesthetic with or without Hyaluronidase in Carpal Tunnel Release: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yeo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hyaluronidase is an enzyme that temporarily liquefies the interstitial barrier, allowing easy dispersal of local anaesthetic through cleavage of tissue planes. This prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study investigates the utility of adding hyaluronidase to local anaesthetic in the setting of carpal tunnel release. Methods. 70 consecutive carpal tunnel release patients were recruited and randomised into a control group only receiving local anaesthetic and a hyaluronidase group receiving both hyaluronidase and local anaesthetic. Pain scores were rated using the visual analogue scale (VAS by patients immediately after local anaesthetic injection and again immediately after the carpal tunnel release. Results. Preoperative VAS scores, taken after local anaesthetic injection, were greater than postoperative VAS scores. Postoperative VAS scores were significantly lower in the hyaluronidase group and tourniquet times were significantly shorter in the hyaluronidase group. Conclusion. Hyaluronidase addition to local anaesthetic in carpal tunnel release resulted in significant reductions in operative time and pain immediately after operation.

  20. A Case Report of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Raynaud's Phenomenon Treated by Bee Venom and Carthami Flos Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Seok-woo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study is to report the effect of Pharmacopuncture therapy on a patient suffering from the pain and cold intolerance of hand caused by Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon. Methods : We had treated the patient diagnosed as Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon by Sweet BV and CF pharmacopuncture. We injected Sweet BV and CF into acupuncture points on both hands - Sweet BV into Baxie (EX-UE9, CF into Naegwan (PC6 and Daereung (PC7.And then we evaluated her symptoms by VAS (Visual Analog Scale. Results : Clinical symptoms about Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon were remarkably improved by Sweet BV and CF Pharmacopuncture. Conclusion : Therefore, we concluded that pharmacopuncture therapy - Sweet BV, CF etc. - may be useful to treat Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon.

  1. Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of Scaphoid treated by Curettage and Bone Grafting: Case report and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Jain, Anil Kumar; Dhammi, Ish Kumar; Mishra, Puneet; Modi, Prasant

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Intraosseous ganglions, although share same pathology as the soft tissue ganglions are rare entities, further rare in carpals. Cases of intraosseous ganglions are reported in literature mostly in lower limbs and lunate among carpals, with treatment options ranging from curettage and grafting to calcium phosphate cement injection and finally to arthroscopic treatment. Case report: Here, we present a case of 2 years follow up of 40 years old female with nonspecific clinical finding of wrist and slight limitation of restriction of motion, diagnosed as intraosseous ganglion cyst of scaphoid. This case was treated with curettage and bone grafting having excellent results with visual and analog pain scores reduced from 68 to 11 and range of motion was 90° extension to 80° flexion and full grip strength. Conclusion: Intraosseous ganglion cyst should be considered in differential diagnosis of chronic dull wrist pain because they produce disabling symptoms which ceases once adequately treated by curettage and bone grafting.

  2. The effect of local corticosteroid injection on F-wave conduction velocity and sympathetic skin response in carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz, Orhan; Aygül, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; Özdemir, Gökhan; Odabaş, Faruk Ömer; Kaya, M. Dursun; Ulvi, Hızır

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of steroid injection for the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), with F-wave parameters and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Seventeen hands of 10 women patients were treated with local steroid injection with 2-month follow-up. All patients underwent single injection into the carpal tunnel. Response to injection was measured nerve conduction studies (NCSs), median nerve F waves, and SSR before and after treatment. To determine the ...

  3. Pain Levels after Local Anaesthetic with or without Hyaluronidase in Carpal Tunnel Release: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, G.; Gupta, A; Ding, G.; Skerman, H.; Khatun, M.; Melsom, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Hyaluronidase is an enzyme that temporarily liquefies the interstitial barrier, allowing easy dispersal of local anaesthetic through cleavage of tissue planes. This prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study investigates the utility of adding hyaluronidase to local anaesthetic in the setting of carpal tunnel release. Methods. 70 consecutive carpal tunnel release patients were recruited and randomised into a control group only receiving local anaesthetic and a hyaluronidase gro...

  4. Comparison of the Effects between Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-young Ku; Kyoung-hee Lee; Sung-Woo Cho; Sang-Chan Lee; Hyoun-min Youn; Kyung-jeon Jang; Choon-ho Song; Chang-beohm Ahn; Cheol-hong Kim

    2010-01-01

    Objectives : The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Methods : From February to September 2010, the number of patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome who volunteered for this clinical study was 16 and 7 out of 16 patients complained both hands. Total 23 cases of hands were randomly divided by 2 groups. We injected Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture on PC7(Daereung) twice a week for 4week...

  5. The Usefulness of Latency Difference Tests of Median-Ulnar and Median-Radial Nerves in Mild Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Berrin LEBLEBİCİ; Adam, Mehmet; BAĞIŞ, Selda; M. Nafiz AKMAN

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate of the usefulness of latency differences of median nerve-ulnar nerve and median nerve-radial nerve in patients with mild idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Materials and Methods: 168 women, 243 hands with the clinical diagnosis of carpal tunel syndrome and 46 healthy women were evaluated. In addition to the conventional electrophysiological measurement, median nerve-ulnar nerve latency differences and median nerve-radial nerve latency differences were also measured. ...

  6. Comparative Anatomy of the Subsynovial Connective Tissue in the Carpal Tunnel of the Rat, Rabbit, Dog, Baboon, and Human

    OpenAIRE

    Ettema, Anke M.; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    The tenosynovium in the human carpal tunnel is connected to the flexor tendons and the median nerve by the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT). The most common histological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a compression neuropathy of the median nerve, is noninflammatory fibrosis of the SSCT. The relationship, if any, between the fibrosis and nerve pathology is unknown, although some have speculated that a change in the SSCT volume or stiffness might be the source of the compression. ...

  7. 14C. Case Studies on the Outcome of Integrative Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Trigger Fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Tick, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Alleviating Pain Carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger fingers, and deQuervaines' tenosynovitis are often regarded as surgical lesions. Using an interprofessional team approach, all these conditions can be treated with nonsurgical techniques. A 44-year-old accountant presented with hand pain requiring workplace accommodation. He had electrodiagnositc evidence of carpal tunnel syndrome bilaterally with the right side worse than the left. He was scheduled ...

  8. Prospective analysis of the accuracy of diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome using a web-based questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Bland, Jeremy D P; Rudolfer, Stephan; Weller, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective To confirm the accuracy of a diagnostic questionnaire for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) when presented via a public website rather than on paper. Design Prospective comparison of the probability of CTS as assessed by the web-based questionnaire at http://www.carpal-tunnel.net with the results of nerve conduction studies. Setting Subregional neurophysiology laboratory serving a population of 700 000 in East Kent, UK. Participants 2821 individuals who were able to complete an online di...

  9. Etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype wrist movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Lewańska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common neuropathy of upper limbs and a leading cause of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of work exposure, repetitive and forceful exertions of the hand and use of vibrating hand tools. The aim of the study was to evaluate etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype movements in wrist. Material and Methods: We conducted the retrospective analysis of 300 patients (261 women, 39 men, mean age 52 years (standard deviation: ±6.93 hospitalized with the suspicion of occupational CTS. Results: The study revealed high percentage (68.7% of diseases and systemic factors involved in the pathogenesis of CTS in the analyzed population, especially obesity (32%, thyroid diseases (28.7%, hormone replacement therapy and/or oophorectomy (16.3% and diabetes mellitus (12%. In 111 patients the coexistence of at least a couple of potential etiological factors of the neuropathy was recognized. Clinical analysis and occupational exposure allowed to diagnose occupational carpal tunnel syndrome in 18 (6% patients only. The undeniable long-term (20.2±9.3 years occupational exposure to repetitive, forceful movements in the wrist was observed in this group. Conclusion: The results of our study indicated that non-occupational etiological factors of CTS predominated and in 37% of patients at least several factors were found. The analysis showed the high prevalence of CTS in workers employed in various sectors of industry, including so called "blue collar" workers. Our study confirmed the multifactorial etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome, however, occupational agents contributed to only 6% of cases. Med Pr 2014;65(2:261–270

  10. Effect of age on subjective complaints and objective severity of carpal tunnel syndrome: prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Povlsen, B; Aggelakis, K; KOUTROUMANIDIS, M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Older patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who are resistant to conservative treatment often have a less than satisfactory outcome after surgery. We therefore investigated whether the age of the patient affects the subjective complaints or the objective severity of the nerve entrapment prior to surgery in patients younger than 40 years compared with those above 70 years of age. Design Prospective study. Setting NHS specialist neurophysiology department. Participants One hundred and...

  11. The Effects of Low Intensity Laser on Clinical and Electrophysiological Parameters of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common type of entrapment neuropathy. Conservative therapy is usually considered as the first step in the management of CTS. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is among the new physical modalities, which has shown therapeutic effects in CTS. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of applying LASER and splinting together with splinting alone in patients with CTS.

  12. Biomechanical risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome: a pooled study of 2474 workers

    OpenAIRE

    Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Eisen, Ellen A.; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Hegmann, Kurt T; Thiese, Matthew S.; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley; Burt, Susan; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Merlino, Linda; Gerr, Fred; Rempel, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Between 2001 and 2010, five research groups conducted coordinated prospective studies of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence among US workers from various industries and collected detailed subject-level exposure information with follow-up of symptoms, electrophysiological measures and job changes. Objective This analysis examined the associations between workplace biomechanical factors and incidence of dominant-hand CTS, adjusting for personal risk factors. Methods 2474 particip...

  13. Ultrasound assessment of transverse carpal ligament thickness: a validity and reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-06-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) forms the palmar boundary of the carpal tunnel and plays an important role in carpal tunnel mechanics. TCL hypertrophy has been observed for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and postulated as a potential etiologic factor. Ultrasound is particularly advantageous for TCL imaging because of its capability of detecting the interfaces between the TCL and other tissues. The purposes of this study were to develop an ultrasound based method to measure the TCL thickness and to test the validity and reliability of this method. Three operators conducted two sessions of ultrasound examination on eight cadaveric specimens and eight healthy volunteers. A custom script was used to calculate TCL thickness along the TCL length from the ultrasound images. The ultrasound based TCL thickness of the cadaveric specimens was compared with the dissection based TCL thickness for validation. The results showed Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.867-0.928, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values of 0.726-0.865, a standard error of measurement of 0.02-0.07 mm and a minimal detectable difference of 0.05-0.15 mm. The high correlation coefficients and small errors indicate that the ultrasound based method is valid for measuring TCL thickness. Furthermore, ultrasound measurements showed excellent intraoperator and interoperator reliability with ICC values as 0.826-0.933 and 0.840-0.882, respectively. The ultrasound based TCL thickness was in the range of 0.93-2.34 (1.54 ± 0.33) mm and agreed well with previous studies. The ultrasound method developed in this study is a valuable tool to examine morphologic properties of healthy and pathologic TCLs. PMID:22502882

  14. Thrombosis of the persistent median artery as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome – case study

    OpenAIRE

    Rzepecka-Wejs, Ludomira; Multan, Aleksandra; Konarzewska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent neuropathy of the upper extremity, that mainly occurs in manual workers and individuals, whose wrist is overloaded by performing repetitive precise tasks. In the past it was common among of typists, seamstresses and mechanics, but nowadays it is often caused by long hours of computer keyboard use. The patient usually complains of pain, hypersensitivity and paresthesia of his hand and fingers in the median nerve distribution. The symptoms often incre...

  15. Median Nerve Deformation and Displacement in the Carpal Tunnel during Index Finger and Thumb Motion

    OpenAIRE

    van Doesburg, Margriet H. M.; Yoshii, Yuichi; Villarraga, Hector R.; Henderson, Jacqueline; Cha, Stephen s; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion, using ultrasound. Thirty wrists from 15 asymptomatic volunteers were evaluated. Cross-sectional images during motion from full extension to flexion of the index finger and thumb were recorded. On the initial and final frames, the median nerve, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and index finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendo...

  16. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa A. Zukowski, MA; Jaimie A. Roper, MS; Orit Shechtman, PhD, OTR/L; Dana M. Otzel, PhD; Patty W. Hovis, MSESS; Mark D. Tillman, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury part...

  17. Gliding characteristics of flexor tendon and tenosynovium in carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Anke M; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C; O'Byrne, Megan M; An, Kai-Nan

    2007-04-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is noninflammatory fibrosis of the synovium. How this fibrosis might affect tendon function, if at all, is unknown. The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS) of the ulnar tenosynovial bursa. Fibrosis of the SSCT may well affect its gliding characteristics. To investigate this possibility, the relative motion of the flexor tendon and VS was observed during finger flexion in patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery, and for comparison in hands without CTS, in an in vitro cadaver model. We used a camera to document the gliding motion of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS III) tendon and SSCT in three patients with CTS during carpal tunnel release and compared this with simulated active flexion in three cadavers with no antemortem history of CTS. The data were digitized with the use of Analyze Software (Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN). In the CTS patients, the SSCT moved en bloc with the tendon, whereas, in the controls the SSCT moved smoothly and separately from the tendon. The ratio of VS to tendon motion was higher for the patients than in the cadaver controls. These findings suggest that in patients with CTS the synovial fibrosis has altered the gliding characteristics of the SSCT. The alterations in the gliding characteristics of the SSCT may affect the ability of the tendons in the carpal tunnel to glide independently from each other, or from the nearby median nerve. These abnormal tendon mechanics may play a role in the etiology of CTS. PMID:16944527

  18. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Dexterous Manipulation Are Grip Type-Dependent

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Wei; Johnston, Jamie A; Ross, Mark A.; Sanniec, Kyle; Gleason, Elizabeth A.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) impairs sensation of a subset of digits. Although the effects of CTS on manipulation performed with CTS-affected digits have been studied using precision grip tasks, the extent to which CTS affects multi-digit force coordination has only recently been studied. Whole-hand manipulation studies have shown that CTS patients retain the ability to modulate multi-digit forces to object mass, mass distribution, and texture. However, CTS results in sensorimotor deficits re...

  19. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Interobserver Reliability of the Blinded Scratch-Collapse Test

    OpenAIRE

    Blok, Robin D.; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Ring, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective observational study of 41 patients with a provisional diagnosis of CTS or a combination of CTS and cubital tunnel syndrome and prescribed electrodiagnostic testing. The treating hand surgeon performed the...

  20. Cumulative keyboard strokes: a possible risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Eleftheriou Andreas; Rachiotis George; Varitimidis Socratis E; Koutis Charilaos; Malizos Konstantinos N; Hadjichristodoulou Christos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Contradictory reports have been published regarding the association of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) and the use of computer keyboard. Previous studies did not take into account the cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes among computer workers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cumulative keyboard use (keyboard strokes) and CTS. Methods Employees (461) from a Governmental data entry & processing unit agreed to participate (response rat...

  1. Superficial Palmar Arch Aneurysm after Carpal Tunnel Decompression, a Rare Complication: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gull

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available False aneurysms of the palmar arteries are rare. They are usually associated with traumatic injuries to the hand vasculature. We present a case of superficial palmar arch aneurysm (SPAA, complicating carpal tunnel decompression which presented as a pulsatile mass at the site of previous surgery. Initial diagnosis was made on clinical examination and confirmed on doppler ultrasound (US and computed tomographic angiography (CTA. The feeding vessel of the aneurysm was subsequently occluded using coil embolization.

  2. Intradermal Therapy (Mesotherapy) for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Conforti, Giorgio; Capone, Loredana; Corra, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common cause of severe hand pain. In this study we treated acute pain in CTS patients by means of local intradermal injections of anti-inflammatory drugs (mesotherapy). Methods In twenty-five patients (forty-five hands), CTS diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and neurophysiological examination prior to mesotherapy. A mixture containing lidocaine 10 mg, ketoprophen lysine-acetylsalycilate 80 mg, xantinol nicotinate 100 mg, cyanocobalamin...

  3. In vivo high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel at 8.0 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heading AbstractObjective. To determine the feasibility of acquiring in vivo images of the human carpal tunnel at 8 tesla (T).Design. The wrist of an asymptomatic volunteer was imaged with an 8 T /80 cm magnet. The subject was imaged prone with the arm over the head and the wrist placed in neutral position in a custom-built dedicated shielded wrist coil. Axial two-dimensional gradient-echo (GRE) images of the wrist were acquired.Results. Image contrast and resolution at 8 T are excellent. The infrastructure of the median nerve, particularly the interfascicular epineurium and individual fascicles, is better visualized at 8 T than at 1.5 T. The flexor tendons are well delineated from each other and the surrounding soft tissues, and tertiary tendon fiber bundles are resolved. The boundaries of the carpal tunnel are better defined at 8 T.Conclusion. We have obtained the first high-quality in vivo images of the human carpal tunnel at 8 T. The 8 T images demonstrated better contrast and resolution than those obtained at 1.5 T. (orig.)

  4. Musculoskeletal lesions and lameness in 121 horses with carpal sheath effusion (1999-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Joan S; Genovese, Ronald L; Döpfer, Dörte; Stewart, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Equine carpal sheath effusion has multiple etiologies. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the prevalence of distinct musculoskeletal lesions lameness in a sample of horses with a clinical diagnosis of carpal sheath effusion. A total of 121 horses met inclusion criteria. Seventy-four percent (89/121) of horses were lame at presentation; middle-aged (9-18 years, 80%) and older (> 18 years, 85%) horses were lame more frequently than young horses (horses, 10 exhibited osseous abnormalities, whereas 111 were diagnosed with soft tissue lesions. Eighty-four percent (93/111) of the soft tissue injuries extended from the caudodistal antebrachium to the palmar metacarpus. The superficial digital flexor tendon (98/111; 88%) and accessory ligament of the superficial digital flexor tendon (64/111; 58%) were the most commonly injured structures, with both structures affected in 41 (41/111; 37%) horses. Injuries within the caudodistal antebrachium included the superficial digital flexor musculotendinous junction (66), the accessory ligament of the superficial digital flexor tendon (64), and deep digital flexor muscle (21), in isolation or in combination with other structures. Increased echogenicity in the medial superficial digital flexor musculotendinous junction was detected in 40 horses and was significantly associated with increasing age (middle-aged, 19/40; old, 18/40). Findings from this study indicated that age should be taken into consideration for horses presented with carpal sheath effusion and that adjacent structures within the caudodistal antebrachium should be included in evaluations. PMID:25572121

  5. Pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To use pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to monitor median nerve integrity in patients suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Diffusivity and anisotropy images along the median nerve were compared among 12 patients, 12 age-matched and 12 young control subjects and correlated with electrophysiological neurography results. Slice-wise DTI parameter values were calculated to focus on local changes. Results of pre-operative patients and age-matched control subjects differed only in the distal nerve. Moreover, pre-operative patients differed significantly from young controls and post-operative patients. The main abnormalities were increased diffusivity and decreased anisotropy in the carpal tunnel and distal median nerve. Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. Slice-wise analysis showed high pre-operative diffusivity at the distal nerve. All groups had relatively large inter-subject variation in both diffusivity and anisotropy. DTI can provide information complementary to clinical examination, electrophysiological recordings and anatomical MRI of diseases and injuries of peripheral nerves. However, similar age-related changes in diffusivity and anisotropy may weaken DTI specificity. Slice-wise analysis is necessary for detection of local changes in nerve integrity. circle Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging provides information complementary to conventional diagnostic methods. circle Age caused similar changes to diffusivity and anisotropy as carpal tunnel syndrome. circle Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. circle Inter-subject variation in diffusivity and anisotropy was considerable. (orig.)

  6. Open carpal tunnel release with use of a nasal turbinate speculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muppavarapu, Raghuveer C; Rajaee, Sean S; Ruchelsman, David E; Belsky, Mark R

    2015-11-01

    Incomplete release of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve injury are complications of carpal tunnel release (CTR). In this article, we describe a modified mini-open release using a fine nasal turbinate speculum to aid in the proximal release with direct visualization of the proximal limb of the TCL and the distal volar forearm fascia (DVFF). The technique begins with a 2.5-cm palmar longitudinal incision, and standard distal release of the TCL is completed. A fine nasal turbinate speculum is inserted into the plane above the proximal limb of the TCL and the DVFF. A long-handle scalpel is used to incise the TCL and the DVFF under direct visualization. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 101 consecutive CTR cases (63 right, 38 left). Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms were relieved in all patients with a high degree of satisfaction. This modified mini-open technique provides surgeons with a reproducible and inexpensive method to ensure a safe proximal release of the TCL. PMID:26566548

  7. Acupuncture in treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Khosrawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most preva lent form of peripheral neuropathy. The efficacy of acupuncture in management of mild to moderate CTS has been investigated in limited studies with controversial results. The aim of this study was to assess the short-term effects of acupuncture in treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial study, participants were randomly assigned to either control group which night splinting, vitamin B1, B6 and sham acupuncture for four weeks were administered, or intervention group that un-derwent acupuncture in 8 sessions over 4 weeks and night splinting. The clinical symptoms using global symptom score (GSS and electrophysiological parameters were assessed at baseline and four weeks after the intervention. RESULTS: Of 72 patients met the inclusion criteria, 64 patients actually completed the 4 week intervention and were evaluated for the outcome. There was a statistically significant difference in GSS between two arms of treatment after the intervention (p 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicated that the acupuncture can improve the overall subjective symptoms of carpal tun-nel syndrome and could be adopted in comprehensive care programs of these patients.

  8. Evaluation of surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome using local anesthesia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Marco Felipe Francisco Honorato; da Rocha Luz Júnior, Aurimar; Roncaglio, Bruno; Queiróz Júnior, Célio Pinheiro; Tribst, Marcelo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the results and complications from surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome by means of an open route, using a local anesthesia technique comprising use of a solution of lidocaine, epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate. Material and methods This was a cohort study conducted through evaluating the medical files of 16 patients who underwent open surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, with use of local anesthesia consisting of 20 mL of 1% lidocaine, adrenaline at 1:100,000 and 2 mL of sodium bicarbonate. The DASH scores before the operation and six months after the operation were evaluated. Comparisons were made regarding the intensity of pain at the time of applying the anesthetic and during the surgical procedure, and in relation to other types of procedure. Results The DASH score improved from 65.17 to 16.53 six months after the operation (p < 0.01). In relation to the anesthesia, 75% of the patients reported that this technique was better than or the same as venous puncture and 81% reported that it was better than a dental procedure. Intraoperative pain occurred in two cases. There were no occurrences of ischemia. Conclusion Use of local anesthesia for surgically treating carpal tunnel syndrome is effective for performing the procedure and for the final result. PMID:26962490

  9. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some types of fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone ...

  10. A prospective study of prognostic factors for duration of sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalsgaard Jesper

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic carpal tunnel release with a single portal technique has been shown to reduce sick leave compared to open carpal tunnel release, claiming to be a less invasive procedure and reducing scar tenderness leading to a more rapid return to work, and the purpose of this study was to identify prognostic factors for prolonged sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release in a group of employed Danish patients. Methods The design was a prospective study including 75 employed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome operated with ECTR at two hospitals. The mean age was 46 years (SD 10.1, the male/female ratio was 0.42, and the mean preoperative duration of symptoms 10 months (range 6-12. Only 21 (28% were unable to work preoperatively and mean sick leave was 4 weeks (range 1-4. At base-line and at the 3-month follow-up, a self-administered questionnaire was collected concerning physical, psychological, and social circumstances in relation to the hand problem. Data from a nerve conduction examination were collected at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Significant prognostic factors were identified through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results After the operation, the mean functional score was reduced from 2.3 to 1.4 (SD 0.8 and the mean symptom score from 2.9 to 1.5 (SD 0.7. The mean sick leave from work after the operation was 19.8 days (SD 14.3. Eighteen patients (24% had more than 21 days of sick leave. Two patients (3% were still unable to work after 3 months. Significant prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis for more than 21 days of postoperative sick leave were preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem and a preoperative distal motor latency. Conclusion Preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem, and a preoperative distal nerve conduction motor latency were prognostic factors for postoperative work absence of more than 21 days. Other factors may be important

  11. Dupuytren’s disease digital radius IV right hand and carpal tunnel syndrome on ipsilateral hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teona Sebe Ioana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren’s contracture is a fibroproliferative disease whose etiology and pathophysiology are unclear and controversial. It is a connective tissue disorder, which takes part in the palmar’s fibromatosis category and has common characteristics with the healing process. Dupuytren’s disease is characterized by the flexion contracture of the hand due to palmar and digital aponevrosis. It generally affects the 4th digital radius, followed by the 5th one. Without surgery, it leads to functional impotence of those digital rays and/or hand. It is associated with other diseases and situational conditions like Peyronie’s disease, the Lederhose disease (plantar fibromatosis, Garrod’s digital knuckle-pads, diabetes, epilepsy, alcoholism, micro traumatisms, stenosing tenosynovitis and not the least with carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel syndrome is a peripheral neuropathy with the incarceration of the median nerve at the ARC level, expressed clinically by sensory and motor disturbances in the distribution territory of the median nerve, which cause functional limitations of daily activities of the patient. After the failure of the nonsurgical treatment or the appearance of the motor deficit, is established the open or endoscopic surgical treatment with the release of the median nerve. Postoperative recovery in both diseases is crucial to the functionality of the affected upper limb and to the quality of the patient’s life. The patient, a 61 years old man, admitted to the clinic for the functional impotence of the right hand, for the permanent flexion contracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP of the 4th finger with extension deficit, for the damage of the thumb pulp clamp of the 4th finger, for nocturnal paresthesia of fingers I-III and pain that radiates into the fingertips. After clinical, paraclinical, imagistic and electrical investigations, surgery is practiced partial aponevrectomy

  12. Carpal height and postoperative strength after proximal row carpectomy or four-corner arthrodesis: Clinical, anatomical and biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laronde, Pascale; Christiaens, Nicolas; Aumar, Aurélien; Chantelot, Christophe; Fontaine, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and four-corner arthrodesis (4CA) are the two most commonly performed surgical procedures to treat wrist arthritis. Postoperative strength is one of the criteria for choosing between the two techniques. Some authors believe that strength is correlated with residual carpal height. The goal of this study was to determine if postoperative carpal height was predictive of postoperative strength. This study consisted of two parts: a clinical evaluation of grip strength after 4CA or PRC; anatomical and radiological measurements of carpal height before and after 4CA or PRC. Grip strength was better preserved after PRC (87.5%) than after 4CA (76.1%), when expressed relative to the opposite hand (P=0.053). There was a significant decrease in carpal height for the PRC group with a Youm's index of 0.37 versus 0.50 for the 4CA group (P<0.0001). Our clinical results and analysis of the literature indicate that 4CA is not superior to PRC when it comes to grip strength, whereas carpal height is significantly decreased after PRC. The decreased tendon excursion after PRC is balanced by an increase in joint stresses after 4CA. PMID:27117123

  13. Unicameral bone cyst of the lunate in an adult: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alici Tugrul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of a symptomatic unicameral (simple bone cyst of the lunate in a 42-year- old woman. The lesion was treated with curettage and cancellous autogenous iliac bone grafting. At five years of follow-up the wrist was pain free, there were no limitations of motion, and the radiographs showed complete obliteration of the cavity. To the best of our knowledge, no other unicameral bone cyst of the lunate has been reported in an adult. Cysts with significant cavities at the carpal bones in an adult should be approached cautiously, as they may require early curettage and bone grafting for healing, before collapse and degenerative changes occur.

  14. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by two different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A.; Vestergaard, A.; Dohn, U.M.;

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the ability of two different dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. Methods: CR and two MRI examinations (using 0.2 T Esaote Artoscan and 0...... 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. Conclusions: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, in particular due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal heads and carpal bones. The MagneVu unit detected fewer erosions than the Artoscan unit due to a lower average image quality and a smaller.......2 T portable MagneVu MV1000 units) of 418 bones in the dominant wrist and second to fifth MCP joints of 15 patients with RA and 4 healthy controls were performed and evaluated blindly for bones being visible and for erosions. Results: In MCP joints, MagneVu visualised 18.5% of bones entirely and 71...

  15. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser for cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses. Part II: Morphologic and histochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, A J; Krook, L P; Roth, J E; King, J M

    1991-01-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. After euthanasia at week 8, the treated and control joints were examined for gross changes, and samples of cartilage and subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and peripheral lymph nodes were examined histologically. Depletion of cartilage matrix glycosaminoglycan was assessed by safranin-O histochemical staining of the laser site and adjacent cartilage. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth, with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. PMID:1712998

  16. A Case Report of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Raynaud's Phenomenon Treated by Bee Venom and Carthami Flos Pharmacopuncture

    OpenAIRE

    Choi Seok-woo; Park Pyeong-beom; Oh Sung-jong

    2009-01-01

    Objectives : This study is to report the effect of Pharmacopuncture therapy on a patient suffering from the pain and cold intolerance of hand caused by Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon. Methods : We had treated the patient diagnosed as Carpal tunnel syndrome with Raynaud's phenomenon by Sweet BV and CF pharmacopuncture. We injected Sweet BV and CF into acupuncture points on both hands - Sweet BV into Baxie (EX-UE9), CF into Naegwan (PC6) and Daereung (PC7).And then we evalu...

