WorldWideScience

Sample records for carotid space anatomical

  1. Anatomical nuances of the internal carotid artery in relation to the quadrangular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Ricardo L L; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Goulart, Carlos R; Upadhyay, Smita; Buohliqah, Lamia; Lazarini, Paulo R; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in relation to the quadrangular space (QS) and to propose a classification system based on the results. METHODS A total of 44 human cadaveric specimens were dissected endonasally under direct endoscopic visualization. During the dissection, the anatomical variations of the ICA and their relationship with the QS were noted. RESULTS The space between the paraclival ICAs (i.e., intercarotid space) can be classified as 1 of 3 different shapes (i.e., trapezoid, square, or hourglass) based on the trajectory of the ICAs. The ICA trajectories also directly influence the volumetric area of the QS. Based on its geometry, the QS was classified as one of the following: 1) Type A has the smallest QS area and is associated with a trapezoid intercarotid space, 2) Type B corresponds to the expected QS area (not minimized or enlarged) and is associated with a square intercarotid space, and 3) Type C has the largest QS area and is associated with an hourglass intercarotid space. CONCLUSIONS The different trajectories of the ICAs can modify the area of the QS and may be an essential parameter to consider for preoperative planning and defining the most appropriate corridor to reach Meckel's cave. In addition, ICA trajectories should be considered prior to surgery to avoid injuring the vessels.

  2. The carotid space: anatomical review, main diseases and imaging diagnosis methods; O espaco carotideo: revisao anatomica, principais doencas e metodos de diagnostico por imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Jacob, Beatriz Mahmud; Iizuka, Helio Magnus Yoshimi [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem; Soares, Ademir Humberto [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2000-12-01

    The carotid space is situated at the lateral aspect of the neck and extends from the base of the skull to the upper mediastinum, traversing the supra and the infrahyoid neck. This space contains the internal and common carotid arteries, the internal jugular vein, the lymph nodes of the internal jugular chain, the vagus nerve and in its upper portion the glossopharyngeal (IX), accessory (XI) and hypoglossal (XII) nerves. These structures may be the site of several diseases such as vascular anomalies, inflammatory and infectious diseases, the neoplasms. The authors reviewed the literature and performed an ionographic study in order to review the anatomy of the carotid space, its relationship to the contiguous spaces and most frequent diseases, and the imaging methods for its assessment, particularly computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  3. Anatomical variations of the carotid arteries in adult Kenyans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the topography and anatomical variations of the carotid arteries among Kenyans. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi. Subjects: Eighty carotid arteries of forty cadavers were dissected. Results: The bifurcation of the commonest ...

  4. Anatomical Considerations on Surgical Anatomy of the Carotid Bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamantios Michalinos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical anatomy of carotid bifurcation is of unique importance for numerous medical specialties. Despite extensive research, many aspects such as precise height of carotid bifurcation, micrometric values of carotid arteries and their branches as their diameter, length, and degree of tortuosity, and variations of proximal external carotid artery branches are undetermined. Furthermore carotid bifurcation is involved in many pathologic processes, atheromatous disease being the commonest. Carotid atheromatous disease is a major predisposing factor for disabling and possibly fatal strokes with geometry of carotid bifurcation playing an important role in its natural history. Consequently detailed knowledge of various anatomic parameters is of paramount importance not only for understanding of the disease but also for design of surgical treatment, especially selection between carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Carotid bifurcation paragangliomas constitute unique tumors with diagnostic accuracy, treatment design, and success of operative intervention dependent on precise knowledge of anatomy. Considering those, it becomes clear that selection and application of proper surgical therapy should consider anatomical details. Further research might ameliorate available treatment options or even lead to innovative ones.

  5. [Anatomic variations of the internal carotid artery: implications for the neurologic endovascular therapist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, Marco; Leeb, Angel; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Tortuosity of the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) can hinder navigation intravascular devices for treating intracranial aneurysms and even complex ICA access techniques can fail. Variations in the course of the internal carotid artery are known as coiling, kinking or tortuosity of the vessel. Such failures have clinical relevance. During endovascular procedures these anomalies difficult the intravascular surgical procedure. A potential alternative is the reconstruction of these anatomic anomalies of the carotid artery using neuro-interventional methods. We present a practical review of the literature.

  6. Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Sreenath, Satyan B; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Farzal, Zainab; Zanation, Adam M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the extent of carotid artery exposure attained, including the identification of the external carotid branches and lower cranial nerves in five sequential external approaches to the parapharyngeal space, and to provide an anatomical algorithm. Anatomical study. Six latex-injected adult cadaver heads were dissected in five consecutive approaches: transcervical approach with submandibular gland removal, posterior extension of the transcervical approach, transcervical approach with parotidectomy, parotidectomy with lateral mandibulotomy, and parotidectomy with mandibulectomy. The degree of carotid artery exposure attained, external carotid branches, and lower cranial nerves visualized was documented. The transcervical approach exposed 1.5 cm (Standard Deviation (SD) 0.5) of internal carotid artery (ICA) and 1.25 cm (SD 0.25) of external carotid artery (ECA). The superior thyroid and facial arteries and cranial nerve XII and XI were identified. The posterior extension exposed 2.9 cm (SD 0.7) of ICA and 2.7 cm (SD 1.0) of ECA. Occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries were visualized. The transparotid approach exposed 4.0 cm (SD 1.1) of ICA and 3.98 cm (SD 1.8) of ECA. Lateral mandibulotomy exposed the internal maxillary artery, cranial nerve X, the sympathetic trunk, and 4.6 cm (SD 2.4) of ICA. Mandibulectomy allowed for complete ECA exposure, cranial nerve IX, lingual nerve, and 6.9 cm (SD 1.3) of ICA. Approaches for the parapharyngeal space must be based on anatomic and biological patient factors. This study provides a guide for the skull base surgeon for an extended approach based on the desired anatomic exposure. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:585-591, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. AnAtomicAl vAriAtions of the cArotid Arteries in Adult KenyAns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-05

    May 5, 2008 ... Adult KenyAns d. anangwE, H. saidi, J. ogEng'o and K.o. awori. ABstrAct. Objective: to describe the topography and anatomical variations of the carotid arteries among. Kenyans. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: department of human Anatomy, university of nairobi. Subjects: eighty carotid ...

  8. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  9. Anatomic Variation of Facial Vein in Carotid-Cavernous Fistula and Trans-Facial Vein Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao-Bao; Chang, Feng-Chi; Teng, Michael Mu-Huo; Ting, Ta-Wei

    2015-07-01

    Trans-facial vein (FV) embolization via the internal jugular vein is an alternative approach to embolization of carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs). The purpose of this study is to report the anatomic variation of FVs and our experience of trans-FV embolization of CCFs. Over 6 years, 26 patients (12 men and 14 women; age range 27-72 years old) with CCFs underwent trans-FV embolization because of anterior drainage of fistulas. We retrospectively analyzed angioarchitecture of the CCFs focusing on the anatomic variations of FVs and angiographic and clinical outcomes after embolization. FVs drained to the internal jugular vein in 10 (38%) cases; FVs unexpectedly emptied into the external jugular vein in 16 (62%) cases. All FVs entered into the internal jugular vein at the level of the hyoid bone. In cases with fistulas to the FV and EJV, the termination of FVs was variable including superior (n = 5), inferior (n = 1), or at the level of the hyoid bone (n = 10). Successful microcatheterization via different insertions of FVs to jugular veins was achieved in all cases. One patient had a small residual fistula, and 2 patients had fistula recurrence. Temporary impairment of cranial nerve III or VI occurred in 4 patients. The mean clinical follow-up time was 18 months. Trans-FV embolization is an effective and safe method to manage CCFs with anterior drainage. However, anatomic variations of the FV exist, and a careful work-up of fistula venous drainage before trans-FV embolization is essential to reduce erroneous attempts, procedure time, and periprocedural risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the carotid space: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Sun; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja; Park, Ji Sang; Jeong, Sun Hye [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Chondrosarcoma is a commonly encountered malignant cartilaginous tumor. However, only 1% of chondrosarcomas arise in the extraskeletal region. The pathologic types of this tumor include mesenchymal, myxoid, and low grade. A mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant cartilaginous tumor that is rarely encountered, and it shows similar imaging features to other malignant soft-tissue tumors. Here, we report a mesenchymal chondrosarcoma presenting as a palpable mass in the neck, arising in the carotid space, which is also known as the retrostyloid parapharyngeal space.

  11. Anatomical and technical predictors of perioperative clinical outcomes after carotid artery stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuRahma, Ali F; DerDerian, Trevor; Hariri, Nizar; Adams, Elliot; AbuRahma, Joseph; Dean, L Scott; Nanjundappa, Aravinda; Stone, Patrick A

    2017-08-01

    A few other studies have reported the effects of anatomical and technical factors on clinical outcomes of carotid artery stenting (CAS). This study analyzed the effect of these factors on perioperative stroke/myocardial infarction/death after CAS. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 409 of 456 patients who underwent CAS during the study period. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the effects of anatomical and technical factors on perioperative stroke, death, and myocardial infarction (major adverse events [MAEs]). The MAE rate for the entire series was 4.7% (19 of 409), and the stroke rate was 2.2% (9 of 409). The stroke rate for asymptomatic patients was 0.46% (1 of 218; P = .01). The MAE rates for patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) were 7% (11 of 158) vs 3.2% (8 of 251) for other indications (P = .077). The stroke rates for heavily calcified lesions were 6.3% (3 of 48) vs 1.2% (4 of 332) for mildly calcified/noncalcified lesions (P = .046). Differences in stroke and MAE rates regarding other anatomical features were not significant. The stroke rate for patients with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) before embolic protection device (EPD) insertion was 9.1% (2 of 22) vs 1.8% (7 of 387) for patients without (P = .07) and 2.6% (9 of 341) for patients with poststenting PTA vs 0% (0 of 68) for patients without. The MAE rate for patients with poststenting PTA was 5.6% (19 of 341) vs 0% (0 of 68) for patients without (P = .0536). The MAE rate for patients with the ACCUNET (Abbott, Abbott Park, Ill) EPD was 1.9% (3 of 158) vs 6.7% (16 of 240) for others (P = .029). The differences between stroke and MAE rates for other technical features were not significant. A regression analysis showed that the odds ratio for stroke was 0.1 (P = .031) for asymptomatic indications, 13.7 (P = .014) for TIA indications, 6.1 (P = .0303) for PTA performed before EPD insertion, 1.7 for PTA performed before

  12. The baboon (Papio anubis extracranial carotid artery: An anatomical guide for endovascular experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laufer Ilya

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As novel endovascular strategies are developed for treating neurological disease, there is an increasing need to evaluate these techniques in relevant preclinical models. The use of non-human primates is especially critical given their structural and physiological homology with humans. In order to conduct primate endovascular studies, a comprehensive understanding of the carotid anatomy is necessary. We therefore performed a detailed examination of the vessel lengths, lumen diameters and angles of origin of the baboon extracranial carotid system. Methods We characterized the extracranial carotid system often male baboons (Papio anubis, range 15.1–28.4 kg by early post-mortem dissection. Photographic documentation of vessel lengths, lumen diameters, and angles of origin were measured for each segment of the carotid bilaterally. Results The common carotid arteries averaged 94.7 ± 1.7 mm (left and 87.1 ± 1.6 mm (right in length. The average minimal common carotid lumen diameters were 3.0 ± 0.3 mm (left and 2.9 ± 0.2 mm (right. Each animal had a common brachiocephalic artery arising from the aorta which bifurcated into the left common carotid artery and right braciocephalic artery after 21.5 ± 1.6 mm. The vascular anatomy was found to be consistent among animals despite a wide range of animal weights. Conclusions The consistency in the Papio anubis extracranial carotid system may promote the use of this species in the preclinical investigation of neuro-interventional therapies.

  13. The significance of the pharyngeal veins during carotid endarterectomy: description of an anatomical triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoori, J; Mahadevan, V; Aldoori, M

    2018-02-01

    Injuries to the hypoglossal and vagus nerves are the most commonly reported injuries during carotid endarterectomy. While unilateral single nerve injury is usually well tolerated, bilateral or combined nerve injuries can pose a serious threat to life. This study aims to increase awareness of the inferior pharyngeal vein, which usually passes posterior to the internal carotid artery but sometimes crosses anterior to it. Injury to either or both hypoglossal and vagus nerves can occur during control of unexpected haemorrhage from the torn and retracted edges of the inferior pharyngeal vein. We recommend careful ligation and division of this vein. In addition, we observed in 9 (17.3%) of the 52 operations that the pharyngeal vein formed a triangle with the vagus and hypoglossal nerves when it passes anterior to the internal carotid artery.

  14. 3D reconstruction of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: comparison between spatial compound ultrasound models and anatomical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Bo L.; Fagertun, Jens; Wilhjelm, Jens E.

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with the creation of 3D models that can work as a tool for discriminating between tissue and background in the development of tissue classification methods. Ten formalin-fixed atherosclerotic carotid plaques removed by endarterectomy were scanned with 3D multi-angle spatial...

  15. Anatomical models for space radiation applications: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, W

    1994-10-01

    Extremely detailed computerized anatomical male (CAM) and female (CAF) models that have been developed for use in space radiation analyses are discussed and reviewed. Recognizing that the level of detail may currently be inadequate for certain radiological applications, one of the purposes of this paper is to elicit specific model improvements or requirements from the scientific user-community. Methods and rationale are presented which describe the approach used in the Space Shuttle program to extrapolate dosimetry measurements (skin doses) to realistic astronaut body organ doses. Several mission scenarios are presented which demonstrate the utility of the anatomical models for obtaining specific body organ exposure estimates and can be used for establishing cancer morbidity and mortality risk assessments. These exposure estimates are based on the trapped Van Allen belt and galactic cosmic radiation environment models and data from the major historical solar particle events.

  16. Anatomic Basis for Brachial Plexus Block at the Costoclavicular Space: A Cadaver Anatomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Reina, Miguel Angel; Pangthipampai, Pawinee; Karmakar, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The costoclavicular space (CCS), which is located deep and posterior to the midpoint of the clavicle, may be a better site for infraclavicular brachial plexus block than the traditional lateral paracoracoid site. However, currently, there is paucity of data on the anatomy of the brachial plexus at the CCS. We undertook this cadaver anatomic study to define the anatomy of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS and thereby establish the anatomic basis for ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block at this proximal site. The anatomy and topography of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS was evaluated in 8 unembalmed (cryopreserved), thawed, fresh adult human cadavers using anatomic dissection, and transverse anatomic and histological sections, of the CCS. The cords of the brachial plexus were located lateral and parallel to the axillary artery at the CCS. The topography of the cords, relative to the axillary artery and to one another, in the transverse (axial) plane was also consistent at the CCS. The lateral cord was the most superficial of the 3 cords and it was always anterior to both the medial and posterior cords. The medial cord was directly posterior to the lateral cord but medial to the posterior cord. The posterior cord was the lateral most of the 3 cords at the CCS and it was immediately lateral to the medial cord but posterolateral to the lateral cord. The cords of the brachial plexus are clustered together lateral to the axillary artery, and share a consistent relation relative to one another and to the axillary artery, at the CCS.

  17. A New Anatomic Variation: Coexistence of Both Dandy-Walker Variant and Ophthalmic Artery Originating From Contralateral Internal Carotid Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Havan, Nuri; Gedikli, Yusuf; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2016-06-01

    The authors report on 1 patient of variant origin of right ophthalmic artery (OA) from ophthalmic segment of the left internal carotid artery. A 41-year-old man was performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR angiography. Cerebral MR imaging revealed a Dandy-Walker variant. In MR angiography the authors observed this unusual variant of origin of OA and a complete occlusion of right internal carotid artery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first patient who has coincidence of both Dandy-Walker variant and origin of OA from contralateral internal carotid artery. Careful observation of MR angiography images with maximum intensity projection is very important for detecting rare vascular variations.

  18. The anatomic relationship between the internal jugular vein and the carotid artery in children after laryngeal mask insertion. An ultrasonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Ravi G; Wilson, Morven; Wilson, Graham; Marciniak, Bruno; Engelhardt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation, although challenging in children and prone to complications, is frequently required for total parenteral nutrition and infusion of drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the anatomic relationship between the internal jugular vein (IJV) and carotid artery (CA) before, and after, insertion of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in children using ultrasound. Patients aged 2-16 were recruited to this prospective study and divided into three groups of 20 patients each: group 1: LMA size 2, group 2: LMA size 2½, and group 3: LMA size 3. Prior to, and following, LMA insertion, the position and depth of the vessels, and time to locate them were recorded. All measurements were taken at the level of the cricoid cartilage in a neutral head position in the spontaneously breathing patient during expiration. The IJV position in relation to the CA was noticed as anterior (A), anterolateral (AL), lateral (L), or medial (M). The position of the IJV was found to be in the anterolateral (AL) or anterior (A) position to the CA in the majority of cases. The anatomic relationship changed in 10/120 (8.3%) following insertion of the LMA. The mean depth was 0.80 (± 0.15) cm for the right IJV before LMA insertion and 0.84 (± 0.17) cm after insertion. Similar measurements were taken on the left side [0.81 (± 0.14) cm and 0.83 (± 0.18) cm]. The diameter as well as the depth of the IJV increased with the age and weight of the patient. This study demonstrates that the IJV is anterior or anterolateral to the artery in the majority of cases and that the anatomic relationship may change following the insertion of the LMA. It supports the need for using ultrasound-guided techniques for IJV cannulation following LMA insertion in spontaneously breathing children. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Relationship between intracranial internal carotid artery calcification and enlarged cerebral perivascular space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Xiao-Xiao [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); The First People' s Hospital of Wenling, Department of Neurology, Wenling (China); Li, Ge-Fei; Wu, Yi-Lan; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Zhao, Ying; Shi, Yan-Hui; Zhuang, Mei-Ting; Hou, Tian-Yu; Zhao, Rong; Liu, Feng-Di; Wang, Xue-Mei; Shen, Ying; Cui, Guo-Hong; Su, Jing-Jing; Chen, Wei [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); Tang, Xue-Mei; Sun, Ji; Liu, Jian-Ren [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Shanghai (China)

    2017-06-15

    The association between intracranial internal carotid artery (IICA) calcification and lacunes, white matter hyperintensity (WMH), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) has been well researched. However, enlarged cerebral perivascular space (PVS) has not yet been reported to correlate with intracranial internal carotid artery calcification. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between IICA calcification and enlarged PVS. A total of 189 patients with ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory who presented within 7 days of ictus from 2012 to 2015 were enrolled respectively. All patients were required to have undergone head computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, or computed tomography angiography. Clinical characteristics were recorded. IICA calcification and enlarged PVS were semi-quantitatively evaluated, and the presence of lacunes, WMH, and CMBs was recorded. Of the 189 patients, 63.5% were male. Mean age of the patients was 68.6 ± 12.2 years. There were 104 patients with IICA calcification. Age, diabetes mellitus, lacunes, and white matter hyperintensity were significantly associated with IICA calcification (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age, diabetes mellitus, and lacunes were independent predictors of IICA calcification (P < 0.05). A lower risk of IICA calcification was found in patients with a higher enlarged PVS score (P = 0.004). Higher enlarged PVS scores were associated with a lesser degree of IICA calcification. There appears to be a relationship between reduced risk of IICA calcification and enlarged PVS. (orig.)

  20. Internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm with life-threatening epistaxis as a complication of deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio Lucas; Waisberg, Daniel Reis

    2011-05-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the cervical internal carotid artery is a very rare, potentially fatal complication of a neck space infection in children associated with high mortality and morbidity. A 3-year-old boy presented with spontaneous massive epistaxis 45 days after a deep neck space infection caused by a peritonsillar abscess. During nasopharyngeal packing, he evolved with cardiac arrest. Intra-arterial angiography was then performed that revealed a large pseudoaneurysm. Endovascular treatment using detachable balloons achieved complete exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm. The child made an uneventful recovery and was discharged with mild left hemiparesis and no deficit of sensory or cognitive functions. Pseudoaneurysms of the internal carotid artery after a deep neck space infection can be associated with delayed and potentially fatal massive epistaxis. Furthermore, a regional (ie, extranasal) blood vessel should be promptly investigated when there are signs of hypovolemic shock. A high level of suspicion and definitive treatment are essential for successful management of these patients.

  1. Carotid Space Mass Proximal to Vagus Nerve Causing Asystole and Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Leviter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of vagal nerve rootlets, whether surgical or through mass effect of a neoplasm, can result in asystole and hypotension, accompanied by ST depression and right bundle branch block. There are few case reports of a neoplasm causing these effects, and this case describes a patient with such a mass presenting with syncopal episodes. A 43-year-old man with a past medical history of HIV, bipolar disorder, and epilepsy was admitted to the neurology service for a video electroencephalogram (vEEG to characterize syncopal episodes that were felt to be epileptic in origin. During the study, he experienced symptoms of his typical aura, which correlated with a transient symptomatic high degree AV block on telemetry, and an absence of epileptic findings on vEEG. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the brain showed a mass in the left posterior carotid space at the skull base. The patient underwent permanent dual chamber MRI-compatible pacemaker placement for his heart block. His syncopal episodes resolved, but presyncopal symptoms persisted. We discuss the presentation and treatment of vagal neoplasms.

  2. Carotid Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  3. A guide for inflatable penile prosthesis reservoir placement: pertinent anatomical measurements of the retropubic space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gerard; Hsiao, Wayland; Hsaio, Wayland; Karpman, Edward; Bella, Anthony J; Bella, Anthony T; Carrion, Rafael; Jones, Leroy; Christine, Brian; Eisenhart, Elizabeth; Cleves, Mario A; Kramer, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The primary concern for many prosthetic urologic surgeons in placing the three-piece inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) is the concept of "blind reservoir placement." Extensive reports permeate the literature regarding bladder, bowel, vascular, and various hernial complications occurring while attempting to place the reservoir into the retropubic space. However, despite these widely documented complications, there is a paucity of published literature on surgically pertinent anatomical measurements of the retropubic space relating to reservoir placement. The focus of this project was to evaluate the special relationships and anatomical measurements of the retropubic space to better aid the surgeon in the safe placement of the reservoir. Analyses of the spatial measurements of reservoir placement into the retropubic space with a focus on utilizing a penoscrotal approach were conducted. In addition, we reviewed and evaluated the published literature for important contributions surrounding the various surgical techniques during placement of a penile prosthesis reservoir. Cadaveric pelvic specimens were dissected to determine the distance and angulation (in degrees) from the inguinal ring to several critical anatomic structures in the pelvis. This format was utilized to simulate the basic features of reservoir placement into the classic retropubic space. We also reviewed and evaluated the published literature for important contributions describing the various surgical techniques in the placement of penile prosthesis reservoirs into the retropubic space. Anatomic measurements were obtained from the inguinal ring to the bladder, external iliac vein, and superior origin of the dorsal suspensory ligament at the anterior apex of the pendulous penis. The angle was measured from the inguinal ring to these structures and recorded. We also reviewed the published literature for various penoscrotal IPP surgical techniques involving placement of the reservoir into the retropubic

  4. Gemelli-obturator complex in the deep gluteal space: an anatomic and dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balius, Ramon; Susín, Antonio; Morros, Carles; Pujol, Montse; Pérez-Cuenca, Dolores; Sala-Blanch, Xavier

    2017-12-07

    To investigate the behavior of the sciatic nerve during hip rotation at subgluteal space. Sonographic examination (high-resolution ultrasound machine at 5.0-14 MHZ) of the gemelli-obturator internus complex following two approaches: (1) a study on cadavers and (2) a study on healthy volunteers. The cadavers were examined in pronation, pelvis-fixed position by forcing internal and external rotations of the hip with the knee in 90° flexion. Healthy volunteers were examined during passive internal and external hip rotation (prone position; lumbar and pelvic regions fixed). Subjects with a history of major trauma, surgery or pathologies affecting the examined regions were excluded. The analysis included eight hemipelvis from six fresh cadavers and 31 healthy volunteers. The anatomical study revealed the presence of connective tissue attaching the sciatic nerve to the structures of the gemellus-obturator system at deep subgluteal space. The amplitude of the nerve curvature during rotating position was significantly greater than during resting position. During passive internal rotation, the sciatic nerve of both cadavers and healthy volunteers transformed from a straight structure to a curved structure tethered at two points as the tendon of the obturator internus contracted downwards. Conversely, external hip rotation caused the nerve to relax. Anatomically, the sciatic nerve is closely related to the gemelli-obturator internus complex. This relationship results in a reproducible dynamic behavior of the sciatic nerve during passive hip rotation, which may contribute to explain the pathological mechanisms of the obturator internal gemellus syndrome.

  5. Planarian regeneration in space: Persistent anatomical, behavioral, and bacteriological changes induced by space travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokuma, Junji; Durant, Fallon; Williams, Katherine B; Finkelstein, Joshua M; Blackiston, Douglas J; Clements, Twyman; Reed, David W; Roberts, Michael; Jain, Mahendra; Kimel, Kris; Trauger, Sunia A; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Levin, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Regeneration is regulated not only by chemical signals but also by physical processes, such as bioelectric gradients. How these may change in the absence of the normal gravitational and geomagnetic fields is largely unknown. Planarian flatworms were moved to the International Space Station for 5 weeks, immediately after removing their heads and tails. A control group in spring water remained on Earth. No manipulation of the planaria occurred while they were in orbit, and space-exposed worms were returned to our laboratory for analysis. One animal out of 15 regenerated into a double-headed phenotype-normally an extremely rare event. Remarkably, amputating this double-headed worm again, in plain water, resulted again in the double-headed phenotype. Moreover, even when tested 20 months after return to Earth, the space-exposed worms displayed significant quantitative differences in behavior and microbiome composition. These observations may have implications for human and animal space travelers, but could also elucidate how microgravity and hypomagnetic environments could be used to trigger desired morphological, neurological, physiological, and bacteriomic changes for various regenerative and bioengineering applications.

  6. Deep organ space infection after emergency bowel resection and anastomosis: The anatomic site does not matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Elizabeth; Siboni, Stefano; Haltmeier, Tobias; Inaba, Kenji; Lam, Lydia; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2015-11-01

    Deep organ space infection (DOSI) is a serious complication after emergency bowel resection and anastomosis. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and risk factors for the development of DOSI. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database study including patients who underwent large bowel or small bowel resection and primary anastomosis. The incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for DOSI were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 87,562 patients underwent small bowel, large bowel, or rectal resection and anastomosis. Of these, 14,942 (17.1%) underwent emergency operations and formed the study population. The overall mortality rate in emergency operations was 12.5%, and the rate of DOSI was 5.6%. A total of 18.0% required ventilatory support in more than 48 hours, and 16.0% required reoperation. Predictors of DOSI included age, steroid use, sepsis or septic shock on admission, severe wound contamination, and advanced American Society of Anesthesiologists classification. The anatomic location of resection and anastomosis was not significantly associated with DOSI. Patients undergoing emergency bowel resection and anastomosis have a high mortality, risk of DOSI, and systemic complications. Independent predictors of DOSI include wound and American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, sepsis or septic shock on admission, and steroid use. The anatomic location of resection and anastomosis was not significantly associated with DOSI. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.

  7. Relação anatômica entre o nervo hipoglosso e a bifurcação carotídea Anatomical relation between the hypoglossal nerve and the carotid artery bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe S. G. Fortes

    to establish the anatomical relation between the carotid artery bifurcation and hypoglossal nerve. Study design: experimental. Material and method: Carotid artery and hypoglossal nerve dissections were carried out in 38 fresh corpses. All the individuals were placed in standard position and the dissections were performed with surgical technique. The measurements were done in centimeters and millimeters from the dissected carotid bifurcation to the XII nerve in the cervical area. Results: Twenty-six individuals were male and 12 female. The majority were whites, 30, and 8 were non-whites. The distance between hypoglossal nerve and carotid artery bifurcation ranged from 0.5 cm to 4.3 cm, with mean of 2.1 cm, median 2.0 cm and standard deviation of 0.63 cm. Neck length, age, gender and race were related with the measurements and failed to show significant statistic correlation (a > 0.05. Conclusion: In this sample there is a great anatomic variation of the distance between hypoglossal nerve and carotid artery bifurcation and there was no statistical difference concerning age, gender, race and neck length. A better understanding of the anatomic course of this nerve and its variation in relation to carotid artery bifurcation, are relevant to prevent hypoglossal nerve lesions in the carotid artery surgery.

  8. Microanatomy of the Supracavernous Internal Carotid - Anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This anatomic variety is often associated with aneurysms and other vascular anomalies. The discovery of a case and the review of the literature allow us to evoke some embryological hypotheses. Keywords: Anterior cerebral artery, Internal carotid artery, Optic nerve, Aneuryom, Artère cérébrale antérieure, Artère carotide ...

  9. Marginal space learning for medical image analysis efficient detection and segmentation of anatomical structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yefeng

    2014-01-01

    Presents an award winning image analysis technology (Thomas Edison Patent Award, MICCAI Young Investigator Award) that achieves object detection and segmentation with state-of-the-art accuracy and efficiency Flexible, machine learning-based framework, applicable across multiple anatomical structures and imaging modalities Thirty five clinical applications on detecting and segmenting anatomical structures such as heart chambers and valves, blood vessels, liver, kidney, prostate, lymph nodes, and sub-cortical brain structures, in CT, MRI, X-Ray and Ultrasound.

  10. Novel analysis of 4DCT imaging quantifies progressive increases in anatomic dead space during mechanical ventilation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Elizabeth H; Preissner, Melissa; Carnibella, Richard P; Samarage, Chaminda R; Bennett, Ellen; Diniz, Marcio A; Fouras, Andreas; Zosky, Graeme R; Jones, Heather D

    2017-09-01

    Increased dead space is an important prognostic marker in early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that correlates with mortality. The cause of increased dead space in ARDS has largely been attributed to increased alveolar dead space due to ventilation/perfusion mismatching and shunt. We sought to determine whether anatomic dead space also increases in response to mechanical ventilation. Mice received intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline and mechanical ventilation (MV). Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans were performed at onset of MV and after 5 h of MV. Detailed measurements of airway volumes and lung tidal volumes were performed using image analysis software. The forced oscillation technique was used to obtain measures of airway resistance, tissue damping, and tissue elastance. The ratio of airway volumes to total tidal volume increased significantly in response to 5 h of mechanical ventilation, regardless of LPS exposure, and airways demonstrated significant variation in volumes over the respiratory cycle. These findings were associated with an increase in tissue elastance (decreased lung compliance) but without changes in tidal volumes. Airway volumes increased over time with exposure to mechanical ventilation without a concomitant increase in tidal volumes. These findings suggest that anatomic dead space fraction increases progressively with exposure to positive pressure ventilation and may represent a pathological process.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We demonstrate that anatomic dead space ventilation increases significantly over time in mice in response to mechanical ventilation. The novel functional lung-imaging techniques applied here yield sensitive measures of airway volumes that may have wide applications. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. A cardiologist in the carotids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William A

    2004-05-05

    Carotid endarterectomy for stroke prevention has been the standard of care for 50 years in patients with extra-cranial carotid bifurcation disease. Over the past decade, carotid stenting has emerged as a viable alternative to surgery. Combined with filter embolic protection devices, both a randomized control trial (Stenting and Angioplasty with Protection in Patients at High Risk for Endarterectomy registry [SAPPHIRE]) as well as registry data (ACCULINK for Revascularization of Carotids in High Risk Patients registry [ARCHeR] and Registry Study to evaluate the Neuroshield Bare-Wire Cerebral Protection System and X-Act Stent in patients at high risk for Carotid Endarterectomy [SECuRITY]) have compared favorably to endarterectomy in patients at high risk for operative revascularization. Conditions associated with high operative risk included patients with significant cardiac, pulmonary, and renal disease; previous neck operation; previous radiation; and anatomically difficult surgical access. On the basis of these results, a carotid stent system approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is anticipated in 2004. Although this will be a welcome addition to endarterectomy in the armamentarium of therapeutic options for patients with carotid disease, several challenges lie ahead. Coverage and reimbursement for the carotid stenting has been severely restricted to include only those procedures performed as part of an FDA investigational device exemption trial protocol, and a national noncoverage decision will have to be reckoned with before broader coverage can be put into place (assuming FDA approval). In addition, the level of national expertise in carotid endovascular intervention is limited, and training will need to be tailored to the three specialties likely to perform the procedure: cardiology, radiology, and vascular surgery. Each of these specialties will have specific, and different, requirements for their training, further complicating the task of

  12. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... results of stenting versus endarterectomy for carotid-artery stenosis. N Engl J Med . 2016;374(11):1021- ...

  13. Tree-space statistics and approximations for large-scale analysis of anatomical trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Owen, Megan; Petersen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    space of leaf-labeled trees. This tree-space is a geodesic metric space where any two trees are connected by a unique shortest path, which corresponds to a tree deformation. However, tree-space is not a manifold, and the usual strategy of performing statistical analysis in a tangent space and projecting...... onto tree-space is not available. Using tree-space and its shortest paths, a variety of statistical properties, such as mean, principal component, hypothesis testing and linear discriminant analysis can be defined. For some of these properties it is still an open problem how to compute them; others...... parametrize the relevant parts of tree-space well. Using the developed approximate statistics, we illustrate how the structure and geometry of airway trees vary across a population and show that airway trees with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease come from a different distribution in tree-space than...

  14. Resection of the mesopancreas (RMP: a new surgical classification of a known anatomical space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konerding Moritz A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognosis after surgical therapy for pancreatic cancer is poor and has been attributed to early lymph node involvement as well as to a strong tendency of cancer cells to infiltrate into the retropancreatic tissue and to spread along the peripancreatic neural plexuses. The objective of our study was to classify the anatomical-surgical layer of the mesopancreas and to describe the surgical principles relevant for resection of the mesopancreas (RMP. Immunohistochemical investigation of the mesopancreatic-perineural lymphogenic structures was carried out with the purpose of identifying possible routes of metastatic spread. Methods Resection of the mesopancreas (RMP was performed in fresh corpses. Pancreas and mesopancreas were separated from each other and the mesopancreas was immunohistochemically investigated. Results The mesopancreas strains itself dorsally of the mesenteric vessels as a whitish-firm, fatty tissue-like layer. Macroscopically, in the dissected en-bloc specimens of pancreas and mesopancreas nerve plexuses were found running from the dorsal site of the pancreatic head to the mesopancreas to establish a perineural plane. Immunohistochemical examinations revealed the lymphatic vessels localized in direct vicinity of the neuronal plexuses between pancreas and mesopancreas. Conclusion The mesopancreas as a perineural lymphatic layer located dorsally to the pancreas and reaching beyond the mesenteric vessels has not been classified in the anatomical or surgical literature before. The aim to ensure the greatest possible distance from the retropancreatic lymphatic tissue which drains the carcinomatous focus can be achieved in patients with pancreatic cancer only by complete resection of the mesopancreas (RMP.

  15. [The external carotid vein. Historical review of Paul Launay's work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, J F; Lauwers, F

    1997-08-01

    The authors, one century later, review the anatomical studies conducted by Launay, a student of Farabeuf, concerning the venous drainage of the face and neck. These studies were based on the analogy between the arterial system and the venous drainage of the external carotid territory. After describing the external carotid vein, the didactic and practical aspects of this study are emphasized.

  16. [Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Basulto, S D; Montejo-Montejo, J

    Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms are infrequent but its clinical behavior, high risk of bleeding and complex anatomic relationships of the sac permit to consider these lesions as a challenge cases. 497 patients harboring intracranial aneurysms were operated on at Manuel Ascunce Domenech Hospital, Camagüey, Cuba between January 1982 to august 2001. We utilized microsurgical procedures, optical magnification, specialized neuroanesthesia and Intensive Care Unit postoperatory following. All patients were evaluated clinically with World Federation Neurological Surgeon Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale. There were 16 patients with intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms (3.2 %). 12 patients were under 40 years and 50% were between 16 and 30 years old. All patients present intracranial bleeding. There was 87.5% of total or partial recuperation. There was one death only. Postoperative deficit were observed at 44% but 31% disappeared three month later. Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms are complex anatomoclinical lesions. Clinically, we observed high tendency to bleed and multiplicity. Anatomically, these sacs have complex arterial relationship that difficult dissection and clipping. They have frequent postoperative morbidity. Multiple or bilateral aneurysmal sacs will be clipped by one surgical procedure.

  17. Standard anatomical and visual space for the mouse retina: computational reconstruction and transformation of flattened retinae with the Retistruct package.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Sterratt

    Full Text Available The concept of topographic mapping is central to the understanding of the visual system at many levels, from the developmental to the computational. It is important to be able to relate different coordinate systems, e.g. maps of the visual field and maps of the retina. Retinal maps are frequently based on flat-mount preparations. These use dissection and relaxing cuts to render the quasi-spherical retina into a 2D preparation. The variable nature of relaxing cuts and associated tears limits quantitative cross-animal comparisons. We present an algorithm, "Retistruct," that reconstructs retinal flat-mounts by mapping them into a standard, spherical retinal space. This is achieved by: stitching the marked-up cuts of the flat-mount outline; dividing the stitched outline into a mesh whose vertices then are mapped onto a curtailed sphere; and finally moving the vertices so as to minimise a physically-inspired deformation energy function. Our validation studies indicate that the algorithm can estimate the position of a point on the intact adult retina to within 8° of arc (3.6% of nasotemporal axis. The coordinates in reconstructed retinae can be transformed to visuotopic coordinates. Retistruct is used to investigate the organisation of the adult mouse visual system. We orient the retina relative to the nictitating membrane and compare this to eye muscle insertions. To align the retinotopic and visuotopic coordinate systems in the mouse, we utilised the geometry of binocular vision. In standard retinal space, the composite decussation line for the uncrossed retinal projection is located 64° away from the retinal pole. Projecting anatomically defined uncrossed retinal projections into visual space gives binocular congruence if the optical axis of the mouse eye is oriented at 64° azimuth and 22° elevation, in concordance with previous results. Moreover, using these coordinates, the dorsoventral boundary for S-opsin expressing cones closely matches

  18. Stenotic lesion level did not affect outcomes of carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhara, Masamitsu; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Akai, Atsushi; Isaji, Toshihiko; Akagi, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kota; Miyahara, Takuya; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-05-01

    Background Carotid endarterectomy is the established treatment for carotid artery stenosis, and remains the primary surgical option due to its superior outcomes compared to carotid arterial stenting. However, Japanese patients are known to have unfavorable anatomical conditions for carotid endarterectomy, with a relatively higher level of the carotid artery bifurcation than in the Western population. We investigated the outcomes of carotid endarterectomy in our institute and evaluated the procedural quality by comparing patients based on higher or lower lesion levels. Methods The clinical data of 65 patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy were collected retrospectively. The outcomes reviewed included stroke-free survival and stroke-free rate. The patients were divided into a higher group ( n = 25) and a lower group ( n = 40), based on lesion location in respect of the 2nd cervical vertebral level. Results There was no perioperative death and only one case of stroke in the higher group within 30 days after carotid endarterectomy. At 5 years after carotid endarterectomy, the stroke-free survival rates were 83.4% in the higher group and 87.8% in the lower group, while the stroke-free rates were 96.0% and 94.0%, respectively; there were no significant differences between groups. Conclusions Stenotic lesion level did not affect the outcome or procedural quality of carotid endarterectomy.

  19. Low level termination of external carotid artery and its clinical significance: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Devadasa Shetty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The external carotid arterial system is a complex vascular system providing nourishment to the territorial areas of the head and neck. The branches of the external carotid artery are the key landmarks for adequate exposure and appropriate placement of cross-clamps on the carotid arteries during carotid endarterectomy. Knowledge of anatomical variation of the external carotid artery is important in head and neck surgeries. Variations in the branching pattern of the external carotid artery are well known and documented. We report a rare case of low-level termination of the external carotid artery. It terminated by dividing into maxillary and superficial temporal arteries deep into the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, one inch below the angle of the mandible. The occipital and posterior auricular arteries arose from a common trunk given off by the external carotid artery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 160-163

  20. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow or blocked, usually because ... other substances found in the blood. Carotid artery disease is serious because it can block the blood ...

  1. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right- and left-internal carotid arteries, and the right- and left-external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to both the head and brain. Review Date 6/1/2015 Updated by: Daniel ...

  2. Bilateral carotid body tumor resection in a female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Burgess

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Surgical resection of carotid body tumors represents a special challenge to the surgeon because of the complex anatomical location of the tumor, including close relationship with the cranial nerves, involvement of the carotid vessels and large vascularization of the tumor. With the advance of diagnosis and improvement in surgical techniques as well as the understanding of biological behavior of tumors, surgical treatment has become a safer alternative for treating these tumors.

  3. Wall shear stress evolution in carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    The steady flow in an anatomically realistic human carotid bifurcation was simulated numerically. Main parameters such as wall shear stress (WSS), velocity profiles and pressure distributions are investigated in the carotid artery, namely in bifurcation and sinusoidal enlargement regions. Flow in the carotid sinus is dominated by a single secondary vortex motion accompanied by a strong helical flow. This type of flow is induced primarily by the curvature and asymmetry of the in vivo geometry. Low wall shear stress concentration occurs at both the anterior and posterior aspects of the proximal internal bulb.

  4. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  5. Gender differences in patients with carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoberock, Konstanze; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Atlihan, Gülsen; Daum, Günter; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Eifert, Sandra; Wipper, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    This overview analyses gender differences in prevalence, epidemiology, risk factors and therapy in patients with carotid stenosis in a systematic review. Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death in Western society, where about 20% of cases are triggered by a carotid stenosis or occlusion, which occurs more frequently in men than in women. The stroke-protective effect of carotid endarterectomy is greater in men. Men have lower peri-procedural stroke and death rates. Particularly men with carotid stenosis and a life expectancy of at least 5 years benefit from surgical treatment. Also, the recurrence rate of ipsilateral stroke 5 years after initial surgery is lower in men than in women. It is not yet fully clarified whether there are significant gender differences regarding the outcome after endovascular versus surgical treatment. Gender differences in the outcome of carotid artery repair may be caused by biological, anatomical (smaller vessel diameter in women) or hormonal differences as well as a protracted development of atherosclerotic changes in women and different plaque morphology. Moreover, women are on average older at the time of surgery and their surgical treatment is often delayed. To reduce the risk of stroke and to improve treatment outcome especially for women, further research on gender differences and their causes is mandatory and promising.

  6. Carotid Stump Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Toufic Dakhoul MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To highlight the case of a patient with multiple transient ischemic attacks and visual disturbances diagnosed with carotid stump syndrome and managed with endovascular approach. Case Presentation. We present the case of a carotid stump syndrome in an elderly patient found to have moderate left internal carotid artery stenosis in response to an advertisement for carotid screening. After a medical therapeutic approach and a close follow-up, transient ischemic attacks recurred. Computed tomographic angiography showed an occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and the presence of moderate stenosis in the right internal carotid artery, which was treated by endovascular stenting and balloon insertion. One month later, the patient presented with visual disturbances due to the left carotid stump and severe stenosis of the left external carotid artery that was reapproached by endovascular stenting. Conclusion. Considerations should be given to the carotid stump syndrome as a source of emboli for ischemic strokes, and vascular assessment could be used to detect and treat this syndrome.

  7. Carotid artery stenting; Karotisangioplastie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiehler, Jens [Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neuroradiologische Diagnostik und Intervention, Diagnostikzentrum

    2009-09-15

    An ipsilateral stenosis of the internal carotid artery is found in 10 - 15 % of all ischemic strokes and indicates an increased risk of a second stroke. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a therapy that is established for many years. CAS reveals complication rates and long-term efficacy comparable to carotid endarterectomy (TEA). Especially younger patients seem to benefit from CAS. Abilities and experiences of the therapist and the choice of the techniques used are critical for patient safety. The efficacy of CAS for treatment of asymptomatic carotid stenosis is probable but still unproven in prospective-randomized trial. (orig.)

  8. Treatment of a symptomatic intrathoracic internal carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Brown

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrathoracic common carotid artery bifurcations are an anatomic anomaly with such rarity that only six cases have been reported to date. The true incidence of and preferred treatment options for a diseased intrathoracic common carotid artery bifurcation or internal carotid artery (ICA have not been clearly described. This case report describes a 72-year-old man who experienced a postoperative right hemispheric stoke after an aortic valve replacement, radiofrequency maze procedure, and left atrial appendage clip. Postoperative cerebrovascular evaluation revealed a severely diseased intrathoracic ICA that was treated by ligation of the diseased proximal ICA and transposition of the distal ICA to the disease-free external carotid artery. The patient provided written consent to present the history, data, and images in this manuscript.

  9. Location of the internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yasin Hamarat

    2017-10-06

    Oct 6, 2017 ... There are some published results of OA anatomical studies [18,20-22]. .... right eye) and the depth of intracranial segment of ophthal- mic artery ... internal carotid artery and segments of ophthalmic artery in high tension glaucoma patients. No. of glaucoma patients. Eye. ICA edge, mm. IOA, mm. EOA, mm.

  10. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Current Approaches for Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Permanent neurologic injuries and death following stroke, necessitates more vigorous treatment of carotid disease. Carotid stenting and carotid endarterectomy are treatment options in many centers besides medical treatment. Whether the patient is symptomatic or asymtomatic, indications and management strategies for treatment remain controversial. Despite the debate, carotid endarterectomy is still accepted to be the most efficientintervention to decrease risk of stroke due to carotid artery stenosis.

  12. A Procedure for Calculating the Vertical Space Height of the Sacrum When Determining Skeletal Height for Use in the Anatomical Method of Adult Stature Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Atsuko; Emanovsky, Paul D; Pietrusewsky, Michael; Holland, Thomas D

    2016-03-01

    Estimating stature from skeletonized remains is one of the essential parameters in the development of a biological profile. A new procedure for determining skeletal height (SKH) incorporating the vertical space height (VSH) from the anterior margin of the sacral promontory to the superior margins of the acetabulae for use in the anatomical method of stature estimation is introduced. Regression equations for stature estimation were generated from measurements of 38 American males of European ancestry from the William M. Bass Donated Skeletal Collection. The modification to the procedure results in a SKH that is highly correlated with stature (r = 0.925-0.948). Stature estimates have low standard errors of the estimate ranging from 21.79 to 25.95 mm, biases from to 0.50 to 0.94 mm, and accuracy rates from 17.71 mm to 19.45 mm. The procedure for determining the VSH, which replaces "S1 height" in traditional anatomical method models, is a key improvement to the method. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Carotid stenting versus carotid endarterectomy : Evidence basis and cost implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M. P.; de Borst, G. J.; Mali, W. P. Th. M.; Kappelle, L. J.; Moll, F. L.; Ackerstaff, R. G. A.; Rothwell, P. M.; Brown, M. M.; van Sambeek, M. R.; Buskens, E.

    Objective: Carotid Angioplasty combined with Stenting (CAS) is increasingly performed because of its presumed benefits. A study was performed to identify key factors that determine the cost-effectiveness as compared to conventional carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Methods: The incremental

  14. Eversion carotid endarterectomy generates fewer microemboli than standard carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mingyuan; Sillesen, H H; Lorentzen, Jørgen E

    2000-01-01

    to test whether the occurrence of microembolism differed between eversion and standard carotid endarterectomy (CEA).......to test whether the occurrence of microembolism differed between eversion and standard carotid endarterectomy (CEA)....

  15. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis. This final recommendation statement applies to adults who ...

  16. Stent Placement for Carotid Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Lownie, Stephen P; Pandey, Sachin K; Boulton, Mel R

    2017-02-01

    The carotid web is an intraluminal shelf-like projection arising from the posterior wall of the carotid bifurcation and an uncommon etiology of ischemic strokes. We describe the feasibility of endovascular stent placement to treat this condition. A 47-year-old woman presented with a sudden occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography showed a carotid web in the ipsilateral carotid bifurcation. Treatment included mechanical thrombectomy for the middle cerebral artery occlusion and carotid stent placement to prevent further ischemic episodes from the carotid web. At the 6-month follow-up, good apposition of the stent against the artery wall was noted, and the patient was free of neurologic symptoms. Carotid artery stent placement is a feasible option in the management of carotid webs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antiplatelet Therapy in Carotid Artery Stenting and Carotid Endarterectomy in the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, A; Halliday, A; Bulbulia, R; Coppi, G; de Borst, G J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/237108151

    OBJECTIVE: Strokes are infrequent but potentially serious complications following carotid intervention, but antiplatelet therapy can reduce these risks. There are currently no specific guidelines on dose or duration of peri-procedural antiplatelet treatment for patients undergoing carotid

  18. Staged bilateral carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Engell, Hans Christian

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 56 staged bilateral carotid endarterectomies, new neurologic symptoms developed in 5% and 20% following the first and second procedure, respectively. All complications were transient or minor. The incidence of postendarterectomy hypertension was significantly higher following...... the second procedure, when operations were staged less than 3 weeks apart. A correlation between these hypertensive episodes and the occurrence of new neurologic symptoms could not be shown. However, as this correlation has been proved in several other reports, bilateral carotid endarterectomy is advised...

  19. Anatomic Preformed Post: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lamas Lara, César; Cirujano Dentista, Diplomado en Odontología Restauradora y Estética de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM. Docente del Curso de Operatoria Dental I y II ULADECH Católica.; Alvarado Menacho, Sergio; Cirujano Dentista, Especialista en Rehabilitación Oral, Profesor Asociado del Área de Prótesis y Oclusión de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Pari Espinoza, Rosa; Alumna del 5to año de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, preformed posts are being used frequently, but they do not follow root canal anatomy. Obtaining a more anatomical form of the root canal and reducing the space of the cement, it would help to reduce the possibility of its eviction. This article details the process of making of an anatomical preformed post and the advantages that would represent its clinical use. En la actualidad los postes preformados se utilizan con mucha frecuencia, pero tienenla dificultad de no seguir la anat...

  20. Visualization of the superior opthalmic vein on carotid angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servo, A.

    1982-05-01

    Visualization of the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) on carotid angiography was investigated based on a prospective sample of 452 carotid angiograms performed during one year. The SOV with normal blood flow direction, from facial veins into the cavernous sinus (CS), was seen on 26% and with reversed flow direction in 7% of the angiograms. A hypothesis was suggested that the anatomical variations of the moddle cerebral (MCV) and uncal veins (UV) affected the visualization. When both the MCV and UV drained into the CS, the SOV was seen in 11% of 179 angiograms. If the MCV and UV bypassed the CS, the SOV was seen on 51% of 118 angiograms. The difference is significant. Intubation of the patient increased the visualization of the SOV with normal flow direction but did not affect the visualization of the SOV with reversed flow. No SOV with normal blood flow direction was seen on selective internal carotid angiography.

  1. Determination of bilateral symmetry of carotid artery structure and function in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uithoven KE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Katelyn E Uithoven,1 Justin R Ryder,2 Roland Z Brown,3 Kyle D Rudser,3 Nicholas G Evanoff,1 Donald R Dengel,1,2 Aaron S Kelly2,4 1School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, 3Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 4Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: The carotid artery represents an ideal location for noninvasive assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in youth. Examination of arterial structure and function is generally conducted in the left common carotid. However, if the left common carotid is inaccessible or provides a poor acoustic window, it is unknown if the right common carotid can provide comparable values. The symmetry of carotid arteries in youth with high-resolution ultrasound was compared. Participants (N=230 [121 females], 13.8±2.9 years old were assessed for carotid intima media thickness (cIMT, carotid lumen diameter (cLD, carotid incremental elastic modulus (cIEM, carotid diameter compliance (cDC, carotid cross-sectional compliance (cCSC, carotid diameter distensibility (cDD, and carotid cross-sectional distensibility (cCSD. No significant differences (P>0.05 all were found for cIMT (0.49±0.09 vs 0.49±0.08 mm, cIEM (1095±382 vs 1116±346 mmHg, cDC (0.01±0.0 vs 0.01±0.0 mm/mmHg, cCSC (0.01±0.001/mmHg vs 0.01±0.001/mmHg, cDD (14.0%±3.16% vs 13.7%±3.18%, and cCSD (30.1%±7.37% vs 29.4%±7.36%. Significant differences were found for cLD (6.06±0.62 mm vs 6.33±0.64 mm, P<0.001. The majority of measures for arterial structure and function are comparable between the left and right common carotid arteries. There were differences present for cLD; however, these discrepancies are likely due to anatomical differences between the left and right common carotid arteries. Therefore, if the left common carotid is unable to be assessed properly, the right common

  2. Carotid Artery Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that look for inherited genetic markers linked to disease, and imaging tests that produce pictures of the inside of the body. These ... a risk factor. Risk factors for carotid artery disease include: age high blood pressure diabetes tobacco smoking high cholesterol coronary artery disease (CAD) obesity ...

