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Sample records for carotenoid crystal formation

  1. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  2. Carotenoid Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ray K.; White, David C.

    1970-01-01

    The carotenoid pigments of Staphylococcus aureus U-71 were identified as phytoene; ζ-carotene; δ-carotene; phytofluenol; a phytofluenol-like carotenoid, rubixanthin; and three rubixanthin-like carotenoids after extraction, saponification, chromatographic separation, and determination of their absorption spectra. There was no evidence of carotenoid esters or glycoside ethers in the extract before saponification. During the aerobic growth cycle the total carotenoids increased from 45 to 1,000 nmoles per g (dry weight), with the greatest increases in the polar, hydroxylated carotenoids. During the anaerobic growth cycle, the total carotenoids increased from 20 nmoles per g (dry weight) to 80 nmoles per g (dry weight), and only traces of the polar carotenoids were formed. Light had no effect on carotenoid synthesis. About 0.14% of the mevalonate-2-14C added to the culture was incorporated into the carotenoids during each bacterial doubling. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The incorporation and turnover of 14C indicated the carotenes were sequentially desaturated and hydroxylated to form the polar carotenoids. PMID:5423369

  3. Composition and (in)homogeneity of carotenoid crystals in carrot cells revealed by high resolution Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Maciej; Marzec, Katarzyna M.; Grzebelus, Ewa; Simon, Philipp W.; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2015-02-01

    Three categories of roots differing in both β/α-carotene ratio and in total carotenoid content were selected based on HPLC measurements: high α- and β-carotene (HαHβ), low α- and high β-carotene (LαHβ), and low α- and low β-carotene (LαLβ). Single carotenoid crystals present in the root cells were directly measured using high resolution Raman imaging technique with 532 nm and 488 nm lasers without compound extraction. Crystals of the HαHβ root had complex composition and consisted of β-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. In the LαHβ and LαLβ roots, measurements using 532 nm laser indicated the presence of β-carotene only, but measurements using 488 nm laser confirmed co-occurrence of xanthophylls, presumably lutein. Thus the results show that independently on carotenoid composition in the root, carotenoid crystals are composed of more than one compound. Individual spectra extracted from Raman maps every 0.2-1.0 μm had similar shapes in the 1500-1550 cm-1 region indicating that different carotenoid molecules were homogeneously distributed in the whole crystal volume. Additionally, amorphous carotenoids were identified and determined as composed of β-carotene molecules but they had a shifted the ν1 band probably due to the effect of bonding of other plant constituents like proteins or lipids.

  4. Effects of different fungal elicitors on growth, total carotenoids and astaxanthin formation by Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Yu, Longjiang; Zhou, Pengpeng

    2006-01-01

    Six fungal elicitors prepared from Rhodotorula rubra, Rhodotorula glutinis, Panus conchatus, Coriolus versicolor, Mucor mucedo, Mortieralla alpina M-23 were examined to determine their effects on the growth, total carotenoids and astaxanthin formation by Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The results showed that different fungal elicitor could cause diversely stimulating effects. Among the fungal elicitors tested, the M. mucedo elicitor concentration of 30 mg l(-1) promoted the biomass and total carotenoids yield most remarkably, resulting in 69.81+/-6.00% and 78.87+/-4.15% higher than the control, respectively. At the concentration of 30 mg l(-1), R. glutinis elicitor stimulated the highest astaxanthin yield with a 90.60+/-5.98% increase compared to the control. The R. rubra elicitor concentration of 30 mg l(-1) resulted in the optimal total carotenoids and astaxanthin content to be 42.24+/-0.49% and 69.02+/-0.72% higher than the control, respectively. At the concentration of 30 mg l(-1), R. rubra elicitor gave the highest increase in the ratio of astaxanthin in total carotenoids by 18.85+/-0.11% of the control.

  5. [Effects of light on carotenoid biosynthesis and color formation of citrus fruit peel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Shanglong; An, Xinmin; Zhao, Zhizhong

    2003-11-01

    The effects of shading fruit with opaque paper bag at the late stage of fruit enlargement on the contents of chlorophyll, carotenoid and in "Hongshigan" citrus (C. reticulata x C. sinensis) fruit peel and its color were examined. The results showed that after shading, the chlorophyll content in peel decreased quickly, which resulted in its earlier color shifting. In contrast, the contents of total carotenoids and each carotenoid component did not increase, but decreased significantly. At the stage of fruit riping, both chlorophyll in shaded and unshaded fruit disappeared, and the shaded fruit, owing to its lower level of carotenoids, had a lighter color than the unshaded fruit. The sugar content in peel of shaded fruit did not differ obviously from that of unshaded fruit at the earlier stage, but dropped markedly at the late stage of shading. Removing the enclosing paper bag from shaded fruit at the late stage of shading resulted in the increase of sugar, and correspondingly in the increase of carotenoid, especially of beta-cryptoxanthin accumulation with consequent darkening of fruit color. These results stressed the effect of light on stimulating carotenoid synthesis, especially the accumulation of beta-cryptoxanthin in citrus fruit peel. The light is the enviromental signal essential for carotenoid synthesis in citrus fruit during certain stage of fruit development. PMID:14997627

  6. The Aromatic Carotenoids in the Organic Matter of the Devonian Domanic Formation (on example of Tatarstan territory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, Irina; Nosova, Fidania; Ostroukhov, Sergey; Pronin, Nikita

    2015-04-01

    the paleo facies conditions of the Domanik formation -- black shales rich in organic matter. The use of aromatic carotenoids can restore paleo facies conditions of sedimentation of the Domanik strata, as well as a comparison of these with paleo tectonics and paleo geodynamics of the passive continental margin.

  7. Encapsulation of Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Henelyta S.; Schuchmann, Heike P.; Engel, Robert; Walz, Elke; Briviba, Karlis

    Carotenoids are natural pigments, which are synthesized by microorganisms and plants. More than 600 naturally occurring carotenoids have been found in the nature. The main sources of carotenoids are fruits, vegetables, leaves, peppers, and certain types of fishes, sea foods, and birds. Carotenoids may protect cells against photosensitization and work as light-absorbing pigments during photosynthesis. Some carotenoids may inhibit the destructive effect of reactive oxygen species. Due to the antioxidative properties of carotenoids, many investigations regarding their protective effects against cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, as well as other degenerative illnesses, have been carried out in the last years (Briviba et al. 2004; Krinsky et al. 2004; Kirsh et al. 2006). A diet rich in carotenoids may also contribute to photoprotection against UV radiation (Stahl et al. 2006). In vitro studies have shown that carotenoids such as β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene stimulate bone formation and mineralization. The results may be related to prevention of osteoporosis (Kim et al. 2003; Yamaguchi and Uchiyama 2003; 2004; Yamaguchi et al. 2005).

  8. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  9. Carotenoid Distribution in Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaíno, Jennifer; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring red, orange and yellow pigments that are synthesized by plants and some microorganisms and fulfill many important physiological functions. This chapter describes the distribution of carotenoid in microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea, microalgae, filamentous fungi and yeasts. We will also focus on their functional aspects and applications, such as their nutritional value, their benefits for human and animal health and their potential protection against free radicals. The central metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of carotenoids is described as the three following principal steps: (i) the synthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate and the formation of dimethylallyl pyrophosphate, (ii) the synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate and (iii) the synthesis of carotenoids per se, highlighting the differences that have been found in several carotenogenic organisms and providing an evolutionary perspective. Finally, as an example, the synthesis of the xanthophyll astaxanthin is discussed. PMID:27485217

  10. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  11. Potential production of carotenoids from Neurospora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI PRIATNI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Priatni S. 2014. Review: Potential production of carotenoids from Neurospora. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 63-68. Carotenoids are abundant and widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. Commercial use of carotenoids competes between microorganisms and synthetic manufacture. Carotenoids production can be increased by improving the efficiency of carotenoid synthesis in microbes. Some of the cultural and environmental stimulants are positively affecting the carotenoid content of carotenogenic strains such as Neurospora. Neurospora is a fungus that exhibits the formation of spores and conidia, the part of the cell for carotenoids biosynthesis. The Indonesian traditional fermented food, red peanut cake or oncom, especially in West Java, is produced from legume residues of Neurospora sp. This fungus has been isolated and identified as Neurospora intermedia. In order to apply this pigment for food and cosmetic colorants, encapsulation techniques of carotenoids have been developed to improve its solubility and stability.

  12. Hydrogen Bond Formation between the Carotenoid Canthaxanthin and the Silanol Group on MCM-41 Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunlong; Xu, Dayong; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-08-20

    The formation of one or two hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) between canthaxanthin (CAN), a dye, and the silanol group(s) on the MCM-41 surface has been studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and calorimetric experiments. It was found that the formation of the H-bond(s) stabilized the CAN molecule more than its radical cation (CAN(•+)). The charge distribution, bond lengths, and the HOMO and LUMO energies of CAN are also affected. The formation of the H-bond(s) explains the lower photoinduced electron transfer efficiency of CAN imbedded in Cu-MCM-41 versus that for β-carotene (CAR) imbedded in Cu-MCM-41 where complex formation with Cu(2+) dominates. These calculations show that to achieve high electron transfer efficiency for a dye-sensitized solar cell, H-bonding between the dye and the host should be avoided. PMID:26230844

  13. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  14. Key to xenobiotic carotenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Richard Sliwka; Vassilia Partali

    2012-01-01

    A listing of carotenoids with heteroatoms (X = F, Cl, Br, I, Si, N, S, Se, Fe) directly attached to the carotenoid carbon skeleton has been compiled. The 178 listed carotenoids with C,H,X atoms demonstrate that the classical division of carotenoids into hydrocarbon carotenoids (C,H) and xanthophylls (C,H,O) has become obsolete.

  15. Formation of Piroxicam Polymorphism in Solution Crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Hansen, Thomas; Qu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, new insights into crystallization prior to actual nucleation have shown interesting results for drugs showing differences in hydrogen bonding or orientation in various polymorphic forms. On the basis of this concept, piroxicam was chosen as a model compound because the two common forms, I...... and II, show hydrogen bonding between different parts of the molecules and differences in the orientation of molecules in the crystal lattice. The goal of this work is to explore how various methods of controlling polymorphism during production could be employed. The mechanisms behind the nucleation were...... also explored, and new insights into polymorphic control are documented and discussed. The crystal landscape was mapped for cooling crystallization of piroxicam from acetone/water mixtures (0.5 K/min) and for antisolvent crystallization from acetone with water as the antisolvent. Varying cooling rates...

  16. Formation of collimated beams behind the woodpile photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally observe formation of narrow laser beams behind the woodpile photonic crystal, when the beam remains well collimated in free propagation behind the crystal. We show that the collimation depends on the input laser beam's focusing conditions, and we interpret theoretically the observed effect by calculating the spatial dispersion of propagation eigenmodes and by numerical simulation of paraxial propagation model.

  17. Origin of Aggregate Formation in Antibody Crystal Suspensions Containing PEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Christian; Mathaes, Roman; Saedler, Rainer; Winter, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    The crystalline state of proteins is deemed as a promising formulation platform for biopharmaceuticals. However, a stabilizing effect of protein crystal suspensions is controversially discussed. In fact, antibodies can display an increased aggregation and particle formation profile after the crystallization process compared with liquid or solid amorphous formulations. Nevertheless, studies regarding aggregate formation and its origin remain meager in literature. It was the aim of this study to investigate these aspects for a model IgG antibody (mAb1), which shows an increased aggregate formation after crystallization with polyethylene glycol. The presence of a dynamic equilibrium, a steady exchange of protein between the crystals and the supernatant, was demonstrated by replacing the supernatant with an identical but fluorescence-labeled protein solution and followed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Aggregate formation was monitored by size exclusion high-pressure chromatography and flow cytometry. Constantly increasing aggregate levels were found for the crystal fraction and for the supernatant. For the later, markedly higher particle counts were detected. The labeled supernatant and the unlabeled protein crystals allowed a precise identification of the origin of the aggregates. The rising aggregate fractions of the crystals displayed high mean fluorescence intensities that elucidated their origin in the supernatant. PMID:26886344

  18. Role of nucleation of bile liquid crystal in gallstone formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ming Yang; Jie Wu; Jin-Yi Li; Lin Gu; Min-Fei Zhou

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of bile liquid crystal in the process of gallbladder stone formation and to provide bases for preventing and treating cholelithiasis.METHODS: 46 guinea pigs, half males and half females,were randomly divided into control group and stone-causing group. Normal feed and stoneleading feed were used respectively to raise guinea pigs in the control group and stone-causing group. The guinea pigs were killed in three batches during the raising period. Under polarizing microscope, the pattern changes of bile liquid crystal in the gallbladder biles of the guinea pigs in the control group and stone-causing group were dynamicly observed respectively in single-blind trial.RESULTS: It was found that there were few crystals in the guinea pigs′biles of the control group, and their Malta cross was small and scattered, and existed in single form. With the increase of the feeding days, bile liquid crystals grew and Malta cross became bigger with their distribution densified, denser somewhere, but always existed in single form. While those of the stone-causing group had more bile liquid crystals, Malta cross was big and merged in strings.With the increase of the feeding days, bile liquid crystals grew in amount and strings of Malta cross increased and became bigger. The crosses in strings were arranged more and more regularly and they gradually changed into stone crystals.CONCLUSION: Formation of gallbladder stone is a process of nucleation from different substances, and the causing-stone gallbladder bile is a constantly supersaturated solution, and bile liquid crystal is a nucleation factor in the formation of gallbladder stones. The process of nucleation includes gathering, merging and phase-changing of bile liquid crystals.The process of gathering, merging of bile liquid crystal is the key to nucleation.

  19. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade.

  20. Formation of collimated beams behind the woodpile photonic crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Trull Silvestre, José Francisco; Maigyte, Lina; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Cojocaru, Crina; Rutkauskas, Marius; Peckus, Martynas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally observe formation of narrow laser beams behind the woodpile photonic crystal, when the beam remains well collimated in free propagation behind the crystal. We show that the collimation depends on the input laser beam’s focusing conditions, and we interpret theoretically the observed effect by calculating the spatial dispersion of propagation eigenmodes and by numerical simulation of paraxial propagation model. Peer Reviewed

  1. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine a...

  2. Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, Felix; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an Ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix by using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a data set of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consi...

  3. Formation of Optical Solitons in Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰胜; 陈雄文

    2004-01-01

    Relying on the huge group velocity dispersion available in photonic crystal (PC) waveguides, we observe the formation of both Bragg grating solitons and gap solitons in nonlinear PC waveguides in numericalexperiments. Also,we indicate the potential applications of optical solitons in optical limiting, optical delay, and pulse compression and the feasibility of observing optical solitons in practical experiments.

  4. Defective urinary crystallization inhibition and urinary stone formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvalho

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nephrocalcin (NC is a glycoprotein produced in the kidney and inhibits calcium oxalate crystal formation. It has been separated into 4 isoforms (A, B, C, and D and found that (A + B are more abundant than (C + D in urine of healthy subjects, but the reverse is seen in human urine of kidney stone patients. To further examine the role of this protein in inhibition of urinary crystallization, nephrocalcin isoforms were purified from 2 genetically pure dog species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied healthy Beagles, known to be non-stone forming dogs, and Mini-Schnauzers, known to be calcium oxalate stone formers. NC was isolated and purified from each group. Urinary biochemistry and calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibition were measured. RESULTS: Specific crystal growth inhibition activity was significantly higher in non-stone forming dogs (9.79 ± 2.25 in Beagles vs. 2.75 ± 1.34 of Mini-Schnauzers, p < 0.005. Dissociation constants toward calcium oxalate monohydrate were 10-fold different, with Beagles' isoforms being 10 times stronger inhibitors compare to those of Mini-Schnauzers'. Isoforms C + D of NC were the main isoforms isolated in stone-forming dogs. CONCLUSION: NC of these two species of dogs differently affects calcium oxalate crystallization and might have a role in determining ulterior urinary stone formation.

  5. Entropy-driven crystal formation on highly strained substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Savage, John R.

    2013-05-20

    In heteroepitaxy, lattice mismatch between the deposited material and the underlying surface strongly affects nucleation and growth processes. The effect of mismatch is well studied in atoms with growth kinetics typically dominated by bond formation with interaction lengths on the order of one lattice spacing. In contrast, less is understood about how mismatch affects crystallization of larger particles, such as globular proteins and nanoparticles, where interparticle interaction energies are often comparable to thermal fluctuations and are short ranged, extending only a fraction of the particle size. Here, using colloidal experiments and simulations, we find particles with short-range attractive interactions form crystals on isotropically strained lattices with spacings significantly larger than the interaction length scale. By measuring the free-energy cost of dimer formation on monolayers of increasing uniaxial strain, we show the underlying mismatched substrate mediates an entropy-driven attractive interaction extending well beyond the interaction length scale. Remarkably, because this interaction arises from thermal fluctuations, lowering temperature causes such substrate-mediated attractive crystals to dissolve. Such counterintuitive results underscore the crucial role of entropy in heteroepitaxy in this technologically important regime. Ultimately, this entropic component of lattice mismatched crystal growth could be used to develop unique methods for heterogeneous nucleation and growth of single crystals for applications ranging from protein crystallization to controlling the assembly of nanoparticles into ordered, functional superstructures. In particular, the construction of substrates with spatially modulated strain profiles would exploit this effect to direct self-assembly, whereby nucleation sites and resulting crystal morphology can be controlled directly through modifications of the substrate.

  6. Defect formation energy in pyrochlore: the effect of crystal size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Ewing, Rodney C.; Becker, Udo

    2014-09-01

    Defect formation energies of point defects of two pyrochlores Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 as a function of crystal size were calculated. Density functional theory with plane-wave basis sets and the projector-augmented wave method were used in the calculations. The results show that the defect formation energies of the two pyrochlores diverge as the size decreases to the nanometer range. For Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore, the defect formation energy is higher at nanometers with respect to that of the bulk, while it is lower for Gd2Zr2O7. The lowest defect formation energy for Gd2Zr2O7 is found at 15-20 Å. The different behaviors of the defect formation energies as a function of crystal size are caused by different structural adjustments around the defects as the size decreases. For both pyrochlore compositions at large sizes, the defect structures are similar to those of the bulk. As the size decreases, for Gd2Ti2O7, additional structure distortions appear at the surfaces, which cause the defect formation energy to increase. For Gd2Zr2O7, additional oxygen Frenkel pair defects are introduced, which reduce the defect formation energy. As the size further decreases, increased structure distortions occur at the surfaces, which cause the defect formation energy to increase. Based on a hypothesis that correlates the energetics of defect formation and radiation response for complex oxides, the calculated results suggest that at nanometer range Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is expected to have a lower radiation tolerance, and those of Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore to have a higher radiation tolerance. The highest radiation tolerance for Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore is expected to be found at ˜2 nanometers.

  7. Image formation by and wave propagation in a photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parimi, Patanjali; Vodo, Plarenta; Wentao, Lu; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    Negative refraction and imaging by a flat slab of a material are two of the important consequences of lefthanded electromagnetism. In our recent work we have demonstrated negative refraction and imaging by photonic crystals in the microwave frequency range [1]. The details of image formation are intriguing and urge its investigation. We have carried out microwave measurements in a parallel plate waveguide made of a pair of metallic plates. The Photonic crystal is made of alumina rods arranged on a square lattice such that the electric field is parallel to the axis of the rods. The detector is a dipole antenna which is inserted into the waveguide from outside. HP 8510C network analyzer is used to measure the complex transmission coefficient . The intensity maps of vs. probe position are obtained by scanning the probe using an x-y robot, both inside and outside the crystal. The results suggest Bloch wave propagation inside the crystal and that the image formation requires a better understanding than a simple ray diagram following geometric optics. [1] P. V. Parimi et al., Nature, 426, 404 (2003).

  8. Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Felix; Lindmaa, Alexander; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit ...

  9. Hydrophilic Carotenoids: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Agócs

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are substantially hydrophobic antioxidants. Hydrophobicity is this context is rather a disadvantage, because their utilization in medicine as antioxidants or in food chemistry as colorants would require some water dispersibility for their effective uptake or use in many other ways. In the past 15 years several attempts were made to synthetize partially hydrophilic carotenoids. This review compiles the recently synthetized hydrophilic carotenoid derivatives.

  10. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  11. Carotenoid metabolism in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. Th...

  12. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  13. Carotenoids in Microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Vitalia; Escobar, Carolina; Galarza, Janeth; Gimpel, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of isoprenoids synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms as well as by some non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi with broad applications in food, feed and cosmetics, and also in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. Microalgae represent an important source of high-value products, which include carotenoids, among others. Carotenoids play key roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis and in the protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against photooxidative damage. Carotenoids are generally divided into carotenes and xanthophyls, but accumulation in microalgae can also be classified as primary (essential for survival) and secondary (by exposure to specific stimuli).In this chapter, we outline the high value carotenoids produced by commercially important microalgae, their production pathways, the improved production rates that can be achieved by genetic engineering as well as their biotechnological applications. PMID:27485224

  14. Modeling of cluster formation in nonlinear optical lithium niobate crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voskresenskii, V. M.; Starodub, O. R., E-mail: starodub@chemy.kolasc.net.ru; Sidorov, N. V.; Palatnikov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Rare Earth Elements and Mineral Raw Materials, Kola Science Center (Russian Federation); Mavrin, B. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The processes occurring during the formation of energetically equilibrium oxygen-octahedral clusters in the ferroelectric phase of lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) crystal, have been qualitatively modeled in dependence of the phase composition. The modeling results are compared with the data obtained within vacancy models. It is shown that the cluster structure constructed along the crystallographic Y axis is most ordered, while that constructed along the polar Z axis is least ordered. The largest spread in the ratio R = Li/Nb is observed in the direction of the Z axis.

  15. A Unified Theory of Melting, Crystallization and Glass Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotterill, R. M. J.; Jensen, F. J.; Damgaard Kristensen, W.;

    1975-01-01

    In recent years, dislocations have been involved in theories of melting, in models of the liquid state, and in calculations of the viscosity of glasses. Particularly noteworthy are the Mott-Gurney model of a liquid as a polycrystal with a grain size (i. e. a dislocation network size) of near......-atomic dimensions, and the demonstration by Kotze and Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf that the solid-liquid interfacial energy is proportional to the grain boundary energy for a number of elements. These developments suggest the possibility of a relatively simple picture of crystallization and glass formation. In the liquid...

  16. Carotenoids and Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Uragami, Chiasa; Cogdell, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous and essential pigments in photosynthesis. They absorb in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum and transfer the absorbed energy to (bacterio-)chlorophylls, and so expand the wavelength range of light that is able to drive photosynthesis. This is an example of singlet-singlet energy transfer, and so carotenoids serve to enhance the overall efficiency of photosynthetic light reactions. Carotenoids also act to protect photosynthetic organisms from the harmful effects of excess exposure to light. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoids plays a key role in this photoprotective reaction. In the light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria and chlorophytes, carotenoids have an additional role of structural stabilization of those complexes. In this article we review what is currently known about how carotenoids discharge these functions. The molecular architecture of photosynthetic systems will be outlined first to provide a basis from which to describe carotenoid photochemistry, which underlies most of their important functions in photosynthesis. PMID:27485220

  17. Carotenoids and Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Uragami, Chiasa; Cogdell, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous and essential pigments in photosynthesis. They absorb in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum and transfer the absorbed energy to (bacterio-)chlorophylls, and so expand the wavelength range of light that is able to drive photosynthesis. This is an example of singlet-singlet energy transfer, and so carotenoids serve to enhance the overall efficiency of photosynthetic light reactions. Carotenoids also act to protect photosynthetic organisms from the harmful effects of excess exposure to light. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoids plays a key role in this photoprotective reaction. In the light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria and chlorophytes, carotenoids have an additional role of structural stabilization of those complexes. In this article we review what is currently known about how carotenoids discharge these functions. The molecular architecture of photosynthetic systems will be outlined first to provide a basis from which to describe carotenoid photochemistry, which underlies most of their important functions in photosynthesis.

  18. Formation of norisoprenoid flavor compounds in carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots: characterization of a cyclic-specific carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid pigments that upon oxidative cleavage lead to the production of norisoprenoids that have profound effect on flavor and aromas of agricultural produce. The biosynthetic pathway to norisoprenoids in carrots (Daucus carota L.) is still widely unknown. We found that geranial i...

  19. Investigation of defects formation on different stages of sapphire crystals growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical simulations and calculations allow to estimate the large number of factors influence on crystals growth and quality and to determine the main cause of the defect structures formation in the solid phase. The research results allow making the quantity estimation of defects formation in sapphire crystals. The simulation results can help to define defect formation zones and can be used for recommendations about crystals quality improvement

  20. Environmental factors affect calcium oxalate crystals formation in tradescantia pallida (commelinaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tradescantia pallida has major types of calcium oxalate crystals i.e., raphide, prismatic, and druse that are widely distributed within collenchmya, cortical and vascular parenchyma in the stem. However, mechanisms involved in crystal formation in response to stress conditions are not properly understood. In order to evaluate formation of these crystals in response to heavy metals i.e., mercury, sections of control (untreated) and mercury treated plants were prepared, stained with toluidine blue and photographed (infinity software). Mercuric chloride at high doses increased all types of crystals as compared with low doses; suggesting that mercury stress increases metabolic activities of Tradescantia that produce crystals may be, in order to defend themselves. So in T. pallida, crystal formation is influenced by mercury stress that increased raphide and prismatic crystals in the treated plants. However, biochemical aspects involved in oxalic acid formation and release of Ca by Hg need to be explored more. (author)

  1. 类胡萝卜素对蛹虫草子实体形成的影响%Effect of carotenoids on the formation of Cordyceps militaris fruit body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡久平; 周礼红; 赵永霞; 吴铄溟

    2013-01-01

    类胡萝卜素对蛹虫草子实体形成有很大影响.为了探讨类胡萝卜素与蛹虫草子实体形成的关系,选取三种典型菌落形态的蛹虫草菌株,研究其在光照黑暗交替条件下不同菌落形态和类胡萝卜紊含量对子实体形成的影响.采用酸热法和吸收光谱法提取测定类胡萝卜素含量.结果表明三类蛹虫草在沙氏平板上均有可形成子实体的菌株,说明形态与子实体形成无直接关系.类胡萝卜素含量在3000μg/g以下的菌株在沙氏培养基上无子实体形成,3000~3500μg/g有子实体形成平均为2个/cm2,3500~6500μg/g菌株子实体形成能力较强平均为7个/cm2,含量在6500μg/g以上菌株形成子实体平均在5个/cm2,全黑暗培养菌株未检测到类胡萝卜素,也无子实体形成.%Carotenoids are the key factors affecting the formation of fruit bodies of Cordyceps militaris. Three type strains Cordyceps militaris which had typical colony morphology were selected. The influence of conditions such as light and dark cycle, different colony morphology on the formation of the fruit body and contents of carotenoids was investigated. Carotenoids were extracted by hydrochloric acid(HCI) with heating (by boiling water) and detected by absorption spectroscopy. The result was that the strains had ability to product fruit bodies in three morphology differently, the formation of fruit body and colony morphology were not related. The fruit body could not be formed as the carotenoid content of less than 3000μg/g. However,the rate of formation of fruit body was 2,7,5 each square centimetre, as the carotenoids contents of 3000~3500μg/g, 3500~6500μg/g, more than 6500μg/g, respectively. On the contrary, neither the fruit body and the carotenoids could be detected under the dark condition.

  2. Dietary factors that affect carotenoid bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van het K.

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects of increased vegetable consumption. To better understand the potential benefits of carotenoids, we investigated the bioavailability of carotenoids from vegetables and dietary factors which might influence carotenoid bioavailability.In a

  3. Biologically active polymers from spontaneous carotenoid oxidation: a new frontier in carotenoid activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Johnston

    Full Text Available In animals carotenoids show biological activity unrelated to vitamin A that has been considered to arise directly from the behavior of the parent compound, particularly as an antioxidant. However, the very property that confers antioxidant activity on some carotenoids in plants also confers susceptibility to oxidative transformation. As an alternative, it has been suggested that carotenoid oxidative breakdown or metabolic products could be the actual agents of activity in animals. However, an important and neglected aspect of the behavior of the highly unsaturated carotenoids is their potential to undergo addition of oxygen to form copolymers. Recently we reported that spontaneous oxidation of ß-carotene transforms it into a product dominated by ß-carotene-oxygen copolymers. We now report that the polymeric product is biologically active. Results suggest an overall ability to prime innate immune function to more rapidly respond to subsequent microbial challenges. An underlying structural resemblance to sporopollenin, found in the outer shell of spores and pollen, may allow the polymer to modulate innate immune responses through interactions with the pattern recognition receptor system. Oxygen copolymer formation appears common to all carotenoids, is anticipated to be widespread, and the products may contribute to the health benefits of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables.

  4. Diffusion model of the formation of growth microdefects: A new approach to defect formation in crystals (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanin, V. I.; Talanin, I. E.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical studies of defect formation in semiconductor silicon play an important role in the creation of breakthrough ideas for next-generation technologies. A brief comparative analysis of modern theoretical approaches to the description of interaction of point defects and formation of the initial defect structure of dislocation-free silicon single crystals has been carried out. Foundations of the diffusion model of the formation of structural imperfections during the silicon growth have been presented. It has been shown that the diffusion model is based on high-temperature precipitation of impurities. The model of high-temperature precipitation of impurities describes processes of nucleation, growth, and coalescence of impurities during cooling of a crystal from 1683 to 300 K. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion model of defect formation provides a unified approach to the formation of a defect structure beginning with the crystal growth to the production of devices. The possibilities of using the diffusion model of defect formation for other semiconductor crystals and metals have been discussed. It has been shown that the diffusion model of defect formation is a platform for multifunctional solution of many key problems in modern solid state physics. Fundamentals of practical application of the diffusion model for engineering of defects in crystals with modern information technologies have been considered. An algorithm has been proposed for the calculation and analysis of a defect structure of crystals.

  5. Mechanistic aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Moïse, Alexander R.

    2014-01-08

    Carotenoid synthesis is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. Carotenoids are tetraterpenes derived through the condensation of the five-carbon (C5) universal isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). A recently developed concept that could explain the role of the poly-cis pathway in carotenoid synthesis is that the intermediates of this pathway have additional physiological roles that extend beyond serving as precursors of lycopene. This concept is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. The feedback regulation of early carotenoid synthetic genes in response to a block in upstream metabolism represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the mechanism and regulation of carotenoid synthesis and of metabolic regulation in general. The molecular details of a signaling pathway that regulates carotenogenesis in response to the levels of carotenoid precursors are still unclear.