  17. Review of the dimensions of the median nerve and carpal tunnel using sonography in asymptomatic adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The study aims to establish the normal range of all sono logic measurements of carpal tunnel (CT) structures in an asymptomatic population. Sonological evaluation of 150 wrists in 75 asymptomatic adults was performed. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at four levels, the flattening ratio (FR) at three levels, the antero-posterior (AP) diameter of the CT and the distance of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) from the trapezium-hamate (TmH) line were measured. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) CSA of the median nerve at the distal forearm, CT inlet, mid and outlet were 6.8 (1.3), 704 (1.1),7.5 (1.0), 7.1 (1.0) mm2, respectively. The mean (SD) FR at the CT inlet, mid and outlet were 2.66 (0.54), 2.55 (0.54), 3.69 (0.82), respectively. The mean (SD) AP diameter of the CT was lOA mm (1.1). Volar bowing of the retinaculum was seen in 7.3% of normal wrists. The normal range at two SDs of the CSA of the median nerve at the inlet was 5.2-9.6 mm2. The upper limit of volar bowing of the flexor retinaculum was 0.8 mm. The FR overlaps with values obtained in other studies of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The mean AP diameter of the CT was lOA mm (SD 1.1). To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest study performed in an asymptomatic population assessing the different sono logical parameters related to the CT.

  18. Randomized clinical trial of surgery versus conservative therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome [ISRCTN84286481

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Judith A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conservative treatment remains the standard of care for treating mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome despite a small number of well-controlled studies and limited objective evidence to support current treatment options. There is an increasing interest in the usefulness of wrist magnetic resonance imaging could play in predicting who will benefit for various treatments. Method and design Two hundred patients with mild to moderate symptoms will be recruited over 3 1/2 years from neurological surgery, primary care, electrodiagnostic clinics. We will exclude patients with clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of denervation or thenar muscle atrophy. We will randomly assign patients to either a well-defined conservative care protocol or surgery. The conservative care treatment will include visits with a hand therapist, exercises, a self-care booklet, work modification/ activity restriction, B6 therapy, ultrasound and possible steroid injections. The surgical care would be left up to the surgeon (endoscopic vs. open with usual and customary follow-up. All patients will receive a wrist MRI at baseline. Patients will be contacted at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after randomization to complete the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Assessment Questionnaire (CTSAQ. In addition, we will compare disability (activity and work days lost and general well being as measured by the SF-36 version II. We will control for demographics and use psychological measures (SCL-90 somatization and depression scales as well as EDS and MRI predictors of outcomes. Discussion We have designed a randomized controlled trial which will assess the effectiveness of surgery for patients with mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. An important secondary goal is to study the ability of MRI to predict patient outcomes.

  19. Early response of local steroid injection versus mini incision technique in treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpal tunnel syndrome Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the commonest peripheral neuropathies which effects mainly middle aged women. Different techniques are being tried to decrease the post-operative pain in patients operated for CTS. The objective of this study was to compare effectiveness of local injection of steroid and mini incision technique in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted at department of Orthopedics and department of Neurosurgery, Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Aug 2011 to Feb 2013. A total of 116 patients of CTS were randomly allocated to either of the two groups. Fifty-eight Patient in Group A were subjected to local steroid injection and the same number of patient in Group B underwent mini incision technique. All patients of were advised to report to the OPD after one month to determine intervention effectiveness in terms of improvement in at least one grade of pain. Results: In this study mean age of the patients was 32.8 ± 5.1 years. Female gender was in dominance with 99 (86.3%) cases. In this study we compared the effectiveness of local steroid injection and mini incision technique in the treatment of carpel tunnel syndrome. We found out that the steroid injection was effective in 69.0% cases while mini incision technique was effective in 56.9% cases. The difference being statistically insignificant with a p-value of 0.17. Conclusion: The difference in pain after 1 month of the intervention was not statistically significant. (author)

  20. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  1. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  2. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  3. Medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome ameliorated with thrust manipulation of the elbow and carpals

    OpenAIRE

    Kearns, Gary; Wang, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of thrust manipulation to the elbow and carpals in the management of a patient referred with a medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS). The patient was a 45-year-old woman with a 6-week history of right medial elbow pain, ulnar wrist pain, and intermittent paresthesia in the ulnar nerve distribution. Upon initial assessment, she presented with a positive elbow flexion test and upper limb neurodynamic test with ulnar nerve bias. A biomec...

  4. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Thomas W.; Dell, Paul C.; Conrad, Bryan P; Tanner, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR) in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and r...

  5. Wrist flexion as an adjunct to the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnan, J B; Waylonis, G W

    1991-03-01

    The effects of five minutes of wrist flexion on median motor and sensory evoked potential latencies in 87 individuals were studied. Nineteen subjects had carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as diagnosed by increased median nerve latencies across the wrist, and 68 had values in the normal range and were assigned to the control group. A slight prolongation of up to 0.5m sec of evoked potential latencies was observed in both groups after flexion, but the differences between the two groups were not significant to establish the value of adding wrist flexion to conventional screening methods. PMID:1998456

  6. Hand pain other than carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS): the role of occupational factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréu, José-Luis; Otón, Teresa; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Sanz, Jesús

    2011-02-01

    Some occupational factors have been implicated in the development of disorders manifested as hand pain. The associations seem to be well documented in processes such as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) or writer's cramp. There are contradictory data in the literature about the relationships of trigger finger, De Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT) and tenosynovitis of the wrist with occupational factors. In this article, we review current knowledge about clinical manifestations, case definition, implicated occupational factors, diagnosis and treatment of the most relevant hand pain disorders that have been associated with occupational factors, excluding carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). PMID:21663848

  7. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Tanner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and rotation of the trapezium, radius, and first metacarpal, before and after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, radius and trapezium, and first metacarpal and trapezium during loading was calculated using rigid body mechanics. Overall stiffness of each specimen was determined. Results. Total construct stiffness following CTR was reduced in all specimens but not significantly. No significant changes were found in adduction, pronation, or dorsiflexion of the trapezium with respect to radius after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, between radius and trapezium, or between first metacarpal and trapezium after open CTR was not decreased significantly. Conclusion. From this data, we cannot determine if releasing the transverse carpal ligament alters kinematics of the CMC joint.

  8. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Marc A; Conrad, Bryan P; Dell, Paul C; Wright, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR) in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and rotation of the trapezium, radius, and first metacarpal, before and after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, radius and trapezium, and first metacarpal and trapezium during loading was calculated using rigid body mechanics. Overall stiffness of each specimen was determined. Results. Total construct stiffness following CTR was reduced in all specimens but not significantly. No significant changes were found in adduction, pronation, or dorsiflexion of the trapezium with respect to radius after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, between radius and trapezium, or between first metacarpal and trapezium after open CTR was not decreased significantly. Conclusion. From this data, we cannot determine if releasing the transverse carpal ligament alters kinematics of the CMC joint. PMID:23251808

  9. Progression of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome According to Electrodiagnostic Testing in Nonoperatively Treated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark van Suchtelen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  This study tested the null hypothesis that nonoperatively treated patients would not show disease progression of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS over time according to median nerve distal motor latency (DML on two electrodiagnostic tests.   Methods:  This retrospective study analyzed sixty-two adult nonoperatively treated patients who were diagnosed with CTS confirmed by a minimum of two electrodiagnostic tests at our institution between December 2006 and  tober 2012. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was conducted to test the difference between electrodiagnostic measurements between the first and last test. Results: The mean time between the first and last electrodiagnostic test was 26±12 months (range, 12 to 55 months. The only electrodiagnostic measurement that increased significantly was the difference between median and ulnar DML on the same side (r=0.19, P =0.038. The time between the electrodiagnostic tests was significantly longer for patients with at least 10% worsening of the DML at the second test compared to cases of which the DML did not worsen or improve a minimum of 10% (P =0.015.  Conclusions: There is evidence that—on average—idiopathic median neuropathy at the carpal tunnel slowly progresses over time, and this can be measured with electrodiagnostics, but studies with a much longer interval between lectrodiagnostic tests may be needed to determine if it always progresses.

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome and the use of computer mouse and keyboard: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atroshi Isam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review examines evidence for an association between computer work and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. Methods A systematic review of studies of computer work and CTS was performed. Supplementary, longitudinal studies of low force, repetitive work and CTS, and studies of possible pathophysiological mechanisms were evaluated. Results Eight epidemiological studies of the association between computer work and CTS were identified. All eight studies had one or more limitation including imprecise exposure and outcome assessment, low statistical power or potentially serious biases. In three of the studies an exposure-response association was observed but because of possible misclassification no firm conclusions could be drawn. Three of the studies found risks below 1. Also longitudinal studies of repetitive low-force non-computer work (n = 3 were reviewed but these studies did not add evidence to an association. Measurements of carpal tunnel pressure (CTP under conditions typically observed among computer users showed pressure values below levels considered harmful. However, during actual mouse use one study showed an increase of CTP to potentially harmful levels. The long term effects of prolonged or repeatedly increased pressures at these levels are not known, however. Conclusion There is insufficient epidemiological evidence that computer work causes CTS.

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, C.; Hancart, C.; Thuc, V.Le; Cotten, A. [Service de Radiologie Osteoarticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU de Lille (France); Chantelot, C. [Clinique d' Orthopedie, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU de Lille (France); Chechin, D. [Philips Medical Systems, Suresnes (France)

    2008-10-15

    The purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography of the human median nerve with a 1.5-T MR scanner and to assess potential differences in diffusion between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. The median nerve was examined in 13 patients and 13 healthy volunteers with MR DTI and tractography using a 1.5-T MRI scanner with a dedicated wrist coil. T1-weighted images were performed for anatomical correlation. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were quantified in the median nerve on tractography images. In all subjects, the nerve orientation and course could be detected with tractography. Mean FA values were significantly lower in patients (p=0.03). However, no statistically significant differences were found for mean ADC values. In vivo assessment of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel using DTI with tractography on a 1.5-T MRI scanner is possible. Microstructural parameters can be easily obtained from tractography images. A significant decrease of mean FA values was found in patients suffering from chronic compression of the median nerve. Further investigations are necessary to determine if mean FA values may be correlated with the severity of nerve entrapment. (orig.)

  12. The Efficacy of 100 and 300 mg Gabapentin in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a neuropathy due to the compression of the median nerve. It is shown that gabapentin in high doses is effective in treatment of CTS patients. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of low doses of gabapentin in treatment of CTS patients. Ninety patients with CTS were randomly assigned to groups A, B and C. Gabapentin was administered to group A with dose of 100 mg/day and to group B with dose of 300 mg/day for 2 months. Group C received no treatment. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and parasthesia, Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) including Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. The pinch and grip strength was also measured. There was significant improvement in VAS, grip strength, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ score in all three groups (p CMAP and SNAP was not significant. Groups A and B in comparison to group C had significantly better improvement in VAS, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ total score (p < 0.05). There was significantly more improvement in pinch strength and SSS score in group B compared to group A (p < 0.05). Gabapentin in low doses is a useful drug in treatment of CTS symptoms with no side effects and intolerance. Gabapentin with dose of 300 mg/day is more effective than the dose of 100 mg/day. PMID:26664397

  13. Duration of symptomatology and median segmental sensory latency in 993 carpal tunnel syndrome hands (668 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOUYOUMDJIAN JOAO ARIS

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available According to median sensory nerve action potential onset-latency to index finger in a 140 mm fixed distance, 993 carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS hands from 668 patients were grouped into MIld (3.0 to 3.5 ms, 384 hands, MOderate (3.6 to 4.4 ms, 332 hands, SEvere (> 4.4 ms, 135 hands and UNrecordable (142 hands and correlated with CTS symptomatology duration. All patients have sensory antidromic median-radial latency difference (MRD e > or = 1.0 ms without any doubt about CTS diagnosis. Patients with systemic disease, trauma or previous surgery were excluded. There is a remarkable cumulative percentage increase from 1 to 12 months in group UN (3.5% to 38.7%, 11 folds, much less than the group MI (13.8% to 54.6%, 3.9 folds. There is also a remarkable non-cumulative percentage increase in group UN, from 1 to 4-12 months; the group MI had a relatively uniform distribution in all symptomatic duration groups from 1 to > 60 months. The conclusion is that median nerve compression at carpal tunnel can lead to unrecordable potentials in a relatively short period from 1 to 12 months of evolution, suggesting acute/subacute deterioration. Electrophysiological evaluation must be done periodically in patients that underwent clinical treatment, since cumulative 38.7% of group UN was found in 12 months period.

  14. High-resolution MRI predicts steroid injection response in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Oki, Hodaka; Kinoshita, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Korogi, Yukunori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Oshige, Takahisa; Sakai, Akinori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitakyushu (Japan); Matsuyama, Atsushi; Hisaoka, Masanori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Oncology, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    To correlate median nerve T2 signal and shape at the carpal tunnel with steroid injection (SI) response in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. One hundred and sixty-three CTS wrists of 92 consecutive patients who were scheduled to undergo SI were prospectively evaluated with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a nerve conduction study. All patients underwent axial high-resolution T2-weighted MRI (in-plane resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 mm). The CTS wrists were classified into three groups according to the nerve T2 signal and the flattening ratio at the hook of hamate level: group 1, high and oval; group 2, high and flat; group 3, low and flat. Clinical response to SI was evaluated at 6 months after injection. One hundred and thirteen of the 163 wrists (69.3 %) responded well to SI. The percentage of improvement was 81.7 % (49/60) in group 1, 69.9 % (51/73) in group 2, and 43.3 % (13/30) in group 3 (P < 0.01). On stepwise logistic regression analysis high-resolution MRI was the only significant independent factor for SI response in CTS patients (P < 0.01). High-resolution MRI correlates well with SI response in CTS patients and seems useful for predicting SI response. (orig.)

  15. Levels of endocrine hormones and lipids in male patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Uzkeser

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between endocrine hormones, lipid levels and clinical parameters in male patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS.Materials and methods: Fifteen male patients with CTS and 16 healthy controls were included in the study. Serum free T3, free T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were analyzed. Symptom severity and hand function were assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire in clinical examination.Results: Serum free T3, free T4, TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were similar between CTS patients and controls (p> 0.05. Also, there was no statistically significant correlation between laboratory parameters and clinical characteristics in patients with CTS (p> 0.05.Conclusion: The serum free T3, free T4, TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels seem within normal range in male CTS patients. Further studies are needed to investigate association endocrine factors, lipid levels such as triglyceride and total cholesterol with CTS in male and female patients.

  16. The role of extrinsic ligaments in maintaining carpal stability - A prospective statistical analysis of 85 arthroscopic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overstraeten, Luc; Camus, Emmanuel J

    2016-02-01

    Several biomechanical studies have shown that the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments are not the only stabilizers of the proximal carpal row. However, no study has yet analyzed the range of ligament lesions leading to instability in vivo. Arthroscopy has been used to assess the condition of the wrist's extrinsic ligaments by palpating and tensioning the various ligament and capsule structures. In this prospective study, this arthroscopic method was used in 85 cases of wrist sprain without static instability to evaluate the correlation between lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments and carpal instability. In SL instability, a scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) lesion was statistically correlated with lesions of the long radiolunate ligament (P<0.05). There also was a statistically significant correlation between lesions of the SLIL and the radioscaphocapitate, scaphotrapezial and dorsal intercarpal ligaments. There was a correlation between the stage of SL instability and the number of lax extrinsic ligaments (P<0.05) but not with the severity of the extrinsic ligament lesions. In LT instability, a LT interosseous ligament lesion was statistically correlated with lesions of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (P<0.05). There also was a correlation between the stage of LT instability and the number (P<0.005) and severity (P<0.001) of the extrinsic ligament lesions. Arthroscopy can reveal hidden radiographic instability and can also be used to define the number and severity of injured ligaments. In carpal instability, a lesion of one intrinsic carpal ligament was associated with a lesion of one or more extrinsic ligaments. PMID:27117018

  17. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DXA)? Bone density scanning, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ( ... is today's established standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  18. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Poh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2 nd and/or 3 rd carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the 2 nd carpometacarpal (metacarpal-trapezoid joint and highlight the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of carpal boss impingement and secondary osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature describing the imaging findings of partial osseous coalition and degenerative osteoarthritis in relation to carpal boss.

  19. Pre- and post-operative comorbidities in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, and trigger digit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Gong, H S; Lee, H J; Lee, Y H; Rhee, S H; Baek, G H

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 633 hands in 362 patients who had idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and underwent carpal tunnel release between 1999 and 2009. Electrophysiological studies and simple radiographs of the wrist, cervical spine, and basal joint of the thumb were routinely checked, and patients were also assessed for the presence of trigger digit or de Quervain's disease before and after surgery. Among 362 patients, cervical arthritis was found in 253 patients (70%), and C5-C6 arthritis was the most common site. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb was observed in 216 (34%) of the 633 hands. Trigger digit or de Quervain's disease was observed in 85 of the 633 hands (13%) before surgery, and developed in 67 hands (11%) after surgery. Cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis, and trigger digit commonly coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient education about these disorders is very important when they coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:22553311

  20. Wrist Ultrasonography vs. Electrophysiological Studies in the Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Hashemi Attar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nIntroduction: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is characterized by pain or paresthesia in areas innervated by the median nerve. Electrophysiological studies are gold standard diagnostic tests for CTS. The objective of this study was to compare ultrasonography and electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of CTS. "nMaterials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 100 wrists of 50 consecutive patients referred to 22-Bahman hospital (Mashhad with the clinical diagnosis of CTS from spring 2007 to summer 2008. These patients suspicious for CTS in at least one of their wrists (based on their complaints and neurological examination including Tinel’s test and Phallen test, were referred for electrophysiological studies including nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. All the patients underwent ultrasonography of both wrists within a week after electrophysiological studies. Ultrasonographies were performed by a radiologist using a high frequency (12 MHz linear probe (PHILIPS Envisor C. The cross sectional area of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel. Measurements equal or more than 10 mm2 were considered as the CTS. Ultrasonographic findings and also clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were compared with electrophysiological studies (as the gold standard diagnostic test for each wrist separately. "nResults: Of the 100 wrists (50 patients, 53 wrists were diagnosed as CTS based on the electrophysiological studies. Ninety one percent of the wrists with CTS were in female patients. The mean age was 52.1 years (23-75 years. There was no predisposing factor for most cases; however, 6% were affected by diabetes, 6% by hypertriglyceridemia, and 2% by hypothyroidism. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were 59%, 88

  1. Feasibility of a Novel Functional Sensibility Test as an Assisted Examination for Determining Precision Pinch Performance in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Po-Ting; Su, Fong-Chin

    2013-01-01

    To understand the feasibility of a novel functional sensibility test for determining precision pinch performance in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, this study investigates the validity, sensitivity and specificity of functional sensibility derived from a pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test. Participants include 70 clinically defined carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients with 119 involved hands and 70 age- and gender-matched controls. To examine the discriminating ability of the functi...

  2. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  3. Bone indicators of grasping hands in lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Grasping is one of a few adaptive mechanisms that, in conjunction with clinging, hooking, arm swinging, adhering, and flying, allowed for incursion into the arboreal eco-space. Little research has been done that addresses grasping as an enhanced manual ability in non-mammalian tetrapods, with the exception of studies comparing the anatomy of muscle and tendon structure. Previous studies showed that grasping abilities allow exploitation for narrow branch habitats and that this adaptation has clear osteological consequences. The objective of this work is to ascertain the existence of morphometric descriptors in the hand skeleton of lizards related to grasping functionality. A morphological matrix was constructed using 51 morphometric variables in 278 specimens, from 24 genera and 13 families of Squamata. To reduce the dimensions of the dataset and to organize the original variables into a simpler system, three PCAs (Principal Component Analyses) were performed using the subsets of (1) carpal variables, (2) metacarpal variables, and (3) phalanges variables. The variables that demonstrated the most significant contributions to the construction of the PCA synthetic variables were then used in subsequent analyses. To explore which morphological variables better explain the variations in the functional setting, we ran Generalized Linear Models for the three different sets. This method allows us to model the morphology that enables a particular functional trait. Grasping was considered the only response variable, taking the value of 0 or 1, while the original variables retained by the PCAs were considered predictor variables. Our analyses yielded six variables associated with grasping abilities: two belong to the carpal bones, two belong to the metacarpals and two belong to the phalanges. Grasping in lizards can be performed with hands exhibiting at least two different independently originated combinations of bones. The first is a combination of a highly elongated centrale

  4. Invited commentary on: Flexor retinaculum division: does it contribute to the success of carpal tunnel release of Krieger Y et al. International J of Ther and Rehab, March 2011, Vol. 18, no.3, p.139-42

    OpenAIRE

    Huisstede, Bionka; Hoogvliet, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy. Open decompression of the median nerve is considered the standard surgical treatment for CTS. This article describes a study to assess and compare the clinical efficacy of operative treatment performed by transverse carpal ligament release alone (limited carpel tunnel release (CTR)), to that achieved after transverse carpal ligament release with additional division of the proximal portion of the flexor retinaculum (e...

  5. CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME. ETIOLOGICAL, CLINICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF 262 CASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢祖能; 汤晓芙

    1995-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty-two patients with carpal turmel syndrome (CTS) were analyzed retrospeetively. Results showed that middia-and older-age women were more apt to have CTS than men, and that the dominant hand was more frequently affected. Hormonal changes, repetitive and forceful movements, awkward positions of hand and wrist, and other factors may be associated with CTS. Typical clinical manifestations include pain and pareathesia in the median nerve territory, worsening at night or in the early morning, and being relieved by shaking the hand. Although the patients may localize the discomfort beyond the territory, sensory changes are variable and not entirely reliable. Conduction abnormalities often appeared selectively in the median nerve distal to the wriat in CTS. If the patient who is clinically suggestive of CTS shows normal conduction with conventional methods, palmar stimulation and inching technique is recommended. The diagnosis of CTS requires confirmation of illness history, symptoms and signs with objective electrodiagnostic tests.

  6. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression. PMID:25856042

  7. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Zukowski, MA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression.

  8. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... also affect the results of the following tests: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  9. A study of interpolation method in diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The low correlation between the patients′ signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and results of electrodiagnostic tests makes the diagnosis challenging in mild cases. Interpolation is a mathematical method for finding median nerve conduction velocity (NCV exactly at carpal tunnel site. Therefore, it may be helpful in diagnosis of CTS in patients with equivocal test results. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate interpolation method as a CTS diagnostic test. Settings and Design: Patients with two or more clinical symptoms and signs of CTS in a median nerve territory with 3.5 ms ≤ distal median sensory latency <4.6 ms from those who came to our electrodiagnostic clinics and also, age matched healthy control subjects were recruited in the study. Materials and Methods: Median compound motor action potential and median sensory nerve action potential latencies were measured by a MEDLEC SYNERGY VIASIS electromyography and conduction velocities were calculated by both routine method and interpolation technique. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Student′s t-test were used for comparing group differences. Cut-off points were calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of 70.8% and 84.7% were obtained for median motor NCV and a sensitivity of 98.3%, specificity of 91.7%, PPV and NPV of 91.9% and 98.2% were obtained for median sensory NCV with interpolation technique. Conclusions: Median motor interpolation method is a good technique, but it has less sensitivity and specificity than median sensory interpolation method.

  10. DASH (disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand) evaluation of QOL for carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The questionnaire on the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand is a region-specific, self-administered outcome instrument that is developed as a measure of self-rate upper extremity disability and symptoms. Last year, the Japanese version of disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) was cross-culturally adapted. The main purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between DASH and clinical assessment (findings of MRI and electrodiagnostic parameters). The subjects comprised 41 patients (6 males and 35 females) with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), except for cases with other upper extremity disorders. These subjects prospectively completed DASH 1 (disability module), DASH 2 (symptom module), and DASH (disability and symptom module) before the release of the open carpal tunnel. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the symptom duration (A: shorter than 3 months, B: 4-11 months, C: longer than 12 months). All patients were preoperatively assessed with regard to sensory conduction velocity (SCV) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP). In addition, all patients underwent MRI in order to evaluate the flexor tenosynovial swelling represented by palmar bowing of the flexor retinaculum (PBFR). The relationships were estimated using the Spearman rank score, unpaired t tests, and Bonferroni tests. DASH 2 scores indicated greater responsiveness than DASH 1, which reflected the character of CTS. DASH 1 scores were higher in patients who were affected in their dominant hand than in those whose nondominant hand was affected. The DASH scores decreased significantly in groups A and B, with the exception of C. However, DASH did not show any correlation either with the parameters, age, or MRI assessment. DASH can be used for the research of preoperative outcomes related to CTS. It also has the advantage of being useful in assessing and comparing the outcome for various other hand disorders. (author)

  11. Temporal trend of carpal tunnel release surgery: a population-based time series analysis.

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    Naif Fnais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel release (CTR is among the most common hand surgeries, although little is known about its pattern. In this study, we aimed to investigate temporal trends, age and gender variation and current practice patterns in CTR surgeries. METHODS: We conducted a population-based time series analysis among over 13 million residents of Ontario, who underwent operative management for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS from April 1, 1992 to March 31, 2010 using administrative claims data. RESULTS: The primary analysis revealed a fairly stable procedure rate of approximately 10 patients per 10,000 population per year receiving CTRs without any significant, consistent temporal trend (p = 0.94. Secondary analyses revealed different trends in procedure rates according to age. The annual procedure rate among those age >75 years increased from 22 per 10,000 population at the beginning of the study period to over 26 patients per 10,000 population (p<0.01 by the end of the study period. CTR surgical procedures were approximately two-fold more common among females relative to males (64.9% vs. 35.1 respectively; p<0.01. Lastly, CTR procedures are increasingly being conducted in the outpatient setting while procedures in the inpatient setting have been declining steadily - the proportion of procedures performed in the outpatient setting increased from 13% to over 30% by 2010 (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Overall, CTR surgical-procedures are conducted at a rate of approximately 10 patients per 10,000 population annually with significant variation with respect to age and gender. CTR surgical procedures in ambulatory-care facilities may soon outpace procedure rates in the in-hospital setting.

  12. The evaluation of vitamin D levels in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Azize Esra; Bilgen, Halide Rengin; Dürüyen, Hümeyra; Altıntaş, Özge; Kolukisa, Mehmet; Asil, Talip

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). 25(OH)D levels were checked in 108 consecutive patients with CTS symptoms and 52 healthy controls. All patients underwent nerve conduction studies and completed Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BQ) symptom severity and functional status scales to quantify symptom severity, pain status and functional status. There were 57 patients with electrophysiological confirmed CTS (EP+ group) and 51 electrophysiological negative symptomatic patients (EP- group). 25(OH) D deficiency (25(OH)D ng/ml) was found in 96.1 % of EP- group, in 94.7 % of EP+ group and in 73.8 % of control group. 25(0H) D level was found significantly lower both in EP+ and EP- groups compared to control group (p = 0.006, p vitamin D level in EP- group was lower than EP+ group, statistically difference was not significant between EP+ and EP- groups (p = 0.182). BQ symptom severity and functional status scores and BQ pain sum score were not significantly different between EP+ and EP- groups. We found no correlation with 25(OH) D level for BQ symptom severity, functional status and pain sum scores. 25(OH) D deficiency is a common problem in patients with CTS symptoms. As evidenced by the present study, assessment of serum 25(OH)D is recommended in CTS patients even with electrophysiological negative results. PMID:26939675

  13. New Developmental Evidence Clarifies the Evolution of Wrist Bones in the Dinosaur–Bird Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Francisco; Ossa-Fuentes, Luis; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Smith-Paredes, Daniel; Nuñez-León, Daniel; Salinas-Saavedra, Miguel; Ruiz-Flores, Macarena; Vargas, Alexander O.