  3. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study) : an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Joerg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molynewc, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Fell, G.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; Van Schil, P.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; De Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verhelst, R.; DeJaegher, L.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J-F; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M-F; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L-H; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Alback, A.; Harno, H.; Ijas, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepantalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruininckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Nieholt, G. J. Lycklama A.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; De Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. Bart; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sorensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennoe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gimenez Gaibar, A.; Perendreu, J.; Bjorses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T-B; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Bonati, L. H.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E-W; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, N.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Bradbury, A. W.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H-C; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dolman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Beard, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Gaines, P.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Clifton, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Brown, M. M.; Jaeger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Wong, J.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.; Rogers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid

  4. Carotid revascularization: risks and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Marlene O'Brien, Ankur Chandra Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: Despite a decline during the recent decades in stroke-related death, the incidence of stroke has remained unchanged or slightly increased, and extracranial carotid artery stenosis is implicated in 20%–30% of all strokes. Medical therapy and risk factor modification are first-line therapies for all patients with carotid occlusive disease. Evidence for the treatment of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis greater than 70% with either carotid artery stenting (CAS or carotid endarterectomy (CEA is compelling, and several trials have demonstrated a benefit to carotid revascularization in the symptomatic patient population. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis is more controversial, with the largest trials only demonstrating a 1% per year risk stroke reduction with CEA. Although there are sufficient data to advocate for aggressive medical therapy as the primary mode of treatment for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, there are also data to suggest that certain patient populations will benefit from a stroke risk reduction with carotid revascularization. In the United States, consensus and practice guidelines dictate that CEA is reasonable in patients with high-grade asymptomatic stenosis, a reasonable life expectancy, and perioperative risk of less than 3%. Regarding CAS versus CEA, the best-available evidence demonstrates no difference between the two procedures in early perioperative stroke, myocardial infarction, or death, and no difference in 4-year ipsilateral stroke risk. However, because of the higher perioperative risks of stroke in patients undergoing CAS, particularly in symptomatic, female, or elderly patients, it is difficult to recommend CAS over CEA except in populations with prohibitive cardiac risk, previous carotid surgery, or prior neck radiation. Current treatment

  5. Carotid endarterectomy: The procedure of choice for carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Savitr Sastri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is the commonest cause of neurological morbidity and mortality. Carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be beneficial in preventing ischemic strokes in patients with significant stenosis of the carotid artery, both in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Carotid artery stenting has been proposed as an alternative to CEA for this population. This paper reviews the available literature on carotid endarterectomy comparing it to the best medical therapy and carotid artery stenting in the prevention of ischemic strokes in patients with carotid stenosis. The use of newer imaging techniques and tools to redefine the existing idea of "asymptomatic" stenosis and post procedural strokes has also been reviewed. We present a concise review of existing data that shows unequivocally that endarterectomy still remains superior to stenting and best medical therapy as of now.

  6. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of carotid-arery stenosis. N Engl J Med . 2010;363(1):11- ...

  7. Carotid artery stenosis -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000717.htm Carotid artery stenosis - self-care To use the sharing features on ... feel their pulse under your jawline. Carotid artery stenosis occurs when the carotid arteries become narrowed or ...

  8. Spontaneous carotid dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dutra Queiroz Flumignan

    Full Text Available Summary Carotid dissection is a rare occurrence but it is the main cause of stroke in individuals aged less than 45 years, and can be the etiology in up to 25% of strokes in young adults. We report a case with classic image of ying yang on vascular ultrasound, which was treated according to the best available medical evidence, yielding a favorable outcome.

  9. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Brzost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63×55×88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible.

  10. Simple classification of carotid bifurcation: is it possible to predict twisted carotid artery during carotid endarterectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Tomoya; Nomura, Motohiro; Tamase, Akira; Mori, Kentaro; Seki, Shunsuke; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-12-01

    The internal carotid artery (ICA) usually runs posterolaterally to the external carotid artery (ECA), but occasionally we encounter the twisted carotid bifurcation, a variant in which the ICA courses medially to the ECA during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Prediction of this anomaly in the preoperative evaluation is mandatory, although descriptions in the literature are limited. We reviewed the clinical features of patients who underwent CEA and analyzed preoperative cerebral angiography, especially the anteroposterior (AP) view to determine whether it could be a predictive modality. In 58 consecutive CEA cases, we simply classified them into three groups; type 1 (the ICA runs laterally and the ECA runs medially), type 2 (the ICA and ECA run to overlap each other), and type 3 (the ICA runs medially and the ECA runs laterally), based on the findings of AP view of cerebral angiography. We compared the clinical features and intraoperative findings of these groups. Of 58 cases, types 1-3 were 24, 30, and four cases, respectively. Twisted carotid bifurcations were recognized in seven cases (12.4 %), including three cases in type 2 and four in type 3, and all twisted cases were found on the right side. Twisted carotids and right-sided lesion were significantly frequent in type 3, but no statistical differences of coexisting diseases were recognized among the three groups. CEAs of twisted carotid bifurcations were performed successfully with correction of the carotid position in three and as it was in four cases. Twisted carotid bifurcations were observed during operation in 10 % in type 2 and 100 % in type 3. CEA of twisted carotid bifurcations can be performed safely with or without correction of the carotid position. AP view of cerebral angiography could be useful for preoperative evaluation.

  11. The carotid bodies in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive rats--a study concerning size, location and blood supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, J O; Honig, A; Pfeiffer, C; Schmidt, M

    1981-01-01

    Size, anatomical position and blood supply of the carotid bodies were studied by light microscopic methods in spontaneously hypertensive rats of the Okamoto-strain (SHR) and in normotensive Wistar rats (NWR) of a random-bred strain. In both groups of animals the single carotid body was usually supplied by only one glomic artery which most frequently derived from the external carotid artery, more rarely from the occipital artery and very seldom from the internal carotid artery. In general the carotid bodies were of ellipsoide shape and compact structure and as a rule closely located to the internal carotid artery. In the NWR at the origins of their glomic arteries almost regularly circular intraarterial cushions were found; in the SHR such cushions were only seen in a few cases, and if so than they were less clearly developed. In the SHR, never in the NWR, within the carotid body the lumen of some branches of the glomic arteries was narrowed by pad-like structures. When compared with the NWR the SHR showed enlarged carotid bodies and a respiratory alcalosis, suggesting that systemic hypertension leads to morphologically and functionally detectable alterations of both carotid body structure and function.

  12. Tortuous Common Carotid Artery: A Report of Four Cases Observed in Cadaveric Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Iwanaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A tortuous common carotid artery poses a high risk of injury during tracheotomy. Preoperative diagnosis is therefore important to avoid serious complications. We found four cases of tortuous common carotid artery during an anatomical dissection course for students. The first case was a 91-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries without arteriosclerosis. Case 2 was a 78-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries without arteriosclerosis. Case 3 was an 86-year-old woman who died from bladder cancer and who also had a right tortuous common carotid artery without arteriosclerosis. Case 4 was an 89-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries and a tortuous brachiocephalic artery with severe arteriosclerosis. Case 4 was also examined using computed tomography to evaluate the arteriosclerosis. Computed tomography revealed severe calcification of the vascular wall, which was confirmed in the aortic arch and origins of its branches. In all four cases, the tortuosity was located below the level of the thyroid gland. Based on prior study results indicating that fusion between the carotid sheath and visceral fascia was often evident at the level of the thyroid gland, we speculated that the major region in which tortuosity occurs is at the same level or inferior to the level of the thyroid gland.

  13. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Bonati, L.H.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Lo, T.H.; Gaines, P.; Dorman, P.J.; Macdonald, S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Hendriks, J.M.; McCollum, C.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  14. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2010-03-20

    Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy.

  15. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gaibar, A. Gimenez; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  16. Targeted particle tracking in computational models of human carotid bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ian

    2011-12-01

    A significant and largely unsolved problem of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of flow in anatomically relevant geometries is that very few calculated pathlines pass through regions of complex flow. This in turn limits the ability of CFD-based simulations of imaging techniques (such as MRI) to correctly predict in vivo performance. In this work, I present two methods designed to overcome this filling problem, firstly, by releasing additional particles from areas of the flow inlet that lead directly to the complex flow region ("preferential seeding") and, secondly, by tracking particles both "downstream" and "upstream" from seed points within the complex flow region itself. I use the human carotid bifurcation as an example of complex blood flow that is of great clinical interest. Both idealized and healthy volunteer geometries are investigated. With uniform seeding in the inlet plane (in the common carotid artery (CCA)) of an idealized bifurcation geometry, approximately half the particles passed through the internal carotid artery (ICA) and half through the external carotid artery. However, of those particles entering the ICA, only 16% passed directly through the carotid bulb region. Preferential seeding from selected regions of the CCA was able to increase this figure to 47%. In the second method, seeding of particles within the carotid bulb region itself led to a very high proportion (97%) of pathlines running from CCA to ICA. Seeding of particles in the bulb plane of three healthy volunteer carotid bifurcation geometries led to much better filling of the bulb regions than by particles seeded at the inlet alone. In all cases, visualization of the origin and behavior of recirculating particles led to useful insights into the complex flow patterns. Both seeding methods produced significant improvements in filling the carotid bulb region with particle tracks compared with uniform seeding at the inlet and led to an improved understanding of the complex

  17. MR imaging of carotid webs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Mari E. [University of Calgary, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Calgary (Canada); Foothills Medical Centre, Seaman Family MR Research Centre, Calgary (Canada); Eswaradass, Prasanna Venkatesan; Singh, Dilip; Mitha, Alim P.; Menon, Bijoy K. [University of Calgary, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Calgary (Canada); Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary Stroke Program, Calgary (Canada); Goyal, Mayank [Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary Stroke Program, Calgary (Canada); University of Calgary, Department of Radiology, Calgary (Canada); Frayne, Richard [Foothills Medical Centre, Seaman Family MR Research Centre, Calgary (Canada); University of Calgary, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    We propose a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol for the characterization of carotid web morphology, composition, and vessel wall dynamics. The purpose of this case series was to determine the feasibility of imaging carotid webs with MR imaging. Five patients diagnosed with carotid web on CT angiography were recruited to undergo a 30-min MR imaging session. MR angiography (MRA) images of the carotid artery bifurcation were acquired. Multi-contrast fast spin echo (FSE) images were acquired axially about the level of the carotid web. Two types of cardiac phase resolved sequences (cineFSE and cine phase contrast) were acquired to visualize the elasticity of the vessel wall affected by the web. Carotid webs were identified on MRA in 5/5 (100%) patients. Multi-contrast FSE revealed vessel wall thickening and cineFSE demonstrated regional changes in distensibility surrounding the webs in these patients. Our MR imaging protocol enables an in-depth evaluation of patients with carotid webs: morphology (by MRA), composition (by multi-contrast FSE), and wall dynamics (by cineFSE). (orig.)

  18. Clipping Surgery for Paraclinoid Carotid Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yasunaga; Suzuki, Yota; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Paraclinoid carotid aneurysm is widely treated with coil embolization. However, all paraclinoid carotid aneurysms cannot be obliterated by the endovascular approach. Our direct surgical procedure was presented. The clinical data of surgically treated paraclinoid carotid aneurysms were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred ninety paraclinoid carotid aneurysms in 181 patients were directly obliterated at the Shinshu University Hospital and its affiliated hospitals between 1991 and 2013. Direct surgical repair of the paraclinoid carotid aneurysm is still useful, even in the era of endovascular treatment.

  19. Intracerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Boesen, J

    1987-01-01

    Among 662 consecutive carotid endarterectomies eight cases of postoperative ipsilateral intracerebral haemorrhage were identified, occurring into brain areas which, preoperatively were without infarction. As blood pressures across the stenosis were routinely measured during surgery, the internal...

  20. Lower third molar displaced to lateral pharyngeal space after mandibular angle fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Pereira, Rodrigo; da Silva, Jonathan Ribeiro; Bonardi, João Paulo; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo

    2018-02-18

    The removal of displaced dental elements from deep anatomical spaces is a condition that requires the knowledge of the region and skills to perform the procedure. The lateral pharyngeal space contains important structures such as the internal carotid artery and close proximity with the cranium basis. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case of a lower third molar displaced to the lateral pharyngeal space after a mandibular angle fracture and its treatment by surgical intervention. The tooth was removed under general anesthesia by direct approach and the fracture was reduced and fixed with a plate and screws. This case report illustrates the importance of an immediate procedure to avoiding severe complications and further damage to important anatomical structures.

  1. Isolated origin of the left internal carotid artery from the pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Michael C; Nguyen, Pamela H; DiPatri, Arthur J; Shaibani, Ali

    2008-09-01

    The authors describe what is, to their knowledge, the first reported case of the anomalous origin of an internal carotid artery from the pulmonary artery. An otherwise asymptomatic 6-year-old girl, who presented with headaches and hypertension, underwent a comprehensive workup that revealed extensive meningeal and cerebral artery anastomoses to the left internal carotid artery--itself arising from the origin of the left pulmonary artery. This unique anatomical anomaly, caused by a disturbed pattern of aortic arch regression, resulted in a right-to-left vascular shunt into the pulmonary artery and a disturbance of intracranial artery flow patterns, complicating the management options.

  2. Assessing the blood pressure waveform of the carotid artery using an ultrasound image processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe [Dept. of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Dept. of Medical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saben, Hazhir [Dept. Radiology, Imaging Center of Imam Khomaini Hospital, Tehran Medical Sciences University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce and implement a noninvasive method to derive the carotid artery pressure waveform directly by processing diagnostic sonograms of the carotid artery. Ultrasound image sequences of 20 healthy male subjects (age, 36±9 years) were recorded during three cardiac cycles. The internal diameter and blood velocity waveforms were extracted from consecutive sonograms over the cardiac cycles by using custom analysis programs written in MATLAB. Finally, the application of a mathematical equation resulted in time changes of the arterial pressure. The resulting pressures were calibrated using the mean and the diastolic pressure of the radial artery. A good correlation was found between the mean carotid blood pressure obtained from the ultrasound image processing and the mean radial blood pressure obtained using a standard digital sphygmomanometer (R=0.91). The mean absolute difference between the carotid calibrated pulse pressures and those measured clinically was -1.333±6.548 mm Hg. The results of this study suggest that consecutive sonograms of the carotid artery can be used for estimating a blood pressure waveform. We believe that our results promote a noninvasive technique for clinical applications that overcomes the reproducibility problems of common carotid artery tonometry with technical and anatomical causes.

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Carotid plaque thickness and carotid plaque burden predict future cardiovascular events in asymptomatic adult Americans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Sartori, Samantha; Sandholt, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Prediction of cardiovascular events improves using imaging, i.e. coronary calcium score and ultrasound assessment of carotid plaque. This study analysed the predictive value of two ultrasound measures of carotid plaque size: carotid plaque thickness and carotid and intima......-media thickness (IMT). Methods and results: A total of 6102 asymptomatic persons underwent assessment of conventional risk factors and imaging by carotid ultrasound. Carotid plaque burden (cPB) and maximum carotid plaque thickness (cPTmax) were measured from 'cross-sectional sweep' video acquisition...

  5. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  6. Contemporary Neuroradiographic Assessment of the Cochleo-Carotid Partition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoman, Nael M; Samy, Ravi N; Pensak, Myles L

    2016-01-01

    The cochleo-carotid partition (CCP) describes the intimate anatomic relationship between the petrous carotid artery and the cochlear basal turn. This partition bears significant surgical and unique clinical relevance. The purpose of this paper is to radiographically assess the CCP and discuss its clinical implications. A total of 155 consecutive fine-cut temporal bone CT scans were retrospectively reviewed, and study scans were digitally analyzed in both axial and coronal views. The shortest distance between the petrous carotid canal and the cochlear basal turn was measured. In all, 310 temporal bones were studied, with a mean CCP of 1.9 mm (range 0.2-8.5, SD 1.1). The following CCP measurements were obtained: ≤1.0 mm [n = 46 (14.8%)]; 1.1-2.0 mm [n = 161 (51.9%)]; 2.1-3.0 mm [n = 29 (9.4%)], and ≥4.0 mm [n = 12 (4.2%)]. One temporal bone (0.3%) had complete CCP dehiscence. There was a positive correlation between each patient's right and left CCP measures (p ear window in patients with audiovestibular symptoms, and pathophysiology of new-onset tinnitus following cochlear implantation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. [Anatomical basis for rejuvenation surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinna, R; Herlin, C; Garson, S; Dast, S; Delay, E

    2017-10-01

    The understanding of the face anatomy is mandatory before to be able to appreciate the different surgical techniques of face lifting. Despite numerous controversies and anatomical variations, we can find in the literature several keystone works that allows us to understand that the soft tissues of the face are not only a superposition of layers but also a tridimensionnal structure with a fibrous system that links the different layers. This structures creates a mix loose spaces, fat and retaining ligament that can be describe in a quite systematic manner. This systematisation can help the surgeon during the surgical procedure to search and find the area where there is no danger and alert him around the retaining for example, which is where we can often find a vessel or a branch of the facial nerve that we want to avoid. This article summarizes these anatomical knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Asymptomatic carotid arterial stenosis - population based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general population is discussed in many countries because of the benefits of carotid endarterectomy in the three trials. Many factors influence the cost-effectiveness of screening. These factors are the prevalence of carotid stenosis, the

  9. Carotid artery stenting : a 2009 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeebregts, Clark J.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Geelkerken, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of patients with significant carotid stenosis and has proven its value over the past decades. Endovascular techniques have evolved, and carotid artery stenting (CAS) is challenging CEA to become

  10. The Interaction Between Carotid Baroreceptor and Chemoreceptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension and hypoxia often occur together in the clinical setting implying that the carotid baroreceptor and carotid chemoreceptors are affected simultaneously. This work was designed to study the effects of increased reflex sympathetic activity following carotid baroreceptor and chemoreceptor stimulation on reflex ...

  11. Cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Sørensen, O

    1987-01-01

    Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 56 patients before and one to four times after uncomplicated carotid endarterectomy. The findings were related to the ratio between internal carotid artery (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) mean pressures. Within the 1st...... postoperative day CBF increased by a median of 37% in the ipsilateral and 33% in the contralateral hemisphere. Later recordings showed a gradual return of CBF toward the preoperative level. Sixteen patients with an ICA/CCA pressure ratio below 0.7 showed a significantly more pronounced and longer-lasting flow......, occurred in the low pressure ratio group, while the hemispheric asymmetry on average was unchanged in the high pressure ratio group. This relative hyperemia was most pronounced 2 to 4 days following reconstruction. The marked hyperemia, absolute as well as relative, in patients with a low ICA/CCA pressure...

  12. Carotid endarterectomy with regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaugh, R E; Pikus, H J

    2001-09-01

    The senior author (REH) has changed his technique for performing carotid endarterectomy from the use of general anesthesia to the use of cervical block anesthesia. Because a randomized study was not performed, it is difficult to separate effects of increased surgical experience from those caused by a change in anesthetic regimen. Nonetheless, there has been a substantial decrease in complications, length of hospital stay, and costs concomitant with the change to regional anesthesia; we think there is a causal relationship. The use of cervical block anesthesia has practically eliminated the non-stroke-related complications associated with carotid endarterectomy in our practice. The technique for performing carotid endarterectomy under cervical block anesthesia is described in detail.

  13. The prognostic role of carotid plaque ultrasonography in cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy: carotid plaque and cardiac risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyfos, George; Toutouzas, Konstantinos P; Benetos, George; Konstadoulakis, Manousos; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Katsaragakis, Stilianos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Zografos, Georgios; Filis, Konstantinos

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the correlation of ultrasound determined carotid plaque morphology with coronary risk and cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy. Fifty patients (in a series of 162) scheduled for carotid endarterectomy had the indication for coronary CT-angiography preoperatively and were included in this study. Patients were classified according to ultrasonographic characteristics of carotid plaque. The Duke Criteria were used to assess the degree of coronary risk (low, medium and high risk). Cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy was evaluated based on symptoms, cardiac Troponin I measurement and electrocardiographic findings. There were no deaths, strokes or symptomatic myocardial infarctions postoperatively (30-day results). Ten patients (20%) showed asymptomatic cardiac damage postoperatively. Cardiac damage after surgery did not show any difference between the three cardiac risk groups. Echogenic and specifically Type IV carotid artery plaques (Gray-Weale Criteria) were associated with high cardiac risk preoperatively and with postoperative cardiac damage. The degree of carotid artery stenosis, and echolucent carotid plaques were not associated with postoperative cardiac damage. Asymptomatic postoperative cardiac damage occurs often after carotid endarterectomy and presents independently from coronary risk. Carotid plaques of higher echogenicity are associated with severity of coronary artery disease and cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy.

  14. Carotid cavernous fistula after elective carotid endarterectomy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Asser

    2014-12-01

    This is a case to illustrate a rare complication of carotid artery surgery. The patient had atherosclerotic vessel damage of ICA visible on earlier CT scans. This combined with abrupt increase of transmural pressure due to the revascularization procedure could possibly lead to arterial wall rupture and fistula formation.

  15. Carotid revascularization and medical management for asymptomatic carotid stenosis: Protocol of the CREST-2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Virginia J; Meschia, James F; Lal, Brajesh K; Turan, Tanya N; Roubin, Gary S; Brown, Robert D; Voeks, Jenifer H; Barrett, Kevin M; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Huston, John; Lazar, Ronald M; Moore, Wesley S; Wadley, Virginia G; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Moy, Claudia S; Chimowitz, Marc; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G

    2017-10-01

    Rationale Trials conducted decades ago demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy by skilled surgeons reduced stroke risk in asymptomatic patients. Developments in carotid stenting and improvements in medical prevention of stroke caused by atherothrombotic disease challenge understanding of the benefits of revascularization. Aim Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial (CREST-2) will test whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting plus contemporary intensive medical therapy is superior to intensive medical therapy alone in the primary prevention of stroke in patients with high-grade asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods and design CREST-2 is two multicenter randomized trials of revascularization plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone. One trial randomizes patients to carotid endarterectomy plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone; the other, to carotid stenting plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone. The risk factor targets of centrally directed intensive medical therapy are LDL cholesterol medical therapy alone arm is 4.8% higher or 2.8% lower than an anticipated 3.6% rate in the revascularization arm. Discussion Management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis requires contemporary randomized trials to address whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting plus intensive medical therapy is superior in preventing stroke beyond intensive medical therapy alone. Whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting has favorable effects on cognition will also be tested. Trial registration United States National Institutes of Health Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02089217.

  16. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    simulationer, som tillod beregning af longitudinelle stress-niveauer i den fibrøse kappe. Afhandlingen indeholder tre artikler, som beskriver denne metode. Den første; “Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques using MRI-Based Fluid Structure Interaction Models”, beskriver i detaljer metoden til at danne de...

  17. Anatomical Individualized ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ata Rahnemai-Azar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is composed of two bundles, which work together to provide both antero-posterior and rotatory stability of the knee. Understanding the anatomy and function of the ACL plays a key role in management of patients with ACL injury. Anatomic ACL reconstruction aims to restore the function of the native ACL. Femoral and tibial tunnels should be placed in their anatomical location accounting for both the native ACL insertion site and bony landmarks. One main component of anatomical individualized ACL reconstruction is customizing the treatment according to each patient’s individual characteristics, considering preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of the native ACL and knee bony anatomy. Anatomical individualized reconstruction surgery should also aim to restore the size of the native ACL insertion as well. Using this concept, while single bundle ACL reconstruction can restore the function of the ACL in some patients, double bundle reconstruction is indicated in others to achieve optimal outcome.

  18. Fate of the external carotid artery following carotid interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kevin; Zhou, Wei; Tedesco, Maureen M; Al-Khatib, Weesam K; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Bech, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    The external carotid artery (ECA) is an important collateral pathway for cerebral blood flow. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) typically crosses the ECA, while carotid endarterectomy (CEA) includes deliberate ECA plaque removal. The purpose of the present study was to compare the long-term patency of the ECA following CAS and CEA as determined by carotid duplex ultrasound. Duplex ultrasounds and hospital records were reviewed for consecutive patients undergoing CAS between February 2002 and April 2008, and were compared with those undergoing CEA in the same time period. Preoperative and postoperative ECA peak systolic velocities were normalized to the common carotid artery (CCA) as ECA/CCA ratios. A significant (80% or greater) ECA stenosis was defined as an ECA/CCA ratio of 4.0. A change of ratio by more than 1 was defined as significant. Data were analyzed using Student's t test and χ(2) analysis. A total of 86 CAS procedures in 83 patients were performed (81 men, mean age 69.9 years). Among them, 38.4% of patients had previous CEA, 9.6% of whom had contralateral internal carotid artery occlusion. Sixty-seven CAS and 65 CEA patients with complete duplex data in the same time period were included in the analyses. There was no difference in the incidence of severe ECA stenosis on preoperative ultrasound evaluations. During a mean follow-up of 34 months (range four to 78 months), three postprocedure ECA occlusions were found in the CAS group. The likelihood of severe stenosis or occlusion following CAS was 28.3%, compared with 11% following CEA (PECA status. Reduction in the patient's degree of ECA stenosis was observed in 9.4% of CAS versus 26.6% of CEA patients. Overall, immediate postoperative ratios of both groups were slightly improved, but there was a trend of more disease progression in the CAS group during follow-up. CAS is associated with a higher incidence of post-procedure ECA stenosis. Despite the absence of neurological symptoms, a trend toward late

  19. Differential effects of carotid artery stenting versus carotid endarterectomy on external carotid artery patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Edward Y; Karmacharya, Jagajan; Velazquez, Omaida C; Carpenter, Jeffrey P; Skelly, Christopher L; Fairman, Ronald M

    2007-04-01

    To determine the effect of stent coverage of the external carotid artery (ECA) after carotid artery stenting (CAS) compared to eversion endarterectomy of the ECA after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The records of 101 CAS and 165 CEA procedures performed over 2 years were reviewed. Duplex velocities and history and physical examinations were taken prior to the procedure, at 1 month, and at 6-month intervals subsequently. CAS was performed by extending the stent across the internal carotid artery (ICA) lesion into the common carotid artery (CCA) thereby covering the ECA. CEA was performed with eversion endarterectomy of the ECA. The mean peak systolic velocities (PSV) in the ICA pre-CAS and pre-CEA were 361 and 352 cm/s, respectively. In terms of CAS, there was a significant increase in ECA velocities versus baseline at 12 (p = 0.009), 18 (p = 0.00001), and 24 (p = 0.005) months. In the CEA group, there was a significant decrease in ECA velocities versus baseline at 1 (p = 0.01) and 6 (p = 0.004) months. There were 2 occluded ECAs in follow-up in the CAS group and none in the CEA group. No significant differences were noted when comparing preprocedural ICA or ECA velocities. However, at the 1-, 6-, and 12-month intervals, the ECA velocities in the CAS group were significantly higher than in the CEA group (p = 0.03, p = 0.001, and p = 0.0004, respectively). There were no neurological symptoms in any patients during the study period. Although progressive stenosis of the ECA is noted during CAS, the ECA usually does not occlude. Furthermore, there are no associated neurological symptoms. Thus, apprehension for progressive ECA occlusion should not be a contraindication to CAS. In addition, concern for ECA coverage should not deter stent extension from the ICA to the CCA during CAS.

  20. Acute internal carotid artery occlusion after carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Yunoki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of acute carotid artery (CA occlusion following carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Case 1: a 58-year-old man was admitted with transient right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR angiography (MRA revealed cerebral infarction in the left cerebral hemisphere and left CA stenosis. Ten days after admission, he underwent CEA. 24 h after surgery, he developed right hemiplegia. MRI and MRA demonstrated a slightly enlarged infarction and left internal carotid artery (ICA occlusion. Emergency reoperation was performed and complete recanalization achieved. The patient made a clinically significant recovery. Case 2: a 65 year-old man underwent a right-sided CEA for an asymptomatic 80% CA stenosis. 48 h after surgery, his family noticed he was slightly disorientated. MRI and MRA revealed multiple infarctions and right ICA occlusion. He was treated with antiplatelet therapy without reoperation because sufficient cross-flow from the left ICA through the anterior communicating artery was demonstrated by angiography, and his neurological symptoms were mild. His symptoms gradually alleviated and he was discharged 14 days after surgery. With ICA occlusion after CEA, immediate re-operation is mandatory with severe neurological symptoms, whereas individualized judgement is needed when the symptoms are mild.

  1. Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting utilization trends over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerritt, Matthew R; Block, Robert C; Pearson, Thomas A; Young, Kate C

    2012-03-29

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been the standard in atherosclerotic stroke prevention for over 2 decades. More recently, carotid artery stenting (CAS) has emerged as a less invasive alternative for revascularization. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an increase in stenting parallels a decrease in endarterectomy, if there are specific patient factors that influence one intervention over the other, and how these factors may have changed over time. Using a nationally representative sample of US hospital discharge records, data on CEA and CAS procedures performed from 1998 to 2008 were obtained. In total, 253,651 cases of CEA and CAS were investigated for trends in utilization over time. The specific data elements of age, gender, payer source, and race were analyzed for change over the study period, and their association with type of intervention was examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. Rates of intervention decreased from 1998 to 2008 (P use displayed a significant downward trend (P use over the study period (P time, the proportion of white patients who received intervention decreased significantly (P gender, white race, and earlier in the study period were significant positive predictors of CEA use. Rates of carotid revascularization have decreased over time, although this has been the result of a reduction in CEA despite an overall increase in CAS. Among the specific patient factors analyzed, age, gender, race, and time were significantly associated with the utilization of these two interventions.

  2. [Surgical treatment of tumors of the carotid body with reconstruction of the internal carotid artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reparaz, L; Magallón, P; Riera, L; Capilla, M T; Merino, M J; Martínez, I; Hernández, A; Sáez, L; Alamo, O; Jiménez Cossío, J A

    1990-01-01

    The experience about treatment in infiltrating tumors of Carotid Corpus, III Degree (Shamblin), is presented. Different methods of carotid reconstruction, and biologic and evolutive characteristics are emphasized, discussing preoperatory study and surgical technics.

  3. [Sports-related carotid artery dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrouschot, J; Bormann, A; Routsi, D; Stoll, A

    2009-09-01

    Sports-related carotid artery dissection are very rare and were described in different kinds of sports. We report on a 45-year old man who suffered bilateral brain infarctions caused by bilateral extracranial internal carotid artery dissection after excessive weight lifting in a gym. As possible trigger factors for the dissections we assumed the abrupt extension of the neck during weight lifting and the frequent Valsalva manoeuvers with massive rise in the pressure in the carotid artery system. The patient underwent angioplasty and stenting of the stenosis of right carotid artery, the primarily occluded left carotid artery recanalized spontaneously. Secondary prevention was established by platelet aggregation inhibitors. The patient recovered completely. The pathogenesis of sports-related dissections is multifactorial. In addition to sporting activities hereditary or acquired structural aberrations in the arterial walls could be discussed. Acute focal neurological symptoms after sport should always focus on carotid or vertebral artery dissection. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  4. A Case of Hybrid Carotid Revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Prasad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral infarction attributed to extracranial carotid and vertebral artery disease is defined as clinical stroke with evidence of infarction on brain imaging associated with >50% stenosis or occlusion of an extracranial carotid or vertebral artery documented by noninvasive imaging or angiography. Radiation to the neck poses a high risk for developing carotid stenosis. Even though the standard treatment for extracranial artery stenosis is carotid endarterectomy (CEA, higher rates of cranial nerve injury and wound complications including infection limit CEA applications in patients with prior radiation. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS should be considered as an alternative to CEA for those patients with high surgical risk. We report a case of CAS in a patient who had prior neck radiation for malignancy, presenting with carotid stenosis.

  5. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadori, Amir A; Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Van Baalen, Mary; Semones, Edward J [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Shavers, Mark R [Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Dodge, Charles, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [University of Houston-Downtown, Houston, TX 77002 (United States)

    2011-03-21

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  6. DURAL CAROTID-CAVERNOUS FISTULAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Cvenkel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas (CCF are communications fed by meningeal branches of the intracavernous internal carotid artery (ACI or/and external carotid artery (ACE. In contrast to typical CCF, the arteriovenous shunting of blood is usually low flow and low pressure. Spontaneous dural CCF are more common in postmenopausal women. Aetiology is unknown, but congenital malformation or rupture of thin-walled dural arteries within venous sinuses is believed to be the cause.Case reports. 3 cases lacking the typical clinical signs of CCF who had been treated as chronic conjunctivitis, myositis of the extraocular muscle and orbital pseudotumour are presented. Clinical presentation depends on the direction and magnitude of fistular flow and on the anatomy of the collateral branches. If increased blood flow is directed anteriorly in ophthalmic veins the signs of orbito-ocular congestion are present (»redeyed shunt syndrome«. Drainage primarly in the inferior petrosal sinus may cause painful oculomotor and abducens palsies without signs of ocular congestion (»white-eyed shunt syndrome«. Also different therapeutic approaches as well as possible complications are described.Conclusions. For definite diagnosis angiography is obligatory and is also therapeutic as one third to one half of dural CCF close spontaneously. Because of potential severe eye and systemic complications, surgical intervention is indicated only in cases with uncontrolled secondary glaucoma and hypoxic retinopathy.

  7. Endarterectomy for a symptomatic carotid web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, John; Trestman, Eric B; Yean, Chetra; Lipsitz, Evan C

    2017-10-01

    Background We report a symptomatic carotid web successfully treated with carotid endarterectomy. A healthy 43-year-old woman presented with acute-onset left-sided weakness. Carotid web was evident on computed tomography angiography as a focal filling defect in the right common carotid artery. This right common carotid artery web extended into the ICA created an eddy resulting in turbulent flow. Subsequent acute embolus formation led to embolization and acute stroke. Method Review of the literature was performed using Medline Plus and PubMed databases. Result The patient underwent carotid endarterectomy with primary closure. Procedure was well tolerated and there was an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Arterial webs are a rare arteriopathy and a usual arrangement of fibromuscular intralumenal in-growth with unclear etiology. It is however, an important potential etiology of stroke in patients without traditional atherosclerotic risk factors. Carotid web and atypical carotid fibromuscular dysplasia should be considered in young, otherwise healthy patients presenting with stroke and without the typical risk factors for atherosclerotic carotid disease and stroke.

  8. Aberrant internal carotid artery in the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Keun Tak; Kang, Hyun Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The knowledge about the aberrant internal carotid artery (ICA) in the middle ear is essential for clinicians, because a misdiagnosis of the aberrant ICA could have serious consequences such as excessive aural bleeding during a middle ear surgery. A 38-year-old woman presented with tinnitus and hearing difficulties of the left ear that had started 5 years ago. During otoscopy, an anteroinferior bluish mass was seen in the tympanic space. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a left-side aberrant ICA with bony dehiscence of the carotid canal in the middle ear and a reduced diameter of the tympanic ICA. Herein we report a case of an aberrant ICA in the middle ear. We also review the literature regarding this important vascular anomaly of the temporal bone which may lead to disastrous surgical complications.

  9. Towards the sensory nature of the carotid body: Hering, De Castro and Heymans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando De Castro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The carotid body or glomus caroticum is a chemosensory organ bilaterally located between the external and internal carotid arteries. Although known by anatomists since the report included by Von Haller and Taube in the mid XVIIIth century, its detailed study started the first quarter of the XXth. The Austro-German physiologist Heinrich E. Hering studied the cardio-respiratory reflexes searched for the anatomical basis of this reflex in the carotid sinus, while the Ghent School leaded by the physio-pharmacologists Jean-François Heymans and his son Corneille focussed in the cardio-aortic reflexogenic region. In 1925, Fernando De Castro, one of the youngest and more brilliant disciples of Santiago Ramón y Cajal at the Laboratorio de Investigaciones Biológicas (Madrid, Spain, profited from some original novelties in histological procedures to study the fine structure and innervation of the carotid body. De Castro unravelled them in a series of scientific papers published between 1926 and 1929, which became the basis to consider the carotid body as a sensory receptor (or chemoreceptor to detect the chemical changes in the composition of the blood. Indeed, this was the first description of arterial chemoreceptors. Impressed by the novelty and implications of the work of De Castro, Corneille Heymans invited the Spanish neurologist to visit Ghent on two occasions (1929 and 1932, where both performed experiences together. Shortly after, Heymans visited De Castro at the Instituto Cajal (Madrid. From 1932-33, Corneille Heymans focused all his attention on the carotid body his physiological demonstration of De Castro’s hypothesis regarding chemoreceptors was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1938, just when Spain was immersed in its catastrophic Civil War.

  10. The haemodynamic effect of carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ming-Yuan; Sillesen, H H; Jørgensen, Lisbeth

    2002-01-01

    to assess the haemodynamic effect of carotid artery surgery, and to relate postoperative changes to the state of cerebral circulation before revascularisation.......to assess the haemodynamic effect of carotid artery surgery, and to relate postoperative changes to the state of cerebral circulation before revascularisation....

  11. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 60. Read More Carotid artery disease Carotid artery surgery Recovering after stroke Risks of tobacco Smoking - tips on how to quit Stent Stroke ...

  12. Medical treatment in carotid artery intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkert, J. L.; Meerwaldt, R.; Lefrandt, Johan; Geelkerken, R. H.; Zeebregts, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Medical treatment has a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with occlusive carotid artery disease. Large trials have provided the justification for operative treatment besides medical treatment in patients with recent significant carotid artery stenosis two decades ago. Since then, medical

  13. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C

    2015-01-01

    characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). SUBJECTS/METHODS: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters...... the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could represent an additional biomarker, depicting the impact of altered hemodynamics on arterial wall....

  14. Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The performance of complex tasks on the International Space Station (ISS) requires significant preflight crew training commitments and frequent skill and knowledge refreshment. This report documents a recently developed just-in-time training methodology, which integrates preflight hardware familiarization and procedure training with an on-orbit CD-ROM-based skill enhancement. This just-in-time concept was used to support real-time remote expert guidance to complete medical examinations using the ISS Human Research Facility (HRF). An American md Russian ISS crewmember received 2-hours of hands on ultrasound training 8 months prior to the on-orbit ultrasound exam. A CD-ROM-based Onboard Proficiency Enhancement (OPE) interactive multimedia program consisting of memory enhancing tutorials, and skill testing exercises, was completed by the crewmember six days prior to the on-orbit ultrasound exam. The crewmember was then remotely guided through a thoracic, vascular, and echocardiographic examination by ultrasound imaging experts. Results of the CD ROM based OPE session were used to modify the instructions during a complete 35 minute real-time thoracic, cardiac, and carotid/jugular ultrasound study. Following commands from the ground-based expert, the crewmember acquired all target views and images without difficulty. The anatomical content and fidelity of ultrasound video were excellent and adequate for clinical decision-making. Complex ultrasound experiments with expert guidance were performed with high accuracy following limited pre-flight training and CD-ROM-based in-flight review, despite a 2-second communication latency.

  15. Early fetal anatomical sonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Jennifer C

    2012-10-01

    Over the past decade, prenatal screening and diagnosis has moved from the second into the first trimester, with aneuploidy screening becoming both feasible and effective. With vast improvements in ultrasound technology, sonologists can now image the fetus in greater detail at all gestational ages. In the hands of experienced sonographers, anatomic surveys between 11 and 14 weeks can be carried out with good visualisation rates of many structures. It is important to be familiar with the normal development of the embryo and fetus, and to be aware of the major anatomical landmarks whose absence or presence may be deemed normal or abnormal depending on the gestational age. Some structural abnormalities will nearly always be detected, some will never be and some are potentially detectable depending on a number of factors.

  16. Toward the detection of intraplaque hemorrhage in carotid artery lesions using photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabul, Mustafa Umit; Heres, Maarten; Rutten, Marcel C. M.; van Sambeek, Marc R.; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Lopata, Richard G. P.

    2017-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) may have the ability to reveal the composition and the anatomical structure of carotid plaques, which determines its mechanical properties and vulnerability. We used PAI and plane wave ultrasound (PUS) imaging to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of endarterectomy samples ex vivo and compared the results with histology to investigate the potential of PAI-based identification of intraplaque hemorrhage. Seven carotid plaque samples were obtained from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy and imaged with a fully integrated hand-held photoacoustic (PA) probe, consisting of a pulsed diode laser (tpulse=130 ns, Epulse=1 mJ, λ=808 nm) and a linear array transducer (fc=7.5 MHz). The samples were rotated 360 deg with 10 deg steps, and data were spatially compounded to obtain complete 3-D images of the plaques. Areas of high absorption in the 3-D datasets were identified and compared to histological data of the plaques. Data in six out of seven endarterectomy samples revealed the presence of intraplaque hemorrhages that were not visible in the PUS images. Due to the noninvasive nature of PAI, this ex vivo study may elucidate preclinical studies toward the in vivo, noninvasive, vulnerability assessment of the atherosclerotic carotid plaque.

  17. Reference Man anatomical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  18. The importance of internal carotid artery occlusion tolerance test in carotid endarterectomy under locoregional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaretti, Marcos; de Vasconcelos, Laura T; Dourado, Jules; de Souza, Renata F; Fontoura, Renato R; de Sousa, Atos A

    2016-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is considered a safe and effective method for preventing stroke in the short and long term in patients with severe carotid stenosis. The internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion tolerance test was performed to evaluate cerebral tolerance during temporary carotid occlusion, defined as the capacity of the cerebral hemisphere to maintain adequate cerebral blood flow during occlusion of the ICA. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the importance of this test in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. From August 2008 to May 2015, 115 consecutive patients (39 female, 77 male) were referred for carotid endarterectomy at the Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte by the main author. Of the 115 patients who participated in the study, 107 were submitted to carotid endarterectomy. Morbi-mortality was 2.7 %. The presence of deficits during the ICA occlusion tolerance test in less than 30 s was associated with the presence of complications. Among the 104 patients who showed no deficits during the test, only one case (0.9 %) presented complications, while among the three cases that showed deficits during the test and who were submitted to carotid endarterectomy, two cases presented complications (p carotid endarterectomy under locoregional anesthesia is a safe surgical procedure. The internal carotid artery occlusion tolerance test can help identify high-risk patients who have been assigned this treatment.

  19. Associations between Carotid Artery Plaque Score, Carotid Hemodynamics and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiping Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The carotid artery plaque score (PS is an independent predictor of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD. This study aims to evaluate the combination of PS and carotid hemodynamics to predict CHD. Methods: A total of 476 patients who underwent carotid ultrasonography and coronary angiography were divided into two groups depending on the presence of CHD. PS, carotid intima-media thickness, and carotid blood flow were measured. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to establish the best prediction model for CHD presence. Results: Age, sex, carotid intima-media thickness of internal carotid artery and carotid bifurcation, PS, peak systolic velocity (PSA of right internal carotid artery (RICA, and most resistance index data were significantly related with the presence of CHD. The area under the curve for a collective model, which included factors of the PS, carotid hemodynamics and age, was significantly higher than the other model. Age, PS, and PSA of RICA were significant contributors for predicting CHD presence. Conclusions: The model of PS and PSA of RICA has greater predictive value for CHD than PS alone. Adding age to PS and PSA of RICA further improves predictive value over PS alone.

  20. Associations between Carotid Artery Plaque Score, Carotid Hemodynamics and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Liu, Mengxue; Ren, Tiantian; Wang, Xiangqian; Liu, Dandan; Xu, Mingliang; Han, LingFei; Wu, Zewei; Li, Haibo; Zhu, Yu; Wen, Yufeng; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The carotid artery plaque score (PS) is an independent predictor of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). This study aims to evaluate the combination of PS and carotid hemodynamics to predict CHD. Methods: A total of 476 patients who underwent carotid ultrasonography and coronary angiography were divided into two groups depending on the presence of CHD. PS, carotid intima-media thickness, and carotid blood flow were measured. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to establish the best prediction model for CHD presence. Results: Age, sex, carotid intima-media thickness of internal carotid artery and carotid bifurcation, PS, peak systolic velocity (PSA) of right internal carotid artery (RICA), and most resistance index data were significantly related with the presence of CHD. The area under the curve for a collective model, which included factors of the PS, carotid hemodynamics and age, was significantly higher than the other model. Age, PS, and PSA of RICA were significant contributors for predicting CHD presence. Conclusions: The model of PS and PSA of RICA has greater predictive value for CHD than PS alone. Adding age to PS and PSA of RICA further improves predictive value over PS alone. PMID:26569275

  1. Variant termination of the common carotid artery: Cases of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In all cases of trifurcation, superior thyroid artery was the third branch. The common carotid artery quadrifurcated into external, internal carotid, superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries. The pentafurcations comprised internal carotid, external carotid, superior thyroid, occipital and posterior auricular arteries.

  2. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid artery...

  3. Midazolam depresses carotid body chemoreceptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C; Shvarev, Y; Takeda, S; Sakamoto, A; Lindahl, S G E; Eriksson, L I

    2006-02-01

    Although the contribution of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor system in peripheral chemosensation is unclear, immunohistochemistry has demonstrated the presence of GABA-ergic receptors in mammalian carotid bodies. We hypothesized that an activation of the carotid body GABA receptors would counteract the depolarizing effect of hypoxia. The carotid body with arterial supply and the carotid sinus nerve was removed en bloc from New Zealand White rabbits and placed in a perfusion chamber. The carotid body preparation was perfused via the cut common carotid artery with a modified Tyrode's solution at a rate of 3.5-4.5 ml/min with a constant pressure of 45 cmH2O. The carotid sinus nerve firing frequency (Hz) was recorded at two different oxygen tension levels during perfusion with midazolam of 1, 10 and 100 microg/l. The frequency was decreased by midazolam in a dose-dependent manner (n = 8). Firing frequencies (mean +/- SEM) at the low oxygen tension level decreased from 643.13 +/- 67.2 Hz in the control to 554.5 +/- 67.7 Hz (P = 0.054 vs. control), 509.01 +/- 100.5 Hz (P chemoreceptor activity in a dose-dependent manner.

  4. Carotid artery stenting vs carotid endarterectomy: meta-analysis and diversity-adjusted trial sequential analysis of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangalore, Sripal; Kumar, Sunil; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    The role of carotid artery stenting (CAS) when compared with carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is controversial, with recent trials showing an increased risk of harm with CAS.......The role of carotid artery stenting (CAS) when compared with carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is controversial, with recent trials showing an increased risk of harm with CAS....

  5. [Diagnostic and treatment of carotid bodies tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonev, A; Zakhariev, T

    2007-01-01

    Carotid body tumor is rare neoplasm (about 0,5 per cent of all tumors).[28]. The tumor arise from paraganglionic cells of carotid body, which develops from both mesodermal elements of the third branchial arch and neural elements originating from the neural crest ectoderm.[25]. Mathews warned: "this rare tumor presents unusual difficulties to the surgeon, and should one encounter it without having suspected the diagnosis, the experience will not soon be forgotten".[19]. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the frequency, number of spreading and results from the treatment in patients with carotid bodies tumors. Eleven patients (2,58%) with carotid bodies tumors were diagnosed and operated under upon from January 1990 to June 2007 at the "Department of Vascular surgery and Angiology" of "St. Ekaterina" University hospital - Sofia, from commonly 427 surgical intervention in the area of carotid triangle for the same period. The clinical picture, operating time and blood loss during the surgery were examined. Careful subadventitial dissection was used like a method, which have to reduce the number of postoperative complications and blood loss. All 11 patients were operated upon with endotrachial anesthesia and in two of them there was intracranial nerves injure, reconstruction of carotid artery has established in two of the patients. In the early postoperative period there was disphagia in three of the patients, four were with partial damage of n. hypoglossus, two- with damage of the face branch of n. facialis and six with parasthesia at the operated side. CT angiography of carotid bifurcation has established as basic method in the diagnostic. Total extirpation of the tumor remains the basic method of treatment from high quality specialists in carotid surgery. Careful subadvetitial dissection and accuracy excision allow the whole separation of the tumor from the carotid bifurcation without traumatic lesion. [28].

  6. Carotid artery stenosis after neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Kasuya, Junji; Terasaki, Tadashi [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Uchino, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    Carotid artery stenosis sometimes occurs after cervical radiotherapy. We report a 70-year-old woman with a history of radiotherapy for thyroid cancer at the age of 28 years. She had no signs and symptoms except the skin lesion at the irradiation site. Duplex ultrasonography revealed heterogeneous plaques showing 50% stenosis of bilateral common carotid arteries. Those lesions were observed within segment of irradiation, where atheromatous plaque usually seldom occurs. These indicated that the carotid stenosis was induced by radiotherapy. Although the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy for radiation-induced plaque is not clear, the plaques remained unchanged for 4 years in spite of aspirin administration. (author)

  7. General principles of carotid Doppler ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Whal [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Carotid Doppler ultrasonography is a popular tool for evaluating atherosclerosis of the carotid artery. Its two-dimensional gray scale can be used for measuring the intima-media thickness, which is very good biomarker for atherosclerosis and can aid in plaque characterization. The plaque morphology is related to the risk of stroke. The ulceration of plaque is also known as one of the strong predictors of future embolic event risk. Color Doppler ultrasonography and pulse Doppler ultrasonography have been used for detecting carotid artery stenosis. Doppler ultrasonography has unique physical properties. The operator should be familiar with the physics and other parameters of Doppler ultrasonography to perform optimal Doppler ultrasonography studies.

  8. Solitary fibrous tumor surrounding the carotid sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms that are mostly found arising from the pleura. Although SFTs recently have been reported in other regions, they are rare in the head and neck and have often been misdiagnosed due to their rarity. SFTs are benign in most cases. Clinically, SFTs usually manifest as well-circumscribed, slow-growing, smooth and painless masses. Symptoms are often minimal, although they may include sore throat, difficulty in swallowing, change of voice or trismus. CT-Scan and MRI are the most sensitive imaging procedures used. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the lesion. Because recurrences have been noted up to 30 years after surgery, long-term follow up is mandatory. In this article, we present a case of a Solitary Fibrous Tumor arising in the parapharyngeal space in a 20-year-old man, involving the carotid sheath, treated by surgical excision with no recurrence after 1 year. The clinical presentation, surgical management and pathological findings are described.

  9. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S. Ducatman MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center ® (FPSC databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above. The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative

  10. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Tristram

    2016-01-01

    The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center® (FPSC) databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above). The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative value unit

  11. Why carotid endarterectomy is method of choice in treatment of carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radak Đorđe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedures used in treatment of carotid stenosis are endarterectomy, PTA with stent implantation, resection with graft interposition and by-pass procedure. Segmental lesions are found more often and treated by the first two mentioned procedures. In case of longer lesions and extension to the greater part of the common carotid artery, the other two procedures are performed. For the past few years, the main dilemma has been whether to perform carotid endarterectomy or PTA with stent implantation. Both early and long-term results speak in favour of carotid endarterectomy, regardless of an increased number of PTA and carotid stenting. At the same time, PTA and carotid stenting are more expensive procedures. Both methods have their defined and important roles in treatment of segmental occlusive carotid lesions. Severe cardiac, pulmonary and renal conditions, which increase the risk of general anaesthesia, are not an absolute indication for PTA and stenting, since endarterectomy can be done in regional anaesthesia. Main indications for PTA with stent implantation are: surgically inaccessible lesions (at or above C2; or subclavian; radiation- induced carotid stenosis; prior ipsilateral radical neck dissection; prior carotid endarterectomy (restenosis.