  6. Formation of liquid inclusion induced light scatter in KDP (DKDP) crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙洵; 孙大亮; 许心光; 王正平; 付有君; 王圣来; 曾红; 李毅平; 于锡玲; 高樟寿

    2001-01-01

    We describe in this paper the formation of liquid inclusion induced light scatter in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal and deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystals. The measurement has been done with an atomic force microscope (AFM). The mechanism of formation of liquid inclusion scatter has been proposed and the effect of super-saturation discussed.

  7. Liquid Crystal Formation from Sunflower Oil: Long Term Stability Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Filho, Pedro Alves; Maruno, Mônica; Ferrari, Márcio; Topan, José Fernando

    2016-06-09

    The Brazilian biodiversity offers a multiplicity of raw materials with great potential in cosmetics industry applications. Some vegetable oils and fatty esters increase skin hydration by occlusivity, keeping the skin hydrated and with a shiny appearance. Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) oil is widely employed in cosmetic emulsions in the form of soaps, creams, moisturizers and skin cleansers due to the presence of polyphenols and its high vitamin E content. Liquid crystals are systems with many applications in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations and are easily detected by microscopy under polarized light due to their birefringence properties. The aim of this research was to develop emulsions from natural sunflower oil for topical uses. Sunflower oil (75.0% w/w) was combined with liquid vaseline (25.0% w/w) employing a natural self-emulsifying base (SEB) derivative. The high temperature of the emulsification process did not influence the antioxidant properties of sunflower oil. Fatty esters were added to cosmetic formulations and extended stability tests were performed to characterize the emulsions. Fatty esters like cetyl palmitate and cetyl ester increase the formation of anisotropic structures. O/W emulsions showed acidic pH values and pseudoplastic behavior. The presence of a lamellar phase was observed after a period of 90 days under different storage conditions.

  8. Liquid Crystal Formation from Sunflower Oil: Long Term Stability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alves da Rocha-Filho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian biodiversity offers a multiplicity of raw materials with great potential in cosmetics industry applications. Some vegetable oils and fatty esters increase skin hydration by occlusivity, keeping the skin hydrated and with a shiny appearance. Sunflower (Helianthus annus L. oil is widely employed in cosmetic emulsions in the form of soaps, creams, moisturizers and skin cleansers due to the presence of polyphenols and its high vitamin E content. Liquid crystals are systems with many applications in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations and are easily detected by microscopy under polarized light due to their birefringence properties. The aim of this research was to develop emulsions from natural sunflower oil for topical uses. Sunflower oil (75.0% w/w was combined with liquid vaseline (25.0% w/w employing a natural self-emulsifying base (SEB derivative. The high temperature of the emulsification process did not influence the antioxidant properties of sunflower oil. Fatty esters were added to cosmetic formulations and extended stability tests were performed to characterize the emulsions. Fatty esters like cetyl palmitate and cetyl ester increase the formation of anisotropic structures. O/W emulsions showed acidic pH values and pseudoplastic behavior. The presence of a lamellar phase was observed after a period of 90 days under different storage conditions.

  9. Formation of co-crystals: Kinetic and thermodynamic aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, E.; Mangin, D.; Puel, F.; Rivoire, A.; Monnier, O.; Garcia, E.; Klein, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    Co-crystallisation is a recent method of great interest for the pharmaceutical industry, since pharmaceutical co-crystals represent useful materials for drug products. In this study, an active pharmaceutical ingredient (carbamazepine (CBZ)) co-crystallized with a vitamin (nicotinamide (NCT)) was chosen as a model substance. This work was focused on the construction of a phase diagram for the system CBZ/NCT, split in six domains for kinetic reasons (the different solid phases which might appear during the crystallisation) and in four domains according to thermodynamic aspects (the stable final phase obtained). Although co-crystals are not ionic compounds, the supersaturation of co-crystals can be evaluated by considering the solubility product. Batch crystallisation operations were carried out in a stirred vessel equipped with an in situ video probe. This latter device was a powerful analysis tool to monitor the CBZ/NCT co-crystals and single CBZ crystals since these two crystalline phases grown in ethanol exhibited needle and platelet habits. As concerns kinetics, the different solid phases which might appear during the experiments were observed and competed against each others. In accordance with thermodynamics, the stable solid form was obtained at the end of the operation. Finally some preliminary results indicate that the nucleation of co-crystals may be favoured by the presence of CBZ crystals. Epitaxial relationships between CBZ/NCT co-crystals and CBZ crystals were suspected.

  10. Vacancy formation energy in the quantal crystals of the two helium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derived a simple expression for the vacancy formation energy in a quantual crystal near melting in terms of its Lindemann parameter and of the density response of its liquid near freezing. Numerical illustrations are given for vacancies in 4He and 3He crystals. (author). 19 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Formation of temperature fields in doped anisotropic crystals under spatially inhomogeneous light beams passing through them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, E. V.; Markelov, A. S.; Trushin, V. N., E-mail: trushin@phys.unn.ru; Chuprunov, E. V. [Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The features of formation of thermal fields in potassium dihydrophosphate crystal doped with potassium permanganate under a 532-nm laser beam passing through it have been investigated. Data on the influence of birefringence on the temperature distribution in an anisotropic crystal whose surface is illuminated by a spatially modulated light beam are presented.

  12. Formation of temperature fields in doped anisotropic crystals under spatially inhomogeneous light beams passing through them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, E. V.; Markelov, A. S.; Trushin, V. N.; Chuprunov, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    The features of formation of thermal fields in potassium dihydrophosphate crystal doped with potassium permanganate under a 532-nm laser beam passing through it have been investigated. Data on the influence of birefringence on the temperature distribution in an anisotropic crystal whose surface is illuminated by a spatially modulated light beam are presented.

  13. The Or gene enhances carotenoid accumulation and stability during post-harvest storage of potato tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yang, Yong; Xu, Qiang; Owsiany, Katherine; Welsch, Ralf; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Lu, Shan; Van Eck, Joyce; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Failla, Mark; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2012-03-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality. To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability, we investigated transgenic potato tubers that expressed the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene. We found that the Or transgene not only promoted retention of β-carotene level, but also continuously stimulated its accumulation during 5 months of cold storage. In contrast, no increased levels of carotenoids were observed in the tubers of vector-only controls or a yellow-flesh variety during the same period of storage. The increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be associated with the formation of lipoprotein-carotenoid sequestering structures, as well as with the enhanced abundance of phytoene synthase, a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the provitamin A carotenoids stored were shown to be stable during simulated digestion and accessible for uptake by human intestinal absorptive cells. Proteomic analysis identified three major functional groups of proteins (i.e. heat shock proteins, glutathione-S-transferases, and carbohydrate metabolic proteins) that are potentially important in the Or-regulated carotenoid accumulation. Our results show that regulation of carotenoid sequestration capacity is an important mechanism by which carotenoid stability is regulated. Our findings suggest that induction of a proper sink structure formation in staple crops may provide the crops with a unique ability to promote and/or stabilize provitamin A accumulation during plant growth and post-harvest storage. PMID:22155949

  14. Formation of a crystallization courtyard in eutectic systems and crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurin, V. N.; Osipov, V. N.; Derkachenko, L. I.; Korchunov, B. N.; Popova, T. B.

    2014-03-01

    The so-called crystallization courtyard is investigated that forms in processes of mass crystallization around the Ge and Si crystals and their solid solutions (Ge+Si) during cooling of hypereutectic alloys in the Ge-Al, Si-Al, and (Ge+Si)-Al eutectic systems. For the first time, data on the composition and microhardness of this crystallization courtyard are given and its role is shown as a stopper of cracking in an Al-(Ge,Si) system during rapid cooling after the heating system is turned off. For the first time, it is suggested that a crystallization courtyard forms in all hypereutectic systems (including every system in which the amount of the taken solvent does not correspond to the eutectic point).

  15. Formation Enthalpy Calculation of Oxygen Vacancy Defect in Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG Liang-sheng; LI Yao; TANG Dong-yan; XU Chong-quan; WEI Yong-de

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between temperature and oxygen vacancy concentration is deduced in this paper. Based on the data of thermal weight-loss experiment, the formation enthalpies of congruent and several doped LN crystals have been calculated. It was found that the formation enthalpy of oxygen vacancies can be decreased evidently by doping valence-changeable ions. The experimental results were discussed and a new reduction process of the photorefractive LN crystal at a relatively low temperature was proposed, and the reduced crystals showed a good effect in practical use.

  16. Wave propagation in single column woodpile phononic crystals: Formation of tunable band gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunho; Yang, Jinkyu

    2014-11-01

    We study the formation of frequency band gaps in single column woodpile phononic crystals composed of orthogonally stacked slender cylinders. We focus on investigating the effect of the cylinders' local vibrations on the dispersion of elastic waves along the stacking direction of the woodpile phononic crystals. We experimentally verify that their frequency band structures depend significantly on the bending resonant behavior of unit cells. We propose a simple theoretical model based on a discrete element method to associate the behavior of locally resonant cylindrical rods with the band gap formation mechanism in woodpile phononic crystals. The findings in this work imply that we can achieve versatile control of frequency band structures in phononic crystals by using woodpile architectures. The woodpile phononic crystals can form a new type of vibration filtering devices that offer an enhanced degree of freedom in manipulating stress wave propagation.

  17. Habit and formation mechanism of β-BaB2O4 crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲维卓; 洪慧聪; 路治平; 赵天德; 华素坤; 唐鼎元; 赵庆兰

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between the orientation of structure unit [B3O6]3- anion ring and the morphology of β-BaBO4 crystal has been studied on the basis of crystallography. According to the results measured from the solution structure of Na2O-B2O3 system, the structure of the growth unit of β-BaB2O4 crystal and the incorporation discipline of the growth unit on the faces and facets of the crystal are proposed. The formation mechanism and crystallization habit of the β-BaB2O4 are discussed. The dimensions of the growth unit vary with the physicochemistry conditions of the crystal growth. Moreover, the incorporation rates of the growth units with different dimensions on the faces and facets are also changed This is the major reason of the diver-sity of the crystal morphology

  18. Supercoiled DNA; plectonemic structure and liquid crystal formation

    CERN Document Server

    Maarel, J R C; Jesse, W; Backendorf, C; Egelhaaf, S U; Lapp, A

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the phase behaviour of pUC18 plasmid solutions with phase separation experiments and polarized light microscopy. Furthermore, the configuration of the superhelix is monitored with small-angle neutron scattering. The phase diagram is interpreted with liquid crystal theory including the effects of charge, orientation entropy, excluded volume, as well as the elastic, entropic and electrostatic contributions to the molecular free energy.

  19. THE RESULTS OF TESTING TO EVALUATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND SETTLING IN THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.

    2009-06-30

    The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology offers the potential to increase waste loading for High Level Waste (HLW) glasses leading to significant improvements in waste throughput rates compared to the reference Joule Heated Melter (JHM). Prior to implementation of a CCIM in a production facility it is necessary to better understand processing constraints associated with the CCIM. The glass liquidus temperature requirement for processing in the CCIM is an open issue. Testing was conducted to evaluate crystal formation and crystal settling during processing in the CCIM to gain insight into the effects on processing. A high aluminum/high iron content glass composition with known crystal formation tendencies was selected for testing. A continuous melter test was conducted for approximately 51 hours. To evaluate crystal formation, glass samples were obtained from pours and from glass receipt canisters where the glass melt had varying residence time in the melter. Additionally, upon conclusion of the testing, glass samples from the bottom of the melter were obtained to assess the degree of crystal settling. Glass samples were characterized in an attempt to determine quantitative fractions of crystals in the glass matrix. Crystal identity and relative composition were determined using a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Select samples were also analyzed by digesting the glass and determining the composition using inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). There was evidence of crystal formation (primarily spinels) in the melt and during cooling of the collected glass. There was evidence of crystal settling in the melt over the duration of the melter campaign.

  20. Combination of transient 2D-IR experiments and ab initio computations sheds light on the formation of the charge-transfer state in photoexcited carbonyl carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Segado Centellas, Mireia; Lapini, Andrea; Lima, Manuela; Avila, Francisco; Santoro, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Chiara; Righini, Roberto

    2014-08-14

    The excited state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids is very complex because of the coupling of single- and doubly excited states and the possible involvement of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) states. In this contribution we employ ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and theoretical computations to investigate the relaxation dynamics of trans-8'-apo-β-carotenal occurring on the picosecond time scale, after excitation in the S2 state. In a (slightly) polar solvent like chloroform, one-dimensional (T1D-IR) and two-dimensional (T2D-IR) transient infrared spectroscopy reveal spectral components with characteristic frequencies and lifetimes that are not observed in nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane). Combining experimental evidence with an analysis of CASPT2//CASSCF ground and excited state minima and energy profiles, complemented with TDDFT calculations in gas phase and in solvent, we propose a photochemical decay mechanism for this system where only the bright single-excited 1Bu(+) and the dark double-excited 2Ag(-) states are involved. Specifically, the initially populated 1Bu(+) relaxes toward 2Ag(-) in 200 fs. In a nonpolar solvent 2Ag(-) decays to the ground state (GS) in 25 ps. In polar solvents, distortions along twisting modes of the chain promote a repopulation of the 1Bu(+) state which then quickly relaxes to the GS (18 ps in chloroform). The 1Bu(+) state has a high electric dipole and is the main contributor to the charge-transfer state involved in the dynamics in polar solvents. The 2Ag(-) → 1Bu(+) population transfer is evidenced by a cross peak on the T2D-IR map revealing that the motions along the same stretching of the conjugated chain on the 2Ag(-) and 1Bu(+) states are coupled.

  1. Formation of cholesterol bilayer domains precedes formation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes: EPR and DSC studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2013-08-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol %. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogues, it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol % cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol % cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that the formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol % is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol % cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals.

  2. ASTAXANTHIN: A POTENTIAL CAROTENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Dhankhar et al.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a member of the carotenoid family, is a dark-red pigment which is the main carotenoid found in the marine world of algae and aquatic animals. Astaxanthin, is present in many types of seafood, including salmon, trout, red sea bream, shrimp and lobster, as well as in birds such as flamingo and quail. Synthetic Astaxanthin dominates the world market but recent interest in natural sources of the pigment has increased substantially. Common sources of natural Astaxanthin, are the green algae haematococcus pluvialis, the red yeast, Phaffia rhodozyma, as well as crustacean byproducts. Astaxanthin possesses unusual antioxidant property which has caused a surge in the nutraceutical market of the encapsulated products. Numerous studies have shown that astaxanthin has potential health-promoting effects in the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as cancers, chronic inflammatory diseases, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, cardiovascular diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, liver diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, eye diseases, skin diseases, exercise-induced fatigue, male infertility, and renal failure. In this article, the currently available scientific literature regarding the most significant activities of astaxanthin is reviewed.

  3. Crystal Ice Formation of Solution and Its Removal Phenomena From Cooled Solid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masaaki; Nagasaka, Kouji

    Experimental studies for freezing phenomena of ethylene glycol solution on cooled plate have been performed. A polyvinyl chloride as well as an acrylic resin plates are used for the cooled plates. It is found that the crystal ice formed at the cooled plate is removed from the plate due to buoyancy force acting the crystal ice. It means that ice formation on a cooled plate without deposit ice layer is possible by the present method. It is shown that the cooled plate surface is under cooled about 1.0~1.5 degree below the freezing temperature of the solution during the crystal ice formation and its removal phenomena. The degree of under cooled temperature is unaffected by the cooling temperature of the plate. For higher concentration of solution, it is found that the number of the removed crystal ice per unit time is increased and the volume of each removed ice is decreased.

  4. Comparison of the mechanism of gap formation for tri- and bi-component phononic crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Hong-Gang; Wen Ji-Hong; Liu Yao-Zong; Yu Dian-Long; Wang Gang; Wen Xi-Sen

    2008-01-01

    Using an exact Mie scattering solution, this paper investigates the mode conversions during the Mie scattering of a single bi- or one-component sphere in unbounded epoxy. Then the formation mechanism of the first complete gap in the corresponding tri- or bi-component phononic crystal is investigated by the multiple-scattering method. It is shown that the heavy density of the scatterer plays an essential role in the Mie resonance and the formation of the gaps for both types of the phononic crystals. For the tri-component phononic crystal, the gap is mainly induced by the Mie resonance of the single scatterer. For the bi-component phononic crystal, the transverse wave (by mode-conversion during the Mie scattering under a longitudinal wave incidence) is modulated by the periodicity and governed by the Bloch theory,which induces the gap cooperatively.

  5. Formation and growth mechanism of TiC crystal in TiCp/Ti composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金云学; 王宏伟; 曾松岩; 张二林

    2002-01-01

    Ti-C and Ti-Al-C alloys were prepared using gravity and directional solidification processes. Morphologies of TiC crystal were investigated by using SEM, XRD and EDX. Also, the formation and growth mechanism of TiC crystal have been analyzed on the basis of coordination polyhedron growth unit theory. During solidification of titanium alloys, the coordination polyhedron growth unit is TiC6. TiC6 growth units stack in a linking mode of edge to edge and form octahedral TiC crystal with {111} planes as present faces. Although the growing geometry of TiC crystal is decided by its lattice structure, the final morphology of TiC crystal depends on the effects of its growth environment. In solute concentration distribution, the super-saturation of C or TiC6 at the corners of octahedral TiC crystal is much higher than that of edges and faces of octahedral TiC crystal. At these corners the driving force for crystal growth is greater and the interface is instable which contribute to quick stacking rate of growth units at these corners and result in secondary dendrite arms along TiC crystallographic 〈100〉 directions. TiC crystal finally grows to be dendrites.

  6. Monitoring of hydroxyapatite crystal formation using field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajisa, Taira; Sakata, Toshiya

    2016-04-01

    The biomineralization process of hydroxyapatite (HAp) in simulated body fluid (SBF) was monitored in realtime using extended-gate FETs whose gate electrode was modified with a variety of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). It was found that the gate surface potential of the carboxyl- and amino-group-terminated SAM-coated gate FET was increased in SBF as HAp crystals grew on the gate surface. Moreover, in the carboxyl-group-terminated SAM-coated gate FET, the rate of increase and the shift of gate surface potential of the FET were found to depend on the concentration of calcium ions in the SBF. It was concluded that the process of HAp crystallization at a SAM-modified surface can be detected using FETs. Thus, a FET device that enables the easy detection of ionic charges in a real-time and label-free manner, will be useful for evaluating biomaterials based on biomineralization such as those in the bone regeneration process.

  7. Nanocrystalline structure formation at crystallization of Fe-Nd films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe100-xNdx films (x=33,50,75,83) were prepared by vacuum evaporation technique. The TEM data show that initial films contain amorphous phase. Maximal quantity of amorphous phase was found for x=33. The diffraction of amorphous phase differs from ones of as-quenched alloys. The films were treated by electron beam treatment in-situ at multistage regime. The crystallization process was registered step by step. The different behavior at various intensity of treatment was observed. During the first stage of treatment the nanosize precipitations (7-50 nm) are found to form. Relatively stable nanocrystalline structure at x=33 consists of α-Fe precipitations in amorphous matrix. Fine dispersed nanosize structure appears at first stage of crystallization in films with x=75. During electron beam treatment the last structure transforms in local spherical areas. In films at x=83 the bcc-Nd based solid solution and/or fcc γ-phase appear. (orig.)

  8. Adding microchemistry to microstructure: Potential causes for the formation of continuous crystal networks in subliquidus basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethian, J. A.; Suckale, J.

    2013-12-01

    Much of the compositional variation of igneous rocks results from the separation of liquid from crystals, a process that depends sensitively on the presence of crystal networks. The formation of a continuous crystal network may also lead to finite yield strength and thus cause a change from a Newtonian to a nonlinear rheology with important consequences for flow behavior. While numerous empirical relationships describing yield strength in particle suspensions exist, they provide limited insight into the physics underlying the rheological transition. The goal of this study is to investigate potential causes behind the formation of crystal networks and the associated onset of yield strength. We have developed a computational technique for modeling flow at the scale of individual crystals in both 2D and 3D. In our computations, crystals and magmatic fluid are fully coupled meaning that we are not only resolving the effect of the ambient flow field on the motion of the crystals, but also the hydrodynamic interactions between crystals and their feedback on the magmatic liquid. This type of approach allows us to derive the macroscopic behavior of the aggregate essentially from first principles. We assume that the basaltic liquid has a Newtonian rheology and that the crystals behave as solid bodies. The solid-body motion of the crystals can then be captured through an additional body force in the Stokes equation, which obviates the need for a body-fitted mesh and improves the computational efficiency in 3D. We have extensively benchmarked our code for both spherical and cubical crystal shapes to verify that we are able to reproduce drag forces measured in experiments. Previous studies have demonstrated that crystal shape is an important parameter in determining the crystal fraction over which crystal-bearing magmas exhibit finite yield strengths. The structural characteristics of the crystalline phase, including the shape and aspect ratio of individual crystals as well as

  9. Mechanisms of color centor formation in chromium-containing scandium garnet crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhanisms of absorption induced by UV pumping radiation in chromium-containing crystals of scandium garnets (GSGG:Cr3+; GSGG:Cr3+, Nd3+; ISGG:Cr3+) are revealed. It is experimentally ascertained that color center formation processes in two-activated crystals are sufficiently suppressed. This is conditioned by a reduction of contribution to the process of coloring of charges released by shortwave pumping radiation from Cr3+ ion metastable level, the population of which in a two-activated crystal is low due to efficient Cr3+→Nd3+ energy transfer

  10. Wigner crystal model of counterion induced bundle formation of rod-like polyelectrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Shklovskii, B. I.

    1998-01-01

    A simple electrostatic theory of condensation of rod-like polyelectrolytes under influence of polyvalent ions is proposed. It is based on the idea that Manning condensation of ions results in formation of the Wigner crystal on a background of a bundle of rods. It is shown that, depending on a single dimensionless parameter, this can be the densely packed three-dimensional Wigner crystal or the two-dimensional crystal on the rod surfaces. For DNA the location of charge on the spiral results in...

  11. Unsaturated glycerophospholipids mediate heme crystallization: biological implications for hemozoin formation in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Stiebler

    Full Text Available Hemozoin (Hz is a heme crystal produced by some blood-feeding organisms, as an efficient way to detoxify heme derived from hemoglobin digestion. In the triatomine insect Rhodnius prolixus, Hz is essentially produced by midgut extracellular phospholipid membranes known as perimicrovillar membranes (PMVM. Here, we investigated the role of commercial glycerophospholipids containing serine, choline and ethanolamine as headgroups and R. prolixus midgut lipids (RML in heme crystallization. All commercial unsaturated forms of phospholipids, as well as RML, mediated fast and efficient β-hematin formation by means of two kinetically distinct mechanisms: an early and fast component, followed by a late and slow one. The fastest reactions observed were induced by unsaturated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine (uPE and phosphatidylcholine (uPC, with half-lives of 0.04 and 0.7 minutes, respectively. β-hematin crystal morphologies were strikingly distinct among groups, with uPE producing homogeneous regular brick-shaped crystals. Interestingly, uPC-mediated reactions resulted in two morphologically distinct crystal populations: one less representative group of regular crystals, resembling those induced by uPE, and the other largely represented by crystals with numerous sharp edges and tapered ends. Heme crystallization reactions induced by RML were efficient, with a heme to β-hematin conversion rate higher than 70%, but clearly slower (t1/2 of 9.9-17.7 minutes than those induced by uPC and uPE. Interestingly, crystals produced by RML were homogeneous in shape and quite similar to those mediated by uPE. Thus, β-hematin formation can be rapidly and efficiently induced by unsaturated glycerophospholipids, particularly uPE and uPC, and may play a role on biological heme crystallization in R. prolixus midgut.

  12. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kevin; Cerda, Ariel; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota) is one of the most important vegetable cultivated worldwide and the main source of dietary provitamin A. Contrary to other plants, almost all carrot varieties accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids in the root, resulting in a wide variety of colors, including those with purple, yellow, white, red and orange roots. During the first weeks of development the root, grown in darkness, is thin and pale and devoid of carotenoids. At the second month, the thickening of the root and the accumulation of carotenoids begins, and it reaches its highest level at 3 months of development. This normal root thickening and carotenoid accumulation can be completely altered when roots are grown in light, in which chromoplasts differentiation is redirected to chloroplasts development in accordance with an altered carotenoid profile. Here we discuss the current evidence on the biosynthesis of carotenoid in carrot roots in response to environmental cues that has contributed to our understanding of the mechanism that regulates the accumulation of carotenoids, as well as the carotenogenic gene expression and root development in D. carota. PMID:27485223

  13. [Carotenoids: 1. Metabolism and physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, H; Fayol, V; Galabert, C; Grolier, P; Le Moël, G; Steghens, J P; Van Kappel, A; Nabet, F

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids are a family of pigments with at least 600 members. They derive from lycopene after steps of cyclisation, dehydrogenation and oxidation. It is their chemical structure that determines their physiochemical properties and, in part, their biological activities. About 50 carotenoids can be found in human diet and about 20 of them have been found in plasma and tissues. There is no RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) for carotenoids. Quantities of carotenoids in diet are difficult to estimate, partly because methods used for the establishment of food composition tables were not specific and sensitive enough. Also, given values do not always take into account variations due to season and region of culture. Absorption of beta-carotene in humans has been the subject of numerous studies but only very little is known about other carotenoids. In general, absorption depends on bioavailability from the food matrix and solubility in micelles. After absorption through passive diffusion, carotenoids follow the chylomicrons metabolism. They are taken up by the liver and released in the blood stream in lipoproteins (VLDL). Carotenoids with no-substituted beta-ionone cycles (alpha and beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin) have provitamin A activity. Highest activity has been found for all-trans beta-carotene. Not all steps of vitamin A biosynthesis and metabolism of other carotenoids have been clarified yet. Besides their provitamin A activity, carotenoids have numerous biological functions. They are efficient scavengers of free radicals, particularly of 1O2. In vitro they have been shown to protect LDL. However, results in vivo are inconsistent. Other functions include enhancement of gap junctions, immunomodulation and regulation of enzyme activity involved in carcinogenesis. PMID:10210743

  14. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vega, José M.; Inés Garbayo; Francisco Bédmar; María Cuaresma; Carlos Vílchez; Eduardo Forján

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesised by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functions of carotenoids relevant for life on earth. Biological properties of carotenoids allow for wide range of commercial applications. Indeed, recent interest in the carotenoids has be...

  15. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  16. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion.

  17. Analysis of ripple formation in single crystal spot welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Lab de Metallurgie Physique; Corrigan, D.; Boatner, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

    1997-10-01

    Stationary spot welds have been made at the (001) surface of Fe-l5%Ni-15%Cr single crystals using a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA). On the top surface of the spot welds, very regular and concentric ripples were observed after solidification by differential interference color microscopy. Their height (typically 1--5 {micro}m) and spacing (typically {approximately} 60 {micro}m) decreased with the radius of the pool. These ripples were successfully accounted for in terms of capillary-wave theory using the fundamental mode frequency f{sub 0} given by the first zero of the zero-order Bessel function. The spacing d between the ripples was then equated to v{sub s}/f{sub 0}, where v{sub s} is the solidification rate. From the measured ripple spacing, the velocity of the pool was deduced as a function of the radius, and this velocity was in good agreement with the results of a heat-flow simulation.

  18. Photorefractive grating formation in piezoelectric La3Ga5SiO14:Pr3+ crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Hansen, C.; Johansen, P.M.; Fridkin, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    Photorefractive grating formation and erasure in piezoelectric crystals of La3Ga5SiO14:Pr3+ are presented. The specific photoconductivity and the photorefractive sensitivity are determined. The polarization dependence of the grating formation due to the bulk photovoltaic effect is shown and compa......Photorefractive grating formation and erasure in piezoelectric crystals of La3Ga5SiO14:Pr3+ are presented. The specific photoconductivity and the photorefractive sensitivity are determined. The polarization dependence of the grating formation due to the bulk photovoltaic effect is shown...... and compared favorably with the theoretical expression. This photorefractive material provides a possibility for separate investigations of the charge migration processes responsible for the photorefractive effect. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  19. Interface stability and defect formation during crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabietti, L.M.R.

    1991-01-08

    Unidirectional solidification experiments have been carried out in organic crystals with the aim of improving our knowledge on the effects of constraints on the interface morphology and to increase our understanding of the growth of anisotropic materials. The experimental information shows that lateral constraints such as a sharp change in the cross-sectional area in the solid liquid interface path, can produce important changes in the microstructure if the interface morphology is planar, cellular or dendritic. The study of anisotropic materials cover several topics. It is first shown that slight anisotropy does not influence the dendrite tip selection criterion. This conclusion is obtained from the analysis of the relationship between tip radius and velocity for dendrites growing under the steady state condition for two different materials, CBr{sub 4} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}, which have different surface energy anisotropy values. The values of the dendrite operating parameters {sigma}* are compared with the predictions of the solvability theory and the morphological stability theory. The experiments show better agreement with the latter theory. Critical experiments have been designed and carried out to find the response functions which determine the composition and temperature of the interface as a function of velocity in faceted materials. The experiments, carried out in Napthalene-Camphor system, indicate a strong temperature dependence of the planar interface growth which can be correlated with the step growth mechanism. Experiments on the interface instability show an important dependence on the crystallographic orientation. Unidirectional solidification experiments in zone refined Napthalene confined in very thin cells (gap size {le} 50 {mu}m) have proven to be a good method to study the defect production at the solid liquid interface. 118 refs., 90 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Matrix Gla Protein is Involved in Crystal Formation in Kidney of Hyperoxaluric Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Lu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrix Gla protein (MGP is a molecular determinant regulating vascular calcification of the extracellular matrix. However, it is still unclear how MGP may be invovled in crystal formation in the kidney of hyperoxaluric rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the hyperoxaluric group and control group. Hyperoxaluric rats were administrated by 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG for up to 8 weeks. Renal MGP expression was detected by the standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC method. Renal crystal deposition was observed by a polarizing microscope. Total RNA and protein from the rat kidney tissue were extracted. The levels of MGP mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot. Results: Hyperoxaluria was induced successfully in rats. The MGP was polarly distributed, on the apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells, and was found in the ascending thick limbs of Henle's loop (cTAL and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT in hyperoxaluric rats, its expression however, was present in the medullary collecting duct (MCD in stone-forming rats. Crystals with multilaminated structure formed in the injurious renal tubules with lack of MGP expression.MGP mRNA expression was significantly upregulated by the crystals' stimulations. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the MGP was involved in crystals formation by the continuous expression, distributing it polarly in the renal tubular cells and binding directly to the crystals.