    2014-01-01

    From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal–anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal–anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur–bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2). The distal–posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as “element x,” but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal–posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal–posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological

  14. Therapies for the bone in mucopolysaccharidoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Montaño, Adriana M.; Yabe, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Akemi; Dung, Vu Chi; Giugliani, Roberto; Kubaski, Francyne; Mason, Robert W.; Yasuda, Eriko; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Kenji E.; Barrera, Luis A.; Sly, William S.; Orii, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    Patients with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) have accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in multiple tissues which may cause coarse facial features, mental retardation, recurrent ear and nose infections, inguinal and umbilical hernias, hepatosplenomegaly, and skeletal deformities. Clinical features related to bone lesions may include marked short stature, cervical stenosis, pectus carinatum, small lungs, joint rigidity (but laxity for MPS IV), kyphoscoliosis, lumbar gibbus, and genu valgum. Patients with MPS are often wheelchair-bound and physical handicaps increase with age as a result of progressive skeletal dysplasia, abnormal joint mobility, and osteoarthritis, leading to 1) stenosis of the upper cervical region, 2) restrictive small lung, 3) hip dysplasia, 4) restriction of joint movement, and 5) surgical complications. Patients often need multiple orthopedic procedures including cervical decompression and fusion, carpal tunnel release, hip reconstruction and replacement, and femoral or tibial osteotomy through their lifetime. Current measures to intervene in bone disease progression are not perfect and palliative, and improved therapies are urgently required. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and gene therapy are available or in development for some types of MPS. Delivery of sufficient enzyme to bone, especially avascular cartilage, to prevent or ameliorate the devastating skeletal dysplasias remains an unmet challenge. The use of an anti-inflammatory drug is also under clinical study. Therapies should start at a very early stage prior to irreversible bone lesion, and damage since the severity of skeletal dysplasia is associated with level of activity during daily life. This review illustrates a current overview of therapies and their impact for bone lesions in MPS including ERT, HSCT, gene therapy, and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25537451

  15. MRI-Apparent Localized Deformation of the Median Nerve Within the Carpal Tunnel During Functional Hand Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz, Jessica E.; Kunze, Nicole M.; Main, Erin K; Thedens, Daniel R.; Baer, Thomas E.; Lawler, Ericka A.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    In MR images, the median nerve of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients frequently appears flatter than in healthy subjects. The purpose of this work was to develop a metric to quantify localized median nerve deformation rather than global nerve flattening, the hypothesis being that localized median nerve deformation would be elevated in CTS patients. Twelve patients with CTS and 12 matched normals underwent MRI scanning in eight isometrically loaded hand conditions. 2D cross sections of the ...

  16. Biomechanical analysis of load transmission characteristics of limited carpal fusions used to treat Kienböck’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gunal, Izge; Ozcan, Ozal; Uyulgan, Bahadir; Baran, Onder; Arman, Candan; Karatosun, Vasfi

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Although limited carpal fusions used in the treatment of Kienböck’s disease are thought to act by decreasing the loads on the lunate, biomechanical studies show that capitohamate fusion acts oppositely to what is expected. This experimental study was designed to resolve this paradox, Methods: In a biomechanical cadaveric study, load transmissions at the radioulnacarpal joint were investigated under 140 and 210 newtons of load with three wrist postures, namely, neutral, ulnar an...

  17. Apparent Transverse Compressive Material Properties of the Digital Flexor Tendons and the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Rudert, M. James; Goreham-Voss, Curtis M; Thomas D. Brown

    2010-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered peripheral nerve disorder caused by mechanical insult to the median nerve, which may in part be a result of impingement by the adjacent digital flexor tendons. Realistic finite element (FE) analysis to determine contact stresses between the flexor tendons and median nerve depends upon the use of physiologically accurate material properties. To assess the transverse compressive properties of the digital flexor tendons and median nerve, these t...

  18. Comparison of the Effects between Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-young Ku

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Methods : From February to September 2010, the number of patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome who volunteered for this clinical study was 16 and 7 out of 16 patients complained both hands. Total 23 cases of hands were randomly divided by 2 groups. We injected Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture on PC7(Daereung twice a week for 4weeks for experimental group(n=11, and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture with the same methods for control group(n=12. One case was dropped out due to itchiness of allergic response in the experimental group. Improvement of the symptoms was evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale, Pain Rating Scale, Tinel’s sign, Phalen’s sign and Nerve Conduction Velocity. Nerve Conduction Velocity was checked at baseline and the end of the trial and others were checked at baseline, after 2 and 4 weeks. Results : Both groups showed significant improvement in Visual Analogue Scale, Pain Rating Scale, but no significant difference between two groups. Only the control group showed significant reduction of the‘ poitive response’in the Tinel’s sign and Phalen’s sign. However, no groups improved in Nerve Conduction Velocity. Conclusions : These results showed that Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture could decrease the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Further studies will be required to examine more cases for the long period and use more various concentration and amount pharmacopuncture for the effect on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome due to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient: clinical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Daniel; Aido, Ricardo; Sousa, Marco; Costa, Luís; Oliveira, Vânia; Cardoso, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 56-year-old male patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) diagnosed during adolescence and with an insidious clinical evolution, characterised by an exuberant cutaneous involvement, referred to the orthopaedics outpatient clinic presenting with carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve. A comprehensive clinical approach is discussed, considering the natural history of the disease and its potential complications, as wel...

  20. Morphology of the thoracic limb bones in the giant anteater

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    Fabrício Singaretti de Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The giant anteater has a grayish-brown pelage with white and black tones, its skull is elongated, cylindrical, and there are no teeth. Its tail is long, with thick and long bristles, resembling a flag. This is an endangered species, due to the constant degradation of its habitat, in addition to deaths caused by fires and roadkills. Thus, this paper aimed to describe the morphology of the thoracic limb bones in Myrmecophaga tridactyla, focusing on its main bone accidents. We used two specimens of giant anteater collected on highways in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, after death due to being run over. The scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, and the hand bones showed particular characteristics adapted to the species’ lifestyle and habits. In general, the scapula resembles that in human beings and the humerus is similar to that in armadillo, the radius and ulna exhibit articular surfaces which enable a wide range of rotational movements in the forearm, the carpal bones are also similar in number and shape to those in human beings, and the fingers are well developed in the giant anteater, having long, strong and sharp claws, especially in the third finger. Thus, the anatomical description of the thoracic limb bones in the giant anteater showed to be important, providing a deeper understanding both of the functional aspects of the thoracic limb and the comparative anatomy of wild animals.

  1. 创伤性腕部轴向骨折与脱位的治疗%Treatment of traumatic axial carpal fracture and dislocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘峰; 李占雨; 刘浩宇; 魏壮

    2015-01-01

    cases of open injury underwent debridement, open reduction, internal fixation, one-stage repair of ligaments and nerves, 2 of whom needed an abdominal pedicle flap to resurface their defective skin;the other 2 cases of severe open injury had to receive secondary amputation due to complications after debridement, open reduction, internal fixation, one-stage repair of ligaments and nerves.Results Postoperative follow-ups ranged from 7 to 113 months (average, 77 months).According to the criteria proposed by the Hand Surgery Society of the Chinese Medical Association, functional recovery of the hand was rated as excellent in one case, good in 2 cases, moderate in one and poor in 3 cases.Conclusions Severity of soft tissue injury is much greater than that of bone and joint injury in traumatic axial carpal fracture and dislocation, a special type of wrist injury.Prevention of Osteofascial Compartment Syndrome and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome should be our first concern in the treatment of closed axial injury while our first attention should be paid to soft tissue injury in the treatment of open axial injury.

  2. A new formula for assessing skeletal age in growing infants and children by measuring carpals and epiphyses of radio and ulna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Stefano; Mangiulli, Tatiana; Merelli, Vera; Conforti, Federica; Velandia Palacio, Luz Andrea; Agostini, Susanna; Spinas, Enrico; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a specific formula for the purpose of assessing skeletal age in a sample of Italian growing infants and children by measuring carpals and epiphyses of radio and ulna. A sample of 332 X-rays of left hand-wrist bones (130 boys and 202 girls), aged between 1 and 16 years, was analyzed retrospectively. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was applied to study how sex affects the growth of the ratio Bo/Ca in the boys and girls groups. The regression model, describing age as a linear function of sex and the Bo/Ca ratio for the new Italian sample, yielded the following formula: Age = -1.7702 + 1.0088 g + 14.8166 (Bo/Ca). This model explained 83.5% of total variance (R(2) = 0.835). The median of the absolute values of residuals (observed age minus predicted age) was -0.38, with a quartile deviation of 2.01 and a standard error of estimate of 1.54. A second sample test of 204 Italian children (108 girls and 96 boys), aged between 1 and 16 years, was used to evaluate the accuracy of the specific regression model. A sample paired t-test was used to analyze the mean differences between the skeletal and chronological age. The mean error for girls is 0.00 and the estimated age is slightly underestimated in boys with a mean error of -0.30 years. The standard deviations are 0.70 years for girls and 0.78 years for boys. The obtained results indicate that there is a high relationship between estimated and chronological ages. PMID:26874435

  3. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in workers engaged in the assembly of manufactured products in various industries in the province of Brescia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, P G

    1996-01-01

    Tests were carried out on five manual assembly departments in a variety of different factories, in order to assess the risks associated with the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and to describe the prevalence of this disorder among exposed workers. The application of the risk analysis method proposed by the EPM Research Unit in Milan (Italy) demonstrated the presence of numerous jobs featuring both a high frequency of actions per minute and a total lack of recovery times, in addition to a variety of incongrous upper limb postures. The clinical and instrumental investigation diagnosed 76 cases of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among the 170 exposed workers. 62% of the cases was bilateral and 24% was associated with Guyon Channel Syndrome. In two of the five departments reviewed, the carpal tunnel disorders detected were endemic, and featured unusually high prevalence. The situation had been seriously underestimated by the company technical and medical staff, resulting in a failure to call for the urgent adoption of individual protection and collective prevention measures. The authors recommend that an extensive and adequate occupational risk assessment analysis be performed: the local occupational health services could play a critical role in identifying the highest risk industries and the diseases diagnosed in a hospital environment. PMID:9148125

  4. Síndrome do túnel do carpo: aspectos atuais Carpal tunnel syndrome: present approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOÃO ARIS KOUYOUMDJIAN

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Baseado na experiência eletrofisiológica do autor em 668 pacientes e em dados de literatura, foi realizada revisão sobre síndrome do túnel do carpo (STC analisando aspectos clínico-epidemiológicos e de conducão nervosa. O nervo mediano sofre desmielinização nodal ou segmentar por compressão no túnel do carpo, 3-4 cm distal à prega do punho. O complexo sintomátíco inclui dormência e fomigamento noturno nas mãos, frequentemente bilateral e mais comum em mulheres na faixa etária de 40-60 anos. São descritos casos familiares em que a herança poderia determinar ligamento transverso do carpo mais espesso. Fatores antropomórficos podem também representar risco adicional porém com pouca significância estatística. Ressonância magnética pode ser útil em casos selecionados e atípicos. São discutidos aspectos do tratamento conservador e controvérsias do tratamento cirúrgico. Na condução nervosa clássica observa-se aumento de latência distal sensitiva (segmentar e motora do nervo mediano. Métodos adicionais de sensibilização incluem latência palma-punho do mediano (misto, diferença de latência palma-punho mediano/ulnar (misto, diferença de latência mediano/radial e mediano/ulnar (sensitivo, técnica da centimetragem punho-palma com registro no II/III dedos e diferença mediano/ulnar com registro lumbrical/interósseo (motor.A clinical, epidemiological and nerve conduction studies report on carpal tunnel syndrome was done after electrophysiological author's experience on 668 cases and literature review. The median nerve underwent focal (nodal or segmental demyelination after compression on carpal tunnel, 3-4 distal to wrist fold. The symptomatic complex includes nocturnal hands numbness and paraesthesia, mostly bilateral and between 40-60 years old. Familial cases are described and the gene could encode thick transverse carpal ligament. Anthropomorphic findings could also bring about an additional risk, but with low

  5. [Bone diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:26946704

  6. A comparison of the performance of anatomical MRI and DTI in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Sung Hye [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Gwanpyeong-ro 170 beon-gil, Dongan-gu, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 431-796 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do, 200-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Bong Cheol, E-mail: hallymradms@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Gwanpyeong-ro 170 beon-gil, Dongan-gu, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 431-796 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chanyeong [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Gwanpyeong-ro 170 beon-gil, Dongan-gu, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 431-796 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Su Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 82, Gumi-ro, 173 beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do, 200-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The good parameters of both scans in CTS diagnosis were CSA(P1), FA(P1) and FA(P0). • Median nerve signal intensity and flexor retinacular bowing were not significantly different between CTS and controls. • The prestenotic swelling of median nerve of CTS was demonstrated as relatively large CSA and low FA value at P1 level. • Combination of both scans in evaluation of carpal tunnel increased diagnostic performance, and provided merits of both scans. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare the performance of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with that of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and methods: We performed 3T anatomical MRI and DTI on 42 patients and 42 age-matched controls. The median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA), relative median nerve signal intensity, and palmar bowing of the flexor retinaculum, assessed with anatomical MRI, and fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient of the median nerve, assessed with DTI, were measured at four locations: the hamate level, the pisiform level (P0), the level located 1 cm proximal to the P0 level (P1), and the distal radioulnar joint level (DR). Adding the ratios and differences of the median nerve parameters between the measurements at the DR and other locations to the diagnostic parameters, we evaluated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of all the diagnostic parameters of both scans. Results: The AUCs of FA(P1) (0.814) and FA(P0) (0.824) in DTI were larger than the largest AUC for anatomical MRI, CSA(P1) (0.759). However, the receiver operating characteristics of the three parameters were not significantly different (P > 0.1). The sensitivity and specificity of CSA(P1) (76.2% and 73.8%) and FA(P1) (73.8% and 76.2%) increased after inclusive and exclusive combination to 90.5% each. Conclusion: The individual performances of both scans were not significantly different in diagnosing CTS

  7. Value of F-wave studies on the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemdar M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Murat Alemdar Sakarya University Education and Research Hospital, Sakarya, Turkey Background: F waves are late electrophysiological responses to antidromic activation of motor neurons and are used to evaluate the conduction along the whole length of peripheral nerves. We aimed to determine the diagnostic efficacies of minimum median nerve F-wave latency (FWL and median-to-ulnar nerve F-wave latency difference (FWLD on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. Materials and methods: The electrophysiological studies consisted of sensory and motor nerve conduction and F-wave studies of the median and ulnar nerves. The best cut-off points of minimum median nerve FWL and FWLD for the diagnosis of CTS were detected for the whole study group and for different height subgroups (Group 1: 150–159 cm, Group 2: 160–169 cm, and Group 3: over 170 cm. The diagnostic efficacies of minimum median nerve FWL and FWLD were calculated for the whole CTS group and for the mild CTS group, separately. Results: The best cut-off point of minimum median nerve FWL on the diagnosis of CTS was determined as 24.60 ms for the whole group. It was 23.90 ms for Group 1, 24.80 ms for Group 2, and 28.40 ms for Group 3. The usage of these stratified cut-off points yielded a higher total diagnostic efficacy rate than single cut-off point usage (79.9% vs 69%, respectively; P=0.02. The best cut-off point of FWLD on the diagnosis of CTS was 0.80 ms for the whole group. It was 0.55 ms for Group 1, 0.30 ms for Group 2, and 0.85 ms for Group 3. Both the single cut-off point usage and the stratified chart usage for FWLD had equal diagnostic efficacy (85.1%. In the mild CTS group, diagnostic efficacy was 55.5% for minimum median nerve FWL and 78.8% for FWLD (P=0.0001. Conclusion: Median-to-ulnar nerve FWLD yields a higher diagnostic efficacy than minimum median nerve FWL on the diagnosis of CTS. However, the sensitivities of both parameters are not satisfactory for the extremities with mild CTS

  8. A comparison of the performance of anatomical MRI and DTI in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The good parameters of both scans in CTS diagnosis were CSA(P1), FA(P1) and FA(P0). • Median nerve signal intensity and flexor retinacular bowing were not significantly different between CTS and controls. • The prestenotic swelling of median nerve of CTS was demonstrated as relatively large CSA and low FA value at P1 level. • Combination of both scans in evaluation of carpal tunnel increased diagnostic performance, and provided merits of both scans. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare the performance of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with that of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and methods: We performed 3T anatomical MRI and DTI on 42 patients and 42 age-matched controls. The median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA), relative median nerve signal intensity, and palmar bowing of the flexor retinaculum, assessed with anatomical MRI, and fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient of the median nerve, assessed with DTI, were measured at four locations: the hamate level, the pisiform level (P0), the level located 1 cm proximal to the P0 level (P1), and the distal radioulnar joint level (DR). Adding the ratios and differences of the median nerve parameters between the measurements at the DR and other locations to the diagnostic parameters, we evaluated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of all the diagnostic parameters of both scans. Results: The AUCs of FA(P1) (0.814) and FA(P0) (0.824) in DTI were larger than the largest AUC for anatomical MRI, CSA(P1) (0.759). However, the receiver operating characteristics of the three parameters were not significantly different (P > 0.1). The sensitivity and specificity of CSA(P1) (76.2% and 73.8%) and FA(P1) (73.8% and 76.2%) increased after inclusive and exclusive combination to 90.5% each. Conclusion: The individual performances of both scans were not significantly different in diagnosing CTS

  9. Invited commentary on: Flexor retinaculum division: does it contribute to the success of carpal tunnel release of Krieger Y et al. International J of Ther and Rehab, March 2011, Vol. 18, no.3, p.139-42

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisstede, Bionka; Hoogvliet, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy. Open decompression of the median nerve is considered the standard surgical treatment for CTS. This article describes a study to assess and compare the clinical efficacy of operative treatment performed by transverse carpal

  10. Age dependent T2 changes of bone marrow in pediatric wrist MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabshin, Nogah [Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel-HaShomer (Israel); Schweitzer, Mark E. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    Hyperintensity of the bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences can be seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during childhood, even in the absence of bone pathology. They can be related to hematopoietic marrow, normal and abnormal bone remodeling. We sought to investigate whether hyper intensity of the bone marrow on MRI of the wrist is age-dependent and to evaluate if this signal follows a consistent age-related pattern. Thirty-one wrist 1.5 T MR images of children (7-18 years) without suspected bone pathology were evaluated for foci of hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive coronal sequences using a scale of 1-3. Correlation of frequency, location and intensity of these foci with age was obtained. Results were analyzed for distribution in single bones and in the following regions: distal forearm, first/second carpal rows, and metacarpal bases. A total of 448 bones were evaluated. Eighty-eight out of 448 (21 out of 31 wrists) showed hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive sequences. The distribution was: radius in 19, ulna in 19, first metacarpal base in 11, scaphoid in 9, lunate in 6, pisiform in 6, and fifth metacarpal base in 1. The involvement of the first and second carpal rows and the metacarpal bases was almost similar (13, 12, and 12 respectively). In the distal forearm, the intensity was similar to or higher than that in the wrist (2.2 vs. 2.0). Frequency decreased with age (100% at 7-9 and 25% at 16-18 years). Foci of hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive sequences can be seen on MRI of the wrist during childhood even without apparent symptoms. It shows a consistent pattern with maturation: frequency and intensity decrease and there is distal-to-proximal resolution. This may be a normal finding that may represent normal bone remodeling or decreasing hematopoietic marrow and should not be confused with pathological bone marrow edema. (orig.)

  11. Talking Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  12. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker for bone resorption. It is ... resorption include: N-telopeptide (N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTx)) – a peptide fragment from the amino terminal ...

  13. Imaging and treatment of a fracture of the hamate bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relatively rare fractures of the hamate bone are the most common osseous injuries of the distal carpal row, whereby fractures of both the body and the hook of the hamate occur. We present a hamulus ossis hamati fracture that was caused by direct trauma in a high-level game of underwater rugby. Although this was diagnosed by conventional X-ray, the precise position of the fracture was clearly imaged using thin-layer CT, while additional multiplanar MRT revealed further sequelae of the trauma. A CT follow-up after 10 weeks of conservative therapy did not show any osseous consolidation, which indicated the need for surgical revision with exstirpation of the hamulus. (orig.)

  14. Incidence of trapezius myofascial trigger points in patients with the possible carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Azadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS often complain of prominent pain in shoulder and arm, also there are patients that have pain in their shoulder and arm which is due to myofascial trigger point (MTP located in their upper trapezius muscle. Despite the frequency of this observation, few studies have previously sought to establish possible relationship between the CTS and MTP in shoulder area. Methods: Samples were 160 patients (221 hands consist of 130 females and 30 males, with suspected diagnosis of CTS, from March 2008 to October 2008. In this study after performing electrodiagnosis searches, another evaluation was performed to find out if there was any sign of myofascial trigger point. The correlation between these two was sought. Results: It was found that all of 36 hands with normal electrodiagnostic findings had myofascial trigger points in their upper trapezius muscle. Out of 185 hands, 130 hands (70% with electrophysiological evidences of CTS showed myofascial trigger points in their trapezius muscles. Statistical analysis revealed significant (p < 0.001 reverse correlation between the severity of CTS and the presence of MTP. Conclusions: The findings of this study imply the significant correlation between occurrence of CTS and MTP. It is suggested that clinicians consider the probability of existence of MTP in patients referred for diagnosis of CTS.

  15. Mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Zoghi, Maryam

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to investigate the relationship between the effects of median nerve strain during the elbow extension component of the upper limb neurodynamic test 1 (ULNT1) and the evoked musculoskeletal changes. 11 patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 11 matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. In all subjects, elbow extension was carried out in both ULNT1 and neutral positions of the shoulder and arm. From these two starting positions a KIN-COM(®) dynamometer carried out passive elbow extension while EMG activity of 10 arm and shoulder muscles, elbow-flexor resistive torque and elbow extension ROM were measured concurrently. The result showed that, in the ULNT1 position, increased EMG activity of the involved muscles, increased elbow extension resistive torque and pain responses occurred much earlier in the range of elbow extension in the CTS group compared to healthy controls. These findings demonstrated increased mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in CTS patients compared to healthy controls. PMID:23561861

  16. Technical advances in ultrasound and MR imaging of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare the latest ultrasound-array technology to a conventional ''high-resolution'' transducer, modified MRI technique, and nerve conduction studies (NCS), in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In 19 normal wrists and 15 wrists with CTS, US with two different transducers was performed: a conventional linear-array transducer (LA) and a newly developed Multi-D linear-array transducer (MDA) were used. The US images were evaluated determining the swelling and the flattening ratios of the median nerve and correlated to respective findings in MRI (1.5 T) and to NCS. The NCS confirmed CTS in all 15 wrists. Measures of median nerve compression (swelling and flattening ratios) were significantly different in patients with CTS and controls (p<0.01) with both types of US transducers and MRI. The MDA yielded higher correlation to MRI than the LA. Using critical values of 1.3 for the swelling and 3.4 for the flattening ratio, MRI, and US with the MDA yielded a sensitivity of 100% each. Modern imaging modalities allow for an exact diagnosis of CTS even in cases with only slight median nerve pathology. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of the scratch collapse test for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanji, H S; Becker, S J E; Mudgal, C S; Jupiter, J B; Ring, D

    2014-02-01

    This prospective study measured and compared the diagnostic performance characteristics of various clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvres for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), including the scratch collapse test. Eighty-eight adult patients that were prescribed electrophysiological testing to diagnose CTS were enrolled in the study. Attending surgeons documented symptoms and results of standard clinical manoeuvres. The scratch collapse test had a sensitivity of 31%, which was significantly lower than the sensitivity of Phalen's test (67%), Durkan's test (77%), Tinel's test (43%), CTS-6 lax (88%), and CTS-6 stringent (54%). The scratch test had a specificity of 61%, which was significantly lower than the specificity of thenar atrophy (96%) and significantly higher than the specificity of Durkan's test (18%) and CTS-6 lax (13%). The sensitivity of the scratch collapse test was not superior to other clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvers for CTS, and the specificity of the scratch collapse test was superior to that of Durkan's test and CTS-6 lax. Further studies should seek to limit the influence of a patient's clinical presentation on scratch test performance and assess the scratch test's inter-rater reliability. PMID:23855039

  18. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: interobserver reliability of the blinded scratch-collapse test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Robin D; Becker, Stéphanie J E; Ring, David C

    2014-06-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective observational study of 41 patients with a provisional diagnosis of CTS or a combination of CTS and cubital tunnel syndrome and prescribed electrodiagnostic testing. The treating hand surgeon performed the scratch-collapse test. Next, the test was administered by one of the six observers, unaware of the patient's symptoms and the diagnosis made by treating hand surgeon. The kappa statistic (κ) was used to calculate the interrater reliability between the treating hand surgeons and blinded scratchers. The agreement between the blinded observers and the hand surgeons on the scratch-collapse test was substantial 0.63 (95 % CI, 0.34-0.87; p scratch test in our sample was 32 %. In a small study with a spectrum bias favoring electrophysiologically confirmed CTS the reliability was lower than that reported by the inventors of the test, but was still substantial. We propose a larger study of patients with a greater variety of electrodiagnostic test results using fewer observers with more experience. PMID:24876682

  19. Utility of MRI Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Ma, Jingxu; Zhao, Liping; Wang, Yunling; Jia, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND After successful utilization of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in detecting brain pathologies, it is now being examined for use in the detection of peripheral neuropathies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic potentials of DTI in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). MATERIAL AND METHODS The literature search was performed in multiple electronic databases using a keyword search and final selection of the studies was based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. We performed a meta-analyses of mean differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) between CTS patient and healthy subjects. Publication bias detection was done with Begg's test and sensitivity analyses were performed to explore the source/s of higher heterogeneity and the authenticity of results. RESULTS FA was significantly lower in CTS patients in comparison with healthy subjects (mean and the difference [95% confidence interval] was -0.06 [-0.10, -0.02] (p=0.003). The ADC was significantly higher in CTS patients (mean difference [95% CI] was 0.10 [0.02, 0.18], p=0.02). Overall sensitivity of FA-based diagnosis was 82.82%, with 77.83% specificity. CONCLUSIONS DTI can be a valuable tool in diagnosing CTS. PMID:26942911

  20. The Effect of Provocative Tests on Electrodiognosis of Clinical Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Emad

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Nerve conduction study is the most sensitive test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. This test is normal in some patients with mild CTS. Median nerve conduction study evaluation after a provocative test (e.g. wrist flexion may be helpful for diagnosis of mild CTS. This study aimed to determine the effect of wrist flexion on median nerve conduction in patients suspected to CTS and in healthy subjects. Materials & Methods: In this case-controlled study, 20 patients (20 hands with clinical signs of CTS and normal routine electrodiagnosis test results and 20 healthy subjects were investigated. Measured parameters included: median nerve distal sensory latency (DSL, nerve conduction velocity (NCV, compound nerve action potential (CNAP, distal motor latency (DML and compound muscle action potential amplitude (CMAP AMP. The above noted parameters were measured before and after 5 minutes of full wrist flexion. Data were collected by filling out a questionnaire and were analyzed using Paired T-test. Results: Distal Sensory Latency increment and NCV decrement after 5 minutes wrist flexion in the patients group were statistically significant (p<0.05. The same parameters did not show a significant incremental or decremental change in the control group. Conclusion: Median nerve DSL and NCV measurement after 5 minutes wrist flexion may be helpful in determining more sensitive parameters in the electrodiagnosis of CTS.

  1. Prevalence, incidence and risk factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in a large footwear factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquelaure, Y; Mariel, J; Dano, C; Fanello, S; Penneau-Fontbonne, D

    2001-01-01

    The study was conducted to assess the prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large modern footwear factory and to identify factors predictive of CTS. To this end, 199 workers were examined in 1996, and 162 of them were re-examined in 1997. Ergonomic and psychosocial risk factors of CTS were assessed by workpost analysis and self-administered questionnaire. The prevalence of CTS at baseline in 1996 and in 1997 was 16.6% (95%CI: 11.4-21.7) and 11.7% (95%CI: 6.7-16.8), respectively. The incidence rate of CTS in 1997 was 11.7% (95%CI: 6.7-7.8). No specific type of job performance was associated with CTS. Obesity (OR = 4.4; 95%CI: 1.1-17.1) and psychological distress at baseline (OR = 4.3; 95%CI: 1.0-18.6) were strongly predictive of CTS. Rapid trigger movements of the fingers were also predictive of CTS (OR = 3.8; 95%CI: 1.0-17.2). A strict control of thework by superiors was negatively associatedwith CTS (OR = 0.5; 95%CI: 0.2-1.3). The prevalence and incidence of CTS in this workforce were largely higher than in the general population and numerous industries. The study highlights the role of psychological distress in workers exposed to a high level of physical exposure and psychological demand. PMID:11885919

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome and HIV infection. A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Reyes-Corcho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The first clinical case of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS in Cuban HIV-infected patient was described, and the scientific literature indexed in: PUBMED/MEDLINE, LILACS and BIREME were revised. The case presented was a male with HIV infection without preceding opportunistic illnesses, CD4+ T cell count over 200 cells/mm3 and clinical symptoms of pain, tingling and numbness in the right hand and wrist for three months. The electrophysiological study was compatible with CTS. The pharmacological treatment did not modify the symptoms and the patient received specific surgical treatment with absolute resolution of symptoms. CTS is a compressive neuropathy that can occur in HIV-positive individuals with as similar frequency as in the general population. The association between HIV infection and CTS is scarcely described in the medical scientific literature and probably does not represent a different phenomenon from what happens in the HIV-negative population. Nevertheless, its clinical recognition among other neurological and muscle-skeletal manifestations in HIV-infected patients is important.