  12. Carotid angioplasty with stenting for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nozomu; Tanasawa, Toshihiko; Okada, Takeshi; Endo, Otone; Yamamoto, Naohito [Kainan Hospital Aichi Prefectural Welfare Federation of Agricultural Cooperatives, Department of Neurosurgery, Aichi (Japan); Miyachi, Shigeru; Hattori, Kenichi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    Carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is becoming accepted as an effective and reliable treatment option for severe carotid artery stenosis. However, it is rarely applied for carotid occlusion, especially in its chronic stage. We report our experience of CAS for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion representing compromised cerebral blood flow using various protection methods. A 77-year-old woman, who was already diagnosed with severe left internal carotid artery stenosis, suddenly had right hemiparesis and aphasia. At that time, she was treated conservatively because her neurological status was quite good, in spite of left carotid artery occlusion. Her symptoms improved in the short term, except slight aphasia, but deteriorated again 18 days from the onset, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed new ischemic lesions. CAS was then performed for the occluded carotid artery on the 23rd day from the first onset. Using the proximal protection technique, the occluded lesion was crossed carefully with a microguidewire. Stents were also placed successfully with the distal protection technique. The occluded carotid artery was completely recanalized without any unfavorable events or neurological deterioration. In this patient, CAS was successfully to treat chronic carotid artery occlusion. These procedures and techniques are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  13. Novel flow quantification of the carotid bulb and the common carotid artery with vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    2014-01-01

    complexity. A secondary aim was to establish accuracy parameters to detect flow changes/patterns in the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bulb (CB). The right carotid bifurcation including the CCA and CB of eight healthy volunteers were scanned in a longitudinal plane with vector flow ultrasound...... and by vector concentration calculation. A vortex with complex flow was found in all carotid bulbs, whereas the CCA had mainly laminar flow. The medical experts evaluated the flow to be mainly laminar in the CCA (0.82 +/- 0.14) and mainly complex (0.23 +/- 0.22) in the CB. Likewise, the estimated vector...

  14. TUMOURS OF PARAPHARYNGEAL SPACE WITHOUT OROPHARYNGEAL SWELLING: A SERIES OF TWO CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The parapharyngeal space is a complex anatomical area. Tumors located in the parapharyngeal space are relatively rare and account for 0.5% of all the head and neck tumors. Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common parapharyngeal space tumor. The clinical features are slow growing swelling of parotid and upper cervical region, bulging on lateral oropharyngeal wall, dysphagia, u/l Eustachian tube dysfunction, pain, trismus, and obstructive sleep apnoea. The pre-styloid tumours displace the lateral pharyngeal wall medially, parotid gland laterally and carotid artery laterally while maintain the fat plane with deep lobe of parotid gland. Post-styloid tumour displace the carotid artery medially and anteriorly with obliteration of fat plane around the vessels and pre-styloid fat anterolaterally. We report a series of two cases of pleomorphic adenoma, involving the prestyloid parapharyngeal space, and in continuity with the deep lobe of the parotid gland. However no medial bulge was seen on lateral oropharyngeal wall. Complete excision of the lesion was performed using the cervical-transparotid approach preserving the facial nerve. Main aim of our study is to emphasize that the parapharyngeal tumors are not always presented with oropharyngeal symptoms like lateral pharyngeal wall bulge, dysphagia, dysarthria and trismus.

  15. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions...... and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24-159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects...... without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). RESULTS: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile...

  16. Understanding anatomical terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, L A; Natrajan, M; Kothari, M L

    1996-01-01

    Words are our masters and words are our slaves, all depending on how we use them. The whole of medical science owes its origin to Greco-Roman culture and is replete with terms whose high sound is not necessarily accompanied by sound meaning. This is even more the case in the initial, pre-clinical years. Anatomical terminology seems bewildering to the initiate; and maybe that is a reason why love of anatomy as a subject does not always spill over through later years. Employing certain classifications of the origin of the anatomical terms, we have prepared an anthology that we hope will ease the student's task and also heighten the student's appreciation of the new terms. This centers on revealing the Kiplingian "how, why, when, where, what, and who" of a given term. This presentation should empower students to independently formulate a wide network of correlations once they understand a particular term. The article thus hopes to stimulate students' analytic and synthetic faculties as well. A small effort can reap large rewards in terms of enjoyment of the study of anatomy and the related subjects of histology, embryology, and genetics. It is helpful to teachers and students alike. This exercise in semantics and etymology does not demand of the student or his teacher any background in linguistics, grammar, Greek, Latin, Sanskrit, anatomy, or medicine.

  17. Ophthalmic masquerades of the atherosclerotic carotids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with carotid atherosclerosis can present with ophthalmic symptoms. These symptoms and signs can be due to retinal emboli, hypoperfusion of the retina and choroid, opening up of collateral channels, or chronic hypoperfusion of the globe (ocular ischemic syndrome. These pathological mechanisms can produce many interesting signs and a careful history can bring out important past symptoms pointing toward the carotid as the source of the patient′s presenting symptom. Such patients are at high risk for an ischemic stroke, especially in the subsequent few days following their first acute symptom. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with these ophthalmic symptoms and signs caused by carotid atherosclerosis for making an early diagnosis and to take appropriate measures to prevent a stroke. This review elaborates the clinical features, importance, and implications of various ophthalmic symptoms and signs resulting from atherosclerotic carotid artery disease.

  18. Defective cerebrovascular autoregulation after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Schroeder, T V

    1993-01-01

    Correction of high grade carotid artery stenosis may result in cerebral hyperperfusion because of defective vascular autoregulation. Thus, transcranial Doppler was used to determine mean arterial flow velocity (Vmean) of the middle cerebral artery in 95 patients before and after carotid endartere......Correction of high grade carotid artery stenosis may result in cerebral hyperperfusion because of defective vascular autoregulation. Thus, transcranial Doppler was used to determine mean arterial flow velocity (Vmean) of the middle cerebral artery in 95 patients before and after carotid......th postoperative day, respectively. The mean pressure difference across the stenosis was 31 (0-63) mmHg in the symptomatic group (n = 18) as opposed to only 10 (0-60) mmHg in the asymptomatic group (n = 77) (p surgery, ipsilateral Vmean increased to 177...

  19. Fusiform aneurysm model in rabbit carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinald, Nicoleta; Fournier, Benjamin; Naveau, Adrien; Couty, Ludovic; Lemitre, Mathilde; Seguier, Sylvie; Coulomb, Bernard; Gogly, Bruno; Lafont, Antoine; Durand, Eric

    2010-01-01

    To develop a reproducible and accessible model of elastase-induced fusiform aneurysm in carotid rabbit arteries. Elastase, at a concentration of 1-30 U, was incubated into the lumen of carotid rabbit arteries. Four weeks later, angiography, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry and zymography were performed. The optimal concentration of elastase in this model was 3 U according to the balance between mortality and thrombosis rates. Indeed, at 3 U, external carotid diameter increased from 1.9 +/- 0.1 to 3.1 +/- 0.4 mm (p < 0.0001) associated with degradation of elastic fibers, matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, apoptosis and macrophage infiltration. Our study underlines that abdominal aortic aneurysm can be reliably duplicated in an elastase-induced aneurysm in carotid artery, a much more accessible vessel. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma masquerading as a carotid body tumour with a postoperative complication of first-bite syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casserly, Paula

    2012-01-31

    Carotid body tumours (CBT) are the most common tumours at the carotid bifurcation. Widening of the bifurcation is usually demonstrated on conventional angiography. This sign may also be produced by a schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic plexus. A 45-year-old patient presented with a neck mass. Investigations included contrast-enhanced CT, MRI and magnetic resonance arteriography with contrast enhancement. Radiologically, the mass was considered to be a CBT due to vascular enhancement and splaying of the internal and external carotid arteries. Intraoperatively, it was determined to be a cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma (CSCS). The patient had a postoperative complication of first-bite syndrome (FBS).Although rare, CSCS should be considered in the differential diagnosis for tumours at the carotid bifurcation. Damage to the sympathetic innervation to the parotid gland can result in severe postoperative pain characterised by FBS and should be considered in all patients undergoing surgery involving the parapharyngeal space.

  1. A clear map of the lower cranial nerves at the superior carotid triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Garcia-Gonzalez, Ulises; Agrawal, Abhishek; Tavares, Paulo L M S; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2010-07-01

    The lower cranial nerves must be identified to avoid iatrogenic injury during skull base and high cervical approaches. Prompt recognition of these structures using basic landmarks could reduce surgical time and morbidity. The anterior triangle of the neck was dissected in 30 cadaveric head sides. The most superficial segments of the glossopharyngeal, vagus and its superior laryngeal nerves, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves were exposed and designated into smaller anatomic triangles. The midpoint of each nerve segment inside the triangles was correlated to the angle of the mandible (AM), mastoid tip (MT), and bifurcation of the common carotid artery. A triangle bounded by the styloglossus muscle, external carotid artery, and facial artery housed the glossopharyngeal nerve. This nerve segment was 0.06 ± 0.71 cm posterior to the AM and 2.50 ± 0.59 cm inferior to the MT. The vagus nerve ran inside the carotid sheath posterior to internal carotid artery and common carotid artery bifurcation in 48.3% of specimens. A triangle formed by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, sternocleidomastoid muscle, and internal jugular vein housed the accessory nerve, 1.90 ± 0.60 cm posterior to the AM and 2.30 ± 0.57 cm inferior to the MT. A triangle outlined by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, internal jugular vein, and common facial vein housed the hypoglossal nerve, which was 0.82 ± 0.84 cm posterior to the AM and 3.64 ± 0.70 cm inferior to the MT. Comprehensible landmarks can be defined to help expose the lower cranial nerves to avoid injury to this complex region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Carotid canal dehiscence in the human skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor Vazquez, J.F.; Gil Verona, J.A. [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valladolid, Ramon y Cajal, 7, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain); Garcia Porrero, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valladolid (Spain)

    1999-06-01

    Abnormalities of the floor of the carotid canal have been studied in 538 skulls. These abnormalities range from a fissure to total absence of the floor. This variation may be caused by abnormalities of the internal carotid artery or deficiencies in ossification of the skull base. CT suggests that these changes should be taken into account by surgeons working on the skull base. (orig.) With 4 figs., 8 refs.

  3. Correlation of carotid blood flow and corrected carotid flow time with invasive cardiac output measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene W Y; Caplin, Joshua D; Azad, Aftab; Wilson, Christina; Fifer, Michael A; Bagchi, Aranya; Liteplo, Andrew S; Noble, Vicki E

    2017-12-01

    Non-invasive measures that can accurately estimate cardiac output may help identify volume-responsive patients. This study seeks to compare two non-invasive measures (corrected carotid flow time and carotid blood flow) and their correlations with invasive reference measurements of cardiac output. Consenting adult patients (n = 51) at Massachusetts General Hospital cardiac catheterization laboratory undergoing right heart catheterization between February and April 2016 were included. Carotid ultrasound images were obtained concurrently with cardiac output measurements, obtained by the thermodilution method in the absence of severe tricuspid regurgitation and by the Fick oxygen method otherwise. Corrected carotid flow time was calculated as systole time/√cycle time. Carotid blood flow was calculated as π × (carotid diameter)2/4 × velocity time integral × heart rate. Measurements were obtained using a single carotid waveform and an average of three carotid waveforms for both measures. Single waveform measurements of corrected flow time did not correlate with cardiac output (ρ = 0.25, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.49, p = 0.08), but an average of three waveforms correlated significantly, although weakly (ρ = 0.29, 95% CI 0.02-0.53, p = 0.046). Carotid blood flow measurements correlated moderately with cardiac output regardless of if single waveform or an average of three waveforms were used: ρ = 0.44, 95% CI 0.18-0.63, p = 0.004, and ρ = 0.41, 95% CI 0.16-0.62, p = 0.004, respectively. Carotid blood flow may be a better marker of cardiac output and less subject to measurements issues than corrected carotid flow time.

  4. Anterior petrosal approach: The safety of Kawase triangle as an anatomical landmark for anterior petrosectomy in petroclival meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2015-12-01

    Anterior petrosectomy through the middle fossa is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. To access posterior fossa through middle fossa, we quantitatively evaluate the safety of Kawase triangle as an anatomical landmark. We reviewed pre- and postoperative Multi-Slice CT scan (1mm thickness) of patients with petroclival meningioma between Jan 2009 and Sep 2013 in which anterior petrosectomy was performed to access the posterior fossa part of the tumor. The distances between drilling start and finish edge to the vital anatomical skull base structures such as internal auditory canal (IAC) and superior semicircular canal and petrous apex (petrous part of the carotid artery) were measured and analyzed. Drilling entrance length is directly related with tumor size. The distances between anatomical structures and drilling points decrease with increasing tumor size, but it always remains a safe margin between drilling points and IAC, internal carotid artery (ICA), and semicircular canals in axial and coronal views. The Kawase triangle is shown to be a safe anatomical landmark for anterior petrosectomy. The described landmarks avoid damage to the vital anatomical structures during access to the posterior fossa through middle fossa, despite temporal bone anatomical variations and different tumor sizes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Internal Carotid Artery Ectasia: The Value of Imaging Studies Prior to Biopsy of a Retropharyngeal Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Chan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of retropharyngeal tissue mass often raises the suspicion of malignancy, especially in elderly patients. This prompts urgent biopsy to investigate tissue histology. We discuss a case where this is contraindicated as the retropharyngeal mass was illustrated by CT scanning and confirmed with MRI to be a tortuous coursing internal carotid artery. An awareness of this unusual anatomical variation and a careful interpretation of imaging studies both at the stage of differential diagnosis and pre-operative screening are essential to avoid damage to important structures, causing unnecessary complications.

  6. Clinical implications of internal carotid artery tortuosity, kinking and coiling: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenteno M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical variations of the internal carotid artery are diverse. Abnormalities in their geometry and paths are commonly identified by ultrasonography and angiography. The surgical correction of symptomatic CAs is better in preventing stroke compared with best medical therapy, as well as it completely eliminates the symptoms in patients with nonhemispheric symptoms. The ICA anomalies may be dangerous and represent a risk factor for massive bleeding. Suture ligatures can penetrate and occlude torn vessels, scalpels or biting instruments can lacerate vessels, and indirectly conducted electric cauterization can burn the soft of bony tissues

  7. The relation of carotid calcium volume with carotid artery stenosis in symptomatic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, H. A.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Smagge, L.; Kurvers, A. G.; Gratama van Andel, H. A.; van den Berg, R.; Nederkoorn, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research showed a strong correlation of calcium volume scores with degree of stenosis, suggesting that calcium volume could be used in the diagnosis of carotid artery stenosis. We investigated the accuracy of the use of calcium volume scores to diagnose carotid artery stenosis in our target

  8. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Motion-insensitive carotid intraplaque hemorrhage imaging using 3D inversion recovery preparation stack of stars (IR-prep SOS) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Eun; Roberts, John A; Eisenmenger, Laura B; Aldred, Booth W; Jamil, Osama; Bolster, Bradley D; Bi, Xiaoming; Parker, Dennis L; Treiman, Gerald S; McNally, J Scott

    2017-02-01

    Carotid artery imaging is important in the clinical management of patients at risk for stroke. Carotid intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) presents an important diagnostic challenge. 3D magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) has been shown to accurately image carotid IPH; however, this sequence can be limited due to motion- and flow-related artifact. The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate an improved 3D carotid MPRAGE sequence for IPH detection. We hypothesized that a radial-based k-space trajectory sequence such as "Stack of Stars" (SOS) incorporated with inversion recovery preparation would offer reduced motion sensitivity and more robust flow suppression by oversampling of central k-space. A total of 31 patients with carotid disease (62 carotid arteries) were imaged at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 3D IR-prep Cartesian and SOS sequences. Image quality was determined between SOS and Cartesian MPRAGE in 62 carotid arteries using t-tests and multivariable linear regression. Kappa analysis was used to determine interrater reliability. In all, 25 among 62 carotid plaques had carotid IPH by consensus from the reviewers on SOS compared to 24 on Cartesian sequence. Image quality was significantly higher with SOS compared to Cartesian (mean 3.74 vs. 3.11, P < 0.001). SOS acquisition yielded sharper image features with less motion (19.4% vs. 45.2%, P < 0.002) and flow artifact (27.4% vs. 41.9%, P < 0.089). There was also excellent interrater reliability with SOS (kappa = 0.89), higher than that of Cartesian (kappa = 0.84). By minimizing flow and motion artifacts and retaining high interrater reliability, the SOS MPRAGE has important advantages over Cartesian MPRAGE in carotid IPH detection. 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:410-417. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Carotid endarterectomy in patients with occlusion of the contralateral carotid artery. Perioperative risk and late results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T; Rasmussen, L

    1987-01-01

    Recent reports on the outcome of carotid endarterectomy in patients with contralateral occlusion have been conflicting. Therefore, we reviewed 51 cases identified, among 675 consecutive carotid endarterectomies. A perioperative mortality of 2% and a permanent morbidity rate of 16% was observed...... severe strokes when compared to patients with only minor reduction in CPP. In addition, the internal carotid artery blood flow following endarterectomy was significantly higher in the low pressure group (P less than 0.02). No patients were lost during follow-up, for a mean of 34 months. The cumulative....... Compared with a complication rate of about 5% previously reported from this institution, this clearly indicates contralateral carotid occlusion as a major risk factor in carotid surgery. Though not statistically significant, patients with severely reduced cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) had suffered more...

  11. Early control of distal internal carotid artery during carotid endarterectomy: does it reduce cerebral microemboli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommertz, G; Das, M; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Krings, T; Mess, W H; Schiefer, J; Jacobs, M J

    2010-06-01

    According to the results of the large trials on carotid endarterectomy (CEA), this type of surgery is only warranted if perioperative mortality and morbidity are kept considerably low. Less attention has been paid to methods of cerebral protection during CEA, although intraoperative transcranial Doppler (TCD) can visualise intracerebral microemboli (MES) during routine carotid dissection, although MES occur throughout the CEA, only those during dissection are related to neurological outcome. Prevention of MES by means of early control of the distal internal carotid artery dislodging from the carotid artery plaque during dissection is very likely the mechanism behind an eventual benefit from this approach. Hence, the amount of MES might serve as a surrogate parameter for the risk of periprocedural neurological events. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether early control of the distal carotid artery during CEA is capable of reducing the number of MES by means of a prospective randomised trial. Twenty-eight patients (29 procedures) could be prospectively included in our study. Before surgery we randomly assigned the patients to two groups: group A (N.=12): CEA by means of early control of the distal internal carotid artery; group B (N.=17): CEA with dissection of the total carotid bifurcation before clamping the arteries. Periprocedurally, we continuously monitored the cerebral blood flow in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery by means of TCD. Pre- and postoperative morbidity were independently verified by a neurologist control of the distal internal carotid artery did not reduce the occurrence of MES during dissection of the carotid bifurcation. Also, the total number of MES throughout the procedure and postoperatively was comparable between both groups. The procedure related times as well as the clinical outcome did not differ significantly. Thus, early control of the distal internal carotid artery has got no advantage but also no disadvantage

  12. Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the right carotid artery showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just past the ... artery or ulceration in the area after the stenosis in this close-up film. Note the narrowed ...

  13. The complexity of anatomical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grizzi Fabio

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1 Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2 Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic as well as macroscopic level of observation, show a different degree of complexity. (3 Complexity can reside in the structure of the anatomical system (having many diverse parts with varying interactions or an intricate architecture or in its behaviour. Often complexity in structure and behaviour go together. (4 Complex systems admit many descriptions (ways of looking at the system each of which is only partially true. Each way of looking at a complex system requires its own description, its own mode of analysis and its own breaking down of the system in different parts; (5 Almost all the anatomical entities display hierarchical forms: their component structures at different spatial scales or their process at different time scales are related to each other. Conclusion The need to find a new way of observing and measuring anatomical entities, and objectively quantifying their different structural changes, prompted us to investigate the non-Euclidean geometries and the theories of complexity, and to apply their concepts to human anatomy. This attempt has led us to reflect upon the complex significance of the shape of an observed anatomical entity. Its changes have been defined in relation to variations in its status: from a normal (i.e. natural to a pathological or altered state introducing the concepts of kinematics and dynamics of anatomical forms, speed of their changes, and that of scale of their observation.

  14. [Prevention of cerebral ictus, of carotid origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar Martín, E

    2001-01-01

    The current incidence of stroke in Europe and the USA is about 200 per 100,000 population per annum. Eighty percent of strokes are ischaemic and 20% are due to hemorrhage. Approximately half the patients with ischaemic strike have carotid artery stenosis and about one third (10% all stroke victims) have had no warning symptoms such as transient ischaemi attacks. The European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) and North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) have effectively shown that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) can prevent strokes in symptomatic patients. The benefit of operation is, at present, confined to those with at least 70% stenosis; for 30-69%, the trials have not yet reported a result. In asymptomatic patients the Veterans Administration Study and the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis Study (ACAS) have yielded promising results that surgery may reduce the risk of TIA and minor stroke. There is as yet no convincing evidence in asymptomatic patients that moderate or severe stroke (or death) can be prevented by CEA. The aim of this trial is to determine whether CEA and appropriate best medical treatment (BMT) can improve stroke free survival time when compared with BMT alone.

  15. Direct Carotid Exposure for Neuroendovascular Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Seong; Yilmaz, Ali; Ozkul, Ayca; Yeo, Dong Kyu; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2016-11-01

    Objective The transfemoral approach is a common route for catheterization of the supra-aortic vessels in neuroendovascular therapy. However, in some cases, the patient's anatomy prevents transfemoral catheterization or distal access to the carotid s. In such cases, direct carotid exposure (DCE) for neuroendovascular approaches may be used to treat cerebrovascular diseases. Methods We present 11 cases in which we were unable to perform the distal approach and DCE was the preferred neuroendovascular treatment procedure. Results DCE was performed on 11 patients with cerebral aneurysm (n = 8), carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) (n = 1), malignant brain tumor (n = 1), and carotid angioplasty and stenting (n = 1). Ten patients were female; one was male. Ages ranged from 63 to 87 years (mean: 71.36 years). Coil embolization was performed on patients with cerebral aneurysm and CCF. The patient with a malignant brain tumor underwent polyvinyl alcohol particle embolization. The only complication was a carotid artery dissection that occurred in one patient during stenting. Conclusion DCE for neuroendovascular approaches can be used as an alternative for patients with tortuous vasculature access in the femoral route. In such patients, a combination of neuroendovascular treatment and surgery in a hybrid operating room with angiography is preferred. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. A Rare Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy: Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotid sinus hypersensitivity is a common cause of fainting and falls in the elderly, and can be diagnosed by carotid sinus massage. We present a 67-year-old diabetic man who was admitted with hyperglycemia. During thyroid examination, clouding of consciousness occurred with unilateral palpation. Asystole was documented for 4.8 seconds and suspected for 7 seconds upon carotid sinus massage. A cardioverter defibrillator was implanted. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity should be kept in mind when examining diabetic patients.

  17. Costs of secondary prevention of stroke by carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Carsten; Sørensen, Mette; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2012-01-01

    We estimated the costs to the Danish National Health Service of preventing stroke due to carotid artery stenosis by carotid endarterectomy (CEA), including costs of identifying patients, Doppler ultrasound (DUS) examination and CEA.......We estimated the costs to the Danish National Health Service of preventing stroke due to carotid artery stenosis by carotid endarterectomy (CEA), including costs of identifying patients, Doppler ultrasound (DUS) examination and CEA....

  18. Carotid plaque burden as a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Muntendam, Pieter; Adourian, Aram

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare carotid plaque burden, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and abdominal aortic diameter (AAD) to coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in people without known cardiovascular disease.......The purpose of this study was to compare carotid plaque burden, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and abdominal aortic diameter (AAD) to coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in people without known cardiovascular disease....

  19. Differential mechanical response and microstructural organization between non-human primate femoral and carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Li, Haiyan; Gleason, Rudolph L.

    2014-01-01

    Unique anatomic locations and physiologic functions predispose different arteries to varying mechanical responses and pathologies. However, the underlying causes of these mechanical differences are not well understood. The objective of this study was to first identify structural differences in the arterial matrix that would account for the mechanical differences between healthy femoral and carotid arteries and second to utilize these structural observations to perform a microstructurally motivated constitutive analysis. Femoral and carotid arteries were subjected to cylindrical biaxial loading and their microstructure was quantified using two-photon microscopy. The femoral arteries were found to be less compliant than the carotid arteries at physiologic loads, consistent with previous studies, despite similar extracellular compositions of collagen and elastin (P > 0.05). The femoral arteries exhibited significantly less circumferential dispersion of collagen fibers (P arteries. Elastin transmural distribution, in vivo axial stretch, and opening angles were also found to be distinctly different between the arteries. Lastly, we modeled the arteries’ mechanical behaviors using a microstructural-based, distributed collagen fiber constitutive model. With this approach, the material parameters of the model were solved using the experimental microstructural observations. The findings of this study support an important role for microstructural organization in arterial stiffness. PMID:24532266

  20. MR coil sensitivity inhomogeneity correction for plaque characterization in carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, Olivier; Hillenbrand, Claudia; Suri, Jasjit; Wilson, David L.

    2004-05-01

    We are involved in a comprehensive program to characterize atherosclerotic disease using multiple MR images having different contrast mechanisms (T1W, T2W, PDW, magnetization transfer, etc.) of human carotid and animal model arteries. We use specially designed intravascular and surface array coils that give high signal-to-noise but suffer from sensitivity inhomogeneity. With carotid surface coils, challenges include: (1) a steep bias field with an 80% change; (2) presence of nearby muscular structures lacking high frequency information to distinguish bias from anatomical features; (3) many confounding zero-valued voxels subject to fat suppression, blood flow cancellation, or air, which are not subject to coil sensitivity; and (4) substantial noise. Bias was corrected using a modification of the adaptive fuzzy c-mean method reported by Pham et al. (IEEE TMI, 18:738-752), whereby a bias field modeled as a mechanical membrane was iteratively improved until cluster means no longer changed. Because our images were noisy, we added a noise reduction filtering step between iterations and used about 5 classes. In a digital phantom having a bias field measured from our MR system, variations across an area comparable to a carotid artery were reduced from 50% to images were qualitatively improved and large regions of skeletal muscle were relatively flat. Other commonly applied techniques failed to segment the images or introduced strong edge artifacts. Current evaluations include comparisons to bias as measured by a body coil in human MR images.

  1. First clinical experience with the GARDEX EPD: a novel embolic protection device for carotid artery stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Scheinert, Dierk; Borghesi, Raffaello; Cremonesi, Alberto; Rosenschein, Uri; Scheinert, Susanne; Bräunlich, Sven; Bausback, Yvonne; Ulrich, Matthias; Schmidt, Andrej

    2013-01-22

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has become an alternative to carotid endarterectomy in the treatment of carotid artery disease. The use of an embolic protection device (EPD) can reduce the frequency of embolic events during CAS. Difficult vascular anatomy may complicate current generation EPD placement. This problem is addressed by a new EPD, the GARDEX System. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and performance of the GARDEX EPD during CAS. Thirty-eight patients underwent CAS with the GARDEX EPD in two medical centres. All patients were prospectively followed up for 30 days. Device performance and procedural details were collected and analysed prospectively. Vessel anatomy and lesion morphology were evaluated and stratified into a scoring system for anatomic difficulty. More than a third of the patients were considered to have difficult vascular anatomy for CAS. All enrolled patients were successfully treated. There was one (2.6%) minor periprocedural stroke and there were two (5.3%) periprocedural TIAs which resolved within 24 hours. No additional complications were noted during the 30-day follow-up period. In this first experience, CAS under cerebral protection with the GARDEX EPD was safe and feasible. Our data suggest that the use of the GARDEX EPD is simple and shows high success rates even in challenging anatomies. The role of this new device in CAS needs to be further confirmed in a larger patient population.

  2. Assessing Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Carotid Steno-Occlusive Disease Using MRI BOLD and ASL Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata F. Leoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR, a predictive factor of imminent stroke, has been shown to be associated with carotid steno-occlusive disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD and arterial spin labeling (ASL, have emerged as promising noninvasive tools to evaluate altered CVR with whole-brain coverage, when combined with a vasoactive stimulus, such as respiratory task or injection of acetazolamide. Under normal cerebrovascular conditions, CVR has been shown to be globally and homogenously distributed between hemispheres, but with differences among cerebral regions. Such differences can be explained by anatomical specificities and different biochemical mechanisms responsible for vascular regulation. In patients with carotid steno-occlusive disease, studies have shown that MRI techniques can detect impaired CVR in brain tissue supplied by the affected artery. Moreover, resulting CVR estimations have been well correlated to those obtained with more established techniques, indicating that BOLD and ASL are robust and reliable methods to assess CVR in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. Therefore, the present paper aims to review recent studies which use BOLD and ASL to evaluate CVR, in healthy individuals and in patients with carotid steno-occlusive disease, providing a source of information regarding the obtained results and the methodological difficulties.

  3. Role of carotid duplex imaging in carotid screening programmes – an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillard Jonathan H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the UK and the largest single cause of severe disability. Each year more than 110,000 people in England suffer from a stroke which costs the National Health Service (NHS over GBP2.8 billion. Thus, it is imperative that patients at risk be screened for underlying carotid artery atherosclerosis. Aim To assess the role of carotid ultrasound in different carotid screening programmes. Methods A literature overview was carried out by using PubMed search engine, to identify different carotid screening programmes that had used ultrasound scan as a screening tool. Results It appears that the carotid ultrasound is an effective method for screening carotid artery disease in community as it effectively predicts the presence of stenosis with high accuracy. There is a need for primary care to recommend high risk patients for regular screening, to reduce stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA related morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Screening programmes using carotid ultrasonography contribute to public health awareness and promotion which in long term could potentially benefit in disease prevention and essentially promote better standards of healthcare.

  4. Diabetes Mellitus with Chronic Complications in Relation to Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbala, Oluwole; Martin, Kimberly D; Otuada, David; Akinyemiju, Tomi

    2017-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting are effective treatment procedures for carotid artery stenosis. Although diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent among patients undergoing these revascularization procedures, few studies have examined their impact on periprocedural outcomes. The study aimed to determine whether perioperative outcomes among patients undergoing carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy varied depending on the presence of diabetes with or without chronic complications. We examined adults aged 45 and above hospitalized between 2007 and 2011 in U.S. hospitals who underwent carotid artery revascularization procedures. We used data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample and evaluated the influence of diabetes with or without chronic complications on outcomes. Among patients receiving carotid artery stenting, diabetic patients with chronic complications had significantly increased odds of acute kidney injury (odds ratio [OR]: 3.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.31-4.35) and longer hospital stay (β: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.58-2.38) compared with nondiabetic patients. Diabetic patients with chronic complications receiving carotid endarterectomy experienced increased odds of myocardial infarction (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: .90-1.40), stroke (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: .97-1.72), perioperative infection (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.29-4.65), mortality (OR: 1.48, 95% CI: 1.01-2.16), and longer hospital stay (β (days): 2.05, 95% CI: 1.90-2.20) compared with nondiabetic patients. No significant increased odds of perioperative outcomes were observed among diabetic patients without chronic complications. Uncomplicated diabetes did not appear to convey a higher odds of perioperative outcomes among patients undergoing revascularization. However, the presence of diabetes with chronic complications is an important risk factor in the carotid endarterectomy category. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier

  5. [Risk factors of rupture of internal carotid artery during surgical resection of carotid body tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Wang, J S; Yao, C; Chang, G Q; Yin, H H; Li, S Q; Lü, W M; Hu, Z J; Wang, S M

    2017-06-13

    Objective: To investigate risk factors of rupture of internal carotid artery resection during carotid body tumor resection and to summarize our treatment experience. Methods: During the period from 1991 to 2016, rupture of internal carotid artery occurred in 27 patients (28 tumors) during surgical resection of carotid body tumor in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. Their clinical and follow-up data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. For all patients underwent surgical resection during this period, Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors of intraoperative rupture of internal carotid artery. Results: Of these 28 tumors, there were 15 (53.6%) tumors with diameter≥5 cm and 20 (71.4%) Shamblin Ⅲ tumors. Intraoperatively, shunt was applied for 8 (28.6%) cases. Thirteen (46.4%) patients underwent ligation of external carotid artery, while 2 (7.1%) patients accepted resection of cranial nerves. Direct closure/patchplasty, autologous vessels or graft reconstruction was used in 16, 10 and 2 cases, respectively. Postoperatively, stroke occurred in 4(14.3%) cases and cranial nerve deficit in 15 (53.6%) cases. During a median length of 36 (14-125) months, cranial nerve deficit persisted in 5 cases. Follow-up radiologic examination indicated 3 (10.7%) cases of targeted vessel occlusion. However, no new-onset stroke was identified. Among all patients underwent surgical resection of carotid body tumor, female (OR=3.650, P=0.012), age≤25 years old (OR=3.710, P=0.013) and Shamblin Ⅲ tumor (OR=4.631, P=0.008) increase the risks of intraoperative carotid artery rupture. Conclusions: Shamblin Ⅲ tumor is the predictor of rupture of internal carotid artery. Intraoperative, properly increased blood pressure, intraoperative heparinization and use of shunt for those cases without well-compensated cranial collateral arteries are likely to decreasing the incidence of stroke.

  6. Risk Factors for Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, or Death Following Carotid Endarterectomy : Results from the International Carotid Stenting Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doig, D.; Turner, E. L.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R. L.; De Borst, G. J.; Stansby, G.; Beard, J. D.; Engelter, S. T.; Richards, T.; Brown, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is standard treatment for symptomatic carotid artery stenosis but carries a risk of stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), or death. This study investigated risk factors for these procedural complications occurring within 30 days of endarterectomy in the

  7. Risk Factors For Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, or Death Following Carotid Endarterectomy: Results From the International Carotid Stenting Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doig, D.; Turner, E. L.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R. L.; de Borst, G. J.; Stansby, G.; Beard, J. D.; Engelter, S. T.; Richards, T.; Brown, M. M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J. F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M. F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L. H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A.; Roos, Y. B.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J.; Bruijninckx, C. M.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S.; van Hasselt, B. A.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C.; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J.; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Kort, G. A.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, J.; Gaibar, A. G.; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T. B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E. W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nahser, H. C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is standard treatment for symptomatic carotid artery stenosis but carries a risk of stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), or death. This study investigated risk factors for these procedural complications occurring within 30 days of endarterectomy in the

  8. Apolipoprotein E and carotid artery atherosclerosis - The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, AJC; Bots, ML; Havekes, LM; del Sol, AI; Cruts, M; Grobbee, DE; Hofman, A; Van Broeckhoven, C; Witteman, JCM; van Duijn, CM

    Background and Purpose-Carotid artery atherosclerosis is a strong predictor for future stroke. It is yet unclear whether the apolipoprotein E polymorphism (APOE) is related to atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of APOE in carotid artery

  9. Endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting : the quest continues part two

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkert, Joe L.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    BACKGROUND: Although randomized trials on carotid artery stenting (CAS) could not establish its equivalence to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with symptomatic carotid disease, CAS is rapidly evolving. Data on long-term outcome after CAS from randomized trials have now become available and

  10. Endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting : the quest continues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, Michiel G.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is still considered the "gold-standard" of the treatment of patients with significant carotid stenosis and has proven its value during past decades. However, endovascular techniques have recently been evolving. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is challenging CEA

  11. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for carotid bifurcation stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Carotid Endartectomy (CEA) has been proven to benefit patients with carotid bifurcation stenosis. For patients unfit for this therapy an alternative has been developed, namely Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting (CAS). No anesthesia or neck dissection is necessary in this procedure. In this thesis

  12. Interobserver agreement for 10% categories of angiographic carotid stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); F. van Kooten (Fop); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although the reliability of the assessment of severe 70% to 99% carotid stenosis by carotid angiography has been proven excellent, this may not necessarily be the case for a more detailed classification of carotid stenoses by 10% categories. METHODS: Angiograms

  13. General principles of carotid Doppler ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whal Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Carotid Doppler ultrasonography is a popular tool for evaluating atherosclerosis of the carotid artery. Its two-dimensional gray scale can be used for measuring the intima-media thickness, which is very good biomarker for atherosclerosis and can aid in plaque characterization. The plaque morphology is related to the risk of stroke. The ulceration of plaque is also known as one of the strong predictors of future embolic event risk. Color Doppler ultrasonography and pulse Doppler ultrasonography have been used for detecting carotid artery stenosis. Doppler ultrasonography has unique physical properties. The operator should be familiar with the physics and other parameters of Doppler ultrasonography to perform optimal Doppler ultrasonography studies.

  14. Hyperhomocysteinemia and recurrent carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liewald Florian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperhomocysteinemia has been identified as a potential risk for atherosclerotic disease in epidemiologic studies. This study investigates the impact of elevated serum homocysteine on restenosis after carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Methods In a retrospective study, we compared fasting plasma homocysteine levels of 51 patients who developed restenosis during an eight year period after CEA with 45 patients who did not develop restenosis. Restenosis was defined as at least 50% stenosis and was assessed by applying a routine duplex scan follow up investigation. Patients with restenosis were divided into a group with early restenosis (between 3 and 18 months postoperative, a total of 39 patients and late restenosis (19 and more months; a total of 12 patients. Results The groups were controlled for age, sex, and risk factors such as diabetes, nicotine abuse, weight, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Patients with restenosis had a significant lower mean homocysteine level (9.11 μmol/L; range: 3.23 μmol/L to 26.49 μmol/L compared to patients without restenosis (11.01 μmol/L; range: 5.09 μmol/L to 23.29 μmol/L; p = 0.03. Mean homocysteine level in patients with early restenosis was 8.88 μmol/L (range: 3.23–26.49 μmol/L and 9.86 μmol/L (range 4.44–19.06 μmol/L in late restenosis (p = 0.50. Conclusion The finding suggests that high plasma homocysteine concentrations do not play a significant role in the development of restenosis following CEA.

  15. Anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidenberg, Joy S

    2007-06-01

    This special issue of the Anatomical Record explores many of the anatomical adaptations exhibited by aquatic mammals that enable life in the water. Anatomical observations on a range of fossil and living marine and freshwater mammals are presented, including sirenians (manatees and dugongs), cetaceans (both baleen whales and toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses), the sea otter, and the pygmy hippopotamus. A range of anatomical systems are covered in this issue, including the external form (integument, tail shape), nervous system (eye, ear, brain), musculoskeletal systems (cranium, mandible, hyoid, vertebral column, flipper/forelimb), digestive tract (teeth/tusks/baleen, tongue, stomach), and respiratory tract (larynx). Emphasis is placed on exploring anatomical function in the context of aquatic life. The following topics are addressed: evolution, sound production, sound reception, feeding, locomotion, buoyancy control, thermoregulation, cognition, and behavior. A variety of approaches and techniques are used to examine and characterize these adaptations, ranging from dissection, to histology, to electron microscopy, to two-dimensional (2D) and 3D computerized tomography, to experimental field tests of function. The articles in this issue are a blend of literature review and new, hypothesis-driven anatomical research, which highlight the special nature of anatomical form and function in aquatic mammals that enables their exquisite adaptation for life in such a challenging environment. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Retrograde Suction Decompression Through Direct Puncture of the Common Carotid Artery for Paraclinoid Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Toyooka, Terushige; Fujii, Kazuya; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomura, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Arata; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Surgical clipping of paraclinoid aneurysm can be very difficult because strong adhesions may hinder the dissection of the perforators and surrounding anatomical structures from the aneurysm dome. We describe our experience with using retrograde suction decompression during the clipping of paraclinoid aneurysms and discuss the relative advantages and pitfalls. This study included 23 patients with large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms who underwent surgical treatment consisting of direct clipping with suction decompression between March 2004 and August 2014. Direct puncture of the common carotid artery (CCA) was performed with a 20-gauge needle. The aneurysm was temporarily trapped by clamping of the CCA and external carotid artery (ECA), followed by temporary clipping of the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) distal to the aneurysm neck. Blood was then gently aspirated through a catheter introduced into the cervical ICA, resulting in collapse of the aneurysm. Therefore, safe aneurysm dissection was feasible during interruption of the blood flow, which could be maintained for up to 5 min. This procedure was repeated until dissection and clipping of the aneurysm were completed. Seven patients were admitted with SAH, 11 with asymptomatic unruptured aneurysm, and 5 with symptomatic unruptured aneurysm. The aneurysms were located on the paraclinoidal segment of the ICA in 15 cases, on the ICA-posterior communicating artery (PComA) in 6, at the ICA bifurcation in 1, and on the anterior wall of the ICA in 1. None of them suffered complications related to the CCA puncture. Surgical outcome was good recovery in 13 patients, moderate disability in 4, severe disability in 4, and vegetative state in 1. Retrograde suction decompression through direct puncture of the common carotid artery is a useful adjunct technique for the clipping of paraclinoid ICA aneurysms.

  17. Evolution of the anatomical theatre in Padova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; De Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in planning a new anatomical theatre included: (1), the placement of the teacher and students on the same level in a horizontal anatomical theatre where it is possible to see (theatre) and to perform (dissecting room); (2), in the past, dissection activities were concentrated at the center of the theatre, while in the new anatomical theatre, such activities have been moved to the periphery through projection on surrounding screens-thus, students occupy the center of the theatre between the demonstration table, where the dissection can be seen in real time, and the wall screens, where particular aspects are magnified; (3), three groups of tables are placed with one in front with two lateral flanking tables in regards to the demonstration table, in a semicircular arrangement, and not attached to the floor, which makes the room multifunctional for surgical education, medical students and physician's continued professional development courses; (4), a learning station to introduce the students to the subject of the laboratory; (5), cooperation between anatomists and architects in order to combine the practical needs of a dissection laboratory with new technologies; (6), involvement of the students, representing the clients' needs; and (7), creation of a dissecting room of wide measurements with large windows, since a well-illuminated space could reduce the potentially negative psychological impact of the dissection laboratory on student morale. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  18. The history of surgical treatment for occlusive carotid artery diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-biao ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the history of surgical treatment for occlusive carotid artery diseases is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that, after the results of large cohort, multicenter, randomized clinical trials, including North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET and European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST, were reported in 1991, the important role of carotid endarterectomy (CEA for the surgical treatment of carotid atherosclerosis had already been confirmed. Although it has a late start in China, CEA has a bright and promising future.

  19. Unilateral Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula Causing Bilateral Ocular Manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demartini, Zeferino; Liebert, Fernando; Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Jung, Thiago Simiano; Rocha, Carlos; Santos, Alex Marques Borges; Koppe, Gelson Luis

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral carotid cavernous fistula presents with ipsilateral ocular findings. Bilateral presentation is only seen in bilateral fistulas, usually associated with indirect (dural) carotid cavernous fistulas. Direct carotid cavernous fistulas are an abnormal communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. They typically begin with a traumatic disruption in the artery wall into the cavernous sinus, presenting with a classic triad of unilateral pulsatile exophthalmos, cranial bruit and episcleral venous engorgement. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with traumatic right carotid cavernous sinus fistula and bilateral ocular presentation successfully treated by interventional neuroradiology.

  20. Enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Min; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Se Hoon; Choi, Eun Chang [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The superior cervical sympathetic ganglion, the largest and most cranial of the three cervical sympathetic ganglia, transfers sympathetic signals to specific targets on the head and neck. This ganglion is located just lateral to the retropharyngeal space along the medial margin of the carotid sheath. Located thus, an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion can mimic a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space of the suprahyoid neck in head and neck cancer patients. However, this is often disregarded by radiologists due to lack of interest in its anatomic location. We present a case of an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a retropharyngeal metastatic lymph node in a 42-year-old man with oral tongue cancer.

  1. Birds, behavior, and anatomical evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Wyles, J S; Kunkel, J.G.; Wilson, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Study of more than 200 species suggests that the anatomical differences among birds are as big as those among other vertebrates of comparable taxonomic rank. The result is notable because, for more than 100 years, many biologists have believed that birds are more uniform anatomically than other classes of vertebrates. Furthermore, assessment of biochemical and geological evidence suggests that the time scale for bird evolution could be quite short. Hence, birds may share with placental mammal...

  2. Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Nekovee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio is being intensively researched as the enabling technology for license-exempt access to the so-called TV White Spaces (TVWS, large portions of spectrum in the UHF/VHF bands which become available on a geographical basis after digital switchover. Both in the US, and more recently, in the UK the regulators have given conditional endorsement to this new mode of access. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in technology, regulation, and standardisation of cognitive access to TVWS. It examines the spectrum opportunity and commercial use cases associated with this form of secondary access.

  3. For-Profit Hospital Status and Carotid Artery Stent Utilization in US Hospitals Performing Carotid Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Justin V; George, Benjamin P; Kelly, Adam G; Holloway, Robert G

    2017-11-01

    Carotid artery stenting may be an economically attractive procedure for hospitals and physicians. We sought to identify the association of hospital ownership (nonprofit versus for-profit) on carotid artery stenting (CAS) versus carotid endarterectomy utilization in US hospitals. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample admissions for cerebrovascular disease from 2008 to 2011, we identified all private, nonfederal US hospitals performing at least 20 carotid revascularization procedures annually, including carotid artery stenting (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision 00.63) or carotid endarterectomy (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision 38.12). We used a multilevel multivariable logistic regression controlling for patient demographics, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics, to assess the effect of hospital ownership on CAS use. Across 723 hospitals (600 nonprofit, 123 for-profit), 66 731 carotid revascularization admissions were identified. Approximately 1 in 5 (n=11 641; 17.4%) revascularizations received CAS. The mean CAS rate among nonprofit hospitals was 17.5 per 100 revascularizations (median, 11.5; interquartile range, 5.2-24.5), and the mean CAS rate among for-profit hospitals was 24.2 per 100 revascularizations (median, 16.0; interquartile range, 6.7-33.3; Pprofit hospital designation was associated with greater odds of CAS (adjusted odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.98). For-profit hospital ownership is associated with a higher rate of CAS compared to nonprofit hospitals in those receiving carotid revascularization. Further research is needed to understand the individual- and system-level factors driving this difference. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Combining carotid intima-media thickness with carotid plaque on screening for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David S; Bestwick, Jonathan P; Morton, Geraint; Drummond, Linda; Jenkins, Nick; Khodabakhsh, Pouran; Curzen, Nick P

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-detected carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and carotid plaque are possible screening tests for coronary heart disease (CHD) among asymptomatic individuals. To assess the increase in screening performance of combining carotid IMT and plaque compared with each measurement alone in the identification of individuals with CHD. Ultrasound examination of left and right carotid arteries was performed on 100 individuals (median age 57), 55 with a history of CHD (unstable angina or myocardial infarction) and 45 without. IMT measurements were taken from the common carotid artery and plaque was identified above, at and below the carotid bifurcation. Associations between IMT and plaque were determined using logistic regression, and screening performance was assessed from the distributions of IMT and plaque among cases and controls. At a false-positive rate of 5%, IMT (cut-off >0.75 mm) identified 30% (95% CI 14-58) of affected individuals. There was an increase in the detection rate of 8 percentage points (1-33%) using IMT and plaque combined compared with IMT alone. As the false-positive increased, the difference in the detection rate increased, up to a maximum of 20 percentage points (5-38%) at a false-positive rate of 20%. The comparison of IMT and plaque combined with plaque alone could only be estimated for the false-positive rate observed using plaque alone (18%); at this point the detection rate was 72% for plaque and 75% for plaque and IMT combined, an increase of 3 percentage points (0-4%). In screening for CHD, combining carotid IMT measurement with plaque assessment is better than using either measurement alone, but the improvement in discrimination is not sufficient to make carotid ultrasound screening for CHD worthwhile.

  5. Stenosis of calcified carotid artery detected on Panoramic Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, So Yang; Oh, Won Mann; Yoon, Suk Ja; Yoon, Woong; Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol [School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Palomo, Juan M. [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2009-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the luminal stenosis of the internal carotid artery with calcification detected on panoramic radiographs. This study used fifty carotid arteries of 36 dental patients whose panoramic radiograph and computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the presence of carotid artery calcification. A neuroradiologist interpreted CTA to determine the degree of stenosis of the internal carotid arteries. The degree of stenosis was stratified in four stages; normal (no stenosis), mild stenosis (1-49%), moderate stenosis (50-69%) and severe stenosis (70-99%). Among the fifty carotid arteries with calcification detected on both panoramic radiography and CTA, 20 carotid arteries (40%) were normal, 29 carotid arteries (18%) had mild stenosis, 1 carotid artery (2%) had moderate stenosis, and there was none with severe stenosis. Sixty percent of the carotid arteries with calcification detected on both panoramic radiography and CTA had internal luminal stenosis, and two percent had moderate stenosis. When carotid atheroma is detected on panoramic radiograph, it is possible that the dental patient has luminal stenosis of the internal carotid artery.

  6. Stroke prevention-surgical and interventional approaches to carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajamani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra cranial carotid artery stenosis is an important cause of stroke, which often needs treatment with carotid revascularization. To prevent stroke recurrence, carotid endarterectomy (CEA has been well-established for several decades for symptomatic high and moderate grade stenosis. Carotid stenting is a less invasive alternative to CEA and several recent trials have compared the efficacy of the 2 procedures in patients with carotid stenosis. Carotid artery stenting has emerged as a potential mode of therapy for high surgical risk patients with symptomatic high-grade stenosis. This review focuses on the current data available that will enable the clinician to decide optimal treatment strategies for patients with carotid stenosis.

  7. Carotid baroreceptor stimulation blood pressure response mapped in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (C-Map study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Nikhil; Clair, Daniel G; Jaye, Deborah A; Scheiner, Avram

    2016-12-01

    Continuous stimulation of the carotid baroreceptors has been shown to evoke a sustained systolic blood pressure (SBP) reduction in hypertensive subjects. This study conducted a detailed mapping of the SBP and heart rate response to electrical stimulus at different locations in the carotid sinus region in patients undergoing a carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The Carotid Sinus Autonomic Response Mapping (C-Map) Study is a multicenter, prospective, non-randomized, acute feasibility study conducted in 10 hypertensive subjects undergoing CEA. Electrode pairs were placed in multiple locations in the region of the carotid sinus for acute stimulation, and the tests were repeated after plaque removal and vessel repair. The configuration that elicited the largest pressure reduction in 8 of 10 patients was with the electrodes arranged longitudinally along the medial (in relation to the bifurcation) wall of the internal carotid artery (ICA) near the bifurcation (11.2±8.1mmHg, pEndarterectomy surgery did not affect maximal acute stimulation response but improved baroreflex sensitivity acutely. Acute extravascular baroreceptor stimulation (BRS) mapping demonstrated that blood pressure reductions are dependent on electrode location and orientation. In most subjects, the largest SBP reductions were elicited in the region of the medial wall of the ICA. This area can be targeted for future BRS lead design and implant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anatomic distribution of gadolinium contrast medium by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging after peribulbar and retrobulbar injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, David R P; Belliveau, Michel J; Enright, Thomas; Islam, Omar; El-Defrawy, Sherif R; Gale, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    To examine the anatomic distribution of gadolinium contrast medium by high-resolution surface-coil magnetic resonance imaging after peribulbar and retrobulbar injection. Comparative case series in which 4 healthy volunteers were randomized to peribulbar (n = 2) or retrobulbar (n = 2) injection of gadolinium and lidocaine hydrochloride, 2%, without epinephrine. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before injection and at 5 minutes and 90 minutes after injection. The peribulbar injection technique resulted in contrast medium primarily in the extraconal space, with no gadolinium observed at the orbital apex; surprisingly, a small amount of contrast medium was observed in the pterygopalatine fossa immediately after peribulbar injection. The retrobulbar injection technique resulted in gadolinium signal diffusely enhancing the intraconal space, orbital apex, optic nerve sheath, and optic canal. The signal intensity was clearly observed in the cavernous sinus surrounding the cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery. A small amount of contrast medium was detected in the pterygopalatine fossa. The retrobulbar injection technique localizes to the intraconal space, with access to intracranial and central nervous system structures via the optic canal, superior orbital fissure, and cavernous sinus. In contrast, the peribulbar injection technique produces a mostly extraconal distribution; however, intraconal solution may communicate with the central nervous system via the inferior orbital fissure and pterygopalatine fossa. This novel finding suggests that peribulbar anesthesia has a readily accessible route for central nervous system toxic effects. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium contrast medium administration provides an important methodological advantage over previously described techniques and is a safe, reproducible, and superior method of orbital imaging.

  9. Enhanced Phenylephrine Contractions in Rabbit Carotid Arteries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carotid arteries were isolated from rabbits and cut into 2mm rings, suspended in 20ml organ baths and bubbled with 95% O2, 5% CO2 and isometric ... There were no significant differences in PE contractions following exposure to intact erythrocytes and ghosts from subjects with different Hb genotypes; however, exposure ...