  1. The formation and crystallization for amorphous AlFeZr{sub 4} prepared by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Hongmei, E-mail: chenhm@gxu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Nonferrous Metals and Materials of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Ouyang Yifang [Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Nonferrous Metals and Materials of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Guo Debo [Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Nonferrous Metals and Materials of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Liao Shuzhi [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhong Xiaping [Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Nonferrous Metals and Materials of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Du Yong; Liu Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2010-04-15

    Amorphous AlFeZr{sub 4} alloy has been prepared from elemental mixture powders by mechanical alloying. The microstructure, thermal stability and morphology of as-milled mixture powders were analyzed by XRD and DTA respectively. Two sequential exothermal peaks exist during the procedure of crystallization. The effective activation energies for crystallization were evaluated according to Kissinger's plot. The crystallization products of as-milled powders annealed at temperature over the crystallization temperature were studied, and the structural characteristic analysis of annealed sample was performed in an X-ray diffractometer. The crystallized phases are composed of FeZr{sub 2}, AlZr{sub 2} and AlFeZr intermetallic compounds. The formation enthalpies for FeZr{sub 2}, AlZr{sub 2} and AlFeZr are calculated from first-principles and Miedema's theory. Based on the calculated formation enthalpies, the products of crystallization for amorphous AlFeZr{sub 4} alloy are explained from thermodynamic point of view.

  2. Refractive Index Change and Color Center Formation in LiYF_4 Crystal Induced by a Femtosecond Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The refractive index change and color centers formation in LiYF4 crystal at room temperature are induced by a femtosecond laser irradiation. A mechanism for refractive index change and color centers formation is proposed.

  3. Refractive Index Change and Color Center Formation in LiYF4 Crystal Induced by a Femtosecond Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanzhong Zhao; Jianrong Qiu; Lüyun Yang; Xiongwei Jiang; Congshan Zhu

    2003-01-01

    The refractive index change and color centers formation in LiYF4 crystal at room temperature are induced by a femtosecond laser irradiation. A mechanism for refractive index change and color centers formation is proposed.

  4. Dynamics of Crystal Formation in the Greenland NorthGRIP Ice Core

    CERN Document Server

    Mathiesen, J; Jensen, M H; Levinsen, M; Olesen, P; Dahl-Jensen, D; Svensson, A; Mathiesen, Joachim; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Levinsen, Mogens; Olesen, Poul; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Svensson, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The North Greenland Ice Core Project (NorthGRIP) provides paleoclimatic information back to at least 115 kyr before present [Dahl-Jensen et al., 2002]. Each year, precipitation on the ice sheet covers it with a new layer of snow, which gradually transforms into ice crystals as the layer sinks into the ice sheet. The size distribution of ice crystals has been measured at selected depths in the upper 880 m of the NorthGRIP ice core [Svensson et al., 2003b], which cover a time span of 5300 years. The distributions change with time toward a universal curve, indicating a common underlying physical process in the formation of crystals. We identify this process as an interplay between fragmentation of the crystals and diffusion of their grain boundaries. The process is described by a two-parameter differential equation to which we obtain the exact solution. The solution is in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed distributions.

  5. The Formation of Crystal Defects in a Fe-Mn-Si Alloy Under Cyclic Martensitic Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Vladimir I; Danilchenko, Vitaliy E; Iakovlev, Viktor E

    2016-12-01

    Formation of crystalline defects due to cyclic martensitic transformations (CMT) in the iron-manganese Fe-18 wt.% Mn-2 wt.% Si alloy was investigated using X-ray diffractometry. Conditions for accumulation of fragment sub-boundaries with low-angle misorientations and chaotic stacking faults in crystal lattice of austenite and ε-martensite were analyzed.

  6. Formation of nano-hydroxyapatite crystal in situ in chitosan-pectin polyelectrolyte complex network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)/polysaccharide composites have been widely used in bone tissue engineering due to their chemical similarity to natural bone. Polymer matrix-mediated synthesis of nano-hydroxyapatite is one of the simplest models for biomimetic. In this article, the nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan-pectin (nHCP) composites were prepared through in situ mineralization of hydroxyapatite in chitosan-pectin polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) network. The formation processes of nHCP were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The interactions between nHA crystal and chitosan-pectin PEC networks were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The morphology and structure of nHA crystal were characterized by XRD and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Results suggested that the interfacial interactions between nano-hydroxyapatite crystal and chitosan-pectin PEC network assist the site specific nucleation and growth of nHA nanoparticles. The nHA crystals grow along the c-axis. In this process, pH value is the main factor to control the nucleation and growth of nHA crystal in chitosan-pectin PEC networks, because both the interactions' strength between nHA crystal and chitosan-pectin and diffusion rate of inorganic ions depend on the pH value of the reaction system. Apart from the pH value, the chitosan/pectin ratio and [Ca2+] also take important effects on the formation of nHA crystal. An effective way to control the size of nHA crystal is to adjust the content of pectin and [Ca2+]. It is interesting that the Zeta potential of nHCP composites is about - 30 mV when the chitosan/pectin ratio ≤ 1:1, and the dispersion solution of nHCP composites has higher stability, which provides the possibility to prepare 3D porous scaffolds with nHCP for bone tissue engineering.

  7. Formation of large (≃100 μm ice crystals near the tropical tropopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Sayres

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-altitude aircraft measurements with in situ imaging instruments indicated the presence of relatively large (≃100 μm length, thin (aspect ratios of ≃6:1 or larger hexagonal plate ice crystals near the tropical tropopause in very low concentrations (<0.01 L−1. These crystals were not produced by deep convection or aggregation. We use simple growth-sedimentation calculations as well as detailed cloud simulations to evaluate the conditions required to grow the large crystals. Uncertainties in crystal aspect ratio leave a range of possibilities, which could be constrained by knowledge of the water vapor concentration in the air where the crystal growth occurred. Unfortunately, water vapor measurements made in the cloud formation region near the tropopause ranged from <2 ppmv to ≃3.5 ppmv. The higher water vapor concentrations correspond to very large ice supersaturations (relative humidities with respect to ice of about 200%. If the aspect ratios of the hexagonal plate crystals are as small as the image analysis suggests (6:1, see companion paper Lawson et al., 2007 then growth of the large crystals before they sediment out of the supersaturated layer would only be possible if the water vapor concentration were on the high end of the range indicated by the different measurements (>3 ppmv. On the other hand, if the crystal aspect ratios are quite a bit larger (≃14, then H2O concentrations toward the low of the measurement range (≃2–2.3 ppmv would suffice to grow the large crystals. Gravity-wave driven temperature and vertical wind perturbations only slightly modify the H2O concentrations needed to grow the crystals. We find that it would not be possible to grow the large crystals with water concentrations less than 2 ppmv, even with assumptions of a very high aspect ratio of 15 and steady upward motion of 2 cm s−1 to loft the crystals in the tropopause region. These calculations would seem to imply that the measurements

  8. Formation of Large (Approximately 100 micrometers) Ice Crystals Near the Tropical Tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. J.; Pfister, L.; Bui, T. V.; Lawson, P.; Baker, B.; Mo, Q.; Baumgardner, D.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Moyer, E. J.; Hanisco, T. F.; Sayres, D. S.; SaintClair, J. M.; Alexander, M.; Toon, O. B.; Smith, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent high-altitude aircraft measurements with in situ imaging instruments indicated the presence of relatively large (approx.100 microns length), thin (aspect ratios of approx.6:1 or larger) hexagonal plate ice crystals near the tropical tropopause in very low concentrations (formation region near the tropopause with different instruments ranged from ice supersaturations (relative humidities with respect to ice of about 200%). If the aspect ratios of the hexagonal plate crystals are as small as the image analysis suggests (6:1, see companion paper (Lawson et al., 2008)) then growth of the large crystals before they sediment out of the supersaturated layer would only be possible if the water vapor concentration were on the high end of the range indicated by the different measurements (>3 ppmv). On the other hand, if the crystal aspect ratios are quite a bit larger (approx.10:1), then H2O concentrations toward the low end of the measurement range (approx.2-2.5 ppmv) would suffice to grow the large crystals. Gravity-wave driven temperature and vertical wind perturbations only slightly modify the H2O concentrations needed to grow the crystals. We find that it would not be possible to grow the large crystals with water concentrations less than 2 ppmv, even with assumptions of a very high aspect ratio of 15 and steady upward motion of 2 cm/s to loft the crystals in the tropopause region. These calculations would seem to imply that the measurements indicating water vapor concentrations less than 2ppmv are implausible, but we cannot rule out the possibility that higher humidity prevailed upstream of the aircraft measurements and the air was dehydrated by the cloud formation. Simulations of the cloud formation with a detailed model indicate that homogeneous freezing should generate ice concentrations larger than the observed concentrations (20/L), and even concentrations as low as 20/L should have depleted the vapor in excess of saturation and prevented growth of large

  9. Disorderly crystal structures in transition metal rich-metalloid alloys: implications for glass formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easy glass formation usually occurs near eutectics where the glass forming temperature is close to the melting point. However, as Anderson observed [1], other factors also enter. Citing covalent systems such as SiO2 and GeS2, he noted that glass formation is favored when the crystal structure(s) of the compounds are complicated. The purpose of the present communication is to see what transition metal rich-metalloid compounds have complicated structures and what implications this might have for glass formation

  10. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI2 with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD+-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state

  11. Ion-induced pattern formation on indium tin oxide for alignment of liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Škereň, T., E-mail: tomas.skeren@fjfi.cvut.cz [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Doornaert, D. [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Wave Propagation and Signal Processing Research Group, KU Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Glorieux, C. [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Modarresi, H. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); Guan, T. [Departement Elektrotechniek ESAT-MICAS, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Temst, K. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); Vandervorst, W. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium)

    2015-08-31

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is broadly used as a transparent conducting material for electrodes in optoelectronic devices. Irradiation of ITO with low energy ions can result in the formation of periodic surface nanopatterns which can serve as an alternative for the polymer alignment layer in liquid crystal devices. We investigated the formation of the ion-induced surface nanopatterns on ITO with focus on the influence of the crystalline structure of the material. We find that the crystallinity plays a crucial role in the pattern formation, with no pattern developing on an amorphous ITO surface. We discuss these findings in the context of the state-of-the-art theory for ion-induced patterning. We show that the ion-induced pattern plays a critical role in the liquid crystal alignment on ITO surfaces.

  12. Formation of large (≃100 μm ice crystals near the tropical tropopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Alexander

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-altitude aircraft measurements with in situ imaging instruments indicated the presence of relatively large (≃100 μm length, thin (aspect ratios of ≃6:1 or larger hexagonal plate ice crystals near the tropical tropopause in very low concentrations (<0.01 L−1. These crystals were not produced by deep convection or aggregation. We use simple growth-sedimentation calculations as well as detailed cloud simulations to evaluate the conditions required to grow the large crystals. Uncertainties in crystal aspect ratio leave a range of possibilities, which could be constrained by knowledge of the water vapor concentration in the air where the crystal growth occurred. Unfortunately, water vapor measurements made in the cloud formation region near the tropopause with different instruments ranged from <2 ppmv to ≃3.5 ppmv. The higher water vapor concentrations correspond to very large ice supersaturations (relative humidities with respect to ice of about 200%. If the aspect ratios of the hexagonal plate crystals are as small as the image analysis suggests (6:1, see companion paper (Lawson et al., 2008 then growth of the large crystals before they sediment out of the supersaturated layer would only be possible if the water vapor concentration were on the high end of the range indicated by the different measurements (>3 ppmv. On the other hand, if the crystal aspect ratios are quite a bit larger (≃10:1, then H2O concentrations toward the low end of the measurement range (≃2–2.5 ppmv would suffice to grow the large crystals. Gravity-wave driven temperature and vertical wind perturbations only slightly modify the H2O concentrations needed to grow the crystals. We find that it would not be possible to grow the large crystals with water concentrations less than 2 ppmv, even with assumptions of a very high aspect ratio of 15 and steady upward motion of 2 cm s−1 to loft the crystals in the tropopause region. These calculations would seem

  13. Self-Organized Collective Crystal-Like Formations of the Attractive/repulsive Swarming System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wen-Qiang; Gao, Dan; Wang, Ying-Guan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive attractive/repulsive (A/R) swarming model is proposed to explore the role of self-organized formation in swarming systems. By defining the adjustable A/R range γi, which is affected by the localized steady state of agents, the standard collective crystal-like swarming formations are straightforwardly unfolded in different scale. Meanwhile, with numerical simulations and analyses, the results show that the adaptive A/R swarming model provides an effective solution to the current existing dilemma of the collective liquid-like formation with unexpected neighbor distances and the split crystal-like formation. The actual neighbor distance of the adaptive A/R model could converge to the expected neighbor distance as planned, based on the different settings of the expected neighbor distance and the A/R range. Moreover, such adjustable A/R swarming formations may find their potential applications such as the formation of self-organized multi-robots and unmanned aerial vehicles, the automatic networking of sensors, etc.

  14. Carotenoid profile and retention in yellow-, purple- and red-fleshed potatoes after thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotíková, Zora; Šulc, Miloslav; Lachman, Jaromír; Pivec, Vladimír; Orsák, Matyáš; Hamouz, Karel

    2016-04-15

    This research aimed to investigate the effect of thermal processing on carotenoid profile, quantity and stability in 22 colour-fleshed potato cultivars grown in the Czech Republic. The total of nine carotenoids was analysed by HPLC using a C30 column and PDA detection. The total carotenoid content for all cultivars ranged from 1.44 to 40.13 μg/g DM. Yellow cultivars showed a much higher average total carotenoid content (26.22 μg/g DM) when compared to red/purple-fleshed potatoes (5.69 μg/g DM). Yellow cultivars were dominated by antheraxanthin, whereas neoxanthin was the main carotenoid in red/purple cultivars. Thermal processing significantly impacted all potato cultivars. Boiling decreased the total carotenoids by 92% compared to baking (88%). Lutein was the most stable carotenoid against thermal processing (decreased by 24-43%) followed by β-carotene (decreased by 78-83%); other carotenoids were degraded nearly completely. Increased formation of (Z)-isomers by thermal processing has not been confirmed. PMID:26617045

  15. The Or Gene Enhances Carotenoid Accumulation and Stability During Post-Harvest Storage of Potato Tubers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Mark Failla; Theodore W.Thannhauser; Yong Yang; Qiang Xu; Katherine Owsiany; Ralf Welsch; Chureeporn Chitchumroonchokchai; Shan Lu; Joyce Van Eck; Xiu-Xin Deng

    2012-01-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality.To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability,we investigated transgenic potato tubers that expressed the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene.We found that the Or transgene not only promoted retention of β-carotene level,but also continuously stimulated its accumulation during 5 months of cold storage.In contrast,no increased levels of carotenoids were observed in the tubers of vector-only controls or a yellowflesh variety during the same period of storage.The increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be associated with the formation of lipoprotein-carotenoid sequestering structures,as well as with the enhanced abundance of phytoene synthase,a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway.Furthermore,the provitamin A carotenoids stored were shown to be stable during simulated digestion and accessible for uptake by human intestinal absorptive cells.Proteomic analysis identified three major functional groups of proteins (i.e.heat shock proteins,glutathione-S-transferases,and carbohydrate metabolic proteins) that are potentially important in the Or-regulated carotenoid accumulation.Our results show that regulation of carotenoid sequestration capacity is an important mechanism by which carotenoid stability is regulated.Our findings suggest that induction of a proper sink structure formation in staple crops may provide the crops with a unique ability to promote and/or stabilize provitamin A accumulation during plant growth and post-harvest storage.

  16. Crystal growth limitation as a critical factor for formation of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we study the formation mechanism and crystallization behavior of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses influenced by the addition of rare-earth elements. Samples are characterized by conventional X-ray diffractometry, optical microscopy, and high-resolution field-emission-gun scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In the rare-earth-containing alloys, bulk metallic glasses are formed with populations of quenched-in nuclei. Consequently, crystallization on isothermal annealing occurs without any incubation period. This behavior, not typical of bulk metallic glasses in general, implies that in the rare-earth-containing alloys glass formation is possible only because of restricted crystal growth: both on cooling from the molten and on heating from the glassy state, growth of the primary χ-Fe36Cr12Mo10 crystals is too slow to be significant on a reasonable timescale. The low growth rate is connected with large inhomogeneous strain in the growing nanoparticles, while nucleation of eutectic colonies is hampered by slow diffusion of a rare-earth alloying element

  17. Do carboximide–carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanpreet Kaur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular interactions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations.

  18. Formation of Nanotwin Networks during High-Temperature Crystallization of Amorphous Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis; Reina, Celia; Marian, Jaime

    2015-11-01

    Germanium is an extremely important material used for numerous functional applications in many fields of nanotechnology. In this paper, we study the crystallization of amorphous Ge using atomistic simulations of critical nano-metric nuclei at high temperatures. We find that crystallization occurs by the recurrent transfer of atoms via a diffusive process from the amorphous phase into suitably-oriented crystalline layers. We accompany our simulations with a comprehensive thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the growth process, which explains the energy balance and the interfacial growth velocities governing grain growth. For the crystallographic orientation, we find a degenerate atomic rearrangement process, with two zero-energy modes corresponding to a perfect crystalline structure and the formation of a Σ3 twin boundary. Continued growth in this direction results in the development a twin network, in contrast with all other growth orientations, where the crystal grows defect-free. This particular mechanism of crystallization from amorphous phases is also observed during solid-phase epitaxial growth of semiconductor crystals, where growth is restrained to one dimension. We calculate the equivalent X-ray diffraction pattern of the obtained nanotwin networks, providing grounds for experimental validation.

  19. Relationship between Multi-Phase Formation and Molecular Structure for Liquid Crystal System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhenxin; MA Heng; LI Shipu

    2005-01-01

    A mechanical model of liquid crystals ( LCs ) was used to explain the phase formation and thermal properties. The LC phases in the model are micro-machine systems consisting of an ensemble of molecular rotors, and some dynamic parameters in a semi-experiment molecular orbit method. A novel explanation on the multi-phase formation of LC system is obtained. It is found that the value of the critical rotational velocity is a key parameter for the characterization of each homologous series. The dipole moment of the molecules was also discussed.

  20. Vitamin E attenuates crystal formation in rat kidneys: roles of renal tubular cell death and crystallization inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-S; Chen, J; Chen, C-F; Ma, M-C

    2006-08-01

    We previously reported that oxidative stress and renal tubular damage occur in chronic hyperoxaluric rats. However, the in vivo responses of renal epithelial cells after vitamin E administration and their correlations with calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal formation have not been evaluated. Male Wistar rats received 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG) for 7, 21, or 42 days to induce CaOx deposition (EG group). Another group of EG-treated rats received 200 mg kg(-1) of vitamin E intraperitoneally (EG+E group) to evaluate its effect on hyperoxaluria. Urinary electrolytes and biochemistry and levels of lipid peroxides and enzymes were examined, together with serum vitamin E levels. Levels of the tubular markers, alpha and mu glutathione S-transferase, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), osteopontinin (OPN), and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) were also measured, and TUNEL staining was performed to examine the viability of the tubular epithelium. There were no significant differences between the two age-matched controls either untreated or given vitamin E. Compared to untreated controls, tubular cell death was increased at all time points in EG rats with a gradual increase in CaOx crystals, whereas the number of PCNA-positive cells was only significantly increased on day 21. In EG+E rats, tubular cell death was decreased compared to the EG group, and cell proliferation was seen at all time points, while CaOx crystal deposition was decreased, but hyperoxaluria, urinary lipid peroxides, and enzymuria were unaffected. Vitamin E supplement prevented the loss of OPN and THP in renal tissues by EG and the reduction in their levels in the urine. The beneficial effect of vitamin E in reducing CaOx accumulation is due to attenuation of tubular cell death and enhancement of the defensive roles of OPN and THP.

  1. Formation of a Tropopause Cirrus Layer Observed over Florida during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Thaopaul; Weinheimer, Andrew; Weinstock, Elliot; Smith, Jessica; Pittman, Jasna; Baumgardner, Darrel; Lawson, Paul; McGill, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    On July 13, 2002 a widespread, subvisible tropopause cirrus layer occurred over the Florida region. This cloud was observed in great detail with the NASA Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) instrumentation, including in situ measurements with the WB-57 aircraft. In this paper, we use the 13 July cloud as a case study to evaluate the physical processes controlling the formation and evolution of tropopause cirrus layers. Microphysics measurements indicate that ice crystal diameters in the cloud layer ranged from about 7 to 50 microns, and the peak number mode was about 10-25 microns. In situ water vapor and temperature measurements in the cloud indicated supersaturation with respect to ice throughout, with ice saturation ratios as large as 1.8. Even when the ice surface area density was as high as about 500 sq microns/cu cm, ice supersaturations of 20-30% were observed. Trajectory analysis shows that the air sampled near the tropopause on this day generally came from the north and cooled considerably during the previous few days. Examination of infrared satellite imagery along air parcel back trajectories from the WB-57 flight track indicates that the tropopause cloud layer formation was, in general, not simply left over ice from recently generated anvil cirrus. Simulations of cloud formation using time-height curtains of temperature along the trajectory paths show that the cloud could have formed in situ near the tropopause as the air was advected into the south Florida region and cooled to unusually low temperatures. If we assume a high threshold for ice nucleation via homogeneous freezing of aqueous sulfate aerosols, the model reproduces the observed cloud structure, ice crystal size distributions, and ice supersaturation statistics. Inclusion of observed gravity wave temperature perturbations in the simulations is essential to reproduce the observed cloud properties. Without waves, crystal

  2. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Two-Dimensional Locally Resonant Sonic Crystals Comprised of Helmholtz Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, L.; Elford, D. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Swallowe, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new type of sonic crystal technology offering a novel method of achieving broad acoustic band gaps. The proposed design of a locally resonating sonic crystal (LRSC) is constructed from "C"-shaped Helmholtz resonators as opposed to traditional solid scattering units. This unique construction enables a two band gap system to be generated in which the first -- a Bragg type band gap, arises due to the periodic nature of the crystal, whilst the second gap results from resonance of the air column within the resonators. The position of this secondary band gap is found to be dependent upon the dimensions of the resonating cavity. The band gap formation is investigated theoretically using finite element methods, and confirmed through experimental testing. It is noted that the resonance band gaps detected cover a much broader frequency range (in the order of kHz) than has been achieved to date. In addition the possibility of overlapping such a wide band gap with the characteristic Bragg gap generated by the structure itself could yield gaps of even greater range. A design of sonic crystal is proposed, that comprises of several resonators with differing cavity sizes. Such a structure generates multiple resonance gaps corresponding to the various resonator sizes, which may be overlapped to form yet larger band gaps. This multiple resonance gap system can occur in two configurations. Firstly a simple mixed array can be created by alternating resonator sizes in the array and secondly using a System coined the Matryoshka (Russian doll) array in which the resonators are distributed inside one another. The proposed designs of LRSC's offer a real potential for acoustic shielding using sonic crystals, as both the size and position of the band gaps generated can be controlled. This is an application which has been suggested and investigated for several years with little progress. Furthermore the frequency region attenuated by resonance is unrelated to the crystals lattice

  3. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  4. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  5. Controlling competition between crystallization and glass formation in binary colloids with an external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism by which a liquid may become arrested, forming a glass, is a long-standing problem. So far no clear structural mechanism has been found. One promising approach is to use real space analysis of colloidal dispersions at the single-particle level to reveal local structural details which are inaccessible to many experimental techniques. Here we report a simple method to control glass formation which enables us to tackle the competition between crystallization and vitrification. While monodisperse colloidal hard spheres may readily crystallize, polydisperse suspensions tend to form glassy structures. We exploit the difference in sedimentation velocities of colloidal particles of different sizes, leading to a sediment which changes continuously in composition as a function of height, revealing glassy and crystalline states

  6. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and Charge Transfer Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation describes the development and implementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probe apparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation of investigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specific attention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highly symmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes the development and construction of the experimental apparatus used throughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss the investigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resulting from a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of its methyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we are able to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provide evidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT) type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1 state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of the carotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidence for the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systems and found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigation of the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsible for the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allows for a more detailed understanding of the importance of structural dynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting

  7. Carotenoids in Adipose Tissue Biology and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, M Luisa; Canas, Jose A; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Cell, animal and human studies dealing with carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives as nutritional regulators of adipose tissue biology with implications for the etiology and management of obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases are reviewed. Most studied carotenoids in this context are β-carotene, cryptoxanthin, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, together with β-carotene-derived retinoids and some other apocarotenoids. Studies indicate an impact of these compounds on essential aspects of adipose tissue biology including the control of adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis), adipocyte metabolism, oxidative stress and the production of adipose tissue-derived regulatory signals and inflammatory mediators. Specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives restrain adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy while enhancing fat oxidation and energy dissipation in brown and white adipocytes, and counteract obesity in animal models. Intake, blood levels and adipocyte content of carotenoids are reduced in human obesity. Specifically designed human intervention studies in the field, though still sparse, indicate a beneficial effect of carotenoid supplementation in the accrual of abdominal adiposity. In summary, studies support a role of specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives in the prevention of excess adiposity, and suggest that carotenoid requirements may be dependent on body composition. PMID:27485231

  8. Formation of classical crystals of dipolar particles in a helical geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    K. Pedersen, J.; V. Fedorov, D.; S. Jensen, A.;

    2014-01-01

    We consider crystal formation of particles with dipole-dipole interactions that are confined to move in a one-dimensional helical geometry with their dipole moments oriented along the symmetry axis of the confining helix. The stable classical lowest energy configurations are found to be chain...... dipoles per revolution, this implies a breaking of the initial periodicity to form a cluster of two chains close together and a third chain removed from the cluster. This is driven by the competition between in-chain and out-of-chain interactions, or alternatively the side-by-side repulsion and the head...

  9. Formation Mechanism of Guided Resonances and Bound States in the Continuum in Photonic Crystal Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Xingwei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry-P\\'erot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, as well as BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry.

  10. Signatures for Wigner crystal formation in the chemical potential of a two-dimensional electron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding; Huang, Xuting; Dietsche, Werner; von Klitzing, Klaus; Smet, Jurgen H

    2014-08-15

    We investigate the evolution of the chemical potential of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) as a function of density at a fixed magnetic field. By using a bilayer system, changes in the chemical potential of one 2DES are determined from the density variation induced in the second, nearby 2DES. At high magnetic fields around a filling factor of ν=1 or ν=2, the chemical potential jump associated with the condensation in a quantum Hall state exhibits two anomalies symmetrically located around these integer filling factors. They are attributed to the formation of a 2D Wigner crystal of quasiparticles. PMID:25170727

  11. Network formation in colloid-liquid crystal mixtures studied by confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J; Poon, W C K [School of Physics and the Collaborative Optical Spectroscopy, Micromanipulation and Imaging Centre (COSMIC), JCMB, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-19

    We studied the formation of particle networks in colloid + liquid crystal mixtures cooled below the isotropic-nematic transition temperature by time-resolved laser scanning confocal microscopy. Our observations confirm a recent suggestion that alkane impurities play a crucial role in slowing down the speed of the isotropic-nematic interface. This enables the growing nematic droplets to 'push' particles into increasingly concentrated regions, ultimately resulting in a cellular network solid. We also found that faster cooling rates resulted in increasingly hierarchical cellular structures.

  12. Influence of dietary carotenoids on radical scavenging capacity of the skin and skin lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, M C; Friedrich, A; Tscherch, K; Haag, S F; Darvin, M E; Vollert, H; Groth, N; Lademann, J; Rohn, S

    2013-06-01

    Nutrition rich in carotenoids is well known to prevent cell damage, premature skin aging, and skin cancer. Cutaneous carotenoids can be enriched in the skin by nutrition and topically applied antioxidants have shown an increase in radical protection after VIS/NIR irradiation. In this paper, it was investigated whether orally administered carotenoids increase the radical scavenging activity and the radical protection of the skin using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the skin lipid profile was investigated applying HPTLC on skin lipid extracts. Furthermore, in vivo Raman resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the cutaneous carotenoid concentration. A double blind placebo controlled clinical study was performed with 24 healthy volunteers, who have shown a slow but significant and effective increase in cutaneous carotenoids in the verum group. The enhancement in carotenoids increases the radical scavenging activity of the skin and provides a significant protection against stress induced radical formation. Furthermore, the skin lipids in the verum group increased compared to the placebo group but only significantly for ceramide [NS]. These results indicate that a supplementation with dietary products containing carotenoids in physiological concentrations can protect the skin against reactive oxygen species and could avoid premature skin aging and other radical associated skin diseases.

  13. Statistical optimisation of cell growth and carotenoid production by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iriani R. Maldonade

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential statistical methods were used to maximise carotenoid production by a strain of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, isolated from the Brazilian ecosystem. Initially, a factorial 2(5-1 experimental design was used, and the variables were pH and the levels of glucose, yeast extract, MgSO4.7H2O and KH2PO4. The nitrogen source (yeast extract was the most important variable in enhancing carotenoid production; MgSO4.7H2O and KH2PO4 had a negative influence. The initial pH had no significant effect on carotenoid and cell productions. We further investigated the effects of glucose and yeast extract effects, using a second-order central composite design (CCD to optimise carotenoid production, which was adequately approximated with a full quadratic equation obtained from a two-factor-2-level design. The analysis of quadratic surfaces showed that after 5 days of cultivation at 25ºC, the maximum carotenoid concentration (745 µg l-1 was obtained with 15 g l-1 of yeast extract and 20 g l-1 of glucose. The maximum carotenoid production (152 µg g-1 was obtained with 5 g l-1 yeast extract and 10 g l-1 glucose. Carotenoid formation was more sensitive to changes in yeast extract concentration than to changes in glucose concentration. Maximum cell production was achieved with 15-17 g l-1 of yeast extract and 15-20 g l-1 of glucose.