  3. Epithelioid Sarcoma of the Forearm Arising from Perineural Sheath of Median Nerve Mimicking Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Fujii

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of epithelioid sarcoma in the forearm of a 33-year-old male presenting with symptoms and signs of carpal tunnel syndrome originating from the direct involvement of the median nerve. Due to the slow growing of the tumor, the patient noticed the presence of tumor mass in his forearm after several months from the initial onset of the symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an 8×4 cm mass involving the median nerve in the middle part of the forearm, and histological analysis of the biopsy specimen revealed the diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma. Radical surgical resection was performed in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy. The function of the flexors were restored by the multiple tendon transfers (EIP→FDS; ECRL→FDP; BrR→FPL; EDM→opponens with superficial cutaneous branch of radial nerve transfer to the resected median nerve. The function of the affected hand showed excellent with the DASH disability/symptom score of 22.5, and both the grasp power and sensory of the median nerve area has recovered up to 50% of the normal side. The patient returned to his original vocation and alive with continuous disease free at 3.5-year follow-up since initial treatment.

  4. Bone densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Alexandersen, P; Møllgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    The bisphosphonates have been introduced as alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The expected increasing application in at clinical practice demands cost-effective and easily handled methods to monitor the effect on bone....... The weak response at the distal forearm during antiresorptive treatment has restricted the use of bone densitometry at this region. We describe a new model for bone densitometry at the distal forearm, by which the response obtained is comparable to the response in other regions where bone densitometry...... is much more expensive and technically complicated. By computerized iteration of single X-ray absorptiometry forearm scans we defined a region with 65% trabecular bone. The region was analyzed in randomized, double-masked, placebo- controlled trials: a 2-year trial with alendronate (n = 69), a 1-year...

  5. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Rafael Inácio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184

  6. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser for cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses. Part I: Technique and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J E; Nixon, A J; Gantz, V A; Meyer, D; Mohammed, H

    1991-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser, used in a rapidly pulsed mode, was evaluated for intra-articular use in horses. Under arthroscopic guidance, a lensed 5 mm laser probe attached directly to a hand-held carbon dioxide laser was inserted into one intercarpal joint of eight horses. In four horses, a cartilage crater 1 cm in diameter was created to the level of the subchondral bone of the articular surface of the third carpal bone. In four horses, the laser was directed perpendicular to the articular surface of the third carpal bone and activated to penetrate the cartilage and subchondral bone. The intercarpal joint of the opposite carpus in each horse was subjected to arthroscopic examination and insertion of the laser probe for an equivalent time. The laser was not activated and these joints served as sham operated controls. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, then euthanatized, and the joints were examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intra-articular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling. PMID:1853552

  7. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for enchondral bone growth and its disorders. I. Normal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to discuss and illustrate the common effects on normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' is proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the non-physeal ends of small tubular bones. The last layer of development of both physes and acrophysis is the cartilaginous zone of provisional calcification (ZPC). The enchondral bone abutting the ZPC shares similar properties at physes and acrophyses, including the relatively lucent metaphyseal bands of many normal infants at several weeks of age. The bone-in-bone pattern of the normal vertebral bodies and bands of demineralization of the tarsal bones just under the ZPC are the equivalent of those bands. The growth arrest/recovery lines of metaphyses similarly have equivalent lines in growth centers and other acrophyseal sites. Nearly the same effects can also be anticipated from the relatively similar growth plate at the cartilaginous cap of benign exostoses (''paraphysis''). The companion article will explore abnormalities at acrophyseal sites, including metabolic bone disease and dysplasias. (orig.)

  8. Sickness Absence from Work among Persons with New Physician-Diagnosed Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Population-Based Matched-Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atroshi, Isam; Zhou, Caddie; Jöud, Anna; Petersson, Ingemar F.; Englund, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is common among employed persons. Data on sickness absence from work in relation to carpal tunnel syndrome have been usually based on self-report and derived from clinical or occupational populations. We aimed to determine sickness absence among persons with physician-diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome as compared to the general population. Methods In Skåne region in Sweden we identified all subjects, aged 17–57 years, with new physician-made diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome during 5 years (2004–2008). For each subject we randomly sampled, from the general population, 4 matched reference subjects without carpal tunnel syndrome; the two cohorts comprised 5456 and 21,667 subjects, respectively (73% women; mean age 43 years). We retrieved social insurance register data on all sickness absence periods longer than 2 weeks from 12 months before to 24 months after diagnosis. Of those with carpal tunnel syndrome 2111 women (53%) and 710 men (48%) underwent surgery within 24 months of diagnosis. We compared all-cause sickness absence and analyzed sickness absence in conjunction with diagnosis and surgery. Results Mean number of all-cause sickness absence days per each 30-day period from 12 months before to 24 months after diagnosis was significantly higher in the carpal tunnel syndrome than in the reference cohort. A new sickness absence period longer than 2 weeks in conjunction with diagnosis was recorded in 12% of the women (n = 492) and 11% of the men (n = 170) and with surgery in 53% (n = 1121) and 58% (n = 408) of the surgically treated, respectively; median duration in conjunction with surgery was 35 days (IQR 27–45) for women and 41 days (IQR 28–50) for men. Conclusions Persons with physician-diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome have substantially more sickness absence from work than age and sex-matched persons from the general population from1 year before to 2 years after diagnosis. Gender differences were small. PMID:25803841

  9. The best cutoff point for median nerve cross sectional area at the level of carpal tunnel inlet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Sarraf

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy. It accounts 90% of all entrapment neuropathies all over the world. Ultrasound is a non-invasive, cost effective and available para-clinical method which could be applied for CTS diagnosis. Cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the level of the inlet is considered as a diagnostic criterion in CTS cases. In this study, thirty-eight patients with electrophysiologically confirmed idiopathic CTS and 22 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventy-one affected nerves and 42 unaffected nerves were evaluated within 14 days after electrophysiological examination. The largest cross-sectional area (CSA was measured at the level of the carpal tunnel inlet and the maximum nerve perimeter was also recorded by means of the software. Mean CSA and perimeter were 14.02 ± 4.5 mm2 and 1.7±0.28m in all patients and 8.2±2.1 mm2, 1.3±0.19 m in controls (P<0.001, P<0.001. Mean CSA and Perimeter were significantly different between patient's groups and control. The best cut off point for CSA of the tunnel inlet was 10.5 mm2 with sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 76% (AUC (Area under the Curve = 0.9, P<0.001. The best cut off point for inlet perimeter was 1.44 m with sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 77 % (AUC=0.87, P<0.001. Our findings showed that median nerve CSA at carpal tunnel inlet could be used as the diagnostic criteria for CTS.

  10. Apparent transverse compressive material properties of the digital flexor tendons and the median nerve in the carpal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Rudert, M James; Goreham-Voss, Curtis M; Brown, Thomas D

    2011-03-15

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered peripheral nerve disorder caused by mechanical insult to the median nerve, which may in part be a result of impingement by the adjacent digital flexor tendons. Realistic finite element (FE) analysis to determine contact stresses between the flexor tendons and median nerve depends upon the use of physiologically accurate material properties. To assess the transverse compressive properties of the digital flexor tendons and median nerve, these tissues from ten cadaveric forearm specimens were compressed transversely while under axial load. The experimental compression data were used in conjunction with an FE-based optimization routine to determine apparent hyperelastic coefficients (μ and α) for a first-order Ogden material property definition. The mean coefficient pairs were μ=35.3 kPa, α=8.5 for the superficial tendons, μ=39.4 kPa, α=9.2 for the deep tendons, μ=24.9 kPa, α=10.9 for the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon, and μ=12.9 kPa, α=6.5 for the median nerve. These mean Ogden coefficients indicate that the FPL tendon was more compliant at low strains than either the deep or superficial flexor tendons, and that there was no significant difference between superficial and deep flexor tendon compressive behavior. The median nerve was significantly more compliant than any of the flexor tendons. The material properties determined in this study can be used to better understand the functional mechanics of the carpal tunnel soft tissues and possible mechanisms of median nerve compressive insult, which may lead to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:21194695

  11. A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY ON THE CLINICO - ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL RESULTS OF OPEN AND ENDOSCOPIC CARPAL TUNNEL RELEASE SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreejith

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare short term surgical outcome of carpal tunnel syndrome release, against endoscopic approach. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective randomized study was conducted on 91 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, who were treated endoscopically or surgically from 2011 to 2013 at KMCT medical college, Calicut . All the patients were confirmed as a case of carpal tunnel syndrome after correlating sensory nerve conduction studies with clinical findings. None of these cases responded to medical treatment and hence opted surgery. Out of these 91 cases, 71 patients were available for post - surgical follow up. On 35 cases endoscopic CTR was performed and remaining 36 were open CTR. These patients were followed up for 6 months and each patient was evaluated for symptom amelioration, complications, operation time, time needed to resume normal lifestyle and the frequency of revision surgery if needed. RESULTS: First few months after surgery, it was observed that endoscopically treated patients were better symptomatically and functionally. Wound scarring, scar tenderness and other local wound problems were significantly more pronounced in patients who underwent open CTR. R eturn to normal daily activities were more delayed in open CTR patients compared to endoscopically treated wrists. Even then there was no significant symptom amelioration, electromyographic testing and complications at the end of six months between these two methods. CONCLUSION: Immediate, short term results were better in endoscopically treated patients due to cosmetic advantages as there is less scar and early return to activities of daily living. On a 6 month review, it was found that both the methods gave comparable results.

  12. Is surgical intervention more effective than non-surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome? a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Qiyun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common disorder in hand surgery practice. Both surgical and conservative interventions are utilized for the carpal tunnel syndrome. Although certain indications would specifically indicate the need for surgery, there is a spectrum of patients for whom either treatment option might be selected. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the efficacy of surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome with conservative treatment Methods We included all controlled trials written in English, attempting to compare any surgical interventions with any conservative therapies. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2010, MEDLINE (1980 to June 2010, EMBASE (1980 to June 2010, PEDro (searched in June 2010, international guidelines, computer searches based on key words and reference lists of articles. Two reviewers performed study selection, assessment of methodological quality and data extraction independently of each other. Weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals for patient self-reported functional and symptom questionnaires were calculated. Relative risk (RR and 95% confidence intervals for electrophysiological studies and complication were also calculated. Results We assessed seven studies in this review including 5 RCTs and 2 controlled trials. The methodological quality of the trials ranged from moderate to high. The weighted mean difference demonstrated a larger treatment benefit for surgical intervention compared to non surgical intervention at six months for functional status 0.35( 95% CI 0.22, 0.47 and symptom severity 0.43 (95% CI 0.29, 0.57. There were no statistically significant difference between the intervention options at 3 months but there was a benefit in favor of surgery in terms of function and symptom relief at 12 months ( 0.35, 95% CI 0.15, 0.55 and 0.37, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.56. The RR for secondary outcomes of normal

  13. Carpal tunnel syndrome due to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient: clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Daniel; Aido, Ricardo; Sousa, Marco; Costa, Luís; Oliveira, Vânia; Cardoso, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 56-year-old male patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) diagnosed during adolescence and with an insidious clinical evolution, characterised by an exuberant cutaneous involvement, referred to the orthopaedics outpatient clinic presenting with carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve. A comprehensive clinical approach is discussed, considering the natural history of the disease and its potential complications, as well as the lack of consensus regarding standard therapeutic options for the compressive peripheral neuropathies in the NF1 disease. PMID:23853185

  14. Bone Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the knee in either the femur (thigh) or tibia (shinbone). Other common locations include the hip and ... bone that is weakened by a tumor to fracture, or break. This may be severely painful. Occasionally, ...

  15. Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a fall! If you play sports like football, soccer, lacrosse, or ice hockey, always wear all the ... to strengthen your bones is through exercise like running, jumping, dancing, and playing sports. Take these steps ...

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome in administrative workers of the Universidad de Cartagena, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedoya-Marrugo Elías Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: occupational medicine and occupational health, when they try theconsequences that have the use of the computer in special the mouse, the keyboardand the handwritten work, they have checked that with the time, it generates symptomswith the time that affect the health, labor performance and the productivity of thecompany, while they cause lesions and sequels in the worker.Objective: to determine the clinical prevalence of the Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTSbetween the administrative workers of a public university.Methods: descriptive study by means of a socio-demographics survey and clinicalmanifestations of CTS designed for the study, autocompleted and applied forconvenience to 174 administrative workers of the Universidad de Cartagena, Colombia.To those who referred suggestive symptoms of STC, Tinel test, Phanel test and pressuretest were done in the carpal. There was considered STC to the presence of painfulsymptomatology and to the presence of positive result in the three clinical tests.Results: in the study, 174 workers were included. Average age: 41.7 ± 9.0 years old.Average antiquity in the job for the women: 12.1 years old and for men 8.9 years. 31(17.8% expressed to have painful symptomatology in hands. After the applicationof the three clinical tests, a clinical prevalence of STC of 4.5% (8 of 174 workerswas estimated. All the affected workers of STC according to clinical examination werewomen.Conclusion: clinical prevalence of STC in a group of administrative workers of aColombian public university was of 4.5%. The prevalence of SCT is of large variability.Rev.cienc.biomed. 2012;3(1: 254-259RESUMEN:Introducción: la medicina del trabajo y la salud ocupacional, al tratar las consecuenciasque tiene el uso del computador en especial el mouse, el teclado y el trabajo manuscrito,han comprobado que estos con el tiempo generan síntomas que afectan la salud,el rendimiento laboral y la productividad de la empresa, mientras causan

  17. Sonography and electrodiagnosis in carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis, an analysis of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a review of the international literature concerning sonography for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Analysis of the results and comparison with electrodiagnostic data provide a sensible albeit personal view on the relevance of sonography and whether it competes or is complementary to electrodiagnosis (EDX). Although EDX is considered as the gold standard for CTS diagnosis, one author chose surgical results to define CTS. The normal and threshold mean values for sonography are particularly variable from one study to another. The standard deviation (S.D.), when compared to mean values, makes normal and abnormal data overlap considerably and produces many false negatives when the specificity is high, and many false positives when the sensitivity is high. In fact, sonography is non-interpretable in only 10 to 15% of the population, and it affirms the median nerve lesion at the wrist in 55% of cases when EDX does it in more than 90% with common tests. Further more the specificity of sonography leads to a false positive diagnosis in 1 case out of 5 versus 1 out of 40 with EDX. The main conclusion is that there is no competition but rather a complementarity between sonography and EDX: sonography is certainly an efficient imaging technique but cannot replace proper EDX performed for upper limb paresthesiae. Namely, sonography can answer only one out of the 8 questions a complete EDX answer: Are sonographic images compatible with a median nerve lesion at the wrist? The answer to this solely question can be obtain with a partial EDX using a single conduction test (motor or sensitive), then duration and cost will be comparable to sonography but will be both more sensitive and specific. Finally, one must kept in mind that the final aim of all examinations in CTS is to determine the cause(s) of upper limb paresthesiae, not simply if there is a median nerve lesion at wrist or not

  18. Carpal angles as measured on CT and MRI: can we simply translate radiographic measurements?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Stephanie; Ghumman, Simranjit S.; Moser, Thomas P. [Hopital Notre-Dame (CHUM), Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ladouceur, Martin [Research Center CHUM, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the reliability of carpal angles measured on CT and MRI compared to radiography and assess if these measurements are interchangeable. Our institutional ethic research committee approved this study. For this retrospective study, two independent observers measured the scapholunate (SL), capitolunate (CL), radiolunate (RL), and radioscaphoid (RS) angles on 21 sets of exams, with each set including a radiograph, CT, and MRI of the same wrist. Inter- and intra-observer agreements were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Linear mixed models and two-way contingency tables were used to determine if the angles measured on cross-sectional modalities were significantly different from those obtained on radiography. Inter-observer agreement was strong (ICC >0.8) for all angles, except for the RL angle measured on MRI (ICC 0.68). Intra-observer agreement was also strong for all angles, except for the CL angle measured on CT (ICC 0.66). SL angles measured on CT and MRI were not statistically different from those measured on radiographs (p = 0.37 and 0.36, respectively), unlike CL, RL, and RS angles (p < 0.05). Accuracy between modalities varied between 76 and 86 % for the SL angle and ranged between 43 and 76 % for the other angles. CL, RL, and RS angles showed large intermodality variability. Therefore, their measurements on CT or MRI could potentially lead to miscategorization. Conversely, our data showing no significant difference between modalities, SL angle could be measured on CT and MRI to assess wrist instability with a lower risk of error. (orig.)

  19. Cumulative keyboard strokes: a possible risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheriou Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contradictory reports have been published regarding the association of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS and the use of computer keyboard. Previous studies did not take into account the cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes among computer workers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cumulative keyboard use (keyboard strokes and CTS. Methods Employees (461 from a Governmental data entry & processing unit agreed to participate (response rate: 84.1 % in a cross-sectional study. Α questionnaire was distributed to the participants to obtain information on socio-demographics and risk factors for CTS. The participants were examined for signs and symptoms related to CTS and were asked if they had previous history or surgery for CTS. The cumulative amount of the keyboard strokes per worker per year was calculated by the use of payroll’s registry. Two case definitions for CTS were used. The first included subjects with personal history/surgery for CTS while the second included subjects that belonged to the first case definition plus those participants were identified through clinical examination. Results Multivariate analysis used for both case definitions, indicated that those employees with high cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes were at increased risk of CTS (case definition A: OR = 2.23;95 % CI = 1.09-4.52 and case definition B: OR = 2.41; 95%CI = 1.36-4.25. A dose response pattern between cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes and CTS has been revealed (p  Conclusions The present study indicated a possible association between cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes and development of CTS. Cumulative exposure to key-board strokes would be taken into account as an exposure indicator regarding exposure assessment of computer workers. Further research is needed in order to test the results of the current study and assess causality between cumulative keyboard strokes and

  20. Carpal angles as measured on CT and MRI: can we simply translate radiographic measurements?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the reliability of carpal angles measured on CT and MRI compared to radiography and assess if these measurements are interchangeable. Our institutional ethic research committee approved this study. For this retrospective study, two independent observers measured the scapholunate (SL), capitolunate (CL), radiolunate (RL), and radioscaphoid (RS) angles on 21 sets of exams, with each set including a radiograph, CT, and MRI of the same wrist. Inter- and intra-observer agreements were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Linear mixed models and two-way contingency tables were used to determine if the angles measured on cross-sectional modalities were significantly different from those obtained on radiography. Inter-observer agreement was strong (ICC >0.8) for all angles, except for the RL angle measured on MRI (ICC 0.68). Intra-observer agreement was also strong for all angles, except for the CL angle measured on CT (ICC 0.66). SL angles measured on CT and MRI were not statistically different from those measured on radiographs (p = 0.37 and 0.36, respectively), unlike CL, RL, and RS angles (p < 0.05). Accuracy between modalities varied between 76 and 86 % for the SL angle and ranged between 43 and 76 % for the other angles. CL, RL, and RS angles showed large intermodality variability. Therefore, their measurements on CT or MRI could potentially lead to miscategorization. Conversely, our data showing no significant difference between modalities, SL angle could be measured on CT and MRI to assess wrist instability with a lower risk of error. (orig.)

  1. A Comparison of Boosting Tree and Gradient Treeboost Methods for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülhan OREKİCİ TEMEL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Boosting is one of the most successful combining methods. The principal aim of these combining algorithms is to obtain a strong classifier with small estimation error from the combination of weak classifiers. Boosting based on combining tree has many advantages. Data sets can contain mixtures of nominal, ordinal and numerical variables. AdaBoost and Gradient TreeBoost are commonly used boosting procedure. Both methods are a stage wise additive model fitting procedure. Our goal in this study is to explain the both method and to compare the algorithm results on a neurology data set on the purpose of classification. Material and Methods: The data set consists of 4076 incidences in total. The condition of being a patient with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS or not was considered as the dependent variable. Boosting Tree and Gradient TreeBoost applications were conducted in Statistica 7.0 and Salford Predictive Modeler: TreeNet (R trial version 6.6.0.091. Results: In AdaBoost and Gradient TreeBoost algorithm, multiple trees are grown of the training data. 200 trees are produced for both models. 70 trees in the AdaBoost Algorithm and 196 trees in the Gradient TreeBoost algorithm are chosen as the optimal trees. Conclusion: The sensitivity or specify values in the test data of Gradient TreeBoost are high indicates that they can be used as a successful method in CTS diagnosis. . It is believed that the boosting methods will become very more and more popular in health science due to its easy implementation and high predictive performance.

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome and computer exposure at work in two large complementary cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediouni, Z; Bodin, J; Dale, A M; Herquelot, E; Carton, M; Leclerc, A; Fouquet, N; Dumontier, C; Roquelaure, Y; Evanoff, B A; Descatha, A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The boom in computer use and concurrent high rates in musculoskeletal complaints and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among users have led to a controversy about a possible link. Most studies have used cross-sectional designs and shown no association. The present study used longitudinal data from two large complementary cohorts to evaluate a possible relationship between CTS and the performance of computer work. Settings and participants The Cosali cohort is a representative sample of a French working population that evaluated CTS using standardised clinical examinations and assessed self-reported computer use. The PrediCTS cohort study enrolled newly hired clerical, service and construction workers in several industries in the USA, evaluated CTS using symptoms and nerve conduction studies (NCS), and estimated exposures to computer work using a job exposure matrix. Primary and secondary outcome measures During a follow-up of 3–5 years, the association between new cases of CTS and computer work was calculated using logistic regression models adjusting for sex, age, obesity and relevant associated disorders. Results In the Cosali study, 1551 workers (41.8%) completed follow-up physical examinations; 36 (2.3%) participants were diagnosed with CTS. In the PrediCTS study, 711 workers (64.2%) completed follow-up evaluations, whereas 31 (4.3%) had new cases of CTS. The adjusted OR for the group with the highest exposure to computer use was 0.39 (0.17; 0.89) in the Cosali cohort and 0.16 (0.05; 0.59) in the PrediCTS cohort. Conclusions Data from two large cohorts in two different countries showed no association between computer work and new cases of CTS among workers in diverse jobs with varying job exposures. CTS is far more common among workers in non-computer related jobs; prevention efforts and work-related compensation programmes should focus on workers performing forceful hand exertion. PMID:26353869

  3. New radiographic bone erosions in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are detectable with magnetic resonance imaging a median of two years earlier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, Michael; Stoltenberg, Michael;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a 5-year followup study, we investigated the temporal relationship between development of wrist joint erosions as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus conventional radiography (CR), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We also evaluated the risk of erosive...... progression on CR associated with the presence of MRI erosions. METHODS: In 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, MRI and CR of the dominant wrist were performed annually for 5 years. In each image set, each wrist bone (metacarpal bases, carpal bones, radius, and ulna) was assessed for the absence or...... presence of bone erosions. RESULTS: Nine bones showed radiographic erosions at baseline. Twenty-seven new radiographic erosions developed during the 5-year followup period. Of these 27 new erosions, 21 were detected 1-5 years earlier by MRI than by CR, 3 were simultaneously detected by both methods, 2 were...

  4. [Outbreak of carpal tunnel syndrome of the upper limbs in automobile seat assemblers: results of exposure evaluation and clinical investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, P G; Colombini, D; Rocco, A; Custureri, F; Paderno, G

    1996-01-01

    A group of 59 female workers in the sewing and upholstery departments of a factory manufacturing automobile seats underwent clinical and instrumental tests following reports of several cases of suspected carpal tunnel syndrome. A risk evaluation analysis for disorders attributable to repeated trauma of the upper limbs (WMSDs) was simultaneously carried out using the protocol recommended by the EPM Research Unit in Milan. Evidence was found of a high frequency of elementary actions associated with considerable muscular involvement along with inadequate recovery periods. The clinical investigation revealed an unusually high percentage of carpal tunnel syndromes, often associated with Guyon channel syndrome. This disorder affects males and females equally, is often bilateral, and is not associated with known non-occupational factors. The widespread outbreak of work-related musculo-skeletal disorders reported in the departments in question may have arisen from a combination of significant risk factors relating to the types of activities performed, and the long service of the workers. It is reasonable to assume that failure to adopt technical preventive and organisational measures may have stemmed primarily from a poor evaluation of the relevant occupational risks, and from many years of substandard health surveillance practices. PMID:9148122

  5. The effect of tendon excursion velocity on longitudinal median nerve displacement: differences between carpal tunnel syndrome patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; Wang, Yuexiang; Passe, Sandra M; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2015-04-01

    The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a viscoelastic structure connecting the median nerve (MN) and the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. Increased strain rates increases stiffness in viscoelastic tissues, and thereby its capacity to transfer shear load. Therefore, tendon excursion velocity may impact the MN displacement. In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) the SSCT is fibrotic and may be ruptured, and this may affect MN motion. In this study, ultrasonography was performed on 14 wrists of healthy controls and 25 wrists of CTS patients during controlled finger motions performed at three different velocities. Longitudinal MN and tendon excursion were assessed using a custom speckle tracking algorithm and compared across the three different velocities. CTS patients exhibited significantly less MN motion than controls (p ≤ 0.002). While in general, MN displacement increased with increasing tendon excursion velocity (p ≤ 0.031). These findings are consistent with current knowledge of SSCT mechanics in CTS, in which in some patients the fibrotic SSCT appears to have ruptured from the tendon surface. PMID:25640903

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome due to an atypical deep soft tissue leiomyoma: The risk of misdiagnosis and mismanagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriou Christos G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leiomyomas of the deep soft tissue are quite uncommon and occur even more rarely in upper extremity. Case presentation A 32-year old manual laborer man presented with a two-year history of numbness, tingling and burning pain in the palmar surface of the left hand and fingers. His medical history was unremarkable and no trauma episode was reported. According to the clinical examination and the result of median nerve conduction study (NCS the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome was established. Operative release of the transverse carpal ligament was subsequently performed but the patient experienced only temporary relief of his symptoms. MRI examination revealed a deep palmary located mass with well-defined margins and ovoid shape. Intraoperatively, the tumor was in continuity with the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon of the middle finger causing substantial compression to median nerve. Histopathological findings of the resected mass were consistent with leiomyoma. After two years the patient was pain-free without signs of tumor recurrence. Conclusion Despite the fact that reports on deep soft tissue leiomyoma are exceptional, this tumor had to be considered as differential diagnosis in painful non-traumatic hand syndromes especially in young patients.

  7. Exposure-response relationships between movements and postures of the wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome among male and female house painters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate exposure-response relationships between measured movements and postures of the wrist and the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and any modifications by sex. METHODS: In 2011, we established a historical cohort of 9364 members of the Painters' Union in Denmark...

  8. Acute effect of topical menthol on chronic pain in slaughterhouse workers with carpal tunnel syndrome: triple-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel;

    2014-01-01

    Topical menthol gels are classified "topical analgesics" and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10...

  9. Development of forelimb bones in indigenous sheep fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included detection of the sites of ossification centers and their sequence of appearance in the forelimb bones of indigenous sheep fetuses by using double staining method with younger specimens and radiography or maceration methods with old specimens, as well as, histological study with some ages. The results showed that the primary ossification centers of the forelimb in indigenous sheep fetuses appeared firstly in the diaphyses of radius and ulna, humerus, scapula, metacarpus, phalanges and lastly in the carpal bone at an estimated age of 43, 45, 46, 47, 49 - 56 and 90-118 days old respectively. The results of statistical analysis of the total lengths of scapula, humerus, radius, ulna and metacarpus with the lengths of their ossified parts through the 7th – 15th weeks of fetus age, showed presence of significant differences in the average of these measurements among most of studied weeks. Also there was a significant differences in the average of relative increase in the total length and length of ossified part of diaphysis of studied bones during the 7th week in comparison to the same average in the other studied weeks (8th-15th week of indigenous sheep fetuses age.