  10. Haemodynamic evaluation of carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral ischaemia in the region of an internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis may be caused by embolism or cerebral hypoperfusion. A severe ICA stenosis may be well compensated by collateral blood supply, however, in some patients the capacity of the collateral blood supply is insufficient. Studi...

  11. Hemodynamic significance of internal carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    a significant improvement in baseline flow occur. Flow reserve determined by cerebral vasodilation, however, will improve in most patients with hemodynamic failure. In addition, some patients in the low-pressure group develop marked, but temporary, hyperperfusion after reconstruction of very high grade carotid...

  12. Carotid artery revascularization : Surgical and endovascular developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, G.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Carotid artery revascularization. Surgical and endovascular developments. Stroke is among the most disabling chronic diseases and the third major cause of death in the Western world. In the Netherlands around 12 per 1000 inhabitants suffers a stroke, and in 2005 over 10.000 people died as a result

  13. Volumetric assessment of the carotid bifurcation: an alternative concept to stenosis grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Manuel; Arrébola, Manel; Bruguer, Sara; Lago, Aida; Lara, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    To design a volumetric method for the assessment of carotid atheromatosis (CA) based on computed tomography (CT) angiography and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions; to analyze the accuracy and optimal threshold values to differentiate between equivalent degrees of severity by duplex scanning and CT angiography (two-dimensional maximum intensity projection [2D MIP]; internal carotid artery stenosis [ICS] 50%); and to assess the method's suitability to detect progression of CA. suitability and accuracy of a new diagnostic method. 90 carotid bifurcations (45 patients) were assessed with duplex scanning and CT angiography, and reevaluated after 12 ± 2 months follow-up. Determinations: Assessment of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis degree with duplex scanning and 2D MIP CT angiography projections. Volumetric assessment of carotid bifurcation by CT angiography (contrast volume [mm(3)] and density [Hounsfield units, H.U.] between 2-cm below and 1-cm above the anatomic bifurcation of the carotid artery [BifV], and its ratio with 1-cm segment of the common carotid artery [CCV]). descriptive statistics; intraobserver and interobserver agreement (Bland-Altman plot and intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], accuracy of 3D volumetry and duplex scanning as referred to MIP 2D CT angiography as gold standard: sensitivity (Sens), specificity (Sp), kappa index, and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). Estimation of MIP 2D images (CT angiography) confirmed the findings of duplex scanning in 23 of 30 ICS 50% (Sens, 0.91; Sp, 0.77% kappa = 0.68). Three-dimensional volumetric assessment of carotid bifurcation showed an intraobserver and interobserver agreement with an ICC of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.904-0.985) and 0.94 (95% CI, 0.822-0.977), respectively. The BifV-to-CCV ratio was 5.2 ± 1.8 in the ICS 50% group (P = 0.001). The optimal cutoff point of the BifV-to-CCV relationship was identified from the ROC curve in 4.1 (Sens, 0.75; Sp, 0

  14. INTERNAL CAROTID ENDARTERECTOMY UNDER LOCAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Šikovec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endarterectomy of the internal carotid artery, supported by medicamental treatment, is the best method used to prevent stroke with symptomatic patients with an over 70-percent narrowing of the ipsilateral carotid artery. With patients who have successfully passed the operation the occurrence of the stroke is less often than with non-operated patients (1% vs. 6–10% per year. Therefore, it is important that the operation is carried out as safely as possible. Currently, the average acceptable rate of death and/ or severe stroke risk stands at between 2–4%. Greatest problems faced during carotid artery surgery are embolism of the affected artery during preparation, brain ischaemia during the blockade of the carotid artery, and embolism and intimal tearing due to injury of the internal carotid artery by the temporary internal shunt. Due to the risk of causing an embolism and intimal tearing, the use of the internal shunt can be dangerous. Therefore, selective usage of the shunt is recommended when necessary due to brain ischaemia.Methods. Under block/conduction anaesthesia (deep and superficial cervical block we have performed surgery on 23 patients (16 males, 7 females because of severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery (over 70%. A mixture of Xylocain 1% and Marcain 1.5% was used for the cervical block. Cerebral blood circulation was monitored by neurological testing of the patient awake during the procedure. During the procedure, we performed standard monitoring of the vital functions including the blood pressure. Additionally, the transcranial Doppler monitoring of the blood flow through the middle cerebral artery was used with 20 of the patients.Results. Even after placing the artery clamp and cutting off the blood flow through the internal carotid artery no neurological deficits were observed with 18 patients, neither did we use temporary internal shunt with them. Five patients suffered problems with loss of consciousness

  15. Internal carotid artery dissection in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV: diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Nasser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS type IV, also known as vascular EDS, is an inherited connective tissue disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1/100,000 to 1/250,000. In EDS type IV, vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a preference for large- and medium-sized arteries. Dissections of the vertebral and carotid arteries in their extra- and intra-cranial segments are typical. The authors report the case of a patient with EDS type IV for whom the diagnosis was established based on clinical signs and who developed internal carotid artery dissection at the age of 44 years. In the absence of a specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical interventions should focus on symptomatic relief, prophylactic measures, and genetic counseling. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated, and a conservative approach to vascular complications is usually recommended.

  16. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  17. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburger, Kristen M.; Molinari, Filippo; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Saba, Luca; Rodrigues, Paulo; Liboni, William; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge™ systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 ± 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 ± 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  18. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiburger, Kristen M; Molinari, Filippo [Biolab, Department of Electronics, Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Acharya, U Rajendra [Department of ECE, Ngee Ann Polytechnic (Singapore); Saba, Luca [Department of Radiology, A.O.U. di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Rodrigues, Paulo [Department of Computer Science, Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Liboni, William [Neurology Division, Gradenigo Hospital, Torino (Italy); Nicolaides, Andrew [Vascular Screening and Diagnostic Centre, London (United Kingdom); Suri, Jasjit S, E-mail: filippo.molinari@polito.it [Fellow AIMBE, CTO, Global Biomedical Technologies Inc., CA (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge(TM) systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 {+-} 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 {+-} 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  19. An opinion about ‘International Journal of Anatomical Variations’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murlimanju BV

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Respected Doctor, Selcuk Tunali, MD, PhD:Recently, we read with interest your article titled ‘Introducing International Journal of Anatomical Variations’ and got impressed by your wordings [1]. The background of the journal logo is pretty enthusiastic; convey our regards to Prof. Mustafa Aldur for such a wonderful logo. We liked IJAV because to the best of our knowledge, this is the only journal exclusively made for the anatomical variations in the field of medicine. We hope your journal will be utmost helpful to various surgeons, clinicians and researchers in the field of medicine. We congratulate you sir, for bringing out such an important journal.Also we liked the articles of Nayak SB [2,3] which got published in IJAV and cited them in our research publications. The article titled ‘Neurovascular variations in the carotid triangle’ [2] is very interesting and we would like to add that, the superior laryngeal artery was reported [4] to be found absent in 3.5% of the cases.

  20. Anatomical considerations in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Joao P; Reghin Neto, Matheus; Chaddad Neto, Feres; DE Oliveira, Evandro

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the vascular anatomy, including anatomic variations, anatomy of the perforators, and areas of irrigation for each specific vascular trunk is relevant for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Understanding the microanatomy of the cerebral vessels helps surgeons to select the most appropriate microsurgical approach for each case. Anterior circulation aneurysms may be originated from the internal carotid artery and its branches, anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery. Although presenting different surgical nuances, we favor the use of the pterional approach for most anterior circulation aneurysms. In some instances, extensions of the pterional approach improve the surgical exposure and may be selected. In its turn, posterior fossa aneurysms remain a challenge to the neurosurgeon. The exquisite eloquence and complexity of posterior fossa contents require a through knowledge of microsurgical anatomy of this region. Such anatomic background guides the surgeon to the most appropriate approach, which may vary dependind on the size, position of the aneuryms and its relatonship to the surrounding structures.

  1. Anatomic variations of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huapaya, Julio Arturo; Chávez-Trujillo, Kristhy; Trelles, Miguel; Dueñas Carbajal, Roy; Ferrandiz Espadin, Renato

    2015-07-31

    Previous publications from two countries in South America found one anatomical variation not previously reported in the rest of the world, which in turn give some clues with regard to a racial difference. The objective of the present study is to describe variations in the anatomical distribution of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population. To describe variations in the anatomical distribution of the branches of the aortic arch in a Peruvian population. A descriptive study of patients who underwent a tomography angiography of the aorta was performed. We analyzed the reports that showed the description of the variations of the branches of the aortic arch based on the eight types currently described in the literature. From 361 analyzed reports, 282 patients (78.12%) had a normal aortic arch configuration (type I; aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid and left subclavian arteries); followed by type II (left common carotid artery as a branch of the aorta) with 41 patients (11.36%); and type IX (common ostium for the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery) with 25 patients (6.93%). The latter and two other types are new variations. Aortic Arch Type I, Type II and Type IX were the most frequent variations in this Peruvian study. Additionally, we also found two more new types that have not been previously described in the literature. Further investigation regarding these variations is needed in order to assess a racial factor in South America and possible relationships with clinical or surgical events.

  2. Genetically determined serum levels of mannose-binding lectin correlate negatively with common carotid intima-media thickness in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Lone N; Garred, Peter; Christiansen, Buris

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to accelerated atherosclerosis that cannot be attributed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors alone. Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene (MBL2) causing low serum concentrat...... carotid artery (ccIMT) is a validated noninvasive anatomic measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. In a cross-sectional study we examined the relation among ccIMT, MBL2 genotypes, and serum concentrations of MBL....

  3. Anatomical pathology is dead? Long live anatomical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, John M; Francis, Glenn D

    2011-10-01

    The standard diagnostic instrument used for over 150 years by anatomical pathologists has been the optical microscope and glass slide. The advent of immunohistochemistry in the routine laboratory in the 1980s, followed by in situ hybridisation in the 1990s, has increased the armamentaria available to the diagnostic pathologist, and this technology has led to changed patient management in a limited number of neoplastic diseases. The first decade of the 21 century has seen an increasing number of publications using proteomic technologies that promise to change disease diagnosis and management, the traditional role of an anatomical pathologist. Despite the plethora of publications on proteomics and pathology, to date there are actually limited data where proteomic technologies do appear to be of greater diagnostic value than the standard histological slide. Though proteomic techniques will become more prevalent in the future, it will need the expertise of an anatomical pathologist to dissect out and validate this added information.

  4. Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting in the US Medicare Population, 1999-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Judith H; Jones, Michael R; Leifheit, Erica C; Sheffet, Alice J; Howard, George; Lal, Brajesh K; Howard, Virginia J; Wang, Yun; Curtis, Jeptha; Brott, Thomas G

    2017-09-19

    Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting are the leading approaches to revascularization for carotid stenosis, yet contemporary data on trends in rates and outcomes are limited. To describe US national trends in performance and outcomes of carotid endarterectomy and stenting among Medicare beneficiaries from 1999 to 2014. Serial cross-sectional analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 years or older from 1999 to 2014 using the Medicare Inpatient and Denominator files. Spatial mixed models adjusted for age, sex, and race were fit to calculate county-specific risk-standardized revascularization rates. Mixed models were fit to assess trends in outcomes after adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, and symptomatic status. Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting. Revascularization rates per 100 000 beneficiary-years of fee-for-service enrollment, in-hospital mortality, 30-day stroke or death, 30-day stroke, myocardial infarction, or death, 30-day all-cause mortality, and 1-year stroke. During the study, 937 111 unique patients underwent carotid endarterectomy (mean age, 75.8 years; 43% women) and 231 077 underwent carotid artery stenting (mean age, 75.4 years; 49% women). There were 81 306 patients who underwent endarterectomy in 1999 and 36 325 in 2014; national rates per 100 000 beneficiary-years decreased from 298 in 1999-2000 to 128 in 2013-2014 (P endarterectomy and from 61% to 70% among patients who underwent stenting) and the proportion of symptomatic patients (all P endarterectomy and 1.13% (95% CI, 0.71% to 1.54%) among patients who underwent stenting; an absolute decrease from 1999 to 2014 was observed for endarterectomy (1.4%; 95% CI, 1.2% to 1.5%) but not stenting (-0.1%; 95% CI, -0.5% to 0.4%). Rates for 1-year ischemic stroke decreased after endarterectomy (absolute decrease, 3.5% [95% CI, 3.2% to 3.7%]; adjusted annual decrease, 2.17% [95% CI, 2.00% to 2.34%]) and stenting (absolute decrease, 1

  5. Microsurgical anatomy of the human carotid body (glomus caroticum): Features of its detailed topography, syntopy and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Sissy-Amelie; Wöhler, Aliona; Beutner, Dirk; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-03-01

    The human glomus caroticum (GC) is not readily accessible during ordinary anatomical teaching courses because of insufficient time and difficulties encountered in the preparation. Accordingly, most anatomical descriptions of its location, relationship to neighboring structures, size and shape are supported only by drawings, but not by photographs. The aim of this study is to present the GC with all associated roots and branches. Following microscope-assisted dissection and precise photo-documentation, a detailed analysis of location, syntopy and morphology was performed. We carried out this study on 46 bifurcations of the common carotid artery (CCA) into the external (ECA) and internal (ICA) carotid arteries and identified the GC in 40 (91%) of them. We found significant variations regarding the location of the GC and its syntopy: GC was associated with CCA (42%), ECA (28%) and ICA (30%) lying on the medial or lateral surface (82% or 13%, respectively) or exactly in the middle (5%) of the bifurcation. The short and long diameter of its oval form varied from 1.0 × 2.0 to 5.0 × 5.0mm. Connections with the sympathetic trunk (100%), glossopharyngeal (93%), vagus (79%) and hypoglossal nerve (90%) could be established in 29 cadavers. We conclude that precise knowledge of this enormous variety might be very helpful not only to students in medicine and dentistry during anatomical dissection courses, but also to surgeons working in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Carotid stenosis: what is the high-risk population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hun Park

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Prevention is the best treatment for cerebrovascular disease, which is why early diagnosis and the immediate treatment of carotid stenosis contribute significantly to reducing the incidence of stroke. Given its silent nature, 80% of stroke cases occur in asymptomatic individuals, emphasizing the importance of screening individuals with carotid stenosis and identifying high-risk groups for the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and the most frequent risk factors for carotid stenosis. METHODS: A transversal study was conducted in the form of a stroke prevention campaign held on three nonconsecutive Saturdays. During the sessions, carotid stenosis diagnostic procedures were performed for 500 individuals aged 60 years or older who had systemic arterial hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus and/or coronary heart disease and/or a family history of stroke. RESULTS: The prevalence of carotid stenosis in the population studied was 7.4%, and the most frequent risk factors identified were mean age of 70 years, carotid bruit, peripheral obstructive arterial disease, coronary insufficiency and smoking. Independent predictive factors of carotid stenosis include the presence of carotid bruit or peripheral obstructive heart disease and/or coronary insufficiency. CONCLUSIONS: The population with peripheral obstructive heart disease and carotid bruit should undergo routine screening for carotid stenosis.

  7. Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring May Detect Carotid Occlusion Intolerance during Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Furuse, Motomasa; Yagi, Ryokichi; Ohmura, Tomohisa; Ohnishi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Naokado; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Kawabata, Shinji; Miyachi, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2018-02-05

    The frequency of the occurrence of adverse events associated with carotid artery stenting (CAS) is usually low, but serious adverse events such as cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may occur. Real-time monitoring is ideal for the early detection of adverse events during the surgical procedure. This study aimed to evaluate continuous blood glucose (BG) monitoring for the detection of adverse events during CAS. Forty patients undergoing scheduled CAS were prospectively enrolled. An artificial pancreas was used for continuous BG monitoring (once per minute), using venous blood extracted at a rate of 2 mL/hr during CAS. The primary endpoint was a correlation between BG change and adverse events. CAS was discontinued in 1 patient, and BG was not measured in 5 patients (12.5%) because of the inability to extract blood. Among 34 evaluable patients, no patient developed CHS, but 3 patients (9%) experienced carotid occlusion intolerance. During CAS, BG was significantly higher in patients with carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 5 mg/dL) than in patients without carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 0 mg/dL) (P = 0.0221). A cutoff BG value ≥4 mg/dL during CAS showed 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of carotid occlusion intolerance. There was no significant correlation between BG change and other adverse events. BG elevation may help detect carotid occlusion intolerance although it is still unknown whether BG monitoring can detect CHS. Further studies should validate that a cutoff BG elevation value of ≥4 mg/dL during CAS indicates carotid occlusion intolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anatomic Relationship Between Right Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve and Cervical Fascia and Its Application Significance in Anterior Cervical Spine Surgical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jianlin; Jiang, Heng; Ren, Dajiang; Wang, Chongwei

    2017-04-15

    An anatomic study of anterior cervical dissection of 42 embalmed cadavers. The aim was to study the anatomic relationship between recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and cervical fascia combined with the requirements in anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). There has been no systematic research about how to avoid RLN injury in anterior cervical spine surgical approach from the aspect of the anatomic relationship between RLN and cervical fascia. Forty-two adult cadavers were dissected to observe the relationships between RLN and different cervical fascia layers. RLN pierced out the alar fascia from the inner edge of the carotid sheath in all cases, and the piercing position in 22 cases (52.4%) was located at the lower segment of T1. The enter point into visceral fascia of RLN was located at C7-T1 in 25 cases (59.5%). The middle layer of deep cervical fascia exhibited the most stable anatomic relationship with RLN at the carotid sheath confluence site. Pulling visceral sheath leftwards would significantly increase the RLN tension. Using the close and stable relationship between RLN and cervical fascia could help to avoid RLN injury in anterior cervical spine surgical approach. 4.

  9. Usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for detection of carotid plaque ulceration in patients with symptomatic carotid atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, Gerrit L; van Dijk, Anouk C; van den Oord, Stijn C H; Hussain, Burhan; Verhagen, Hence J M; Sijbrands, Eric J G; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van der Lugt, Aad; Schinkel, Arend F L

    2013-07-15

    Previous data have indicated that carotid plaque ulceration is a strong predictor of cerebrovascular events. Standard ultrasound and color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) scans have poor diagnostic accuracy for the detection of carotid plaque ulceration. The aim of the present prospective study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) scans for the detection of carotid plaque ulceration. The Institutional Ethics Committee approved the study protocol, and all patients provided informed consent. The patients had symptomatic stenosis of the internal carotid artery and underwent carotid computed tomographic angiography as part of their clinical evaluation. All patients underwent a CDUS examination in conjunction with CEUS. Carotid plaque ulceration was defined as the presence of ≥1 disruptions in the plaque-lumen border ≥1 × 1 mm. Carotid computed tomographic angiography was used as reference technique. The study population consisted of 20 patients (mean age 64 ± 9 years, 80% men), and 39 carotid arteries were included in the present analysis. Computed tomographic angiography demonstrated that the plaque surface was smooth in 15 (38%), irregular in 7 (18%) and ulcerated in 17 (44%) carotid arteries. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CDUS for the detection of ulceration was 29%, 73%, 54%, 46%, and 57%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CEUS for the detection of ulceration was 88%, 59%, 72%, 63%, and 87%, respectively. CEUS had superior sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of carotid plaque ulceration compared with CDUS. CEUS improved the intrareader and inter-reader variability for the assessment of carotid plaque ulceration compared with CDUS. In conclusion, CEUS could be an additional method for the detection of carotid plaque ulceration. The role of CDUS for the assessment of carotid

  10. CT angiography helps to differentiate acute from chronic carotid occlusion: the ''carotid ring sign''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Patrik; Ntaios, George [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Neurology Service, Lausanne (Switzerland); Delgado, Montserrat G. [Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Bezerra, Daniel C. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Meuli, Reto; Binaghi, Stefano [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    Currently, there is no reliable method to differentiate acute from chronic carotid occlusion. We propose a novel CTA-based method to differentiate acute from chronic carotid occlusions that could potentially aid clinical management of patients. We examined 72 patients with 89 spontaneously occluded extracranial internal carotids with CT angiography (CTA). All occlusions were confirmed by another imaging modality and classified as acute (imaging <1 week of presumed occlusion) orchronic (imaging >4 weeks), based on circumstantial clinical and radiological evidence. A neuroradiologist and a neurologist blinded to clinical information determined the site of occlusion on axial sections of CTA. They also looked for (a) hypodensity in the carotid artery (thrombus), (b) contrast within the carotid wall (vasa vasorum), (c) the site of the occluded carotid, and (d) the ''carotid ring sign'' (defined as presence of a and/or b). Of 89 occluded carotids, 24 were excluded because of insufficient circumstantial evidence to determine timing of occlusion, 4 because of insufficient image quality, and 3 because of subacute timing of occlusion. Among the remaining 45 acute and 13 chronic occlusions, inter-rater agreement (kappa) for the site of proximal occlusion was 0.88, 0.45 for distal occlusion, 0.78 for luminal hypodensity, 0.82 for wall contrast, and 0.90 for carotid ring sign. The carotid ring sign had 88.9% sensitivity, 69.2% specificity, and 84.5% accuracy to diagnose acute occlusion. The carotid ring sign helps to differentiate acute from chronic carotid occlusion. If further confirmed, this information may be helpful in studying ischemic symptoms and selecting treatment strategies in patients with carotid occlusions. (orig.)

  11. Carotid Endarterectomy with Routine Shunt for Patients with Contralateral Carotid Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jie; Li, Jinyong; Ye, Zhidong; Fan, Xueqiang; Wen, Jianyan; Zhang, Jianbin; Liu, Peng

    2017-10-20

    This study aimed to report the clinical features and early and long-term outcomes of patients treated with carotid endarterectomy (CEA) combined with a routine shunt for carotid stenosis with the occlusion of the contralateral carotid artery (CCO), and to compare them with patients without contralateral occlusion (NO-CCO). A retrospective analysis included 301 patients who had carotid artery stenosis treated with CEA using a routine shunt. Of these patients, 35 patients and 266 patients were categorized into a CCO group and NO-CCO group, respectively. Demographics and short-term and long-term outcomes were documented and compared. The demographic characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. The periprocedural mortality, stroke rate, and rate of periprocedural myocardial infarction were not significantly different between both groups. The mean follow-up period for long-term outcomes was 34.45 ± 22.99 months, and the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no statistical difference between both groups regarding stroke, myocardial infarction, and mortality. CEA combined with the routine shunt is an effective and durable procedure for carotid artery stenosis patients with CCO.

  12. Carotid Endarterectomy to Remove Retained Solitaire Stent Retriever inside Carotid Stent after Mechanical Thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Mary In-Ping Huang; Smith, Tony P; Brown, Patrick A; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2017-05-01

    Tandem occlusions of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) occur in up to a third of patients with acute ischemic strokes undergoing endovascular mechanical thrombectomy. Understanding open neurosurgical management of associated complications with this procedure is important. A 67-year-old man with acute onset of left hemiparesis and a tandem right ICA and MCA occlusion. He underwent carotid stent angioplasty of a stenotic ICA, followed by attempted Solitaire stent retrieval of an MCA clot. On withdrawal, the tines of the Solitaire stent lodged inside the Precise carotid stent. The patient was started on aspirin, Plavix, and heparin infusion, and underwent a carotid endarterectomy (CEA) with safe removal of the stents and primary vessel repair. This is the first case reported to date of a Solitaire stent becoming lodged inside a Precise carotid stent, salvaged by CEA with safe removal of the stents and primary vessel repair. We discuss the timing, indication, alternatives, and technical nuances of a CEA in this setting. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Space obstructive syndrome: intracranial hypertension, intraocular pressure, and papilledema in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Thomas C

    2012-01-01

    Humans undergo several consistent and measurable changes of fluid distribution and regulation in the course of adapting to microgravity. Recently, a syndrome of objective findings has been described by Mader et al. associated with long-duration missions, including hyperopic shifts, mildly elevated intracranial pressure, papilledema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, and other anatomic findings. Experience with venous obstructive lesions leads the author to propose a primary obstructive process, unique to or exacerbated by microgravity, acting at the level of the proximal internal jugular veins, termed Space Obstructive Syndrome (SOS). Literature, anatomy, and ultrasound observations revealed four major potential compression zones of the internal jugular vein, with Zone I between the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the carotid artery as the primary area of compression, both in 1 G in an upright position and in microgravity. Internal jugular vein compression, along with loss of gravitationally induced cranial outflow of blood in the vertebral veins and collaterals, may lead to intracranial venous hypertension with resultant facial/head and upper airway swelling, increased intraocular pressure, intracranial hypertension, and papilledema. Further study and proof of concept will necessitate ultrasound, Doppler flow study, and internal jugular vein pressure measurements on orbit in the International Space Station. If proven, SOS will give researchers opportunity for study and development of mitigation strategies such as artificial gravity systems.

  14. Stenting of Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimae, N.; Morimoto, T.; Nagata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate our cases of cervical internal carotid artery stenosis for safty stenting. We investigate the preoperative internal carotid artery stenosis using by integrated backscatter (IBS) method of ultra sonography, comparing with the thirty five surgical specimens as to their nature, histological structure, thickness of fibrous cap. We choose the protection method according to plaque structure, and placed Easy-Wall stent or Smart stent after prePTA. We added post PTA according to the extent of expansion and IVUS findings. Calibrated IBS = IBS value (ROI) /intinal IBS value of ‘bleeding’, ‘lipiď, ‘thrombus’, fiber, ‘hyalinization’ were -27.5, -22.5, -15.2, -11.1, +2.1. That of the thin fibrous cap were -10.9*, that of thic fibrous cap were -2.4 (*p safty stenting. PMID:20591243

  15. Current management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Serrano-Rodríguez, L

    2015-05-01

    Asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) is a common problem in daily clinical practice, and its management is still the subject of controversy. In contrast to symptomatic carotid disease, the main studies on surgical treatment of patients with ACS have shown only a modest benefit in the primary prevention of stroke. In addition, current medical treatment has drastically decreased the risk of stroke in patients with ACS. Selecting patients amenable to endovascular treatment and determining how and when to conduct the ultrasound follow-up of these patients are issues that still need resolving. This article analyzes two new studies underway that provide evidence for better management of ACS in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and oxidized low density lipoprotein in carotid atherosclerosis[S

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, Kasey C.; Maguire, Colin T.; Wolfert, Robert; Burns, Alan R.; Reardon, Michael; Geis, Richard; Holvoet, Paul; Morrisett, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma levels of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) have been identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Lp-PLA2 is the sole enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxidized phospholipids on LDL particles in atherosclerotic plaques. We have studied the relationship between Lp-PLA2 and oxLDL in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) tissues and in matched plasmas. In extracts from CEA anatomical segments, the levels of oxLDL were s...

  17. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  18. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  19. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  20. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  5. Very Early Carotid Endarterectomy After Intravenous Thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzini, C; Gentile, M; De Vito, A; Traina, L; Sette, E; Fainardi, E; Mascoli, F; Casetta, I

    2016-04-01

    The timing of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) after thrombolysis is still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to analyse a cohort of patients undergoing urgent endarterectomy after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke. This was an observational study. Prospective databases were reviewed and matched to identify patients who underwent CEA early after intravenous thrombolysis (2009-14). The focus was carotid surgery performed within 12 hours of stroke onset in patients with a high grade (≥70%) symptomatic carotid stenosis, associated with vulnerable plaques or stroke in evolution, and evidence of a significant salvageable ischaemic penumbra on perfusion computed tomography scan. Demographic and clinical information, as well as data on relevant outcomes were extracted. Thirty four consecutive stroke patients who underwent CEA within 2 weeks of thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke and ipsilateral high grade carotid stenosis were identified. In 11 patients the surgical procedure was performed within 12 hours of the onset of symptoms. All patients showed a clinical improvement after combined treatment. The 3 month outcome was favourable (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) in 10 patients. No haemorrhagic complications were registered. There was neither peri-operative stroke nor stroke within 3 months of surgery. One patient died from acute myocardial infarction 3 days after intervention. This experience suggests that very early CEA after thrombolysis, aimed at removing the source of potential embolisation and restoring blood flow, may be safe and can lead to a favourable outcome. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cerebral Ischemia Due to Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kamacı Şener

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blunt injury to the neck region may lead to carotid artery dissection and cerebral ischemia. Blunt injury to carotid artery is not frequent but determination of the presence of trauma in the history of stroke patients will provide early diagnosis and treatment of them. In this article, a case with cerebral ischemia resulting from traumatic carotid artery dissection is presented and clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and choice of treatment are discussed in the light of the literature.

  7. Containment Relations in Anatomical Ontologies

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    In addition to parthood relations, containment relations are needed for describing the locations of anatomical individuals. My lungs are contained, but not part of, in my thoracic cavity. Urine is contained in, but not part of, the cavity of my urinary bladder.

  8. The Fate of Anatomical Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoeff, Rina; Zwijnenberg, Robert

    Almost every medical faculty possesses anatomical and/or pathological collections: human and animal preparations, wax- and other models, as well as drawings, photographs, documents and archives relating to them. In many institutions these collections are well-preserved, but in others they are poorly

  9. The haemodynamic effect of carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M-Y; Sillesen, H H; Jørgensen, L G; Schroeder, T V

    2002-07-01

    to assess the haemodynamic effect of carotid artery surgery, and to relate postoperative changes to the state of cerebral circulation before revascularisation. using transcranial Doppler we studied bilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) flow velocities before and on 1st day, 2nd or 3rd day and 4th or 5th day and 3 months after carotid surgery in 61 patients. In addition, ipsilateral MCA flow velocity was monitored continuously during surgery. Data were related to the internal carotid artery (ICA) perfusion pressure (cerebral perfusion pressure index, CPPI), measured directly before ICA clamping. postoperatively, MCA flow velocities increased significantly overall (pCPPICPPI, whereas MCA flow velocities remained increased in the group of patients with low CPPI. At 3 months flow velocities in both groups were normalised. New neurological symptoms occurred in four patients, who all had low CPPI preoperatively (22% (4/18) vs 0%; Fisher's exact test: p=0.006). some degree of hyperperfusion was seen in most patients, but the changes were significantly more pronounced in patients with preoperative hypoperfusion, who also suffered significantly more neurological complications.

  10. [Morbidity and mortality of carotid endarterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Pérez, A; Cabrera Morán, V; Abad Vázquez, C; Muñoz Falcón, L; Hernández Ruiz, A; Hermida Anllo, M; Cárdenes Romero, I

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate the peroperative complications in carotid surgery, a cohort of 64 patients operated of carotid endarterectomy (EC) were evaluated. A total 78 EC were performed, 56 unilateral (EC-U) and 11 bilateral (EC-B). All the cases were managed in a similar manner regarding surgical technique, monitoring, anesthetic management and pre and postoperative care. A temporary shunt was inserted in 6 cases. The hospital mortality has been 0. We registered the following postoperative complications: arterial hypertension in 23.1 of EC-U and 18.2% of EC-B, cervical hematoma in 5.3% (EC-U) and 13.6% (EC-B), TIA in 5.3% (EC-U) and 4.5% (EC-B), stroke 1.7% (EC-U) and 4.5% (EC-B), vocal cord injury in 3.5% of EC-U and chest pain with angina in 1.7% of EC-U. A review of the mortality and morbidity in carotid surgery is done.

  11. Hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent angioplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Reith, W.; Krick, C.; Karp, K.; Zimmer, A.; Struffert, T.; Kuehn, A.L.; Papanagiotou, P. [University of the Saarland, Department for Interventional and Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Homburg (Germany); Roth, C.; Haass, A. [University of the Saarland, Clinic for Neurology, Homburg (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    This study assesses the incidence and causes of hyperperfusion syndrome occurring after carotid artery stenting (CAS). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical database of 417 consecutive patients who were treated with CAS in our department to identify patients who developed hyperperfusion syndrome and/or intracranial hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging was performed before and after CAS in 269 cases. A Spearman's rho nonparametric correlation was performed to determine whether there was a correlation between the occurrence/development of hyperperfusion syndrome and the patient's age, degree of stenosis on the stented and contralateral side, risk factors such as diabetes, smoking, hypertension, adiposity, gender and fluoroscopy time, and mean area of postprocedural lesions as well as preexisting lesions. Significance was established at p < 0.05. Of the 417 carotid arteries stented and where MRI was also completed, we found hyperperfusion syndrome in 2.4% (ten cases). Patients who had preexisting brain lesions (previous or acute stroke) were at a higher risk of developing hyperperfusion syndrome (p = 0.022; Spearman's rho test). We could not validate any correlation with the other patient characteristics. Extensive microvascular disease may be a predictor of hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent placement. We believe that further studies are warranted to predict more accurately which patients are at greater risk of developing this often fatal complication. (orig.)

  12. Approach To Unstable Plaque In Carotid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Ghabaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Risk of cerebral infarction due to thrombo emboli originating  from carotid artery disease estimated to be near 15%, and this risk  is closely associated with the severity of luminal stenosis. But at the same time characteristics  of the plaque should be taken into account for therapeutic planning when the patient is asymptomatic and the diameter of the stenosis does not reach the threshold of 70%. Search for markers of plaque vulnerability, instability, or thromboembolic potential as complementary to the degree of the luminal stenosis in stroke risk prediction should be considered .These morphologic features of carotid plaques are increasingly believed to be one of those markers that could carry further prognostic information, and early recognition of these plaques features may identify a high-risk subgroup of patients who might particularly benefit from aggressive interventions with aggressive medical treatment. Color and duplex Doppler sonography  evaluates both  morphologic and hemodynamic   abnormalitie of carotid. Echogensity, degree of stenosis and plaque surface features are essential parameters of morphological abnormality.

  13. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Case Report and Endovascular Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakhoul, Lara Toufic; Tawk, Rabih

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To highlight the case of a patient with multiple transient ischemic attacks and visual disturbances diagnosed with carotid stump syndrome and managed with endovascular approach. Case Presentation. We present the case of a carotid stump syndrome in an elderly patient found to have moderate left internal carotid artery stenosis in response to an advertisement for carotid screening. After a medical therapeutic approach and a close follow-up, transient ischemic attacks recurred. Computed tomographic angiography showed an occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and the presence of moderate stenosis in the right internal carotid artery, which was treated by endovascular stenting and balloon insertion. One month later, the patient presented with visual disturbances due to the left carotid stump and severe stenosis of the left external carotid artery that was reapproached by endovascular stenting. Conclusion. Considerations should be given to the carotid stump syndrome as a source of emboli for ischemic strokes, and vascular assessment could be used to detect and treat this syndrome.

  14. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-01-01

    .... We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid...

  15. Deglutition syncope: a manifestation of vagal hyperactivity following carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endean, Eric D; Cavatassi, William; Hansler, Joseph; Sorial, Ehab

    2010-09-01

    A 61-year-old man with left amaurosis fugax and bilateral >80% internal carotid artery stenoses underwent a left carotid endarterectomy. On the first postoperative day, he developed hypotension, bradycardia, and chest pain with food ingestion. He was diagnosed as having deglutition syncope and was treated with oral anticholinergics. Similar symptoms occurred when he underwent a right carotid endarterectomy. Deglutition syncope is a neurally mediated situational syncope resulting from vagus nerve over-activity. This is the first report of deglutition syncope associated with carotid endarterectomy. It is important to recognize and differentiate these symptoms from other causes of postendarterectomy hemodynamic instability.

  16. Anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy - general or loco-regional?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrehuş, Claudiu

    2015-04-01

    Carotid endarterectomy has been widely used for the surgical treatment of carotid stenosis, and may be performed under either general or loco-regional anaesthesia. The greatest risks of carotid endarterectomy are the neurologic complications and the myocardial infarction. Anaesthetic and surgical techniques are constantly under scrutiny to try to reduce the relatively high incidence of morbidity and mortality of an operation which in itself is only preventative. Loco-regional anaesthesia is an alternative to general anaesthesia which has attracted considerable attention amid claims of a reduction in operative morbidity and mortality. This review describes the problems and some solutions for providing loco-regional or general anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy.

  17. Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries with basilar aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briganti, F.; Tortora, F.; Elefante, A. [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Cattedra di Neuroradiologia, 80131, Napoli (Italy); Maiuri, F. [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Department of Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery Service, Napoli (Italy)

    2004-10-01

    We report a rare case of bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries with an associated aneurysm of the basilar tip, studied by CT angiography, MR angiography and digital angiography. The patient became symptomatic with an episode of loss of consciousness, likely due to reduced blood perfusion. The other 20 reported cases of bilateral carotid hypoplasia (only four of which with an associated aneurysm) are reviewed. The findings of noninvasive procedures (including narrowing of the carotid canals on CT) may lead to a correct diagnosis before angiography is performed; they may also help to differentiate angiographic narrowing of the hypoplastic internal carotids from the string sign often observed in some acquired conditions. (orig.)

  18. The first derivative of the carotid displacement pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. H.; Spodick, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The amplitude and time relationships of the carotid derivative in normal individuals and unselected cardiac patients is investigated together with the effects of different contraction strengths in patients with pulsus alternans and subjects challenged with isoproterenol and propranolol. Data regarding the relationship between the preejection period (PEP) and the ratio of peak to total amplitude of the carotid displacement pulse derivative are presented. It is found that cardiac abnormality tends to reduce the rate of rise of the carotid displacement pulse. The results obtained show that the PEP is a somewhat more sensitive index of the changes studied than the carotid displacement derivative.

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Carotid Artery Stenting Versus Carotid Endarterectomy Among Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Jessica J; Nguyen, Louis L; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Kumamaru, Hiraku; Chen, Chih-Ying; Williams, Lauren A; Liu, Jun; Rothman, Andrew T; Jaff, Michael R; Seeger, John D; Benenati, James F; Schneider, Peter A; Aronow, Herbert D; Johnston, Joseph A; Brott, Thomas G; Tsai, Thomas T; White, Christopher J; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-05-01

    Effectiveness of carotid artery stenting (CAS) relative to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) among Medicare patients has not been established. We compared effectiveness of CAS versus CEA among Medicare beneficiaries. We linked Medicare data (2000-2009) to the Society for Vascular Surgery's Vascular Registry (2005-2008) and the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's (NCDR) Carotid Artery Revascularization and Endarterectomy Registry (2006-2008/2009). Medicare patients were followed up from procedure date until death, stroke/transient ischemic attack, periprocedural myocardial infarction, or a composite end point for these outcomes. We derived high-dimensional propensity scores using registry and Medicare data to control for patient factors and adjusted for provider factors in a Cox regression model comparing CAS with CEA. Among 5254 Society for Vascular Surgery's Vascular Registry (1999 CAS; 3255 CEA) and 4055 Carotid Artery Revascularization and Endarterectomy Registry (2824 CAS; 1231 CEA) Medicare patients, CAS patients had a higher comorbidity burden and were more likely to be at high surgical risk (Society for Vascular Surgery's Vascular Registry: 96.7% versus 44.5%; Carotid Artery Revascularization and Endarterectomy Registry: 71.3% versus 44.7%). Unadjusted outcome risks were higher for CAS. Mortality risks remained elevated for CAS after adjusting for patient-level factors (hazard ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.46). After further adjustment for provider factors, differences between CAS and CEA were attenuated or no longer present (hazard ratio for mortality, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.37). Performance was comparable across subgroups defined by sex and degree of carotid stenosis, but there was a nonsignificant trend suggesting a higher risk of adverse outcomes in older (>80) and symptomatic patients undergoing CAS. Outcomes after CAS and CEA among Medicare beneficiaries were comparable after adjusting for both patient- and provider

  20. [Anatomical visibility of the meridian information channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xi-lang

    2008-12-01

    The "structure imperfectness of signal channel rule" put forward by the author of the present paper may provide a theoretical evidence for the systematicness of meridian information channel. The conclusion that no special structure of the meridian-collateral system has been found is likely to serve as a piece of counterevidence. According to the latest structural view, the development of capillaries, lymphatic vessels and nerves needs target cells-released inducible factors. In the initial phase of the development of the organism, the asymmetry of the interspaces among cells results in the production and arrangement imbalance of the sequential factors which make the capillaries, lymphatic vessels and nerves distribute sequentially in time and space. Meridian-collateral, following the "systemic statistic distribution rule", is a general expression of this distribution pattern. As a systematic structure, the meridian-collateral system distributes in an optimized way in the human body and has both orderly and compatible characteristics. The author thinks that the meridian-collateral information channel is anatomically visible in the time and spatial structure, and in its logical structure and compatibility during the process of growth. Hence, many techniques of delicate anatomy, quantitative anatomy, growth anatomy, comparative anatomy, tridimensional remodeling of living creature and dynamical remodeling of growth all should be used as the important tools for studying the meridian information channel. The theory and the anatomical techniques determine what you would finally find.

  1. Morphometric analysis of one anatomic scoliotic specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Stefan; Labelle, Hubert; Mitulescu, Anca; Latimer, Bruce; Skalli, Wafa; Lavaste, François; de Guise, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a 3-D deformation affecting the position of the spine in space. The regional deformity has been studied extensively but the local changes have not been widely investigated and this being mainly due to the rarity of anatomical specimens. The objective of this study was to identify a deformation pattern for idiopathic scoliosis. We thus studied one complete scoliotic specimen using a digitizing protocol developed by our research group. The anatomical specimen was selected from the Hamann-Todd Osteology Collection at the Cleveland Natural History Museum, which contains over 1,300 skeletons. We were also able to match this scoliotic specimen with one normal specimen for age, sex, race, height and weight. Each vertebra was measured by taking approximately 200 points on each surface. Parameters for each vertebra were then calculated from these sets of points. Each scoliotic vertebra was then compared with a corresponding normal vertebra of the matched specimen. We present the first findings of these measurements, which show pedicle and posterior elements changes that are thought to be secondary to the scoliotic deformation.

  2. Surgical techniques and curative effect of carotid endarterectomy for carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min HAN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the surgical techniques of carotid endarterectomy (CEA for treating carotid artery stenosis, in order to improve the surgical efficacy and reduce intraoperative adverse events and complications after operation. Methods Retrospective analysis was carried out on surgical data of 53 cases who were performed CEA from October 2010 to October 2013 in Department of Neurosurgery in Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. There were 39 males and 14 females, aged from 40 to 78 years old and mean age (60.34 ± 8.92 years old; the course of disease was from 2 d to 4 years. Twenty-six cases were diagnosed as right carotid stenosis, 15 cases left carotid stenosis and 12 cases double-sided carotid stenosis. Among all of those cases, 35 cases were diagnosed as moderate stenosis (30%-69%, 16 cases severe stenosis (70%-99% , and 2 cases complete occlusion. Results Among 53 patients, 50 patients underwent CEA; 2 cases underwent CEA and aneurysm clipping; one case underwent stent removal surgery and CEA because restenosis was found after carotid artery stenting (CAS. Postoperative neck CTA and fMRI showed good morphology of carotid artery, fluent blood flow and improved cerebral perfusion after operation. All of those patients were followed up for 3 to 24 months. One case died of myocardial infarction; 2 cases appeared skin numbness on the operating side of the neck, and the symptom disappeared 3 months later; one case appeared hoarseness after operation; 3 cases experienced mild transient ischemic attack (TIA and the symptom disappeared 2 months later. No case of stroke was found. Conclusions CEA is a safe and effective surgical approach to treat carotid stenosis. Correct and reasonable choices of the surgical indications and skilled surgical technique are the key to ensure the success of operation and to improve efficacy of the therapy. doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.006Video: http://www.cjcnn.org/index.php/cjcnn/pages/view/v14n2a6

  3. Oxidative stress in carotid arteries of patients submitted to carotid endarterectomy. The role of aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Márcio Luís; Carraro, Cristina Campos; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Kalil, Antônio Nocchi; Aerts, Newton

    2016-08-01

    To evaluated the role of oxidative stress on aging process in patients submitted to carotid endarterectomy. Twenty patients were divided into two groups: older group (≥ 70 years old); and the younger group (aging is associated with increased concentrations of oxygen species and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity as so as nitrite reduction in human carotid artery specimens. Maybe therapies that block NADPH oxidase activity and enhance nitrite stores would be a good strategy to reduce the effect of oxidative stress in arterial aging.

  4. [Intraluminal Thrombus in Internal Carotid Artery Successfully Treated with Adjuvant Anticoagulant Therapy Followed by Carotid Endarterectomy:A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamide, Hisato; Hayashi, Yutaka; Ueno, Megumi

    2016-10-01

    An intraluminal thrombus in the carotid artery is relatively rare. A high frequency of perioperative symptomatic stroke has been reported in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, and no standard therapy has yet been developed. A 69-year-old woman, with no history of trauma, presented with ischemic stroke and mild right hemiparesis. Computed tomography and MRI showed an infarction in the left parietal region. A carotid Doppler study showed carotid stenosis on the left side. Further investigation with digital subtraction angiography confirmed significant carotid artery stenosis with an intraluminal thrombus in the left internal carotid artery. She was treated with initial intravenous anticoagulant therapy followed by carotid endarterectomy with thrombus removal 14 days after admission(subacute phase). There was no postoperative complication and she had uneventful course over 3 years of follow-up. Initial adjuvant anticoagulant therapy for symptomatic intraluminal thrombus followed by carotid revascularization is an effective surgical strategy. A meticulous surgical procedure is required to perform a carotid endarterectomy in patients with an intraluminal thrombus.

  5. Carotid and Aortic Stiffness in Patients with Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra I Ershova

    Full Text Available The role of plasma cholesterol in impairing arterial function and elasticity remains unclear. We evaluated arterial stiffness, measured locally in the common carotid artery by high-resolution echo-tracking, and aortic stiffness, using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV (the "gold-standard" measurement of arterial stiffness, in treatment-naive patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH.The study included 66 patients with FH (10-66 years old and 57 first-degree relatives without FH (11-61 years old. Carotid-femoral PWV was determined by SphygmoCor (AtCor, Australia. The parameters of carotid stiffness β-index, Peterson elastic modulus and local PWV were assessed with regard to the common carotid artery at a distance of 1cm from the bifurcation (AlokaProsound Alpha7, Japan.FH patients showed significantly higher β-index (6.3(4.8-8.2 vs. 5.2(4.2-6.4, p = 0.005, Ep (78(53-111 kPa vs. 62(48-79 kPa, p = 0.006, local PWV (5.4(4.5-6.4 m/c vs. 4.7(4.2-5.4 m/c, p = 0.005, but comparable values of carotid-femoral PWV (6.76(7.0-7.92 m/c vs. 6.48(6.16-7.12 m/c, p = 0.138. Carotid arteries and the aorta stiffened with age in patients with FH, but after 30 years, carotid arteries stiffened more significantly than the aorta.Our study demonstrated that treatment-naive patients with FH had stiffer carotid arteries than their relatives, but showed no difference in aortic stiffness. We also found out that the rate of reduction of elasticity of the aorta and carotid arteries in FH patients varies: it is observed earlier in carotid arteries than in the aorta.

  6. Derivação carótido-carotídea por via retrofaríngea: seguimento tardio Retropharyngeal carotid-carotid crossover bypass: late follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Roech Aerts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Existem diversas opções para o tratamento da doença oclusiva dos troncos supra-aórticos, de acordo com a apresentação clínica e a localização das lesões arteriais. As abordagens cervicais são aceitas como alternativas de baixa morbimortalidade, com elevada perviedade em longo prazo. Os autores relatam um caso tratado com sucesso através de derivação carótido-carotídea cruzada por via retrofaríngea associada à endarterectomia da bifurcação carotídea. São discutidos também os aspectos clínicos e as opções cirúrgicas ou endovasculares para o melhor tratamento desses pacientes.A variety of therapeutic options are available to manage the disease of supra-aortic trunks based on clinical presentations and anatomic location of the arterial lesions. The cervical approach is accepted as having low morbidity and mortality with elevated long-term patency. The authors report a successfully treated case of carotid-carotid crossover bypass by the retropharyngeal route associated with endarterectomy of carotid bifurcation. We also discuss clinical aspects, and surgical or endovascular options for the best treatment of these patients.

  7. Anatomical structure of Polystichum Roth ferns rachises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana V. Tyshchenko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The morpho-anatomical characteristics of rachis cross sections of five Polystichum species is presented. The main and auxiliary anatomical features which help to distinguish investigated species are revealed.

  8. Assessment of vinyl polysiloxane as an innovative injection material for the anatomical study of vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaud, Jacques; Chalvet, Laurane; Del Corso, Marco; Cerboni, Elsa; Feugier, Patrick; Mertens, Patrick; Simon, Emile

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous injection materials for the study of vasculature in anatomical specimens, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. Latex and resins are the most widely used injection materials but need several days to set. The development of new materials taking shorter time to polymerize might be very useful to improve anatomic specimen study conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vinyl polysiloxane (VPS), a silicon material widely used for dental impressions with the advantage to set very rapidly, as an injection material. We assessed the preparation, use, diffusion and setting time of the product in different anatomical regions (central nervous system, external carotid/jugular, lower limb) to observe its behavior in variably sized vessels. Our results suggest that VPS might be of interest for the study of vessels in anatomical specimens. The main strengths of the product are represented by (1) simplicity of use, as it is a ready-to-use material, (2) very rapid polymerization, (3) availability in a range of viscosities making easier the exploration of small vessels, (4) its better elasticity compared to resins, (5) and finally its availability in a range of colors making it a material of choice for vascular system dissections including those with very small caliber vessels.

  9. Meta-analysis of the costs of carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, E E; Baldew, V G M; den Ruijter, H M; de Borst, G J

    2017-09-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is currently associated with an increased risk of 30-day stroke compared with carotid endarterectomy (CEA), whereas both interventions seem equally durable beyond the periprocedural period. Although the clinical outcomes continue to be scrutinized, there are few data summarizing the costs of both techniques. A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases in August 2016 identifying articles comparing the costs or cost-effectiveness of CAS and CEA in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Combined overall effect sizes were calculated using random-effects models. The in-hospital costs were specified to gain insight into the main heads of expenditure associated with both procedures. The literature search identified 617 unique articles, of which five RCTs and 12 cohort studies were eligible for analysis. Costs of the index hospital admission were similar for CAS and CEA. Costs of the procedure itself were 51 per cent higher for CAS, mainly driven by the higher costs of devices and supplies, but were balanced by higher postprocedural costs of CEA. Long-term cost analysis revealed no difference in costs or quality of life after 1 year of follow-up. Hospitalization and long-term costs of CAS and CEA appear similar. Economic considerations should not influence the choice of stenting or surgery in patients with carotid artery stenosis being considered for revascularization. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Numerical simulation of blood flow and plaque progression in carotid-carotid bypass patient specific case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Nenad; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Milosevic, Zarko; Kovacevic, Pavle; Velicki, Lazar

    2015-01-01

    This study describes computer simulation of blood flow and plaque progression pattern in a patient who underwent surgical treatment for infected carotid prosthetic tube graft using carotid-carotid cross-over bypass. The 3D blood flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, together with the continuity equation. Mass transfer within the blood lumen and through the arterial wall is coupled with the blood flow and is modelled by the convection-diffusion equation. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transport in lumen of the vessel is described by Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The inflammatory process is solved using three additional reaction-diffusion partial differential equations. Calculation based on a computer simulation showed that flow distribution in the left carotid artery (CA) was around 40-50% of the total flow in the right common CA. Also, the left CA had higher pressure gradient after surgical intervention. Plaque progression simulation predicted development of the atherosclerotic plaque in the position of the right common CA and the left internal CA. A novel way of atherosclerotic plaque progression modelling using computer simulation shows a potential clinical benefit with significant impact on the treatment strategy optimization.

  11. Endarterectomy or Stenting in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Dallit; Falah, Batla; Karmeli, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death in the western world, and carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be effective in treating both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Carotid stenting is a relatively new form of treatment for carotid stenosis and few studies have looked specifically at asymptomatic patients. To retrospectively examine short- and long-term results in the treatment of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis with surgery or stenting. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis treated by carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy in our department from 2006-2007. The primary endpoints were stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period; or any ipsilateral stroke, restenosis, or death within 4 years after the procedure. The study comprised 409 patients who were treated by either stenting or surgery. There was a low morbidity rate in both treatment groups with no significant difference in morbidity or mortality between the treatment groups in both in the short-term as well as long-term. Both treatment methods have a low morbidity and mortality rate and should be considered for patients with few risk factors and a long life expectancy. Treatment method should be selected according to the patient's individual risk factors and imaging data.