  14. Experimental evidence for the participation of deep eutectic solvents in silver chloride crystal formation at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jitkumar; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-05-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) obtained by the complexation of choline chloride (ChoCl) as hydrogen bond acceptor and hydrogen bond donors such as ethylene glycol (ChoCl-EG 1:2) and glycerol (ChoCl-Gly 1:2) were used as media for the formation of AgCl crystals. Although formation of AgCl crystals was observed in both the solvents but the rate of formation of crystals was faster in ChoCl-EG 1:2 at low temperature (4-5 °C). In the crystals, cholinium cations were found to be present with chloride ions bridged with Ag ions resulting generation of 1D network of AgCl2 anions.

  15. Microalgae as Sources of Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Xavier Malcata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine microalgae constitute a natural source of a variety of drugs for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications—which encompass carotenoids, among others. A growing body of experimental evidence has confirmed that these compounds can play important roles in prevention (and even treatment of human diseases and health conditions, e.g., cancer, cardiovascular problems, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy, cataracts and some neurological disorders. The underlying features that may account for such favorable biological activities are their intrinsic antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumoral features. In this invited review, the most important issues regarding synthesis of carotenoids by microalgae are described and discussed—from both physiological and processing points of view. Current gaps of knowledge, as well as technological opportunities in the near future relating to this growing field of interest, are also put forward in a critical manner.

  16. Microparticle Formation and Crystallization Rate of HMX with Supercritical CO2 Antisolvent Recrystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Microparticle formation and crystallization rate of 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX) in acetone solution using supercritical carbon dioxide antisolvent (GAS) recrystallization were studied. Scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared radiation were used to examine particle size, crystallinity and chemical structure. The results show that β-HMX microparticle in different average size (2-9.5μm) and with narrow size distribution were obtained by controlling the expansibility, expansion speed, initial concentration and temperature during recrystallization of HMX. The formation of nuclei may be a main cause of consumption of solute when the solution is expanded rapidly enough and the equilibrium concentration is lower, in which almost monodisperse microparticle can be obtained.

  17. Microparticle Formation and Crystallization Rate of HMX with Supercritical CO2 Antisolvent Recrystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡建国; 周展云; 邓修

    2001-01-01

    Microparticle formation and crystallization rate of 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-l,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX) in acetone solution using supercritical carbon dioxide antisolvent (GAS) recrystallization were studied. Scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared radiation were used to examine particle size, crystallinity and chemical structure. The results show that β-HMX microparticle in different average size (2--9.5μm) and with narrow size distribution were obtained by controlling the expansibility, expansion speed, initial concentration and temperature during recrystallization of HMX. The formation of nuclei may be a main cause of consumption of solute when the solution is expanded rapidly enough and the equilibrium concentration is lower, in which almost monodisperse microparticle can be obtained.

  18. Formation of Polymer Networks for Fast In-Plane Switching of Liquid Crystals at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Byeong-Hun; Song, Dong Han; Kim, Ki-Han; Wok Park, Byung; Choi, Sun-Wook; Park, Sung Il; Kang, Sung Gu; Yoon, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byeong Koo; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2013-09-01

    We formed a polymer structure to enable fast in-plane switching of liquid crystals at low temperatures. The problem of the inevitable slow response at low temperatures was reduced by the formation of in-cell polymer networks in in-plane switching (IPS) cells. The electro-optic characteristics of polymer-networked IPS cells were measured at temperatures ranging from -10 to 20 °C. The turn-on and turn-off times of an IPS cell were reduced by 44.5 and 47.2% at -10 °C by the formation of polymer networks. We believe that the proposed technology can be applied to emerging display devices such as mobile phones and automotive displays that may be used at low temperatures.

  19. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Supersaturated Lysozyme Solutions and Associated Precipitate Formation/Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (wlv) NaCl at pH= 4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  20. Carotenoid changes of intact watermelons after storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Collins, Julie K

    2006-08-01

    Watermelon contains lycopene, a red carotenoid pigment that has strong antioxidant properties. The lycopene content of watermelon is substantial, contributing 8-20 mg per 180 g serving. There are no reports on carotenoid changes in whole watermelon during storage. Three types of watermelon, open-pollinated seeded, hybrid seeded, and seedless types, were stored at 5, 13, and 21 degrees C for 14 days and flesh color, composition, and carotenoid content were compared to those of fruit not stored. Watermelons stored at 21 degrees C had increased pH, chroma, and carotenoid content compared to fresh fruit. Compared to fresh fruit, watermelons stored at 21 degrees C gained 11-40% in lycopene and 50-139% in beta-carotene, whereas fruit held at 13 degrees C changed little in carotenoid content. These results indicate that carotenoid biosynthesis in watermelons can be affected by temperature and storage. PMID:16881688

  1. Carotenoids in Aquaculture: Fish and Crustaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkeng, Bjorn

    This Chapter deals with selected topics on the use of carotenoids for colouration in aquaculture and incudes examples from ecological studies which support our understanding of functions and actions of carotenoids and colouration in fishes and crustaceans. Animal colours may be physical or structural in origin [1], e.g. Tyndall blues and iridescent diffraction colours, or they may be due to pigments, including carotenoids (Chapter 10).

  2. Carotenoids in Algae: Distributions, Biosyntheses and Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Shinichi Takaichi

    2011-01-01

    For photosynthesis, phototrophic organisms necessarily synthesize not only chlorophylls but also carotenoids. Many kinds of carotenoids are found in algae and, recently, taxonomic studies of algae have been developed. In this review, the relationship between the distribution of carotenoids and the phylogeny of oxygenic phototrophs in sea and fresh water, including cyanobacteria, red algae, brown algae and green algae, is summarized. These phototrophs contain division- or class-specific carote...

  3. A study on ice crystal formation behavior at intracellular freezing of plant cells using a high-speed camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninagawa, Takako; Eguchi, Akemi; Kawamura, Yukio; Konishi, Tadashi; Narumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular ice crystal formation (IIF) causes several problems to cryopreservation, and it is the key to developing improved cryopreservation techniques that can ensure the long-term preservation of living tissues. Therefore, the ability to capture clear intracellular freezing images is important for understanding both the occurrence and the IIF behavior. The authors developed a new cryomicroscopic system that was equipped with a high-speed camera for this study and successfully used this to capture clearer images of the IIF process in the epidermal tissues of strawberry geranium (Saxifraga stolonifera Curtis) leaves. This system was then used to examine patterns in the location and formation of intracellular ice crystals and to evaluate the degree of cell deformation because of ice crystals inside the cell and the growing rate and grain size of intracellular ice crystals at various cooling rates. The results showed that an increase in cooling rate influenced the formation pattern of intracellular ice crystals but had less of an effect on their location. Moreover, it reduced the degree of supercooling at the onset of intracellular freezing and the degree of cell deformation; the characteristic grain size of intracellular ice crystals was also reduced, but the growing rate of intracellular ice crystals was increased. Thus, the high-speed camera images could expose these changes in IIF behaviors with an increase in the cooling rate, and these are believed to have been caused by an increase in the degree of supercooling.

  4. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis During Fruit Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lado, Joanna; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Rodrigo, María Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are recognized as the main pigments in most fruit crops, providing colours that range from yellow and pink to deep orange and red. Moreover, the edible portion of widely consumed fruits or their derived products represent a major dietary source of carotenoids for animals and humans. Therefore, these pigments are crucial compounds contributing to fruit aesthetic and nutritional quality but may also have protecting and ecophysiological functions in coloured fruits. Among plant organs, fruits display one of the most heterogeneous carotenoids patterns in terms of diversity and abundance. In this chapter a comprehensive list of the carotenoid content and profile in the most commonly cultivated fleshy fruits is reported. The proposed fruit classification systems attending to carotenoid composition are revised and discussed. The regulation of carotenoids in fruits can be rather complex due to the dramatic changes in content and composition during ripening, which are also dependent on the fruit tissue and the developmental stage. In addition, carotenoid accumulation is a dynamic process, associated with the development of chromoplasts during ripening. As a general rule, carotenoid accumulation is highly controlled at the transcriptional level of the structural and accessory proteins of the biosynthetic and degradation pathways, but other mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modifications or the development of sink structures have been recently revealed as crucial factors in determining the levels and stability of these pigments. In this chapter common key metabolic reactions regulating carotenoid composition in fruit tissues are described in addition to others that are restricted to certain species and generate unique carotenoids patterns. The existence of fruit-specific isoforms for key steps such as the phytoene synthase, lycopene β-cyclases or catabolic carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases has allowed an independent regulation of the pathway in fruit tissues

  5. Fermentative production of carotenoids from marine actinomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ashokkumar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In marine actinomycetes, carotenoid production occurs in constitutive, light-dependent or cryptic manner. The present work deals with the fermentative production of carotenoids from marine actinomycetes."nMaterials and Methods: Marine actinomycetes namely Streptomyces strain AQBMM35 was isolated from the marine sponge Mycale mytilorum collected from South West coast of India using ISP media. The Streptomyces isolates were characterized for their colony characteristics, morphological properties, physiological and biochemical properties and were tentatively identified. Fermentation of the strain under fluorescent white light was carried out for the production of carotenoids. UV spectrum, TLC and HPLC analysis were done for the confirmation of carotenoids."nResults: The characteristics studied strongly suggest that the strain AQBMM35 belongs to the genus Streptomyces sp. It has been found that Streptomyces strain (AQBMM35 fermenting under fluorescent white light produced carotenoids. Spectrophotometric analysis of the carotenoid fraction revealed a peak at 280 nm. TLC analysis of the carotenoid extract showed the presence of phytoene (Rf of 0.81. HPLC confirmed the production of phytoene when compared with standards."nConclusion: The fermenting sponge-associated Streptomyces isolate (AQBMM35 produced carotenoids namely phytoene. If this symbiotic Streptomyces strain, from which secondary metabolite like carotenoids are derived, can be cultured under light, then it can be used for mass production of precursor pigment and it can be used as an antioxidant and also as a food additive.

  6. Quasicrystal formation, phase selection and crystallization kinetics in Zr-Cu-Ni-Al based metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaternary Zr-Cu-Ni-Al is one of the best glass forming alloys known. In a narrow concentration range icosahedral quasicrystals are formed upon annealing; in Zr69.5Cu12Ni11Al7.5 the metastable primitive icosahedral phase is probably oxygen stabilized. At slightly higher oxygen contents (about 1 at.%) the formation of a metastable fcc ''big-cube'' phase (NiTi2-type) is competing with very high nucleation rates. The aim of this paper is to investigate in detail the formation of quasicrystals as well as microstructures consisting of the ''big-cube'' phase in order to design in particular nanocrystalline structures by controlled crystallization. Nucleation rates were measured by means of crystallization statistics. By modeling the obtained nucleation rates in the framework of diffusion controlled classical nucleation interfacial energies as well as melting temperatures for the metastable phases could be derived. Atomic mobility was estimated from growth data. Using these data TTT-diagrams can be drawn and microstructures (for example nanocrystalline) predicted. The phase selection during the formation of the metastable structures was observed to depend strongly not only on the exchange of the Zr by Hf or Ti, but also on the late transition elements chosen, hydrogen or oxygen contamination as well as on alloying with small amounts of other elements for example Si, Sn, Y or Mo. Regarding the influence of the late transition metals there is some evidence that the quasicrystals are a hybrid of two structural elements, i.e. the tetragonal Zr2Ni(Al2Cu) and the tetragonal Zr2Cu (MoSi2) structure. The mentioned alloying elements as well as oxygen and hydrogen are assumed to influence the arrangement of the structural elements towards one or the other structure. (orig.)

  7. Recombinant formate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana: Preparation, crystal growth in microgravity, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalin, I. G., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Serov, A. E.; Skirgello, O. E. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I.; Samygina, V. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Popov, V. O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Tishkov, V. I. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-15

    Crystals of high-purity recombinant NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AraFDH) were grown in microgravity in the Modul'-1 protein crystallization apparatus on the International Space Station. The space-grown crystals have larger sizes than those grown on Earth. X-ray diffraction data suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure were collected from the space-grown crystals to a resolution of 1.22 A using an X-ray synchrotron source. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 107.865 A, c = 71.180 A, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90 deg.

  8. Recombinant formate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana: Preparation, crystal growth in microgravity, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of high-purity recombinant NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AraFDH) were grown in microgravity in the Modul'-1 protein crystallization apparatus on the International Space Station. The space-grown crystals have larger sizes than those grown on Earth. X-ray diffraction data suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure were collected from the space-grown crystals to a resolution of 1.22 A using an X-ray synchrotron source. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P43212; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 107.865 A, c = 71.180 A, α = β = γ = 90 deg.

  9. Impacts of crystal metal on secondary aliphatic amine aerosol formation during dust storm episodes in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyang; Bei, Yiling

    2016-03-01

    Trimethylamine (TMA) enters the atmosphere from a variety of sources and is a ubiquitous atmospheric organic base. The atmospheric reaction mechanism of TMA with key atmospheric oxidants is important to predict its distribution and environmental behavior in the particle phase. While previous studies have extensively focused on the production of particle amine salts (i.e. trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)) using chamber experiments, the atmospheric behavior of TMAO in the environment is still poorly understood. Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected at two sampling sites in Beijing from March 10 to May 10, 2012. We analyzed the samples for water-soluble ions, crystal metals, TMA, and TMAO. Water-soluble ions (e.g. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+), TMA, and TMAO were measured using ion chromatography, while crystal metal (e.g. Al, Fe, Mn) in PM2.5 was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two dust storms (DS) occurred during the sampling period on March 28 and April 28. Mineral dust impacted PM2.5 mass and composition greatly during dust storm days, as it contributed approximately 1.2-4.0 times greater on dust storm days versus non-dust storm days. We found TMAO concentrations were highly associated with aluminum in PM2.5. Further, we applied the density functional theory (DFT) method to confirm that aluminum plays a catalytic effect in the reaction of TMA with ozone (O3). Our work improves understanding of the effect of crystal metals on secondary aliphatic amine aerosol formation in the atmosphere.

  10. Crystal structures and in-situ formation study of mayenite electrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Luis; De La Torre, Angeles G; Bruque, Sebastián; García-Muñoz, Jose L; García-Granda, Santiago; Sheptyakov, Denis; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2007-05-14

    Mayenite inorganic electrides are antizeolite nanoporous materials with variable electron concentration [Ca12Al14O32]2+ square5-deltaO1-delta2-e2delta- (0 crystal structure contains positively charged cages where loosely bounded oxide anions are located. These oxygens can be removed to yield electron-loaded materials in which the electrons behave like anions (electrides). Here, a new preparation method, which allows synthesizing powder mayenite electrides easily, is reported. Accurate structural data for the white (delta = 0) and green electride (delta approximately 0.5) are reported from joint Rietveld refinements of neutron and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and also from single-crystal diffraction. The electride formation at high temperature under vacuum has been followed in-situ by neutron powder diffraction. The evolution of mayenite crystal structure, including the changes in the key occupation factor of the intracage oxide anions, is reported. Furthermore, the stability of mayenite framework in very low oxygen partial pressure conditions is also studied. It has been found that C12A7 decomposes, at 1373 K in reducing conditions, to give Ca5Al6O14 (C5A3) and Ca3Al2O6 (C3A). The kinetics of this transformation has also been studied. The fit of the transformed fraction to the classic Avrami-Erofe'ev equation gave an "Avrami exponent", n = 2, which indicates that nucleation is fast and the two-dimensional linear growth of the new phases is likely to be the limiting factor. PMID:17432850

  11. The Role of Carotenoids in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theognosia Vergou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The human skin, as the boundary organ between the human body and the environment, is under the constant influence of free radicals (FR, both from the outside in and from the inside out. Carotenoids are known to be powerful antioxidant substances playing an essential role in the reactions of neutralization of FR (mainly reactive oxygen species ROS. Carotenoid molecules present in the tissue are capable of neutralizing several attacks of FR, especially ROS, and are then destroyed. Human skin contains carotenoids, such as α-, γ-, β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and their isomers, which serve the living cells as a protection against oxidation. Recent studies have reported the possibility to investigate carotenoids in human skin quickly and non-invasively by spectroscopic means. Results obtained from in-vivo studies on human skin have shown that carotenoids are vital components of the antioxidative protective system of the human skin and could serve as marker substances for the overall antioxidative status. Reflecting the nutritional and stress situation of volunteers, carotenoids must be administered by means of antioxidant-rich products, e.g., in the form of fruit and vegetables. Carotenoids are degraded by stress factors of any type, inter alia, sun radiation, contact with environmental hazards, illness, etc. The kinetics of the accumulation and degradation of carotenoids in the skin have been investigated.

  12. Method of producing purified carotenoid compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggink, Laura (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of producing a carotenoid in solid form includes culturing a strain of Chlorophyta algae cells in a minimal inorganic medium and separating the algae comprising a solid form of carotenoid. In one embodiment f the invention, the strain of Chlorophyta algae cells includes a strain f Chlamydomonas algae cells.

  13. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors in many horticultural crops attribute to overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegeta...

  14. Apocarotenoids: A New Carotenoid-Derived Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Juan Camilo Moreno; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are precursors of carotenoid derived molecules termed apocarotenoids, which include isoprenoids with important functions in plant-environment interactions such as the attraction of pollinators and the defense against pathogens and herbivores. Apocarotenoids also include volatile aromatic compounds that act as repellents, chemoattractants, growth simulators and inhibitors, as well as the phytohormones abscisic acid and strigolactones. In plants, apocarotenoids can be found in several types of plastids (etioplast, leucoplast and chromoplast) and among different plant tissues such as flowers and roots. The structural similarity of some flower and spice isoprenoid volatile organic compounds (β-ionone and safranal) to carotenoids has led to the recent discovery of carotenoid-specific cleavage oxygenases, including carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases and 9-cis-epoxydioxygenases, which tailor and transform carotenoids into apocarotenoids. The great diversity of apocarotenoids is a consequence of the huge amount of carotenoid precursors, the variations in specific cleavage sites and the modifications after cleavage. Lycopene, β-carotene and zeaxanthin are the precursors of the main apocarotenoids described to date, which include bixin, crocin, picrocrocin, abscisic acid, strigolactone and mycorradicin.The current chapter will give rise to an overview of the biosynthesis and function of the most important apocarotenoids in plants, as well as the current knowledge about the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase enzymes involved in these biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27485225

  15. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilchez, C.; Forján, E.; Cuaresma, M.; Bédmar, F.; Garbayo, I.; Vega, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functi

  16. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-08-01

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry-Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors.

  17. Carotenoid Metabolism: Biosynthesis, Regulation,and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Lu; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are Indispensable to plants and play a critical role in human nutrition and health. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of carotenoid metabolism in plants. The biosynthetic pathway has been extensively studied.Nearly all the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated and characterized from various organisms. In recent years, there is an increasing body of work on the signaling pathways and plastid development, which might provide global control of carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. Herein, we will highlight recent progress on the biosynthesis,regulation, and metabolic engineering of carotenoids in plants, as well as the future research towards elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and metabolic network that control carotenoid metabolism.

  18. The intake of carotenoids in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Jakobsen, Jette; Andersen, N. L.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the intake of carotenoids in the Danish population Danish fruits and vegetables were screened with an HPLC method consisting of extraction with ethanol:tetrahydrofuran, separation by reversed phase HPLC with the mobile phase acetonitril:methanol:dichlormethan, triethylamin, BHT...... in the foods the mean intake and intake distribution of the carotenoids were calculated. Carrots and tomatoes have both high contents of carotenoids (8,450 mu g/100 g alpha- + beta-carotene and 4,790 mu g/100 g lycopene, respectively) and high intakes (19 and 15 g/day, respectively) and were responsible for 47......% and 32%, respectively, of the mean intake of carotenoids of 4.8 mg/day A median value of 4.1 mg/day was found indicating skewed intake distributions. The difference between men and women was 0.4 mg/day (p carotenoids, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene, contributed...

  19. Carotenoids as signaling molecules in cardiovascular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Barzegari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation play important roles in the etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Thus, natural antioxidant carotenoids existing in fruits and vegetables could have a significant role in the prevention of CVD. Nevertheless,clinical data are conflicting about the positive effect of some antioxidant carotenoids in reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Many biological actions of carotenoids have been attributed to their antioxidant effect; however, the precise mechanism by which carotenoids produce their beneficial effects is still under discussion. They might modulate molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation, acting at Akt, tyrosine kinases, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP kinase and growth factor signaling cascades. Screening for a promising cardiovascular protective carotenoids therefore might be performed in vitro and in vivo with caution in cross-interaction with other molecules involved in signaling pathways especially those affecting microRNAs, performing a role in molecular modulation of cardiovascular cells.

  20. PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CAROTENOIDS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumita S. Kadia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is an essential vitamin which is required in the vision process, epithelial maintenance, mucous secretion and reproduction obtained from carotenoids. Carotenoids have been considered to provide benefits in age-related diseases, against some forms of cancer (in especial lung cancer, strokes, macular degeneration, and cataracts. Till date, more than 600 carotenoids are known and 50 of them are consumed in meals to be transformed into the essential nutrient vitamin A. After their absorption, these carotenoids are metabolized by an oxidative rupture to retinal, retinoic acid and small quantities of breakdown products and are transported by plasma lipoproteins. Carotenes are mainly associated with low-density lipoproteins, while xanthophylls show a uniform distribution between the low- and high-density lipoproteins. The present review provides an insight into the recent status of pharmacological aspects of carotenoids.

  1. Elucidating the Effect of Biomolecule Structure on Calcium Carbonate Crystal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbok, K. E.; Duckworth, O.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide have lead to a steady increase in atmospheric concentration. This greenhouse gas has been identified as a key driver of climate change and also has lead to increased acidification of marine and terrestrial waters. Calcium carbonate precipitation at the Earth's surface is an integral linkage in the global carbon cycle, especially in regards to regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide. As concern for the effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 levels grows, the need to understand calcium carbonate systems escalates concurrently. Calcium carbonate phases are the most abundant group of biominerals; therefore, elucidating the mechanism of biomineralization is critical to understanding CaCO3 precipitation and may aid in the development of novel carbon sequestration strategies. The ubiquity of microorganisms leads to an extensive number of biomolecules present in the Earth's systems, and thus an extensive range of possible effects on CaCO3 formation. Carboxylic acids are very common biomolecules and have a relatively simple structure, thus making them an ideal family of model compounds. This study examines the kinetics, thermodynamics, phase, and morphology of calcium carbonate crystals precipitated in the presence of carboxylate-containing biomolecules, including citric acid, succinic acid, and aspartic acid. The experiments utilize a unique (NH4)2CO3 gas-diffusion reactor, which allows in-situ measurements of chemical conditions during the precipitation and growth of crystals. Continuous monitoring of the in-situ conditions of pCO2, pH, [Ca2+], and optical absorbance provides data on the supersaturation at which nucleation occurs and the kinetics of mineral growth. The use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction provides information on the morphology and mineralogy of precipitates. The combination of these data sets will provide an in-depth view of the ideal concentration of calcium ions required for solution saturation

  2. Hillock formation of Pt thin films on single-crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinski, Henning; Ryll, Thomas; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Gauckler, Ludwig J.; Stender, Patrick; Schmitz, Guido

    2012-03-01

    The stability of metal thin films on a dielectric substrate is conditioned by the magnitude of the interactive forces at the interface. In the case of a nonreactive interface and weak adhesion, the minimization of the free surface energy gives rise to an instability of the thin film. In order to study these effects, Pt thin films with a thickness of 50 nm were deposited via ion-beam sputtering on yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystals. All Pt films were subjected to heat treatments up to 973 K for 2 h. The morphological evolution of Pt thin films has been investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and standard image analysis techniques. Three main observations have been made: (i) The deposition method has a direct impact on the morphological evolution of the film during annealing. Instead of hole formation, which is typically observed as a response to a thermal treatment, anisotropic pyramidal-shaped hillocks are formed on top of the film. (ii) It is shown by comparing the hillocks’ aspect ratio with finite element method simulations that the hillock formation can be assigned to a stress relaxation process inside the thin film. (iii) By measuring the quasiequilibrium shapes and the shape fluctuations of the formed Pt hillocks the anisotropy of the step free energy and its stiffness have been derived in addition to the anisotropic kink energy of the hillocks’ edges.

  3. Structures and Analysis of Carotenoid Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2016-01-01

    Modifications of the usual C40 linear and symmetrical carotenoid skeleton give rise to a wide array of structures of carotenes and xanthophylls in plant tissues. These include acyclic, monocyclic and dicyclic carotenoids, along with hydroxy and epoxy xanthophylls and apocarotenoids. Carotenols can be unesterified or esterified (monoester) in one or two (diester) hydroxyl groups with fatty acids. E-Z isomerization increases the array of possible plant carotenoids even further. Screening and especially quantitative analysis are being carried out worldwide. Visible absorption spectrometry and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy have been used for the initial estimation of the total carotenoid content or the principal carotenoid content when large numbers of samples needed to be analyzed within a short time, as would be the case in breeding programs. Although inherently difficult, quantitative analysis of the individual carotenoids is essential. Knowledge of the sources of errors and means to avoid them has led to a large body of reliable quantitative compositional data on carotenoids. Reverse-phase HPLC with a photodiode array detector has been the preferred analytical technique, but UHPLC is increasingly employed. HPLC-MS has been used mainly for identification and NMR has been useful in unequivocally identifying geometric isomers. PMID:27485219

  4. Spatial and temporal mapping of coke formation during paraffin and olefin aromatization in individual H-ZSM-5 crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Y.M.; Mores, D.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of carbonaceous deposits that occurs during the aromatization of C4–C7 paraffin and olefin hydrocarbons is visualized in a space- and time-resolved manner over individual micron-sized H-ZSM- 5 zeolite crystals. In situ UV–vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy techniques are

  5. Carotenoids and health in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna J; Lyner, Natalie; McKinley, Michelle C

    2015-01-01

    As the proportion of older people increases, so will chronic disease incidence and the proportion of the population living with disability. Therefore, new approaches to maintain health for as long as possible in this age group are required. Carotenoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds found predominantly in fruit and vegetables that have been proposed to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Such properties may impact on the risk diseases which predominate in older people, and also ageing-related physiological changes. Working out the effect of carotenoid intake versus fruit and vegetable intake is difficult, and the strong correlation between individual carotenoid intakes also complicates any attempt to examine individual carotenoid health effects. Similarly, research to determine whether carotenoids consumed as supplements have similar benefits to increased dietary intake through whole foods, is still required. However, reviewing the recent evidence suggests that carotenoid intake and status are relatively consistently associated with reduced CVD risk, although β-carotene supplementation does not reduce CVD risk and increases lung cancer risk. Increased lycopene intake may reduce prostate cancer progression, with a potential role for carotenoids at other cancer sites. Lutein and zeaxanthin have a plausible role in the maintenance of eye health, whilst an association between carotenoid intake and cognitive and physical health appears possible, although research is limited to date. Given this accruing evidence base to support a specific role for certain carotenoids and ageing, current dietary advice to consume a diet rich in fruit and vegetables would appear prudent, and efforts maintained to encourage increased intake.

  6. Fiber-coupled photonic crystal nanocavity for reconfigurable formation of coupled cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Ooka, Yuta; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-03-01

    High Q optical cavities are employed to realize a coupled cavity system with which to achieve optical signal processing. Photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities are particularly attractive because they are suitable for integration. However, they usually suffer from low coupling efficiency with optical fiber and poor resonant wavelength controllability. We recently demonstrated cavity mode formation by placing a tapered nanofiber close to a two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide. The cavity mode couples directly with the nanofiber, which results in a coupling efficiency of 39% with a high Q of over half a million. The cavity is formed due to the modulation of the effective refractive index, which is caused by bringing a nanofiber close to the silicon slab. Precise tuning of the resonant wavelength becomes possible by changing the contact area of the nanofiber. In this study, we demonstrate the coupling and de-coupling of coupled PhC nanocavities formed by a nanofiber placed on a PhC waveguide. The wavelength shift of one of the cavities (mode A) is more sensitive than that of the other cavity (mode B) to a change in the nanofiber contact area. By using this difference, we can tune the resonant wavelength of mode A (Q = 4.6×105) to that of mode B (Q = 6.0×105). Then, a clear anti-crossing with a mode splitting of g/2π = 0.94 GHz is observed, which is the result of the coupling of the two modes. A reconfigurable coupled cavity system was demonstrated.

  7. Carotenoid-cleavage activities of crude enzymes from Pandanous amryllifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningrum, Andriati; Schreiner, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Carotenoid degradation products, known as norisoprenoids, are aroma-impact compounds in several plants. Pandan wangi is a common name of the shrub Pandanus amaryllifolius. The genus name 'Pandanus' is derived from the Indonesian name of the tree, pandan. In Indonesia, the leaves from the plant are used for several purposes, e.g., as natural colorants and flavor, and as traditional treatments. The aim of this study was to determine the cleavage of β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal by carotenoid-cleavage enzymes isolated from pandan leaves, to investigate dependencies of the enzymatic activities on temperature and pH, to determine the enzymatic reaction products by using Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrophotometry (HS-SPME GC/MS), and to investigate the influence of heat treatment and addition of crude enzyme on formation of norisoprenoids. Crude enzymes from pandan leaves showed higher activity against β-carotene than β-apo-8'-carotenal. The optimum temperature of crude enzymes was 70°, while the optimum pH value was 6. We identified β-ionone as the major volatile reaction product from the incubations of two different carotenoid substrates, β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal. Several treatments, e.g., heat treatment and addition of crude enzymes in pandan leaves contributed to the norisoprenoid content. Our findings revealed that the crude enzymes from pandan leaves with carotenoid-cleavage activity might provide a potential application, especially for biocatalysis, in natural-flavor industry.

  8. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  9. Carotenoid maintenance handicap and the physiology of carotenoid-based signalisation of health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Despite a reasonable scientific interest in sexual selection, the general principles of health signalisation via ornamental traits remain still unresolved in many aspects. This is also true for the mechanism preserving honesty of carotenoid-based signals. Although it is widely accepted that this type of ornamentation reflects an allocation trade-off between the physiological utilisation of carotenoids (mainly in antioxidative processes) and their deposition in ornaments, some recent evidence suggests more complex interactions. Here, we further develop the models currently proposed to explain the honesty of carotenoid-based signalisation of heath status by adding the handicap principle concept regulated by testosterone. We propose that under certain circumstances carotenoids may be dangerous for the organism because they easily transform into toxic cleavage products. When reserves of other protective antioxidants are insufficient, physiological trade-offs may exist between maintenance of carotenoids for ornament expression and their removal from the body. Furthermore, we suggest that testosterone which enhances ornamentation by increasing carotenoid bioavailability may also promote oxidative stress and hence lower antioxidant reserves. The presence of high levels of carotenoids required for high-quality ornament expression may therefore represent a handicap and only individuals in prime health could afford to produce elaborate colourful ornaments. Although further testing is needed, this ‘carotenoid maintenance handicap’ hypothesis may offer a new insight into the physiological aspects of the relationship between carotenoid function, immunity and ornamentation.