  10. Bone scintigraphy in Erdheim-chester disease: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, V.L.; Soares, L.M.M.; Ribeiro, V.P.B.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.L.A.; Hironaka, F.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, of unknown etiology, characterized by infiltration of foamy histiocytes. Clinically, patients usually present with bone pain, and various extraskeletal manifestations. ECD differs from Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) by radiologic and immunohistochemistry features. Case report: A 57-year-old woman presented with a history of intense pain on her left hand, besides eyelid xanthelasmas and xanthoms on frontal area ten years ago. Four years late she presented with pain on hips, legs and feet. Xanthoms spread to perioral area, mento and neck. Radiographs of the hands showed osteolysis of carpal bones bilaterally, osteolysis of fifth left metacarpal bone, osteosclerosis of all metacarpal bones bilaterally, except the fifth, and osteosclerosis of the second and third proximal falanges bilaterally. The legs showed bilateral diaphyseal and metaphyseal osteosclerosis. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake on face bone (maxilla), and symmetric intense uptake on elbows, distal radii and ulnae, hands, distal area of femurs, tibias particularly on proximal and distal area, and feet. A tibia biopsy and a biopsy of neck lesion were made. The analysis of histology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with ECD. She has been treated with a-interferon for 1,5 year, and she reports delay in xanthoms progression and bone pain remission. Discussion: ECD is an adult multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltrative disease of unknown etiology. It may be confused with LCH, however ECD have distinctive immunohistochemistry and radiologic findings. LCH shows typically lytic bone lesions on axial skeleton, whereas symmetrical long-bone osteosclerosis is the radiologic sign for ECD. LCH stain positive for CD1a and S-100 protein, and the electron microscopy of cytoplasm discloses Biberck granules. ECD stain positive for CD68, negative for CD1a and S-100 protein, shows absent of

  11. Bone scintigraphy in Erdheim-chester disease: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, of unknown etiology, characterized by infiltration of foamy histiocytes. Clinically, patients usually present with bone pain, and various extraskeletal manifestations. ECD differs from Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) by radiologic and immunohistochemistry features. Case report: A 57-year-old woman presented with a history of intense pain on her left hand, besides eyelid xanthelasmas and xanthoms on frontal area ten years ago. Four years late she presented with pain on hips, legs and feet. Xanthoms spread to perioral area, mento and neck. Radiographs of the hands showed osteolysis of carpal bones bilaterally, osteolysis of fifth left metacarpal bone, osteosclerosis of all metacarpal bones bilaterally, except the fifth, and osteosclerosis of the second and third proximal falanges bilaterally. The legs showed bilateral diaphyseal and metaphyseal osteosclerosis. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake on face bone (maxilla), and symmetric intense uptake on elbows, distal radii and ulnae, hands, distal area of femurs, tibias particularly on proximal and distal area, and feet. A tibia biopsy and a biopsy of neck lesion were made. The analysis of histology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with ECD. She has been treated with a-interferon for 1,5 year, and she reports delay in xanthoms progression and bone pain remission. Discussion: ECD is an adult multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltrative disease of unknown etiology. It may be confused with LCH, however ECD have distinctive immunohistochemistry and radiologic findings. LCH shows typically lytic bone lesions on axial skeleton, whereas symmetrical long-bone osteosclerosis is the radiologic sign for ECD. LCH stain positive for CD1a and S-100 protein, and the electron microscopy of cytoplasm discloses Biberck granules. ECD stain positive for CD68, negative for CD1a and S-100 protein, shows absent of

  12. Bone densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an x-ray bone densitometer, special calibration techniques are employed to accommodate variations. In one aspect, a bone-like calibration material is interposed and the system determines the calibration data from rays passing only through flesh. In another aspect, a rotating device carries the calibration material through the beam. The specific densitometer shown uses an x-ray tube operated at two different voltages to generate a pencil beam, the energy levels of the x-ray photons being a function of the voltage applied. An integrating detector is timed to integrate the detected signal of the patient-attenuated beam over each pulse, the signals are converted to digital values and a digital computer converts the set of values produced by the raster scan into a representation of the bone density of the patient. Multiple reference detectors with differing absorbers are used by the system to continuously correct for variation in voltage and current of the x-ray tube. Calibration is accomplished by the digital computer on the basis of passing the pencil beam through known bone-representing substance as the densitometer scans portions of the patient having bone and adjacent portions having only flesh. A set of detected signals affected by the calibration substance in regions having only flesh is compared by the computer with a set of detected signals unaffected by the calibration material

  13. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  14. What Is Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by your browser. Home Bone Basics What Is Bone? Publication available in: PDF (57 KB) Related Resources ... Men, and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis Prevention For Your Information Bone Remodeling Throughout life, bone is constantly renewed through ...

  15. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  16. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... White House Lunch Recipes The Facts About Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Kids > The Facts About Broken Bones ... through the skin . continue What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  17. Bone biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  18. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia to ... remove the bone can be done if the biopsy exam shows that there is an abnormal growth ...

  19. The value of ultrasonographic measurement in carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with negative electrodiagnostic tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyuncuoglu, Hasan Rifat [Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey); Kutluhan, Suleyman [Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey)]. E-mail: skutluhan@hotmail.com; Yesildag, Ahmet [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey); Oyar, Orhan [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey); Guler, Kezban [Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey); Ozden, Ahmet [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey)

    2005-12-15

    The diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is mainly based on clinical findings and electrodiagnostic tests (EDT). However, EDT results do not support clinical findings in some cases. It has been recently suggested that ultrasonography (US) can be used to diagnose CTS. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether US has a diagnostic value for CTS in patients with negative EDT findings or not. EDT was performed on 319 wrists with clinical CTS findings in electrophysiology laboratory. Median and ulnar nerve conduction velocities were measured in all cases and electromyography was performed in patient with tenar atrophy and having suspicion involvement of brachial plexus as EDT. Fifty-nine wrists with negative EDT (study group) and 30 wrists from 15 healthy individuals (control group) were examined using US. The mean of cross-sectional areas (CSAs) measurements were found 8.83 {+-} 3.05 mm{sup 2} by tracing method (TM) and 8.51 {+-} 3.13 mm{sup 2} by ellipsoid formula (EF) in study group, and 7.63 {+-} 1.52 mm{sup 2} by TM and 7.66 {+-} 1.42 mm{sup 2} by EF in control group. The differences between study group and control group according to both TM and EF were significant (t-test p = 0.0079, p = 0.0460, respectively). In study group, CSAs were larger than 10.5 mm{sup 2} in 18 (30.51%) and 16 (27.12%) wrists according to TM and EF findings, respectively, and in only one wrist (3.33%) in control group by both TM and EF. The differences of ultrasonographic CTS numbers between study group and control group were significant (p = 0.0024 by TM, p = 0.0086 by EF). We confirmed the usefulness of quantitative US assessment in the diagnosis of CTS in the patients with negative EDT findings. If EDT findings are inadequate to confirm the CTS in the patients with clinical CTS, US studies may be helpful to diagnose.

  20. The value of ultrasonographic measurement in carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with negative electrodiagnostic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is mainly based on clinical findings and electrodiagnostic tests (EDT). However, EDT results do not support clinical findings in some cases. It has been recently suggested that ultrasonography (US) can be used to diagnose CTS. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether US has a diagnostic value for CTS in patients with negative EDT findings or not. EDT was performed on 319 wrists with clinical CTS findings in electrophysiology laboratory. Median and ulnar nerve conduction velocities were measured in all cases and electromyography was performed in patient with tenar atrophy and having suspicion involvement of brachial plexus as EDT. Fifty-nine wrists with negative EDT (study group) and 30 wrists from 15 healthy individuals (control group) were examined using US. The mean of cross-sectional areas (CSAs) measurements were found 8.83 ± 3.05 mm2 by tracing method (TM) and 8.51 ± 3.13 mm2 by ellipsoid formula (EF) in study group, and 7.63 ± 1.52 mm2 by TM and 7.66 ± 1.42 mm2 by EF in control group. The differences between study group and control group according to both TM and EF were significant (t-test p = 0.0079, p = 0.0460, respectively). In study group, CSAs were larger than 10.5 mm2 in 18 (30.51%) and 16 (27.12%) wrists according to TM and EF findings, respectively, and in only one wrist (3.33%) in control group by both TM and EF. The differences of ultrasonographic CTS numbers between study group and control group were significant (p = 0.0024 by TM, p = 0.0086 by EF). We confirmed the usefulness of quantitative US assessment in the diagnosis of CTS in the patients with negative EDT findings. If EDT findings are inadequate to confirm the CTS in the patients with clinical CTS, US studies may be helpful to diagnose

  1. Diagnostic properties of nerve conduction tests in population-based carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnsson Ragnar

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous nerve conduction tests are used for the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS, with a wide range of sensitivity and specificity reported for each test in clinical studies. The tests have not been assessed in population-based studies. Such information would be important when using electrodiagnosis in epidemiologic research. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various nerve conduction tests in population-based CTS and determine the properties of the most accurate test. Methods In a population-based study a questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 3,000 persons. Of 2,466 responders, 262 symptomatic (numbness/tingling in the radial fingers and 125 randomly selected asymptomatic responders underwent clinical and electrophysiologic examinations. A standardized hand diagram was administered to the symptomatic persons. At the clinical examination, the examining surgeon identified 94 symptomatic persons as having clinically certain CTS. Nerve conduction tests were then performed on the symptomatic and the asymptomatic persons by blinded examiners. Analysis with receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the nerve conduction tests in distinguishing the persons with clinically certain CTS from the asymptomatic persons. Results No difference was shown in the diagnostic accuracy of median nerve distal motor latency, digit-wrist sensory latency, wrist-palm sensory conduction velocity, and wrist-palm/forearm sensory conduction velocity ratio (area under curve, 0.75–0.76. Median-ulnar digit-wrist sensory latency difference had a significantly higher diagnostic accuracy (area under curve, 0.80. Using the optimal cutoff value of 0.8 ms for abnormal sensory latency difference shown on the ROC curve the sensitivity was 70%, specificity 82%, positive predictive value 19% and negative predictive value 98%. Based on the clinical diagnosis

  2. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I;

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling of...... aged bones....

  3. Cultural adaptation of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire in patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome:A Turkish version study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilkerilhanli; Dilek Durmus; Gulhan Orekici

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cultural adaptations of the questionnaires are important for easy use. We aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the Turkish Version of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire in patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Methods: To assess test-retest reliability, the Turkish “Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire” and “Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand”questionnaires were answered by patients and controls and were repeated a week later. For testing internal consistency, the Cronbach's alpha test was used. For testing validity, correlations between the subscales of the“Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire” and “Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand” questionnaire were measured in patient groups. One hundred patients with idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and 50 healthy participants were included in the study. Results: In test-retest reliability, intraclass correlations of the subscales of the“Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire”were high. Cronbach's alphas were found to be high in all subscales. There was no significant correlation between asthetics and pain scales. We found significant differences between patients and controls regarding all subscales of the“Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire”. Correlations between subscales of the “Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire” and “Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand”questionnaire were significant. We found no difference between one-hand effected and two-hand effected patients, in terms of the “Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire”, “Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand” questionnaire Function/Symptom and Work average scores. Conclusion: This study showed that the Turkish version of the“Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire”is reliable and valid and can be used in Turkish patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome because it is comprehensible and practicable. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B

  4. Incomplete longitudinal fracture of the proximal palmar cortex of the third metacarpal bone in horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven horses, 2 to 4 years of age, were examined because of moderate-to-severe forelimb lameness, mild effusion of the middle carpal joint (3 horses), and pain on palpation of the origin of the suspensory ligament (4 horses). The lameness was abolished by anesthetic infiltration of the middle carpal joint in six horses. In four of them, a high palmar nerve block also abolished the lameness. A linear radiolucency in the proximal end of the third metacarpal bone (McIII) was interpreted as an incomplete longitudinal fracture. In one horse, distinct intramedullary sclerosis limited to the palmar cortex was indicative of an incomplete fracture confined to the palmar cortex. No osteoproliferative lesions were identified on the dorsal cortex of any of the horses. Surgical treatment with cortical screws in lag fashion accompanied by a rest period was successful in one horse. In four horses, rest for at least 3 months resulted in clinical soundness. In two horses, a shorter rest period resulted in recurrence of the lameness even though the horses were sound when put back into training. Careful clinical and radiographic examinations helped differentiate incomplete longitudinal fractures from lesions involving the carpus and proximal aspect of the suspensory ligament

  5. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of 2 different dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. METHODS: CR and 2 MRI-examinations (on 0.2T Esaote...... carpal bones. MagneVu and CR detected 100% and 89%, respectively, of large erosions (OMERACT-RAMRIS-score > 1 on Artoscan) in MCP-joints, and 69% and 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. CONCLUSIONS: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, particularly due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal...... Artoscan and 0.2T portable MagneVu MV1000 units) of 418 bones in the dominant wrist and 2.-5. MCP-joints of 15 RA patients and 4 healthy controls were performed and blindedly evaluated for bones being visible and for erosions. RESULTS: In MCP-joints, MagneVu visualized 18.5% of bones entirely and 71...

  6. Pain, depression and sleep disorders in patients with diabetic and nondiabetic carpal tunnel syndrome: a vicious cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Tanik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a condition involving nerve entrapment that often leads to chronic neuropathic pain. We aimed to evaluate sleep quality and related parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic CTS patients. Method This study included a total of 366 patients with chronic CTS. These patients’ sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. The severity of neuropathic pain was evaluated using the Douleur Neuropathique-4 (DN4 questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS. Results In the non-diabetic patient group, the total PSQI score was found to affect BDI and VAS, while in the diabetic patient group, the duration of symptoms affected VAS, BDI and fasting glucose levels. Conclusion For diabetic patients, hyperglycemia depression and chronification of neuropathic pain may lead to deterioration of sleep quality. Therefore, consideration of these parameters in the treatment may break a vicious cycle.

  7. A randomised controlled trial of absorbable versus non-absorbable sutures for skin closure after open carpal tunnel release.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Theopold, C

    2012-05-01

    We compared the aesthetic outcome of scars after closure of open carpal tunnel incisions with either absorbable 4-0 Vicryl Rapide or non-absorbable 4-0 Novafil. Patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial and scars were scored at 6 weeks using a modified Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Scores demonstrated differences only for pain, vascularity and cross-hatching between both groups, though none of these were statistically significant. The dissolving and falling out of Vicryl Rapide was significantly more comfortable than removal of 4-0 Novafil sutures, assessed on a numerical analogue scale. There was no difference in infection rate between both study groups, supporting overall the use of Vicryl Rapide for the closure of palmar hand incisions, in light of the convenience and cost savings associated with absorbable sutures.

  8. Association of a high normalized protein catabolic rate and low serum albumin level with carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Lee, Meng

    2016-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common mononeuropathy in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The association between chronic inflammation and CTS in hemodialysis (HD) patients has rarely been investigated. HD patients with a high normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and low serum albumin level likely have adequate nutrition and inflammation. In this study, we assume that a low serum albumin level and high nPCR is associated with CTS in HD patients. We recruited 866 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients and divided them into 4 groups according to their nPCR and serum albumin levels: (1) nPCR MHD patients, nPCR ≥1.29 g/kg/d and serum albumin 7.5 years were associated with CTS. A high nPCR and low serum albumin level, which likely reflect adequate nutrition and inflammation, were associated with CTS in MHD patients. PMID:27368039

  9. Effect of radial shock wave therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: A prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Ke, Ming-Jen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chih-Ya; Lin, Ching-Yueh; Li, Tsung-Ying; Shih, Feng-Mei; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Three recent studies demonstrated the positive effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for treating carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, none have entirely proved the effects of ESWT on CTS because all studies had a small sample size and lacked a placebo-controlled design. Moreover, radial ESWT (rESWT) has not been used to treat CTS. We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled, double-blinded study to assess the effect of rESWT for treating CTS. Thirty-four enrolled patients (40 wrists) were randomized into intervention and control groups (20 wrists in each). Participants in the intervention group underwent three sessions of rESWT with nightly splinting, whereas those in the control group underwent sham rESWT with nightly splinting. The primary outcome was visual analog scale (VAS), whereas the secondary outcomes included the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ), cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. Evaluations were performed before treatment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the third rESWT session. A significantly greater improvement in the VAS, BCTQ scores, and CSA of the median nerve was noted in the intervention group throughout the study as compared to the control group (except for BCTQ severity at week 12 and CSA at weeks 1 and 4) (p controlled trial and demonstrate that rESWT is a safe and effective method for relieving pain and disability in patients with CTS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:977-984, 2016. PMID:26610183

  10. Effect of Vitamin B6 on Clinical Symptoms and Electrodiagnostic Results of Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Talebi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS refers to a cluster of signs and symptoms that stems from compression of the median nerve traveling through carpal tunnel. Surgery is a definite treatment for CTS; however, many conservative therapies have been proposed. The present study set out to assess the effect of vitamin B6 in patients with CTS. Methods: Forty patients (67 hands with mild-moderate CTS were initially selected and randomly assigned into two groups as follows: 1 Case group with 20 subjects (32 affected hands receiving vitamin B6 (120 mg/day for 3 months and splinting. 2 Control group with 19 subjects (35 affected hands only received splinting. One subject from the control group dispensed with continuing participation in the research. Daily symptoms and electrodiagnostic (NCV-EMG results were assessed at baseline and after 3 months. Results: Nocturnal awakening frequency due to pain, daily pain, daily pain frequency, daily pain persistence, hand numbness, hand weakness, hand tingling, severity of nocturnal numbness and tingling, nocturnal awakening frequency owing to hand numbness and tingling, and clumsiness in handling objects improved significantly in the vitamin B6-treated patients; even so, only problem with opening a jam bottle and handling phone significantly reduced in the control group. The median nerve sensory latency mean decreased following the treatment; and the median nerve sensory amplitude mean and sensory conduction velocity mean increased. Conclusion: The present study suggests that vitamin B6 treatment improves clinical symptoms and sensory electrodiagnostic results in CTS patients, and thus is recommended for CTS treatment.

  11. Mild leptospirosis with three-year persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies, initially manifesting as carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Sehnal, Ernst; Stanek, Gerold

    2005-08-01

    Long-term persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira after mild leptospirosis has not been reported. In a 45-year-old female pet-shop worker with carpal tunnel syndrome, accompanied by arthralgias, coughing, repeatedly elevated temperature, followed by easy fatigability, personality change, memory and speech disturbance, blurred vision, myalgia and swollen lymph nodes, leptospirosis was diagnosed, based upon history, clinical findings, and serological investigations. After the described symptoms had disappeared following doxycyclin for 2 weeks, IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira remained positive during the next three years. This case illustrates that leptospirosis may start as carpal tunnel syndrome and that the severity of leptospirosis does not seem to be related to the intensity of the humoral immune response against the causative agent. PMID:16038755

  12. Clinical Usefulness of Oral Supplementation with Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Curcumin Phytosome, and B-Group Vitamins in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Surgical Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Pajardi; Paola Bortot; Veronica Ponti; Chiara Novelli

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after...

  13. Individual flexor tendon identification within the carpal tunnel: A semi-automated analysis method for serial cross-section MR images

    OpenAIRE

    Kunze, Nicole M.; Goetz, Jessica E.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Baer, Thomas E.; Lawler, Ericka A.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is commonly viewed as resulting from chronic mechanical insult of the median nerve by adjacent anatomical structures. Both the median nerve and its surrounding soft tissue structures are well visualized on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the wrist and hand. Addressing nerve damage from impingement of flexor digitorum tendons co-occupying the tunnel is attractive, but to date has been restricted by lack of means for making individual identifications of the respective t...

  14. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa Rafael Inácio; da Silva Rodrigues Eula Katucha; Tamanini Guilherme; Marcolino Alexandre Márcio; Elui Valéria Meirelles Carril; de Jesus Guirro Rinaldo Roberto; Mazzer Nilton; de Cássia Registro Fonseca Marisa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conser...

  15. Association between work-related biomechanical risk factors and the occurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome: an overview of systematic reviews and a meta-analysis of current research

    OpenAIRE

    Kozak, Agnessa; Schedlbauer, Grita; Wirth, Tanja; Euler, Ulrike; Westermann, Claudia; Nienhaus, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Background Occupational risks for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) have been examined in various occupations, and several systematic reviews (SRs) have been published on this topic. There has been no critical appraisal or synthesis of the evidence in the SRs. The aims of this study are (1) to synthesise the observational evidence and evaluate the methodological quality of SRs that assess the effect of biomechanical risk factors on the development of CTS in workers, (2) to provide an update of cur...

  16. Reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item CTS symptoms scale for outcomes assessment in carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales, Roberto S.; Martin-Hidalgo, Yolanda; Reboso-Morales, Luis; Atroshi, Isam

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms scale (CTS-6). Methods In this cross-sectional study 40 patients diagnosed with CTS based on clinical and neurophysiologic criteria, completed the standard Spanish versions of the CTS-6 and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (QuickDASH) scales on two occasions with a 1-week interval. Internal-consistency reliability wa...

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a dialysis-related amyloidosis manifestation – incidence, risk factors and results of surgical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Gądek, Artur; Drożdż, Maciej; Miśkowiec, Krzysztof; Dutka, Julian; Sydor, Antoni; Chowaniec, Eve; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common complication of dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) developing in patients on long-term dialysis therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of CTS and identify factors influencing the development of CTS in patients on maintenance hemodialysis, as well as results of its surgical treatment. Material/Methods The study included 386 patients, among whom CTS was diagnosed in 40 patients (10.4%) on the basis of signs...

  18. Individual flexor tendon identification within the carpal tunnel: A semi-automated analysis method for serial cross-section magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Kunze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Kunze1, Jessica E Goetz2, Daniel R Thedens3, Thomas E Baer2, Ericka A Lawler2, Thomas D Brown21Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAAbstract: Carpal tunnel syndrome is commonly viewed as resulting from chronic mechanical insult of the median nerve by adjacent anatomical structures. Both the median nerve and its surrounding soft tissue structures are well visualized on magnetic resonance (MR images of the wrist and hand. Addressing nerve damage from impingement of flexor digitorum tendons co-occupying the tunnel is attractive, but to date has been restricted by a lack of means for making individual identifications of the respective tendons. In this image analysis work, we have developed a region-growing method to positively identify each individual digital flexor tendon within the carpal tunnel by tracking it from a more distal MR section where the respective tendon identities are unambiguous. Illustratively, the new method was applied to MRI scans from four different subjects in a variety of hand poses. Conventional shape measures yielded less discriminatory information than did evaluations of individual tendon location and arrangement. This new method of rapid identification of individual tendons will facilitate analysis of tendon/nerve interactions within the tunnel, thereby providing better information about mechanical insult of the median nerve.Keywords: carpal tunnel syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging, region growing, digital flexor tendons

  19. Bone marrow biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  20. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  1. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors...

  2. Diagnostic values of bone scintigram for painful disorders of the hand and the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From April 1993 to April 1997, 43 patients underwent bone scintigraphic examination for various painful conditions in the hand and the wrist joint. Three hours after an intravenous injection of 740 MBq of TC-99m HMDP, wrist scintigram was obtained. Of 18 patients with ulnar wrist pain, 12 patients had positive scan. The accumulation pattern in the five cases of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome showed different patterns. Slight difference of the accumulation between the ulnar head and the ulnar styloid process was well differentiated. Each carpal bone could be well identified, but when two bones were overlapping as in the triquetrum and the pisiform, additional physical findings were helpful. Six patients showed negative scan. The two patients with positive triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) tear but with negative bone scan showed no bony involvement, whereas those with TFC tear and positive scan were the ones having some bony disorders such as ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. Of 25 patients with wrist pain other than ulnar pain, 14 patients had positive scan. The remaining 11 patients who had negative scan included three patients with occult ganglion, two with wrist sprain and six with various disorders. (K.H.)

  3. Different findings in bone scintigraphy between ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: There is an ethnic variance on the length of the ulnar and radius. In Caucasian the length of the radius is relatively longer than the ulnar, but in Oriental the length of the ulnar is longer. This difference results in the different ethnic prevalence of ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease, avascular necrosis of the lunate. It is important to differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease, because they show similar symptoms but need different treatment and different method of operation. Methods: Seventeen patients with the wrist pain were enrolled in this study (mean age: 45+/-13yrs M:F=12:5). Nine patients were diagnosed as Kienbock's disease and Eight patients were diagnosed as ulnar impaction. Three to four hours after injection of 20mCi of Tc-99m MDP, bone scintigraphy images of the both hands were obtained and analyzed visually. Results: In Kienbock's disease, 8 patients showed increased uptake in the lunate with or without other carpal bones. One patient showed photon defect in the lunate. Otherwise in all patients with ulnar impaction syndrome, increased uptakes were found in the lunate, with or without increase uptake in the triquetrum or the distal ulnar, which are related to triangular fibrocartilage complex. Pin hole scintigraphy and pin hole SPECT demonstrated more precise structure of the wrist. Conclusion: We could differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease in bone scan. We should carefully evaluate bone scintigraphic findings in patients with wrist pain

  4. Utility of bone scintigraphy in the study of hereditary disorders of the connective tissues (HDCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Collagen fiber genetic alterations predispose to pain and instability of joints, with a tendency to osteoarthritis, and may also cause fragility of other tissues. Objective: To demonstrate that Bone Scintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissues (HDCT). Material and methods: We studied the scintigraphic changes of wrists, carpal bones and hands of 22 adult patients with HDCT who were diagnosed clinically using both the Brighton Criteria(1), as well as own criteria**. We compared them to 22 controls with similar age and sex, who had a bone scintigram done for other purposes. Results: Statistically significant scintigraphic positivity was found in the areas studied in the patients as compared to controls (p ≤ 0.05), with a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 73%. There was no correlation of the degree of positivity with age, sex or type of HDCT studied. A scintigraphic positivity was seen both in patients with lax joints, as well as in those with a lesser degree of joint mobility. Conclusions: We concluded that bone scintigraphic studies are useful in the diagnosis of adult HDCT patients (including Benign Joint Hyper mobility Syndrome (BJHS) and other forms of Ehlers-Danlos). We suggest that not only hypermobility of joints, but also cartilage fragility are important pathogenic factors in the genesis of these alterations. We formulate a new hypothesis of the importance of low folic acid intake during pregnancy, as a cause for mutations that would give rise to HDCT (Au)

  5. Bone strength: more than just bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The following bone density measurements have limited utility in determining bone strength because they do not include bone quality: microarchitecture, mineralization, ability to repair damage, collagen structure, crystal size, or marrow composition. Patients with kidney disease have poor bone quality. Newman et al. now describe beneficial effects with raloxifene in an animal model of progressive kidney disease. These biomechanical measurements will be important in the development of medications to decrease fractures in patients. PMID:26759040

  6. Clinical characteristics, neurophysiological grade and outcome of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome A retrospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingxia Dang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is diagnosed mainly according to clinical symptoms, physical sign and neurodiagnostic laboratory examination. The therapeutic effect of conservative management and surgical operation in treating CTS need to be further observed and evaluated. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical characteristics, neurophysiological grade and outcome in patients with CTS.DESIGN: Retrospective case-analysis.SETTING: Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi'an Jiaotong University. PARTICIPANTS: Totally 161 patients with suspected CTS from National Neuroscience Institute of Singapore referred to the Neurodiagnostic Laboratory for the confirmatory testing between January and September 2002. The involved patients, 137 male and 24 female, were aged 21-85 years. METHODS:①The condition of diabetes mellitus complicated by abnormal thyroid function was observed.②The effect on predominant hand, and paraesthesia were observed.③Neuroelectrophysiological studies were performed and the results were graded into mild, moderate and severe CTS according to the American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM) criteria.④Conservative management and surgical intervention were followed up 3 months later, and symptoms and physical sign basically disappeared, and function was basically recovered, which indicated that disease condition improved.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①Condition of CTS complicated by metabolic disease;②Effects on predominant hand and paraesthesia;③Electrophysiological grading; ④Prognosis.RESULTS: Totally 161 patients participated in the final analysis.①Condition of CTS complicated by metabolic disease: Among 161 patients, 17.4% (28/161) were documented to have diabetes mellitus and 7(4.3%) had hypothyroidism.②Effects on predominant hand and paraesthesia: Dominant hand involvement was present in 134 patients (83.2%) and more than 75% had onset of symptoms in the dominant hand. Sensory symptoms like

  7. Bone development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.;

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effect of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administration during early neonatal life on skeletal development and function, with emphasis on bone exposed to regular stress and used to serve for systemic changes monitoring, the rib. Shropshire ram...... at 146 days of life and five left and right ribs (fourth to eighth) were removed for analysis. The influence of AKG on skeletal system development was evaluated in relation to both geometrical and mechanical properties, as well as quantitative computed tomography (QCT). No significant differences between...... has a long-term effect on skeletal development when given early in neonatal life, and that changes in rib properties serve to improve chest mechanics and functioning in young animals. Moreover, neonatal administration of AKG may be considered as an effective factor enhancing proper development...

  8. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density is the amount of bone ...