  12. Heritability of carotid intima-media thickness : A twin study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Jinying; Cheema, Faiz A.; Bremner, J. Douglas; Goldberg, Jack; Su, Shaoyong; Snieder, Harold; Maisano, Carisa; Jones, Linda; Javed, Farhan; Murrah, Nancy; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Vaccarino, Viola

    Objective: To estimate the heritability of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a surrogate marker for atherosclerosis, independent of traditional coronary risk factors. Methods and results: We performed a classical twin study of carotid IMT using 98 middle-aged male twin pairs, 58 monozygotic (MZ)

  13. Carotid endarterectomy in Durban - the first 10 years | Kadwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was a prospective evaluation of the Durban experience with carotid endarterectomy over the past decade. Since 1981, 478 carotid endarterectomies have been performed in 411 patients. The majority of these patients were white men, with an average age of 60,6 years. The indication for surgery was a ...

  14. Carotid endarterectomy after intravenous thrombolysis for acute cerebral ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathenborg, Lisbet Knudsen; Jensen, L P; Baekgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has proven effective in the treatment of acute cerebral ischaemic attack in selected cases. In the presence of a carotid artery stenosis, such patients may be candidates for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Few studies have been made on the safety of CEA performed after...

  15. Extended BSI for continuous EEG monitoring in carotid endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective Carotid endarterectomy is a common procedure as a secondary prevention of stroke, and is often performed with selective shunting. Although various EEG parameters have been proposed to determine if the brain is at risk during carotid artery clamping, the common procedure is still

  16. Posture-dependent chronotropic effect of carotid sinus massage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Oxhøj, H; Mickley, H

    1987-01-01

    The hypertensive carotid sinus can be divided into cardioinhibitory (chronotropic) and vasodepressor components; the former can be evaluated by carotid sinus massage performed in the supine position. We present the case of a patient in whom the abnormal cardioinhibitory response could only be dem...

  17. Effect of Chronic hypoxia on Carotid vascular responses to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine whether chronic hypoxia would alter the noradrenaline (NA)-evoked vascular responses in carotid circulation in rats. Furthermore, whether the carotid autoregulatory response to NA-evoked rise in arterial blood pressure (ABP) is compromised by chronic hypoxia or not. Also ...

  18. Recurrent carotid stenosis after CEA and CAS: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Brajesh K

    2007-12-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is the preferred method for cerebral revascularization in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic high-grade extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has recently emerged as a less invasive alternative to endarterectomy. Carotid stenting has been demonstrated to be technically feasible and safe in high-risk patients. It has been approved as an acceptable method for revascularization in circumstances where CEA yields suboptimal results. While the final role of CAS in carotid revascularization will be determined on the basis of ongoing randomized trials, it is clear that stenting will continue to be performed in subgroups of patients with carotid stenosis. Therefore, it is anticipated that there will be a corresponding increase in the number of in-stent restenosis cases. Considerable controversy exists regarding the clinical significance, natural history, threshold for management, and appropriate intervention of recurrent carotid stenosis after endarterectomy and after stenting. This review analyzes current information on this important clinical problem and presents evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of recurrent carotid stenosis.

  19. Denervation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid baro- and chemoreceptors play an important role in blood pressure and blood gas homeostasis. Inadvertent denervation of these receptors in humans has been reported following surgery and radiotherapy in the area of the carotid bifurcation. The resulting syndrome of baroreflex failure is

  20. Ultrasound Evaluation of Intima-Media Thickness of Carotid Arteries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ultrasound measured Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT) is a simple and inexpensive tool for assessing the cumulative effects of hypertension on the carotid arterial walls. It is also an independent predictor of future myocardial infarctionand stroke risk. Objectives: This study compared ultrasound measured ...

  1. Spontaneous carotid artery dissection causing a juvenile cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S.; Huebsch, P.; Schindler, E.

    1988-11-01

    The case of a 19-year-old patient is presented who was admitted with aphasia and hemiparesis due to basal ganglia infarction as a result of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery. The difficulties in diagnosing this disease with CT and MRI in the acute stage are demonstrated. Angiography is still imperative in order to ascertain that a carotid dissection has occurred.

  2. A curve model for association of serum homocysteine with carotid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adjusted regression analysis showed that the threshold values of Hcy with end diastolic velocity (EDV) of right common carotid artery (CCA) were 12.50 and 19.00, while for the EDV of right internal carotid artery (ICA), the values were 11.50 and 22.00. U-shaped curves were observed between Hcy and peak systolic ...

  3. EXTERNAL CAROTID-ARTERY REVASCULARIZATION - INDICATIONS, OPERATIVE TECHNIQUES AND RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOONTJE, AH

    1992-01-01

    The external carotid artery (ECA) is an important collateral pathway in patients with ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion and recurrent symptoms. An ipsilateral ECA revascularization can improve cerebral perfusion or eliminate an embolic source. In the past 11 years 11 patients

  4. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of carotid arteries: Early results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolić Momčilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Treatment of carotid stenosis could be surgical: eversion endarterectomy, conventional endarterectomy and patch-plasty, resection with graft interposition and bypass procedure or, in the past few years, carotid artery angioplasty (PTA with stent implantation. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to present early results of carotid artery angioplasty and stenting, as well as to identify indications for this procedure. METHOD Twenty-three patients with stenosis of internal carotid artery were included in the prospective study which was performed in the period from July 2006 to July 2007. For PTA and stenting of the carotid artery we used Balloon dilatation catheter Ultra-softTM SV and Carotid WallstentTM MonorailTM. During the procedure, brain protection by embolic protection system Filter Wire EZ was essentially performed. Descriptive statistical methods were performed to present and describe the patient characteristics, risk factors and results. RESULTS 23 patients were examined. In four (17.39% cases there was asymptomatic, while in 19 (82.61% there was symptomatic homodynamic significant stenosis of the internal carotid artery. Four of these 19 patients (17.39% had late restenosis following carotid endarterectomy, four (17.39% important respiratory failure, and 11 (47.83% important heart disease. Patients were followed up for the first 30 postopertive days. In that period, there were no mortality and no needs for surgical conversions. In one case (4.35%, residual stenosis of 30% remained. Two patients (8.70% had TIA and one (4.35% had CVI. CONCLUSION Main indications for PTA and stenting of carotid arteries are: surgically inaccessible lesions (at or above C2; or subclavial; radiation-induced carotid stenosis; prior ispilateral radical neck dissection; prior carotid endarterectomy (restenosis, severe cardiac and pulmonary conditions. Limitations and contraindications to carotid angioplasty and stentning include: significant

  5. Noncavernous arteriovenous shunts mimicking carotid cavernous fistulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobkitsuksakul, Chai; Jiarakongmun, Pakorn; Chanthanaphak, Ekachat; Pongpech, Sirintara

    2016-01-01

    The classic symptoms and signs of carotid cavernous sinus fistula or cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) consist of eye redness, exophthalmos, and gaze abnormality. The angiography findings typically consist of arteriovenous shunt at cavernous sinus with ophthalmic venous drainage with or without cortical venous reflux. In rare circumstances, the shunts are localized outside the cavernous sinus, but mimic symptoms and radiography of the cavernous shunt. We would like to present the other locations of the arteriovenous shunt, which mimic the clinical presentation of carotid cavernous fistulae, and analyze venous drainages. We retrospectively examined the records of 350 patients who were given provisional diagnoses of carotid cavernous sinus fistulae or cavernous sinus dural AVF in the division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok between 2008 and 2014. Any patient with cavernous arteriovenous shunt was excluded. Of those 350 patients, 10 patients (2.85%) were identified as having noncavernous sinus AVF. The angiographic diagnoses consisted of three anterior condylar (hypoglossal) dural AVF, two traumatic middle meningeal AVF, one lesser sphenoid wing dural AVF, one vertebro-vertebral fistula (VVF), one intraorbital AVF, one direct dural artery to cortical vein dural AVF, and one transverse-sigmoid dural AVF. Six cases (60%) were found to have venous efferent obstruction. Arteriovenous shunts mimicking the cavernous AVF are rare, with a prevalence of only 2.85% in this series. The clinical presentation mainly depends on venous outflow. The venous outlet of the arteriovenous shunts is influenced by venous afferent-efferent patterns according to the venous anatomy of the central nervous system and the skull base, as well as by architectural disturbance, specifically, obstruction of the venous outflow.

  6. The impact of contralateral carotid artery stenosis on outcomes after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothof, Alexander B; Soden, Peter A; Fokkema, Margriet; Zettervall, Sara L; Deery, Sarah E; Bodewes, Thomas C F; de Borst, Gert J; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2017-12-01

    Patients with contralateral carotid occlusion (CCO) have been excluded from randomized clinical trials because of a deemed high risk for adverse neurologic outcomes with carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Evidence for this rationale is limited and conflicting. Therefore, we aimed to compare outcomes after CEA between patients with and without CCO and varying degrees of contralateral carotid stenosis (CCS). We identified patients undergoing CEA from 2003 to 2015 in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) registry. Patients were stratified by preoperative symptom status and presence of CCO. Multivariable analysis was used to account for differences in demographics and comorbidities. Our primary outcome was 30-day stroke/death risk. Of 15,487 patients we identified who underwent CEA, 10,377 (67%) were asymptomatic. CCO was present in 914 patients, of whom 681 (75%) were asymptomatic. Overall, the 30-day stroke/death was 2.0% for symptomatic patients (CCO: 2.6%) and 1.1% for asymptomatic patients (CCO: 2.3%). After adjustment, including symptom status, CCO was associated with higher 30-day stroke/death (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-3.3; P = .001), any in-hospital stroke (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6; P carotid artery stenting than after CEA. We believe that CEA remains a valid and safe option for patients with CCO and that CCO should not be applied as a criterion to promote carotid artery stenting per se. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A high-resolution anatomical framework of the neonatal mouse brain for managing gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyl Boline

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide a high-resolution atlas and use it as an anatomical framework to localize the gene expression data for mouse brain on postnatal day 0 (P0. A color Nissl-stained volume with a resolution of 13.3×50×13.3 µm3 was constructed and co-registered to a standard anatomical space defined by an averaged geometry of C57BL/6J P0 mouse brains. A 145 anatomical structures were delineated based on the histological images. Anatomical relationships of delineated structures were established based on the hierarchical relations defined in the atlas of adult mouse brain (MacKenzie-Graham et al., 2004 so the P0 atlas can be related to the database associated with the adult atlas. The co-registered multimodal atlas as well as the original anatomical delineations is available for download at http://www.loni.ucla.edu/Atlases/. The region-specific anatomical framework based on the neonatal atlas allows for the analysis of gene activity within a high-resolution anatomical space at an early developmental stage. We demonstrated the potential application of this framework by incorporating gene expression data generated using in situ hybridization to the atlas space. By normalizing the gene expression patterns revealed by different images, experimental results from separate studies can be compared and summarized in an anatomical context. Co-displaying multiple registered datasets in the atlas space allows for 3D reconstruction of the co-expression patterns of the different genes in the atlas space, hence providing better insight into the relationship between the differentiated distribution pattern of gene products and specific anatomical systems.

  8. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual...... of restenosis and the development of symptoms, perhaps with the exception of internal carotid artery occlusion, which is not an accepted indication for carotid endarterectomy. Together with recent data from the literature, these observations challenge the indication for reoperative carotid surgery....... rate of focal strokes was estimated to be 2% and 1.5% on the operated and the contralateral, non-operated carotid artery, respectively. Doppler examination revealed 48% re-stenoses, including 14% occlusion and 15% greater than 50% stenosis. However, there was no association between the occurrence...

  9. Three-dimensional carotid ultrasound plaque texture predicts vascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Engelen, Arna; Wannarong, Thapat; Parraga, Grace

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carotid ultrasound atherosclerosis measurements, including those of the arterial wall and plaque, provide a way to monitor patients at risk of vascular events. Our objective was to examine carotid ultrasound plaque texture measurements and the change in carotid plaque...... texture during 1 year in patients at risk of events and to compare these with measurements of plaque volume and other risk factors as predictors of vascular events. METHODS: We evaluated 298 patients with carotid atherosclerosis using 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound at baseline and after 1 year and measured...... carotid plaque volume and 376 measures of plaque texture. Patients were followed up to 5 years (median [range], 3.12 [0.77-4.66]) for myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, and stroke. Sparse Cox regression was used to select the most predictive plaque texture measurements in independent...

  10. Hemodynamic significance of internal carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    . Examination of periorbital flow direction or oculoplethysmography could be used as a screening procedure. Negative tests most certainly rule out any severe pressure gradient across the stenosis, irrespective of the luminal reduction. A positive result, on the other hand, should be further quantified since...... a significant improvement in baseline flow occur. Flow reserve determined by cerebral vasodilation, however, will improve in most patients with hemodynamic failure. In addition, some patients in the low-pressure group develop marked, but temporary, hyperperfusion after reconstruction of very high grade carotid...

  11. Noninvasive characterization of carotid plaque strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir A; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Hatsukami, Thomas; Cebral, Juan; Jones, Michael; Huston, John; Howard, George; Lal, Brajesh K

    2017-06-01

    Current risk stratification of internal carotid artery plaques based on diameter-reducing percentage stenosis may be unreliable because ischemic stroke results from plaque disruption with atheroembolization. Biomechanical forces acting on the plaque may render it vulnerable to rupture. The feasibility of ultrasound-based quantification of plaque displacement and strain induced by hemodynamic forces and their relationship to high-risk plaques have not been determined. We studied the feasibility and reliability of carotid plaque strain measurement from clinical B-mode ultrasound images and the relationship of strain to high-risk plaque morphology. We analyzed carotid ultrasound B-mode cine loops obtained in patients with asymptomatic ≥50% stenosis during routine clinical scanning. Optical flow methods were used to quantify plaque motion and shear strain during the cardiac cycle. The magnitude (maximum absolute shear strain rate [MASSR]) and variability (entropy of shear strain rate [ESSR] and variance of shear strain rate [VSSR]) of strain were combined into a composite shear strain index (SSI), which was assessed for interscan repeatability and correlated with plaque echolucency. Nineteen patients (mean age, 70 years) constituting 36 plaques underwent imaging; 37% of patients (n = 7) showed high strain (SSI ≥0.5; MASSR, 2.2; ESSR, 39.7; VSSR, 0.03) in their plaques; the remaining clustered into a low-strain group (SSI <0.5; MASSR, 0.58; ESSR, 21.2; VSSR, 0.002). The area of echolucent morphology was greater in high-strain plaques vs low-strain plaques (28% vs 17%; P = .018). Strain measurements showed low variability on Bland-Altman plots with cluster assignment agreement of 76% on repeated scanning. Two patients developed a stroke during 2 years of follow-up; both demonstrated high SSI (≥0.5) at baseline. Carotid plaque strain is reliably computed from routine B-mode imaging using clinical ultrasound machines. High plaque strain correlates with known

  12. Experiences with carotid endarterectomy at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnikrishnan Madathipat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerotic carotid artery disease poses a grave threat to cerebral circulation, leading to a stroke with its devastating sequelae, if left untreated. Carotid endarterectomy has a proven track record with compelling evidence in stroke prevention. Objectives: aTo confirm that carotid endarterectomy (CEA is safe and effective in preventing stroke at both short and long term. b to demonstrate long term patency of internal carotid artery when arteriotomy repair is performed using autologous saphenous vein patch. Materials and Methods: During ten years, from September 1997 to February 2008, thirty nine patients who underwent consecutive carotid endarterectomy at our institute, form the basis of this report. Their age ranged from thirty to seventy eight years, with a mean age of 56. There were four women in this cohort. Thirty seven patients were symptomatic with> 70% stenosis and two were asymptomatic with> 80% stenosis, incidentally detected. Imaging included Duplex scan and MRA for carotid territory and brain, and non-invasive cardiac assessment. Co-morbidities included smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease. Carotid Endarterectomy was performed under general anaesthesia, using carotid shunt and vein patch arteriotomy repair. Results: All the patients made satisfactory recovery, without major adverse cerebral events in this series. Morbidities included Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA in two, needing only medications in one, and carotid stenting in the other. Minor morbidities included neck hematoma in two and transient hypoglossal paresis in three patients. Yearly follow-up included duplex scan assessment for all the patients. Two patients died of contralateral stroke, two of myocardial events and two were lost to follow up. Thirty three patients are well and free of the disease during the follow up of three to 120 months. Conclusion: Carotid endarterectomy provided near total freedom from adverse cerebral

  13. The presence of some cytokines and Chlamydia pneumoniae in the atherosclerotic carotid plaque in patients with carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Janczak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last few years the role of microorganisms in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been widely discussed. Chlamydia pneumoniae activates immune cells to produce cytokines that are responsible for the formation of atheromatous carotid lesions.Material and methods: The study was carried out at the Department of Vascular, General and Transplantation Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, in 2002-2003, on 100 consecutive symptomatic patients with internal carotid stenosis, who underwent an endarterectomy procedure. Each patient had their carotid artery sampled in order to find C. pneumoniae DNA using the nested PCR method and some cytokines (TGF-β, VEGF, FGF, TNF-α using immunohistochemical examination. The control group consisted of 20 young organ donors who had been diagnosed with brain death and who had their healthy carotid artery harvested. Analogous genetic and immunohistochemical tests were performed.Results: We did not confirm the presence of either cytokines or C. pneumoniae in the healthy carotid arteries. The presence of FGF was probably due to intima fibroblast activity, which is responsible for elastin and collagen synthesis for the extracellular matrix. C. pneumoniae was discovered in 68% of patients with carotid plaques. Three cytokines (TGF-β, FGF, TNF-α were detected in atherosclerotic internal carotid arteries as well.Conclusion: Chronic infection by C. pneumoniae may exacerbate carotid plaque development and may lead to its destabilization.

  14. QEEG changes during carotid clamping in carotid endarterectomy : Spectral edge frequency parameters and relative band power parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laman, DM; Wieneke, GH; van Duijn, H; Veldhuizen, RJ; van Huffelen, AC

    Intraoperative monitoring is needed to identify accurately those patients in need of a shunt during carotid endarterectomy. EEG can be used for this purpose, but there is no consensus on the variables to use. Using a database consisting of 149 EEGs recorded from patients during carotid

  15. [Restenosis of carotid arteries after carotid endarterectomy: current aspects of the problem: (local and systemic risk factors). Part 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, R Z; Kulikova, A N; Bakhmet'ev, A S

    2012-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is currently the most effective surgical means of preventing ischaemic stroke. Despite the fact that this type of intervention is widely used, there seems to be no tendency toward decreased incidence of such a complication as restenosis of carotid arteries.The present review deals with the results of analyzing the literature on the problem concerning carotid artery restenosis after carotid endarterectomy. Considered herein are the problems of epidemiology and prevalence of the complication involved. Special attention is paid to local and systemic risk factors for the development of restenosis. Studying risk factors of restenosis after carotid endarterectomy is of considerable importance for both prevention and choice of pathogenetically targeted treatment of patients presenting with atherosclerotic lesions of brachiocephalic vessels.

  16. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan

    2012-01-01

    centerline tree, which is relatively unaffected by pathology. A thorough leave-one-patient-out evaluation of the algorithm is made on 40 segmented airway trees from 20 subjects labeled by 2 medical experts. We evaluate accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary......We present a fast and robust supervised algorithm for label- ing anatomical airway trees, based on geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for a given unlabeled air- way tree are evaluated based on the distances to a training set of labeled airway trees....... In tree-space, the airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway...

  17. External ventricular drain as a nontraumatic suction device in carotid endarterectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Jukes, Alistair; Allan, Rodney

    2017-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is a commonly performed operation to remove plaque at the region of the carotid bifurcation. We present our technique to keep the field clear and to minimize potential trauma to the carotid using a neurosurgical external ventricular drain passed behind the common carotid and placed in the dependent position under the arteriotomy.

  18. External ventricular drain as a nontraumatic suction device in carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Jukes, MBBS(Hons, BLibStud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotid endarterectomy is a commonly performed operation to remove plaque at the region of the carotid bifurcation. We present our technique to keep the field clear and to minimize potential trauma to the carotid using a neurosurgical external ventricular drain passed behind the common carotid and placed in the dependent position under the arteriotomy.

  19. Cognitive changes after carotid artery stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Struffert, T.; Krick, C.; Backens, M. [University of the Saarland, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Homburg (Germany); Supprian, T.; Falkai, P.; Reith, W. [University of the Saarland, Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Homburg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    We aimed to test changes in cognitive performance after carotid artery stenting (CAS). Ten patients were neuropsychologically tested at least 24 h before and 48 h after CAS. To diminish thromboembolic events, we used a proximal protection device. The following neuropsychological tests were selected: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), symbol digit test and subtests of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery (verbal fluency, constructional practice, word list memory and delayed recall). Affective state was determined by the Beck Depression Score (BDS). No patient suffered from depression (BDS <1) or dementia (MMSE 29.9{+-}1.5). Nine of the ten patients (P=0.12) showed increased speed in the Number Connection Test (NCT) (corresponding to trail making test). Most patients showed better or similar results concerning delayed recall (P=0.31). No change was observed in the symbol digit test, word list memory, verbal fluency or constructional practice. Better results concerning NCT and delayed recall after carotid stenting might be due to improved brain perfusion. After CAS, cognitive and memory performance seem to improve. Further studies with different time intervals and more refined testing, as well as perfusion-weighted imaging, are needed. (orig.)

  20. Isolated Subarachnoidal Hemorrhage following Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bodenant

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is a rare but well-described complication following carotid endarterectomy or stenting. Clinical signs are ipsilateral, throbbing, unilateral headache with nausea or vomiting, seizures, and neurological deficits, with or without intracerebral abnormalities on CT scan, such as brain edema or intracerebral hemorrhage. Subarachnoidal hemorrhage is rarely described especially if it occurs isolated. We describe a 74-year-old man with a history of high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, atrioventricular block with pacemaker, and ischemic cardiopathy with coronary bypass. He underwent right carotid endarterectomy for a 90% NASCET asymptomatic stenosis. Four days after surgery, he complained of unusual headaches with right, throbbing hemicrania. Nine days after surgery, he presented with left hemiplegia and a partial motor seizure. He had fluctuant altered consciousness, left hemiplegia, and left visual and sensory neglect. Brain CT showed right frontal subarachnoidal hemorrhage without parenchymal bleeding. Cerebral angiography found no cerebral aneurysm, no vascular malformation, but a vasospasm of the left middle cerebral artery. Transcranial Doppler confirmed this vasospasm. Evolution was favorable with no recurrence of seizures but with an improvement of the neurological deficits and vasospasm. Physicians should bear in mind this very rare complication of endarterectomy and immediately perform neuroimaging in case of unusual headache following endarterectomy or angioplasty.

  1. The role of carotid ultrasound in assessing carotid atherosclerosis in individuals at low-to-intermediate cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Blai; Betriu, Angels; Feinstein, Steve B; Valdivielso, Jose M; Zamorano, Jose L; Fernández, Elvira

    2013-12-01

    Detection of carotid atherosclerosis might help to better identify individuals susceptible to cardiovascular events. We aimed to quantify the number of participants with carotid atherosclerosis and low-to-intermediate cardiovascular risk according to the traditional risk factor scoring, and therefore with an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. Cross-sectional, observational study performed during a cardiovascular screening program. From a total of 3778 volunteers, low-to-intermediate cardiovascular risk individuals (N=2354) were identified and studied. Physical examination, blood test, and carotid ultrasound followed standard procedures. Common, bulb, and internal carotid arteries were examined and common carotid intima-media thickness was measured. SCORE risk value was calculated for all participants. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis was performed. Mean age of participants was 58.9 (15) years, 43.8% were men, 23.7% had hypertension, and 20.5% had hypercholesterolemia. The mean SCORE value was 1.47 (1.4). Both carotid intima-media thickness and the prevalence of carotid plaques increased steadily and significantly (P<.005) as advanced decades of life were analyzed. Variables significantly related with the presence of carotid atherosclerosis were age, male sex, and systolic blood pressure. Interestingly, 592 (25.1%) individuals were reclassified to a higher risk due to the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. There was a clear dissociation between cardiovascular risk scoring and the presence of atherosclerosis, because 1 of 4 study participants at low-to-intermediate cardiovascular risk had carotid atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management. © 2013.

  3. A new method for IVUS-based coronary artery disease risk stratification: A link between coronary & carotid ultrasound plaque burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Shukla, Devarshi; Londhe, Narendra D; Shrivastava, Vimal K; Banchhor, Sumit K; Saba, Luca; Nicolaides, Andrew; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-02-01

    Interventional cardiologists have a deep interest in risk stratification prior to stenting and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is most commonly adapted for screening, but current tools lack the ability for risk stratification based on grayscale plaque morphology. Our hypothesis is based on the genetic makeup of the atherosclerosis disease, that there is evidence of a link between coronary atherosclerosis disease and carotid plaque built up. This novel idea is explored in this study for coronary risk assessment and its classification of patients between high risk and low risk. This paper presents a strategy for coronary risk assessment by combining the IVUS grayscale plaque morphology and carotid B-mode ultrasound carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) - a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Support vector machine (SVM) learning paradigm is adapted for risk stratification, where both the learning and testing phases use tissue characteristics derived from six feature combinational spaces, which are then used by the SVM classifier with five different kernels sets. These six feature combinational spaces are designed using 56 novel feature sets. K-fold cross validation protocol with 10 trials per fold is used for optimization of best SVM-kernel and best feature combination set. IRB approved coronary IVUS and carotid B-mode ultrasound were jointly collected on 15 patients (2 days apart) via: (a) 40MHz catheter utilizing iMap (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) with 2865 frames per patient (42,975 frames) and (b) linear probe B-mode carotid ultrasound (Toshiba scanner, Japan). Using the above protocol, the system shows the classification accuracy of 94.95% and AUC of 0.95 using optimized feature combination. This is the first system of its kind for risk stratification as a screening tool to prevent excessive cost burden and better patients' cardiovascular disease management, while validating our two hypotheses

  4. Anatomical aspects of sinus floor elevations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, J P; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Disch, F J; Tuinzing, D B

    2000-06-01

    Inadequate bone height in the lateral part of the maxilla forms a contra-indication for implant surgery. This condition can be treated with an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. This sinus floor elevation, formerly called sinus lifting, consists of a surgical procedure in which a top hinge door in the lateral maxillary sinus wall is prepared and internally rotated to a horizontal position. The new elevated sinus floor, together with the inner maxillary mucosa, will create a space that can be filled with graft material. Sinus lift procedures depend greatly on fragile structures and anatomical variations. The variety of anatomical modalities in shape of the inner aspect of the maxillary sinus defines the surgical approach. Conditions such as sinus floor convolutions, sinus septum, transient mucosa swelling and narrow sinus may form a (usually relative) contra-indication for sinus floor elevation. Absolute contra-indications are maxillary sinus diseases (tumors) and destructive former sinus surgery (like the Caldwell-Luc operation). The lateral sinus wall is usually a thin bone plate, which is easily penetrated with rotating or sharp instruments. The fragile Schneiderian membrane plays an important role for the containment of the bonegraft. The surgical procedure of preparing the trap door and luxating it, together with the preparation of the sinus mucosa, may cause a mucosa tear. Usually, when these perforations are not too large, they will fold together when turning the trap door inward and upward, or they can be glued with a fibrin sealant, or they can be covered with a resorbable membrane. If the perforation is too large, a cortico-spongious block graft can be considered. However, in most cases the sinus floor elevation will be deleted. Perforations may also occur due to irregularities in the sinus floor or even due to immediate contact of sinus mucosa with oral mucosa. Obstruction of the antro-nasal foramen is, due to its high location, not a

  5. [Is there a role for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis screening?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenberg, Eitan; Bass, Arie

    2014-08-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is highly controversial Many surgeons routinely screen their patients for carotid disease prior to major operations, yet the benefit of such practice was never demonstrated. The treatment of symptomatic patients has not changed much during the last twenty years, since the publication of the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET). However, in contrast, the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis Study (ACAS) and the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial (ACST) failed to get the same acceptance among the multidisciplinary group treating CAS.The prevalence of asymptomatic 60-99% carotid artery stenosis among the general population is about 1%. Neither ACAS nor ACST showed that stenosis severity was associated with increasing stroke risk. The 'realpolitik' is that mass interventions in asymptomatic patients will probably only ever prevent about 1% of all strokes. This is even truer regarding patients scheduLed for major operation, in which the incidence of stroke is less than 1%. Moreover the current evidence in the literature suggests that the best medicaL treatment (BMT) results in 0.5% strokes per year, better than resuLts which can be offered by surgery. According to the current evidence, it seems that asymptomatic carotid artery screening should be discontinued, since it is a major waste of resources.

  6. Race-ethnic variation in carotid bifurcation geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sebastian; Nelson, Donoffa; Rundek, Tatjana; Mandrekar, Jay; Rabinstein, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Disturbances in local blood flow influenced by arterial geometry contribute to atherogenesis. Carotid bifurcation hemodynamics depend on the relative sizes of the common carotid artery (CCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and external carotid artery (ECA), which vary considerably among individuals. The prevalence of carotid bifurcation atherosclerosis differs among race-ethnic groups and is generally lower in African Americans despite a more adverse vascular risk factor profile. We here examine whether there are race-ethnic differences in carotid bifurcation anatomy. The diameters of the CCA, carotid bulb, ICA, and ECA were measured from consecutive cerebral angiograms of African American, white, and Caribbean Hispanic patients. The bulb/CCA, ICA/CCA, ECA/CCA, ECA/ICA, and total cross-sectional outflow/inflow ratio ([ICA(2) + ECA(2)]/CCA(2)) were calculated. The final analysis included 272 bifurcations of which 103 were among white, 87 Hispanic, and 82 African American patients. The mean age of the population was 59.8 +/- 15.8 years and 148 (54.4%) were men. African Americans had a lower ICA/CCA ratio (P ECA ratio (P ECA/CCA ratio (P groups. We found significant differences in the relative sizes of the ICA, ECA, and CCA among race-ethnic groups. African Americans had a proportionally smaller ICA and larger ECA in comparison with whites and Caribbean Hispanics.

  7. Straight artery sign in extracranial carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Suwanwela, Nitaya

    2003-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become generally accepted as a non-invasive method to provide the definitive diagnosis of cervicocerebral vessel dissection. The finding of an intramural hematoma on axial MR images is the characteristic sign of the disease. However, there has been no previous report of the characteristic magnetic resonance angiographic (MRA) findings. The authors retrospectively reviewed MRI and MRA findings of patients with spontaneous extracranial carotid dissection. The most striking finding on MRA was the straightness of the affected artery when compared to the non-affected side of the same patient. For quantitative measurement, "Carotid Straightness Index (CSI)" was developed to measure the straightness of the arteries and compared the indices of both extracranial internal carotid arteries in the same patient. The patients' age range was from 21-55 years (mean 38 years). There were 6 males and 3 females. All patients had the classical "Straight artery sign" on the MRA. The carotid straightness index was significantly higher in the affected artery when compared to the normal side of the same patient. The straight artery sign and the carotid straightness index can be very useful for early detection of the extracranial carotid dissection. It can be found in early stage disease or in less severe forms of carotid dissection where significant narrowing is not demonstrated.

  8. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emi Akamatsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches.

  9. Digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, M J; Sotnikov, A V

    1996-10-01

    Advances in computer technology continue to bring new innovations to departments of anatomic pathology. This article briefly reviews the present status of digital optical imaging, and explores the directions that this technology may lead over the next several years. Technical requirements for digital microscopic and gross imaging, and the available options for image archival and retrieval are summarized. The advantages of digital images over conventional photography in the conference room, and the usefulness of digital imaging in the frozen section suite and gross room, as an adjunct to surgical signout and as a resource for training and education, are discussed. An approach to the future construction of digital histologic sections and the computer as microscope is described. The digital technologic applications that are now available as components of the surgical pathologist's workstation are enumerated. These include laboratory information systems, computerized voice recognition, and on-line or CD-based literature searching, texts and atlases and, in some departments, on-line image databases. The authors suggest that, in addition to these resources that are already available, tomorrow's surgical pathology workstation will include network-linked digital histologic databases, on-line software for image analysis and 3-D image enhancement, expert systems, and ultimately, advanced pattern recognition capabilities. In conclusion, the authors submit that digital optical imaging is likely to have a significant and positive impact on the future development of anatomic pathology.

  10. [Anatomical study of pelvic colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Y E; Tchangai, B; Kassegne, I; Keke, K; James, K D

    2016-12-01

    Identifying the different kinds of anatomical sigmoid colon in our environment and determine what exposes the most to the occurrence of pelvic colon volvulus. This is a transverse prospective study from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2012 on a series of 63 patients (33 men and 30 women) who underwent laparotomy for non-colonic pathologies. For all patients, the following parameters were recorded: C1: total length of the pelvic colon; C2: the length of the root of the meso-sigmoid; C3: the height of the meso-sigmoid; C4: maximum width of the meso-sigmoid. C1 through the entire series was 61,3cm. C2 average was 5.5cm. C3 height and maximum width C4 were on average 14,6cm and 7.6cm, respectively. Comparison of parameters in men and women showed no significant difference. This study allows us to know the different types of pelvic colons among the population of our operated patients. The measurements performed on the pelvic colon of patients presenting volvulus will help to attribute objectively the true authorship of this surgical emergency to an anatomical type of pelvic colon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasound screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis in subjects with calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Kjell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Directed ultrasonic screening for carotid stenosis is cost-effective in populations with > 5% prevalence of the diagnosis. Occasionally, calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries are incidentally detected on odontological panoramic radiographs. We aimed to determine if directed screening for carotid stenosis with ultrasound is indicated in individuals with such calcifications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Carotid ultrasound examinations were performed on consecutive persons, with findings of calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiography that were otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Results Calcification in the area of the carotid arteries was seen in 176 of 1182 persons undergoing panoramic radiography. Of these, 117 fulfilled the inclusion criterion and were examined with carotid ultrasound. Eight persons (6.8%; 95% CI 2.2-11.5% had a carotid stenosis - not significant over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.232, Binomial test. However, there was a significant sex difference (p = 0.008, as all stenoses were found in men. Among men, 12.5% (95%CI 4.2-20.8% had carotid stenosis - significantly over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.014, Binomial test. Conclusions The incidental finding of calcification in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs should be followed up with carotid screening in men that are otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Trial Registration The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00514644

  12. Relationship between carotid artery stenosis and ischemic ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between carotid artery stenosis and ischemic ocular diseases.METHODS: The clinical data of 30 cases(37 eyesof patients with ischemic eye diseases were collected from November 2010 to May 2014, and they were accepted the fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA, transcranial Doppler(TCDultrasonic blood vessels of the eye, neck vascular color Doppler flow imaging(CDFI, the neck CT angiography(CTAand carotid artery digital subtraction angiography(DSAexamination, and then the ischemic eye disease patients with ocular symptoms were analyzed. The peak systolic velocity(PSVand resistance index(RIof ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery were compared. Correlation between the internal carotid artery intima-media thickness(IMTand ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery PSV and RI correlation risk; ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and ophthalmic artery PSV and RI; PSV and RI associated ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and central retinal artery were analyzed. RESULTS: Eye symptoms: a black dim, reduced vision, the eyes flash, and around the eye pain were 75.7%, 83.8%, 51.4% and 32.4%; The eye signs: the dilatation of retinal vein, retinal hemorrhage, arterial stenosis and cotton spot and the contralateral side were regarded as main signs. Ophthalmic artery PSV and RI value of the differences were statistically significant(PPP>0.05; The ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and ophthalmic artery PSV had no correlation with RI values(P>0.05; PSV and RI and the ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and central retinal artery had no correlation(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: The incidence of ischemic eye diseases and internal carotid artery stenosis is associated with very close, the clinical can regard the degree of internal carotid artery stenosis as an important basis for diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases.

  13. Unilateral Carotid Body Resection in Resistant Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Narkiewicz, MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal and human data indicate pathological afferent signaling emanating from the carotid body that drives sympathetically mediated elevations in blood pressure in conditions of hypertension. This first-in-man, proof-of-principle study tested the safety and feasibility of unilateral carotid body resection in 15 patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The procedure proved to be safe and feasible. Overall, no change in blood pressure was found. However, 8 patients showed significant reductions in ambulatory blood pressure coinciding with decreases in sympathetic activity. The carotid body may be a novel target for treating an identifiable subpopulation of humans with hypertension.

  14. Prospective randomized study of carotid endarterectomy with Fluoropassiv thin wall carotid patch versus venous patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, R; Lansink, K W W; Blomme, A M; Fritschy, W M

    2008-07-01

    The practice of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) with patch angioplasty is more effective compared to primary closure. However, the type of patch material remains a controversy. The Fluoropassiv thin wall carotid patch is a polyester patch with an interpenetrating, nanometer-scale, solvent-applied surface modification, based on a biocompatible fluoropolymer. The present pilot study is the first clinical trial evaluating results of CEA with Fluoropassiv versus venous patch. Eighty-seven patients were randomized to 42 Fluoropassiv patching and 45 venous patching. Patients were observed by a vascular surgeon and a neurologist and scanned using duplex ultrasound with a follow-up of 2 years. No patients were lost to follow-up. Restenosis was defined as a Peak Systolic Velocity ratio >2.6, lumen reduction >50%. Perioperative stroke rate was 2.4% in the Fluoropassiv group and 8.9% in the venous group (p=0.02; 1 regressive, 4 non-regressive strokes). Multivariate analysis showed that bilateral carotid stenosis and stroke as indication for CEA were related to perioperative stroke. There was no link between perioperative stroke and patch type after correction for these factors. Patch type had no influence on operation time, clamp time, cranial nerve damage, hypertension, hematoma, infections, time to discharge, or early thromboembolic events. There were no significant differences between the Fluoropassiv and the venous group for cumulative mortality (respectively 4.4 vs 4.8%), patch occlusion (4.8 vs 2.2%), or stroke rate during 2 year follow-up (2.2 vs 2.4%). This first clinical study with the Fluoropassiv thin wall carotid patch showed no enhanced thrombogenicity compared to a venous patch. The Fluoropassiv patch is not related to a higher rate of postoperative bleeding events either.

  15. Carotid Stenting Versus Endarterectomy for Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Stenosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresoli, Paola; Habib, Bettina; Reynier, Pauline; Secrest, Matthew H; Eisenberg, Mark J; Filion, Kristian B

    2017-08-01

    There is no consensus on the comparative efficacy and safety of carotid artery stenting (CAS) versus carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. To evaluate CAS versus CEA in asymptomatic patients, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. We systematically searched EMBASE, PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials comparing CAS to CEA in asymptomatic patients using a pre-specified protocol. Two independent reviewers identified randomized controlled trials meeting our inclusion/exclusion criteria, extracted relevant data, and assessed quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Random effects models with inverse-variance weighting were used to estimate pooled risk ratios (RRs) comparing the incidences of periprocedural and long-term outcomes between CAS and CEA. We identified 11 reports of 5 randomized controlled trials for inclusion (n=3019) asymptomatic patients. The pooled incidences of any periprocedural stroke (RR, 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-3.40), periprocedural nondisabling stroke (RR, 1.95; 95% CI, 0.98-3.89), and any periprocedural stroke or death (RR, 1.72; 95% CI, 0.95-3.11) trended toward an increased risk after CAS. We could not rule out clinically significant differences between treatments for long-term stroke (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.76-2.03) and the composite outcome of periprocedural stroke, death or myocardial infarction, or long-term ipsilateral stroke (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.70-1.21). Although uncertainty surrounds the long-term outcomes of CAS versus CEA, the potential for increased risks of periprocedural stroke and periprocedural stroke or death with CAS suggests that CEA is the preferred option for the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Carotid endarterectomy in cervical block anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilijevski Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of modern carotid surgery is relief of symptoms, stroke prevention, improvement in quality of life, prevention of vascular dementia, and prolongation of lifetime. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper was to compare the outcome of carotid endarterectomy in cervical block vs. general anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA. METHOD: One hundred patients (76 male, 24 female, mean age 60.81 years with occluded contralateral ICA were operated from 1997-2000. Neurological symptomatology, deficiency and stroke incidence were preoperatively analyzed in two groups. Duplex-scanning, angiograms and CT-scan confirmed the diagnosis. Risk factors analysis included hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, smoking and history of CAD, CABG and PAOD. Morbidity and mortality were used to compare the outcome of surgery in two groups. RESULTS There was no difference of age, gender and symptomatology between the groups. Paresis, TIA and dysphasia were most frequent. 70%-90% of ICA stenosis was seen in the majority of patients. Hypertension and smoking were dominant risk factors in these two groups. Eversion carotid end arterectomy was the most frequent technique used. In three cases out of nine that were operated under cervical block, the neurological symptoms developed just after clamping, so the intra-luminal shunt was placed. Postoperative morbidity was 12% and mortality was 8%. Conclusion: There was no difference of preoperative parameters, surgical technique and outcome in these two groups. Without other intraoperative monitoring, cervical block anesthesia might be an option in patients with the occlusion of the contralateral ICA. However, prospective studies involving more patients are needed.

  17. Characterization of perioperative contralateral stroke after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, W Darrin; Ergul, Emel A; Patel, Virendra I; Lancaster, R Todd; LaMuraglia, Glenn M; Cambria, Richard P; Conrad, Mark F

    2017-11-01

    (P = .01), and CEA with proximal endovascular procedure (P = .03). Contralateral occlusion (P = .06) and degree of contralateral carotid stenosis (P = .14) did not correlate. After logistic regression analysis of significant univariate anatomic and operative factors, length of procedure (odds ratio [OR], 1.08/15 minutes; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.15; P = .02), urgency of operation (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.3-4.6; P = .006), and concomitant proximal endovascular intervention (OR, 8.7; 95% CI, 4.5-31.2; P = .001) remained predictors of contralateral stroke after CEA. Occurrence of both ipsilateral (P < .001) and contralateral (P = .023) stroke significantly reduced 5-year survival compared with those without stroke. There was no difference in the negative survival effect based on laterality of stroke (P = .24). Contralateral stroke after CEA is rare, affecting 0.5% of patients. Traditional risk reduction medical therapy does not affect occurrence. Degree of contralateral stenosis, including contralateral occlusion, does not predict perioperative contralateral stroke. Urgency of operation, length of operation, and performance of concomitant, ipsilateral endovascular intervention predict contralateral stroke risk with CEA. Contralateral stroke affects long-term survival similar to ipsilateral stroke after CEA. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison between outcomes of carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting in treating elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-fei CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To review the clinical data of elderly patients treated by carotid endarterectomy (CEA and carotid artery stenting (CAS, and analyze the safety of two kinds of surgery. Methods A total of 691 patients with carotid artery stenosis underwent CEA (121 cases and CAS (570 cases respectively. The risk factors, clinical symptoms and postoperative complications in 2 groups of patients were analyzed, and the safety of two kinds of surgery were assessed. Results After 30 d of operation, no significant difference was found between 2 groups in death rate (0.83% vs 1.05%, P = 1.000, stroke rate (4.13% vs 1.93% , P = 0.258 or myocardial infarction rate (0.83% vs 0, P = 0.175. Heart complications and cranial nerve injury rate in CEA group was significantly higher than that in CAS group (8.26% vs 1.05%, P = 0.000; 4.96% vs 0, P = 0.000, while sinus bradycardia or hypotension rate in CEA group was significantly lower than that in CAS group (0 vs 7.54%, P = 0.002. Conclusions Both CEA and CAS are safe for the elderly patients. However, the conditions of elderly patients should be evaluated before operation in order to reduce occurence of complications after operation.

  19. Altered structural and mechanical properties in decellularized rabbit carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.; Liao, J.; Joyce, E.M.; Wang, B.; Leach, J.B.; Sacks, M.S.; Wong, J.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, major achievements in creating decellularized whole tissue scaffolds have drawn considerable attention to decellularization as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Decellularized tissues are expected to have mechanical strength and structure similar to the native tissues from which they are derived. However, numerous studies have shown that mechanical properties change after decellularization. Often, tissue structure is observed by histology and electron microscopy, but the structural alterations that may have occurred are not always evident. Here, a variety of techniques were used to investigate changes in tissue structure and relate them to altered mechanical behavior in decellularized rabbit carotid arteries. Histology and scanning electrom microscopy revealed that major extracellular matrix components were preserved and fibers appeared intact, although collagen appeared looser and less crimped after decellularization. Transmission electrom microscopy confirmed the presence of proteoglycans (PG), but there was decreased PG density and increased spacing between collagen fibrils. Mechanical testing and opening angle measurements showed that decellularized arteries had significantly increased stiffness, decreased extensibility and decreased residual stress compared with native arteries. Small-angle light scattering revealed that fibers had increased mobility and that structural integrity was compromised in decellularized arteries. Taken together, these studies revealed structural alterations that could be related to changes in mechanical properties. Further studies are warranted to determine the specific effects of different decellularization methods on the structure and performance of decellularized arteries used as vascular grafts. PMID:19135421

  20. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  1. Effectiveness of a handmade "New Carotid Catheter" in transradial carotid angiography: A comparison with conventional multipurpose catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Yakup

    2017-10-11

    The incidence and severity of carotid atherosclerosis increases in proportion with coronary artery disease and its severity. A special catheter specifically used for transradial carotid angiography has not yet been marketed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility and safety of our carotid catheter, which was made by reshaping currently available catheters. Between 2010 and 2017, a total of 921 patients with indications for carotid angiography were identified after angiographic examinations and included in the study. Carotid angiography was performed in 403 patients (female, n = 161) using the 3.5 JL catheter, while in 518 (female, n = 207) patients, new catheters were employed. The new catheter was shaped like a hook in the laboratory with a heat gun. Demographic information and angiographic data from the patients in both groups were retrospectively analyzed. The baseline characteristics of both groups were comparable. When compared with the use of a 3.5 JL catheter, right transradial carotid angiographies performed with our new handmade catheter resulted in lesser amounts of opaque material used (55 mL vs 66 mL, P catheter also resulted in a higher success rate of selective visualization (97% vs 40%, P complication were comparable between the two catheters (6.5% vs 6.6% P = 234). Neither permanent damage nor morbidity or mortality was observed in either arm. Currently available catheters and methods are inadequate for routine transradial carotid angiography. For routine transradial carotid angiography, innovatively designed catheters are required. The catheter we developed for transradial carotid angiography was more successful than the conventional catheter in obtaining satisfactory images. High quality images can be obtained with the newly designed catheters. Transradial carotid angiography can be performed using our newly developed carotid catheter. The carotid arteries of patients with widespread coronary artery disease can be

  2. Unprotected carotid artery stenting in modern practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Jay; Yeh, Robert W; Kennedy, Kevin F; Hawkins, Beau M; Weinberg, Ido; Weinberg, Mitchell D; Parikh, Sahil A; Garasic, Joseph; Jaff, Michael R; White, Christopher J; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Embolic protection devices (EPD) may provide a mechanism to reduce peri-procedural strokes. They are advocated by consensus guidelines and mandated for Medicare reimbursement. However, outcomes data remain mixed. We aimed to characterize the population of patients undergoing unprotected carotid artery stenting (CAS) and assess the utility of distal filter EPD (F-EPD) in elective CAS. We analyzed patients enrolled in the CARE Registry® undergoing CAS between May, 2005 and January, 2012. We assessed the relationship between distal F-EPD use versus no use (No-EPD) and the composite of in-hospital death or stroke (MAE) in unadjusted and 1:3 propensity-matched analyses. Embolic protection was not attempted in a total of 579 out of 13,263 cases performed (4.4%). Patients in the No-EPD group had worse preprocedure neurologic risk factors including higher rates of acute evolving stroke, prior TIA/stroke, symptomatic lesion status, spontaneous carotid artery dissection, and use of general anesthesia intraprocedurally (all Standardized Differences{sd} >10). After exclusion of nonelective cases there was no significant difference in MAE between the No-EPD and F-EPD groups (1.6% vs. 2.3%, sd = 4.72). Additionally, after propensity matching, rates of MAE did not differ between the No-EPD (n = 355) and F-EPD (n = 1065) groups (1.7% vs. 2.5%, sd = 5.87). Patients selected to undergo unprotected CAS in contemporary practice have high rates of adverse preprocedure neurologic risk factors. Our propensity-matched analysis did not demonstrate evidence of significant benefit or harm associated with use of F-EPD in elective CAS patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Internal carotid artery stenting for blunt carotid artery injuries with an associated pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, John D; Reuland, Kurt R; Villarreal, David H; McGovern, Thomas M; Rowe, Stephen A; Norwood, Scott H

    2008-02-01

    Blunt carotid artery injuries (BCI) are being recognized and treated with increasing frequency because of improved screening protocols. Recent advances in endovascular techniques using microcoils, angioplasty, and stenting offer a new treatment strategy for those patients with traumatic pseudoaneurysms (PA) (BCI and PA). Experience with these techniques is limited because of the rarity of these injuries. Early anticoagulation (AC) or antiplatelet (AP) therapy combined with carotid artery stenting is a safe alternative to AC alone for the treatment of grade III carotid artery injuries (BCI and PA). Prospective cohort study. A rural, community Level I trauma center. All patients with a nonocclusive BCI and PA during a 5.5 year period from June 23, 2000 to December 31, 2005 were included in the study. : Eleven patients with grade BCI and PA underwent endovascular repair. Nine patients (81%) had associated traumatic intracranial hemorrhage. AC (heparin drip) or AP therapy (clopidogrel or aspirin or both) was initiated in all patients within 48 hours of diagnosis of BCI. Time from admission to AC or AP was 21 +/- 9.5 hours (mean +/- SD). Mortality rate was 18% (2 of 11). One death was attributed to severe brain injury. The other was attributed to a stroke from the carotid injury. No patient had radiologic progression of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage on head computed tomography despite AP or AC. One patient sustained a mild embolic cerebrovascular ischemic event before stenting. No other survivors developed a stroke or any other evidence of cerebral ischemic symptoms. Two recurrent PAs developed during hospitalization and were successfully managed with an additional stent. All survivors were discharged with a good neurologic outcome. Seven patients had follow-up from 6 months to 4 years: one developed asymptomatic 50% stenosis at 6 months requiring successful angioplasty. All others showed complete healing without stenosis. Carotid artery stenting is safe and

  4. MR urography: Anatomical and quantitative information on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR urography: Anatomical and quantitative information on congenital malformations in children. Maria Karaveli, Dimitrios Katsanidis, Ioannis Kalaitzoglou, Afroditi Haritanti, Anastasios Sioundas, Athanasios Dimitriadis, Kyriakos Psarrakos ...

  5. Lipoprotein (a) and carotid atherosclerosis in young patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Nathalie; Ruidavets, Jean Bernard; Farghali, Ahmed; Guidolin, Brigitte; Perret, Bertrand; Larrue, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Elevated lipoprotein (a) concentration is associated with carotid atherosclerosis in middle-aged and older patients with ischemic stroke. This association has not been explored in young patients with stroke. A retrospective analysis of data from patients aged 16 to 54 years consecutively treated for acute ischemic stroke in a tertiary stroke unit during 4.5 years was performed. We graded carotid atherosclerosis using carotid duplex as: no atherosclerosis (A); plaque without stenosis (B); or stenosis≥50% (C). One hundred ninety-six patients were included (male/female: 119/77; mean age±SD: 44.3±8.6 years): 115 in Group A; 67 in Group B; and 14 in Group C. Multivariate analysis using polynomial logistic regression showed a graded association of lipoprotein (a) plasma concentration with carotid atherosclerosis (Patherosclerosis in young adults with ischemic stroke. This association was strong, graded, and independent of traditional risk factors including cholesterol.

  6. Ultrasound-guided locoregional anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martusevicius, Robertas; Swiatek, F; Joergensen, L G

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance is increasingly used for invasive anaesthetic procedures to improve efficacy, facilitate performance and reduce risk of complications. Herein, we present a simple approach to ultrasound-guided locoregional anaesthesia for patients undergoing eversion carotid endarterectomy....