  10. Carotenoid bioaccessibility in pulp and fresh juice from carotenoid-rich sweet oranges and mandarins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, María Jesús; Cilla, Antonio; Barberá, Reyes; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Citrus fruits are a good source of carotenoids for the human diet; however, comparative studies of carotenoids in different citrus food matrices are scarce. In this work the concentration and bioaccessibility of carotenoids in sweet oranges and mandarins with marked differences in carotenoid composition were evaluated in pulp and compared to those in fresh juice. The pulp and juice of the red-fleshed Cara Cara sweet orange variety was highly rich in carotenes (mainly lycopene and phytoene) compared to standard Navel orange, while β-cryptoxanthin and phytoene predominated in mandarins. Total carotenoid content in the pulp of the ordinary Navel orange and in the red-fleshed Cara Cara orange, as well as in the Clementine mandarin were higher than in the corresponding juices, although individual carotenoids were differentially affected by juice preparation. Bioaccessibility of the bioactive carotenoids (the ones described to be absorbed by humans) was greater in both pulp and juice of the carotenoid-rich Cara Cara orange compared to the Navel orange while increasing levels of β-cryptoxanthin were detected in the bioaccessible fractions of pulp and juice of mandarins postharvest stored at 12 °C compared to freshly-harvested fruits. Overall, results indicated that higher soluble bioactive carotenoids from citrus fruits and, consequently, potential nutritional and health benefits are obtained by the consumption of pulp with respect to fresh juice.

  11. Tetragonal and orthorhombic modifications HTSC 1-2-3 crystals and probable mechanism of their formation. [Y-Ba-Cu-O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkasov, A.N.; Kamenev, V.I.; Tsymbal, L.T.; Zavadski, E.A. (Donetsk Physical-Technical Inst. of Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    It is stated that identical technological conditions results in formation of two modifications of HTSC 1-2-3 crystals: orthorhombic modifidation (Tc{approx equal}90 K) and tetragonal modification (Tc<75K). Coexistence of these phases in one single crystal is possible. According to the proposed model the formation of two modifications results from the deformation blocking of the orthorhombic phase nucleation in perfect crystals. (orig.).

  12. Cystone, a well-known herbal formulation, inhibits struvite crystal growth formation in single diffusion gel growth technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pralhad S. Patki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was aimed to evaluate the beneficial effect of Cystone® against struvite crystal growth in in vitro conditions. Methods: Various concentrations of Cystone® was prepared in 1 M magnesium acetate solution and evaluated for crystal growth inhibition assay by a well-known method called single diffusion gel growth technique in vitro. Results: Cystone®, a well-known polyherbal formulation, at 0.5, 1 and 2% concentrations showed significant and dose-dependent inhibition of struvite crystal growth formation in in vitro by reducing number, total mass and total volume of the struvite crystals formed and also caused fragmentation of grown struvite crystals in the gel matrix. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate, Cystone® significantly retards the formation of struvite stones and also brings about its fragmentation. This could be one of the probable mechanisms behind the beneficial effect offered by Cystone® in the clinical management of urolithiasis and urinary tract infections. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(1: 51-55

  13. Crystal structures and phase formation thermodynamics of iron-gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pinaki

    Alloy nanoparticles are being increasingly used in wide variety of applications (catalysis, contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging, etc.). Knowledge of crystal structure and phase formation of the alloy nanoparticles is critical for these applications. Anomalous thermodynamic behavior and unusual phase formation have been reported for nanoparticles with size below 10 nm. In the present work, inert gas condensation (IGC) has been used to produce Au-Fe nanoclusters of varied compositions with a mean size between 5-10 nm. Here, the nanoclusters below 10 nm display complete solubility between Fe and Au in Fex Au1-x (0.3 0.65 and fcc for x self-interstitials. The as-deposited clusters were ferromagnetic at room temperature. Heat treatment at 600°C for 15 minutes followed by furnace cooling resulted in the size-dependent transformation of the clusters into additional, non-equilibrium structures that depended on cluster composition, while larger clusters followed bulk behavior. At about 65 atom % Fe, clusters transformed to a well-ordered, single fcc phase with a lattice parameter of 0.363 nm, whereas the phase diagram predicted two-phase equilibrium. The stabilization of a single fcc phase was explained by a thermodynamic analysis. This analysis suggests that the single phase stability in the Fe-Au nanoparticles arises from the fact that the introduction of a phase boundary is energetically opposed. Heat treatment of as-deposited particles results in L12 and L1 0ordered structures near 1:3, 3:1 and 1:1 (Fe:Au) stoichiometries respectively. Magnetically, these nanoparticles display strong ferromagnetic behavior for Fe-rich solid solutions and for the 3:1 L12 structure, and weak ferromagnetic behavior, possibly due to a combination of antiferromagnetic core and uncompensated spins at the surface for other compositions.

  14. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between t...

  15. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Photosynthetic Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Briardo

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the dazzling diversity of colors displayed by living organisms throughout the tree of life is determined by the presence of carotenoids, which most often provide distinctive yellow, orange and red hues. These metabolites play fundamental roles in nature that extend far beyond their importance as pigments. In photosynthetic lineages, carotenoids are essential to sustain life, since they have been exploited to maximize light harvesting and protect the photosynthetic machinery from photooxidative stress. Consequently, photosynthetic organisms have evolved several mechanisms that adjust the carotenoid metabolism to efficiently cope with constantly fluctuating light environments. This chapter will focus on the current knowledge concerning the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in leaves, which are the primary photosynthetic organs of most land plants. PMID:27485221

  16. Effects of added silica nanoparticles on the nematic liquid crystal phase formation in beidellite suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Jasper; Paineau, Erwan; Davidson, Patrick; Bihannic, Isabelle; Michot, Laurent J; Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Petukhov, Andrei V; Lekkerkerker, Henk N W

    2014-05-01

    In this article, we present a study of the liquid crystal phase behavior of mixed suspensions of the natural smectite clay mineral beidellite and nonadsorbing colloidal silica particles. While virtually all smectite clays dispersed in water form gels at very low concentrations, beidellite displays a first order isotropic-nematic phase transition before gel formation (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2009, 113, 15858-15869). The addition of silica nanospheres shifts the concentrations of the coexisting isotropic and nematic phases to slightly higher values while at the same time markedly accelerating the phase separation process. Furthermore, beidellite suspensions at volume fractions above the isotropic-nematic phase separation, trapped in a kinetically arrested gel state, liquefy on the addition of silica nanospheres and proceed to isotropic-nematic phase separation. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we probe the structural changes caused by the addition of the silica nanospheres, and we relate the modification of the phase transition kinetics to the change of the rheological properties. PMID:24758198

  17. On the formation of shocks of electromagnetic plane waves in non-linear crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Demetrios; Perez, Daniel Raoul

    2016-08-01

    An influential result of F. John states that no genuinely non-linear strictly hyperbolic quasi-linear first order system of partial differential equations in two variables has a global C2-solution for small enough initial data. Inspired by recent work of D. Christodoulou, we revisit John's original proof and extract a more precise description of the behaviour of solutions at the time of shock. We show that John's singular first order quantity, when expressed in characteristic coordinates, remains bounded until the final time, which is then characterised by an inverse density of characteristics tending to zero in one point. Moreover, we study the derivatives of second order, showing again their boundedness when expressed in appropriate coordinates. We also recover John's upper bound for the time of shock formation and complement it with a lower bound. Finally, we apply these results to electromagnetic plane waves in a crystal with no magnetic properties and cubic electric non-linearity in the energy density, assuming no dispersion.

  18. Influence of PEG-12 Dimethicone addition on stability and formation of emulsions containing liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, F F; Santos, O D H; Oliveira, W P; Rocha-Filho, P A

    2007-06-01

    Oil/water emulsions, containing liquid crystals, were developed employing Andiroba oil, PEG-12 Dimethicone and Crodafos CES. It was evaluated the influence of silicone surfactants on the emulsions stability and on the formation of liquid crystalline phases and therefore, physicochemical characteristics, such as rheology and zeta potential, were evaluated. Emulsions were prepared by the emulsions phase inversion method. All the formulations presented lamellar liquid crystalline phases. The PEG-12 Dimethicone addition did not change microscopically the liquid crystalline phases. The emulsions containing silicone demonstrated lower viscosity than those without the additive. This is an important feature, as the silicone did not change the rheological profile; however, the addition of silicone still can be used as a viscosity controller. The formulations had their viscosity increased 15 and 150 days after their preparation. This characteristic shows that the emulsions have their organization increased along the storing time. In the analysis of zeta potential, we could verify that all formulations presented negative values between -39.7 and -70.0 mV. Within this range of values, the emulsion physical stability is high (Fig. 10). It was concluded that the addition of PEG-12 Dimethicone kept the liquid crystalline phase of the emulsion obtained with Crodafos CES, influencing in a positive way in the system stability. PMID:18489351

  19. Flow-Induced Crystallization of Collagen: A Potentially Critical Mechanism in Early Tissue Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paten, Jeffrey A; Siadat, Seyed Mohammad; Susilo, Monica E; Ismail, Ebraheim N; Stoner, Jayson L; Rothstein, Jonathan P; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-24

    The type I collagen monomer is one of nature's most exquisite and prevalent structural tools. Its 300 nm triple-helical motifs assemble into tough extracellular fibers that transition seamlessly across tissue boundaries and exceed cell dimensions by up to 4 orders of magnitude. In spite of extensive investigation, no existing model satisfactorily explains how such continuous structures are generated and grown precisely where they are needed (aligned in the path of force) by discrete, microscale cells using materials with nanoscale dimensions. We present a simple fiber drawing experiment, which demonstrates that slightly concentrated type I collagen monomers can be "flow-crystallized" to form highly oriented, continuous, hierarchical fibers at cell-achievable strain rates (fibers. While mechanical tension has been shown to be a critical factor driving collagen fibril formation during tissue morphogenesis in developing animals, the precise role of force in the process of building tissue is not well understood. Our data directly couple mechanical tension, specifically the extensional strain rate, to collagen fibril assembly. We further derive a "growth equation" which predicts that application of extensional strains, either globally by developing muscles or locally by fibroblasts, can rapidly drive the fusion of already formed short fibrils to produce long-range, continuous fibers. The results provide a pathway to scalable connective tissue manufacturing and support a mechano-biological model of collagen fibril deposition and growth in vivo. PMID:27070851

  20. Lack of Evidence for Prenucleation Aggregate Formation in Lysozyme Crystal Growth Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1996-01-01

    There have been numerous claims of large concentrations of prenucleation aggregates in supersaturated as well as undersaturated lysozyme solutions at high salt concentrations. The presence of these aggregates was derived from measurements of the light or neutron scattering intensity, ultracentrifugation and dialysis behavior, as well as over-simplified crystal growth kinetics considerations. In all these interpretations it has been assumed that lysozyme solutions are either ideal or that protein interactions are independent of salt concentration. Contrary to these presumptions, our static and dynamic light scattering experiments provide evidence that lysozyme forms highly non-ideal, strongly interacting solutions. At low salt concentrations, the scattering intensities fall well below the values expected for an ideal, monomeric solution at the same protein concentration, while diffusivities increase with increasing protein concentration. Upon increase in salt concentration, these trends are eventually reversed. This enhancement in scattering intensity and decrease in diffusivity was widely interpreted as sign of aggregate formation. Yet, a quantitative interpretation of the scattering behavior over the whole salt concentration range can only be given in terms of a transition from net repulsion to net attraction between lysozyme monomers. Increased salt screening of the electrostatic repulsion among the protein macro-ions, together with attractive protein interactions, such as van der Waals, hydrophobic and hydration forces, provide an unambiguous mechanism for the observed transition and a more physical interpretation of the various observations.

  1. Mesoscale flux-closure domain formation in single-crystal BaTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, R G P; McGilly, L J; Sharma, P; Gruverman, A; Gregg, J M

    2011-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, Charles Kittel predicted that quadrant domains should spontaneously form in small ferromagnetic platelets. He expected that the direction of magnetization within each quadrant should lie parallel to the platelet surface, minimizing demagnetizing fields,and that magnetic moments should be configured into an overall closed loop, or flux-closure arrangement. Although now a ubiquitous observation in ferromagnets, obvious flux-closure patterns have been somewhat elusive in ferroelectric materials. This is despite the analogous behaviour between these two ferroic subgroups and the recent prediction of dipole closure states by atomistic simulations research. Here we show Piezoresponse Force Microscopy images of mesoscopic dipole closure patterns in free-standing, single-crystal lamellae of BaTiO(3). Formation of these patterns is a dynamical process resulting from system relaxation after the BaTiO(3) has been poled with a uniform electric field. The flux-closure states are composed of shape conserving 90° stripe domains which minimize disclination stresses. PMID:21792183

  2. Marine Carotenoids and Cardiovascular Risk Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Speranza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine carotenoids are important bioactive compounds with physiological activities related to prevention of degenerative diseases.found principally in plants, with potential antioxidant biological properties deriving from their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. They are substances with very special and remarkable properties that no other groups of substances possess and that form the basis of their many, varied functions and actions in all kinds of living organisms. The potential beneficial effects of marine carotenoids have been studied particularly in astaxanthin and fucoxanthin as they are the major marine carotenoids. Both these two carotenoids show strong antioxidant activity attributed to quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. The potential role of these carotenoids as dietary anti-oxidants has been suggested to be one of the main mechanisms for their preventive effects against cancer and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this short review is to examine the published studies concerning the use of the two marine carotenoids, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Crystallization and cooling conditions for the diogenite formation in the turbulent magma ocean of the asteroid 4 Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Kawabata, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    The asteroid 4 Vesta has been completely differentiated to core and mantle despite its small size, of which surface materials are howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) meteorites that we know the detailed petrology, and therefore, is a good target for understanding differentiation of terrestrial planets. A new differentiation model for crust formation was developed by taking magma ocean fluid dynamics, chemical equilibrium, presence of $^{26}$Al, and cooling into consideration with special care to crystal separation. The role of crystal size, thickness of the conductive lid, and fO2 are evaluated as parameters. The results show that large crystals (1cm) settle and form a km-thick cumulate layer of orthopyroxene with Mg# of 0.70-0.90 in ~20 thousand years, which almost agrees with the Mg# of diogenites, whereas thinner layers are formed if the grain size is smaller.

  4. A molecular and carbon isotopic study towards the origin and diagenetic fate of diaromatic carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hartgers, W.A.; Requejo, A.G.; Allan, J.; Hayes, J.M.; Ling, Y.; Xie, T.-M.; Primack, J.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1994-01-01

    Pyrolysates of high-molecular-weight sedimentary fractions of the Duvernay Formation (Western Canada Basin) are dominated by 1,2,3,4- and 1,2,3,5-tetramethylbenzene, which, generated via beta-cleavage, indicate the presence of diaromatic carotenoids in the macromolecular aggregates. This was substan

  5. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between the carotenoid profile and the expression of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes is discussed. Finally, recent results of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of carotenoid contents and expression levels of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes in citrus fruit are shown. PMID:27069398

  6. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between the carotenoid profile and the expression of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes is discussed. Finally, recent results of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of carotenoid contents and expression levels of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes in citrus fruit are shown.

  7. Investigating the Relative Contributions of Secondary Ice Formation Processes to Ice Crystal Number Concentrations Within Mixed-Phase Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the in-cloud ice nuclei concentration can be three or four orders of magnitude less than those of the in-cloud ice crystal number concentration. Different secondary formation processes, active after initial ice nucleation, have been proposed to explain this discrepancy, but their relative importance, and even the exact physics of each mechanism, are still unclear. We construct a simple bin microphysics model (2IM) including depositional growth, the Hallett-Mossop process, ice-ice collisions, and ice-ice aggregation, with temperature- and supersaturation-dependent efficiencies for each process. 2IM extends the time-lag collision model of Yano and Phillips to additional bins and incorporates the aspect ratio evolution of Jensen and Harrington. Model output and measured ice crystal size distributions are compared to answer three questions: (1) how important is ice-ice aggregation relative to ice-ice collision around -15°C, where the Hallett-Mossop process is no longer active; (2) what process efficiencies lead to the best reproduction of observed ice crystal size distributions; and (3) does ice crystal aspect ratio affect the dominant secondary formation process. The resulting parameterization is intended for eventual use in larger-scale mixed-phase cloud schemes.

  8. Carotenoid-enriched transgenic corn delivers bioavailable carotenoids to poultry and protects them against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogareda, Carmina; Moreno, Jose A; Angulo, Eduardo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Portero, Manuel; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are health-promoting organic molecules that act as antioxidants and essential nutrients. We show that chickens raised on a diet enriched with an engineered corn variety containing very high levels of four key carotenoids (β-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and lutein) are healthy and accumulate more bioavailable carotenoids in peripheral tissues, muscle, skin and fat, and more retinol in the liver, than birds fed on standard corn diets (including commercial corn supplemented with colour additives). Birds were challenged with the protozoan parasite Eimeria tenella and those on the high-carotenoid diet grew normally, suffered only mild disease symptoms (diarrhoea, footpad dermatitis and digital ulcers) and had lower faecal oocyst counts than birds on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid-rich corn maintains poultry health and increases the nutritional value of poultry products without the use of feed additives. PMID:25846059

  9. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments in solar saltern microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Joan; Grimalt, Joan O.; de Wit, Rutger; Keely, Brendan J.; Maxwell, James R.

    1994-11-01

    The distributions of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and their degradation products have been studied in two microbial mat systems developed in the calcite and calcite/gypsum evaporite domains of a solar saltern system. Phormidium valderianum and Microcoleus chthonoplastes are the dominant cyanobacterial species, respectively, and large amounts of Chloroflexus-like bacteria occur in the carbonate/gypsum mat. In both systems, the major pigments are chlorophyll a, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and myxoxanthophyll, which originate from these mat-building cyanobacteria. This common feature contrasts with differences in other pigments that are specific for each mat community. Thus, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin, reflecting diatom inputs, are only found in the calcite mat, whereas the calcite/gypsum mat contains high concentrations of bacteriochlorophylls c produced by the multicellular green filamentous bacteria. In both cases, the depth concentration profiles (0-30 and 0-40 mm) show a relatively good preservation of the cyanobacterial carotenoids, zeaxanthin, β-carotene, myxoxanthophyll, and echinenone. This contrasts with the extensive biodegradation of cyanobacterial remains observed microscopically. Fucoxanthin in the calcite mat is also transformed at a faster rate than the cyanobacterial carotenoids. Chlorophyll a, the major pigment in both mats, exhibits different transformation pathways. In the calcite/gypsum mat, it is transformed via C-13 2 carbomethoxy defunctionalization prior to loss of the phytyl chain, leading to the formation of pyrophaeophytin a and, subsequently, pyrophaeophorbide a. On the other hand, the occurrence of the enzyme chlorophyllase, attributed to diatoms in the calcite mat, gives rise to extensive phytyl hydrolysis, with the formation of chlorophyllide a, pyrophaeophorbide a and, in minor proportion, phaeophorbide a. Studies of the sources of the photosynthetic pigments and of their transformation pathways in such simplified ecosystems provide a

  10. Influence of dislocations on the process of pore formation in n-InP (111) single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchikova, Y. A., E-mail: yanasuchikova@mail.ru; Kidalov, V. V. [Berdyansk State Pedagogical University (Ukraine); Sukach, G. A. [National University of Bioresources and Nature Management (Ukraine)

    2011-01-15

    Using scanning electron microscopy, the influence of dislocations on the mechanism of pore formation during electrolytic etching of single-crystal InP is shown. During studying of the nanostructure of porous layers, the features of mechanisms of pore formation in the n-InP samples are established. It is shown that they are caused by outcrop of dislocations on the (111) surface and pore growth both along the surface and perpendicularly to it. The dislocation density in the places of an increased impurity concentration is calculated.

  11. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  12. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation. PMID:27485276

  13. Composition of Carotenoids and Flavonoids in Narcissus Cultivars and their Relationship with Flower Color.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    Full Text Available Narcissus is widely used for cut flowers and potted plants, and is one of the most important commercial bulbous flowers in the floricultural industry. In this study, ten carotenoid and eighteen flavonoid compounds from the perianths and coronas of fifteen narcissus cultivars were measured by HPLC-APCI-MS/MS and UPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS. Among these, six carotenoids, a total of seventeen flavonols and chlorogenic acid were identified in narcissus for the first time. A multivariate analysis was used to explore the relationship between flower color and pigment composition. We found that all-trans-violaxanthin and total carotenoid content were the main factors that affected flower color. These investigations could provide a global view of flower color formation and a theoretical basis for hybridization breeding in narcissus.

  14. Applications of computational chemistry to the study of the antiradical activity of carotenoids: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monego, Debora Luana; da Rosa, Marcelo Barcellos; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero

    2017-02-15

    A summary of the various quantum chemical analyses that have been employed to evaluate the free radical scavenger capacity of carotenoid molecules are tabulated in this review and the most important observations are discussed. These molecules are able to interact with reactive oxygen species through singlet oxygen scavenging, electron transfer, hydrogen atom abstraction and radical adduct formation. Most studies employ density functional theory to compare the antiradical capacity of different carotenoids with the ones that are most explored theoretically, such as lycopene and β-carotene. A significant number of these applications have been directed towards understanding the electron transfer mechanism, and a useful tool called the FEDAM (full-electron donor-acceptor map) was developed to better evaluate this mechanism. Important aspects that may affect the radical scavenging capacity of carotenoids, such as synergistic effects and solubility, are sometimes overlooked, and a greater number of such compounds should be explored. PMID:27664605

  15. Applications of computational chemistry to the study of the antiradical activity of carotenoids: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monego, Debora Luana; da Rosa, Marcelo Barcellos; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero

    2017-02-15

    A summary of the various quantum chemical analyses that have been employed to evaluate the free radical scavenger capacity of carotenoid molecules are tabulated in this review and the most important observations are discussed. These molecules are able to interact with reactive oxygen species through singlet oxygen scavenging, electron transfer, hydrogen atom abstraction and radical adduct formation. Most studies employ density functional theory to compare the antiradical capacity of different carotenoids with the ones that are most explored theoretically, such as lycopene and β-carotene. A significant number of these applications have been directed towards understanding the electron transfer mechanism, and a useful tool called the FEDAM (full-electron donor-acceptor map) was developed to better evaluate this mechanism. Important aspects that may affect the radical scavenging capacity of carotenoids, such as synergistic effects and solubility, are sometimes overlooked, and a greater number of such compounds should be explored.

  16. Formation of Cholesterol Bilayer Domains Precedes Formation of Cholesterol Crystals in Cholesterol/Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Membranes: EPR and DSC Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol%. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogs it was shown that the...

  17. Formation of crystal-like structures and branched networks from nonionic spherical micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiel, Joshua J.; Furusho, Hirotoshi; Skoglund, Ulf; Shen, Amy Q.

    2015-12-01

    Crystal-like structures at nano and micron scales have promise for purification and confined reactions, and as starting points for fabricating highly ordered crystals for protein engineering and drug discovery applications. However, developing controlled crystallization techniques from batch processes remain challenging. We show that neutrally charged nanoscale spherical micelles from biocompatible nonionic surfactant solutions can evolve into nano- and micro-sized branched networks and crystal-like structures. This occurs under simple combinations of temperature and flow conditions. Our findings not only suggest new opportunities for developing controlled universal crystallization and encapsulation procedures that are sensitive to ionic environments and high temperatures, but also open up new pathways for accelerating drug discovery processes, which are of tremendous interest to pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries.

  18. Carotenoid Biosynthetic and Catabolic Pathways: Gene Expression and Carotenoid Content in Grains of Maize Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael da Silva Messias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant carotenoids have been implicated in preventing several age-related diseases, and they also provide vitamin A precursors; therefore, increasing the content of carotenoids in maize grains is of great interest. It is not well understood, however, how the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated. Fortunately, the maize germplasm exhibits a high degree of genetic diversity that can be exploited for this purpose. Here, the accumulation of carotenoids and the expression of genes from carotenoid metabolic and catabolic pathways were investigated in several maize landraces. The carotenoid content in grains varied from 10.03, in the white variety MC5, to 61.50 μg·g−1, in the yellow-to-orange variety MC3, and the major carotenoids detected were lutein and zeaxanthin. PSY1 (phythoene synthase expression showed a positive correlation with the total carotenoid content. Additionally, the PSY1 and HYD3 (ferredoxin-dependent di-iron monooxygenase expression levels were positively correlated with β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin, while CYP97C (cytochrome P450-type monooxygenase expression did not correlate with any of the carotenoids. In contrast, ZmCCD1 (carotenoid dioxygenase was more highly expressed at the beginning of grain development, as well as in the white variety, and its expression was inversely correlated with the accumulation of several carotenoids, suggesting that CCD1 is also an important enzyme to be considered when attempting to improve the carotenoid content in maize. The MC27 and MC1 varieties showed the highest HYD3/CYP97C ratios, suggesting that they are promising candidates for increasing the zeaxanthin content; in contrast, MC14 and MC7 showed low HYD3/CYP97C, suggesting that they may be useful in biofortification efforts aimed at promoting the accumulation of provitamin A. The results of this study demonstrate the use of maize germplasm to provide insight into the regulation of genes involved in the carotenoid pathway, which

  19. Model of phosphorus precipitation and crystal formation in electric arc furnace steel slag filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveau-Mallet, Dominique; Wallace, Scott; Comeau, Yves

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a phosphorus retention mechanisms model based on precipitation and crystallization in electric arc furnace slag filters. Three slag columns were fed during 30 to 630 days with a reconstituted mining effluent at different void hydraulic retention times. Precipitates formed in columns were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electronic microscopy. The proposed model is expressed in the following steps: (1) the rate limiting dissolution of slag is represented by the dissolution of CaO, (2) a high pH in the slag filter results in phosphorus precipitation and crystal growth, (3) crystal retention takes place by filtration, settling and growth densification, (4) the decrease in available reaction volume is caused by crystal and other particulate matter accumulation (and decrease in available reaction time), and (5) the pH decreases in the filter over time if the reaction time is too low (which results in a reduced removal efficiency). Crystal organization in a slag filter determines its phosphorus retention capacity. Supersaturation and water velocity affect crystal organization. A compact crystal organization enhances the phosphorus retention capacity of the filter. A new approach to define filter performance is proposed: saturation retention capacity is expressed in units of mg P/mL voids.

  20. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Palm Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puah C. Wei

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of carotenoids from crude palm oil was carried out in a dynamic (flow- through supercritical fluid extraction system. The carotenoids obtained were quantified using off-line UV-visible spectrophotometry. The effects of operating pressure and temperature, flow rate of the supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2, sample size of feed used on the solubility of palm carotenoids were investigated. The results showed that the extraction of carotenoids was governed by its solubility in the SC-CO2 and can be enhanced by increasing pressure at a constant temperature or decreasing temperature at a constant pressure. Increasing the flow rate and decreasing the sample size can reduce the extraction time but do not enhance the solubility. Palm carotenoids have very low solubility in SC-CO2 in the range of 1.31 x 10-4 g kg-1 to 1.58 x 10-3 g kg-1 for the conditions investigated in this study. The experimental data obtained were compared with those published by other workers and correlated by a density-based equation as proposed by Chrastil.

  1. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein, and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD.

  2. [Carotenoids: 2. Diseases and supplementation studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, H; Fayol, V; Galabert, C; Grolier, P; Moël, G L; Stephens, J; Nabet, F

    1999-05-01

    Inverse correlations have been found in most studies on the relationship between dietary intake and plasma concentrations of carotenoids on one side and degenerative diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases on the other side. Protective effects of carotenoids have been found for pathologies of the retina and the skin. Concentrations of these molecules in blood are lower in digestive pathologies and HIV. Short- and long-term toxicity of carotenoids was found to be low. In combination with the beneficial effects found for diets rich in carotenoids, this has initiated trials with relatively high doses of carotenoid supplements. In the study in Linxian (China) in a rural population with poor nutritional status, supplementation with beta-carotene, zinc, selenium and vitamin E lowered total mortality and mortality from stomach cancer. Other studies (ATBC, Caret.) on well-fed subjects did not show beneficial effects on mortality from cancer and cardiovascular diseases. On the contrary, higher mortality and lung cancer incidence was found in supplemented subjects that were also exposed to asbestos and cigarette smoke. In these studies, doses of supplemental beta-carotene were high and varied from 20 to 50 mg/day. One still ongoing study, called Suvimax, doses subjects for eight years with a cocktail of vitamins and minerals including 6 mg per day of beta-carotene. This supplementation with physiologically seen more "normal" doses might give clarity on the question if beta-carotene is the protective factor in fruits and vegetables. PMID:10377477

  3. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Embryonic Crystal Cell Formation During Drosophila Hematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milchanowski, Allison B.; Henkenius, Amy L.; Narayanan, Maya; Hartenstein, Volker; Banerjee, Utpal

    2004-01-01

    Parallels between vertebrate and Drosophila hematopoiesis add to the value of flies as a model organism to gain insights into blood development. The Drosophila hematopoietic system is composed of at least three classes of terminally differentiated blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. Recent studies have identified transcriptional and signaling pathways in Drosophila involving proteins similar to those seen in human blood development. To identify additional genes involved in Drosophila hematopoiesis, we have conducted a P-element-based genetic screen to isolate mutations that affect embryonic crystal cell development. Using a marker of terminally differentiated crystal cells, we screened 1040 P-element-lethal lines located on the second and third chromosomes and identified 44 individual lines that affect crystal cell development. Identifying novel genes and pathways involved in Drosophila hematopoiesis is likely to provide further insights into mammalian hematopoietic development and disorders. PMID:15454546

  4. On the use of classical JMAK crystallization kinetic theory to describe simultaneous processes leading to the formation of different phases in metals

    OpenAIRE

    Blázquez, J.S.; Conde, C. F.; Conde, A.