  9. Is Greulich and Pyle atlas still a good reference for bone age assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Tsao, Sinchai; Sayre, James W.; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2007-03-01

    The most commonly used method for bone age assessment in clinical practice is the book atlas matching method developed by Greulich and Pyle in the 1950s. Due to changes in both population diversity and nutrition in the United States, this atlas may no longer be a good reference. An updated data set becomes crucial to improve the bone age assessment process. Therefore, a digital hand atlas was built with 1,100 children hand images, along with patient information and radiologists' readings, of normal Caucasian (CAU), African American (BLK), Hispanic (HIS), and Asian (ASI) males (M) and females (F) with ages ranging from 0 - 18 years. This data was collected from Childrens' Hospital Los Angeles. A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been developed based on features extracted from phalangeal regions of interest (ROIs) and carpal bone ROIs from this digital hand atlas. Using the data collected along with the Greulich and Pyle Atlas-based readings and CAD results, this paper addresses this question: "Do different ethnicities and gender have different bone growth patterns?" To help with data analysis, a novel web-based visualization tool was developed to demonstrate bone growth diversity amongst differing gender and ethnic groups using data collected from the Digital Atlas. The application effectively demonstrates a discrepancy of bone growth pattern amongst different populations based on race and gender. It also has the capability of helping a radiologist determine the normality of skeletal development of a particular patient by visualizing his or her chronological age, radiologist reading, and CAD assessed bone age relative to the accuracy of the P&G method.

  10. Effects of placebo-controlled continuous and pulsed ultrasound treatments on carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Armagan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the effects of pulsed and continuous ultrasound treatments combined with splint therapy on patients with mild and moderate idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. METHODS: The study included 46 carpal tunnel syndrome patients who were randomly divided into 3 groups. The first group (n = 15 received a 0 W/cm2 ultrasound treatment (placebo; the second group (n = 16 received a 1.0 W/cm2 continuous ultrasound treatment and the third group (n = 15 received a 1.0 W/cm2 1:4 pulsed ultrasound treatment 5 days a week for a total of 15 sessions. All patients also wore night splints during treatment period. Pre-treatment and post-treatment Visual Analogue Scale, Symptom Severity Scale and Functional Status Scale scores, median nerve motor conduction velocity and distal latency and sensory conduction velocities of the median nerve in the 2nd finger and palm were compared. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02054247. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in all groups in terms of the post-treatment Functional Status Scale score (p<0.05 for all groups, Symptom Severity Scale score (first group: p<0.05, second group: p<0.01, third group: p<0.001 and Visual Analogue Scale score (first and third groups: p<0.01, second group: p<0.001. Sensory conduction velocities improved in the second and third groups (p<0.01. Distal latency in the 2nd finger showed improvement only in the third group (p<0.01 and action potential latency in the palm improved only in the second group (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that splinting therapy combined with placebo and pulsed or continuous ultrasound have similar effects on clinical improvement. Patients treated with continuous and pulsed ultrasound showed electrophysiological improvement; however, the results were not superior to those of the placebo.

  11. Surgical treatment of synovial hyperplasia carpal tunnel syndrome%滑膜增生型腕管综合征的手术治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建强; 姜保国; 陈建海; 付中国; 王天兵

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compressive peripheral neuropathy,which is a couple of clinical syndromes caused by the oppression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel.The tough of the transverse carpal ligament and thickness of its edge are the major factors in the oppression of the median nerve.Under normal circumstances,there is a large amount of tendon synovial in the carpal tunnel,which plays a role of nutrition and lubrication to the nerve. However,the tendon synovial hyperplasia,or even congestion and edema can cause or aggravate the oppression of the median nerve.Also,it will cause an inflammatory stimulate to the nerve.The major clinical manifestations of carpal tunnel syndrome are numbness and pain of three and a half fingers of the radial side.Usually,the pain radiates to the hand and forearm,accompanied with dysfunction of thumb opposition,thenar muscle atrophy and decreased grip and pinch strength.But in the synovial hyperplasia carpal tunnel syndrome,because of increased congestion at night and reflux disorder,there will be a significant night pain and numbness,which sometimes even makes the patients awake at a fixed time at night.These are the typical symptoms of synovial hyperplasia carpal tunnel syndrome. When the patients wake up,many will activate the fingers and wrists to relieve the pain,which promotes the synovial reflux in the carpal tunnel and reduces the pressure of carpal tunnel.As such reasons,there will be a phenomenon that clinical manifestations in the resting state do not fully meet the electrophysiological examination after activity.Patients who were diagnosed as synovial hyperplasia carpal tunnel syndrome were admitted to our hospital.We performed transverse carpal ligament release,carpal tunnel decompression,synovial tissue removal and median nerve release.The purpose of this study is to describe clinical characteristics of synovial hyperplasia carpal tunnel syndrome and analyzes the outcome of treatment

  12. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  13. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  14. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  15. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  16. Bone grafts in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanna Kumar; Belliappa Vinitha; Ghousia Fathima

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  17. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  18. BONE IN OSTEOPETROSIS

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    Ramkumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis, a generalized developmental bone disease due to genetic disturbances, characterized by failure of bone re sorption and continuous bone formation making the bone hard, dense and brittle. Bones of intramembranous ossification and enchondrial ossification are affected genetically and symmetrically. During the process of disease the excess bone formation obliterates the cranial foramina and presses the optic, auditory and facial nerves resulting in defective vision, impaired hearing and facial paralysis. The bone formation in osteopetrosis affects bone marrow function leading to severe anemia and deficient of blood cells. The bone devoid of blood supply due to compression of blood vessels by excess formation of bone are prone to osteomyelitic changes with suppuration and pathological fracture if exposed to infection. Though the condition is chronic progressive, it produces changes leading to fatal condition, it should be studied thoroughly by everyone and hence this article presents a classical case of osteopetrosis with detailed description and discussion for the benefit of readers

  19. Pattern of severity on the basis of elecro-diagonostic studies in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the pattern of severity in patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) presented at electro-diagnostic clinic at Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of study: Elctro-diagnostic Department of Armed Forces Institute of rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi for 6 months from 1st July 2012 to 31st Dec 2012. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and fifty hands from 96 patients, both male and female were sampled according to inclusion criteria by non-probability purposive sampling. Never conduction studies (both motor and sensory studies) were performed using Xeltec electrodiagnostic machine. In patients with normal standard testing but with positive clinical features comparison testing was performed. Results were interpreted and graded according to severity. Results: Out of total 150 hands, 38 hands (25.3%) had minimal CTS, (20.7%) had mild, 56 (37.3%) had moderate, while 21 (14%) severe CTS. Four 2.7%) patients had extensive lesion. Out of all 96 patients 54 (56.25%) had bilateral disease and rest 42 (43.75%) had unilateral disease. Conclusion: The study showed that the most frequent grade at the time of presentation to electro diagnostic clinic is moderate followed by minimal. Since in a large fraction of symptomatic population standard tests were normal, comparison testing is important for early diagnosis. (author)

  20. Motor nerve conduction velocity and function in carpal tunnel syndrome following neural mobilization: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the upper extremity leading to the functional disability. The consequence of the entrapment is the poor health of the nerve (conduction, mobility, and blood flow. Purpose of the Study: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of neural mobilization on the motor nerve conduction velocity and function in the CTS patients. Methods: Thirty CTS patients (only females were scrutinized on the basis of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. They were randomized into two groups A (n = 15 and B (n = 15 using simple random sampling. Group A patients were treated with the conventional physiotherapy regimen and Group B were provided neural mobilization. Results: The data analysis was done using SPSS version 22. The t-test reveals that there was statistically significant improvement in posttreatment values of Group B for numeric pain rating scale, symptom severity scale, function status scale, motor nerve conduction latency, and velocity at P≤ 0.05. Conclusions: Neural mobilization in the CTS patients improves the motor nerve conduction and functional status. It may be incorporated in the physiotherapy treatment protocol of CTS patients.

  1. Diagnostic Value of the Second Lumbrical-Interosseous Distal Motor Latency Comparison Test in Severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangHun; Kim, DongHyun; Cho, Hee-Mun; Nam, Ho-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the usefulness of the second lumbrical-interosseous (2L-INT) distal motor latency (DML) comparison test in localizing median neuropathy to the wrist in patients with absent median sensory and motor response in routine nerve conduction studies. Methods Electrodiagnostic results from 1,705 hands of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms were reviewed retrospectively. All subjects were evaluated using routine nerve conduction studies: median sensory conduction recorded from digits 1 to 4, motor conduction from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and the 2L-INT DML comparison test. Results Four hundred and one hands from a total of 1,705 were classified as having severe CTS. Among the severe CTS group, 56 hands (14.0%) showed absent median sensory and motor response in a routine nerve conduction study, and, of those hands, 42 (75.0%) showed an abnormal 2L-INT response. Conclusion The 2L-INT DML comparison test proved to be a valuable electrodiagnostic technique in localizing median mononeuropathy at the wrist, even in the most severe CTS patients. PMID:26949669

  2. "…you earn money by suffering pain:" Beliefs About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Latino Poultry Processing Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-06-01

    The nature of poultry processing puts workers at risk for developing neurological injuries, particularly carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Many poultry processing workers are Latino immigrants. This qualitative analysis uses an explanatory models of illness (EMs) framework to describe immigrant Latino poultry processing workers' (Guatemalan and Mexican) beliefs of CTS. Understanding these workers' CTS EMs provides a foundation for recommendations to reduce the risk factors for this occupational injury. In-depth interviews were completed with 15 poultry processing workers diagnosed with CTS. Systematic qualitative analysis was used to delineate beliefs about causes, symptoms, physiology, treatments, quality-of-life and health implications of CTS. Participants' EMs largely reflect current biomedical understanding of CTS. These EMs are similar for Guatemalan and Mexican workers. Beliefs about causes include factors in the work environment (e.g., repetition, cold) and individual physical weakness. Treatments include over-the-counter medicine, as well as traditional remedies. Most know the future impact of CTS will include chronic pain. These workers know what causes CTS and that curing it would require quitting their jobs, but feel that they must endure CTS to support their families. Latino poultry processing workers, whether Guatemalan or Mexican, have a fairly complete understanding of what causes CTS, how to treat it, and what they must do to cure it. However, situational factors force them to endure CTS. Policy changes are needed to change the structure of work in poultry processing, particularly line speed and break frequency, if the prevalence of CTS is to be reduced. PMID:24363119

  3. Acupuncture-Evoked Response in Somatosensory and Prefrontal Cortices Predicts Immediate Pain Reduction in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Maeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The linkage between brain response to acupuncture and subsequent analgesia remains poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate this linkage in chronic pain patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. Brain response to electroacupuncture (EA was evaluated with functional MRI. Subjects were randomized to 3 groups: (1 EA applied at local acupoints on the affected wrist (PC-7 to TW-5, (2 EA at distal acupoints (contralateral ankle, SP-6 to LV-4, and (3 sham EA at nonacupoint locations on the affected wrist. Symptom ratings were evaluated prior to and following the scan. Subjects in the local and distal groups reported reduced pain. Verum EA produced greater reduction of paresthesia compared to sham. Compared to sham EA, local EA produced greater activation in insula and S2 and greater deactivation in ipsilateral S1, while distal EA produced greater activation in S2 and deactivation in posterior cingulate cortex. Brain response to distal EA in prefrontal cortex (PFC and brain response to verum EA in S1, SMA, and PFC were correlated with pain reduction following stimulation. Thus, while greater activation to verum acupuncture in these regions may predict subsequent analgesia, PFC activation may specifically mediate reduced pain when stimulating distal acupoints.

  4. Association between the catechol-o-methyltransferase val158met polymorphism with susceptibility and severity of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkol İnal E

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity. In this study, we aimed to clarify the relationships between the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene Val158Met (rs4680 polymorphism and development, functional and clinical status of CTS. Ninety-five women with electro diagnostically confirmed CTS and 95 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The functional and clinical status of the patients was measured by the Turkish version of the Boston Questionnaire and intensity of pain related to the past 2 weeks was evaluated on a visual analog scale (VAS. The Val158Met polymorphism was determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP, method. We divided patients according to the genotypes of the Val158Met polymorphism as Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met. There were not any significant differences in terms of Val158Met polymorphisms between patients and healthy controls (p >0.05. We also did not find any relationships between the Val158Met polymorphism and CTS (p >0.05. In conclusion, although we did not find any relationships between CTS and the Val158Met polymorphism, we could not generalize this result to the general population. Future studies are warranted to conclude precise associations.

  5. Anorexia nervosa and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure, and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk. Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising additional concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, and hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiological estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age, given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  6. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiologic estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  7. Treatment of post-traumatic degenerative changes of the radio-carpal and distal radio-ulnar joints by combining radius, scaphoid, and lunate (RSL) fusion with ulnar head replacement

    OpenAIRE

    van Groningen, Jorg Melcher; Schuurman, Arnold H.

    2011-01-01

    Distal radial fractures are a common type of fracture. In the case of intra-articular fractures, they often result in post-traumatic arthrosis. The objective of this study is to describe a novel alternative to the established salvage techniques for the treatment of post-traumatic arthrosis of the radio-carpal and distal radio-ulnar joints (DRUJ). Six patients with radio-carpal and DRUJ arthrosis were treated with a combined radius, scaphoid, and lunate (RSL) arthrodesis and as a Herbert ulnar...

  8. [Microdestruction of the bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iankovskiĭ, V É

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the detection of microcracks in the compact bone tissue surrounding the fracture and in deformed bone undergoing subcritical loading. The portions of deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones were obtained in the form of blocks longitudinally sawcut from the regions of primary and secondary bone rupture. A total of 300 such blocks were available for the examination. All portions of the deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones showed up microcracks commensurate with the bone structures. They were actually hardened traces of deformation that preceded the fracture and reflected the volume of the destroyed bone tissue; moreover, in certain cases they allowed to identify the kind of the object that exerted the external action (either a blow or slow bending). PMID:25269164

  9. The utility of ultrasonographic bone age determination in detecting growth disturbances; a comparative study with the conventional radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test whether the conventional radiographic technique in determining bone age abnormalities can be replaced by ultrasonography. A total of 54 Caucasian subjects up to 7 years of age with clinically suspected growth problems underwent left hand and wrist radiographic and ultrasonographic bone age estimations with the use of the Greulich-Pyle atlas. The ultrasonographic scans targeted the ossification centers in the radius and ulna distal epiphysis, carpal bones, epiphyses of the first and third metacarpals, and epiphysis of the middle phalanx, as described in previous reports. The degree of agreement between the two sets of data, as well as the accuracy of the ultrasonographic method in detecting radiographically suggested bone age abnormities, was examined. The mean chronological age, radiographic bone age, and ultrasonographic bone age (all in months) were 41.96 ± 22.25, 26.68 ± 14.08, and 26.71 ± 13.50 in 28 boys and 43.62 ± 24.63, 30.12 ± 17.69, and 31.27 ± 18.06 in 26 girls, respectively. According to the Bland-Altman plot there was high agreement between the results of the two methods with only three outliers. The deviations in bone age from the chronological age taken by the two techniques had the same sign in all patients. Supposing radiography to be the method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of sonography in detecting growth abnormalities were all 100 % in males and 90.9, 100, 100, and 93.8 %, respectively, in females. The conventional radiographic technique for determining bone age abnormalities could be replaced by ultrasonography. (orig.)

  10. The utility of ultrasonographic bone age determination in detecting growth disturbances; a comparative study with the conventional radiographic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Tarzamni, Mohammad Kazem; Arami, Sara [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fouladi, Daniel Fadaei [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Neurosciences Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Neurosciences Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghojazadeh, Morteza [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    To test whether the conventional radiographic technique in determining bone age abnormalities can be replaced by ultrasonography. A total of 54 Caucasian subjects up to 7 years of age with clinically suspected growth problems underwent left hand and wrist radiographic and ultrasonographic bone age estimations with the use of the Greulich-Pyle atlas. The ultrasonographic scans targeted the ossification centers in the radius and ulna distal epiphysis, carpal bones, epiphyses of the first and third metacarpals, and epiphysis of the middle phalanx, as described in previous reports. The degree of agreement between the two sets of data, as well as the accuracy of the ultrasonographic method in detecting radiographically suggested bone age abnormities, was examined. The mean chronological age, radiographic bone age, and ultrasonographic bone age (all in months) were 41.96 ± 22.25, 26.68 ± 14.08, and 26.71 ± 13.50 in 28 boys and 43.62 ± 24.63, 30.12 ± 17.69, and 31.27 ± 18.06 in 26 girls, respectively. According to the Bland-Altman plot there was high agreement between the results of the two methods with only three outliers. The deviations in bone age from the chronological age taken by the two techniques had the same sign in all patients. Supposing radiography to be the method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of sonography in detecting growth abnormalities were all 100 % in males and 90.9, 100, 100, and 93.8 %, respectively, in females. The conventional radiographic technique for determining bone age abnormalities could be replaced by ultrasonography. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of High Resolution Ultrasonography and Nerve Conduction Study in the Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Diagnostic Value of Median Nerve Cross-Sectional Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy. This study was performed to evaluate whether high-resolution ultrasonography may be an alternative diagnostic method for nerve conduction study (NCS in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. "nPatients and Methods: 132 wrists of 82 patients and 152 wrists of controls were enrolled in the study. The cross sectional area of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel inlet and outlet in all patients and controls. All patients had a nerve conduction study. Then comparison between ultrasonography and NCS was performed. Combination of clinical diagnosis and NCS was used as the gold standard. "nResults: The mean cross-sectional area (CSA of the median nerve at the tunnel inlet was 11.4±1.7 mm2 for the patient group and 5.78 ±0.9 mm2 for the control group (P<0.001. The mean cross-sectional area at the tunnel outlet was 9.9±1.2 mm2 for the patient group and 4.7±0.7 mm2 for the control group (P<0.001. The best cut-off value of CSA at the tunnel inlet and the outlet was 7.5 mm2. "nConclusion: In patients with clinical diagnosis of CTS we confirmed that the diagnostic value of ultrasonography is similar to NCS and sonography may be used in primary evaluation of CTS.

  12. Wide field of view computed tomography and mid carpal instability: The value of the sagittal radius–lunate–capitate axis – Preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Unique insight into the assessment of mid carpal instability. • 4D CT using sagittal reconstructions along the radius–lunate–capitate axis. • 4D CT observations of vacuum phenomenon, trigger lunate and capitate subluxation. • Earlier recognition of mid carpal instability. - Abstract: Purpose: Dynamic four dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has recently emerged as a practical method for evaluating complex functional abnormality of joints. We retrospectively analysed 4D CT studies undertaken as part of the clinical management of hand and wrist symptoms. We present our initial experience of 4D CT in the assessment of functional abnormalities of the wrist in a group of patients with mid carpal instability (MCI), specifically carpal instability non-dissociative. We aim to highlight unique features in assessment of the radius–lunate–capitate (RLC) axis which allows insight and understanding of abnormalities in function, not just morphology, which may be contributing to symptoms. Materials and methods: Wide field of view multi-detector CT scanner (320 slices, 0.5 mm detector thickness) was used to acquire bilateral continuous motion assessment in hand flexion and extension. A maximum z-axis coverage of 16 cm was available for each acquisition, and a large field of view (FOV) was used. Due to the volume acquisition during motion, reconstructions at multiple time points were undertaken. Dynamic and anatomically targeted multi-planar-reconstructions (MPRs) were then used to establish the kinematic functionality of the joint. Results: Our initial cohort of 20 patients was reviewed. Three findings were identified which were present either in isolation or in combination. These are vacuum phenomenon, triggering of the lunate and capitate subluxation. We provide 4D CT representations of each and highlight features considered of clinical importance and their significance. We also briefly discuss how the current classifications of dynamic wrist

  13. Local steroid injection for moderately severe idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: Protocol of a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial (NCT 00806871

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björk Jonas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS are commonly treated with steroid injection into or proximal to the carpal tunnel. However, evidence for its efficacy beyond one month has not been established in randomized placebo-controlled trials. The primary aim of this randomized trial is to assess the efficacy of steroid injection into the carpal tunnel in relieving symptoms of CTS in patients with symptoms of such severity to warrant surgical treatment but have not been treated with steroid injection. Methods/Design The study is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Patients referred to one orthopedic department because of CTS are screened. Eligibility criteria are age 18 to 70 years, clinical diagnosis of primary idiopathic CTS and abnormal nerve conduction tests or clinical diagnosis made independently by two orthopedic surgeons, failed treatment with wrist splinting, symptom severity of such magnitude that the patient is willing to undergo surgery, no severe sensory loss or thenar muscle atrophy, and no previous steroid injection for CTS. A total of 120 patients will be randomized to injection of 80 mg Methylprednisolone, 40 mg Methylprednisolone, or normal saline, each also containing 10 mg Lidocaine. Evaluation at baseline and at 5, 10, 24 and 52 weeks after injection includes validated questionnaires (CTS symptom severity scale, QuickDASH and SF-6D, adverse events, physical examination by a blinded assessor, and nerve conduction tests. The primary outcome measures are change in the CTS symptom severity score at 10 weeks and the rate of surgery at 52 weeks. The secondary outcome measures are the score change in the CTS symptom severity scale at 52 weeks, time to surgery, and change in QuickDASH and SF-6D scores and patient satisfaction at 10 and 52 weeks. The primary analysis will be carried out using mixed model analysis of repeated measures. Discussion This paper describes the rationale and

  14. Wide field of view computed tomography and mid carpal instability: The value of the sagittal radius–lunate–capitate axis – Preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repse, Stephen E., E-mail: stephrep@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Health, VIC (Australia); Koulouris, George, E-mail: GeorgeK@melbourneradiology.com.au [Melbourne Radiology Clinic, Ground Floor, 3-6/100 Victoria Parade, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Centre for Orthopaedic Research, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Troupis, John M., E-mail: john.troupis@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Monash Health and Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, Monash University, VIC (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Unique insight into the assessment of mid carpal instability. • 4D CT using sagittal reconstructions along the radius–lunate–capitate axis. • 4D CT observations of vacuum phenomenon, trigger lunate and capitate subluxation. • Earlier recognition of mid carpal instability. - Abstract: Purpose: Dynamic four dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has recently emerged as a practical method for evaluating complex functional abnormality of joints. We retrospectively analysed 4D CT studies undertaken as part of the clinical management of hand and wrist symptoms. We present our initial experience of 4D CT in the assessment of functional abnormalities of the wrist in a group of patients with mid carpal instability (MCI), specifically carpal instability non-dissociative. We aim to highlight unique features in assessment of the radius–lunate–capitate (RLC) axis which allows insight and understanding of abnormalities in function, not just morphology, which may be contributing to symptoms. Materials and methods: Wide field of view multi-detector CT scanner (320 slices, 0.5 mm detector thickness) was used to acquire bilateral continuous motion assessment in hand flexion and extension. A maximum z-axis coverage of 16 cm was available for each acquisition, and a large field of view (FOV) was used. Due to the volume acquisition during motion, reconstructions at multiple time points were undertaken. Dynamic and anatomically targeted multi-planar-reconstructions (MPRs) were then used to establish the kinematic functionality of the joint. Results: Our initial cohort of 20 patients was reviewed. Three findings were identified which were present either in isolation or in combination. These are vacuum phenomenon, triggering of the lunate and capitate subluxation. We provide 4D CT representations of each and highlight features considered of clinical importance and their significance. We also briefly discuss how the current classifications of dynamic wrist

  15. Incidence rates of in-hospital carpal tunnel syndrome in the general population and possible associations with marital status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani Carla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a socially relevant condition associated with biomechanical risk factors. We evaluated age-sex-specific incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS in central/northern Italy and explored relations with marital status. Methods Seven regions were considered (overall population, 14.9 million over 3–6-year periods between 1997 and 2002 (when out-of-hospital CTS surgery was extremely rare. Incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS were estimated based on 1 codified demographic, diagnostic and intervention data in obligatory discharge records from all Italian public/private hospitals, archived (according to residence on regional databases; 2 demographic general population data for each region. We compared (using the χscore test age-sex-specific rates between married, unmarried, divorced and widowed subsets of the general population. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for married/unmarried men and women. Results Age-standardized incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years of in-hospital cases of CTS were 166 in women and 44 in men (106 overall. Married subjects of both sexes showed higher age-specific rates with respect to unmarried men/women. SIRs were calculated comparing married vs unmarried rates of both sexes: 1.59 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.57–1.60 in women, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.40–1.45 in men. As compared with married women/men, widows/widowers both showed 2–3-fold higher incidence peaks during the fourth decade of life (beyond 50 years of age, widowed subjects showed similar trends to unmarried counterparts. Conclusion This large population-based study illustrates distinct age-related trends in men and women, and also raises the question whether marital status could be associated with CTS in the general population.

  16. Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on adaptation of multi-digit forces to object weight for whole-hand manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available The delicate tuning of digit forces to object properties can be disrupted by a number of neurological and musculoskeletal diseases. One such condition is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve that causes sensory and motor deficits in a subset of digits in the hand. Whereas the effects of CTS on median nerve physiology are well understood, the extent to which it affects whole-hand manipulation remains to be addressed. CTS affects only the lateral three and a half digits, which raises the question of how the central nervous system integrates sensory feedback from affected and unaffected digits to plan and execute whole-hand object manipulation. We addressed this question by asking CTS patients and healthy controls to grasp, lift, and hold a grip device (445, 545, or 745 g for several consecutive trials. We found that CTS patients were able to successfully adapt grip force to object weight. However, multi-digit force coordination in patients was characterized by lower discrimination of force modulation to lighter object weights, higher across-trial digit force variability, the consistent use of excessively large digit forces across consecutive trials, and a lower ability to minimize net moments on the object. Importantly, the mechanical requirement of attaining equilibrium of forces and torques caused CTS patients to exert excessive forces at both CTS-affected digits and digits with intact sensorimotor capabilities. These findings suggest that CTS-induced deficits in tactile sensitivity interfere with the formation of accurate sensorimotor memories of previous manipulations. Consequently, CTS patients use compensatory strategies to maximize grasp stability at the expense of exerting consistently larger multi-digit forces than controls. These behavioral deficits might be particularly detrimental for tasks that require fine regulation of fingertip forces for manipulating light or fragile objects.

  17. [Palmar wrist arthroscopy for evaluation of concomitant carpal lesions in operative treatment of distal intraarticular radius fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohendorff, B; Eck, M; Mühldorfer, M; Fodor, S; Schmitt, R; Prommersberger, K-J

    2009-10-01

    Fractures of the distal radius, which currently are treated with palmar locking plates, are often accompanied by carpal lesions. Tears of the scapholunate interosseus ligament (SL) can affect the outcome. Between January 2007 and May 2008, 28 patients with distal intraarticular fractures of the radius were included in a prospective study. Preoperative CT-arthrography was performed. SL tears were found in 11 patients, with 10 partial and one complete rupture observed. A tear of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) was detected in 16 patients. Every patient was operated with a palmar locking plate through a palmar approach between the flexor carpi radialis tendon and the radial artery. Then, a palmar wrist arthroscopy using a palmar portal was performed. Eleven SL tears with 9 partial and two total ruptures were diagnosed by arthroscopy. Ten lesions were associated with a C1-fracture with a fracture line projected onto the scapholunate interval. The TFCC was appraisable by palmar wrist arthroscopy only in 4 patients. Three of the SL tears detected by CT-arthrography could not be confirmed by palmar wrist arthroscopy. One complete rupture and one partial lesion confirmed by palmar wrist arthroscopy were found by CT-arthrography to be intact. Palmar wrist arthroscopy affords certainty when assessing the SL ligament. In this study, an assessment of ulnocarpal structures was not possible. For assessment of the ulnocarpal structures, CT-arthrography was superior to palmar wrist arthroscopy. However, the latter is an alternative during emergency treatment or when CT-arthrography is not available. PMID:19790024

  18. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with bone cancer. Accurate diagnosis of a bone tumor often depends on combining information about its location (what bone is affected and even which part of the bone is involved), appearance on x-rays, and appearance under a microscope. ...

  19. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphoma , and myeloma can be treated with a bone marrow transplant . This is now often called a stem cell ... are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. " ...

  20. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cadavers. The types of allograft bone used for spine surgery include fresh frozen and lyophilized (freeze dried). The ... the most common uses of bone grafts in spine surgery is during spinal fusion. The use of autogenous ...

  1. Bone Loss in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DENSITY? Although bone seems as hard as a rock, it’s actually living tissue. Throughout your life, old ... available Bone Loss (.pdf) File: 290 KB 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017 | 800- ...

  2. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paula FJA, Black DM, Rosen CJ. Osteoporosis and bone biology.In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, ... Bone-density testing interval and transition to osteoporosis in ...

  3. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures. Peripheral DEXA ( ...

  4. Smoking and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It has been called a childhood disease with old age consequences because building healthy bones in youth helps ... stronger. Weight-bearing exercise that forces you to work against gravity is the best exercise for bone. ...

  5. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological p...