  7. Gene expression and 18FDG uptake in atherosclerotic carotid plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Græbe, Martin; Hag, Anne Mette Fisker

    2010-01-01

    by carotid endarterectomy. The gene expression of markers of vulnerability - CD68, IL-18, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, GLUT-1, and hexokinase type II (HK2) - were measured in plaques by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: In a multivariate linear regression model, GLUT-1, CD68, cathepsin K, and HK2 gene......) and an additional ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis of greater than 60% were recruited. FDG uptake in the carotids was determined by PET/computed tomography and expressed as mean and maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax). The atherosclerotic plaques were subsequently recovered...... destabilization. Accordingly, FDG-PET could prove to be an important predictor of cerebrovascular events in patients with carotid plaques....

  8. A Case of Complete Resolution of Hemiballismus After Carotid Endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob R; Delavari, Nader; Wilkinson, D Andrew; Roark, Christopher; Thompson, B Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Hemiballismus is a rare presentation of symptomatic carotid stenosis that is underreported in the neurosurgical literature. It is characterized by severe large-amplitude movements that are classically caused by lesions of the subthalamic nucleus. Given the arterial border zone position of the subthalamic nucleus between the anterior and posterior circulation, hemodynamically compromising carotid stenosis can lead to hypoperfusion in this location. We describe the case of a patient who presented with acute-onset hemiballismus that had complete resolution of symptoms after carotid endarterectomy. We suggest that neurovascular imaging should be part of the initial workup of this condition and that prompt diagnosis and treatment of carotid artery stenosis in patients who present with new-onset hemiballismus are essential for reducing risk of imminent stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Traumatic common carotid-internal jugular fistula: positive aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrahami, R; Levinzon, M; Haddad, M; Zelikovsky, A

    1997-06-15

    A 42-year-old man presented with a penetrating neck injury from a pellet gun. Physical examination showed an open 1 cm wound on the right side of the neck, hematoma of the right sternocleidomastoid muscle, and carotid artery injury. He was hemodynamically stable and there was no neurological deficit. Arteriogram of the neck disclosed a pseudoaneurysm with an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein. At surgery, the tears in the carotid artery and jugular vein were sutured and a vacuum drain was introduced. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged 5 days later. Instead of the expected results of a penetrating carotid artery injury, such as blood loss, airway obstruction or neurological deficit, the arteriovenous fistula caused by the pellet actually saved the patient's life. Blood flow from the artery via the pseudoaneurysm to the jugular vein kept the patient in stable condition.

  10. Closure of carotid artery puncture site with a percutaneous device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massière, Bernardo; von Ristow, Arno; Cury, José Mussa; Gress, Marcus; Vescovi, Alberto; Pedron, Cleoni; Medina, Antônio Luiz; Masques, Marcos Areas; Silveira, Paulo Roberto; Jeha, Salim

    2009-03-01

    The surgical treatment of traumatic neck injuries in patients with hostile anatomy is associated with higher risk of complications, due to the technical challenge and associated clinical conditions. The use of a percutaneous closure device for removal of a 7.5 Fr sheath, nonintentionally implanted into the carotid artery, is reported. The right common carotid sheath was removed after introducing a 0.035-inch guidewire; the Angioseal 8 Fr device was then introduced over the wire, successfully sealing the puncture site. Duplex scan control showed patency of the carotids, sealing of the puncture, and adequate flow in the jugular vein and carotid arteries. This maneuver allowed the safe placement of a percutaneous arterial device (Angioseal) to close the puncture site.

  11. Anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy – general or loco-regional?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrehuş, Claudiu

    2015-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy has been widely used for the surgical treatment of carotid stenosis, and may be performed under either general or loco-regional anaesthesia. The greatest risks of carotid endarterectomy are the neurologic complications and the myocardial infarction. Anaesthetic and surgical techniques are constantly under scrutiny to try to reduce the relatively high incidence of morbidity and mortality of an operation which in itself is only preventative. Loco-regional anaesthesia is an alternative to general anaesthesia which has attracted considerable attention amid claims of a reduction in operative morbidity and mortality. This review describes the problems and some solutions for providing loco-regional or general anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy. PMID:28913451

  12. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  13. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches for Cerebral Aneurysms: Anatomical, Virtual Reality and Morphometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Di Somma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of the present contribution is to perform a detailed anatomic and virtual reality three-dimensional stereoscopic study in order to test the effectiveness of the extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for selected anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods. The study was divided in two main steps: (1 simulation step, using a dedicated Virtual Reality System (Dextroscope, Volume Interactions; (2 dissection step, in which the feasibility to reach specific vascular territory via the nose was verified in the anatomical laboratory. Results. Good visualization and proximal and distal vascular control of the main midline anterior and posterior circulation territory were achieved during the simulation step as well as in the dissection step (anterior communicating complex, internal carotid, ophthalmic, superior hypophyseal, posterior cerebral and posterior communicating, basilar, superior cerebellar, anterior inferior cerebellar, vertebral, and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries. Conclusion. The present contribution is intended as strictly anatomic study in which we highlighted some specific anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms that can be reached via the nose. For clinical applications of these approaches, some relevant complications, mainly related to the endonasal route, such as proximal and distal vascular control, major arterial bleeding, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak, and olfactory disturbances must be considered.

  14. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches for Cerebral Aneurysms: Anatomical, Virtual Reality and Morphometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Notaris, Matteo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Alobid, Isam; San Molina, Joan; Berenguer, Joan; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present contribution is to perform a detailed anatomic and virtual reality three-dimensional stereoscopic study in order to test the effectiveness of the extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for selected anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods. The study was divided in two main steps: (1) simulation step, using a dedicated Virtual Reality System (Dextroscope, Volume Interactions); (2) dissection step, in which the feasibility to reach specific vascular territory via the nose was verified in the anatomical laboratory. Results. Good visualization and proximal and distal vascular control of the main midline anterior and posterior circulation territory were achieved during the simulation step as well as in the dissection step (anterior communicating complex, internal carotid, ophthalmic, superior hypophyseal, posterior cerebral and posterior communicating, basilar, superior cerebellar, anterior inferior cerebellar, vertebral, and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries). Conclusion. The present contribution is intended as strictly anatomic study in which we highlighted some specific anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms that can be reached via the nose. For clinical applications of these approaches, some relevant complications, mainly related to the endonasal route, such as proximal and distal vascular control, major arterial bleeding, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak, and olfactory disturbances must be considered. PMID:24575410

  15. Long-term outcomes after stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis: the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, Leo H.; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Ederle, Jörg; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Mali, Willem P. Th M.; Beard, Jonathan D.; Cleveland, Trevor; Engelter, Stefan T.; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Ford, Gary A.; Dorman, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Doig, D.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Kennedy, F.; Tindall, H.; Turner, E.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davis, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van, P.; St, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; Brugge-Oostende, A. Z. Sint Jan; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verhelst, R.; Ziekenhuis, Imelda; DeJaegher, L.; Daneault, N.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Curtze, S.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Lappalainen, K.; Lepäntalo, M.; Meretoja, A.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; van Hasselt, A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; Lycklama, G. J.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Schultze, L. J.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Buczek, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; San, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsäter, A.; Mätzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Bonati, L. H.; Engelter, S. T.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Belli, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.; Rogers, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stenting is an alternative to endarterectomy for treatment of carotid artery stenosis, but long-term efficacy is uncertain. We report long-term data from the randomised International Carotid Stenting Study comparison of these treatments. Methods Patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis

  16. Anatomic measures of upper airway structures in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. Barrera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determine if anatomic dimensions of airway structures are associated with airway obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects with (n = 14 and without (n = 14 OSA as determined by clinical symptoms and sleep studies; volunteer sample. Skeletal and soft tissue dimensions were measured from radiocephalometry and magnetic resonance imaging. The soft palate thickness, mandibular plane-hyoid (MP-H distance, posterior airway space (PAS diameters and area, and tongue volume were calculated. Results: Compared to controls, the OSA group demonstrated a significantly longer MP-H distance (P = 0.009 and shorter nasal PAS diameter (P = 0.02. The PAS area was smaller (P = 0.002 and tongue volume larger in the OSA group (P = 0.004. The MP-H distance, PAS measurements, and tongue volume are of clinical relevance in OSA patients. Conclusions: A long MP-H distance, and small PAS diameters and area are significant anatomic measures in OSA; however the most substantial parameter found was a large tongue volume. Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnea, Anatomy, Anatomic measurement, Posterior airway space, Tongue volume, Hyoid position

  17. Application of pressure wire in carotid artery stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Tao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowad ays, critical carotid stenosis lacks appropriate treatment standards, and carotid artery stenting (CAS needs more direct guidance. This study aims to investigate the possibility of applying pressure wire in CAS, and the guidance of pressure gradients in choosing indications of CAS. Methods From May 2012 to October 2012, 32 consecutive cases with carotid stenosis undergoing CAS were enrolled. Preoperative and postoperative carotid ultrasound and CT perfusion imaging were performed, and intraoperative measurements of endovascular pressure gradients before and after stent implantation were recorded to evaluate intracranial circulation compensation. Results Preopera tive carotid ultrasound showed the rate of stenosis in 32 cases was≥70% or nearly total occlusion. Doppler measurement of peak systolic velocity (PSV of the stenosed vessel ranged 184-718 cm/s. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA examination showed the stenosis rates were 50%-70% in 7 cases, 70%-90% in 16 and > 90% in 9. The coincidence rate of carotid ultrasound and DSA was 84.38% (27/32, and the acquisition rate of intraoperative carotid pressure gradients was 100%. Pressure gradients before stent implantation were 10-92 mm Hg, with an average of (41.45 ± 25.50 mm Hg, and pressure gradients after stent implantation were 0-15 mm Hg, with an average of (3.44 ± 3.47 mm Hg. DSA revealed 4 cases with good intracranial circulation compensation and 28 cases with poor intracranial circulation compensation. Conclusion Pressure wire can be safely and effectively used in CAS to acquire pressure gradients between the two ends of stenosis segment. For carotid artery stenosis patients lacking of intracranial circulation compensation, pressure gradients become higher as stenosis rate increases within a certain range. Therefore, CAS for stenosis with lower pressure gradients should be reconsidered.

  18. An audit tool for assessing the appropriateness of carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feasby Thomas E

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To update appropriateness ratings for carotid endarterectomy using the best clinical evidence and to develop a tool to audit the procedure's use. Methods A nine-member expert panel drawn from all the Canadian Specialist societies that are involved in the care of patients with carotid artery disease, used the RAND Appropriateness Methodology to rate scenarios where carotid endarterectomy may be performed. A 9-point rating scale was used that permits the categorization of the use of carotid endarterectomy as appropriate, uncertain, or inappropriate. A descriptive analysis was undertaken of the final results of the panel meeting. A database and code were then developed to rate all carotid endarterectomies performed in a Western Canadian Health region from 1997 to 2001. Results All scenarios for severe symptomatic stenosis (70–99% were determined to be appropriate. The ratings for moderate symptomatic stenosis (50–69% ranged from appropriate to inappropriate. It was never considered appropriate to perform endarterectomy for mild stenosis (0–49% or for chronic occlusions. Endarterectomy for asymptomatic carotid disease was thought to be of uncertain benefit at best. The majority of indications for the combination of endarterectomy either prior to, or at time of coronary artery bypass grafting were inappropriate. The audit tool classified 98.0% of all cases. Conclusions These expert panel ratings, based on the best evidence currently available, provide a comprehensive and updated guide to appropriate use of carotid endarterectomy. The resulting audit tool can be downloaded by readers from the Internet and immediately used for hospital audits of carotid endarterectomy appropriateness.

  19. [Permanent cardiac pacing in vasovagal syncope and carotid sinus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupliakov, D V; Golovina, G A; Zemlianova, M E; Khokhlunov, S M; Poliakov, V P

    2011-01-01

    Vasovagal syncope and carotid sinus syndrome are common conditions in young and elderly people, respectively, mostly with benign prognosis. Nevertheless, severe or "malignant" syncopal attacks in some patients may be associated with life-threatening injury. Unfortunately, up to now almost all drug trials have failed to demonstrate any benefit in preventing syncope and interventional approach (pacemaker) may be appropriate. This article contains literature review and discussion of indications for pacing in vasovagal syncope and carotid sinus syndrome.

  20. Asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis and cerebrovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis.......The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis....

  1. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  2. Bilateral carotid artery injury response in side impact using a vessel model integrated with a human body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Yu, Mao M; Martin, R Shayn; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2009-10-01

    In a far-side crash configuration, the occupant can experience severe excursion from the seat space. Given this challenge, there are research efforts focused on alternate restraints, such as four-point belts. A potential implication of this geometry would be interaction of the belt with the occupant's neck. This study examines the response of the carotid arteries using a Finite Element Model (FEM) in a far-side crash configuration with a reversed three-point restraint. A FEM of the carotid artery and neck fascia was developed and integrated with the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 1.44. This model was subjected to four test conditions simulating far-side crashes. Load conditions included a low velocity impact of approximately 4 m/s and a higher velocity impact of approximately 10 m/s. For each velocity, the model was restrained with a belt placed low on the neck and a belt placed higher on the neck. Strain data in each element of the carotid arteries was analyzed. The overall response of the vessel was examined to determine locations of high strain values. Low belt placement resulted in more head excursion, stretching the carotid on the non-struck side. High belt placement resulted in compression of the artery on the struck side due to direct loading of the vessel from the belt. Strain values in the carotid artery elements increased with increasing speed of impact. The lower and higher speed tests with a low belt configuration resulted in a maximum principal strains, at maximal belt engagement, of 0.223 and 0.459, respectively. Corresponding values for the high belt configuration were 0.222 and 0.563. In both belt configurations, the non-struck side vessel stretched more than the struck side vessel; however, the non-struck side vessel experienced higher compressive forces. Strain values measured during the simulations can be compared to a value of 0.31 to intimal failure in previous experimental tests. These results quantitatively illustrate the two

  3. Anatomical planes: are we teaching accurate surface anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjalili, S Ali; McFadden, Sarah L; Buckenham, Tim; Wilson, Ben; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-10-01

    Anatomical planes used in clinical practice and teaching anatomy are largely derived from cadaver studies. Numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings exist between and within anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to reassess the accuracy of common anatomical planes in vivo using computed tomographic (CT) imaging. CT scans of the trunk in supine adults at end tidal inspiration were analyzed by dual consensus reporting to determine the anatomy of five anatomical planes: sternal angle, transpyloric, subcostal, supracristal, and the plane of the pubic crest. Patients with kyphosis, scoliosis, or abnormal lordosis, distorting space-occupying lesions, or visceromegaly were excluded. Among 153 thoracic CT scans (mean age 63 years, 53% female), the sternal angle was most common at T4 (females) or T4/5 (males) vertebral level, and the tracheal bifurcation, aortic arch, and pulmonary trunk were most often below this plane. In 108 abdominal CT scans (mean age 60 years, 59% female), the subcostal and supracristal planes were most often at L2 (58%) and L4 (69%), respectively. In 52 thoracoabdominal CT scans (mean age 61 years, 56% female), the transpyloric plane was between lower L1 and upper L2 (75%); in this plane were the superior mesenteric artery (56%), formation of the portal vein (53%), tip of the ninth rib (60%), and the left renal hilum (54%), but the right renal hilum and gallbladder fundus were more often below. The surface anatomy of anatomical planes needs revising in the light of results from living subjects using modern imaging techniques. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People' s Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  5. Treatment of traumatic carotid cavernous fistulas using detachable balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Han, Joon Koo; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    Since the introduction of the concept of detachable balloon technique to occlude arteriovenous fistulas, this technique has become the treatment of choice in the management of traumatic carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF). We tried the occlusion of fistula using detachable balloons in 30 consecutive cases of traumatic CCF and the result of our experience is reported. Transarterial approach with manually-tied latex balloons is tried in all cases and the fistulas were successfully occlude in 28 cases of all. In 20 cases, internal carotid artery was preserved and the arterial lumen was occluded along with fistula opening in 9 cases. In rest of 2 cases, surgical ligation was done because of procedure-related thromboembolism and incomplete occlusion of fistula. We experienced hemiparesis as a major complication in 3 cases. In one of them, the symptom developed during occlusion tolerance test, one just after insertion of guiding catheter into the internal carotid artery, and in one case 2 days after the occlusion of internal carotid artery. In one case, the procedure was performed by the direct puncture of carotid artery because of the ligation of common carotid artery by previous surgery. It is suggested that the systemic heparinization during the procedure is indispensable and starting the procedure with No 9 balloon is considered reasonable.

  6. Choosing wisely for syncope: low-value carotid ultrasound use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W; Schwartz, Aaron L; Gates, Jonathan D; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Havens, Joaquim M

    2014-08-13

    The United States spends more than $750 billion annually on tests and procedures that do not benefit patients. Although there is no physiological indication for carotid ultrasound in "simple" syncope in the absence of focal neurological signs or symptoms suggestive of stroke, there is concern that this practice remains common for routine syncope workups. We used a 5% random-sample Medicare claims database to evaluate large-scale national trends in utilization of low-value carotid ultrasound imaging for simple syncope. We found that 16.5% of all Medicare beneficiaries with simple syncope underwent carotid imaging and 6.5% of all carotid ultrasounds ordered in 2009 were for this low-value indication. These findings were complemented by a manual chart review of 313 patients at a large academic medical center who underwent carotid ultrasound for simple syncope over a 5-year period. For the 48 (15.4%) of 313 patients with stenosis ≥50%, carotid ultrasound did not yield a causal diagnosis. Only 2% of the 313 patients imaged experienced a change in medications after a positive study, and low-value care. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Stroke caused by a myxoma stenosing the common carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Vicente, Elena; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Bellmunt, Sergi; Borras, Xavier F; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Bagué, Silvia; Camps-Renom, Pol; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of stroke due to stenosis caused by a myxoma in the common carotid artery with no evidence of a cardiac origin. Only 1 such case has been reported previously in the literature. A previously healthy 37-year-old woman presented with repeated episodes of acute focal deficits together with motor, sensory, and language symptoms typical of left internal carotid territory involvement. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute and subacute ischemic lesions in the territory of the left middle cerebral artery and border zone infarcts (middle cerebral artery with anterior and posterior cerebral arteries). Magnetic resonance angiography showed a filling defect in the distal portion of the left common carotid artery causing stenosis over 70%. Transesophageal echocardiography showed no embolic sources. Blood tests ruled out a prothrombotic state. The image was initially interpreted as a possible subacute thrombus and anticoagulation was started. No changes were observed in the follow-up carotid ultrasound examination after 12 days of treatment. A gelatinous mass was removed during carotid surgery. No subjacent lesion was observed in the vessel wall. Pathology examination showed a spindle cell fibromyxoid tissue with fibrinoid material typical of myxoma. We hypothesize that the myxoma originated in the vessel, or alternatively, that a cardiac myxoma embolized without leaving a residual cardiac tumor. Although exceptional, myxoma should be added to the list of unusual causes of carotid artery stenosis causing stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Occlusion of Internal Carotid Artery in Kimura's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique case of Kimura's disease in which cerebral infarction was caused by occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. A 25-year-old man with Kimura's disease was admitted to our hospital because of left hemiparesis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed infarction in the right frontal and temporal lobes. Cerebral angiography demonstrated right internal carotid artery occlusion affecting the C1 segment, with moyamoya-like collateral vessels arising from the right opthalamic artery. Kimura's disease is a chronic disease characterized by the clinical triad of slowly enlarging subcutaneous masses with lymphoid hyperplasia in the head and neck. It often occurs in young Asian men. In our patient, the pathogenesis of internal carotid artery occlusion was unknown. There have only been a few case reports in which occlusion of the internal carotid artery was associated with autoimmune disease, and no previous cases of internal carotid occlusion associated with Kimura's disease have been reported. We suspected that occlusion of this patient's internal carotid artery may be caused by the autoimmune mechanism that underlies Kimura's disease.

  9. Morphometric analysis of anatomic scoliotic specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Stefan; Labelle, Hubert; Skalli, Wafa; Latimer, Bruce; de Guise, Jacques

    2002-11-01

    Morphometric analysis of anatomic scoliotic specimens. The objective of this study was to identify a typical deformation pattern for thoracic and lumbar vertebrae in idiopathic scoliosis. Idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformity affecting the orientation and position of the spine in space. The regional deformity has been studied extensively, but most of the knowledge we currently have regarding the local deformity is the result of isolated observations made on rare scoliotic specimens with severe deformities. Thirty scoliotic specimens from two major osteologic sources were studied using a three-dimensional digitizing protocol developed by our research group creating a precise three-dimensional reconstruction of the vertebrae. Parameters were then calculated for each vertebra from these reconstructions. Every scoliotic specimen was then matched with a normal specimen to provide for a representative control group. A total of 984 vertebrae (472 scoliotic and 512 normal vertebrae) were measured, creating the largest database of normal and scoliotic vertebral specimens. A characteristic deformity pattern was identified consisting of progressive vertebral wedging, decreased pedicle width on the concave side of the curve, and articular facet surface varying greatly with all findings increasingly more important toward the apex of the curve and as curve severity increased. All findings were statistically significant with P< 0.05. These results are of critical importance for the understanding of the local and regional deformity and in understanding curve progression. Our results also advocate caution in the use of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine, especially on the concave side of the curve.

  10. Asymptomatic carotid lesions after endarterectomy of contralateral carotid artery. Five-year follow-up study and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Helgstrand, U J; Egeblad, M R

    1987-01-01

    Of 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy five years ago, 135 had a patent asymptomatic contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA). During follow-up (median, 59 months), 36 patients developed new neurologic symptoms (18 strokes and 18 transient ischemic attacks). Thirtee...... of stroke without warning was increased in these subgroups, we did not consider the risk high enough to warrant prophylactic endarterectomy. An exception enough to warrant prophylactic endarterectomy. An exception may be the patient with a more than 90% stenosis....

  11. Incident stroke is associated with common carotid artery diameter and not common carotid artery intima-media thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Joseph F; Sacco, Ralph L; Post, Wendy S; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Arnan, Martinson Kweku; O'Leary, Daniel H

    2014-05-01

    The common carotid artery interadventitial diameter is measured on ultrasound images as the distance between the media-adventitia interfaces of the near and far walls. It is associated with common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass and might therefore also have an association with incident stroke. We studied 6255 individuals free of coronary heart disease and stroke at baseline with mean age of 62.2 years (47.3% men), members of a multiethnic community-based cohort of whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Chinese. Ischemic stroke events were centrally adjudicated. Common carotid artery interadventitial diameter and IMT were measured. Cases with incident atrial fibrillation (n=385) were excluded. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were generated with time to ischemic event as outcome, adjusting for risk factors. There were 115 first-time ischemic strokes at 7.8 years of follow-up. Common carotid artery interadventitial diameter was a significant predictor of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.17 per millimeter) and remained so after adjustment for risk factors and common carotid IMT with a hazard ratio of 1.52/mm (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.88). Common carotid IMT was not an independent predictor after adjustment (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-1.19). Although common carotid IMT is not associated with stroke, interadventitial diameter of the common carotid artery is independently associated with first-time incident ischemic stroke even after adjusting for IMT. Our hypothesis that this is in part attributable to the effects of exposure to blood pressure needs confirmation by other studies. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00063440.

  12. Anatomical distribution and biochemical composition of urolithiasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary lithiasis disorder is one of the oldest disorders known to man yet the anatomic locations of urolithiasis and the chemical compositions vary from one geographic location to another. This study therefore analyzed the anatomic location of urolithiasis and their chemical composition in a sudano-sahelian tropical region.

  13. Anatomical and palynological characteristics of Salvia willeana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, anatomical and palynological features of the roots, stems, petiole and leaves of Salvia willeana (Holmboe) Hedge and Salvia veneris Hedge, Salvia species endemic to Cyprus, were investigated. In the anatomical characteristics of stem structures, it was found that the chlorenchyma composed of 6 or 7 rows of ...

  14. Protective effect of posterior cerebral circulation on carotid body ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, M D; Ozkan, U; Gündoğdu, C; Onder, A

    2002-04-01

    Carotid Bodies (CB) are fed mainly by External Carotid Artery (ECA) and rarely by Internal Carotid Artery (ICA). We aimed to investigate the effect of Bilateral Common Carotid Artery ligation and BCCAL plus bilateral external carotid artery ligation on CB. This study has been conducted on 30 hybrid male rabbits. Normal CB analyses were made in six of these animals and others divided into two groups. BCCAL has been applied to the 1st group, and the 2nd group has undergone bilateral ECA ligation in addition to BCCAL. After sacrificing the animals, both sides CB were histopathologically observed. Normal and ischemic cells were counted. Bilateral Common Carotid Artery ligation did not cause total atrophy in CB. Partial reversible atrophy of CB was seen in group I, but that atrophy was found to be irreversible and all animals died within one week after ligation in group II. Retrograde blood flow mechanisms and collateral circulation impede the oligemic CB atrophy after BCCAL. But bilateral ECA ligation, in addition to BCCAL, causes both sides irreversible CB atrophy and death of animals within one week of ligation. The CB are parasympathetic paraganglia. They are chemoreceptors and located at the bifurcation zone of common carotid arteries. They are fed mainly by ECA or by its branches and rarely by ICA. As a consequence of this, BCCAL and/or ligation of external branches of common carotid artery may lead to an ischemic impairment of CB. In order to analyse the effect of carotid stenosis on CB, CB were directly examined in 6 of 30 hybrid rabbits. BCCAL was applied to twelve rabbits (group I) with ligation of both ECA in addition to BCCAL were made to the others (group II). Animals were followed up four months in group I; but all of the animals in group II died within one week. From both sides the CB were taken including the carotid bifurcation and histopathological changes were evaluated. As a result, it has been observed that incomplete ischemic lesions have developed

  15. Microsurgical Relations between Internal Carotid Artery-Posterior Communicating Artery (ICA-PComA) Segment Aneurysms and Skull Base: An Anatomoclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Darder, José M; Quilis-Quesada, Vicent; Talamantes-Escribá, Fernando; Botella-Maciá, Laura; Verdú-López, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Purpose The study of the clinical, anatomic, imaging, and microsurgical characteristics of the aneurysms of the internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (ICA-PComA) segment and their relationships with the skull base structures. Methods The anatomic relationships of PComA with neurovascular elements and skull base structures were studied in cadavers. The clinical, imaging, and microsurgical findings of 84 microsurgically treated ICA-PComA aneurysms compiled in a prospective database were reviewed. Results The most important anatomic relations of the PComA and ICA-PComA aneurysms are with the oculomotor nerve around the oculomotor triangle that forms the roof of the cavernous sinus. Aneurysms of the ICA-PComA are classified according to the orientation of the aneurysmal sac in infratentorial, supratentorial, and tentorial. Infratentorial aneurysms frequently present with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and oculomotor nerve paralysis. They have relations with skull base structures that often make it necessary to totally or partially resect the anterior clinoid process (6.7%) or anterior petroclinoid dural fold (15%). Supratentorial aneurysms course with SAH and without oculomotor nerve involvement, but they often are associated with intracranial hematoma. Conclusion ICA-PComA aneurysms have complex anatomic relations. The orientation of the aneurysmal fundus induces relevant differences in the anatomic relations, clinical presentation, and microsurgical approach to ICA-PComA aneurysms.

  16. Anatomic characteristics of foramen vesalius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N; Ray, B; Ghosh, S

    2005-01-01

    Foramen Vesalius is an inconstant foramen that gives passage to an emissary vein that connects pterygoid venous plexus with cavernous sinus, the importance of which lies in the fact that an infected thrombus from an extracranial source may reach cavernous sinus. This study presents some data on characteristics of foramen vesalius. We studied 70 sides of 35 dried adult human skulls available in the Department of Anatomy, Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Nepal. Variation in number and incidence of foramen Vesalius were noted. Differences between the right and the left side and between the male and the female sex are discussed. Foramen Vesalius was present in 23 sides (14 right, 9 left) out of the 70 sides observed, the incidence being 32.85% (20.0% right side, 12.85% left side) of all the sides observed. Incidence of bilateral and unilateral foramen vesalius was 22.85% (8 out of 35 skulls) and 20% (7 out of 35 skulls) respectively. Foramen vesalius was found in 10 sides in males and in 13 sides in females. No remarkable differences were observed in the incidence of foramen vesalius between the sides within same sex but the incidence was more in females compared to male skulls. SIGNIFICANCE OF FINDINGS: Anatomic variations of the foramen vesalius could be explained by developmental reasons. Knowledge about characteristics of foramen vesalius and its incidence is not only important for anatomists but equally essential for an operating surgeon.

  17. Carotid endarterectomy versus carotid angioplasty for stroke prevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Zengyan; Jia, Guoyong; Wu, Wei; Wang, Cuilan

    2016-09-08

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of carotid endarterectomy (CE) compared with carotid angioplasty (CA) in preventing stroke. Whether the use of CE is more efficient in preventing stroke than CA is a matter of debate. Data were gathered from randomized controlled trials to evaluate the effect of CE compared with CA on the risk of stroke. Electronic searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were performed to identify studies till November 2014. Only randomized controlled trials performed on patients who received either CE or CA for stroke prevention were included. Nine relevant trials (n = 7163) that met the inclusion criteria were identified. In a pooled analysis, CE resulted in 35 % reduction in relative risk (RR) for short-term stroke [RR, 0.65; 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.47-0.89; P = 0.007)] and 22 % reduction in RR for long-term stroke (RR, 0.78; 95 % CI: 0.66-0.93; P = 0.006) relative to CA. However, CE also increased the risk of 30-day myocardial infarction by 114 % compared with CA (RR, 2.14; 95 % CI: 1.30-3.53; P = 0.003). Sensitivity analyses suggested that CE might influence the risk of 30-day major vascular events and 1-year major vascular events compared with CA. CE could reduce the risk of stroke (whether short term or long term), but resulted in a relative increase in the risk of myocardial infarction. This study might guide appropriate judgments about treatment approach. It also provided evidence to justify general guidelines for patients with carotid artery stenosis.

  18. CT Attenuation Analysis of Carotid Intraplaque Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, L; Francone, M; Bassareo, P P; Lai, L; Sanfilippo, R; Montisci, R; Suri, J S; De Cecco, C N; Faa, G

    2017-11-30

    Intraplaque hemorrhage is considered a leading parameter of carotid plaque vulnerability. Our purpose was to assess the CT characteristics of intraplaque hemorrhage with histopathologic correlation to identify features that allow for confirming or ruling out the intraplaque hemorrhage. This retrospective study included 91 patients (67 men; median age, 65 ± 7 years; age range, 41-83 years) who underwent CT angiography and carotid endarterectomy from March 2010 to May 2013. Histopathologic analysis was performed for the tissue characterization and identification of intraplaque hemorrhage. Two observers assessed the plaque's attenuation values by using an ROI (≥ 1 and ≤2 mm2). Receiver operating characteristic curve, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon analyses were performed. A total of 169 slices were assessed (59 intraplaque hemorrhage, 63 lipid-rich necrotic core, and 47 fibrous); the average values of the intraplaque hemorrhage, lipid-rich necrotic core, and fibrous tissue were 17.475 Hounsfield units (HU) and 18.407 HU, 39.476 HU and 48.048 HU, and 91.66 HU and 93.128 HU, respectively, before and after the administration of contrast medium. The Mann-Whitney test showed a statistically significant difference of HU values both in basal and after the administration of contrast material phase. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a statistical association between intraplaque hemorrhage and low HU values, and a threshold of 25 HU demonstrated the presence of intraplaque hemorrhage with a sensitivity and specificity of 93.22% and 92.73%, respectively. The Wilcoxon test showed that the attenuation of the plaque before and after administration of contrast material is different (intraplaque hemorrhage, lipid-rich necrotic core, and fibrous tissue had P values of .006, .0001, and .018, respectively). The results of this preliminary study suggest that CT can be used to identify the presence of intraplaque hemorrhage according to the attenuation. A threshold of 25

  19. Predicting anatomical landmarks and bone morphology of the femur using local region matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Cong-Bo; Koo, Seungbum

    2015-11-01

    Anatomical landmarks and bony features are frequently used in biomechanical and surgical applications. The purpose of this study was to develop a local region matching-based anatomical landmark prediction method. A reference femur model with anatomical landmarks and a surface division map was prepared. Initial registration between the reference femur model and a target femur model was performed in three-dimensional Cartesian space, and closest point pairs were determined by the initial surface correspondence. The models were mapped to unit spheres through spherical parameterization. Spherical registration using the closest point pairs in the spherical parametric space enabled the application of a division map from the reference model to the target model. The reference and target models were divided into local regions defined in the division map, and the corresponding regions were again registered in Cartesian space. Anatomical landmarks in the local regions were identified in the target model. The accuracy of the proposed method was tested for anatomical landmarks marked by a clinician on 35 femoral models. The effectiveness of local region matching was demonstrated by automatic measurements of the femoral neck-shaft angle. The average prediction error for all eight anatomical landmarks of the femur was 2.74 (±1.78) mm. The average of the predicted neck-shaft angle for our Korean subjects was 126.41° (±4.92°), which was comparable to previous studies in Japanese and Chinese populations. Anatomical landmarks and features could be accurately predicted using the proposed local region matching method. This method offers robustness and accuracy in determining anatomical bony landmarks and bone morphology for clinical and biomechanical applications.

  20. Kidney function during common carotid artery occlusion in anaesthetized cats: influence of vagotomy, constant ventilation, blood pressure stabilization, and carotid body chemoreceptor inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, A; Schmidt, M; Arndt, H; Hanus, U; Kranz, G; Rogoll, I

    1985-01-01

    The reactions of kidney function elicited by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion were studied in six groups of chloralosed cats in which the Nn. vagi, the breathing reaction, the increase of the mean systemic arterial blood pressure, and the carotid body chemoreceptors were excluded successively. Carotid occlusion in the control animals caused a rise of the mean systemic arterial blood pressure, hyperventilation, and an increase in renal sodium and water excretion, resulting from an inhibition of tubular reabsorption. Bilateral cervical vagotomy, relaxation and constant artificial ventilation only slightly modified this renal response. Inactivation of the carotid body chemoreceptors in vagotomized and constantly ventilated cats attenuated the natriuresis due to carotid occlusion regardless of the behaviour of the renal perfusion pressure. On the other hand, keeping the mean arterial blood pressure during carotid occlusion constant by the bleeding technique also reduced the natriuretic reaction. Cats with both inactivated carotid body chemoreceptors and constant renal perfusion pressure exhibited an antinatriuretic reaction during carotid clamping. From these data it is concluded that in narcotized cats the natriuretic response during carotid occlusion is the result of both a stimulation of the carotid body chemoreceptors and the rise of the renal perfusion pressure. In contrast, in dogs this so-called carotid-sinus-polyuria seems to be induced solely by the increase of the systemic arterial blood pressure. The findings additionally indicated that the arterial chemoreceptors may be involved in the physiological daily control of renal sodium excretion already at normal arterial oxygen tension under sea-level conditions.

  1. A systematic literature review of the effect of carotid atherosclerosis on local vessel stiffness and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, Mari E; Singh, Dilip; Menon, Bijoy K; Frayne, Richard

    2015-11-01

    This systematic literature review sought to determine the effects of carotid atherosclerotic plaque on local arterial stiffness. MedLine, EMBASE, and grey literature were searched with the following term: ("atherosclerosis" or "carotid atherosclerosis" or "carotid artery disease" or "carotid plaque") AND ("distensibility" or "elasticity" or "stiffness" or "compliance") NOT ("pulse wave velocity" or "PWV" or "carotid-ankle" or "ankle-brachial" or "augmentation index" or "cardio-ankle" or "CAVI" or "flow mediated dilation" or "FMD"). Results were restricted to English language articles reporting local arterial stiffness in human subjects with carotid atherosclerosis. Of the 1466 search results, 1085 abstracts were screened and 191 full-text articles were reviewed for relevance. The results of the 50 studies that assessed some measure of carotid arterial elasticity or stiffness in patients with carotid plaque were synthesized and reviewed. A number of different measures of carotid elasticity were found in the literature. Regardless of which metric was used, the majority of studies found increased carotid stiffness (or decreased distensibility) to be associated with carotid plaque presence, the degree of atherosclerosis, and incident stroke. Carotid artery mechanics are influenced by the presence of atherosclerotic plaque. The clinical applicability of carotid elasticity measures may be limited by the lack of reference values and standardized techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Eosinophil Cationic Protein, Carotid Plaque, and Incidence of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Johannes; Söderholm, Martin; Borné, Yan; Nilsson, Jan; Persson, Margaretha; Östling, Gerd; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Engström, Gunnar

    2017-10-01

    ECP (eosinophil cationic protein) is a marker of eosinophil activity and degranulation, which has been linked to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We examined the relationship between ECP, carotid plaque, and incidence of stroke in a prospective population-based cohort. The subjects participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1994. A total of 4706 subjects with no history of stroke were included (40% men; mean age, 57.5 years). Carotid plaque was determined by B-mode ultrasound of the right carotid artery. Incidence of stroke was followed up during a mean period of 16.5 years in relation to plasma ECP levels. Subjects in the third tertile (versus first tertile) of ECP tended to have higher prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio: 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.003-1.39; P =0.044 after multivariate adjustments). A total of 258 subjects were diagnosed with ischemic stroke (IS) during follow-up. ECP was associated with increased incidence of IS after risk factor adjustment (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval: 1.13-2.18; for third versus first tertile; P =0.007). High ECP was associated with increased risk of IS in subjects with carotid plaque. The risk factor-adjusted hazard ratio for IS was 1.86 (95% confidence interval: 1.32-2.63) in subjects with carotid plaque and ECP in the top tertile, compared with those without plaque and ECP in the first or second tertiles. High ECP is associated with increased incidence of IS. The association between ECP and IS was also present in the subgroup with carotid plaque. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Lipids and carotid plaque in the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacco Ralph L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipids, particularly low-density (LDL and high-density (HDL lipoproteins, are associated with increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, probably due to atherosclerosis. The objective of this cross-sectional analysis was to investigate the relation between blood lipids and carotid plaque. Methods As part of a prospective population-based study to determine the incidence and risk factors of stroke in a multiethnic population, we evaluated 1804 participants with lipid measurements and B-mode ultrasound of carotid arteries (mean age 69 +/- 10 years; 40% men; 51% Hispanic, 26% black, 23% white. The association between lipid parameters and carotid plaque was analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Results Plaque was present in 61% of participants. Mean total cholesterol was 202 +/- 41 mg/dl. After controlling for other lipid parameters, demographics, and risk factors, the only cholesterol subfraction associated with carotid plaque was LDL (OR per standard deviation (SD = 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.27. Neither HDL nor triglycerides independently predicted carotid plaque. Apolipoprotein B (ApoB was also associated with risk of plaque (OR per SD = 1.29, 95% CI 1.03-1.60. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-1 was associated with a decrease in multiple plaques (OR per SD = 0.76, 95% CI 0.60-0.97, while lipoprotein a was associated with an increased risk of multiple plaques (OR per SD = 1.31, 95% CI 1.03-1.66. ApoB:ApoA-I had the strongest relation with carotid plaque (OR per SD = 1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.69. Conclusions Among the common lipid parameters, LDL has the strongest relation with carotid plaque. Other lipid precursor proteins such as ApoB and ApoA-I may be stronger predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis, however, and better targets for treatment to reduce plaque formation and risk of cerebrovascular disease.

  4. [Ways to improve immediate and remote results of carotid endarterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhuget, R A; Karpenko, A A; Kamenskaya, O V; Ignatenko, P V; Starodubtsev, V B; Postnov, V G

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed the results of carotid endarterectomy in a total of 469 patients with the use of simultaneous assessment of the oxygen status and collateral blood flow of the brain in order to determine feasibility of placing a temporary bypass, carried out at the Centre of Vascular and Hybrid Surgery of the Novosibirsk Scientific Research Institute of Circulatory Pathology named after Academician E.N. Meshalkin in 2008-2012. It was shown that it is more appropriate to use a temporary bypass based on simultaneous assessment of the oxygen status and collateral blood flow of the brain: in synchronous decrease of the degree of cerebral oxygenation during tentative occlusion by more than 20% of the baseline level, or in absolute values of cerebral oxygenation below 40% and simultaneous decrease of retrograde pressure below 40 mm Hg. It was determined that simultaneous assessment of tolerance of the brain to ischaemia significantly decreased the incidence of using a temporary bypass from 16 to 3% (χ2=22.51; pcarotid endarterectomy after 4 years showed that a decrease in the number of temporary shunts did not influence cumulative survival (log-rank test; p=0.73), the incidence of stroke (log-rank test; p=0.68) and patency of the reconstructed carotid arteries in the remote period (log-rank test; p=0.70). It was determined that in the remote period of carotid endarterectomy restenoses of reconstructed carotid arteries were encountered statistically significantly less often in the group of eversion carotid endarterectomy as compared with classic carotid endarterectomy (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.07-070; p=0.009) and with prosthetic repair of the internal carotid artery (OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.02-0.83; p=0.03).

  5. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphisms as risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurnić Irena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Atherosclerosis is still the leading cause of death in Western world. Development of atherosclerotic plaque involves accumulation of inflammatory cells, lipids, smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix proteins in the intima of the vascular wall. Apolipoprotein E participates in the transport of exogenous cholesterol, endogenouly synthesized lipids and triglycerides in the organism. Apolipoprotein E gene has been identified as one of the candidate genes for atherosclerosis. Previous studies in different populations have clearly implicated apolipoprotein E genetic variation (ε polymorphisms as a major modulator of low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Data considering apolipoprotein E polymorphisms in relation to carotid atherosclerosis gave results that are not in full compliance. The aim of present study was to investigate the apolipoprotein E polymorphisms in association with carotid plaque presence, apolipoprotein E and lipid serum levels in patients with carotid atherosclerosis from Serbia. Methods. The study group enrolled 495 participants: 285 controls and 210 consecutive patients with carotid atherosclerosis who underwent carotid endarterectomy. Genotyping of apolipoprotein E polymorphisms were done using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. Results. Patients had significantly decreased frequency of the ε2 allele compared to controls. Patients who carry at least one ε2 allele had a significantly higher level of serum apolipoprotein E and significantly lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared to those who do not carry this allele. Conclusion. Our results suggest protective effect of apolipoprotein E ε2 allele on susceptibility for carotid plaque presence as well as low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering effect in Serbian patients with carotid atherosclerosis. Further research of multiple gene and environmental factors that contribute to the

  6. Carotid Artery Occlusion by Rhinoorbitocerebral Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Al-Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is the third most common invasive fungal infection that particularly occurs in immunocompromised patients. Intracranial and extracranial arteriovenous vasculopathy is a complication that makes this disease more complex and difficult to treat. We describe a 23-year-old female, who presented to her local hospital with acute blindness and diabetic ketoacidosis-induced coma requiring intensive care treatment. She was found to have lesions in the nasal sinuses, orbit, and frontal base. The left carotid artery was occluded from its origin in the neck to the supraclinoid segment and left cavernous sinus involvement. No cerebral infarction was noted. Biopsies obtained by endonasal debridement confirmed mucormycosis. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, she underwent several multidisciplinary approaches to treat her disease. Multiple endonasal, and cranial procedures were done including bilateral orbital exenteration. After prolonged treatment on the intensive care unit she made a remarkable recovery to the point where she was communicating verbally and had normal limb movements and later discharged home. She remained alive and well for two months, but later succumbed to a recurrence of her disease. In conclusion, mucormycosis-induced vasculopathy is a complex problem, which merits aggressive treatment of this invasive disease. It is normally regarded as an indicator of grave prognosis.

  7. Femoral anatomical frame: assessment of various definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Croce, U; Camomilla, V; Leardini, A; Cappozzo, A

    2003-06-01

    The reliability of the estimate of joint kinematic variables and the relevant functional interpretation are affected by the uncertainty with which bony anatomical landmarks and underlying bony segment anatomical frames are determined. When a stereo-photogrammetric system is used for in vivo studies, minimising and compensating for this uncertainty is crucial. This paper deals with the propagation of the errors associated with the location of both internal and palpable femoral anatomical landmarks to the estimation of the orientation of the femoral anatomical frame and to the knee joint angles during movement. Given eight anatomical landmarks, and the precision with which they can be identified experimentally, 12 different rules were defined for the construction of the anatomical frame and submitted to comparative assessment. Results showed that using more than three landmarks allows for more repeatable anatomical frame orientation and knee joint kinematics estimation. Novel rules are proposed that use optimization algorithms. On the average, the femoral frame orientation dispersion had a standard deviation of 2, 2.5 and 1.5 degrees for the frontal, transverse, and sagittal plane, respectively. However, a proper choice of the relevant construction rule allowed for a reduction of these inaccuracies in selected planes to 1 degrees rms. The dispersion of the knee adduction-abduction and internal-external rotation angles could also be limited to 1 degrees rms irrespective of the flexion angle value.

  8. Teaching Anatomically-Sound Turnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Turnout is a vital element of many dance techniques. Aesthetically, turnout is used to fulfill artistic goals related to body line and design. Mechanically, it increases the potential range of movement in certain leg gestures and facilitates movements sideways through space. Turnout involves external rotation of the femur along its long axis in…

  9. Construction of a 3-D anatomical model for teaching temporal lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Wilson, Timothy D

    2012-06-01

    Although we live and work in 3 dimensional space, most of the anatomical teaching during medical school is done on 2-D (books, TV and computer screens, etc). 3-D spatial abilities are essential for a surgeon but teaching spatial skills in a non-threatening and safe educational environment is a much more difficult pedagogical task. Currently, initial anatomical knowledge formation or specific surgical anatomy techniques, are taught either in the OR itself, or in cadaveric labs; which means that the trainee has only limited exposure. 3-D computer models incorporated into virtual learning environments may provide an intermediate and key step in a blended learning approach for spatially challenging anatomical knowledge formation. Specific anatomical structures and their spatial orientation can be further clinically contextualized through demonstrations of surgical procedures in the 3-D digital environments. Recordings of digital models enable learner reviews, taking as much time as they want, stopping the demonstration, and/or exploring the model to understand the anatomical relation of each structure. We present here how a temporal lobectomy virtual model has been developed to aid residents and fellows conceptualization of the anatomical relationships between different cerebral structures during that procedure. We suggest in comparison to cadaveric dissection, such virtual models represent a cost effective pedagogical methodology providing excellent support for anatomical learning and surgical technique training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety and efficacy of the Perclose suture-mediated closure device following carotid artery stenting under clopidogrel platelet blockade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorger, Niels; Finkenzeller, Thomas; Lenhart, Markus; Hamer, Okka; Paetzel, Christian; Borisch, Inghita; Toepel, Ingolf; Feuerbach, Stefan; Link, Johann [University of Regensburg Klinikum, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042, Regensburg (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was evaluation of a closure device (Perclose, Menlo Park, Calif.) for closure of the femoral artery access site in patients undergoing aggressive anticoagulation and platelet blockade after carotid stenting. Fifty-five patients who received clopidogrel in addition to aspirin and heparin as medication for carotid stenting were included for suture of the femoral access site after using 7- or 8-F guide catheters. The technical success, the time for suture, the clotting parameters, and complications were examined. Follow-up investigations, including ultrasound and clinical examinations, were performed. The groin was checked for possible hematoma, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and local infection. Technical success was obtained in 51 of 54 patients (94%) after a mean procedure time of 6 min (range 5-10 min). The suture device was not used in one patient (2%) for anatomical reasons and failed to obtain hemostasis in 3 of 54 (6%) patients. In 4 of 54 patients (7%) bleeding was observed at the punctured site 4-6 h after intervention which was treated by a compression bandage. The mean dedicated activated clotting time was 137 s (range 29-287 s) before intervention and 349 s (150-958 s) just before deploying the Perclose device. During follow-up after 2 days (range 2-6 days) and 6 months no further complications of the puncture site were observed except for two large groin hematomas. No major complications occurred. Closure of the femoral access site after carotid stenting using a Perclose closure device is safe and effective even in patients receiving an aggressive anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of the contribution of the external carotid artery to brain perfusion in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laar, Peter Jan; van der Grond, Jeroen; Bremmer, Jochem P; Klijn, Catharina J M; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate the contribution of the ipsilateral external carotid artery (ECA) to cerebral perfusion in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained. Thirty functionally independent patients (24 men, 6 women; mean age, 63 years) with an angiographically proven unilateral internal carotid artery occlusion and transient or minor disabling ischemic attacks ipsilateral to the side of the internal carotid artery occlusion were included. Grading of ECA collateral flow was performed with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography. The contribution of the ECA to regional cerebral blood flow was assessed with selective arterial spin labeling MRI. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow were analyzed with Student t test. Twenty percent of the patients had ECA Grade 0 collateral flow (no filling of ophthalmic artery), 20% Grade 1 (filling of carotid siphon), and 60% Grade 2 (filling of anterior and/or middle cerebral artery) as demonstrated on digital subtraction angiography. Although in the Grade 1 group, the ECA supplied a smaller region of the brain compared with the Grade 2 group, the mean regional cerebral blood flow of the perfusion territory supplied by the ECA is similar (P=0.70) in the Grade 1 group (mean+/-SD 57+/-16 mL/min/100 g) and the Grade 2 group (60+/-12 mL/min/100g). In patients with symptomatic internal carotid artery occlusion, focal brain regions may strongly depend on the contribution to cerebral perfusion of the ECA ipsilateral to the side of the internal carotid artery occlusion, even in patients with limited ECA collateral supply as demonstrated on digital subtraction angiography.

  12. Research progress of noninvasive high - resolution magnetic resonance imaging in carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng GAO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carotid atherosclerotic stenosis is closely related to recurrent ischemic stroke. Currently, therapies for carotid artery stenosis are mainly intensive medication or surgery, including carotid artery stenting (CAS and carotid endarterectomy (CEA. The prevention of stroke lies in identifying risk factors for carotid artery stenosis, screening patients with high risk of recurrent stroke, so as to benefit from medication or surgery. However, therapeutic schedule is formulated only according to the degrees of carotid artery stenosis, and there lacks of individualized treatment. Recently, new imaging modalities, such as noninvasive high.resolution MRI (HRMRI could detect the vulnerability of carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Compared with the degree of carotid artery stenosis measured by conventional DSA, noninvasive HRMRI can precisely predict the risk of ipsilateral stroke according to plaque morphology, so as to guide individualized treatment. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.05.012

  13. Three-dimensional X-ray angiography of the carotid arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi-Mucelli, F.; Belgrano, M.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Babic, D. [Cardio/Vascular Department, Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands)

    2004-05-01

    DSA plays an important role in the preoperative management of carotid stenosis, and in endovascular treatment such as carotid stenting. Accurate 3D representation of the affected artery, before and after the procedure, is of great value.

  14. Microsurgical Clipping of an Unruptured Carotid Cave Aneurysm: 3-Dimensional Operative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabani, Halima; Yousef, Sonia; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Gandhi, Sirin; Benet, Arnau; Lawton, Michael T

    2017-08-01

    Most aneurysms originating from the clinoidal segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are nowadays managed conservatively, treated endovascularly with coiling (with or without stenting) or flow diverters. However, microsurgical clip occlusion remains an alternative. This video demonstrates clip occlusion of an unruptured right carotid cave aneurysm measuring 7 mm in a 39-year-old woman. The patient opted for surgery because of concerns about prolonged antiplatelet use associated with endovascular therapy. After patient consent, a standard pterional craniotomy was performed followed by extradural anterior clinoidectomy. After dural opening and sylvian fissure split, a clinoidal flap was opened to enter the extradural space around the clinoidal segment. The dural ring was dissected circumferentially, freeing the medial wall of the ICA down to the sellar region and mobilizing the ICA out of its canal of the clinoidal segment. With the aneurysm neck in view, the aneurysm was clipped with a 45° angled fenestrated clip over the ICA. Indocyanine green angiography confirmed no further filling of the aneurysm and patency of the ICA. Complete aneurysm occlusion was confirmed with postoperative angiography, and the patient had no neurologic deficits (Video 1). This case demonstrates the importance of anterior clinoidectomy and thorough distal dural ring dissection for effective clipping of carotid cave aneurysms. Control of venous bleeding from the cavernous sinus with fibrin glue injection simplifies the dissection, which should minimize manipulation of the optic nerve. Knowledge of this anatomy and proficiency with these techniques is important in an era of declining open aneurysm cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Toshinari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR, 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI, 1.010 - 1.059, HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225, and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051 were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  16. [Cerebral hemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy in a young adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, J; Sancho, J; Santonja, J M; Pareja, A; Peiró, C

    1997-02-01

    Cerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy is a rare complication. It follows 0.5% to 20% of all endarterectomies, but should be borne in mind because of the morbidity and mortality seen in most cases. We describe the case of a 42 year old man in whom carotid endarterectomy had been done 7 days before to treat a stenosis of 80%. He complained of a sudden onset of weakness of the right half of his body and changes in his speech. Physical examination showed right inferior facial paresia, right hemiparesia and right extensor cutaneous plantar reflex. On admission to the Emergency Department, before treatment, blood pressure was 80/60. Carotid auscultation and palpation were normal. Cerebral TRC showed a left lenticular haematoma. The patient progressed satisfactorily. We review the literature on the subject as well as the factors which should be considered as possibly predisposing to bleeding after carotid endarterectomy, such as arterial hypertension and occlusion or severe stenosis of the contralateral carotid artery. The detection of patients with the risk of postendarterectomy bleeding by simple noninvasive investigations, such as the transcranial doppler and the acetazolamide test, and early diagnosis of a clinical picture compatible with a hyperperfusion syndrome may contribute to the relief and prevention of sequelae in these patients.