    2014-01-01

    The classical theory of Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov (JMAK) is widely used to describe the kinetics of crystallization even when the premises required for its application are not strictly fulfilled. In this paper we propose a procedure to obtain the JMAK parameters of the independent transformations that simultaneously occur during a crystallization process (e.g. leading to the formation of several crystalline phases). The predictions of the analysis have been used to describe the crystalli...

  5. Molecular Characterization of Carotenoid Biosynthetic Genes and Carotenoid Accumulation in Lycium chinense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shicheng Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lycium chinense is a shrub that has health benefits and is used as a source of medicines in Asia. In this study, a full-length cDNA clone encoding β-ring carotene hydroxylase (LcCHXB and partial-length cDNA clones encoding phytoene synthase (LcPSY, phytoene desaturase (LcPDS, ξ-carotene desaturase (LcZDS, lycopene β-cyclase (LcLCYB, lycopene ε-cyclase (LcLCYE, ε-ring carotene hydroxylase (LcCHXE, zeaxanthin epoxidase (LcZEP, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (LcCCD1, and 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (LcNCED were identified in L. chinense. The transcripts were constitutively expressed at high levels in leaves, flowers and red fruits, where the carotenoids are mostly distributed. In contrast, most of the carotenoid biosynthetic genes were weakly expressed in the roots and stems, which contained only small amounts of carotenoids. The level of LcLCYE transcripts was very high in leaves and correlated with the abundance of lutein in this plant tissue. During maturation, the levels of lutein and zeaxanthin in L. chinense fruits dramatically increased, concomitant with a rise in the level of β-cryptoxanthin. LcPSY, LcPDS, LcZDS, LcLCYB, and LcCHXE were highly expressed in red fruits, leading to their substantially higher total carotenoid content compared to that in green fruits. Total carotenoid content was high in both the leaves and red fruits of L. chinense. Our findings on the biosynthesis of carotenoids in L. chinense provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and may facilitate the optimization of carotenoid production in L. chinense.

  6. Carotenoid content of 50 watermelon cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Collins, Julie K; Davis, Angela R; Roberts, Warren

    2006-04-01

    The lycopene content of 50 commercial cultivars of seeded and seedless red-fleshed watermelons was determined. Scanning colorimetric and spectrophotometric assays of total lycopene were used to separate watermelon cultivars into low (90 mg/kg fw). Cultivars varied greatly in lycopene content, ranging from 33 to 100 mg/kg. Most of the seeded hybrid cultivars had average lycopene contents. Sixteen of the 33 seedless types had lycopene contents in the high and very high ranges. All-trans-lycopene was the predominant carotenoid (84-97%) in all watermelon cultivars measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, but the germplasm differed in the relative amounts of cis-lycopene, beta-carotene, and phytofluene. Red-fleshed watermelon genotypes vary extensively in carotenoid content and offer opportunities for developing watermelons with specifically enhanced carotenoids. PMID:16569049

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements of deuteride (hydride) formation and decomposition in single-crystal Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuteride (hydride) precipitation and decomposition microstructure in single-crystal Pd has been investigated in a series of in situ small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The particle morphology along the absorption and desorption branches of the 353-K pressure-composition isotherm are consistent with a loss of particle coherency, leading to the formation of large, micron-thick plates. The loss of coherency coincides with the system entering the miscibility gap, an observation that suggests irreversible dislocation formation in part drives the hysteretic behavior of the Pd-D (-H) system. SANS analysis further indicates that the decomposition process is characterized by a much higher particle dispersion, with a factor of 40 greater surface-to-volume ratio of the precipitating phase. This we attribute to a more heterogeneous transformation process, presumably at dislocations formed during initial deuteride formation

  8. Dehydrolutein: a metabolically derived carotenoid never observed in raptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David COSTANTINI; Vittorio BERTACCHE; Barbara PASTURA; Anthony TURK

    2009-01-01

    @@ Carotenoids are fat-soluble pigments synthesised by photosynthetic organisms (Brush, 1990). Conversely, animals are incapable of synthesizing carotenoids de novo, and they must obtain them through their diet. However, some animal species are able to make some alterations to the basic chemical structure, converting ingested carotenoids into more oxidized and differently coloured forms (Schiedt, 1998).

  9. Dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, I.; Cadier, E.; Beulens, J. W J; van der A, D. L.; Spijkerman, A. M W; van der Schouw, Y. T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Carotenoids may reduce diabetes risk, due to their antioxidant properties. However, the association between dietary carotenoids intake and type 2 diabetes risk is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether higher dietary carotenoid intakes assoc

  10. The fate of carotenoids in sediments: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koopmans, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Despite carotenoids being abundant natural products, there are only scattered literature reports of carotenoid derivatives (mainly in the form of their 'perhydro' derivatives) in ancient sediments and petroleum. This was thought to be due to the sensitivity of carotenoids toward oxygen and their pre

  11. Dietary factors that affect the bioavailability of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van het K.H.; West, C.E.; Weststrate, J.A.; Hautvast, J.G.A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects of increased vegetable consumption. Various dietary factors have an effect on the bioavailability of carotenoids. The type of food matrix in which carotenoids are located is a major factor. The bioavailability of ß-carotene from vegetab

  12. Thermal formation of mesoporous single-crystal Co3O4 nano-needles and their lithium storage properties

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report the simple solid-state formation of mesoporous Co3O4 nano-needles with a 3D single-crystalline framework. The synthesis is based on controlled thermal oxidative decomposition and re-crystallization of precursor β-Co(OH)2 nano-needles. Importantly, after thermal treatment, the needle-like morphology can be completely preserved, despite the fact that there is a large volume contraction accompanying the process: β-Co(OH)2 → Co3O 4. Because of the intrinsic crystal contraction, a highly mesoporous structure with high specific surface area has been simultaneously created. The textual properties can be easily tailored by varying the annealing temperature between 200-400 °C. Interestingly, thermal re-crystallization at higher temperatures leads to the formation of a perfect 3D single-crystalline framework. Thus derived mesoporous Co3O4 nano-needles serve as a good model system for the study of lithium storage properties. The optimized sample manifests very low initial irreversible loss (21%), ultrahigh capacity, and excellent cycling performance. For example, a reversible capacity of 1079 mA h g-1 can be maintained after 50 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance and ease of synthesis may suggest their practical use in lithium-ion batteries. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2008.

  13. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Faisal; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ˜150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 1016 cm-2, close to the depth ˜250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  14. Quantitative auger electron spectroscopy of the interface carbon layer formation on the vacuum cleavage surfaces of layered semiconductor In4Se3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the qualitative Auger electron spectroscopy of the interface carbon layer formation on the high vacuum cleavage surfaces of layered semiconductor In4Se3 crystals are presented. The kinetics of interfacial carbon layer formation on the cleavage surfaces of crystals and the elemental and phase composition of the interface dependent on the exposition time in high vacuum and on the dose of electron irradiation have been studied by the quantitative Auger electron and mass-spectroscopy methods

  15. Dietary Carotenoids Regulate Astaxanthin Content of Copepods and Modulate Their Susceptibility to UV Light and Copper Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Carman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available High irradiation and the presence of xenobiotics favor the formation of reactive oxygen species in marine environments. Organisms have developed antioxidant defenses, including the accumulation of carotenoids that must be obtained from the diet. Astaxanthin is the main carotenoid in marine crustaceans where, among other functions, it scavenges free radicals thus protecting cell compounds against oxidation. Four diets with different carotenoid composition were used to culture the meiobenthic copepod Amphiascoides atopus to assess how its astaxanthin content modulates the response to prooxidant stressors. A. atopus had the highest astaxanthin content when the carotenoid was supplied as astaxanthin esters (i.e., Haematococcus meal. Exposure to short wavelength UV light elicited a 77% to 92% decrease of the astaxanthin content of the copepod depending on the culture diet. The LC50 values of A. atopus exposed to copper were directly related to the initial astaxanthin content. The accumulation of carotenoids may ascribe competitive advantages to certain species in areas subjected to pollution events by attenuating the detrimental effects of metals on survival, and possibly development and fecundity. Conversely, the loss of certain dietary items rich in carotenoids may be responsible for the amplification of the effects of metal exposure in consumers.

  16. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Braun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO, molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  17. ZEAXANTHIN EPOXIDASE Activity Potentiates Carotenoid Degradation in Maturing Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Jorge, Sabrina; Mehrshahi, Payam; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Lipka, Alexander E; Angelovici, Ruthie; Gore, Michael A; DellaPenna, Dean

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway has enabled altering the composition and content of carotenoids in various plants, but to achieve desired nutritional impacts, the genetic components regulating carotenoid homeostasis in seed, the plant organ consumed in greatest abundance, must be elucidated. We used a combination of linkage mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and pathway-level analysis to identify nine loci that impact the natural variation of seed carotenoids in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ZEAXANTHIN EPOXIDASE (ZEP) was the major contributor to carotenoid composition, with mutants lacking ZEP activity showing a remarkable 6-fold increase in total seed carotenoids relative to the wild type. Natural variation in ZEP gene expression during seed development was identified as the underlying mechanism for fine-tuning carotenoid composition, stability, and ultimately content in Arabidopsis seed. We previously showed that two CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE enzymes, CCD1 and CCD4, are the primary mediators of seed carotenoid degradation, and here we demonstrate that ZEP acts as an upstream control point of carotenoid homeostasis, with ZEP-mediated epoxidation targeting carotenoids for degradation by CCD enzymes. Finally, four of the nine loci/enzymatic activities identified as underlying natural variation in Arabidopsis seed carotenoids also were identified in a recent GWAS of maize (Zea mays) kernel carotenoid variation. This first comparison of the natural variation in seed carotenoids in monocots and dicots suggests a surprising overlap in the genetic architecture of these traits between the two lineages and provides a list of likely candidates to target for selecting seed carotenoid variation in other species. PMID:27208224

  18. Accidental formation of Gd₄(SiO₄)₂OTe: crystal structure and spectroscopic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Marek; Gulay, Lubomir D

    2015-07-01

    Designing new functional materials with increasingly complex compositions is of current interest in science and technology. Complex rare-earth-based chalcogenides have specific thermal, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Tetragadolinium bis[tetraoxidosilicate(IV)] oxide telluride, Gd4(SiO4)2OTe, was obtained accidentally while studying the Gd2Te3-Cu2Te system. The crystal structure was determined by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the space group Pnma. Three symmetry-independent gadolinium sites were determined. The excitation and emission spectra were collected at room temperature and at 10 K. Gd4(SiO4)2OTe appears to be a promising optical material when doped with rare-earth ions. PMID:26146399

  19. Formation and crystallization of bulk Pd82Si18 amorphous alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲建; 王敬丰; 肖建中; 崔昆

    2003-01-01

    Bulk amorphous Pd82Si18 alloy with the largest diameter of 8 mm was prepared by water quenching the molten alloy with flux medium in a quartz tube. The calculation result indicates that the bulk Pd82Si18 amorphous alloys have a low critical cooling rate (Rc) of 4.589 K/s or less. The experimental results show that purifying melt may improve glass forming ability(GFA) of undercooled melt, while liquid phase separation (LPS) of undercooled melt will decrease its GFA. There are some differences in crystallization experiments between bulk metallic glass and amorphous ribbons of Pd82Si18 alloys. These include the numbers of exothermic peak, glass transition temperature Tg, crystallization temperature Tx, region of undercooling liquid (ΔT=Tx-Tg) respectively. The links of cooling rates of melt and crystallization of Pd82Si18 amorphous alloys are explored.

  20. Metallic Na formation in NaCl crystals with irradiation of electron or vacuum ultraviolet photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owaki, Shigehiro [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai, Osaka (Japan). Coll. of Integrated Arts and Sciences; Koyama, Shigeko; Takahashi, Masao; Kamada, Masao; Suzuki, Ryouichi

    1997-03-01

    Metallic Na was formed in NaCl single crystals with irradiation of a variety of radiation sources and analyzed the physical states with several methods. In the case of irradiation of 21 MeV electron pulses to the crystal blocks, the optical absorption and lifetime measurement of positron annihilation indicated appearance of Na clusters inside. Radiation effects of electron beam of 30 keV to the crystals in vacuum showed the appearance of not only metallic Na but atomic one during irradiation with Auger electron spectroscopy. Intense photon fluxes in vacuum ultraviolet region of synchrotron radiation were used as another source and an analyzing method of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed the metallic Na layered so thick that bulk plasmon can exist. (author)

  1. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  2. The carotenoid-continuum: carotenoid-based plumage ranges from conspicuous to cryptic and back again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Mark L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are frequently used by birds to colour their plumage with green, yellow, orange or red hues, and carotenoid-based colours are considered honest signals of quality, although they may have other functions, such as crypsis. It is usually assumed that red through yellow colours have a signalling function while green is cryptic. Here we challenge this notion using the yellow and green colouration of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus, great tits (Parus major and greenfinches (Carduelis chloris as a model. Results The relationship between colouration (chroma, computed using visual sensitivities of conspecifics and detectability (contrast against natural backgrounds as perceived by conspecifics and avian predators followed a similar curvilinear pattern for yellow and green plumage with minimum detectability at intermediate levels of carotenoid deposition. Thus, for yellow and green plumage, colours at or close to the point of minimum detectability may aid in crypsis. This may be the case for blue and great tit green and yellow plumage, and greenfinch green plumage, all of which had comparably low levels of detectability, while greenfinch yellow plumage was more chromatic and detectable. As yellow and green blue tit colouration are strongly affected by carotenoid availability during moult, variation in pigment availability between habitats may affect the degree of background-matching or the costliness of producing cryptic plumage. Conclusions Increasing carotenoid-deposition in the integument does not always lead to more conspicuous colours. In some cases, such as in blue or great tits, carotenoid deposition may be selected through enhanced background-matching, which in turn suggests that producing cryptic plumage may entail costs. We stress however, that our data do not rule out a signalling function of carotenoid-based plumage in tits. Rather, it shows that alternative functions are plausible and that assuming a signalling

  3. Continuous production of carotenoids from Dunaliella salina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinegris, D.M.M.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    During the in situ extraction of ß-carotene from Dunaliella salina, the causal relationship between carotenoid extraction and cell death indicated that cell growth and cell death should be at equilibrium for a continuous in situ extraction process. In a flat-panel photobioreactor that was operated a

  4. Influence of Phenylalanine on Carotenoid Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L.; Ni, X.; Luo, X.

    2015-01-01

    The carotenoids lutein and β-carotene form, in 1:1 ethanol-water mixtures H-aggregates, of different strengths. The effects of phenylalanine on these aggregates were recorded by UV-Vis absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and Raman spectra. The H-aggregate of lutein was characterized by a large 78 nm blue shift in the absorption spectra, confirming the strong coupling between hydroxyl groups of adjacent molecules. The 15 nm blue shift in the β-carotene mixture also indicates that it was assembled by weak coupling between polyenes. After adding phenylalanine, the reducing absorption strength of the aggregates of lutein and reappearance of vibrational substructure indicate that the hydroxyl and amino groups of phenylalanine may coordinate to lutein and disaggregate the H-aggregates. However, phenylalanine had no effect on aggregates of β-carotene. The Raman spectra show three bands of carotenoids whose intensities decreased with increasing phenylalanine concentration. The frequency of ν1 corresponding to the length of the conjugated region was more sensitive to the solution of lutein. This coordination of phenylalanine to lutein could increase the length of the conjugated region. In addition, phenylalanine significantly affected the excited electronic states of carotenoids, which were crucial in the energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophyll a in vivo.

  5. FORMATION (DECOMPOSITION) ENTHALPY CALCULATIONS FOR CRYSTAL LATTICES OF ALKALINE-EARTH FLUORIDES

    OpenAIRE

    Gruba, O.; Germanyuk, N.; Ryabukhin, A.

    2015-01-01

    A series of calculations of structural and thermochemical properties has been carried out for the alkaline-earth fluorides. The calculations have been carried out using the modified model of effective ionic radii and the model of enthalpy calculation for the crystal lattice. The results of the calculations are in accordance with the known experimental data within confidence intervals.

  6. Effects of added silica nanoparticles on the nematic liquid crystal phase formation in beidellite suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landman, Jasper; Paineau, Erwan; Davidson, Patrick; Bihannic, Isabelle; Michot, Laurent J.; Philippe, Adrian Marie; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Lekkerkerker, Henk N W

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a study of the liquid crystal phase behavior of mixed suspensions of the natural smectite clay mineral beidellite and nonadsorbing colloidal silica particles. While virtually all smectite clays dispersed in water form gels at very low concentrations, beidellite displays a

  7. Formation of tilted smectic-C liquid crystal phase in polar Gay-Berne molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation for a system of Gay-Berne molecules having two terminal dipole moments to generate tilted smectic-C liquid crystal phase. We investigate the effect of dipolar orientation with respect to the long molecular axis on phase behaviour. The study indicates that larger dipolar angle can give rise to greater tilt in molecular organization within a layer

  8. Unsaturated Glycerophospholipids Mediate Heme Crystallization: Biological Implications for Hemozoin Formation in the Kissing Bug Rhodnius prolixus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiebler, R.; Majerowicz, D.; Knudsen, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by some blood-feeding organisms, as an efficient way to detoxify heme derived from hemoglobin digestion. In the triatomine insect Rhodnius prolixus, Hz is essentially produced by midgut extracellular phospholipid membranes known as perimicrovillar membrane...

  9. What are carotenoids signaling? Immunostimulatory effects of dietary vitamin E, but not of carotenoids, in Iberian green lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopena, Renata; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    In spite that carotenoid-based sexual ornaments are one of the most popular research topics in sexual selection of animals, the antioxidant and immunostimulatory role of carotenoids, presumably signaled by these colorful ornaments, is still controversial. It has been suggested that the function of carotenoids might not be as an antioxidant per se, but that colorful carotenoids may indirectly reflect the levels of nonpigmentary antioxidants, such as melatonin or vitamin E. We experimentally fed male Iberian green lizards ( Lacerta schreiberi) additional carotenoids or vitamin E alone, or a combination of carotenoids and vitamin E dissolved in soybean oil, whereas a control group only received soybean oil. We examined the effects of the dietary supplementations on phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin-swelling immune response and body condition. Lizards that were supplemented with vitamin E alone or a combination of vitamin E and carotenoids had greater immune responses than control lizards, but animals supplemented with carotenoids alone had lower immune responses than lizards supplemented with vitamin E and did not differ from control lizards. These results support the hypothesis that carotenoids in green lizards are not effective as immunostimulants, but that they may be visually signaling the immunostimulatory effects of non-pigmentary vitamin E. In contrast, lizards supplemented with carotenoids alone have higher body condition gains than lizards in the other experimental groups, suggesting that carotenoids may be still important to improve condition.

  10. [Calcium carbide of different crystal formation synthesized by calcium carbide residue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong-yuan; Kang, Ming; Jiang, Cai-rong; Tu, Ming-jing

    2006-04-01

    To recycle calcium carbide residue effectively, calcium carbide of different crystal form, including global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide was synthesized. Both the influence of pretreatment in the purity of calcium carbide, and the influence of temperatures of carbonization reaction, release velocity of carbon dioxide in the apparition of calcium carbide of different crystal form were studied with DTA-TG and SEM. The result shows that calcium carbide residue can take place chemistry reaction with ammonia chlorinate straight. Under the condition that pH was above 7, the purity of calcium carbide was above 97%, and the whiteness was above 98. Once provided the different temperatures of carbonization reaction and the proper release velocity of carbon dioxide, global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide were obtained.

  11. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Embryonic Crystal Cell Formation During Drosophila Hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Milchanowski, Allison B.; Henkenius, Amy L.; Narayanan, Maya; Hartenstein, Volker; Banerjee, Utpal

    2004-01-01

    Parallels between vertebrate and Drosophila hematopoiesis add to the value of flies as a model organism to gain insights into blood development. The Drosophila hematopoietic system is composed of at least three classes of terminally differentiated blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. Recent studies have identified transcriptional and signaling pathways in Drosophila involving proteins similar to those seen in human blood development. To identify additional genes involv...

  12. Formation and crystallization kinetics of Nd-Fe-B-based bulk amorphous alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Ge, Hongliang; Zhang, Pengyue; Li, Dongyun; Wang, Zisheng [China Jiliang University, Magnetism Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-06-15

    In order to improve the glass-forming ability (GFA) of Nd-Fe-B ternary alloys to obtain fully amorphous bulk Nd-Fe-B-based alloy, the effects of Mo and Y doping on GFA of the alloys were investigated. It was found that the substitution of Mo for Fe and Y for Nd enhanced the GFA of the Nd-Y-Fe-Mo-B alloys. It was also revealed that the GFA of the samples was optimized by 4 at.% Mo doping and increased with theYcontent. The fully amorphous structures were all formed in the Nd{sub 6-x}Y{sub x}Fe{sub 68}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 22} (x =1-5) alloy rods with 1.5 mm-diameter. After subsequent crystallization, the devitrified Nd{sub 3}Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 68}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 22} alloy rod exhibited a uniform distribution of grains with a coercivity of 364.1 kA/m. The crystallization behavior of Nd{sub 3}Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 68}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 22} BMG was investigated in isothermal situation. The Avrami exponent n determined by JAM plot is lower than 2.5, implying that the crystallization is mainly governed by a growth of particles with decreasing nucleation rate. (orig.)

  13. The formation of organic (propolis films)/inorganic (layered crystals) interfaces for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapak, S. I.; Bakhtinov, A. P.; Gavrylyuk, S. V.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Lytvyn, O. S.

    2008-10-01

    Propolis (honeybee glue) organic films were prepared from an alcoholic solution on the surfaces of inorganic layered semiconductors (indium, gallium and bismuth selenides). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize structural properties of an organic/inorganic interfaces. It is shown that nanodimensional linear defects and nanodimensional cavities of various shapes are formed on the van der Waals (VDW) surfaces of layered crystals as a result of chemical interaction between the components of propolis (flavonoids, aminoacids and phenolic acids) and the VDW surfaces as well as deformation interaction between the VDW surfaces and propolis films during their polymerization. The nanocavities are formed as a result of the rupture of strong covalent bonds in the upper layers of layered crystals and have the shape of hexagons or triangles in the (0001) plane. The shape, lateral size and distribution of nanodimensional defects on the VDW surfaces depends on the type of crystals, the magnitude and distribution of surface stresses. We have obtained self-organized nanofold structures of propolis/InSe interface. It is established that such heterostructures have photosensitivity in the infrared range hν<1.2 eV (the values of energy gap are 1.2 eV for InSe and 3.07 eV for propolis films at room temperature).

  14. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    KAUST Repository

    Rodrigo, María J.

    2013-09-04

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly ?-citraurin (3-hydroxy-?-apo-8?-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of ?-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in ?-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7?,8? double bond in zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin, confrming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7?,8? double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. The Author 2013.

  15. Mate choice for a male carotenoid-based ornament is linked to female dietary carotenoid intake and accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomey Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coevolution of male traits and female mate preferences has led to the elaboration and diversification of sexually selected traits; however the mechanisms that mediate trait-preference coevolution are largely unknown. Carotenoid acquisition and accumulation are key determinants of the expression of male sexually selected carotenoid-based coloration and a primary mechanism maintaining the honest information content of these signals. Carotenoids also influence female health and reproduction in ways that may alter the costs and benefits of mate choice behaviours and thus provide a potential biochemical link between the expression of male traits and female preferences. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the dietary carotenoid levels of captive female house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus and assessed their mate choice behavior in response to color-manipulated male finches. Results Females preferred to associate with red males, but carotenoid supplementation did not influence the direction or strength of this preference. Females receiving a low-carotenoid diet were less responsive to males in general, and discrimination among the colorful males was positively linked to female plasma carotenoid levels at the beginning of the study when the diet of all birds was carotenoid-limited. Conclusions Although female preference for red males was not influenced by carotenoid intake, changes in mating responsiveness and discrimination linked to female carotenoid status may alter how this preference is translated into choice. The reddest males, with the most carotenoid rich plumage, tend to pair early in the breeding season. If carotenoid-related variations in female choice behaviour shift the timing of pairing, then they have the potential to promote assortative mating by carotenoid status and drive the evolution of carotenoid-based male plumage coloration.

  16. Short- and long-term efficiency of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to prevent crystal formation in South African wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeff, A E; Robillard, B; du Toit, W J

    2012-01-01

    Crystal formation in bottled wine occurs due to the over-saturation of wine with potassium bitartrate (KHT) salt when exposed to low temperatures. In this study, special focus was given to the efficiency of a crystallisation-inhibiting additive, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), which is widely used in the food industry. In 2008, CMC was authorised by the International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) for use in white and sparkling wines, but is not yet officially permitted in all wine-producing countries. The use of CMC could be of economical importance to the wine industry because energy costs due to cooling can be reduced. Unlike traditional cooling methods, the use of CMC theoretically prevents the loss of acidity. In this study, the short- and long-term efficiencies of CMC were investigated in South African white, rosé and red wines. Efficiency was determined primarily by measuring changes in potassium (K(+)) and tartaric acid (H(2)T) concentrations and visual crystal formation. As part of this study CMC's efficiency was compared with several other crystal inhibition treatments, and was also evaluated for its temperature stability over a year. CMC's effect on colour and total phenols was also assessed. The results reveal a high efficiency in preventing losses in K(+) and H(2)T concentrations in white wines, even with an ageing period of up to 12 months. The addition of CMC to rosé wines also delivered certain positive results, but less so for red wine. Three different commercial CMCs were also compared with mannoproteins to prevent changes in K(+) and H(2)T concentrations in three different wines. Furthermore, sensory evaluation was performed to determine certain organoleptic changes as a result of CMC treatments. PMID:22762479

  17. Antioxidant responses and renal crystal formation in rainbow trout treated with melamine administered individually or in combination with cyanuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Nicole; Prearo, Marino; Abete, Maria Cesarina; Brizio, Paola; Dörr, Ambrosius Josef Martin; Reimschuessel, Renate; Andersen, Wendy; Gasco, Laura; Righetti, Marzia; Elia, Antonia Concetta

    2013-01-01

    In 2007 and 2008, renal stone formation and kidney damage in human infants were linked to consumption of melamine (MEL)-contaminated infant formula, as well as renal failure and death in pets due to pet food containing both MEL and cyanuric acid (CYA). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of MEL and CYA administered individually or in combination on concentrations of certain metabolites and enzyme activities that serve as markers for oxidative stress in kidney and liver of rainbow trout. In addition, the levels of muscle MEL and renal crystal formation were determined. Trout were fed MEL and/or CYA for 8 wk at 250, 500, or 1000 mg of each compound/kg in feed. Fish muscle residues of MEL exhibited a dose-response relationship. Coexposure of trout to MEL and CYA at the highest dose led to lower MEL residue concentrations in muscle compared to exposure to MEL alone. Renal MEL-CYA complexes were found in kidneys of fish treated with combined MEL and CYA. A dose response was evident with respect to both (1) number of trout displaying renal crystals and (2) number of crystals per fish. Changes in concentration of antioxidant parameters, such as glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase, were recorded in both tissues of MEL- and CYA-dosed trout. Lipid peroxidation was more pronounced in kidney than liver. Therefore, feed contaminated with both MEL and CYA could be problematic for fish, as MEL administered to trout, individually or in combination with CYA, may facilitate the onset of oxidative damage in trout. PMID:23721584

  18. Effects of copper, iron and fluoride co-crystallized with sugar on caries development and acid formation in deslivated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalen, P L; Pearson, S K; Bowen, W H

    1996-11-01

    The purpose was to explore the effects of combinations of copper, iron and fluoride (Cu, Fe and F) incorporated in sucrose by co-crystallization on caries development in the deslivated rat model and to examine acid formation by bacteria in the rat mouth. Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were infected with Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 and desalivated when aged 26 days. Eight groups were placed in a König-Höfer programmed feeder and received 17 meals daily at hourly intervals, and essential nutrition (NCP No. 2) by gavage twice daily for 21 days. The groups received (1) plain sucrose, (2) F (8 parts/10(6)) co-crystallized with sucrose, (3) Fe (88 parts/10(6)) sucrose, (4) Cu (75 parts/10(6)) sucrose, (5) Cu + F sucrose, (6) Cu + L Fe sucrose, (7) F + Fe sucrose, and (8) Cu + Fe + F sucrose. At death the jaws were removed and sonicated in 0.9% saline solution for microbial assessment. In addition, organic acid assays were performed for each animal. Keyes smooth-surface and sulcal caries scores were lowest in the Cu + Fe + F sucrose group, but not statistically significantly different from those of the other Cu groups. The numbers of Strep. sobrinus found in the groups that received Cu, Cu + Fe, Cu + F, F + Fe and Cu + Fe + F sugar were lower than in the control group. Lactic acid was found in lower concentrations in Fe, Cu, Cu + F, Cu + Fe and F + Fe groups than in the other groups. It appears that combinations of Cu; Fe and F co-crystallized with sugar may have an additive effect in reducing the cariogenic potential of sugar by affecting lactic acid formation and reducing bacterial colonization.

  19. Carotenoids intake and asthma prevalence in Thai children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several antioxidant nutrients have been described to inversely correlate with asthma. In order to quantify the intake of these substances, it is possible to measure skin levels by Raman spectroscopy, a novel non-invasive technique that can also be used in children. This cross-sectional school-based study involved 423 children from a rural area of Thailand. Asthmatic children were diagnosed according to a Health Interview for Asthma Control questionnaire. Skin carotenoid levels were measured with Raman spectroscopy. Demographic data were obtained by directly interviewing children and their parents, whereas anthropometric parameters were measured by trained staff. Intake of carotenoids, vitamin A and C were evaluated by a food frequency questionnaire. Overall incidence of asthma in Thai schoolchildren (aged 3.5-17.8 years was 17.3%. There was no significant difference in dietary intake of carotenoids and vitamin A and C, and skin carotenoid level between asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. Skin carotenoid level significantly correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake (P<0.05. Carotenoids and vitamin A and C intakes, and skin carotenoid levels were not associated with the risk of asthma in Thai children. Skin carotenoids correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake in mild to moderate degrees. Raman spectroscopy was confirmed to be a useful tool to determine antioxidant skin levels.

  20. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms. PMID:26750123

  1. Enhanced shower formation in aligned thick germanium crystals and discrimination against charged hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurichter, A.; Kirsebom, K.; Medewaldt, R.; Mikkelsen, U.; Møller, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Elsener, K.; Ballestrero, S.; Sona, P.; Romano, J.