  6. Eating disorders and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Dale; Morgan, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a frequent and often-overlooked consequence of eating disorders, in particular anorexia nervosa and eating disorders associated with the female athlete triad. The causes of low BMD are multifactorial and include low peak bone mass accrual, accelerated bone resorption, and changes in bone microarchitecture. Early diagnosis and interventions focused on nutritional rehabilitation and weight gain reduce the risk of further BMD deficits and fractures. PMID:24094471

  7. Bone densitometry and osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to provide a perspective on the current status of bone densitometry and its relevance to osteoporosis diagnosis and management. Therefore, this book will give the reader an introduction to the nature of osteoporosis, its pathophysiology and epidemiology, and the clinical consequences of performing bone densitometry. Aside from standard bone densitometry, newer technologies such as quantitative ultrasound techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and bone structure analysis are discussed in the context of diagnosing osteoporosis. (orig.)

  8. BONE MECHANOTRANSDUCTION: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela e Silva, Fernando; Queiroga, Cristina; Lucena, Sónia; Potes, José

    2011-01-01

    This review focus on the bone physiology and mechanotransduction elements and mechanisms. Bone biology and architecture is deeply related to the mechanical environment. Orthopaedic implants cause profound changes in the biomechanics and electrophysiology of the skeleton. In the context of biomedical engineering, a deep reflexion on bone physiology and electromechanics is needed. Strategic development of new biomaterials and devices that respect and promote continuity with bone str...

  9. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  10. Load transfer through the radiocarpal joint and the effects of partial wrist arthrodesis on carpal bone behaviour: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gíslason, M K; Stansfield, B; Bransby-Zachary, M; Hems, T; Nash, D H

    2012-11-01

    A finite element model of the wrist was developed to simulate mechanical changes that occur after surgery of the wrist. After partial arthrodesis, the wrist will experience altered force transmission during loading. Three different types of partial arthrodesis were investigated - radiolunate, radioscaphoid, and radioscapholunate - and compared with the healthy untreated wrist. The results showed that the compressive forces on the radiocarpal joint decreased compared with the untreated wrist with both radiolunate and radioscaphoid fusions. The load transmission through the midcarpal joints varied depending on arthrodesis type. The forces in the extrinsic ligaments decreased with the fusion, most noticeably in the dorsal radiotriquetral ligament, but increased in the dorsal scaphotriquetral ligament. From the results of the study it can be concluded that the radioscapholunate fusion shows the most biomechanically similar behaviour out of the three fusion types compared with the healthy wrist. The modelling described in this paper may be a useful approach to pre-operative planning in wrist surgery. PMID:22457257

  11. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet & Menopause Bone Loss How are bone loss and menopause related? Throughout life your body keeps a balance between the loss ... The sooner you take steps to prevent bone loss, the lower your risk of osteoporosis later in life. If you are skipping menstrual periods, have had ...

  12. What's a Funny Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes What's a Funny Bone? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's a Funny Bone? Print A A A Text Size Have you ... prickly kind of dull pain? That's your funny bone! It doesn't really hurt as much as ...

  13. Neuroconduccion of the medium nerve in the carpal tunnel in data-entry personnel of two companies of telecommunications. Medellín. October-November 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. De Subiría

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: This study was carried out in order to know the comportment of the median nerve’s impulse speed at the carpal tunnel associated to the exposure time to the fingers’ repetitive motion risk factor. Methodology: This study was applied to data-entry personnel at two companies in the city of Medellin, Colombia, during October and November of 2005. Age, gender, labour exposure time, dominant hand and pathological antecedents associated to the carpal tunnel syndrome variables were investigated. Clinical test and a median nerve conduction test were applied to the workers. Discussion: 55 data-entry workers were evaluated, for a total of 110 hands. The survey included ages between 19 and 40 years old and an average age of 28; 86% of the studied subjects were women; 91% of surveyed subjects declared themselves as right-handed and 60% had a normal weight. Subjects had worked between 12 and 180 months as data-entry personnel with an average time of 83 months, working 48 hours a week. No relevant statistical link was found between labour exposure time and median nerve conduction. Results suggest that doing repetitive movements at work as the only risk factor is not a cause of nerve conduction disorder in the median nerve.

  14. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær;

    2015-01-01

    afterwards macerated by one of the two methods. DNA extraction was performed to see the effect of the macerations on DNA preservation. Furthermore, the bone pieces were examined in a stereomicroscope to assess for any bone damage. The results demonstrated that both methods removed all flesh/soft tissue from...... the bones. The DNA analysis showed that DNA was preserved on all the pieces of bones which were examined. Finally, the investigation suggests that enzyme maceration could be gentler on the bones, as the edges appeared less frayed. The enzyme maceration was also a quicker method; it took three hours...

  15. Tin in Human Bones

    OpenAIRE

    Jambor, Jaroslav; Smreka, Vâclav

    1993-01-01

    TIN IN HUMAN BONES. The tin content in the bones of 149 skeletons from the 1st - 5th centuries A.D., and of 11 individuals of the recent population was determined. The bone samples were carbonized and analyzed through emission spectroscopy with a.c. excitation. The tin content in bones of recent populations not exposed to extra tin supply is about one order of magnitude higher than is the case with the bones od some populations that lived at the beginning of our era. The distribut...

  16. Bone stress injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone stress injuries are due to cyclical overuse of the bone. They are relatively common in athletes and military recruits but also among otherwise healthy people who have recently started new or intensive physical activity. Diagnosis of bone stress injuries is based on the patient's history of increased physical activity and on imaging findings. The general symptom of a bone stress injury is stress-related pain. Bone stress injuries are difficult to diagnose based only on a clinical examination because the clinical symptoms may vary depending on the phase of the pathophysiological spectrum in the bone stress injury. Imaging studies are needed to ensure an early and exact diagnosis, because if the diagnosis is not delayed most bone stress injuries heal well without complications

  17. 特发性腕管综合征马鞍形腕横韧带的MRI特征%Idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome:a saddle-spaded transverse carpal ligament and its ;significances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏萱; 徐雷鸣

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨特发性腕管综合征(CTS)患者鞍状腕横韧带的MRI特征。方法回顾性分析经临床诊断为特发性CTS的21例患者(22个腕关节)作为特发性CTS组;无腕管综合征症状且无腕横韧带及其掌侧软组织病变的32例其他腕部疾病患者(33个腕关节)作为对照组。均行矢状面、横轴面腕关节MRI平扫。观察腕横韧带形态,判断腕横韧带是否为马鞍形,并计算腕横韧带掌凹曲率和正中神经压缩率。采用χ2检验比较2组患者腕横韧带形态的差异,采用非参数秩和检验比较2组患者腕横韧带掌凹曲率的差异,采用Pearson相关分析评价特发性CTS患者腕横韧带掌凹曲率与正中神经的压缩率的相关性。结果特发性CTS患者矢状面像上,马鞍形腕横韧带向掌侧凹,最凹点常位于钩骨钩水平。以马鞍形腕横韧带下凹0.25 mm为标准,马鞍形腕横韧带31例(特发性CTS患者20例、对照组11例),非马鞍形腕横韧带24例(特发性CTS 2例,对照组22例),2组患者腕横韧带形态的差异有统计学意义(χ2=17.791,P<0.01)。特发性CTS和对照组患者的腕横韧带掌凹曲率中位数分别为8.49%和0.00%,差异有统计学意义(Z=-4.79,P<0.01)。特发性CTS患者正中神经层面,腕横韧带掌凹曲率[(7.88±4.28)%)]与正中神经压缩率[(39.36±19.43)%]呈正相关(r=0.714,P<0.01)。结论马鞍形腕横韧带是特发性CTS患者的特征表现,腕横韧带矢状面掌凹屈率和正中神经压缩百分比有助于精确诊断。%Objective To explore the MRI characteristics of saddle transverse carpal ligament (TCL)of patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods The clinical diagnosis of 21 cases of idiopathic CTS patients (22 wrists) were retrospectively analyzed and as the idiopathic CTS group. Thirty two patients without CTS symptoms or TCL and volar soft tissue lesions (33 wrist

  18. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for understanding enchondral bone growth and its disorders. II. Abnormal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to discuss and illustrate the effects common to normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' was proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the nonphyseal ends of small tubular bones. Abnormalities at acrophyseal sites are analogous to those at the physeal growth plates and their metaphyses. For example, changes relating to the zone of provisional calcification (ZPC) are often important to the demonstration of such similarities. Lead lines were an early example of the concept of analogy from abnormality due to physeal and to acrophyseal disturbance. The ZPC is a key factor in understanding patterns of rickets and its healing. Examples (including hypothyroidism, scurvy and other osteoporosis, Ollier disease, achondroplasia, and osteopetrosis, as well as the family of frostbite, Kashin-Beck disease, and rat bite fever) illustrate the acrophysis principle and in turn their manifestations are explained by that principle. (orig.)

  19. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for understanding enchondral bone growth and its disorders. II. Abnormal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, Alan E. [Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, OH 45229-3039, Cincinnati (United States)

    2004-03-01

    In order to discuss and illustrate the effects common to normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' was proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the nonphyseal ends of small tubular bones. Abnormalities at acrophyseal sites are analogous to those at the physeal growth plates and their metaphyses. For example, changes relating to the zone of provisional calcification (ZPC) are often important to the demonstration of such similarities. Lead lines were an early example of the concept of analogy from abnormality due to physeal and to acrophyseal disturbance. The ZPC is a key factor in understanding patterns of rickets and its healing. Examples (including hypothyroidism, scurvy and other osteoporosis, Ollier disease, achondroplasia, and osteopetrosis, as well as the family of frostbite, Kashin-Beck disease, and rat bite fever) illustrate the acrophysis principle and in turn their manifestations are explained by that principle. (orig.)

  20. Bone tumors: Nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tumors represent approximately 5% of childhood malignancies. osteosarcoma is the primary malignant bone tumor, accounting for 60% of cancer with peak incidence in the 2nd decade of life. Ewing's sarcoma is the second most common bone cancer with peak at a slightly younger age. This presentation discusses similarities and differences in the diagnosis and treatment of these two malignancies. Diagnostic procedures include plain radiographs, CT and MRI of the primary site, plain x-ray and CT of the chest, bone scan, and biopsy of the primary tumor. For patients diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma, a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy will also be required. Our current approach to the treatment of bone tumors includes preoperative combination chemotherapy and en bloc surgical removal of the tumor followed by postoperative chemotherapy. In the case of Ewing's sarcoma, radiation therapy may be employed in addition to surgery, if margins are questionable of instead of surgery, if the tumor is not resectable

  1. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  2. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  3. Bone fractures after menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Barlow, David H.; Bouchard, Philippe; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Evers, J.L.H.; Glasier, A.; Negri, Eva; Papapoulos, Socrates E; Ralston, Stuart H; Rizzoli, Rene; Baird, D T; Collins, J.; G. Benagiano; P.G. Crosignani; La Vecchia, C.; Volpe, A

    2010-01-01

    Every year 30% of individuals above age 65 fall, and falls are the principal cause of bone fractures. To reduce fracture incidence requires both prevention of falls and maintenance of bone strength.PubMed searches were performed, for studies of the epidemiology of fractures, bone physiology, endocrine effects, osteoporosis measurement, genetics, prevention and effectiveness. Topic summaries were presented to the Workshop Group and omissions or disagreements were resolved by discussion.Ageing ...

  4. Bone Regeneration in Odontostomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, P; Duvina, M.; Brancato, L.; Delle Rose, G.; Biondi, E.; Civitelli, V.

    2010-01-01

    Maxillary edentulism, together with periodontal disease, is the condition that most frequently induces disruption of alveolar bone tissue. Indeed, the stimulus of the periodontal ligament is lost and the local bone tissue becomes subject to resorption processes that, in the six months following the loss of the tooth, result in alveolar defects or more extensive maxillary atrophy. In both cases, loss of vestibular cortical bone is followed by reduction in the vertical dimension of the alveolar...

  5. Percutaneous Bone Tumor Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Interventional radiology plays a major role in the management of bone tumors. Many different percutaneous techniques are available. Some aim to treat pain and consolidate a pathological bone (cementoplasty); others aim to ablate tumor or reduce its volume (sclerotherapy, thermal ablation). In this article, image-guided techniques of primary and secondary bone tumors with vertebroplasty, ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, laser photocoagulation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ioniza...

  6. Imaging of Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sopo; Ouyang, Tao; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow is the essential for function of hematopoiesis, which is vital for the normal functioning of the body. Bone marrow disorders or dysfunctions may be evaluated by blood workup, peripheral smears, marrow biopsy, plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), MRI and nuclear medicine scan. It is important to distinguish normal spinal marrow from pathology to avoid missing a pathology or misinterpreting normal changes, either of which may result in further testing and increased health care costs. This article focuses on the diffuse bone marrow pathologies, because the majority of the bone marrow pathologies related to hematologic disorders are diffuse. PMID:27444005

  7. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  8. Bone marrow fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  9. The use of dynamic bone scanning in the evaluation of wrist and hand pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-seven patients with complaints of wrist and/or hand pain were evaluated using a quantitative technique of dynamic (blood flow analysis) and static bone scan. The patients were divided in two groups according to their clinical history. Group A included 13 patients with a history of trauma. Seven patients had scaphoid fracture and 6 of them were scanned to determine non-union and/or avascular necrosis of the joint. One patient was scanned to determine the viability of a graft for non-union fracture. In all cases the scan gave a correct diagnosis as confirmed by later x-ray changes. Six patients in this group had negative x-rays. The scan demonstrated 4 cases of occult fractures, 4 had early Kienbock's Disease (KD) and 1 a soft tissue tumor. Group B included 14 patients with no known history of trauma. Nine had positive x-rays including 3 with KD that were scanned to determine their viability for surgical replacement of the lunate. The scan could distinguish between isolated involvement of the lunate and secondary degenerative changes of the surrounding carpal bones and radiocarpal joint. Two patients with tumor were correctly diagnosed by the scan, one as benign and one malignant. Four other patients with nonspecific changes on x-ray showed early arthritis (3 cases) and a cyst of the triquetrum ( 1 case) on the bone scan. Four patients in Group B had negative x-rays and the scan showed degenerative changes (3 cases) and an occult fracture of the hamate (1 case). The use of dynamic and static bone scanning appears to be a very valuable technique in the evaluation of patients with wrist and hand pain

  10. Management of scaphoid nonunion with avascular necrosis using 1,2 intercompartmental supraretinacular arterial bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Dehghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: 1,2 ICSRA, introduced by Aidembery et al., is a well-established technique, with up to 100% union rate among different studies . The purpose of our study was to evaluate the outcome of scaphoid nonunion undergoing 1,2 ICSRA bone graft in Iran. Materials and Methods: All participants who presented sequentially over a period of 24 months between 2010 and 2013 with nonunion scaphoid fracture with AVN in proximal pole were included in the study. Anteroposterior and lateral view plain radiographs of carpal bones were obtained for diagnosis of nonunion, and a diagnosis of avascular necrosis was made by MRI of the scaphoid. Subjects underwent 1,2 ICSRA bone graft surgery. Patients were assessed based on radiographs and the Mayo Wrist Score (MWS questionnaire on before and after surgery. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 18 by paired t test. Results: Overall, 16 patients (100% male were included in the study. Mean age of subjects was 27.50 ± 5.86 (18 to 38. Mean Mayo score was 36.63 ± 8.92 and 83.75 ± 9.22 before and 6 month after surgery, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001. after 8 weeks, 10 (62.5% had union, and after 12 weeks, all subjects had union. Nine (56.25% of our patients had excellent functional outcome, 5 (31.25% had good and 2 (12.5% had satisfactory functional outcome. Conclusion: 1,2 ICSRA is a proper pedicle of vascularized bone graft due to the ease of visibility and dissection. The functional results and union rates were satisfactory in our study.

  11. Extraskeletal and intraskeletal new bone formation induced by demineralized bone matrix combined with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilutions of fresh autogenous bone marrow cells in combination with allogeneic demineralized cortical bone matrix were tested extraskeletally in rats using roentgenographic, histologic, and 45Ca techniques. Suspensions of bone marrow cells (especially diluted 1:2 with culture media) combined with demineralized cortical bone seemed to induce significantly more new bone than did demineralized bone, bone marrow, or composite grafts with whole bone marrow, respectively. In a short-term spinal fusion experiment, demineralized cortical bone combined with fresh bone marrow produced new bone and bridged the interspace between the spinous processes faster than other transplantation procedures. The induction of undifferentiated host cells by demineralized bone matrix is further complemented by addition of autogenous, especially slightly diluted, bone marrow cells

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. top of page How ... Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to no special ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. top of page How ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  16. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000839.htm Bone marrow (stem cell) donation To use the sharing ... stem cells from a donor's blood. Types of Bone Marrow Donation There are two types of bone ...

  17. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Examination Formal name: Bone Marrow Aspiration; Bone Marrow Biopsy Related tests: Complete Blood Count ; WBC Differential ; Reticulocyte ...

  18. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a dialysis-related amyloidosis manifestation – incidence, risk factors and results of surgical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Gądek, Artur; Drożdż, Maciej; Miśkowiec, Krzysztof; Dutka, Julian; Sydor, Antoni; Chowaniec, Eve; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common complication of dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) developing in patients on long-term dialysis therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of CTS and identify factors influencing the development of CTS in patients on maintenance hemodialysis, as well as results of its surgical treatment. Material/Methods The study included 386 patients, among whom CTS was diagnosed in 40 patients (10.4%) on the basis of signs and physical symptoms, as well as by nerve conduction. The group of patients with CTS and the group of patients without CTS were compared according to age (mean 54.50 vs. 56.48 years) and duration of dialysis treatment. Initial analysis of CTS incidence by sex, presence of anti-HCV antibodies, and location of arterio-venous fistula (AV fistula) was undertaken. Results Duration of dialysis treatment was the statistically significant risk factor for the development of CTS (16.05 vs. 4.51 years; p<0.0001). Among patients treated for a long period on hemodialysis (20–30 years), 100% required surgical release procedures, while 66.66% of those treated for 15–19 years, 42.1% of those treated for 10–14 years, and 1.6% of those treated for less than 10 years. CTS was diagnosed more often in anti-HCV-positive patients as compared with anti-HCV-negative patients (47.5 vs. 6.9%; p<0.0001). No significant differences were found when comparing CTS incidence by sex or between the development of CTS requiring surgical release intervention and location of the AV fistula. Conclusions Surgical release procedure of the carpal tunnel gave good treatment results in patients with CTS. PMID:21873947

  20. Wnt Signaling in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takuo; Michigami, Toshimi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signaling is involved not only in embryonic development but also in maintenance of homeostasis in postnatal tissues. Multiple lines of evidence have increased understanding of the roles of Wnt signaling in bone since mutations in the LRP5 gene were identified in human bone diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes mesenchymal progenitor cells to differentiate into osteoblasts. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway possibly through Lrp6, a co-receptor for Wnts as well as Lrp5, in osteoblasts regulates bone resorption by increasing the OPG/RANKL ratio. However, endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling including sclerostin block bone formation. Regulation of sclerostin appears to be one of the mechanisms of PTH anabolic actions on bone. Since sclerostin is almost exclusively expressed in osteocytes, inhibition of sclerostin is the most promising design. Surprisingly, Lrp5 controls bone formation by inhibiting serotonin synthesis in the duodenum, but not by directly promoting bone formation. Pharmacological intervention may be considered in many components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, although adverse effects and tumorigenicity to other tissues are important. More studies will be needed to fully understand how the Wnt signaling pathway actually influences bone metabolism and to assure the safety of new interventions. PMID:23926379

  1. Bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculiarities of clinico-hematologic pattern in patients with acute leukosis when ionizing radiation is used as prepration regime for hystocompatible bone marrow transplantation are listed. Chemico-radiopreparation of patients with acute leukosis is described, different techniques of bone marrow transplantation are presented, secondary signs of the disease are shown

  2. 腕关节镜治疗腕背侧腱鞘囊肿%Wrist Arthroscopy in the Treatment of Carpal Dorsal Ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒正华; 李钧; 丁潮琪; 王西迅; 陈波; 胡继超; 魏勇; 崔岩

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of arthroscopy in the treatment of dorsal carpal ganglion. Methods A total of 22 cases of dorsal carpal ganglion was treated from September 2009 to May 2013.With 4/5 or 6R portal access as arthroscopy vision, 1/2 portal access as working pathway, and 6U for outflow, the scapholunate interosseous ligament ( SLIL) was found and then the examination was carried out toward dorsal part till the reentry point of SLIL and dorsal carpal articular capsule. Pedicles of dorsal carpal ganglion were exposed, and the pedicles and part of articular capsules were removed by planer tools.The joint fluid was cleaned till the ganglion disappeared.Then absorbable sutures were used to close subcutaneous tissues.Pressure bandaging was given.After the operation, a supporter was used to fix the wrist for 3 weeks, during which massage and restorative exercise were conducted. Results Conversion to open surgery was required in 2 cases because the pedicles of dorsal carpal ganglion were not found in intraoperative arthroscopic examinations, including the cyst originated in the extensor tendon in 1 case and originated in the mediocarpal joint in 1 case.The remaining 20 cases underwent treatment under arthroscopy successfully.The patients were followed up for 6-14 months, with an average of 9.2 months.The wrists were normal in appearance and fully functional without obvious scars. Three cases developed recurrence, 1 of which was not given further intervention because the cyst was too tiny to be found at neutral position, and 2 of which were given open resections. Conclusions Although arthroscopic treatment of dorsal carpal ganglion has a relatively high equipment and technical requirements and has certain limitations on indications, the surgery is safe with few complications and good appearance.It can be used as a treatment option for some young women with strong cosmetic requirements.%目的:探讨关节镜治疗腕背侧腱鞘

  3. The normal bone scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses applications of the bone scan. It is the most frequently performed nuclear medicine investigation, the commonest indication being the detection of occult metastases, for which purpose the entire skeleton should be imaged. For other purposes it is often adequate to examine only part of the skeleton. The amount of isotope taken up at any site depends primarily on the local rate of bone turnover rather than on bone mass. The scintigraphic appearance therefore does not necessarily correlate with the radiographic one; however, as there is a relationship between the rate at which bone is replaced and the quantity of bone which is present at any point, the two appearances are not entirely unrelated. Recognition of abnormality is based on a detailed knowledge of normal scintigraphic appearances

  4. Bone markers and osteoporosis therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bandeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several factors are involved in determining bone quality including bone density, bone turnover, the extent of trabecular bone connectivity, cortical porosity and geometry. Metabolically active and in a continuous process of remodeling, approximately 20% of bone tissue is renewed annually. Bone turn over markers (BTM are frequently used in clinical trials and to provide valid information about the effectiveness of osteoporosis treatment, reflecting the state of bone metabolism and its response to treatment, although they are not useful alone to estimate bone loss. In this review the behavior of BTM from different clinical trials or different osteoporotic drugs will be addressed.

  5. Bone scanning in osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on bone scanning in osteoporosis a diagnosis of osteoporosis most often follows fracture, and clearly this should be confirmed by x-ray. The bone scan therefore does not have an important role to play in the initial diagnosis of osteoporosis. While the exact mechanism by which the 99mTc-labeled diphosphonates localize in the skeleton is not fully understood, it is believed that they adsorb onto bone surfaces most probably via the calcium of hydroxyapatite crystals. Because the major factors that affect adsorption are osteoblastic activity and to a lesser extent skeletal vascularity, it is apparent that a bone scan image presents a functional display of skeletal metabolic activity. However, osteoporosis is a disorder in which gradual change in bone mass may occur over many years and, in keeping with this minor imbalance in skeletal metabolism, the bone scan appearances are usually normal. However, the scan images may appear of poor quality because of relatively low bone uptake of tracer with, on occasion, a washed-out pattern of activity in the axial and appendicular bone. It has been suggested that such a pattern occurs in severe or end-stage osteoporosis caused by markedly reduced osteoblastic activity. If kyphosis is observed on the bone scan or if there appears to be loss of spinal height with proximity of ribs to each other or increased closeness of rib cage to pelvis, then appearances suggest vertebral collapse and would be in keeping with a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Such evidence is, however, indirect and in practice a bone scan is an extremely unreliable means of diagnosing osteoporosis

  6. Bone changes in tuberous sclerosis mimicking metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Kong Hwai Loong; Choo Hui Fen [National University Hospital (Singapore). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncology

    1996-02-01

    Sclerotic and lytic bone changes of tuberous sclerosis (TS) can mimic bone metastases. A case is reported of a patient with concomitant sclerotic bone metastases from bronchogenic carcinoma and TS bone changes, diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The increased bone uptake and abnormal magnetic resonance signal allowed distinction of TS bone lesions from bone metastases. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Bone changes in tuberous sclerosis mimicking metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sclerotic and lytic bone changes of tuberous sclerosis (TS) can mimic bone metastases. A case is reported of a patient with concomitant sclerotic bone metastases from bronchogenic carcinoma and TS bone changes, diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The increased bone uptake and abnormal magnetic resonance signal allowed distinction of TS bone lesions from bone metastases. 6 refs., 4 figs

  8. New hand bones of Hadropithecus stenognathus: implications for the paleobiology of the Archaeolemuridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemelin, Pierre; Hamrick, Mark W; Richmond, Brian G; Godfrey, Laurie R; Jungers, William L; Burney, David A

    2008-03-01

    A partial, associated skeleton of Hadropithecus stenognathus (AHA-I) was discovered in 2003 at Andrahomana Cave in southeastern Madagascar. Among the postcranial elements found were the first hand bones (right scaphoid, right hamate, left first metacarpal, and right and left fifth metacarpals) attributed to this rare subfossil lemur. These hand bones were compared to those of extant strepsirrhines and catarrhines in order to infer the positional adaptations of Hadropithecus, and they were compared to those of Archaeolemur in order to assess variation in hand morphology among archaeolemurids. The scaphoid tubercle does not project palmarly as in suspensory and climbing taxa, and the hamate has no hook at all (just a small tubercle), which also points to a poorly developed carpal tunnel. There is a distinctive, radioulnarly directed "spiral" facet for articulation with the triquetrum that is most similar in orientation to that of more terrestrial primates (i.e., Lemur catta, Papio, and Gorilla). The first metacarpal is very reduced and represents only 48% of the length of metacarpal V, as in Archaeolemur, which suggests that pollical grasping of arboreal supports was not important. Compared to Archaeolemur, the shaft of metacarpal V is gracile, and the head has no dorsal ridge and lacks characteristics functionally associated with digitigrade, extended metacarpophalangeal joint postures. Proximally, the articular facet for the hamate is oriented more dorsally. Thus, the carpometacarpal joint V appears to have a distinctive hyperextended set, which has no analog among living or extinct primates. The carpals of Hadropithecus are diagnostic of a pronograde, arboreal and terrestrial (although not digitigrade) locomotor repertoire that typifies Lemur catta and some Old World monkeys. No clinging, suspensory, or climbing specializations that characterize indriids or lorises can be found in the hand of this subfossil lemur. The hand of Hadropithecus likely had similar

  9. What Is a Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page Print this page What is a bone marrow transplant? A bone marrow or cord blood transplant is ... with healthy bone marrow. Tweet What is a bone marrow transplant How a bone marrow transplant works Transplant process ...

  10. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to about here, and I am going to use the crease. In this area, I am going ... bleeding from the skin edges, which we will use an electric cautery to control the bleeding. So, ...

  11. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or too far from your body. Don't rest your wrists on hard surfaces for long periods of time. Switch hands during work tasks. Make sure the tools you use aren't too big for your hands. ... give your hands and wrists time to rest. Don't sit or stand in the same ...

  12. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sitting on a hand table, and the hand has been positioned with this metallic equipment, piece of ... if you look at it very closely, it has small strands like telephone wires running on the ...

  13. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 14, 2012 My name is Deepak Kapila, and I am an orthopaedic hand surgeon. I am also the Chairman of the Department of ... called the Lead Hand. For the procedure itself, I am going to utilize this particular crease in ...

  14. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... visible now – knife -- are called the palmar aponeurosis. These are the shiny, white fibers of the palmar ... The white structure here is the tendon, and these are the structures that go to power the ...

  15. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and it involves making an incision in the palm of the hand and then releasing a ligament ... going to utilize this particular crease in the palm of the hand, and by making the incision ...

  16. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 226-4267 Toll-Free; (301) 565-2966 TTY Internet Address: http://www.niams.nih.gov/ National Institute of Neurological ... 352-9424 Toll-Free; (301) 468-5981 TTY Internet Address: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/ National Institute for Occupational ...

  17. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and these are the structures that go to power the fingers in the front. The movement of the fingers is because of these tendons. The lining that I am removing right now is called, tenosynovium, and this is the lining ...