  17. Intercavernous portion of internal carotid artery occlusion resulting from snowboarding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudiptamohan Mukhopadhyay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sudiptamohan Mukhopadhyay1, Awen Iorwerth21Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK; 2Department of Orthopaedics, Royal Glamorgan Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: A 33-year-old gentleman who was otherwise fit and healthy suffered repetitive low impact head injuries while snowboarding in Austria over a period of one week. During the fall he had several hyperextension injuries and presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness (felt ‘drunk’ on Friday night despite not being drunk, diplopia, abnormal pupillary signs. A Horner’s syndrome was diagnosed and on investigation, the left intercavernous portion of internal carotid artery (ICA was found to be thrombosed. The symptoms gradually settled after conservative treatment for a month. Blunt head trauma is a recognized cause of carotid dissection and thrombosis and many neuromechanics studies have attempted to calculate the wall shear stress involved. Physicians treating snowboarders should be aware of the condition and should look for Horner’s syndrome and consider the possibility of carotid occlusion. With a thorough PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE search using ‘snowboarding’, ‘carotid dissection’, ‘Horner’s syndrome’ no such case was found to be reported. Proper training for such sport activities is essential to avoid serious consequences.Keywords: snowboarding, carotid dissection, Horner’s syndrome

  18. The modified operative technique of partial eversion carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Richard; Porter, Johnathan; Al-Khaffaf, Haytham

    2017-01-01

    We report a modified operative technique termed partial eversion carotid endarterectomy (PECE). During a 9-year period (2006-2015), 352 patients underwent PECE. Indications for surgery, intraoperative details, and outcomes were recorded. The initial 185 patients had carotid duplex ultrasound imaging at 6 weeks and then at 6, 12, and 24 months. Subsequent patients had carotid imaging at 4 to 6 weeks. Indications included stroke (76), transient ischemic attack (153), and amaurosis fugax (33); 58 patients were asymptomatic, and 32 patients had surgery before cardiac surgery. Median clamp time was 14 minutes (interquartile range, 11.5-17 minutes). Median total operation time was 41 minutes (interquartile range, 31-72 minutes). Outcomes included four transient ischemic attacks (1.2%), five strokes (1.4%), and two deaths at 30 days (0.5%). No significant cranial nerve injuries or carotid restenosis was detected during follow-up. PECE is technically straightforward, with outcomes comparable to those of current operative techniques. Its advantages included reduced operative and carotid clamping time. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Carotid body paraganglioma in a teenager. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vázquez, María Elisa; Llamas-Macías, Francisco Javier; Nuño-Escobar, César; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv

    2014-01-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are neuroendocrine tumors. They have a low incidence (0.6%), are generally benign, have a poorly defined etiology, and multiple factors have been associated with their origin. Humans and other species living at high altitudes (>2000 m above sea level) are subjected to a relatively chronic hypoxia and there is a high prevalence of the development of carotid body hyperplasia and eventually paragangliomas. This disease is usually seen in patients in their 50s and in their 30s if there is a family history. We present the case of a 16 year-old female with acute pharyngitis and growing tumor located on the left side of the neck, without symptoms. A duplex Doppler ultrasound showed a solid nodular lesion on the left carotid bifurcation. A left lateral cervicotomy was performed, finding a highly vascularized tumor of 4 × 3 × 3 cm involving the common carotid from its middle third, the internal carotid up to the cranial base, and the external carotid to its upper third, and intimately related to the trachea, esophagus and cervical spine. The tumor was completely resected and the histopathological analysis corroborated the presence of paragangliomas. The publication of this case is relevant and of clinical interest due to the uncommon age of presentation and the fact that it should be considered as a diagnostic possibility.

  20. Association between blood viscosity and common carotid artery elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolino, Cesare; Irace, Concetta; Carallo, Claudio; De Franceschi, Maria Serena; Scavelli, Faustina; Della Valle, Elisabetta; Gnasso, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Elastic properties of the vessel wall are associated with atherosclerosis and major cardiovascular events. Several physiological and pathological conditions can affect arterial elasticity, but few studies have considered the role of hemorheological parameters. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between hemorheological parameters and vascular stiffness in the carotid artery district. One hundred and two individuals were enrolled. Blood and plasma viscosity were measured by a cone-plate viscometer (Wells-Brookfield DV-III, Stoughton, U.S.A.). Echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries was performed in order to calculate elastic indexes (strain, β-stiffness index and distensibility). The association between hemorheological parameters and carotid elasticity indexes was assessed by simple and multiple regression analyses. In simple correlation analysis, only blood viscosity was directly associated with β-stiffness index (r = 0.20, p = 0.05) and inversely with strain (r =-0.26, p = 0.01) and distensibility (r =-0.34, p = 0.001). After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, blood viscosity, but not plasma viscosity or hematocrit, was independently associated carotid arterial measures, together with age, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The results of the present study demonstrate a strong association between blood viscosity and common carotid elasticity indexes.

  1. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation in treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Tank, Jens

    2012-12-24

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is commonly defined as blood pressure that remains above goal in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes. The sympathetic nervous system promotes arterial hypertension and cardiovascular as well as renal damage, thus, providing a logical treatment target in these patients. Recent physiological studies suggest that baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term control of sympathetic activity and blood pressure providing an impetus for the development of electrical carotid sinus stimulators. The concept behind electrical stimulation of baroreceptors or baroreflex afferent nerves is that the stimulus is sensed by the brain as blood pressure increase. Then, baroreflex efferent structures are adjusted to counteract the perceived blood pressure increase. Electrical stimulators directly activating afferent baroreflex nerves were developed years earlier but failed for technical reasons. Recently, a novel implantable device was developed that produces an electrical field stimulation of the carotid sinus wall. Carefully conducted experiments in dogs provided important insight in mechanisms mediating the depressor response to electrical carotid sinus stimulation. Moreover, these studies showed that the treatment success may depend on the underlying pathophysiology of the hypertension. Clinical studies suggest that electrical carotid sinus stimulation attenuates sympathetic activation of vasculature, heart, and kidney while augmenting cardiac vagal regulation, thus lowering blood pressure. Yet, not all patients respond to treatment. Additional clinical trials are required. Patients equipped with an electrical carotid sinus stimulator provide a unique opportunity gaining insight in human baroreflex physiology. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The Accuracy of Noninvasive Imaging Techniques in Diagnosis of Carotid Plaque Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detelina Valchkova Lukanova

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: The ultrasound has high accuracy for diagnostics of carotid plaque morphology, magnetic resonance imaging has high potential for tissue differentiation and multidetector computed tomography determines precisely degree of stenosis and presence of ulceration and calcifications. The three noninvasive imaging modalities are complementary for optimal evaluation of the morphology of carotid plaque. This will help to determine the risk of stroke and to decide on the best treatment – carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting.

  3. Anatomic breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2011-01-01

    methodologies as seen from table 2 in given temporal study. Conclusion The curve-linear anatomical breast coordinate system facilitated computerized analysis of mammograms. The proposed coordinate system slightly improved the risk segregation by Mammographic Texture Resemblance and minimized the geometrical......Purpose Many researchers have investigated measures also other than density in the mammogram such as measures based on texture to improve breast cancer risk assessment. However, parenchymal texture characteristics are highly dependent on the orientation of vasculature structure and fibrous tissue...... inside the breast. Most of the risk assessment and CAD modules use a breast region in a image centered Cartesian x,y coordinate system. Nevertheless, anatomical structure follows curve-linear trajectories. We examined an anatomical breast coordinate system that preserves the anatomical correspondence...

  4. Morphological and anatomical studies of Cyani herba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Chiru

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and anatomical investigation were carried out on stem, leaves, flowers and bracts of the species Centaurea cyanusL. The diagnostic parameters of vegetal product Cyani herbawere defined.

  5. Early results after synchronous carotid stent placement and coronary artery bypass graft in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Juan Guillermo; Rojas, Kristin E; Balestrini, Carlos; Espinel, Camilo; Figueredo, Antonio; Saaibi, Jose Federico; Machuca, Santiago; Murcia, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    The optimal management of patients with combined carotid and coronary artery disease requiring cardiac surgery is still unknown. Staged carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting (CAS), each followed by coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), are options frequently employed. However, for patients with severe carotid artery disease in urgent need of open cardiac revascularization, staged operations may not be the most appropriate alternative. The aim of this study was to describe our experience using a synchronous CAS-CABG method with minimal interprocedural time. We used this synchronous combination of procedures in patients with combined carotid and coronary artery disease admitted for urgent CABG. Patients with concomitant severe carotid and coronary artery disease scheduled for synchronous CAS and urgent CABG between December 2006 and January 2010 were included in the study. All procedures were performed at a single center: the Cardiovascular Foundation of Colombia, in Floridablanca, Santander, Colombia. The study cohort was characterized according to demographic and clinical characteristics, which included degree of carotid stenosis, presence/absence of preoperative neurological symptoms, and cardiac operative risk profile. All patients underwent CAS under embolic protection devices and then CABG within the next 2 hours. Patients received aspirin pre- and postprocedure but were started on clopidogrel only after CABG. The primary end point of the study was the composite incidence rate of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death 30 days after CAS-CABG. Fifteen patients with concomitant severe carotid and coronary artery disease underwent synchronous CAS-CABG. Most patients (60%) were men, and mean (± standard deviation) age was 65.2 (± 8.4) years. Most patients (93%) were neurologically asymptomatic. The median (interquartile range) ejection fraction and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) for the cohort were 55% (36

  6. Introducing International Journal of Anatomical Variations

    OpenAIRE

    Tunali S

    2008-01-01

    Welcome to International Journal of Anatomical Variations (IJAV) - an annual journal of anatomical variations and clinical anatomy case reports. After having a notable experience for eight years in NEUROANATOMY, we are pleased to introduce you IJAV. We are eventually announcing our new journal after three years of feasibility and background study period. We hope that IJAV will fill in the gap in anatomy journals’ bunch. IJAV is an annual, open access journal having electronic version only. De...

  7. Perspective: carotid stenting and the history of disruptive technology in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Frank J

    2008-06-01

    This article defines disruptive technology and discusses such technologies in Vascular Surgery. It considers the question: Is carotid artery stenting (CAS) a disruptive technology? Although CAS will impact positively on the treatment of carotid bifurcation disease, it will probably never displace carotid endarterectomy in the majority of patients. The precise role of CAS remains to be determined.

  8. Plaque At RISK (PARISK): prospective multicenter study to improve diagnosis of high-risk carotid plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truijman, M.T.; Kooi, M.E.; Dijk, A.; de Rotte, A.A.J.; van der Kolk, A.G.; Liem, M.; Schreuder, F.H.; Boersma, M.; Mess, W.H.; van Oostenbrugge, R.J.; Koudstaal, P.J.; Kappelle, L.J.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Nederveen, A.J.; Hendrikse, J.; van der Steen, A.F.; Daemen, M.J.; van der Lugt, A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis are at high risk for recurrent stroke. To date, the decision to perform carotid endarterectomy in patients with a recent cerebrovascular event is mainly based on degree of stenosis of the ipsilateral carotid artery. However, additional

  9. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021453,DRX021454,DRX021452 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  10. File list: NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021453,DRX021454,DRX021452 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  12. Baroreflex Sensitivity And Autonomic Nervous System Function In Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in the elderly may be caused by an apparent hypersensitivity in the high pressure baroreflex control of heart rate and blood pressure - carotid sinus hypersensitivity. Previous studies have found ambiguous results regarding the baroreceptor sensitivity in patients with carotid sinus hyper...... sensitivity may not follow the same neuronal pathways as those responding to the crude external pressures applied during carotid sinus massage...

  13. Prevalence of significant carotid artery stenosis in patients with transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rappeport, Yael; Simonsen, Lene; Christiansen, Hanne Hjertmann

    2002-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is one of the risk factors for transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of carotid artery stenosis and the prevalence of candidates for carotid endarterectomy in a hospital-based cohort of TIA patients under 71...

  14. Early detection of asymptomatic carotid disease in patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rančić Zoran S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in patients with lower extremities atherosclerosis is relatively high. Limiting screening of specific subgroups for any demographic or medical characteristics is ineffective. Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis is indicated in all patients with lower extremities atherosclerosis except in whom prophylactic carotid endarterectomy is not recommended because of comorbid disease or extreme age.

  15. Determinants of carotid atherosclerotic plaque burden in a stroke-free population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selwaness, Mariana; Hameeteman, Reinhard; Van 't Klooster, Ronald; Van den Bouwhuijsen, Quirijn; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Niessen, W.J.; Klein, Stefan; Vernooij, Meike W.; Van Der Lugt, Aad; Wentzel, Jolanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims In a large stroke-free population, we sought to identify cardiovascular risk factors and carotid plaque components associated with carotid plaque burden, lumen volume and stenosis. Methods The carotid arteries of 1562 stroke-free participants from The Rotterdam Study were

  16. MRI of the carotid artery at 7 Tesla: Quantitative comparison with 3 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Wouter; De Rotte, Alexandra A J; Bluemink, Johanna J.; Van Der Velden, Tijl A.; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, DWJ; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 7 Tesla (T) MRI of the carotid arteries, as quantitatively compared with 3T. Materials and Methods: The 7T MRI of the carotid arteries was performed in six healthy subjects and in two patients with carotid stenosis. The healthy group was scanned at 3T and at 7T, using

  17. Carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, and incident aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aortic stenosis (AS) shares risk factors with atherosclerotic vascular disease. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque may reflect the cumulative damage from exposure to different atherosclerotic risk factors. We examined the relationship of carotid IMT and plaque with incident...... AS in a prospective population-based study. APPROACH AND RESULTS: A random sample of participants (age, 45-68 years) in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study underwent B-mode ultrasound with measurements of IMT and the presence of plaque in the common carotid artery (n=5079). Potential risk factors......-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, C-reactive protein, plaque, and IMT. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, height, and leukocyte count were not significantly associated with AS (P>0.05). After adjustments, IMT, plaque, age, smoking, C...

  18. Correlation between aortic/carotid atherosclerotic plaques and cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baojun; Sun, Shaoli; Liu, Guorong; Li, Yuechun; Pang, Jiangxia; Zhang, Jingfen; Yang, Lijuan; Li, Ruiming; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Changchun; Li, Xiue

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between aortic/carotid atherosclerotic plaques and cerebral infarction. We examined 116 cases of cerebral infarction using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in order to exclude cerebrovascular stenosis. Transesophageal echocardiography and color Doppler ultrasound were used to detect aortic atherosclerotic plaques (AAPs) and carotid atherosclerotic plaques (CAPs). AAPs were detected in a total of 70 of the 116 cases (60.3%), including 56 with moderate/severe atherosclerotic changes (48.3%). The difference in the incidence of various types of infarction between APP severity levels was significant (PCAPs (55.2%), including 46 with unstable plaque (39.7%). The difference in the incidence of various types of infarction between CAP stability levels was significant (PCAP are significant causes of embolic infarction without stenosis in the internal carotid arteries.

  19. Imaging markers of stroke risk in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Prabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid stenosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke. While symptomatic carotid stenosis requires prompt revascularization, there is significant debate about the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS, especially in light of recent advances in medical therapy. As a result, there is an even greater need for reliable predictors of stroke risk in asymptomatic patients. Besides clinical factors and stenosis grade, plaque morphology and cerebral hemodynamics may be suitable prognostic tools. High-risk features, using Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI suggest that subpopulations at sufficiently high risk (10% annually can be identified and in whom revascularization would be most beneficial. In this review, imaging tools to aid in stroke risk stratification in patients with ACS are discussed.

  20. Surgical treatment of large and giant cavernous carotid aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriamornrattanakul, Kitiporn; Sakarunchai, Ittichai; Yamashiro, Kei; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Suyama, Daisuke; Kawase, Tsukasa; Kato, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Cavernous carotid aneurysms (CCAs) are uncommon pathologic entities. Extradural place and the skull base location make this type of an aneurysm different in clinical features and treatment techniques. Direct aneurysm clipping is technically difficult and results in a significant postoperative neurological deficit. Therefore, several techniques of indirect surgical treatment were developed with different surgical outcomes, such as proximal occlusion of internal carotid artery (ICA) or trapping with or without bypass (superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass or high-flow bypass). High-flow bypass with proximal ICA occlusion seems to be the most appropriate surgical treatment for CCA because of the high rate of symptom improvement, aneurysm thrombosis, and minimal postoperative complications. However, in cases of CCA presented with direct carotid-cavernous fistula, the appropriate surgical treatment is high-flow bypass with aneurysm trapping, which the fistula can be obliterated immediately after surgery. PMID:28761512

  1. Quality of life after carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most studies documenting beneficial outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CE are limited to mortality and morbidity rates, costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS. Few have examined the dependency of patients and how they perceive their own health changes after surgery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life and independence in activities of daily living (ADL and to study its determinants. Methods Sixty-three patients admitted in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU after CE were eligible for this 14-month follow-up study. Patients were contacted 6 months after discharge to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36 and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Results Among 59 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 43 completed the questionnaires. Sixty-three percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients had worse SF-36 scores for all domains except bodily pain than a general urban population, and comparison with a group of patients 6 months after surgical ICU discharge showed no differences. Six months after PACU discharge, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of ADL Scale and the Katz Index of ADL demonstrated higher dependency scores (5.9 ± 2.2 versus 4.3 ± 2.4 and 0.3 ± 0.8 versus 0.6 ± 0.9, p Conclusion Patients undergoing CE have improved self-perception of quality of life despite being more dependent. Almost all their scores are worse than those in an urban population. We could identify no predictors of greater dependency in ADL tasks six months after PACU discharge.

  2. Reasons for readmission after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambachan, Aksharananda; Smith, Timothy R; Saha, Sujata; Eskandari, Mark K; Bendok, Bernard R; Kim, John Y S

    2014-12-01

    With increasing oversight of postoperative outcomes with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the reduction of readmissions is necessary to avoid financial penalties. This article provides a multi-institutional, multivariate analysis of the pre- and postoperative patient factors associated with readmission after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from 2011, we considered 8456 patients. The primary outcome variable was 30-day unplanned readmission. Multiple logistic regression was used, and we controlled for preoperative demographic variables, comorbidities and clinical characteristics, and postoperative medical and surgical complications. Patients with CEA had a 6.0% unplanned readmission rate. The most common comorbidities in the readmitted patients included hypertension, diabetes, and bleeding disorder. Risk-adjusted multiple regression indicated that preoperative bleeding disorder (odds ratio [OR] 1.62), diabetes (OR 1.46), history of a cerebrovascular accident/stroke (OR 1.46), and increasing age (OR 1.01) were statistically significant predictors for readmission. Postoperatively, surgical-site infection (OR 21.90), myocardial infarction (OR 10.35), sepsis/septic shock (OR 7.79), cerebrovascular accident/stroke (OR 6.58), pneumonia (OR 4.37), and urinary tract infection (OR 3.21) were associated with a greater rate of readmission. Readmission after CEA occurs at a comparatively high rate. Preoperative bleeding disorders, diabetes, cerebrovascular accidents, and age and postoperative surgical-site infection, myocardial infarction, sepsis/septic shock, pneumonia, and cerebrovascular accident were associated with readmission. These findings may help guide the surgical management of patients and prevent costly readmissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Establishment of anatomical terminology in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    The history of anatomical terminology in Japan began with the publication of Waran Naikei Ihan-teimŏ in 1805 and Chŏtei Kaitai Shinsho in 1826. Although the establishment of Japanese anatomical terminology became necessary during the Meiji era when many western anatomy books imported into Janan were translated, such terminology was not unified during this period and varied among translators. In 1871, Tsukumo Ono's Kaibŏgaku Gosen was published by the Ministry of Education. Although this book is considered to be the first anatomical glossary terms in Japan, its contents were incomplete. Overseas, the German Anatomical Society established a unified anatomical terminology in 1895 called the Basle Nomina Anatomica (B.N.A.). Based on this development, Kaibŏgaku Meishŭ which follows the BNA, by Buntarŏ Suzuki was published in 1905. With the subsequent establishment in 1935 of Jena Nomina Anatomica (J.N.A.), the unification of anatomical terminology was also accelerated in Japan, leading to the further development of terminology.

  4. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo, who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression.

  5. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta-Chen Su1, Pao-Ling Torng2, Jiann-Shing Jeng3, Ming-Fong Chen1, Chiau-Suong Liau1,41Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Buddist Tzu-Chi Hospital, Hsin-Dian, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited.Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD, compliance (BAC, and resistance (BAR. Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured.Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity.Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than

  6. Relationship between increased carotid artery stiffness and idiopathic subjective tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, C; Taşolar, S

    2017-05-01

    Tinnitus is defined as perception of sound with no external stimulus, and can separate into pulsatile and non-pulsatile types. Arterial stiffness is a parameter that can predict the cardiovascular event and associated with incidence of stroke. It has been shown that increased arterial stiffness may lead to microvascular damage in brain. Our aim was to assess the arterial stiffness of the carotid system in the development and severity of idiopathic subjective tinnitus. Forty subjective tinnitus patients and 40 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. The parameters obtained from the participants included pure tone hearing (dB), serum lipid profile (mg/dl), fasting glucose (mg/dl), blood pressure (mmHg), and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2). The common carotid artery (CCA) stiffness index, Young's elastic modulus (YEM), common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), vessel diameter, mean velocity (MV), and volume flow (VF) were measured in both the right and left common carotid arteries in both groups. The CCA stiffness index, YEM measurements, right CIMT, and left PI were found to be significantly higher in the patients than those in the control group (p tinnitus and the patient characteristics, there was a significant positive correlation with the CCA stiffness index, YEM measurements, left CIMT, and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). However, only the right and left CCA stiffness parameters were found to be statistically significant in the multivariate analysis as independent predictors of a moderate to high degree of tinnitus. The increased stiffness index of the common carotid arteries was significantly associated with the formation and severity of tinnitus. Therefore, an assessment of the carotideal system may be helpful in these patients.

  7. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Case of radiation induced aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashiro, Takashi; Ikota, Toshio; Yamashita, Kousuke; Kodama, Takao

    1988-08-01

    An unusual case of post-irradiation aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery is presented. A 70-year-old man, complaining of left cervical throbbing mass with focal pain, was admitted on February 8, 1985. It was noted, from his past history, that he had had surgery of the removal of cervical lymphnodes and that unknown dosage of irradiation had been added to the cervical region 30 years before. Left carotid angiography (on admission) demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the cervical portion of internal carotid artery. Right carotid angiography with compression of left carotid artery revealed good cross filling through anterior communicating artery. Computed tomography with contrast media showed a ring like enhanced mass, which was thought to suggest that a large part of the aneurysm was filled with intraluminal thrombosis. During 30 days of evaluation, the aneurysm grew larger and his cervical pain became untolerable. Operation, the resection of the aneurysm and the reconstruction (of circulation) with vein graft, was challenged on March 12. It was so difficult with meticulous work that the ligation of left common carotid artery was performed after all. Seven days after the operation, he suffered from the gastrointestinal bleeding, which was enough to lead him to hypovolemic shock. Thereafter, right hemiparesis and aphasia were brought about. Two months later, he died of pneumonia. On histological examination, it was demonstrated that the aneurysm communicated with the necrotic tissue and that the normal structure of the blood vessel was not observed in the aneurysmal wall and consisted of the collagenous fiber and granulated tissue. The aneurysm was interpreted as a false one.

  9. Vertebrobasilar And Bilateral Carotid Dolichoectasia: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Ali Yürekli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dolichoectasia is a term used to describe marked widening, tortuosity and elongation of an artery. Intracranial vertebral and basilar arteries are most commonly involved. Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia is usually asymptomatic. Both vertebrobasilar and bilateral carotid dolichoectasia has been reported very rarely in the literature. Cranial nerve compression and cerebral ischemia findings are frequently seen in symptomatic patients. We reported a 67-year-old female, without medical or family history for cerebrovascular disease, presented with vertebrobasilar and bilateral carotid dolichoectasia and subarachnoid hemorrhage, manifesting as reduced level of consciousness and weakness, and left abducens palsy.

  10. Clinical spectrum of spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Jayanta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. A CCF is divided into two categories, direct and indirect. Direct fistulas usually account for 70 to 90% of all CCF. Spontaneous, low-flow fistulas are usually associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension and collagen vascular disease or may develop in females during peripartum period. The elderly age group, especially women are at increased risk. We report three cases of spontaneous CCF presenting with ocular manifestations and hypertension, without any collagen vascular disease. One case was a direct variety and the other two were of indirect variety.

  11. Tomographic cerebral blood flow measurement during carotid surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathenborg, Lisbet Knudsen; Vorstrup, Sidsel; Olsen, K S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to depict regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during carotid cross clamping using 99mTechnetium-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (TcHMPAO). This tracer rapidly passes the blood-brain barrier and is retained for hours in the brain tissue. Injecting TcHMPAO during......, Copenhagen, Denmark. MATERIAL: 15 patients who during a period of 4 months underwent carotid endarterectomy. CHIEF OUTCOME MEASURES: Prior to surgery rCBF was determined using 133Xe and SPECT. Intraoperatively stump pressure was measured and a bolus of TcHMPAO was injected for later SPECT measurement. MAIN...

  12. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European...... modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may...

  13. [An automatic system controlled by microcontroller for carotid sinus perfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, X L; Wang, M Y; Fan, Z Z; He, R R

    2001-08-01

    To establish a new method for controlling automatically the carotid perfusion pressure. A cheap practical automatic perfusion unit based on AT89C2051 micro controller was designed. The unit, LDB-M perfusion pump and the carotid sinus of an animal constituted an automatic perfusion system. This system was able to provide ramp and stepwise updown perfusion pattern and has been used in the research of baroreflex. It can insure the precision and reproducibility of perfusion pressure curve, and improve the technical level in corresponding medical field.

  14. Surgical treatment of internal carotid and posterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikus, H J; Heros, R C

    1998-10-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the subarachnoid segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are very common. Although some of the aneurysms arising from the subarachnoid ICA have earned the reputation of easy to treat surgically, aneurysms in this region may be complex and quite difficult to repair. Even a simple aneurysm associated with the posterior communicating artery may harbor surprises for the unwary or inexperienced surgeon. This article details the pertinent anatomy of the subarachnoid internal carotid artery and associated saccular aneurysms, provides a guide to their diagnosis and surgical treatment, and briefly reviews some of the published surgical results. Pitfalls and technique tips are highlighted.

  15. Reversible and Asymptomatic Gyral and Subarachnoid Contrast Enhancement after Carotid Stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangosa, Alessandra Briatico; Tortora, Domenico; Modestino, Francesco; Cotroneo, Antonio R

    2015-01-01

    The presence of sulcal hyperdensity in patients after endovascular procedures is not necessarily attributable to hemorrhage. It may frequently indicate the absolute or concomitant extravasation of contrast material into the subarachnoid spaces. This case report describes the clinical case of an 84-year-old patient with 90% stenosis of the right internal carotid who presented with a diffuse gyral and sulcal hyperdensity in the right temporal-occipital and frontal lobes at routine post-carotid stenting (CAS) brain CT scan. The patient was asymptomatic and CT findings were interpreted as contrast enhancement hyperattenuation and no therapeutic decisions were made. A 24-hour follow-up brain CT demonstrated the complete resolution of the hyperdensity, confirming the diagnosis. In this patient we considered the concomitant presence of gyral and sulcal hyperdensity as the consequence of reversible damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) determining a transitory extravasation of contrast material. Asymptomatic gyral and subarachnoid contrast enhancement following CAS is generally indicative of benign and transitory damage to the BBB and is not to be misinterpreted as hemorrhage. PMID:25923674

  16. Effect of white-matter lesions on the risk of periprocedural stroke after carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS): a prespecified analysis of data from a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Davagnanam, I.; Worp, H.B. van der; Venables, G.S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Featherstone, R.L.; Brown, M.M.; Jager, H.R.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Findings from randomised trials have shown a higher early risk of stroke after carotid artery stenting than after carotid endarterectomy. We assessed whether white-matter lesions affect the perioperative risk of stroke in patients treated with carotid artery stenting versus carotid

  17. Effect of white-matter lesions on the risk of periprocedural stroke after carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS): a prespecified analysis of data from a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Davagnanam, Indran; van der Worp, H. Bart; Venables, Graham S.; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Featherstone, Roland L.; Brown, Martin M.; Jäger, H. Rolf; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verhelst, R.; DeJaegher, L.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gimenez Gaibar, A.; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, N.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.; Rogers, P.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from randomised trials have shown a higher early risk of stroke after carotid artery stenting than after carotid endarterectomy. We assessed whether white-matter lesions affect the perioperative risk of stroke in patients treated with carotid artery stenting versus carotid endarterectomy.

  18. Carotid stiffness, extra-media thickness and visceral adiposity in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Sperry, Susan D; Jorgensen, Randall S; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Skilton, Michael R; Figueroa, Arturo; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2017-10-01

    Carotid extra-media thickness (EMT) encompasses arterial adventitia and perivascular adipose tissue (PAT). Adventitial remodeling and PAT may contribute independently to functional (stiffness) and structural (remodeling) changes in artery wall properties. Visceral adiposity may contribute to PAT, thereby affecting artery stiffness. We investigated the relationships between carotid artery stiffness, EMT, and visceral adiposity in young, healthy individuals. 135 healthy males (20 ± 2 yr, body mass index [BMI] 24.8 ± 3.3 kg/m(2)) underwent anthropometric and vascular measures on two separate days. Visceral adiposity was assessed using waist circumference and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD). Brachial and carotid systolic, diastolic, and pulsatile (PP) blood pressures were assessed using an oscillometric cuff and applanation tonometry, respectively. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and EMT were assessed using Doppler ultrasound. Carotid artery stiffness was calculated as β-stiffness and calibrated to carotid pressures. Separate stepwise multiple regression models demonstrated that carotid PP (β = 0.205) and EMT (β = 0.267) accounted for 12.6% of variance in β-stiffness, while carotid PP (β = 0.195) and SAD (β = 0.226) accounted for 10.5% of variance in EMT (p < 0.05). Mediation analyses revealed carotid PP partially mediated the relationship between a) EMT and β-stiffness, and b) SAD and EMT (p < 0.05). Carotid PP and EMT, but not IMT, are related to carotid β-stiffness. Carotid PP and visceral adiposity (SAD) are related to EMT. Carotid PP partially mediates the association between a) EMT and carotid β-stiffness, and b) SAD and EMT. Our findings suggest visceral adiposity may detrimentally affect subclinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk (carotid PP, EMT) and contribute to artery stiffness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Polyunsaturated fats, carbohydrates and carotid disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Jennifer L; Qiao, Ye; Guallar, Eliseo; Steffen, Lyn M; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Zhang, Yiyi; Wasserman, Bruce A

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrates and fat intake have both been linked to development of atherosclerosis. We examined associations between glycemic index (GI) and fat intake with carotid atherosclerosis. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort enrolled participants during the period 1987-1989 and the Carotid MRI sub-study occurred between 2004 and 2006 (1672 participants attending both visits). Measures of carbohydrate quality (usual GI), fat intake (total, polyunsaturated and saturated) and overall dietary quality index (DASH Diet Score) were derived from a 66-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Trained readers measured lipid core presence and maximum wall thickness. Using multivariate logistic regression, we determined the odds of lipid core presence by quintile (Q) of energy-adjusted dietary components. Restricted cubic spline models were used to examine non-linear associations between dietary components and maximum wall thickness. Mean daily polyunsaturated fat intake was 5 g (SD 1.4). GI and polyunsaturated fat intake had a nonlinear relationship with maximum wall thickness. Low (1-4 g) and high (6-12 g) polyunsaturated fat intake were associated with a statistically significant decreased odds of lipid core presence compared to intake in a majority of participants (OR Q5 vs. Q2-4: 0.64, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.98; OR Q1 vs. Q2-4: 0.64, 95% CI 0.42, 0.96), however, the association with lipid core was attenuated by adjustment for maximum wall thickness, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. GI and polyunsaturated fat intake were not associated with high-risk plaque features, such as lipid core presence, independent of traditional vascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The changes of individual carotid artery wall layer by aging and carotid intima-media thickness value for high risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jang-Ho; Kim, Wuon-Shik; Lee, Moo-Sik; Kim, Kee-Sik; Park, Jeong Bae; Youn, Ho-Joong; Park, Chang-Gyu; Hong, Kyung-Soon; Kim, Jang-Young; Jeong, Jin-Won; Park, Jong Chun; Lim, Do-Sun; Kim, Moo Hyun; Woo, Jeong Taek

    2016-12-01

    It is still unclear which layer (intima or media) is mainly involved in increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) by aging and also unclear regarding CIMT value suggesting high cardiovascular risk, although 75th percentile value of CIMT is known as a high risk in asymptomatic adults. We sought to find the changes of carotid intima thickness (CIT) and carotid media thickness (CMT) by aging and the 75th percentile value of CIMT in asymptomatic Korean adults. This is an observational cohort study. Carotid ultrasound findings (n=2204 from 12 hospitals) were prospectively collected. The carotid images were sent to Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science for analysis using specialized software which can measure intima and media wall also. Mean age was 58.1±13.5 years old (52% of men). Pearson's correlation coefficient between age and right CIMT (r=.489, Pvalue was 0.778 and 0.771 mm, respectively. Mean right CIT was 0.311±0.069 and 0.303±0.064 mm (P=.009), and mean right CMT was 0.391±0.124 and 0.388±0.131 mm (P=.694) in male and female, respectively. Left carotid ultrasound findings showed similar to the right one. An increased CIMT by aging was mainly due to increased CMT rather than CIT in asymptomatic adults. The 75th percentile values of right CIMT were 0.778 and 0.771 mm in asymptomatic Korean male and female adults, respectively. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Unusual looping of the internal carotid artery in relation to an enlarged lymph node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak SB

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations of internal carotid artery is important to surgeons doing head and neck surgery as well as to radiologists doing imaging and invasive techniques. In the current case, the right internal carotid artery showed a characteristic loop at its beginning. An abnormal, enlarged lymph node was found at the carotid bifurcation, which was projecting into the loop. The left internal carotid artery was normal. The unusual looping of internal carotid artery at its beginning might result in altered blood flow to the brain and may lead to confusions in surgical, imaging and invasive techniques.

  2. Carotid intima-media thickness in individuals with and without type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Almdal, Thomas P; Carstensen, Bendix

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of carotid intima-media thickness (carotid IMT) as a surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease is increasing and the method has now also been applied in several trials investigating patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Even though knowledge about methodology is of highest......-mode ultrasound and a computerized software programme (MIA vascular tools) for analysis of carotid IMT. Measurement of carotid IMT in the far wall of the common carotid artery (CCA) was done for 30 patients with T2D and 30 persons without T2D. The examinations were done by two different sonographers and two...

  3. Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion Associated with the Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Anand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old woman presented with a right-hemispheric stroke 1 year after she had suffered a left-hemispheric stroke. Her diagnostic workup was notable for bilateral occlusions of the internal carotid arteries at their origins and a positive lupus anticoagulant antibody test. There was no evidence of carotid dissection or another identifiable cause for her carotid occlusions. These findings suggest that the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome may be implicated in the pathological changes that resulted in occlusions of the extracranial internal carotid arteries. Young stroke patients who present with unexplained internal carotid artery occlusions may benefit from testing for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies.

  4. Case report: Thrombosed giant cavernous carotid artery aneurysm secondary to cervical internal carotid artery dissection: An unusual entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin S Baldawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous thrombosis of a giant intracranial aneurysm with parent artery occlusion is known. The exact mechanism is however unclear and various theories have been proposed. We present an unusual case of an angiographically documented cervical internal carotid artery (ICA dissection, which led to total occlusion of the ICA distal to the dissected site, with acute cessation of forward blood flow. This resulted in acute upstream thrombosis of the giant cavernous carotid artery aneurysm and an acute cavernous sinus syndrome-like presentation.

  5. Noninvasive thermographic visualization of the extent of carotid plaque distribution during carotid endarterectomy using an uncooled infrared camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naoki; Ishihara, Miya; Fujita, Masanori; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative thermographic confirmation of the extent of carotid plaque distribution using an uncooled infrared camera was assessed during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). This camera was small, light, and provided high temperature resolution (infrared camera during CEA. The uncooled infrared camera offers real-time information on vascular patency and extent of plaque. Spatial resolution and image quality are satisfactory, and the procedure can be repeated easily and safely. We have shown that the uncooled infrared camera could be a new and feasible technology for intraoperative imaging of the vascular flow, and isconsidered to be clinically useful during CEA.

  6. Geodesic atlas-based labeling of anatomical trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan

    2015-01-01

    . The algorithm is evaluated on 80 segmented airway trees from 40 subjects at two time points, labeled by 3 medical experts each, testing accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The accuracy of the algorithm is statistically similar......We present a fast and robust atlas-based algorithm for labeling airway trees, using geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for an unlabeled airway tree are evaluated using distances to a training set of labeled airway trees. In tree-space, airway tree...... topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural automatic handling of anatomical differences and noise. A hierarchical approach makes the algorithm efficient, assigning labels from the trachea and downwards. Only the airway centerline tree is used, which is relatively unaffected by pathology...

  7. Carotid stenting versus endarterectomy in the same patient: A "direct" comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Marco M; Scicchitano, Pietro; Cortese, Francesca; Gesualdo, Michele; Zito, Annapaola; Carbonara, Rosa; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Pulli, Raffaele; Salerno, Christian; Impedovo, Giovanni; Marinazzo, Davide; Angiletta, Domenico; Guido, Davide; Regina, Guido

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes and feasibility of carotid artery stenting versus carotid endarterectomy, both procedures performed in the same patient. Forty-five subjects (33 males, 70 ± 7 years) underwent carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting, the counter procedure on the contralateral carotid performed after a variable period. We evaluated the post-procedural percentage of carotid stenosis at 30, 180 days and one-year follow-up, and the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction, New York Heart Association class progression, stroke, death, cardiovascular death, angina, transient ischemic attack and renal failure. Carotid artery stenting treatment reduced the degree of re-stenosis after 180 days equally to carotid endarterectomy procedure (difference: 0.033%, P = 0.285). No statistically significant differences were observed according to the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction and New York Heart Association class progression, revealing odds ratio (OR) equal to 0.182 ( P = 0.361) for acute myocardial infarction and 0.303 ( P = 0.434) for New York Heart Association class progression. Carotid endarterectomy confirms its efficacy in carotid revascularization, but carotid artery stenting constitutes a good alternative when the procedures are selected based on patient-specific risk factors.

  8. Anatomical eponyms - unloved names in medical terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdan, F; Dworzański, W; Cendrowska-Pinkosz, M; Burdan, M; Dworzańska, A

    2016-01-01

    Uniform international terminology is a fundamental issue of medicine. Names of various organs or structures have developed since early human history. The first proper anatomical books were written by Hippocrates, Aristotle and Galen. For this reason the modern terms originated from Latin or Greek. In a modern time the terminology was improved in particular by Vasalius, Fabricius and Harvey. Presently each known structure has internationally approved term that is explained in anatomical or histological terminology. However, some elements received eponyms, terms that incorporate the surname of the people that usually describe them for the first time or studied them (e.g., circle of Willis, follicle of Graff, fossa of Sylvious, foramen of Monro, Adamkiewicz artery). Literature and historical hero also influenced medical vocabulary (e.g. Achilles tendon and Atlas). According to various scientists, all the eponyms bring colour to medicine, embed medical traditions and culture to our history but lack accuracy, lead of confusion, and hamper scientific discussion. The current article presents a wide list of the anatomical eponyms with their proper anatomical term or description according to international anatomical terminology. However, since different eponyms are used in various countries, the list could be expanded.

  9. Determining customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Measurement of physicians' and patients' satisfaction with laboratory services has become a standard practice in the United States, prompted by national accreditation requirements. Unlike other surveys of hospital-, outpatient care-, or physician-related activities, no ongoing, comprehensive customer satisfaction survey of anatomic pathology services is available for subscription that would allow continual benchmarking against peer laboratories. Pathologists, therefore, must often design their own local assessment tools to determine physician satisfaction in anatomic pathology. To describe satisfaction survey design that would elicit specific information from physician customers about key elements of anatomic pathology services. The author shares his experience in biannually assessing customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology with survey tools designed at the Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. Benchmarks for physician satisfaction, opportunities for improvement, and characteristics that correlated with a high level of physician satisfaction were identified nationally from a standardized survey tool used by 94 laboratories in the 2001 College of American Pathologists Q-Probes quality improvement program. In general, physicians are most satisfied with professional diagnostic services and least satisfied with pathology services related to poor communication. A well-designed and conducted customer satisfaction survey is an opportunity for pathologists to periodically educate physician customers about services offered, manage unrealistic expectations, and understand the evolving needs of the physician customer. Armed with current information from physician customers, the pathologist is better able to strategically plan for resources that facilitate performance improvements in anatomic pathology laboratory services that align with evolving clinical needs in health care delivery.

  10. Long-Term Outcomes of Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting for Carotid Artery Stenosis: Real-World Status in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imahori, Taichiro; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Fujita, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Mizowaki, Takashi; Miyake, Shigeru; Kimura, Hidehito; Kohta, Masaaki; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    We investigated long-term outcomes of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS) in our institute to evaluate the outcomes of real-world practice in Japan. Between August 2006 and July 2013, 203 consecutive carotid revascularizations with either CEA or CAS were performed in our institute. The initial treatment was regarded as the starting point in the cases of the patients who received treatment by bilateral carotid artery stenosis or retreatment. We assessed the long-term outcomes with survival analyses. A total of 182 patients (CEA 111, CAS 71), including 86 symptomatic patients, were included in the current study with a mean follow-up period of 42.9 months. The periprocedural stroke/death/myocardial infarction (MI) rate was 3.6% for CEA and 5.6% for CAS groups (P = .71). Estimates of the 4-year event-free rate from the primary end point (the composite of any stroke, death, or MI within 30 days, and any ipsilateral stroke thereafter) using competing risk analysis were 3.6% for CEA and 7.1% for CAS (P = .156). Kaplan-Meier estimates of the 4-year event-free rate from the secondary end point (the composite of any stroke, death, or MI within 30 days, and any stroke or death thereafter) were 13.8% for CEA and 19.1% for CAS (P = .072). Age was the only significant predictor for the primary end point. Both age and CAS were significant predictors for the secondary end point. The current study on real-world practices demonstrated perioperative and long-term outcomes that were comparable to previous major studies of large numbers of patients. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A curve model for association of serum homocysteine with carotid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sample and carotid ultrasonography. Piecewise linear regression ... diabetes). Face-to-face interview was used for the survey. Physical examination included height, weight and blood pressure. In blood pressure measurement, all participants rested for ... Patients were made to take a 10-min break to stabilize blood pressure ...

  12. An unusual case of common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common carotid artery (CCA) pseuoaneurysms are most commonly a result of traumatic injuries. CCA pseudoaneurysm due to migration of ingested foreign body is an unusual occurrence. Here we report a case of a 50-year-old female who presented with a pulsatile swelling in the right lower neck for 2 months.

  13. Increased YKL-40 expression in patients with carotid atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Axel Gottlieb; Rathcke, C.N.; Skjelland, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized a role for the inflammatory protein YKL-40 in atherogenesis and plaque destabilization based on its role in macrophage activation, tissue remodeling, and angiogenesis. Methods: Serum YKL-40 levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay in 89 patients with carotid atheroscl...

  14. Parkinson's disease and carotid intima-media thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa, D; Constantinescu, Aurora; Baltag, D; Ignat, B; Bolbocean, O; Popescu, C D

    2014-01-01

    Reports about the impact of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) on clinical status in Parkinson's disease (PD) are rather controversial. There have been a few studies and inconsistent results regarding the coincidence of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atherosclerotic diseases, such as cerebrovascular disease. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is a known marker for subclinical atherosclerosis. This study was done to investigate the carotid IMT between PD patients and controls. A total of 54 PD patients and 50 controls were examined. The duration of Parkinson's disease, the severity of Parkinson's disease (the Hoehn-Yahr stage) and carotid IMT were examined. The mean Hoehn and Yahr stage was 2.78 (range 2-4). Duration of disease had a mean of 7.59 +/- 0.85 years. The left CCA mean IMT was 0.900 +/- 0.147 in Parkinson group and 0.828 +/- 0.118 in control group (p = 0.007). The right CCA mean IMT was 0.891 +/- 0.176 mm in the Parkinson group and 0.860 +/- 0.164 in control group (p = 0.360). No relationship between the Hoehn and Yahr stages or the duration of PD with the IMT were found by the Pearson's correlation test. The carotid IMT was higher in PD patients than in controls.

  15. Endovascular treat- ment of post- traumatic carotid- cavernous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    Types B, C and D are all indirect. (or dural) fistulae. The angioarchitec- ture of these is analogous to dural arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs) occur- ... penetrating trauma, ruptured intra- cavernous carotid aneurysms, colla- gen deficiency syndromes (such as. Ehlers-Danlos IV syndrome), fibro- muscular dysplasia and arterial dis-.

  16. Endogenous androgens and carotid intimal-medial thickness in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, G P; Sgro', M; Moretti, A; Argenio, G F; Barlascini, C O; Cristofani, R; Salvetti, A

    1999-06-01

    The influence of endogenous androgens on atherosclerotic disease in women is unknown. In this study involving 101 pre- and post-menopausal females, we evaluated the relationship between serum androgen levels and both carotid artery intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and major cardiovascular risk factors. In addition to evaluation of blood pressure, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio, serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), androstenedione (A), total testosterone (TTS), free testosterone (FTS), insulin, cholesterol (total and high density lipoproteins), triglycerides, and glucose were measured. All women underwent carotid ultrasonography. Spearman correlation coefficients showed that serum DHEA-S and A levels were negatively related (P body mass index (P < 0.02). Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that A and FTS showed an inverse association with IMT measures (P < 0.05-0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that in women serum DHEA-S and androgens decline with age and that normal hormonal levels are not associated with major cardiovascular risk factors. They also show that higher DHEA-S and androgen concentrations are related to lower carotid wall thickness; for A this association is independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Our results suggest that, in the physiological range, DHEA-S and androgens in women are correlated with lower risk of carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  17. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population.

  18. Prognosis of Carotid Endarterectomy in High Risk Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Modaghegh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carotid Endarterectomy (CE can be mentioned as a valuable theraputic method for primary and secondary prevention of stroke, provided it can be performed in vascular surgery centers with a low surgical risk. Thus, the present study aimed to assess prognosis of CE in high risk patients of an Iranian vascular surgery center. Methods: This prospective observational study consisted of 50 high risk CE patients during 2011-14 in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. All the high risk CE were performed by a vascular surgeon and a surgical carotid shunt was placed in each CE. Neurologic evaluation was performed before CE and serial neurologic axamination was done after CE by a neurologist. Surgical complications including stroke, death and lower cranial nerve palsy were recorded for 30 days after operation. Results: The study results revealed that 80% of high risk CE patients had symptomatic carotid stenosis on the operation side and 80% had carotid stenosis contralateral to the operation side. Thirteen high risk CE were performed simultaneously with coronary artery by pass graft and 24 patients were demonstrated to have diabetes. Post surgical death and stroke in the high risk CE patients were reported 2% and 4%, respectively. Lower cranial nerve palsy appeared in 2% of patients. Conclusion: The 6% post operative stroke and death rate in the high risk CE patients are comparable to best vascular surgery centers in Europe and North America.

  19. Activation of calpain-1 in human carotid artery atherosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luis M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study, we observed that oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced death of endothelial cells was calpain-1-dependent. The purpose of the present paper was to study the possible activation of calpain in human carotid plaques, and to compare calpain activity in the plaques from symptomatic patients with those obtained from patients without symptoms. Methods Human atherosclerotic carotid plaques (n = 29, 12 associated with symptoms were removed by endarterectomy. Calpain activity and apoptosis were detected by performing immunohistochemical analysis and TUNEL assay on human carotid plaque sections. An antibody specific for calpain-proteolyzed α-fodrin was used on western blots. Results We found that calpain was activated in all the plaques and calpain activity colocalized with apoptotic cell death. Our observation of autoproteolytic cleavage of the 80 kDa subunit of calpain-1 provided further evidence for enzyme activity in the plaque samples. When calpain activity was quantified, we found that plaques from symptomatic patients displayed significantly lower calpain activity compared with asymptomatic plaques. Conclusion These novel results suggest that calpain-1 is commonly active in carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques, and that calpain activity is colocalized with cell death and inversely associated with symptoms.

  20. Endogenous hormones and carotid atherosclerosis in elderly men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. van den Beld (Annewieke); M.L. Bots (Michiel); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aging process is characterized by a number of gradual changes in circulating hormone concentrations as well as a gradual increase in the degree of atherosclerosis. The authors studied whether serum hormone levels are related to atherosclerosis of the carotid

  1. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration in Subclinical Carotid Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deleskog, Anna; Piksasova, Olga; Silveira, Angela; Gertow, Karl; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Sennblad, Bengt; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Larsson, Malin; Leander, Karin; Gigante, Bruna; Kauhanen, Jussi; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Mannarino, Elmo; Giral, Philippe; Gustafsson, Sven; Ostenson, Claes-Goran; Humphries, Steve E.; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Ohrvik, John; Hamsten, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in cardiovascular disease and is associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. We investigated the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration in relation to latitude, baseline carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), and IMT progression,

  2. Spontaneous Recanalization of Complete Internal Carotid Artery: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report | Jul-Dec 2010 | Vol-2 | Issue-2. 73. Spontaneous Recanalization of Complete ... up with periodic carotid ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance. Angiography (MRA) or CT angiography, ... identified high-risk predictive factors for delayed stroke in those treated medically (90 to 94% ...

  3. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ULTRASOUND AND STENOSIS OF INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Flis

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elucidation of the ultrasound structure of the atherosclerotic plaque in stenosis of internal carotid artery may have important implications for carotid surgery. This study compares the ability of computer derived 3D ultrasound gray scale volumetric measurements to diferentiate between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid plaque causing more than 70% stenosis.Methods. Eightysix internal carotid artery stenoses (70–99%, 45 symptomatic, 41 asymptomatic were imaged with 3D ultrasound to obtain the whole volume of the atherosclerotic plaque. Digitalized sonograms were computerized and normalized to the gray scale median (GSM of blood (0 and vessel adventitia (200. Plaque GSM was obtained for the whole volume by computing the volume ratio between echolucent and echogenic areas. The plaque heterogeneity was obtained by computing the density of echogenic areas per volume unit. Parametric t test was used for statistic analysis.Results. Minimum volume GSM ratio (determining echolucency was higher for asymptomatic plaque (0.6 – CI 0.48– 0.91 versus 0.3 – CI 0.21–0.75: p = 0.002. Greater GSM heterogeneity was present in symptomatic plaque (6.8 – CI 2.5– 18.3 versus 0.41 – CI 0.2–3.4;.p = 0.0001.Conclusions. Volume ultrasound imaging that enables objective assessment of whole ultrasonic plaque structure is more sensitive that single longitudinal view sonography for differentiating between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque.