    1995-11-01

    The distribution of the energy released in a thin silicon detector placed on the downstream side of a thick germanium single crystal bombarded with a 150 GeV electron or pion beam along directions close to the axis or along random directions has been investigated. In view of a possible application to very high energy gamma ray astronomy and particle physics, the intrinsic capability of such a device to reject, on the basis of energy discrimination, unwanted events due to charged hadrons together with the resulting loss of efficiency for the detection of showers initiated by high energy electrons, is determined as a function of the chosen energy threshold.

  2. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) evaluation of crystal and plaque formation associated with biocorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, S L; Ross, T J; Barton, L L

    1993-08-01

    The biofilm attributed to Desulfovibrio vulgaris growing in the presence of ferrous metals was examined with an environmental scanning electron microscope. This novel microscope produced images of iron sulfide colloids and other iron containing structures that had not been reported previously. A plaque composed of iron sulfide enveloped the surface of the corroding metal while crystals containing magnesium, iron, sulfur, and phosphorus were present in the culture where corrosion was in progress. A structure resembling the tubercule found in aerobic corrosion was observed on stainless steel undergoing biocorrosion and the elements present in this structure included sulfur, iron, chloride, calcium, potassium, and chromium.

  3. Photonic crystal formation on optical nanofibers using femtosecond laser ablation technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, K P

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that thousands of periodic nano-craters are fabricated on a subwavelength-diameter tapered optical fiber, an optical nanofiber, by irradiating with just a single femtosecond laser pulse. A key aspect of the fabrication is that the nanofiber itself acts as a cylindrical lens and focuses the femtosecond laser beam on its shadow surface. We also demonstrate that such periodic structures on the nanofiber, act as a 1-D photonic crystal (PhC). Such PhC structures on the nanofiber will strongly enhance the field confinement in such a tapered fiber-based system and may open new avenues in nanophotonics and quantum information technology.

  4. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, C., E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Gupta, Adbhut, E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Joshi, Aditya, E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Manjuladevi, V., E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Gupta, Raj Kumar, E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Rajasthan -333031 (India); Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore - 560080 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  5. Evidence of Epigenetic Mechanisms Affecting Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Jacobo; Beltrán, Jesús; Nuñez, Jonathan; Chavarriaga, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are able to regulate plant development by generating non-Mendelian allelic interactions. An example of these are the responses to environmenal stimuli that result in phenotypic variability and transgression amongst important crop traits. The need to predict phenotypes from genotypes to understand the molecular basis of the genotype-by-environment interaction is a research priority. Today, with the recent discoveries in the field of epigenetics, this challenge goes beyond analyzing how DNA sequences change. Here we review examples of epigenetic regulation of genes involved in carotenoid synthesis and degradation, cases in which histone- and/or DNA-methylation, and RNA silencing at the posttranscriptional level affect carotenoids in plants. PMID:27485227

  6. Gel formation in a mixture of a block copolymer and a nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazimullin, Maxim; Müller, Thomas; Messlinger, Stephan; Rehberg, Ingo; Schöpf, Wolfgang; Krekhov, Alexei; Pettau, Robin; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2011-08-01

    The viscoelastic properties of a binary mixture of a mesogenic side-chain block copolymer in a low molecular weight nematic liquid crystal are studied for mass concentrations ranging from the diluted regime up to a liquid crystalline gel state at about 3%. In the gel state, the system does not flow, exhibits a polydomain structure on a microscopic level, and strongly scatters light. Below the gelation point, the system is homogeneous and behaves like a usual nematic, so the continuum theory of liquid crystals can be applied for interpreting the experimental data. Using the dynamic Fréedericksz transition technique, the dependence of the splay elastic constant and the rotational viscosity on the polymer concentration have been obtained. Comparing the dynamic behavior of block copolymer solutions with the respective homopolymer solutions reveals that, above a mass concentration of 1%, self-assembling of the block copolymer chain segments in clusters occurred, resulting in a gel state at higher concentrations. The effective cluster size is estimated as a function of the concentration, and a scaling-law behavior near the sol-gel transition is confirmed. This technique may serve as an alternative method for determining the gelation point. PMID:21929007

  7. Gel formation in a mixture of a block copolymer and a nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazimullin, Maxim; Müller, Thomas; Messlinger, Stephan; Rehberg, Ingo; Schöpf, Wolfgang; Krekhov, Alexei; Pettau, Robin; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2011-08-01

    The viscoelastic properties of a binary mixture of a mesogenic side-chain block copolymer in a low molecular weight nematic liquid crystal are studied for mass concentrations ranging from the diluted regime up to a liquid crystalline gel state at about 3%. In the gel state, the system does not flow, exhibits a polydomain structure on a microscopic level, and strongly scatters light. Below the gelation point, the system is homogeneous and behaves like a usual nematic, so the continuum theory of liquid crystals can be applied for interpreting the experimental data. Using the dynamic Fréedericksz transition technique, the dependence of the splay elastic constant and the rotational viscosity on the polymer concentration have been obtained. Comparing the dynamic behavior of block copolymer solutions with the respective homopolymer solutions reveals that, above a mass concentration of 1%, self-assembling of the block copolymer chain segments in clusters occurred, resulting in a gel state at higher concentrations. The effective cluster size is estimated as a function of the concentration, and a scaling-law behavior near the sol-gel transition is confirmed. This technique may serve as an alternative method for determining the gelation point.

  8. TEM monitoring of silver nanoparticles formation on the surface of lead crystal glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, C. [Fundacion Centro Nacional del Vidrio, Real Fabrica de Cristales, Po Pocillo, 1. 40100 La Granja de San Ildefonso, Segovia (Spain); Villegas, M.A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8. 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mavillegas@cenim.csic.es; Navarro, J.M. Fernandez [Instituto de Optica Daza de Valdes, CSIC, C. Serrano, 121. 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    Silver nanoparticles have been formed on the surface of lead crystal glass by means of (i) ion-exchange of alkaline ions from the glass by Ag{sup +} ions from a molten salts bath, and (ii) silica based sol-gel coatings containing silver. All experimental variables concerning both ion-exchange process and sol-gel coatings application were combined and studied as main parameters governing the reduction of Ag{sup +} ions to Ag{sup 0} atoms and further aggregation to form nanosized colloids. The content of thermoreducing agents (arsenic or antimony oxides) in the lead crystal glass was essential to favour the reduction of silver ions to form nanoparticles. Optimal experimental conditions to be used for the obtaining of surface silver nanoparticles were determined. TEM was used as the principal characterisation technique for direct observation of the nanoparticles generated. The size of silver colloids varied in the 20-300 nm range for ion-exchanged samples and in the 10-80 nm range for sol-gel coated samples.

  9. Formation and growth of crystal defects in directionally solidified multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryningen, Birgit

    2008-07-01

    Included in this thesis are five publications and one report. The common theme is characterisation of directionally solidified multicrystalline silicon for solar cells. Material characterisation of solar cell silicon is naturally closely linked to both the casting process and to the solar cell processing: Many of the material properties are determined by the casting process, and the solar cell processing will to some extend determine which properties will influence the solar cell performance. Solar grade silicon (SoG-Si) made by metallurgical refining route and supplied by Elkem Solar was directionally solidified and subsequently characterised, and a simple solar cell process was applied. Except from some metallic co-precipitates in the top of the ingot, no abnormalities were found, and it is suggested that within the limits of the tests performed in this thesis, the casting and the solar cell processing, rather than the assumed higher impurity content, was the limiting factor. It is suggested in this thesis that the main quality problem in multicrystalline silicon wafers is the existence of dislocation clusters covering large wafer areas. The clusters will reduce the effect of gettering and even if gettering could be performed successfully, the clusters will still reduce the minority carrier mobility and hence the solar cell performance. It has further been pointed out that ingots solidified under seemingly equal conditions might have a pronounced difference in minority carrier lifetime. Ingots with low minority carrier lifetime have high dislocation densities. The ingots with the substantially higher lifetime seem all to be dominated by twins. It is also found a link between a higher undercooling and the ingots dominated by twins. It is suggested that the two types of ingots are subject to different nucleation and crystal growth mechanisms: For the ingots dominated by dislocations, which are over represented, the crystal growth is randomly nucleated at the

  10. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  11. Dynamic Crystallization Experiments Using Conventional and Solar Furnace Techniques--implications For The Formation of Refractory Forsterite In Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, A.; Sauerborn, M.; Klerner, S.; Palme, H.; Neumann, A.; Seboldt, W.

    A distinct generation of forsteritic olivine (Mg2SiO4) grains (RF) with unusually high concentrations of refractory components including CaO (0.7 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.4 wt.%), V, Sc, and REEs occurs in unequilibrated chondrites, including ordinary, carbonaceous, and the highly oxidized Rumurutiites. Contents of siderophile elements like FeO (1 wt.%), Ni, or Mn are extremly low in RF. It is inferred that formation of RF pre-dates the formation of chondrules and matrix as well as formation of the different types of parent bodies (CCs, OCs, oxidized R-chondrites). Hence, RF can help us to better understand the processes in the early stage of the solar system in the time between formation of CAIs and Si,Mg-chondrules. However, formation of RF is not well understood. Crystallization of RF in chon- drules requires chondrule melts with ca. 20 wt.% CaO. Most chondrules have typically <4 wt.% CaO (max. ca. 10 wt.% CaO). We have conducted dynamic crystallization experiments using a conventional furnace (1.5...1000 K·min-1) and the DLR solar furnace (approx. 100000 K·min-1) in order to test if rapid cooling of a chondrule- like melt would produce high CaO in RF. We demostrate that Ca-partitioning between olivine and silicate melt is only weakly influenced by rapid cooling even at extremly high cooling rates in the range of 105 K·min-1 as obtained in the solar furnace ex- periments. At a bulk composition of the starting melt of 7.5 wt.% CaO, no deviation from equilibrium fractionation was observed (T/t = 1.5 . . . 105 K·min-1). At a ol/melt bulk content of 17.5 wt.% CaO, in increase in DCa of approximately 10...20% was observed. Chondrules with CaO contents in the range of 10 wt.% (upper limit of CaO in chondrules) thus cannot be regarded to be the host of RF. Hence, there must have been an early generation of extremly CaO-rich chondrules (20 wt.% CaO). Alternatively, RF may have formed by other processes, e. g. direct condensation from the solar nebula.

  12. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate Metabolism Is Unrelated to the Sporulation and Parasporal Crystal Protein Formation in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; Li, Xin; Qian, Hongliang; Cai, Xia; Li, Xinfeng; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a natural polymer synthesized by many bacteria as a carbon-energy storage material. It was accumulated maximally prior to the spore formation but was degraded during the process of sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis. Intriguingly, B. thuringiensis also accumulates large amounts of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) during sporulation, which requires considerable input of carbon and energy sources. How PHB accumulation affects sporulation and ICP formation remains unclear to date. Intuitively, one would imagine that accumulated PHB provides the energy required for ICP formation. Yet our current data indicate that this is not the case. First, growth curves of the deletion mutants of phaC (encoding the PHB synthase) and phaZ (encoding the PHB depolymerase) were found to be similar to the parent strain BMB171; no difference in growth rate could be observed. In addition we further constructed the cry1Ac10 ICP gene overexpression strains of BMB171 (BMB171-cry), as well as its phaC and phaZ deletion mutants ΔphaC-cry and ΔphaZ-cry to compare their spore and ICP production rates. Again, not much change of ICP production was observed among these strains either. In fact, PHB was still degraded in most ΔphaZ-cry cells as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Together these results indicated that there is no direct association between the PHB accumulation and the sporulation and ICP formation in B. thuringiensis. Some other enzymes for PHB degradation or other energy source may be responsible for the sporulation and/or ICP formation in B. thuringiensis. PMID:27379025

  13. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate Metabolism Is Unrelated to the Sporulation and Parasporal Crystal Protein Formation in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; Li, Xin; Qian, Hongliang; Cai, Xia; Li, Xinfeng; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a natural polymer synthesized by many bacteria as a carbon-energy storage material. It was accumulated maximally prior to the spore formation but was degraded during the process of sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis. Intriguingly, B. thuringiensis also accumulates large amounts of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) during sporulation, which requires considerable input of carbon and energy sources. How PHB accumulation affects sporulation and ICP formation remains unclear to date. Intuitively, one would imagine that accumulated PHB provides the energy required for ICP formation. Yet our current data indicate that this is not the case. First, growth curves of the deletion mutants of phaC (encoding the PHB synthase) and phaZ (encoding the PHB depolymerase) were found to be similar to the parent strain BMB171; no difference in growth rate could be observed. In addition we further constructed the cry1Ac10 ICP gene overexpression strains of BMB171 (BMB171-cry), as well as its phaC and phaZ deletion mutants ΔphaC-cry and ΔphaZ-cry to compare their spore and ICP production rates. Again, not much change of ICP production was observed among these strains either. In fact, PHB was still degraded in most ΔphaZ-cry cells as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Together these results indicated that there is no direct association between the PHB accumulation and the sporulation and ICP formation in B. thuringiensis. Some other enzymes for PHB degradation or other energy source may be responsible for the sporulation and/or ICP formation in B. thuringiensis. PMID:27379025

  14. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate Metabolism Is Unrelated to the Sporulation and Parasporal Crystal Protein Formation in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; Li, Xin; Qian, Hongliang; Cai, Xia; Li, Xinfeng; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a natural polymer synthesized by many bacteria as a carbon-energy storage material. It was accumulated maximally prior to the spore formation but was degraded during the process of sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis. Intriguingly, B. thuringiensis also accumulates large amounts of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) during sporulation, which requires considerable input of carbon and energy sources. How PHB accumulation affects sporulation and ICP formation remains unclear to date. Intuitively, one would imagine that accumulated PHB provides the energy required for ICP formation. Yet our current data indicate that this is not the case. First, growth curves of the deletion mutants of phaC (encoding the PHB synthase) and phaZ (encoding the PHB depolymerase) were found to be similar to the parent strain BMB171; no difference in growth rate could be observed. In addition we further constructed the cry1Ac10 ICP gene overexpression strains of BMB171 (BMB171-cry), as well as its phaC and phaZ deletion mutants ΔphaC-cry and ΔphaZ-cry to compare their spore and ICP production rates. Again, not much change of ICP production was observed among these strains either. In fact, PHB was still degraded in most ΔphaZ-cry cells as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Together these results indicated that there is no direct association between the PHB accumulation and the sporulation and ICP formation in B. thuringiensis. Some other enzymes for PHB degradation or other energy source may be responsible for the sporulation and/or ICP formation in B. thuringiensis.

  15. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihisa Suzuki; Yoshiaki Hattori; Jun Nozawa; Satoshi Uda; Akiko Toyotama; Junpei Yamanaka

    2016-01-01

    Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium po...

  16. Study of transitory forms of carotenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to explain the biological role of the carotenoids their transitory forms were studied with an apparatus measuring the small (∼10-3) short-lived (100 ns to 1 ms) optical density variations obtained by excitation with a ruby laser. Two forms were studied: a) Triplet state 3Car. - This state (t1/2∼6 μs) is obtained not by direct excitation but by T-T energy transfer from chlorophyll, in different media (chloroplasts, pigments in solution or in micelle). Two arguments can be advanced to explain in terms of triplet energy transfer an essential biological role of carotenoids, protection against photodynamic effects: - the energy level of 3Car is lower than that of the singlet of oxygen; - in vivo the T-T transfer from chlorophyll to the carotenoids is very fast: 30 ns.. b) Radical cation Car+. - This form is obtained by electron transfer from carotene to the triplet of Toluidine Blue, in ethanol. Car+ (t1/2∼200 μs) shows a strong absorption band at 910 nm. The properties of Car+ are discussed in relation to other polyene derivatives and to hydrocarbon ions. Car+ could be involved in certain biological electron transfers. (author)

  17. A Unified Picture of S* in Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevičius, Vytautas; Abramavicius, Darius; Polívka, Tomáš; Galestian Pour, Arpa; Hauer, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    In π-conjugated chain molecules such as carotenoids, coupling between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom is of central importance. It governs both dynamic and static properties, such as the time scales of excited state relaxation as well as absorption spectra. In this work, we treat vibronic dynamics in carotenoids on four electronic states (|S0⟩, |S1⟩, |S2⟩, and |Sn⟩) in a physically rigorous framework. This model explains all features previously associated with the intensely debated S* state. Besides successfully fitting transient absorption data of a zeaxanthin homologue, this model also accounts for previous results from global target analysis and chain length-dependent studies. Additionally, we are able to incorporate findings from pump-deplete-probe experiments, which were incompatible to any pre-existing model. Thus, we present the first comprehensive and unified interpretation of S*-related features, explaining them by vibronic transitions on either S1, S0, or both, depending on the chain length of the investigated carotenoid. PMID:27509302

  18. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments of prochloron (prochlorophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H. W.; Lewin, R. A.; Cheng, L.

    1983-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a gradient-elution technique was utilized to separate and quantify chlorophylls a and b as well as major carotenoid pigments present in freeze-dried preprations of prochloron-didemnid associations and in Prochloron cells separated from host colonies. Results confirm earlier spectrophotometric evidence for both chlorophylls a and b in this prokaryote. Chlorophyll a:b ratios range from 4.14 to 19.71; generally good agreement was found between ratios determined in isolated cell preprations and in symbiotic colonies (in hospite). These values are 1.5 to 5-fold higher than ratios determined in a variety of eukaryotic green plants. The carotenoids in Prochloron are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those found in various freshwater and marine blue-green algae (cyanopbytes) from high-light environments. However, Prochloron differs from cyanophytes by the absence of myxoxanthophyll and related glycosidic carotenoids. It pigment characteristics are considered sufficiently different from those of cyanophytes to justify its assignment to a separate algal division.

  19. Macular and serum carotenoid concentrations in patients with malabsorption syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew S; Zhao, Da You; Bernstein, Paul S

    2008-03-01

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to protect the human macula by absorbing blue light and quenching free radicals. Intestinal malabsorption syndromes such as celiac and Crohn's disease are known to cause deficiencies of lipid-soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that subjects with nutrient malabsorption syndromes will demonstrate lower carotenoid levels in the macula and blood, and that these lower levels may correlate with early-onset maculopathy. Resonance Raman spectrographic (RRS) measurements of macular carotenoid levels were collected from subjects with and without a history of malabsorption syndromes. Carotenoids were extracted from serum and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Subjects with malabsorption (n = 22) had 37% lower levels of macular carotenoids on average versus controls (n = 25, P maculopathy were not observed. We conclude that intestinal malabsorption results in lower macular carotenoid levels. PMID:19081745

  20. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki; Parisa Sadighara; Ramin Nabizadeh Nodehi; Mahmood Alimohammadi; Naiema Vakili Saatloo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal) treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged. ...

  1. Enhanced shower formation in aligned thick germanium crystals and discrimination against charged hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baurichter, A. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiat.; Kirsebom, K. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiat.; Medewaldt, R. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiat.; Mikkelsen, U. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiat.; Moeller, S. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiat.; Uggerhoej, E. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiat.; Worm, T. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiat.; Elsener, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Ballestrero, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Florence and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy); Sona, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Florence and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy); Romano, J. [Dipartimento di Fisica, University La Sapienza-Rome and INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    The distribution of the energy released in a thin silicon detector placed on the downstream side of a thick germanium single crystal bombarded with a 150 GeV electron or pion beam along directions close to the left angle 110 right angle axis or along random directions has been investigated. In view of a possible application to very high energy gamma ray astronomy and particle physics, the intrinsic capability of such a device to reject, on the basis of energy discrimination, unwanted events due to charged hadrons together with the resulting loss of efficiency for the detection of showers initiated by high energy electrons, is determined as a function of the chosen energy threshold. (orig.).

  2. Creep substructure formation in sodium chloride single crystals in the power law and exponential creep regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.; Pharr, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Creep tests conducted on NaCl single crystals in the temperature range from 373 to 1023 K show that true steady state creep is obtained only above 873 K when the ratio of the applied stress to the shear modulus is less than or equal to 0.0001. Under other stress and temperature conditions, corresponding to both power law and exponential creep, the creep rate decreases monotonically with increasing strain. The transition from power law to exponential creep is shown to be associated with increases in the dislocation density, the cell boundary width, and the aspect ratio of the subgrains along the primary slip planes. The relation between dislocation structure and creep behavior is also assessed.

  3. Carboidratos e carotenoides totais em duas variedades de mangarito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sato Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição de carboidratos e carotenoides em rizomas mãe e filhos das variedades de mangarito (Xanthosoma riedelianum pequeno e gigante. Amostras dos rizomas coletadas ao longo do ciclo cultural e após 90 dias de armazenamento foram avaliadas quanto aos teores de carboidratos e carotenoides totais. Os rizomas apresentaram aumento no teor de carboidratos, e o rizoma-mãe da variedade pequeno apresentou acréscimos lineares no teor de carotenoides, ao longo do cultivo. O armazenamento reduz os teores de carboidratos e de carotenoides totais em todos os rizomas.

  4. Specific appetite for carotenoids in a colorful bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Senar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since carotenoids have physiological functions necessary for maintaining health, individuals should be selected to actively seek and develop a specific appetite for these compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Great tits Parus major in a diet choice experiment, both in captivity and the field, preferred carotenoid-enriched diets to control diets. The food items did not differ in any other aspects measured besides carotenoid content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Specific appetite for carotenoids is here demonstrated for the first time, placing these compounds on a par with essential nutrients as sodium or calcium.

  5. Cyclisation and aromatisation of carotenoids during sediment diagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koster, J.; Baas, M.; Koopmans, M.; Kaam-Peters, H.M.E. van; Geenevasen, J.A.J.; Kruk, C.

    1995-01-01

    A novel diaryl isoprenoid with an additional aromatic ring, formed from the diaromatic carotenoid isorenieratene by cyclisation and aromatisation during sediment diagenesis, is identified in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks.

  6. AOT-microemulsions-based formation and evolution of PbWO$_{4}$ crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, D; Tang Kai Bin; Liang Zhen Hua; Zheng Hua Gui

    2004-01-01

    Anionic surfactant-AOT-microemulsions-assisted formation and evolution of PbWO//4 nanostructures with bundles rodlike, ellipsoidlike, and spherelike prepared at different media conditions were studied by powder X-ray diffraction pattern, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The possible mechanisms for the formation of PbWO//4 samples in series of microemulsion systems were discussed. Various comparison experiments show that several experimental parameters, such as the AOT concentration, the water content, and reaction temperature play important roles in the morphological control of PbWO//4 nanostructures. Room-temperature photoluminescence of PbWO//4 samples with different morphologies has also been investigated and the results reveal that all these samples showed similar features with emissions at 480 similar to 510 nm but different luminescence intensity. 40 Refs.

  7. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. Results We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were ort...

  8. Monocyclic β-lactam and unexpected oxazinone formation: synthesis, crystal structure, docking studies and antibacterial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Babita; Irfan, Mohammad; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Prakash, Amresh; Yadava, Umesh; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Zafaryab, Md; Rizvi, M Moshahid A; Azam, Amir; Abid, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Novel monocyclic β-lactam derivatives bearing aryl, phenyl and heterocyclic rings were synthesized as possible antibacterial agents. Cyclization of imines (3h, 3t) with phenylacetic acid in the presence of phosphoryl chloride and triethyl amine did not afford the expected β-lactams. Instead, highly substituted 1,3-oxazin-4-ones (4h, 4t) were isolated as the only product and confirmed by single crystal X-ray analysis of 4t. The results of antibacterial activity showed that compound 4l exhibited considerable antibacterial activity with MIC and MBC values of 62.5 µg/mL against Klebsiella pneumoniae. Cytotoxicity assay on Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line revealed non-cytotoxic behavior of compounds 4d, 4h, 4k and 4l up to 200 μg/mL conc. Molecular docking was performed for compound 4l with penicillin binding protein-5 to identify the nature of interactions. The results of both in silico and in vitro evaluation provide the basis for compound 4l to be carried as a potential lead molecule in the drug discovery pipeline against bacterial infections. PMID:26133357

  9. Carotenoids in Staple Cereals: Metabolism, Regulation, and Genetic Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shengnan; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids play a critical role in animal and human health. Animals and humans are unable to synthesize carotenoids de novo, and therefore rely upon diet as sources of these compounds. However, major staple cereals often contain only small amounts of carotenoids in their grains. Consequently, there is considerable interest in genetic manipulation of carotenoid content in cereal grain. In this review, we focus on carotenoid metabolism and regulation in non-green plant tissues, as well as genetic manipulation in staple cereals such as rice, maize, and wheat. Significant progress has been made in three aspects: (1) seven carotenogenes play vital roles in carotenoid regulation in non-green plant tissues, including 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase influencing isoprenoid precursor supply, phytoene synthase, β-cyclase, and ε-cyclase controlling biosynthesis, 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases responsible for degradation, and orange gene conditioning sequestration sink; (2) provitamin A-biofortified crops, such as rice and maize, were developed by either metabolic engineering or marker-assisted breeding; (3) quantitative trait loci for carotenoid content on chromosomes 3B, 7A, and 7B were consistently identified, eight carotenogenes including 23 loci were detected, and 10 gene-specific markers for carotenoid accumulation were developed and applied in wheat improvement. A comprehensive and deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid metabolism in crops will be beneficial in improving our precision in improving carotenoid contents. Genomic selection and gene editing are emerging as transformative technologies for provitamin A biofortification. PMID:27559339

  10. Carotenoids in Staple Cereals: Metabolism, Regulation, and Genetic Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shengnan; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids play a critical role in animal and human health. Animals and humans are unable to synthesize carotenoids de novo, and therefore rely upon diet as sources of these compounds. However, major staple cereals often contain only small amounts of carotenoids in their grains. Consequently, there is considerable interest in genetic manipulation of carotenoid content in cereal grain. In this review, we focus on carotenoid metabolism and regulation in non-green plant tissues, as well as genetic manipulation in staple cereals such as rice, maize, and wheat. Significant progress has been made in three aspects: (1) seven carotenogenes play vital roles in carotenoid regulation in non-green plant tissues, including 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase influencing isoprenoid precursor supply, phytoene synthase, β-cyclase, and ε-cyclase controlling biosynthesis, 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases responsible for degradation, and orange gene conditioning sequestration sink; (2) provitamin A-biofortified crops, such as rice and maize, were developed by either metabolic engineering or marker-assisted breeding; (3) quantitative trait loci for carotenoid content on chromosomes 3B, 7A, and 7B were consistently identified, eight carotenogenes including 23 loci were detected, and 10 gene-specific markers for carotenoid accumulation were developed and applied in wheat improvement. A comprehensive and deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid metabolism in crops will be beneficial in improving our precision in improving carotenoid contents. Genomic selection and gene editing are emerging as transformative technologies for provitamin A biofortification. PMID:27559339

  11. Modeling the relative contributions of secondary ice formation processes to ice crystal number concentrations within mixed-phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sylvia; Hoose, Corinna; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of in-cloud ice crystal number concentrations can be three or four orders of magnitude greater than the in-cloud ice nuclei number concentrations. This discrepancy can be explained by various secondary ice formation processes, which occur after initial ice nucleation, but the relative importance of these processes, and even the exact physics of each, is still unclear. A simple bin microphysics model (2IM) is constructed to investigate these knowledge gaps. 2IM extends the time-lag collision parameterization of Yano and Phillips, 2011 to include rime splintering, ice-ice aggregation, and droplet shattering and to incorporate the aspect ratio evolution as in Jensen and Harrington, 2015. The relative contribution of the secondary processes under various conditions are shown. In particular, temperature-dependent efficiencies are adjusted for ice-ice aggregation versus collision around -15°C, when rime splintering is no longer active, and the effect of aspect ratio on the process weighting is explored. The resulting simulations are intended to guide secondary ice formation parameterizations in larger-scale mixed-phase cloud schemes.

  12. Heterologous carotenoid-biosynthetic enzymes: functional complementation and effects on carotenoid profiles in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form synthetic expression modules and then were complemented with Pantoea agglomerans pathway enzymes (CrtE, CrtB, CrtI, CrtY, and CrtZ). The carotenogenic pathway enzymes in the synthetic modules showed unusual activities when complemented with E. coli. For example, the expression of heterologous CrtEs of B. linens, C. glutamicum, and R. baltica influenced P. agglomerans CrtI to convert its substrate phytoene into a rare product-3,4,3',4'-tetradehydrolycopene-along with lycopene, which was an expected product, indicating that CrtE, the first enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, can influence carotenoid profiles. In addition, CrtIs of R. sphaeroides and R. capsulatus converted phytoene into an unusual lycopene as well as into neurosporene. Thus, this study shows that the functional complementation of pathway enzymes from different sources is a useful methodology for diversifying biosynthesis as nature does. PMID:23144136

  13. Basic building units, self-assembly and crystallization in the formation of complex inorganic open architectures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao

    2001-10-01

    Careful investigations of open-framework metal phosphates reveal that the formation of these complex architectures is likely to involve a process wherein one-dimensional ladders or chains, and possibly zero-dimens ional monomers, transform to higher dimensional structures. The one-dimensional ladder appears to be the primary building unit of these structures. At one stage of the building-up process, spontaneous self-assembly of a low-dimensional structure such as the ladder seems to occur, followed by crys tallization of a two- or three-dimensional structure. Accordingly, many of the higher dimensional structures retain the structural features of the 1D structure, indicating the occurrence of self-assembly. These findings mark the beginnings of our understan ding of complex supramolecular inorganic materials.

  14. Single-crystal star-like arrayed particles of hematite: Synthesis, formation mechanism and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using urea as a precipitation agent, star-like arrayed hematite (α-Fe2O3) particles were prepared by a facile precipitation-oxidation reaction in an aqueous solution containing ceyltrimethylammonium bromide at 80 deg. C. The particles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). Reaction temperature and urea amount are found to affect significantly the morphology and phase composition of the products. The formation mechanism of star-like arrayed α-Fe2O3 particles is proposed to be oriented attachment combining epitaxial overgrowth. The star-like arrayed α-Fe2O3 particles show a weak ferromagnetic behavior with a remanent magnetization of 5.69 x 10-1 emu g-1 and a coercivity of 156.08 Oe at room temperature.