  18. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... important branch of this nerve, it’s called the motor branch. And this branch of the nerve supplies ... the forearm, the base of the forearm. The motor branch supplies these muscles, these are called the ...

  19. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RhMSUS FAQs RhMSUS Designees RhMSUS Volunteer Opportunities Publications & Communications Journals A&R Table of Contents AC&R Table ... by the American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ...

  20. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tunnel pass the tendons and the nerves. So, right beneath this ligament is going to be the ... and it’s actually beneath this bridge of skin right in here. So, I’ve incised this ligament ...

  1. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fingers -- the pull on the tendons by the muscles is what brings the fingers down. And so, ... And this branch of the nerve supplies these muscles of the forearm, the base of the forearm. ...

  2. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety & Health Administration U.S. Department of Labor 200 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20210 http://www.osha. ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of ...

  3. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to spread the skin on the tissues. The fibers that are becoming visible now – knife -- are called the palmar aponeurosis. These are the shiny, white fibers of the palmar aponeurosis, and I am going ...

  4. Pathogenetic differentiation of the bone superscan using bone marrow scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 54-year old patient suffering from a prostatic carcinoma is presented. At the time of diagnosis multiple bone metastases were detected by bone scintigraphy. An initial improvement was observed following antiandrogenic therapy. After three years the patient presented with increasing bone pain, which was most prominent in the knee joints. A 'superscan' was found in bone scintigraphy with an unusually high uptake in the peripheral skeleton. Bone marrow scintigraphy showed a nearly complete metastatic displacement of central bone marrow and a peripheral marrow extension as explanation for the bone scan findings. (orig.)

  5. Bone cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the considerable disparity in published values of the risk for bone cancers from ionising radiation, the article 'An analysis of bone and head sinus cancers in radium dial painters using a two-mutation carcinogenesis model' by Leenhouts and Brugmans in the June 2000 issue of this Journal deserves further comment and consideration. The letter concludes that radiological protection and risk estimation has acquired an extra dimension, and it is clear that the risk of bone cancer from exposure to ionising radiation needs further review. Letter-to-the-editor

  6. Periodontal bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of life the periodontum is subject to changes which may be physiological or pathological. Intraoral radiographs give insight into the hard structures of the dentomaxillar region and provides information on lesions in the bone of the periodontum in that they show radiopacities and radiolucencies caused by such lesions. In this thesis the relation is investigated between the true shape and dimensions of periodontal bone lesions and their radiographic images. A method is developed and tested of making standardized and reproducible radiographs suitable for longitudinal studies of periodontal lesions. Also the possibility is demonstrated of an objective and reproducible interpretation of radiographic characteristics of periodontal bone lesions. (Auth.)

  7. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær;

    2015-01-01

    This proof of concept study investigates the removal of soft tissue from human ribs with the use of two common methods: boiling with a laundry detergent and using enzymes. Six individuals were autopsied, and one rib from each individual was removed for testing. Each rib was cut into pieces and...... the bones. The DNA analysis showed that DNA was preserved on all the pieces of bones which were examined. Finally, the investigation suggests that enzyme maceration could be gentler on the bones, as the edges appeared less frayed. The enzyme maceration was also a quicker method; it took three hours...

  8. Why date old bones?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods for pretreatment and purification of bone have not been accorded the same standard protocols that are applied to other sample materials. Many users lack confidence in bone dates, with some justification, and it is not clear how to proceed. With the advent of AMS dating, it is becoming easy to date very small amounts of highly purified samples such as single amino acids from bone collagen. This note serves a warning that there are dangers in the uncritical application of powerful separation and measurement techniques to uncharacterized material. (orig.)

  9. Bone scintigraphy for horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphy (bone scan) is being used approximately since 1980 in the horse under general anaesthesia. With the construction of custom-made overhead gantries for gamma-cameras scintigraphy found widespread entry in big equine referral hospitals for bone-scanning of the standing horse. Indications for the use of a bone scan in the horse are inflammatory alterations in the locomotor apparatus. It is primarily used for diagnosis of lameness of unknown origin, suspect of stress fracture or hairline fracture and for horses with bad riding comfort with suspected painful lesions in the spine. (orig.)

  10. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and periphe...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  12. Interparietal bones in Nigerian skulls.

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, S. K.; Chowdhary, D S; Jain, S P

    1986-01-01

    The study was conducted on 40 adult Nigerian skulls which were examined for the presence of interparietal and pre-interparietal bones. Only one interparietal bone was found (2.5% of the present series) while a single pre-interparietal bone was found in four skulls (10%) and multiple pre-interparietal bones in one skull (2.5%).

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Long-Term Trend of Bone Development in the Contemporary Teenagers of Chinese Han Nationality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-hui; YING Chong-liang; WAN Lei; ZHU Guang-you

    2012-01-01

    Objective To further improve the accuracy of bone age identification using the time of secondary ossification center appearance and epiphyseal fusion of 7 joints to estimate the age of living individuals.Methods DR films were taken from 7 parts including sternal end of clavical and the left side of shoulder,elbow,carpal,hip,knee and ankle joints of 1709 individuals who came from eastern China,central China and southern China,whose ages were between 11.0 and 20.0 years.From those 7 joints 24 osteal loci were selected as bone age indexes,which could better reflect age growth of teenagers.The characteristics of secondary ossification center appearance and epiphyseal fusion were observed,and the mean and age range of secondary ossification center appearance and epiphyseal fusion were calculated.Results The fusion time of the 24 epiphyses were advanced at different degrees,the most obvious epiphyses the sternal end of clavicle,scapular acromial end,distal end of the radius,distal end of the ulna,iliac crest,ischial tuberosity,the upper and lower end of tibia and fibula.The appearance time of sternal end of clavicle,scapular acromial end,iliac crest and ischial tuberosity epiphyses were all found to be after the age of 12,and the female's age,approximately 1year ahead of schedule in comparison with the male's.Conclusion The relevant forensic information and data for bone age identification should be updated every 10-15 years so as to provide accurate and objective evidence for court testimony,conviction and sentencing.

  16. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  17. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  18. Osteomyelitis of frontal bone

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedil, V. N.; Raizada, R. M.; Singh, A. K. Kennedy; Puttewar, M. P.; Bali, S.

    2004-01-01

    A case of Osteomyelitis of the frontal bone with a subperiosteal absces s, an extrudural abscess and a frontal sinus fistula is presented here for its rarity. A brief review of literature and management of the condition is also discussed.

  19. Skull base bone hyperpneumatization

    OpenAIRE

    Houet, E J; Kouokam, L.M.; Nchimi, A L

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old male with a long standing history of compulsive Valsalva maneuvers, complaining of episodes of vertigo underwent head computed tomography. Axial CT slices at the level of the skull base (Fig. A) and the first cervical vertebrae (Fig. B) shows an extensive unusual pneumatization of both the body and lateral processes of the first cervical vertebrae (arrows), with air pouches dissecting planes between bone cortex and the periosteum around the occipital bone and the lateral process...

  20. Inca bones at asterion

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant E Natekar; Suhit E Natekar; Fatima M De Souza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgical approach towards asterion has to be done with caution as many surgeons are unfamiliar with the anatomical variations. The asterion corresponds to the site of the posterolateral (mastoid) fontanelle of the neonatal skull which closes at the end of the first year. Inca bones provide information as markers for various diseases, and can mislead in the diagnosis of fractures. Observation and Results: 150 dry skull bones from the Department of Anatomy at Goa Medical College, In...

  1. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  2. Bone healing: little secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Einhorn, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new strategies to enhance the healing of fractures continues to evolve with the introduction of both locally and systemically delivered compounds. The recent refinement in the use of autologous bone marrow as a bone graft material has brought the field of stem cell biology into orthopaedic practice. New recombinant peptides such as platelet- derived growth factor and teriparatide show promise as local and systemic enhancers respectively. Finally, recent evidence that mutati...

  3. Detecting microdamage in bone.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, T Clive; Mohsin, Sahar; Taylor, David; Parkesh, Raman; Gunnlaugsson, TThorfinnur; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Giehl, Michael; Gowin, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue-induced microdamage in bone contributes to stress and fragility fractures and acts as a stimulus for bone remodelling. Detecting such microdamage is difficult as pre-existing microdamage sustained in vivo must be differentiated from artefactual damage incurred during specimen preparation. This was addressed by bulk staining specimens in alcohol-soluble basic fuchsin dye, but cutting and grinding them in an aqueous medium. Nonetheless, some artefactual cracks are partially stained and ...

  4. Fracture Nasal Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Venkatesan, Ulaganathan

    2013-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography and u...

  5. FRACTURE NASAL BONES

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian Thaigarajan; Venkatesan Ulaganathan

    2013-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography a...

  6. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal ...

  7. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage

    OpenAIRE

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and fu...

  8. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in ...

  9. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. PMID:24898231

  10. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 μg of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans

  11. Crosstalk between cancer cells and bone microenvironment in bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, as well as lung and liver, is one of the most preferential metastatic target sites for cancers including breast, prostate, and lung cancers. Although the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this preference need to be elucidated, it appears that bone microenvironments possess unique biological features that enable circulating cancer cells to home, survive and proliferate, and destroy bone. In conjunction, cancers that develop bone metastases likely have the capacity to utilize these unique bone environments for colonization and bone destruction. This crosstalk between metastatic cancer cells and bone is critical to the development and progression of bone metastases. Disruption of this interaction will allow us to design mechanism-based effective and specific therapeutic interventions for bone metastases

  12. [Morphological analysis of bone dynamics and metabolic bone disease. Histomorphometric concepts of bone remodeling and modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki E

    2011-04-01

    In tissue level turnover of bone cells, bone remodeling shows a sequential events of activation, resorption, reversal and formation. This may be observed as secondary osteons in the cortical bone and trabecular packets in the cancellous bone. Microcracks are repaired by targeted remodeling, and calcium is released by non-targeted remodeling. In macromodeling, a macroscopic size of a bone increases with growth, without changing its basic figure. In micromodelimg, a shift of trabecula, a minishift, is biomechnically controlled. New lamellar bone is added parallel to compressive and tensile force, and bone resorption occurs at the opposite surface of formation. In minimodeling new lamellar bone is formed with a sequence of activation, then directly formation, without scalloping at the cement line between newly formed bone and its basic bone. PMID:21447918

  13. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. RESULTS: The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony

  14. Mimicking the nanostructure of bone matrix to regenerate bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert; Ma1, Peter X

    2013-11-01

    Key features of bone tissue structure and composition are capable of directing cellular behavior towards the generation of new bone tissue. Bone tissue, as well as materials derived from bone, have a long and successful history of use as bone grafting materials. Recent developments in design and processing of synthetic scaffolding systems has allowed the replication of the bone's desirable biological activity in easy to fabricate polymeric materials with nano-scale features exposed on the surface. The biological response to these new tissue-engineering scaffold materials oftentimes exceeds that seen on scaffolds produced using biological materials. PMID:24688283

  15. Virtual Temporal Bone Anatomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Background The Visible Human Project(VHP) initiated by the U.S. National Library of Medicine has drawn much attention and interests from around the world. The Visible Chinese Human (VCH) project has started in China. The current study aims at acquiring a feasible virtual methodology for reconstructing the temporal bone of the Chinese population, which may provide an accurate 3-D model of important temporal bone structures that can be used in teaching and patient care for medical scientists and clinicians. Methods A series of sectional images of the temporal bone were generated from section slices of a female cadaver head. On each sectional image, SOIs (structures of interest) were segmented by carefully defining their contours and filling their areas with certain gray scale values. The processed volume data were then inducted into the 3D Slicer software(developed by the Surgical Planning Lab at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the MIT AI Lab) for resegmentation and generation of a set of tagged images of the SOIs. 3D surface models of SOIs were then reconstructed from these images. Results The temporal bone and structures in the temporal bone, including the tympanic cavity, mastoid cells, sigmoid sinus and internal carotid artery, were successfully reconstructed. The orientation of and spatial relationship among these structures were easily visualized in the reconstructed surface models. Conclusion The 3D Slicer software can be used for 3-dimensional visualization of anatomic structures in the temporal bone, which will greatly facilitate the advance of knowledge and techniques critical for studying and treating disorders involving the temporal bone.

  16. Bone scan in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984, a survey carried out in 21 countries in Europe showed that bone scintigraphy comprised 16% of all paediatric radioisotope scans. Although the value of bone scans in paediatrics is potentially great, their quality varies greatly, and poor-quality images are giving this valuable technique a bad reputation. The handling of children requires a sensitive staff and the provision of a few simple inexpensive items of distraction. Attempting simply to scan a child between two adult patients in a busy general department is a recipe for an unhappy, uncooperative child with the probable result of poor images. The intravenous injection of isotope should be given adjacent to the gamma camera room, unless dynamic scans are required, so that the child does not associate the camera with the injection. This injection is best carried out by someone competent in paediatric venipunture; the entire procedure should be explained to the child and parent, who should remain with child throughout. It is naive to think that silence makes for a cooperative child. The sensitivity of bone-seeking radioisotope tracers and the marked improvement in gamma camera resolution has allowed the bone scanning to become an integrated technique in the assessment of children suspected of suffering from pathological bone conditions. The tracer most commonly used for routine bone scanning is 99mTc diphosphonate (MDP); other isotopes used include 99mTc colloid for bone marrow scans and 67Ga citrate and 111In white blood cells (111In WBC) for investigation of inflammatory/infective lesions

  17. Bone scintigraphy of decompression sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Value of bone scintigraphy in decompression sickness of 42 patients was retrospectively evaluated. Bone scintigraphy was positive in 30 of 42 patients (83 lesions), while radiography and symptoms were positive in 23 patients (48 lesions), and in 29 patients (44 lesions) respectively. Bone scintigraphy was positive in many lesions with negative radiography or symptoms. However, approximately half of the lesions in which either radiography or symptoms was positive could not be detected by bone scintigraphy. These cases mostly showed radiographic abnormalities such as irregular calcified areas and ''bone island'' in the cervical regions of the humerus, femur and tibia. Both bone scintigraphy and radiography were positive in most of the patients with symptoms of the bends and there seems to be a close relationship between the bends symptoms and bone lesion. We concluded that bone scintigraphy is useful for the evaluation of decompression sickness, but it must be complemented by bone radiography to avoid a significant number of false negative cases. (author)

  18. Bone health in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman-Levin, N; Hochberg, Z; Latzer, Y

    2014-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) put adolescents and young adults at risk for impaired bone health. Low bone mineral density (BMD) with ED is caused by failure to accrue peak bone mass in adolescence and bone loss in young adulthood. Although ED patients diagnosed with bone loss may be asymptomatic, some suffer bone pains and have increased incidence of fractures. Adolescents with ED are prone to increased prevalence of stress fractures, kyphoscoliosis and height loss. The clinical picture of the various EDs involves endocrinopathies that contribute to impaired bone health. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by low bone turnover, with relatively higher osteoclastic (bone resorptive) than osteoblastic (bone formation) activity. Bone loss in AN occurs in both the trabecular and cortical bones, although the former is more vulnerable. Bone loss in AN has been shown to be influenced by malnutrition and low weight, reduced fat mass, oestrogen and androgen deficiency, glucocorticoid excess, impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis, and more. Bone loss in AN may not be completely reversible despite recovery from the illness. Treatment modalities involving hormonal therapies have limited effectiveness, whereas increased caloric intake, weight gain and resumption of menses are essential to improved BMD. PMID:24165231

  19. Estudo da secção do ligamento carpal transverso comparando as técnicas endoscópica e convencional em cadáver humano Evaluation of surgical section of transverse carpal ligament comparing endoscopic and conventional techniques in human corpses

    OpenAIRE

    José Estrela Neto; José Alberto Dias Leite; Marcelo José Cortez Bezerra

    2003-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Verificar, em cadáver, a secção do ligamento carpal transverso (LCT) comparando as técnicas endoscópica tipo CHOW e convencional tipo mini-incisão. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 18 cadáveres, não formolizados, perfazendo um total de 36 punhos, distribuídos em dois grupos. O grupo I compreendeu os 18 punhos esquerdos e utilizou a técnica endoscópica, enquanto o grupo II incluiu os 18 punhos direitos e empregou a técnica convencional. RESULTADOS: A secção completa do LCT ocorreu em 15 cas...

  20. Inca bones at asterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant E Natekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical approach towards asterion has to be done with caution as many surgeons are unfamiliar with the anatomical variations. The asterion corresponds to the site of the posterolateral (mastoid fontanelle of the neonatal skull which closes at the end of the first year. Inca bones provide information as markers for various diseases, and can mislead in the diagnosis of fractures. Observation and Results: 150 dry skull bones from the Department of Anatomy at Goa Medical College, India and other neighboring medical colleges by examining the asterion, and its sutural articulations with parietal, temporal and occipital bones and also anatomical variations if any in adults. Discussion: The anatomical landmarks selected must be reliable and above all easy to identify. Bony structures are more suitable than soft tissue or cartilaginous landmarks because of their rigid and reliable location. Presence of these bones provides false impressions of fractures or the fractures may be interpreted for inca bones especially in the region of asterion either radiologically or clinically which may lead to complications during burr hole surgeries.

  1. Periostin action in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge

    2016-09-01

    Periostin is a highly conserved matricellular protein that shares close homology with the insect cell adhesion molecule fasciclin 1. Periostin is expressed in a broad range of tissues including the skeleton, where it serves both as a structural molecule of the bone matrix and a signaling molecule through integrin receptors and Wnt-beta-catenin pathways whereby it stimulates osteoblast functions and bone formation. The development of periostin null mice has allowed to elucidate the crucial role of periostin on dentinogenesis and osteogenesis, as well as on the skeletal response to mechanical loading and parathyroid hormone. The use of circulating periostin as a potential clinical biomarker has been explored in different non skeletal conditions. These include cancers and more specifically in the metastasis process, respiratory diseases such as asthma, kidney failure, renal injury and cardiac infarction. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, serum levels have been shown to predict the risk of fracture-more specifically non-vertebral- independently of bone mineral density. Because of its preferential localization in cortical bone and periosteal tissue, it can be speculated that serum periostin may be a marker of cortical bone metabolism, although additional studies are clearly needed. PMID:26721738

  2. Fibrosarcoma of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general clinical-radiological description of fibrosarcoma of bone, including tumours with features of malignant fibrous histiocytoma is presented. 104 patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are analysed in terms of age and sex distribution, symptoms, duration of symptoms and tumour localization. The radiological findings obtained in patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. The treatment and course of fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. Data on the type of therapy given were available on 103 patients: 67 were treated by ablative surgery either immediately or within three months of preceding local surgery and/or radiotherapy. In the remaining 36 cases treatment consisted of local surgery, radiotherapy or a combination of these, or non-curative (palliative) treatment. In a few cases ablative surgery was performed at a later stage. 13 patients with fibrosarcoma of the axial skeleton and 14 with fibrosarcoma of the jaws are considered. A causistic discussion of patients with a secondary fibrosarcoma is presented. Secondary fibrosarcoma was found in a total of 19 patients (14%); 4 after irradiation. The features of significance for the course of the disease are discussed: general features such as age and sex, tumour localization in the long bones, presence or absence of a pathological fracture, and the radiological and histological characteristics of the tumour. The type of therapy and the occurrence of lung metastases in relation to the course of the disease is also discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Bone metabolism during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Jean Pierre

    2016-06-01

    During pregnancy, mineral concentrations, of calcium and phosphorus in particular, are maintained at a high level in fetal blood so that the developing skeleton may accrete adequate mineral content. The placenta actively transports minerals for this purpose. Maternal intestinal absorption increases in order to meet the fetal demand for calcium, which is only partly dependent on calcitriol. Mineral regulation is essentially dependent on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates PTH and PTHrP production. If calcium intake is insufficient, the maternal skeleton will undergo resorption due to PTHrP. After birth, a switch from fetal to neonatal homeostasis occurs through increase in PTH and calcitriol, and developmental adaptation of the kidneys and intestines with bone turnover contributing additional mineral to the circulation. Calcium absorption becomes progressively active and dependent on calcitriol. The postnatal skeleton can transiently present with osteoposis but adequate mineral diet usually allows full restoration. Cases of primary osteoporosis must be identified. Loss of trabecular mineral content occurs during lactation in order to provide calcium to the newborn. This programmed bone loss is dependent on a "brain-breast-bone" circuit. The physiological bone resorption during reproduction does not normally cause fractures or persistent osteoporosis. Women who experience fracture are likely to have other causes of bone loss. PMID:27157104

  4. [Inflammation and bone : Osteoimmunological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, K W; Neumann, E; Lange, U

    2016-06-01

    Microscopic fractures (so-called microcracks) or traumatic macrofractures require bone, as the basic scaffold of the human body, to have a high regenerative capability. In order to be able to provide this regenerative capability, bone is in a constant process of remodeling. This finely tuned homeostasis of bone formation and degradation can become disrupted, which leads to osteoporosis or other bone disorders. It has been shown that the immune system is substantially involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and that chronic inflammation in particular can disturb this balance; therefore, this article reviews the osteoimmunological aspects contributing to osteoporosis and other diseases associated with bone degradation. PMID:27250491

  5. Bone Regeneration Using Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Various Biomaterial Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma and disease frequently result in fractures or critical sized bone defects and their management at times necessitates bone grafting. The process of bone healing or regeneration involves intricate network of molecules including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs. BMPs belong to a larger superfamily of proteins and are very promising and intensively studied for in the enhancement of bone healing. More than 20 types of BMPs have been identified but only a subset of BMPs can induce de novo bone formation. Many research groups have shown that BMPs can induce differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and stem cells into osteogenic cells which are capable of producing bone. This review introduces BMPs and discusses current advances in preclinical and clinical application of utilizing various biomaterial carriers for local delivery of BMPs to enhance bone regeneration.

  6. Radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between December 1986 and January 1978, 68 patients with bone metastases were analyzed to evaluate the effect of radiation for the relief of pain. The 68 patients, who had a total of 97 lesions, complained of pain caused by their bone metastasis. The good, fair, and poor responses were found to be 18%, 60%, and 22%, respectively. With reference to the primary neoplasms, the effective response rate was 73% in lung cancer, 100% in breast cancer, 75% in gastric cancer, 100% in hepatic cancer, 100% in bladder cancer, 25% in epipharyngeal cancer, and 70% in the other neoplasms. Depending on the cell types of the lung cancer, the effective response rate was 80% for small cell carcinomas, 72% for adenocarcinomas and 40% for squamous cell carcinomas. Our results suggest that radiotherapy for bone metastases is to be recommended, since the effective response rate was 78% for the relief of pain. (author)

  7. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  8. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poundarik, Atharva A; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and functions to dissipate energy and avert fracture. Microdamage formation is a key determinant of bone quality, and through a range of biological and physical mechanisms, accumulates with age and disease. Accumulated microdamage in bone decreases bone strength and increases bone's propensity to fracture. Thus, a thorough assessment of microdamage, across the hierarchical levels of bone, is crucial to better understand bone quality and bone fracture. This review article details multiple imaging modalities that have been used to study and characterize microdamage; from bulk staining techniques originally developed by Harold Frost to assess linear microcracks, to atomic force microscopy, a modality that revealed mechanistic insights into the formation diffuse damage at the ultrastructural level in bone. New automated techniques using imaging modalities, such as microcomputed tomography are also presented for a comprehensive overview. PMID:25664772

  9. Bone Targeted Therapies for Bone Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wajeeha Razaq

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis to the bone develops commonly in patients with various malignancies, and is a major cause of morbidity and diminished quality of life in many affected patients. Emerging treatments for metastatic bone disease have arisen from advances in our understanding of the unique cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the bone metastasis. The tendency of cancer cells to metastasize to bone is probably the end result of many factors including vascular pathways, the highly ...

  10. Bone formation following implantation of bone biomaterials into extraction sites

    OpenAIRE

    Molly, Liene; Vandromme, Heleen; Quirynen, Marc; Schepers, Evert; Adams, Jessica L; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background: Adequate bone volume is imperative for the osseointegration of endosseous implants, but post-extraction resorption and remodeling may challenge implant placement. The use of bone biomaterials has been advocated to fill extraction sites and to enhance primary implant stability during osseointegration. The objective of the case series was to evaluate bone formation histologically and biomechanically in extraction sites following implantation of three commercially available bone biom...

  11. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  12. Clinical Usefulness of Oral Supplementation with Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Curcumin Phytosome, and B-Group Vitamins in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pajardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS, scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n=60 served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n=60 received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation. Patients in Group C (n=60 received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05. Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen’s tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P<0.05. We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve.

  13. Clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic Acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome undergoing surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Bortot, Paola; Ponti, Veronica; Novelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation). Patients in Group C (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05). Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen's tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:24563654

  14. Surgery is more cost-effective than splinting for carpal tunnel syndrome in the Netherlands: results of an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adèr Herman J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a common disorder, often treated with surgery or wrist splinting. The objective of this economic evaluation alongside a randomized trial was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of splinting and surgery for patients with CTS. Methods Patients at 13 neurological outpatient clinics with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed idiopathic CTS were randomly allocated to splinting (n = 89 or surgery (n = 87. Clinical outcome measures included number of nights waking up due to symptoms, general improvement, severity of the main complaint, paraesthesia at night and during the day, and utility. The economic evaluation was performed from a societal perspective and involved all relevant costs. Results There were no differences in costs. The mean total costs per patient were in the surgery group EURO 2,126 compared to EURO 2,111 in the splint group. After 12 months, the success rate in the surgery group (92% was significantly higher than in the splint group (72%. The acceptability curve showed that at a relatively low ceiling ratio of EURO 2,500 per patient there is a 90% probability that surgery is cost-effective. Conclusion In the Netherlands, surgery is more cost-effective compared with splinting, and recommended as the preferred method of treatment for patients with CTS.

  15. Acute Effect of Topical Menthol on Chronic Pain in Slaughterhouse Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Triple-Blind, Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Sundstrup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical menthol gels are classified “topical analgesics” and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10 participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze or placebo (gel with a menthol scent during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design. Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during the last hour of work (scale 0–10 immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P=0.026 and P=0.044, resp.. Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by −1.2 (CI 95%: −1.7 to −0.6 following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers with CTS and should be considered as an effective nonsystemic alternative to regular analgesics in the workplace management of chronic and neuropathic pain.

  16. Archival bone marrow samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Najmi, Laeya A; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata;

    2015-01-01

    AB Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole...... with samples stored for 4 to 10 years. Acceptable call rates for SNPs were detected for 7 of 42 archival samples. In conclusion, archival bone marrow samples are suitable for DNA extraction and multiple marker analysis, but WGA was less successful, especially when longer fragments were analyzed. Multiple SNP...

  17. FRACTURE NASAL BONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thaigarajan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography and ultrasound in their diagnosis and their management.

  18. [Cytogenetics of bone sarcomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagner-Capodano, A M; Poitout, D

    There has been much progress in the cytogenesis, and molecular biology of bone tumours such as Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcomas, greatly improving diagnostic possibilities and prognosis. Ewing's sarcoma is an indifferentiated sarcoma with round cells which usually occurs in children or adolescents. Ewing's sarcoma corresponds to 6% of all bone tumours. Histologically Ewing's sarcoma belongs to a group of small round cell tumours including neuroblastoma, embryon and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Differential diagnosis is difficult. Cytogenetic examinations can now differentiate Ewing's sarcoma from other small round cell tumours. There is a specific 11:12 translocation (q24; q12) which can be used as a marker. PMID:8785922

  19. Bone lesions in early syphilis detected by bone scintigraphy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, K.; Hvid-Jacobsen, K; Lindewald, H; Sørensen, P S; Weismann, K

    1984-01-01

    We report a case of early syphilis with multiple bone lesions which all resolved after treatment with penicillin. We discuss why bone lesions may be more prevalent than generally believed and why 99m-Tc-MDP-bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than radiography in detecting syphilitic periostitis.

  20. Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Sarah R; Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the bone and the bone marrow is critical in many research fields including basic bone biology, immunology, hematology, cancer metastasis, biomechanics, and stem cell biology. Despite the importance of the bone in healthy and pathologic states, however, it is a largely under-researched organ due to lack of specialized knowledge of bone dissection and bone marrow isolation. Mice are a common model organism to study effects on bone and bone marrow, necessitating a standardized and efficient method for long bone dissection and bone marrow isolation for processing of large experimental cohorts. We describe a straightforward dissection procedure for the removal of the femur and tibia that is suitable for downstream applications, including but not limited to histomorphologic analysis and strength testing. In addition, we outline a rapid procedure for isolation of bone marrow from the long bones via centrifugation with limited handling time, ideal for cell sorting, primary cell culture, or DNA, RNA, and protein extraction. The protocol is streamlined for rapid processing of samples to limit experimental error, and is standardized to minimize user-to-user variability. PMID:27168390