  4. Serum Osteoprotegerin Is Associated With Calcified Carotid Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ami; Choi, Yun-Seok; Choi, Yong-Won; Chung, Woo-Baek; Park, Chul-Soo; Chung, Wook-Sung; Lee, Man-Young; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a kind of tumor necrosis factor, which is related to bone metabolism and vascular calcification. The increase of Osteoprotegerin concentration in serum is related to cardiovascular diseases in humans. The purpose of this study was to figure out the relevance between osteoprotegerin in serum and carotid calcification. Serum OPG concentrations were compared in 145 patients who underwent carotid sonography (average age: 68 ± 9 years old, male: female = 81:64). A calcified plaque (CP) (37 people [27%]), a noncalcified plaque (NCP) (54 people [37%]), and a nonplaque (NP) (54 people [37%]) were classified for this study. No significant differences among 3 groups were demonstrated in the distribution of age, diabetes, high blood pressure, and hyperlipidemia. Serum osteoprotegerin concentrations were significantly increased in CP group rather than NCP group or NP group; (median [interquartile range], 4016 [1410] vs 3210 [1802] pg/mL, P osteoprotegerin concentrations did not indicate a significant difference between NCP Group or NP Group. This study had proved that patient group accompanied with carotid calcification in carotid artery disease had an increased serum OPG concentration, so it could consider that OPG plays an important function on calcification related to arteriosclerosis. PMID:27082605

  5. Insulin sensitivity and carotid intima-media thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, Michaela; Natali, Andrea; Dekker, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Despite a wealth of experimental data in animal models, the independent association of insulin resistance with early carotid atherosclerosis in man has not been demonstrated. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We studied a European cohort of 525 men and 655 women (mean age, 44±8 years) free of conditions know...

  6. Level-Set Based Carotid Artery Segmentation for Stenosis Grading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bemmel, C.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Viergever, M.A.; Niessen, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    A semi-automated method is presented for the determination of the degree of stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MR angiograms. Hereto, we determined the central vessel axis (CA), which subsequently is used as an initialization for a level-set based segmentation

  7. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köklü, Erkan, E-mail: drerkankoklu@gmail.com; Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Clinic of Cardiology (Turkey); Koç, Pınar [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Clinic of Radiology (Turkey)

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  8. A curve model for association of serum homocysteine with carotid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between carotid artery hemodynamics and serum homocysteine. Methods: A total of 894 participants made up of 439 male (49.11 %) and 455 female (50.89 %) from. Ma'anshan, China, enrolled in the cross-sectional study. Data collection included demographics, blood sample and ...

  9. Conventional carotid cerebral angiography an 11 year review of 59 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To study the angiographic pattern of intracranial diseases encountered in Enugu following conventional carotid angiography (CCA) over an 11 year period. Method/Materials: The case notes, indications, request forms, films and radiological reports of all patients who had CCA were compiled and analysed. Results: Fifty ...

  10. Preliminary Report of Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Tapered Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Seung; Jeong; Kim, Young Suk; Byun, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Hwan [Dept. of Neurology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To analyze the results of carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent and to evaluate the effectiveness of the tapered stent compared to previously reported studies using non-tapered stents. From October 2008 to August 2010, elective carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent was attempted in 39 lesions from 36 consecutive patients. Post-procedural complications were evaluated by neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging. Restenosis or occlusion was evaluated by carotid Doppler ultrasound and computerized tomography with angiography. Newly developed neurologic symptoms were evaluated clinically. The self-expandable tapered stent was placed across the carotid artery stenosis. A total stroke was noted in 3 patients, while a major stroke was noted in 1 patient. On diffusion weighted imaging, new lesions were observed in 15 patients, but 13 patients were clinically silent. Follow-up imaging studies were performed in the 13 clinically silent lesions, and no evidence of restenosis or occlusion was found any of the 13 lesions. During clinical follow-up in 34 lesions from 31 patients, there were newly developed neurological symptoms in only 1 patient.

  11. Regional Topography of the Internal Carotid Artery | Kipyator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the extra cranial portion of the internal carotid artery and structures associated with it, which are vulnerable to iatrogenic injury during surgical approach to the neck region in 18 individuals. Distances from the origin of the artery to hypoglossal nerve and posterior belly of digastric muscle were measured.

  12. The carotid baroreflex is reset following prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, E. C.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, N. H.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of arterial pressure may explain the reduction in arterial pressure and left ventricular (LV) function after prolonged exercise. We examined the CBR control of heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), in addition to changes in LV functi...

  13. Association between internal carotid artery dissection and arterial tortuosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca; Piga, Mario [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Radiology, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Argiolas, Giovanni Maria; Siotto, Paolo [Azienda Ospedaliero Brotzu (A.O.B.), Department of Radiology, di Cagliari (Italy); Sumer, Suna; Wintermark, Max [Neuroradiology Division, Neuroradiology, UVA Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Raz, Eytan [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Rome (Italy); Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Vascular Surgery, di Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-10-18

    Carotid artery dissection is an important cause of ischemic stroke in all age groups, particularly in young patients. The purpose of this work was to assess whether there is an association between the presence of an internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and the arterial tortuosity. This study considered 124 patients (72 males and 52 females; median age 57 years) with CT/MR diagnosis of ICAD of the internal carotid artery were considered in this multi-centric retrospective study. The arterial tortuosity was evaluated and, when present, was categorized as elongation, kinking, or coiling. For each patient, both the right and left sides were considered for a total number of 248 arteries in order to have the same number of cases and controls. Fisher's exact test was applied to test the association between elongation, kinking, coiling, dissection, and the side affected by CAD. Fisher's exact test showed a statistically significant association between the ICAD and kinking (p = 0.0089) and coiling (p = 0.0251) whereas no statistically significant difference was found with arterial vessel elongation (p = 0.444). ICAD was more often seen on the left side compared to the right (p = 0.0001). These results were confirmed using both carotid arteries of the same patient as dependent parameter with p = 0.0012, 0.0129, and 0.3323 for kinking, coiling, and elongation, respectively. The presence of kinking and coiling is associated with ICAD. (orig.)

  14. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula presenting as massive epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Deidre; Smith, Samuel D; Dassinger, Melvin S

    2013-04-01

    Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae (CCF) are a rare complication with the potential for great morbidity including intracranial hemorrhage, blindness, cranial nerve palsy and stroke. Traumatic CCF are the most common type of CCF. Here we discuss a patient who sustained blunt head trauma and had substantial epistaxis, requiring massive transfusion, intraoperatively due to unrecognized CCF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of the court-type Thai traditional massage on anatomical relations, blood flow, and skin temperature of the neck, shoulder, and arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakornkul, Vasana; Vannabhum, Manmas; Viravud, Yadaridee; Roongruangchai, Jantima; Mutirangura, Pramook; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Laohapand, Tawee

    2016-09-15

    Court-type Thai traditional massage (CTTM) has specific major signal points (MaSP) for treating musculoskeletal conditions. The objectives of this study are to investigate the anatomical surfaces and structures of MaSPs, and to examine blood flow (BF) and skin temperature (ST) changes after applying pressure on the MaSPs on neck, shoulder, and arm areas. In the anatomical study, 83 cadavers were dissected and the anatomical surfaces and structures of the 15 MaSPs recorded. In human volunteers, BF, peak systolic velocity (PS), diameter of artery (DA), and ST changes were measured at baseline and after pressure application at 0, 30, 60, 180, and 300 s. There was no statistical difference in anatomical surfaces and structures of MaSP between the left and right side of the body. The 3 MaSPs on the neck were shown to be anatomically separated from the location of the common carotid arteries. The BF of MaSPs of the neck significantly and immediately increased after pressure application for 30 s and for 60 s in the arm (p massages were mainly directed towards muscles. MaSPs can cause significant, but brief, increases in BF and ST. Further studies are suggested to identify changes in BF and ST for all of the MaSPs after actual massage treatment sessions as well as other physiological effects of massage.

  16. Clinical significance of carotid and ocular bruits in cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Yoshikiyo; Yanagi, Tsutomu; Ito, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Takeshi (Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    We investigated the clinical significance of carotid and ocular bruits (CB and OB) in 250 consecutive patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). The incidence of bruits was compared with that in 100 age- and sex-matched neurological controls without CVD. In the CVD group, CB alone were found in 12 patients, both carotid and ocular bruits in 7, and OB alone in 2. CB were found only in 3 controls. We then evaluated CVD in the 25 patients (16 men and 9 women) who had bruits. The patients ranged from 55 to 81 years in age (mean: 70.6 years). The patients with CB alone constituted the largest group, and those with OB alone were the smallest group. CB were heard and abnormal blood flow was observed in 19/28 arteries of the 21 patients who underwent echo-flow studies. Carotid artery stenosis/occlusion was detected in 24/31 arteries (77%) in 23 patients who underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Thus, the sensitivity was 0.77 and specificity of a CB 0.91. In 9/10 patients with unilateral OB, ipsilateral or contralateral carotid artery stenosis/occlusion was detected. Diminished cerebral blood flow was observed in 10/15 patients with bruits who underwent SPECT. Of these 8 had reduced cerebral blood flow ipsilaterally to the bruit. Blood flow was reduced in the carotid artery territory in all of the patients, and watershed reductions were commonnest. Among the 25 patients, some showed neurological semiology of the vertebrobasilar territory in addition to that of the carotid territory. There were recurrences in 92% of the patients who had possible lesion in the territory of carotid artery. In 11 patients infarcts in the area of the cortical branch were shown using CT scans. Since bruits are more often audible in patients with CVD disease than in controls and since vascular stenosis and occlusion are detectable more frequently in these patients, bruits can serve as an important sign indicating CVD. (author).

  17. Resection of recurrent neck cancer with carotid artery replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Schneider, Fabrice; Minni, Antonio; Calio, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate overall survival rate, primary patency of vascular reconstructions, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) after en bloc resection of the carotid artery and tumor with in-line polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) carotid grafting, followed by radiotherapy. From 2000 to 2014, 31 consecutive patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery underwent en bloc resection and simultaneous carotid artery reconstruction with a PTFE graft, which was associated in 18 cases with a myocutaneous flap. The primary tumor was a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx in 17 patients and of the hypopharynx in 7, an undifferentiated carcinoma of unknown origin in 4, and an anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid in 3. All of the patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (50-70 Gy), and 10 of them also underwent chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cisplatin). None of the patients died or sustained a stroke during the first 30 days after the index procedure. Postoperative morbidity consisted of 6 transitory dysphagias, 3 vocal cord palsies, 2 wound dehiscences, 1 transitory mandibular claudication, and 1 partial myocutaneous flap necrosis. No graft infection occurred during follow-up. Fifteen patients (48%) died from metastatic cancer during a mean follow-up of 45.4 months (range, 8-175 months). None of the patients showed evidence of local recurrence, stroke, or thrombosis of the carotid reconstruction. The 5-year survival rate was 49 ± 10%. The overall number of QALYs was 3.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-4.37) with a significant difference between patients without metastasis at the time of redo surgery (n = 26; QALYs, 3.74) and those with metastasis (n = 5; QALYs, 0.56; P = .005). QALYs were also significantly improved in patients with cancer of the larynx (n = 17; QALYs, 4.69) compared to patients presenting with other types of

  18. Amaurosis fugax: risk factors and prevalence of significant carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvickström P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pia Kvickström,1 Bertil Lindblom,2,3 Göran Bergström,4,5 Madeleine Zetterberg2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Ophthalmology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, 4Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, 5Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe clinical characteristics and prevalence of carotid stenosis in patients with amaurosis fugax (AF.Method: Patients diagnosed with AF and subjected to carotid ultrasound in 2004–2010 in Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (n=302, were included, and data were retrospectively collected from medical records.Results: The prevalence of significant carotid stenosis was 18.9%, and 14.2% of the subjects were subjected to carotid endarterectomy. Significant associations with risk of having ≥70% stenosis were male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26–5.46, current smoking (aOR: 6.26; 95% CI: 2.62–14.93, diabetes (aOR: 3.68; 95% CI: 1.37–9.90 and previous vasculitis (aOR: 10.78; 95% CI: 1.36–85.5. A majority of the patients (81.4% was seen by an ophthalmologist prior to the first ultrasound. Only 1.7% of the patients exhibited retinal artery emboli at examination.Conclusion: The prevalence of carotid stenosis among patients with AF is higher than has previously been demonstrated in stroke patients. An association with previously reported vascular risk factors and with vasculitis is seen in this patient group. Ocular findings are scarce. Keywords: amaurosis fugax, carotid stenosis, carotid ultrasound, giant cell arteritis, transient ischemic attack, transient monocular visual loss

  19. Carotid Endarterectomy or Stenting in Octogenarians in a Monocentric Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, Cristiano; Taurino, Maurizio; Rizzo, Luigi; Stella, Nazzareno; Persiani, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has emerged as an alternative to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients at high risk for complications from surgery. The very elderly (≥80-year-old) are 1 subgroup of patients identified as being at increased risk for carotid surgery. However, there is concern that the very elderly are also at increased risk for complications of CAS. A stroke and death rate of 12% were reported in very elderly patients during the roll-in phase of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stent Trial. We are reporting on a clinical series of CAS and CEA with independent neurologic assessment in the very elderly. The aim of this article is to evaluate early and mild-term results obtained in the treatment of the carotid artery stenosis in symptomatic and asymptomatic octogenarians, comparing the data of CEA and CAS in academic hospital. Between 2002 and 2013, a consecutive series of 129 CAS and 45 CEA patients (≥80-year-old) were treated in our academic hospital, a center with extensive carotid revascularization experience. Independent neurologic assessment was performed before and after procedures. Exclusion criteria were cerebral hemorrhage diagnosed within 6 months, cerebral tumors and dementia. Hostile aortic arches were nevertheless treated with alternative approaches like cervical or radial access. All the procedures have been performed by the senior authors. The average age was 86.9 years. Most patients were male (56%), and the target lesion carotid stenosis was asymptomatic in 80% of patients. No significant differences were obtained regarding gender, symptoms, risk factors or comorbidities, and evident CT lesions among the 2 groups of different treatments. Embolic protection devices were used in all cases with the CAS procedure. The overall 30-day incidence of stroke and death was 2.3% (3 of 129) in CAS group and 4.4% (2 of 45) in CEA group. Exclusion of high-risk patients from CAS, based on age alone, seems to be unjustified

  20. [Anatomical characteristics and surgical selections of upper lumbar disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cheng-Min; Cui, Xi-Long; Yu, Hai-Yang; Jiang, Wei; Zhai, Yun-Lei

    2016-07-25

    To explore the anatomical characteristics and surgical selections of upper lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate its clinical effects. From January 2009 to January 2013, 26 patients with upper lumbar disc herniation were treated in our department. There were 16 males and 10 females, aged from 28 to 51 years old with an average of 45.7 years, 4 cases were in L₁,₂, 9 cases in L₂,₃, and 13 cases in L₃,₄. The data was collected including distance between outer edge of lower facet and the spinous process, the outer edge of the isthmus and spinous process, the lower edge of lamina and the upper edge of the intervertebral space, nerve root arising points and lower edge of the corresponding pedicle. Transforaminal discectomy and interbody fusion combined with pedicle screw fixation was performed in patients with L₁,₂, L₂,₃ herniated disk and 5 patients with L₃,₄ herniated disk complicated with lumbar instability. However another 8 patients with L₃,₄ herniated disk were treated with posterior fenestration decompression. Clinical effects were evaluated by Japanese Orthopaedic Association(JOA). The relative height rate(R) of the intervertebral space was measured preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. The fusion of the bone graft was also observed. Intraoperative anatomical measurement was taken in all patients. All patients were followed up for more than 1 year with an average of 16 months, and all incisions got healing, JOA was improved from preoperative(10.13±1.49) points to last follow up (25.21±2.13) points with the improvement rate of 79.9%. Among the patients underwent fusion operation, 17 cases obtained bone fusion and 1 case maybe non fusion and no internal fixation failure was found;the R value was (0.231±0.056) mm preoperatively, however (0.345±0.076) mm at 1 year after operation with statistical difference( P 0.05). No spinal instability and lumbar disc herniation recurrence were found in these patients. According to the

  1. Influence of endogenous androgens on carotid wall in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, G P; Moretti, A; Sgró, M; Argenio, G F; Barlascini, C O; Cristofani, R; Salvetti, A

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of a direct association between normal androgen levels and reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women. After menopause the influence of estrogens declines, whereas that of androgens increases. Therefore, we investigated the effects of androgens on atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women, by using carotid artery intimal-medial thickness as a marker of vascular damage. Blood pressure, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, total and free testosterone, estrone, insulin, lipid profile, and glucose were evaluated in 44 women in stable physiological menopause. All subjects underwent carotid ultrasound (Biosound 2000 II s.a. high-resolution unit). Spearman correlation coefficients indicated that serum androstenedione and free testosterone were negatively associated with several carotid intimal-medial thickness measures with correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.477 to 0.397 (p < 0.01-0.04). Moreover, age-adjusted androstenedione and free testosterone highest tertiles showed intimal-medial thickness values significantly (p < 0.03-0.05) lower than the other tertiles. There was a favorable association between hormones and the most important cardiovascular risk factors. This association, however, did not reach statistical significance. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the inverse relationships between the hormones (androstenedione and free testosterone) and several intimal-medial thickness measures were maintained (F: 4.15-6.07, p < 0.05-0.02) after adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors. Our data demonstrate that in postmenopausal women endogenous steroid precursors and androgens are inversely related to carotid intimal-medial thickness, an established marker of atherosclerosis. In addition, these hormones show favorable associations with cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, our study suggests that, after menopause, normal androgen levels may

  2. Cerebral hemodynamic changes and electroencephalography during carotid endarterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K.; Rehncrona, S.; Skeidsvoll, H.; Ryding, E. (University Hospital, Lund (Sweden))

    1990-05-01

    Some patients undergoing endarterectomy for occlusive carotid artery disease run a risk of brain ischemia during cross-clamping of the artery. The present study of 15 patients was undertaken to evaluate changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), as measured with an intravenous (IV) tracer (133Xenon) technique, and to relate CBF changes to changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG). CBF was measured before and after induction of anesthesia, during cross-clamping of the carotid artery, after release of the clamps, and at 24 hours after the operation. All the patients were anesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl, and nitrous oxide and oxygen. EEG was continuously recorded during the operation. Carotid artery shunts were not used. In 8 patients, cross-clamping of the carotid artery did not influence the EEG. In this group of patients, induction of anesthesia caused a 38% decrease in CBF, which presumably reflects the normal reaction to the anesthetic agent given. There were no further changes in CBF during cross-clamping. In 7 patients, the EEG showed signs of deterioration during the intraoperative vascular occlusion. In these patients, anesthesia did not cause any CBF change, whereas cross-clamping the artery induced a 33% decrease in CBF. In individual patients, the severity of EEG changes correlated with the decrease in CBF. The absence of a change in CBF by anesthesia and a decrease due to cross-clamping of the carotid artery may be explained by the presence of a more advanced cerebrovascular disease and an insufficiency to maintain CBF during cross-clamping.

  3. Dose optimization of contrast-enhanced carotid MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterweger, M.; Froehlich, J.M.; Kubik-Huch, R.A.; Seifert, B.; Birrer, M.; Huber, T.; Otto, R. [Institute of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Baden, Baden (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the diagnostic performance of a single-contrast or a double-contrast dose of carotid contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). One-hundred nineteen patients (mean age 65{+-}14.4 years) underwent carotid contrast-enhanced MRA with a standardized protocol (repetition time/echo 3.73 ms/1.38 ms, flip-angle 25 , acquisition-time 19 s, voxel size 1.2 x 1.2 x 0.9 mm{sup 3}) on a 1.5-T scanner (Sonata, Siemens-Medical-Systems) using a neck phased-array coil. Contrast agent was administered intravenously at a rate of 3.0 ml/s, either as a single dose (n=57; 0.1 mmol/kg body weight) or as a double dose (n=62; 0.2 mmol/kg body weight) of meglumine gadoterate (0.5 M/l), followed by 30 ml saline. Qualitative image analysis was performed on maximum intensity projections using a five-point scale. Signal intensities were measured at three different vascular levels on both sides to assess the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Image quality was rated as good or excellent in all cases. A double dose did not influence the efficacy of carotid enhancement (CNR single dose 69.12{+-}19.8; CNR double dose 70.01{+-}20.7; p=0.81) compared with a single dose. In both dose groups the mean CNRs were inversely related to bodyweight, despite adjusted contrast volumes (p=0.0005). Double-dose contrast-enhanced carotid MRA is not superior to single-dose MRA, as overall diagnostic performance and quantitative contrast enhancement are equal. Being more cost-efficient, a single-dose administration of contrast agent is recommended for MRA of the carotid arteries. (orig.)

  4. Lacrimal Gland Pathologies from an Anatomical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Sinan Abit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the patients in our daily practice have one or more ocular surface disorders including conjucntivitis, keratitis, dry eye disease, meibomian gland dysfunction, contact lens related symptoms, refractive errors,computer vision syndrome. Lacrimal gland has an important role in all above mentioned pathologies due to its major secretory product. An anatomical and physiological knowledge about lacrimal gland is a must in understanding basic and common ophthalmological cases. İn this paper it is aimed to explain the lacrimal gland diseases from an anatomical perspective.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery images after carotid artery stenting with neuroprotective balloon occlusions: hemodynamic instability and blood-brain barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, Ryo; Nakahara, Toshinori; Hamasaki, Osamu; Araki, Hayato; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-10-01

    A rare complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS), prolonged reversible neurological symptoms with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We prospectively identified patients who showed CSF space enhancement on FLAIR images. Nineteen patients-5 acute-phase and 14 scheduled-underwent 21 CAS procedures. Balloon catheters were navigated across stenoses, angioplasty was performed using a neuroprotective balloon, and stents were placed with after dilation under distal balloon protection. CSF space hyperintensity or obscuration on FLAIR after versus before CAS indicated CSF space enhancement. Correlations with clinical factors were examined. CSF space was enhanced on FLAIR in 12 (57.1%) cases. Postprocedural CSF space enhancement was significantly related to age, stenosis rate, acute-stage procedure, and total occlusion time. All acute-stage CAS patients showed delayed enhancement. Only age was associated with delayed CSF space enhancement in scheduled CAS patients. Ischemic intolerance for severe carotid artery stenosis and temporary neuroprotective balloon occlusion, causing reperfusion injury, seem to be the main factors that underlie BBB disruption with delayed CSF space enhancement shortly after CAS, rather than sudden poststenting hemodynamic change. Our results suggest that factors related to hemodynamic instability or ischemic intolerance seem to be associated with post-CAS BBB vulnerability. Patients at risk for hemodynamic instability or with ischemic intolerance, which decrease BBB integrity, require careful management to prevent intracranial hemorrhagic and other post-CAS complications.

  6. Indexing Anatomical Phrases in Neuro-Radiology Reports to the UMLS 2005AA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, Vijayaraghavan; Taira, Ricky K.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a methodology to index anatomical phrases to the 2005AA release of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). A phrase chunking tool based on Natural Language Processing (NLP) was developed to identify semantically coherent phrases within medical reports. Using this phrase chunker, a set of 2,551 unique anatomical phrases was extracted from brain radiology reports. These phrases were mapped to the 2005AA release of the UMLS using a vector space model. Precision for the task of indexing unique phrases was 0.87. PMID:16778995

  7. Research Progress on the Risk Factors and Outcomes of Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiang-Dong; Xiong, Wei-Dong; Xiong, Shang-Shen; Chen, Gui-Hai

    2017-03-20

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that results in complex lesions or plaques that protrude into the arterial lumen. Carotid atherosclerotic plaque rupture, with distal atheromatous debris embolization, causes cerebrovascular events. This review aimed to explore research progress on the risk factors and outcomes of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention. We searched the PubMed database for recently published research articles up to June 2016, with the key words of "risk factors", "outcomes", "blood components", "molecular mechanisms", "cellular mechanisms", and "human carotid atherosclerotic plaques". The articles, regarding the latest developments related to the risk factors and outcomes, atherosclerotic plaque composition, blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention, were selected. This review described the latest researches regarding the interactive effects of both traditional and novel risk factors for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, novel insights into human carotid atherosclerotic plaque composition and blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Carotid plaque biology and serologic biomarkers of vulnerability can be used to predict the risk of cerebrovascular events. Furthermore, plaque composition, rather than lesion burden, seems to most predict rupture and subsequent thrombosis.

  8. Carotid versus coronary atherosclerosis burdens in acute compared with chronic symptomatic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Stéphanie; Bibeau, Karine; Bertrand, Olivier F; Lévesque, Valérie; Deschênes St-Pierre, Béatrice; Pibarot, Philippe; Després, Jean-Pierre; Larose, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Prediction of coronary events remains elusive. Carotid atherosclerosis may be a surrogate for coronary risk, as carotid and coronary diseases occur simultaneously - albeit at times with a weak association - depending on clinical presentation. We investigated carotid and coronary atherosclerosis in men with new-onset unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) vs. long-standing severe chronic stable angina (CSA). Bilateral carotid artery and 3-vessel coronary artery atherosclerosis burdens were measured within 1 month, respectively, by 3D-volumetric carotid magnetic resonance imaging and coronary angiography-derived modified CASS-50 score. Men with STEMI (n = 50) and long-standing CSA (n = 50), matched for age, were enrolled (58.6 ± 8.8 years). All of them had carotid atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis burden was greater in the carotid arteries of STEMI vs. CSA (wall volume: 196.2 ± 44.4 vs. 169.2 ± 38.0 mm3/4 mm, p = 0.002), but greater in the coronary arteries of CSA vs. STEMI (modified CASS-50 score: 3 vs. 1, p < 0.0001). Normalized wall index (NWI) of internal carotid was associated with modified CASS-50 score in STEMI (ρ = 0.40, p = 0.022) and in CSA (ρ = -0.39, p = 0.031). Carotid atherosclerosis was observed in all CAD patients, and atherosclerosis burden in carotid and in coronary arteries varied according to clinical presentation.

  9. Prevalence of carotid and pulp calcifications: a correlation using digital panoramic radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Stephen J. [School of Dentistry, University of Louisville, Department of Periodontics, Endodontics and Dental Hygiene, Louisville, KY (United States); Scheetz, James P.; Khan, Zafrulla [University of Louisville, Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Prosthodontics and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Louisville, KY (United States); Farman, Allan G. [School of Dentistry, University of Louisville, Department of Periodontics, Endodontics and Dental Hygiene, Louisville, KY (United States); Horsley, Scott H.; Beckstrom, Brice

    2009-03-15

    To compare the prevalence of pulp calcification with that of carotid calcification using digital panoramic dental radiographs. Digital panoramic radiographs of patients at a dental oncology clinic were included if (1) the carotid artery bifurcation region was visible bilaterally and (2) the patient had non-restored or minimally restored molars and/or canines. An endodontist evaluated the images for pulpal calcifications in the selected teeth. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist independently evaluated the same images for calcifications in the carotid bifurcation region. Odds-ratio and Pearson {chi}{sup 2} were used for data analysis. Presence of pulpal calcification was also evaluated as a screening test for the presence of carotid calcification. A total of 247 panoramic radiographs were evaluated. 32% (n=80) had pulpal calcifications and 25% (n=61) had carotid calcifications with 12% (n=29) having both carotid and pulp calcifications. A significantly higher prevalence of both pulp and carotid calcification was found in subjects older than age 60 years compared to younger age groups. Accuracy of pulpal calcification in screening for carotid calcification was 66.4%. Both pulp and carotid calcifications were more prevalent in older individuals. The presence of pulp calcification was not a strong predictor for the presence of carotid calcification. (orig.)

  10. A CT study of the prevalence of carotid artery calcification in dental patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Woong [Chonnam National Univ. Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death in Korea. Atherosclerotic disease in the carotid artery bifurcation is the most common cause of stroke. The carotid artery calcification is easily appreciated by CT(Computed tomography). CT is often taken in a dental hospital for the diagnosis of inflammation. injury, cyst or tumor on maxillofacial region. However, there was no report of carotid artery calcification on CT in dental patients. The presence of carotid artery calcification was evaluated by an experienced radiologist on CT scans of 287 patients (166 males, 121 females, average age 42, range 6 to 86 years) and the medical history of the patient and the interpretation of CT were reviewed. Carotid artery calcification was detected on CT scans of 57 patients (19.8%; 35 males, 22 females). All the male patients with carotid artery calcification were older than 50, and all the female patients with carotid artery calcification were older than 60. Among the 57 patients, 10 had Diabetes mellitus, 20 had cardiovascular disease, 3 had history of stroke and 3 underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Carotid artery calcification was not included in the interpretation of CT of dental patients except one patient. The prevalence of carotid artery calcification on CT of dental patients was about 20% in this study. Carotid artery calcification should be included in the interpretation of CT of dental patients.

  11. Comparative foliar anatomical and morphological studies of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of anatomical similarities in the adaxial surfaces of their leaflets were sinuous, anticlinal walls, absence of stomata and trichome, epidermal cells are irregular in shape and variable in sizes. On their abaxial surfaces, epidermal cells are irregular in shapes and variable in sizes, stomata present, predominantly ...

  12. Anatomical Pathways for Auditory Memory in Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Munoz-Lopez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory or the ability to store context-rich information about everyday events depends on the hippocampal formation (entorhinal cortex, subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, hippocampus proper, and dentate gyrus. A substantial amount of behavioral-lesion and anatomical studies have contributed to our understanding of the organization of how visual stimuli are retained in episodic memory. However, whether auditory memory is organized similarly is still unclear. One hypothesis is that, like the ‘visual ventral stream’ for which the connections of the inferior temporal gyrus with the perirhinal cortex are necessary for visual recognition in monkeys, direct connections between the auditory association areas of the superior temporal gyrus and the hippocampal formation and with the parahippocampal region (temporal pole, perhirinal, and posterior parahippocampal cortices might also underlie recognition memory for sounds. Alternatively, the anatomical organization of memory could be different in audition. This alternative ‘indirect stream’ hypothesis posits that, unlike the visual association cortex, the majority of auditory association cortex makes one or more synapses in intermediate, polymodal areas, where they may integrate information from other sensory modalities, before reaching the medial temporal memory system. This review considers anatomical studies that can support either one or both hypotheses – focusing on anatomical studies on the primate brain that have reported not only direct auditory association connections with medial temporal areas, but, importantly, also possible indirect pathways for auditory information to reach the medial temporal lobe memory system.

  13. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  14. Anatomical and palynological characteristics of Salvia willeana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... In the anatomical characteristics of stem structures, it was found that the chlorenchyma composed of 6 or 7 rows of cells which was .... consisting of lots of chloroplasts. In the areas located between the corners, there ..... Pollen morphology and plant taxonomy IV. Labiatae, Verbenaceae and Avicenniaceae.

  15. Morphological and anatomical response of Acacia ehrenbergiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both species responded morphologically as well as anatomically to water stress. Water stress caused significant (P=0.05) decrease in relative water content, leaf number and area and leaf water potential, chlorophyll content, and stem height and diameter. Seedlings of both species responded to water stress by the ...

  16. Evolution of the Anatomical Theatre in Padova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in…

  17. Descriptions of anatomical differences between skulls and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The external anatomical differences between the skulls and mandibles of 10 mountain zebras Equus zebra and 10 plains zebras E. burchelli of both sexes were studied. The nomenclature used conforms to Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (1983). Eleven structural differences are described for the first time and illustrated, viz., ...

  18. The Onodi Cell: An Anatomic Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Vigo, Vera; Benet, Arnau

    2017-07-01

    This anatomic image demonstrates the sphenoethmoidal (Onodi) cell (a variant of the paranasal sinuses), the identification of which is critical to prevent neurovascular injury during endoscopic approaches to the sella and adjacent regions of the skull base. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Handbook of anatomical models for radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-01-01

    Covering the history of human model development, this title presents the major anatomical and physical models that have been developed for human body radiation protection, diagnostic imaging, and nuclear medicine therapy. It explores how these models have evolved and the role that modern technologies have played in this development.

  20. Gross anatomical and histomorphological observations on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In birds, the ability to void urine separate from faeces is unique to ostriches. To further explore this characteristic, the anatomy of the terminal rectum and cloaca of the Ostrich Struthio camelus was studied in four ostriches by gross anatomical dissection and light microscopy. The terminal rectum had an unusual tunica ...

  1. TIBIAL LANDMARKS IN ACL ANATOMIC REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Demesсhenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify anatomical landmarks on tibial articular surface to serve as reference in preparing tibial canal with respect to the center of ACL footprint during single bundle arthroscopic repair.Materials and methods. Twelve frozen knee joint specimens and 68 unpaired macerated human tibia were studied using anatomical, morphometric, statistical methods as well as graphic simulation.Results. Center of the tibial ACL footprint was located 13,1±1,7 mm anteriorly from posterior border of intercondylar eminence, at 1/3 of the distance along the line connecting apexes of internal and external tubercles and 6,1±0,5 mm anteriorly along the perpendicular raised to this point.Conclusion. Internal and external tubercles, as well as posterior border of intercondylar eminence can be considered as anatomical references to determine the center of the tibial ACL footprint and to prepare bone canals for anatomic ligament repair.

  2. Report of a rare anatomic variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brucker, Y; Ilsen, B; Muylaert, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the CT findings in a case of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) from the left upper lobe in an adult. PAPVR is an anatomic variant in which one to three pulmonary veins drain into the right atrium or its tributaries, rather than into the left atrium. This results in a lef...

  3. Lateral Patellofemoral Ligament: An Anatomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kalpit N; DeFroda, Steven F; Ware, James Kristopher; Koruprolu, Sarath C; Owens, Brett D

    2017-12-01

    Medial instability of the patellofemoral joint is a rare but known phenomenon that may result from an incompetent lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL). Surgical reconstruction of the LPFL has been described. However, anatomic details of the ligament have not been the subject of scrutiny. To describe the anatomic origin and insertion of the LPFL. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen, unpaired human cadaveric knees (mean age, 57 years) were dissected to identify the LPFL. The dissection was carried out by elevating the iliotibial band to expose the deep capsular layer of the knee joint, followed by a medial parapatellar approach to the knee. Then the quadriceps and patellar tendons were sectioned, and the LPFL was isolated by visualization and palpation. The LPFL was dissected to reveal its origin and insertion; these were measured with respect to the lateral epicondyle and the superior-inferior axis of the lateral patella, respectively. On average, the LPFL had a variable point of origin in location as well as width about the lateral epicondyle. The LPFL originated, on average, 2.6 mm distal (range, 13.1 mm proximal to 11.4 mm distal) and 10.8 mm anterior (range, 7.3 mm posterior to 14.9 mm anterior) to the lateral epicondyle. The LPFL insertion on the patella was more reliably found to be about 45% (range, 23.7%-58.4%) of its lateral articular surface. The insertion on the patella was found to be in the middle third of the lateral patella. The LPFL has an origin that is variable but, on average, was found to be distal and anterior to the lateral epicondyle. The patella insertion was more reliably found to be in the middle third of the lateral patella. These anatomic relationships can help the surgeon reconstruct the LPFL in a more anatomic fashion. Surgeons who are tasked with reconstruction of the LPFL of a patient with idiopathic medial instability or a previous aggressive lateral release of the knee may reference this article to perform an anatomic

  4. ANATOMIC STRUCTURE OF CAMPANULA ROTUNDIFOLIA L. GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Bubenchikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article present results of the study for a anatomic structure of Campanula rotundifolia grass from Campanulaceae family. Despite its dispersion and application in folk medicine, there are no data about its anatomic structure, therefore to estimate the indices of authenticity and quality of raw materials it is necessary to develop microdiagnostical features in the first place, which could help introducing of thisplant in a medical practice. The purpose of this work is to study anatomical structureof Campanula rotundifolia grass to determine its diagnostic features. Methods. Thestudy for anatomic structure was carried out in accordance with the requirements of State Pharmacopoeia, edition XIII. Micromed laboratory microscope with digital adjutage was used to create microphotoes, Photoshop CC was used for their processing. Result. We have established that stalk epidermis is prosenchymal, slightly winding with straight of splayed end cells. After study for the epidermis cells we established that upper epidermis cells had straight walls and are slightly winding. The cells of lower epidermishave more winding walls with prolong wrinkled cuticule. Presence of simple one-cell, thin wall, rough papillose hair on leaf and stalk epidermis. Cells of epidermis in fauces of corolla are prosenchymal, with winding walls, straight or winding walls in a cup. Papillary excrescences can be found along the cup edges. Stomatal apparatus is anomocytic. Conclusion. As the result of the study we have carried out the research for Campanula rotundifolia grass anatomic structure, and determined microdiagnostic features for determination of raw materials authenticity, which included presence of simple, one-cell, thin-walled, rough papillose hair on both epidermises of a leaf, along the veins, leaf edge, and stalk epidermis, as well as the presence of epidermis cells with papillary excrescences along the edges of leaves and cups. Intercellular canals are situatedalong the

  5. Anatomical brain connectivity can assess cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzali, M; Spanò, B; Parker, G J M; Giulietti, G; Castelli, M; Basile, B; Rossi, S; Serra, L; Magnani, G; Nocentini, U; Caltagirone, C; Centonze, D; Cercignani, M

    2013-08-01

    Brain disconnection plays a major role in determining cognitive disabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS). We recently developed a novel diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) tractography approach, namely anatomical connectivitity mapping (ACM), that quantifies structural brain connectivity. Use of ACM to assess structural connectivity modifications in MS brains and ascertain their relationship with the patients' Paced-Auditory-Serial-Addition-Test (PASAT) scores. Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients (n = 25) and controls (n = 25) underwent MRI at 3T, including conventional images, T1-weighted volumes and DW-MRI. Volumetric scans were coregistered to fractional anisotropy (FA) images, to obtain parenchymal FA maps for both white and grey matter. We initiated probabilistic tractography from all parenchymal voxels, obtaining ACM maps by counting the number of streamlines passing through each voxel, then normalizing by the total number of streamlines initiated. The ACM maps were transformed into standard space, for statistical use. RRMS patients had reduced grey matter volume and FA, consistent with previous literature. Also, we showed reduced ACM in the thalamus and in the head of the caudate nucleus, bilaterally. In our RRMS patients, ACM was associated with PASAT scores in the corpus callosum, right hippocampus and cerebellum. ACM opens a new perspective, clarifying the contribution of anatomical brain disconnection to clinical disabilities in MS.

  6. Comprehensive and rapid assessment of carotid plaques in acute stroke using a new single sweep method for three-dimensional carotid ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashyan, Harapet; Saqqur, Maher; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Romanchuk, Helen; Nanda, Navin C; Becher, Harald

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 68-year-old man with acute stroke in whom the newly developed single sweep method for three-dimensional (3D) carotid ultrasound provided a rapid and comprehensive assessment of atherosclerotic plaque burden in the internal carotid artery. The two-dimensional duplex carotid scan diagnosed 50-69% stenosis, and with the three-dimensional method, the markedly hypoechogenic plaque (total volume 1.42 mL) was shown to occupy 77% of the total arterial volume (1.84 mL), consistent with severe lesion. The ultrasound findings were confirmed by computed tomographic angiography and subsequent carotid endarterectomy. The new single sweep 3D carotid ultrasound has the potential to become a valuable clinical tool in the assessment of stroke patients. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Elasticity of the carotid artery walls as a prognostic factor for the occurrence of restenosis after a surgery for internal carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Andrzej; Madycki, Grzegorz; Hendiger, Włodzimierz; Staszkiewicz, Walerian; Lewszuk, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of carotid artery patency is one of the most frequently performed operations in vascular surgery. One of the most important problems that occur both short- and long-term after carotid endarterectomy is recurrent stenosis. Despite advances in imaging studies and better knowledge of the mechanisms of atherogenesis, the mechanism of restenosis remains unclear. Patients with internal carotid artery atherosclerosis experience decreased elasticity of the intima-media complex, resulting in increased vessel wall stiffness. In the future, measurement of carotid artery elasticity may become a marker for the development of post-surgical stenosis occurring after endarterectomy of both the carotid artery and other peripheral vessels. To assess the elasticity of carotid artery walls as a prognostic factor for the occurrence of restenosis after a surgery for common carotid artery stenosis. Classic carotid artery endarterectomy was performed in 180 patients selected on the basis of standard, ultrasound- based recommendations. The phenomenon of restenosis was examined using ultrasound techniques at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the surgery. Measurements of carotid artery elasticity were performed using a Vascular Echo Doppler device, and patients were divided into two groups depending on the occurrence (or non-occurrence) of restenosis. Group I (without restenosis) included 156 (86.6%) patients, and Group II (with restenosis) included 24 (13.4%) patients. At 3 and 6 months after the surgery, an increase of the elasticity of vessel walls (coefficient a) was observed in both groups, but the differences in the elasticity of the carotid arteries were not significant. At 12 months after the surgery, all patients in Group II (with restenosis) had significantly increased coefficient a values as compared to Group I patients (p elasticity as measured using coefficient a may be associated with the process leading to the occurrence of restenosis after the surgery. Further research

  8. The Impact of Carotid Artery Stenting on Cerebral Perfusion, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeAsymptomatic carotid artery stenosis can lead to not only stroke but also cognition impairment. Although it has been proven that carotid artery stenting (CAS can reduce the risk of future strokes, the effect of CAS on cognition is conflicting. In recent years, pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL MRI and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI have been employed in cognitive impairment studies. For the present study, cognition is evaluated in severe asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients undergoing CAS, and the mechanisms underlying the cognitive change are explored by pASL MRI and R-fMRI.Materials and methodsWe prospectively enrolled 24 asymptomatic, severe (≥70%, unilateral internal carotid artery stenosis patients, who were expecting the intervention of CAS. Cognition assessment (including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Minimum Mental State Examination, the Digit Symbol Test, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Verbal Memory Test and an integrated MRI program (pASL MRI, and R-fMRI were administered 7 days before and 3 months after CAS.Results16 subjects completed the follow-up study. After stenting, significant improvement in the scores of the MMSE, the Verbal Memory test, and the delayed recall was found. No significant difference was found in the scores of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Digit Symbol Test, and the immediate recall. After CAS treatment, asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients showed increased perfusion in the left frontal gyrus, increased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF in the right precentral gyrus, and increased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC in the right supra frontal gyrus. However, no significant correlations were found between these imaging changes and cognition assessments.ConclusionSuccessful CAS can partly improve cognition in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients. The cognition

  9. Relative latency of responses of chemoreceptor afferents from aortic and carotid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, S; Nishino, T; Mulligan, E; Mokashi, A

    1980-02-01

    Discharges from aortic and carotid body chemoreceptor afferents were simultaneously recorded in 18 anesthetized cats to test the hypothesis that aortic chemoreceptors, because of their proximity to the heart, respond to changes in arterial blood gases before carotid chemoreceptors. We found that carotid chemoreceptor responses to the onset of hypoxia and hypercapnia, and to the intravenously administered excitatory drugs (cyanide, nicotine, and doxapram), preceded those of aortic chemoreceptors. Postulating that this unexpected result was due to differences in microcirculation and mass transport, we also investigated their relative speed of responses to changes in arterial blood pressure. The aortic chemoreceptors responded to decreases in arterial blood pressure before the carotid chemoreceptors, supporting the idea that the aortic body has microcirculatory impediments not generally present in the carotid body. These findings strengthened the concept that carotid bodies are more suited for monitoring blood gas changes due to respiration, whereas aortic bodies are for monitoring circulation.

  10. Periodontal disease and carotid atherosclerosis: A meta-analysis of 17,330 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Tao; Leng, Wei-Dong; Lam, Yat-Yin; Yan, Bryan P; Wei, Xue-Mei; Weng, Hong; Kwong, Joey S W

    2016-01-15

    The association between periodontal disease and carotid atherosclerosis has been evaluated primarily in single-center studies, and whether periodontal disease is an independent risk factor of carotid atherosclerosis remains uncertain. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and carotid atherosclerosis. We searched PubMed and Embase for relevant observational studies up to February 20, 2015. Two authors independently extracted data from included studies, and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall and subgroup meta-analyses. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by the chi-squared test (Pperiodontal disease was associated with carotid atherosclerosis (OR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.14-1.41; Pperiodontal disease was associated with carotid atherosclerosis; however, further large-scale, well-conducted clinical studies are needed to explore the precise risk of developing carotid atherosclerosis in patients with periodontal disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Computed tomography scan based prediction of the vulnerable carotid plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diab, Hadi Mahmoud Haider; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2017-01-01

    -contrast enhanced computed tomography (NCCT). METHODS: From January 2014 to October 2016 53 patients were included retrospectively, using a cross-sectional design. All patients underwent both CTA and CEA. Sixteen patients had their CEA specimen NCCT scanned. The semi-automated CTA software analyzed carotid stenosis......BACKGROUND: Primary to validate a commercial semi-automated computed tomography angiography (CTA) -software for vulnerable plaque detection compared to histology of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens and secondary validating calcifications scores by in vivo CTA with ex vivo non...... specimen. RESULTS: The semi-automated CTA software had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 89.1% (95% CI, 73.6% - 96.4%), 31.3% (95% CI, 12.1% - 58.5%), 75% (95% CI, 59.3% - 86.2%) and 55.6% (95% CI, 22.6% - 84.6%). Strong correlation between...

  12. 18FDG PET and ultrasound echolucency in carotid artery plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, Martin; Pedersen, Sune F; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to evaluate inflammation in echolucent carotid artery plaques. BACKGROUND: Ultrasound echolucency of carotid artery plaques has been proven to differentiate patients at high risk of stroke. On the other hand, positron emission tomography (PET) of plaques with the use...... for ultrasound and PET imaging. Plaque standardized gray scale medians (GSM) were measured in longitudinal ultrasound images to quantitate echolucency, and GSM values were compared with FDG PET uptake quantified by maximum standardized uptake values (SUV). Symptomatic plaques were compared with contralateral...... plaques ranged from high to low inflammatory activity, as depicted with PET. Quantitative FDG SUV differentiated asymptomatic from symptomatic plaques, whereas GSM values did not. There was a positive correlation between CD68 expression and FDG uptake (r = 0.50, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Our results...

  13. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients.

  14. Spontaneous Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirakov Stanimir S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of an 83-year-old woman with left-sided ophthalmoplegia. She had no family history of connective tissue disease. The computed tomography study found a dilated left cavernous sinus. The conventional cerebral panangiography confirmed the diagnosis - a direct carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF, with no evidence of ruptured aneurysm. The woman underwent endovascular treatment with coiling of the cavernous sinus in combination with application of the Onyx embolic agent in the fistula. During the first 48 hours after the embolization the local pain, exophthalmos and conjunctival injection of the left eye were significantly ameliorated. The pulsatile tinnitus on the left disappeared and the ptosis of the left eyelid partially recovered. Selective angiography is the best method for the diagnosis and classification of CCF. Currently, treatment is possible with low mortality and morbidity rates. The endovascular intervention is able to completely occlude the fistula and maintain adequate blood fl ow through the carotid artery.

  15. Common carotid artery occlusion presenting with recurrent syncopal episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Kader

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic common carotid artery (CCA occlusion is an uncommon occurrence that may require surgical intervention. We aim to describe a case of CCA occlusion that presented with the unusual symptom of recurrent syncope. A 69-year-old lady presented with a history of recurrent syncopal episodes and amaurosis fugax associated with left leg weakness. She was found to have a right CCA occlusion on duplex ultrasound and angiography. She underwent a right common carotid endarterectomy and intraoperative findings revealed a heavily calcified plaque in the CCA just proximal to the bifurcation with organised thrombus filling the CCA proximally. CCA occlusion can rarely present with recurrent syncopal episodes. Surgery may be curative.

  16. Thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting in acute ischemic stroke management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Arnholm, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Kondziella, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    because of procedural complexities and necessity of potent platelet inhibition-in particular following IVT. This study assesses the benefits and harms of thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting and identifies factors associated with clinical outcome and procedural complications. Retrospective single......-center analysis of 47 consecutive stroke patients with carotid occlusion or high-grade stenosis and concomitant intracranial embolus treated between September 2011 and December 2014. Benefits included early improvement of stroke severity (NIHSS ≥ 10) or complete remission within 72 h and favorable long......-term outcome (mRS ≤ 2). Harms included complications during and following EVT. Mean age was 64.3 years (standard deviation ±12.5), 40 (85%) patients received IVT initially. Median NIHSS was 16 (inter-quartile range 14-19). Mean time from stroke onset to recanalization was 311 min (standard deviation ±78...

  17. Morning Glory Syndrome with Carotid and Middle Cerebral Artery Vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezzar, Hachemi; Mbekeani, Joyce N; Dalens, Helen

    2015-12-01

    To report a case of incidental asymptomatic atypical morning glory syndrome (MGS) with concomitant ipsilateral carotid and middle cerebral dysgenesis. A 6-year-old child was discovered to have incidental findings of MGS, with atypia. All visual functions were normal including vision and stereopsis. Neuroimaging revealed ipsilateral carotid and middle cerebral vascular narrowing without associated collateral vessels or cerebral ischemia commonly seen in Moyamoya disease. Subsequent annual examinations have been stable, without signs of progression. This case demonstrates disparity between structural aberrations and final visual and neurological function and reinforces the association between MGS and intracranial vascular disruption. Full ancillary ophthalmic and neuroimaging studies should be performed in all patients with MGS with interval reassessments, even when the patient is asymptomatic and functionally intact.

  18. Reproducibility of Two 3-D Ultrasound Carotid Plaque Quantification Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, Martin; Entrekin, Robert; Collet-Billon, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Compared with single 2-D images, emerging 3-D ultrasound technologies hold the promise of reducing variability and increasing sensitivity in the quantification of carotid plaques for individual cardiovascular risk stratification. Inter- and intra-observer agreement between a manual, cross......-sectional, 2-D freehand sweep and a mechanical 3-D ultrasound investigation of 62 carotid artery plaques is reported with intra-class correlation coefficients (with 95% confidence intervals). Inter-observer agreement was 0.60 (0.29-0.77) for the freehand method and 0.89 (0.83-0.93) for the mechanical 3-D...... acquisition. The use of semi-automated computerized planimetric measurements of plaque burden has high intra-observer repeatability, but is vulnerable to systematic inter-observer differences. For the 2-D freehand sweep, a considerable contribution to variation is introduced by the scanning procedure itself...

  19. Multimodal optoacoustic and multiphoton microscopy of human carotid atheroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Seeger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotid artery atherosclerosis is a main cause of stroke. Understanding atherosclerosis biology is critical in the development of targeted prevention and treatment strategies. Consequently, there is demand for advanced tools investigating atheroma pathology. We consider hybrid optoacoustic and multiphoton microscopy for the integrated and complementary interrogation of plaque tissue constituents and their mutual interactions. Herein, we visualize human carotid plaque using a hybrid multimodal imaging system that combines optical resolution optoacoustic (photoacoustic microscopy, second and third harmonic generation microscopy, and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Our data suggest more comprehensive insights in the pathophysiology of atheroma formation and destabilization, by enabling congruent visualization of structural and biological features critical for the atherosclerotic process and its acute complications, such as red blood cells and collagen.

  20. Bilateral Carotid Artery Dissection after High Impact Road Traffic Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 58 year old man was involved in a high impact road traffic incident and was admitted for observation. Asymptomatic for the first 24 hours, he collapsed with symptoms and signs consistent with a cerebrovascular accident. Computed tomography angiogram (CTA and Magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA demonstrated bilateral internal carotid artery dissections and a left middle cerebral artery infarct. It was not considered appropriate to attempt stenting or other revascularistation. The patient was treated with heparin prior to starting warfarin. He made a partial recovery and was discharged to a rehabilitation facility. This case is a reminder of carotid dissection as an uncommon but serious complication of high speed motor vehicle accident, which may be silent initially. Literature Review suggests risk stratification before relevant radiological screening at risk patients. Significant advances in CTA have made it the diagnostic tool of choice, but ultrasound is an important screening tool.