  15. The effects of dietary carotenoid supplementation and retinal carotenoid accumulation on vision-mediated foraging in the house finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Toomey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For many bird species, vision is the primary sensory modality used to locate and assess food items. The health and spectral sensitivities of the avian visual system are influenced by diet-derived carotenoid pigments that accumulate in the retina. Among wild House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus, we have found that retinal carotenoid accumulation varies significantly among individuals and is related to dietary carotenoid intake. If diet-induced changes in retinal carotenoid accumulation alter spectral sensitivity, then they have the potential to affect visually mediated foraging performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two experiments, we measured foraging performance of house finches with dietarily manipulated retinal carotenoid levels. We tested each bird's ability to extract visually contrasting food items from a matrix of inedible distracters under high-contrast (full and dimmer low-contrast (red-filtered lighting conditions. In experiment one, zeaxanthin-supplemented birds had significantly increased retinal carotenoid levels, but declined in foraging performance in the high-contrast condition relative to astaxanthin-supplemented birds that showed no change in retinal carotenoid accumulation. In experiments one and two combined, we found that retinal carotenoid concentrations predicted relative foraging performance in the low- vs. high-contrast light conditions in a curvilinear pattern. Performance was positively correlated with retinal carotenoid accumulation among birds with low to medium levels of accumulation (∼0.5-1.5 µg/retina, but declined among birds with very high levels (>2.0 µg/retina. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that carotenoid-mediated spectral filtering enhances color discrimination, but that this improvement is traded off against a reduction in sensitivity that can compromise visual discrimination. Thus, retinal carotenoid levels may be optimized to meet the visual demands of specific

  16. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  17. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ω70 promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs

  18. Processes of phase formation in CuO-CuBaO2 system and new method of growth of YBa2Cu3Ox single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimed to design the technology of YBCO superconducting crystal growth the investigations were carried out on phase formation in CuO-CuBaO2 system. A new method of YBa2Cu3Ox single crystal growth was proposed. Crystals were grown from CuyBaOz solution-melt at 900 deg C under oxygen pressure varying of 0.02 to 0.21 atm. for 50-100 h. The use of low pressure allowed one to decrease essentially the temperature of initial treatment that in turn made it possible to reduce the amount of impurities from crucible material. According to technology described superconducting single crystals were obtained as large as 5x5x0.1 mm with transition temperature Ts equal to 93 K

  19. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki; Parisa Sadighara; Ramin Nabizadeh Nodehi; Mahmood Alimohammadi; Naiema Vakili Saatloo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal) treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged.Results:Alcalase extraction produced (234.00±2.00) mg/L carotenoid and NaOH extraction produced (170.00±1.53) mg/L carotenoid. Based on the samples analyzed, alcalase enzyme showed more efficiency than NaOH extraction to achieve carotenoids from shrimp waste.Conclusions:It can be concluded that using alcalase enzyme for carotenoids extraction can produce higher carotenoids concentration than NaOH extraction method. So alcalase enzyme method can be used for achieving this kind of antioxidant.

  20. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged. Results: Alcalase extraction produced (234.00±2.00 mg/L carotenoid and NaOH extraction produced (170.00±1.53 mg/L carotenoid. Based on the samples analyzed, alcalase enzyme showed more efficiency than NaOH extraction to achieve carotenoids from shrimp waste. Conclusions: It can be concluded that using alcalase enzyme for carotenoids extraction can produce higher carotenoids concentration than NaOH extraction method. So alcalase enzyme method can be used for achieving this kind of antioxidant.

  1. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  2. Regulatory control of carotenoid accumulation in winter squash during storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postharvest storage of fruits and vegetables is often required and frequently results in nutritional quality change. In this study, we investigated carotenoid storage plastids, carotenoid content, and its regulation during 3-month storage of winter squash butternut fruits. We showed that storage imp...

  3. Manipulation of Carotenoid Content in Plants to Improve Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Enriqueta; Rodrigo, Maria Jesús; Zacarias, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are essential components for human nutrition and health, mainly due to their antioxidant and pro-vitamin A activity. Foods with enhanced carotenoid content and composition are essential to ensure carotenoid feasibility in malnourished population of many countries around the world, which is critical to alleviate vitamin A deficiency and other health-related disorders. The pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis is currently well understood, key steps of the pathways in different plant species have been characterized and the corresponding genes identified, as well as other regulatory elements. This enables the manipulation and improvement of carotenoid content and composition in order to control the nutritional value of a number of agronomical important staple crops. Biotechnological and genetic engineering-based strategies to manipulate carotenoid metabolism have been successfully implemented in many crops, with Golden rice as the most relevant example of β-carotene improvement in one of the more widely consumed foods. Conventional breeding strategies have been also adopted in the bio-fortification of carotenoid in staple foods that are highly consumed in developing countries, including maize, cassava and sweet potatoes, to alleviate nutrition-related problems. The objective of the chapter is to summarize major breakthroughs and advances in the enhancement of carotenoid content and composition in agronomical and nutritional important crops, with special emphasis to their potential impact and benefits in human nutrition and health. PMID:27485228

  4. Metabolism of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during ripening of raspberry fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, M.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Simic, A.; Uitdewilligen, J.; Arkel, van J.; Vos, de C.H.; Jonker, H.H.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Sibbesen, O.; Qvist, I.; Mikkelsen, J.D.; Hall, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are important lipophilic antioxidants in fruits. Apocarotenoids such as ¿-ionone and ß-ionone, which are breakdown products of carotenoids, are important for the flavor characteristics of raspberry fruit, and have also been suggested to have beneficial effects on human health. Raspberry

  5. Coke formation during the methanol-to-olefin conversion: in situ microspectroscopy on individual H-ZSM-5 crystals with different Brønsted acidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mores, D.; Kornatowski, J.; Olsbye, U.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Coke formation during the methanol-to-olefin (MTO) conversion has been studied at the single-particle level with in situ UV/Vis and confocal fluorescence microscopy. For this purpose, large H-ZSM-5 crystals differing in their Si/Al molar ratio have been investigated. During MTO, performed at 623 and

  6. Metabolism of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during ripening of raspberry fruit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekwilder, J; van der Meer, IM; Simicb, A;

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are important lipophilic antioxidants in fruits. Apocarotenoids such as α-ionone and β-ionone, which are breakdown products of carotenoids, are important for the flavor characteristics of raspberry fruit, and have also been suggested to have beneficial effects on human health. Raspberry...... is one of the few fruits where fruit ripening is accompanied by the massive production of apocarotenoids. In this paper, changes in levels of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening are described. In addition, the isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a carotenoid...... cleavage dioxygenase (CCD), which putatively mediates the degradation of carotenoids to apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening, is reported. Such information helps us to better understand how these compounds are produced in plants and may also enable us to develop novel strategies for improved...

  7. Carotenoids in Marine Invertebrates Living along the Kuroshio Current Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Sakagami

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids of the corals Acropora japonica, A. secale, and A. hyacinthus, the tridacnid clam Tridacna squamosa, the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, and the small sea snail Drupella fragum were investigated. The corals and the tridacnid clam are filter feeders and are associated with symbiotic zooxanthellae. Peridinin and pyrrhoxanthin, which originated from symbiotic zooxanthellae, were found to be major carotenoids in corals and the tridacnid clam. The crown-of-thorns starfish and the sea snail D. fragum are carnivorous and mainly feed on corals. Peridinin-3-acyl esters were major carotenoids in the sea snail D. fragum. On the other hand, ketocarotenoids such as 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin and astaxanthin were major carotenoids in the crown-of-thorns starfish. Carotenoids found in these marine animals closely reflected not only their metabolism but also their food chains.

  8. Carotenoids and Their Isomers: Color Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Jiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages.

  9. Biosynthesis of Carotenoids in Plants: Enzymes and Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Saavedra, Carolina; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most important biocolor isoprenoids responsible for yellow, orange and red colors found in nature. In plants, they are synthesized in plastids of photosynthetic and sink organs and are essential molecules for photosynthesis, photo-oxidative damage protection and phytohormone synthesis. Carotenoids also play important roles in human health and nutrition acting as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Biochemical and biophysical approaches in different plants models have provided significant advances in understanding the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in plants as well as the key points of regulation in their biosynthesis. To date, different plant models have been used to characterize the key genes and their regulation, which has increased the knowledge of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in plants. In this chapter a description of each step in the carotenoid synthesis pathway is presented and discussed. PMID:27485218

  10. Spatially selective Er/Yb-doped CaF{sub 2} crystal formation by CO{sub 2} laser exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Seon; Lee, Jin-Ho; Lim, Ki-Soo, E-mail: kslim@chungbuk.ac.kr

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Oxyfluoride glass–ceramics containing CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals doped with Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions were formed on the glass surface by CO{sub 2} laser and a heat gun exposure. • Most of Er and Yb ions were distributed inside CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals and fluorine loss was observed in the EDS element maps. • IR-to-VIS upconversion emission efficiency of laser annealed glass ceramics was much increased and compared with that of the furnace-annealed glass ceramics. • Distributed volume of the glass ceramics were estimated by a confocal fluorescence microscope imaging. - Abstract: We report the glass–ceramic precipitation on the oxyfluoride glass surface by spatially selective annealing with a CO{sub 2} laser and a heat gun exposure. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of major CaF{sub 2} and miner Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} nanoparticles. We observed ∼100 nm nanoparticle aggregation by tunneling electron microscopy and element distribution in glass and crystal phases. Spatial distribution of glass ceramics near the glass surface was probed by confocal fluorescence microscope by using much enhanced emission from the Er ions in the laser-treated area. Strong emissions at 365 nm excitation and visible up-conversion emissions at 980 nm excitation also indicated well incorporation of Er and Yb ions into a crystalline environment.

  11. Misorientation effect of grain boundary on the formation of discontinuous precipitation in second and third generation single crystal superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available [001] tilt artificial grain boundaries of Ni-based single crystal superalloys CMSX-4 and DD10 have been prepared by self-diffusion bonding. The microstructural stability of 0 ∼ 30∘ artificial grain boundaries have been investigated after heat treatment at 1100 ∘C for 0 ∼ 300 h. TCP phases and cellular colony developed on boundaries are related to misorientation angle of the bonded boundaries of DD10 and DD10 alloys as well as the bonded boundaries of CMSX-4 and DD10 alloys. The heterogeneous nucleation of TCP phase, enveloped by γ′ film, occurred along 15∘ and 20∘ boundaries. Discontinuous Precipitation (DP reaction occurred along high misorientation angle (20∘∼ 30∘ boundaries. However, no TCP phase formation existed along grain boundaries with different misorientation angles in CMSX-4/CMSX-4 bonded alloys as well as for a 0∘ boundary in DD10/DD10 and CMSX-4/DD10 bonded alloys. The current study clearly suggests that grain boundary precipitation and its morphology were influenced by the misorientation angle of grain boundary and the content of refractory elements in alloy.

  12. Spatially selective Er/Yb-doped CaF2 crystal formation by CO2 laser exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxyfluoride glass–ceramics containing CaF2 nanocrystals doped with Er3+ and Yb3+ ions were formed on the glass surface by CO2 laser and a heat gun exposure. • Most of Er and Yb ions were distributed inside CaF2 nanocrystals and fluorine loss was observed in the EDS element maps. • IR-to-VIS upconversion emission efficiency of laser annealed glass ceramics was much increased and compared with that of the furnace-annealed glass ceramics. • Distributed volume of the glass ceramics were estimated by a confocal fluorescence microscope imaging. - Abstract: We report the glass–ceramic precipitation on the oxyfluoride glass surface by spatially selective annealing with a CO2 laser and a heat gun exposure. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of major CaF2 and miner Ca2SiO4 nanoparticles. We observed ∼100 nm nanoparticle aggregation by tunneling electron microscopy and element distribution in glass and crystal phases. Spatial distribution of glass ceramics near the glass surface was probed by confocal fluorescence microscope by using much enhanced emission from the Er ions in the laser-treated area. Strong emissions at 365 nm excitation and visible up-conversion emissions at 980 nm excitation also indicated well incorporation of Er and Yb ions into a crystalline environment

  13. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway: thinking in all dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2013-07-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signaling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavor of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and predictability of metabolic engineering of carotenoids rests in the ability to target carotenoids for specific physiological purposes as well as to simultaneously modify carotenoids along with other desired traits. Here, we ask whether predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway is indeed possible. Despite a long history of research on the pathway, at this point in time we can only describe the pathway as a parts list and have almost no knowledge of the location of the complete pathway, how it is assembled, and whether there exists any trafficking of the enzymes or the carotenoids themselves. We discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the "complete" pathway and make the argument that predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway (and other pathways) will require investigation of the three dimensional state of the pathway as it may exist in plastids of different ultrastructures. Along with this message we point out the need to develop new types of visualization tools and resources that better reflect the dynamic nature of biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23683930

  14. Intraspecific Variation in Carotenoids of Brassica oleracea var. sabellica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageney, Vera; Baldermann, Susanne; Albach, Dirk C

    2016-04-27

    Carotenoids are best known as a source of natural antioxidants. Physiologically, carotenoids are part of the photoprotection in plants as they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important source of carotenoids in European food is Brassica oleracea. Focusing on the most abundant carotenoids, we estimated the contents of ß-carotene, (9Z)-neoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein as well as those of chlorophylls a and b to assess their variability in Brassica oleracea var. sabellica. Our analyses included more than 30 cultivars categorized in five distinct sets grouped according to morphological characteristics or geographical origin. Our results demonstrated specific carotenoid patterns characteristic for American, Italian, and red-colored kale cultivars. Moreover, we demonstrated a tendency of high zeaxanthin proportions under traditional harvest conditions, which accord to low-temperature regimes. We also compared the carotenoid patterns of self-generated hybrid lines. Corresponding findings indicated that crossbreeding has a high potential for carotenoid content optimization in kale. PMID:27045759

  15. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  16. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian colour vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Matthew B; Collins, Aaron M; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Corbo, Joseph C

    2015-10-01

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Thus, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering. PMID:26446559

  17. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  18. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin

    2006-09-01

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  19. Peroxyl radical reactions with carotenoids in microemulsions: Influence of microemulsion composition and the nature of peroxyl radical precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Agamey, Ali; McGarvey, David J

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of acetylperoxyl radicals with different carotenoids (7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene and ζ-carotene) in SDS and CTAC microemulsions of different compositions were investigated using laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The primary objective of this study was to explore the influence of microemulsion composition and the type of surfactant used on the yields and kinetics of various transients formed from the reaction of acetylperoxyl radicals with carotenoids. Also, the influence of the site (hydrocarbon phases or aqueous phase) of generation of the peroxyl radical precursor was examined by using 4-acetyl-4-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (APPHCl) and 1,1-diphenylacetone (11DPA) as water-soluble and lipid-soluble peroxyl radical precursors, respectively. LFP of peroxyl radical precursors with 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene (77DH) in different microemulsions gives rise to the formation of three distinct transients namely addition radical (λmax=460 nm), near infrared transient1 (NIR, λmax=700 nm) and 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene radical cation (77DH(•+), λmax=770 nm). In addition, for ζ-carotene (ZETA) two transients (near infrared transient1 (NIR1, λmax=660 nm) and ζ-carotene radical cation (ZETA(•+), λmax=730-740 nm)) are generated following LFP of peroxyl radical precursors in the presence of ζ-carotene (ZETA) in different microemulsions. The results show that the composition of the microemulsion strongly influences the observed yield and kinetics of the transients formed from the reactions of peroxyl radicals (acetylperoxyl radicals) with carotenoids (77DH and ZETA). Also, the type of surfactant used in the microemulsions influences the yield of the transients formed. The dependence of the transient yields and kinetics on microemulsion composition (or the type of surfactant used in the microemulsion) can be attributed to the change of the polarity of the microenvironment of the carotenoid. Furthermore, the nature of

  20. The Capability of Rhodotorula slooffiae to Produce Carotenoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Sadat Naghavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rhodotorula is characterized by the absence of ballistoconidia, fermentation ability, and starch-like compounds. Biology of the species is not well-identified; therefore molecular identification is required. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region can be used for the identification of the majority of Basidiomycetous species. Carotenoids which are natural pigments can be synthesized by some genera of yeasts such as Rhodotorula. The increase of demand for carotenoids obtained from natural sources has promoted major efforts to recognize potential microbial sources. The aims of this study were to identify a strain isolated from leather wastewater and to investigate its carotenoid production ability. The effect of 2 different medium (Semi-synthetic medium (MMS and yeast malt extract medium (YM on biomass and carotenoid production was studied. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region in addition to morphological and biochemical characterization to identify the strain was carried out. To isolate the carotenoid pigment, cells were suspended in acetone and broken using a homogenizer, followed by centrifugation and supernatant was separated; thus pigments were measured spectrophotometrically at 450 nM using the extinction coefficient E1%450=2500. Results: Identification processes represented strain SG006 as a Rhodotorula slooffiae. The sequence was deposited in the Gene Bank database with accession number JX997835. The results showed that SG006 are able to produce carotenoid and MMS medium promoted carotenoid production. Conclusion: We found that Rhodotorula slooffiae showed the ability to produce carotenoid. However, further work is needed to optimize of the amount of product and to characterize the carotenoids.

  1. Cloning and Characterization of a Lycium chinense Carotenoid Isomerase Gene Enhancing Carotenoid Accumulation in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李招娣; 季静; 王罡

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoid isomerase(CRTISO)is a key enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of cis-lycopene to all-trans lycopene. In this study, we isolated and characterized the CRTISO gene from Lycium chinense (LcCRTISO) for the first time. The open reading frame of LcCRTISO was 1 815 bp encoding a protein of 604 amino acids with a molecular mass of 66.24 kDa. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the LcCRTISO had a high level of simi-larity to other CRTISO. Phylogenetic analysis displayed that LcCRTISO kept a closer relationship with the CRTISO of plants than with those of other species. Semi-quantitative PCR analysis indicated that LcCRTISO gene was expressed in all tissues tested with the highest expression in maturing fruits. The overexpression of LcCRTISO gene in transgenic tobacco resulted in an increase of total carotenoids in the leaves withβ-carotene and lutein being the predominants. The results obtained here clearly suggested that the LcCRTISO gene was a promising candidate for carotenoid production.

  2. Carboidratos e carotenoides totais em duas variedades de mangarito

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Sato Ferreira; Mário Puiatti; Ariana Mota Pereira; Paulo Roberto Cecon; Aline da Silva Bhering; Teresa Drummond Correia Mendes

    2014-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição de carboidratos e carotenoides em rizomas mãe e filhos das variedades de mangarito (Xanthosoma riedelianum) pequeno e gigante. Amostras dos rizomas coletadas ao longo do ciclo cultural e após 90 dias de armazenamento foram avaliadas quanto aos teores de carboidratos e carotenoides totais. Os rizomas apresentaram aumento no teor de carboidratos, e o rizoma-mãe da variedade pequeno apresentou acréscimos lineares no teor de carotenoides, ao long...

  3. Potential implications for epigenetic regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis during root and shoot development

    OpenAIRE

    Cazzonelli, Christopher Ian; Yin, Kuide; Pogson, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Major regulators of carotenoid biosynthesis have remained rather elusive even though the flux through the branch in the carotenoid pathway can affect plant development in response to environmental stimuli, such as light. Our recent investigations demonstrated that the production of the most abundant carotenoid in plants, lutein, is regulated by carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO) activity at a rate-limiting step of this branch point in carotenoid biosynthesis. CRTISO is required to isomerase cis-ca...

  4. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Eamonn; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Beatty, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary supplementation with these carotenoids might prevent, delay, or modify the course of ARM. This article discusses the scientific rationale supporting the hypothesis that L and Z are protective against ARM, and presents the recent evidence germane to this theory. PMID:17160199

  5. About the mechanism for paramagnetic centers formation under the radiolysis of RbNO3 and CsNO3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'ev, V.; Pak, V.

    2014-05-01

    The accumulation of paramagnetic centers - NO2rad and Orad - in RbNO3 and CsNO3 crystals under γ-irradiation at 310 K and their thermal stability has been studied. The values of the initial radiation chemical yield of NO2rad were calculated to be ∼2.5 × 10-2 (100 eV)-1 in both nitrates. These values for Orad - are equal to 0.05 and 0.38 (100 eV)-1 for RbNO3 and CsNO3, respectively. The heating of irradiated crystals results in the decay of NO2rad and Orad - centers with simultaneously appearance of the ozonide ion. The mechanism for paramagnetic centers formation under γ-irradiation of RbNO3 and CsNO3 crystals has been discussed.

  6. About the mechanism for paramagnetic centers formation under the radiolysis of RbNO3 and CsNO3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of paramagnetic centers – NO2· and O·− in RbNO3 and CsNO3 crystals under γ-irradiation at 310 K and their thermal stability has been studied. The values of the initial radiation chemical yield of NO2· were calculated to be ∼2.5 × 10−2 (100 eV)−1 in both nitrates. These values for O·− are equal to 0.05 and 0.38 (100 eV)−1 for RbNO3 and CsNO3, respectively. The heating of irradiated crystals results in the decay of NO2· and O·− centers with simultaneously appearance of the ozonide ion. The mechanism for paramagnetic centers formation under γ-irradiation of RbNO3 and CsNO3 crystals has been discussed

  7. Theoretical and computational comparison of models for dislocation dissociation and stacking fault/core formation in fcc crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mianroodi, J. R.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Svendsen, B.

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the current work is the theoretical and computational comparison of selected models for the energetics of dislocation dissociation resulting in stacking fault and partial dislocation (core) formation in fcc crystals as based on the (generalized) Peierls-Nabarro (GPN: e.g., Xiang et al., 2008; Shen et al., 2014), and phase-field (PF: e.g., Shen and Wang, 2004; Hunter et al., 2011, 2013; Mianroodi and Svendsen, 2015), methodologies (e.g., Wang and Li, 2010). More specifically, in the current work, the GPN-based model of Xiang et al. (2008) is compared theoretically with the PF-based models of Shen and Wang (2004), Hunter et al. (2011, 2013), and Mianroodi and Svendsen (2015). This is carried out here with the help of a unified formulation for these models via a generalization of the approach of Cahn and Hilliard (1958) to mechanics. Differences among these include the model forms for the free energy density ψela of the lattice and the free energy density ψsli associated with dislocation slip. In the PF-based models, for example, ψela is formulated with respect to the residual distortion HR due to dislocation slip (e.g., Khachaturyan, 1983; Mura, 1987), and with respect to the dislocation tensor curl HR in the GPN model (e.g., Xiang et al., 2008). As shown here, both model forms for ψela are in fact mathematically equal and so physically equivalent. On the other hand, model forms for ψsli differ in the assumed dependence on the phase or disregistry fields ϕ, whose spatial variation represents the transition from unslipped to slipped regions in the crystal. In particular, Xiang et al. (2008) and Hunter et al. (2011, 2013) work with ψsli(ϕ). On the other hand, Shen and Wang (2004) and Mianroodi and Svendsen (2015) employ ψsli(ϕ , ∇ ϕ). To investigate the consequences of these differences for the modeling of the dislocation core, dissociation, and stacking fault formation, predictions from the models of Hunter et al. (2011, 2013) and Mianroodi

  8. Effects of micro electric current load during cooling of plant tissues on intracellular ice crystal formation behavior and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninagawa, Takako; Kawamura, Yukio; Konishi, Tadashi; Narumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Cryopreservation techniques are expected to evolve further to preserve biomaterials and foods in a fresh state for extended periods of time. Long-term cryopreservation of living materials such as food and biological tissue is generally achieved by freezing; thus, intracellular freezing occurs. Intracellular freezing injures the cells and leads to cell death. Therefore, a dream cryopreservation technique would preserve the living materials without internal ice crystal formation at a temperature low enough to prevent bacterial activity. This study was performed to investigate the effect of micro electrical current loading during cooling as a new cryopreservation technique. The behavior of intracellular ice crystal formation in plant tissues with or without an electric current load was evaluated using the degree of supercooling, degree of cell deformation, and grain size and growing rate of intracellular ice crystal. Moreover, the transition of intracellular pH during plant tissue cooling with or without electric current loading was also examined using the fluorescence intensity ratio to comprehend cell activity at lower temperatures. The results indicated that micro electric current load did not only decrease the degree of cell deformation and grain size of intracellular ice crystal but also reduced the decline in intracellular pH due to temperature lowering, compared with tissues subjected to the same cooling rate without an electric current load. Thus, the effect of electric current load on cryopreservation and the potential of a new cryopreservation technique using electric current load were discussed based on these results. PMID:27343137

  9. Formation of ZrO2 cubic phase microcrystals during crystallization of amorphous films deposited by laser ablation of Zr in an oxygen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagmut, A. G.; Bagmut, I. A.; Reznik, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and phase transformations during annealing of zirconium dioxide films grown by pulsed laser sputtering of a Zr target in an oxygen atmosphere have been studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction methods. The conditions of the formation of both amorphous and cubic ZrO2 phases have been determined. The electron beam impact on the amorphous film in vacuum is accompanied by the formation of zirconium dioxide microcrystals with fcc lattice. The average grain size in the crystallized film is ˜0.5 μm. The phase transformation is accompanied by film material densification. The relative change in the density during ZrO2 crystallization is 10.27 ± 2.14%.

  10. Carotenoids exclusively synthesized in red pepper (capsanthin and capsorubin) protect human dermal fibroblasts against UVB induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Elisabet; Carvajal-Lérida, Irene; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    Photoprotection by dietary carotenoids has been linked to their antioxidant properties, in particular quenching of singlet molecular oxygen and scavenging of peroxyl radicals. Here, we compared the DNA-protection and antioxidant effects of selected carotenoids exclusively synthesized in red pepper (capsanthin and capsorubin) to the xanthophyll lutein. Preincubation of human dermal fibroblasts (hdf) with capsanthin and capsorubin significantly counteracted UVB induced cytotoxicity at doses between 0 and 300 mJ cm(-2). Pretreatment of hdf with capsanthin, capsorubin or lutein (1 μM) significantly decreased the formation of DNA strand breaks following irradiation with UVB light. All carotenoids studied decreased caspase-3 cleavage (a marker for UVB-induced apoptosis), however, caspase dependent PARP-1 cleavage was not affected suggesting that the remaining caspase activity is sufficient to promote UVB-induced apoptosis. It is conceivable that carotenoids selectively interfere with cellular responses activated by UVB-mediated damage. Our findings indicate that capsanthin and capsorubin exhibit similar properties to lutein and could be used as a dietary supplement to improve natural photoprotection. PMID:27537377

  11. Ozone-Induced Responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): Metabolic Cross-Talk between Volatile Organic Compounds and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Poliana Cardoso-Gustavson; Vanessa Palermo Bolsoni; Debora Pinheiro de Oliveira; Maria Tereza Gromboni Guaratini; Marcos Pereira Marinho Aidar; Mauro Alexandre Marabesi; Edenise Segala Alves; Silvia Ribeiro de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morph...

  12. Regulation of orange carotenoid protein activity in cyanobacterial photoprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurotte, A.; Lopez Igual, R.; Wilson, A.; Comolet, L.; Bourcier de Carbon, C.; Xiao, F.; Kirilovsky, D.

    2015-01-01

    Plants, algae, and cyanobacteria have developed mechanisms to decrease the energy arriving at reaction centers to protect themselves from high irradiance. In cyanobacteria, the photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) and the Fluorescence Recovery Protein are essential elements in this mechanism.

  13. Introduction of new carotenoids into the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus by combining the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways of Erwinia herbicola and Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, C N; Hundle, B S; Hearst, J E; Lang, H.P.; Gardiner, A.T.; Takaichi, S; Cogdell, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Carotenoids have two major functions in bacterial photosynthesis, photoprotection and accessory light harvesting. The genes encoding many carotenoid biosynthetic pathways have now been mapped and cloned in several different species, and the availability of cloned genes which encode the biosynthesis of carotenoids not found in the photosynthetic genus Rhodobacter opens up the possibility of introducing a wider range of foreign carotenoids into the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus than would ...

  14. Formation of color centers optical waveguide in LN crystal by implanting it with 3 MeV oxygen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical waveguide was fabricated by implanting 3 MeV oxygen ions of 5×1014 and 1.5×1015 ions/cm2 into congruent lithium niobate (LN) crystals and annealing them at 200℃-500℃. Optical spectrum was used to investigation defects in the optical waveguide. The results revealed the reduction of Li ions in the implanted LN crystals. The absorption of LN crystal increased with the dose of oxygen ion. This showed that the color centers were formed increasingly with the oxygen ion dose. The color centers and defects affecting the optical absorption include oxygen vacancy, exciton, interstitial atoms and electrons captured by Nb ions occupying the Li ion site. The color centers and defects caused increase of the absorption in the implanted the LN crystals. The annealing temperature seemed to have little effect on reduction of color centers. The optical waveguide of the implanted LN crystal exhibits high temperature stability. (authors)

  15. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  16. Carotenoids and Their Isomers: Color Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Yueming Jiang; Amin Ismail; Kin-Weng Kong; Hock-Eng Khoo; K. Nagendra Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables d...

  17. Macular and serum carotenoid concentrations in patients with malabsorption syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Matthew S.; Zhao, Da You; Bernstein, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to protect the human macula by absorbing blue light and quenching free radicals. Intestinal malabsorption syndromes such as celiac and Crohn’s disease are known to cause deficiencies of lipid-soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that subjects with nutrient malabsorption syndromes will demonstrate lower carotenoid levels in the macula and blood, and that these lower levels may correlate with early-onset maculopathy. Resonance Raman spectrographi...

  18. Carotenoids are essential for the assembly of cyanobacterial photosynthetic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Tünde N; Chukhutsina, Volha; Domonkos, Ildikó; Knoppová, Jana; Komenda, Josef; Kis, Mihály; Lénárt, Zsófia; Garab, Győző; Kovács, László; Gombos, Zoltán; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-10-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids (carotenes and xanthophylls) are important for light harvesting, photoprotection and structural stability of a variety of pigment-protein complexes. Here, we investigated the consequences of altered carotenoid composition for the functional organization of photosynthetic complexes in wild-type and various mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Although it is generally accepted that xanthophylls do not play a role in cyanobacterial photosynthesis in low-light conditions, we have found that the absence of xanthophylls leads to reduced oligomerization of photosystems I and II. This is remarkable because these complexes do not bind xanthophylls. Oligomerization is even more disturbed in crtH mutant cells, which show limited carotenoid synthesis; in these cells also the phycobilisomes are distorted despite the fact that these extramembranous light-harvesting complexes do not contain carotenoids. The number of phycocyanin rods connected to the phycobilisome core is strongly reduced leading to high amounts of unattached phycocyanin units. In the absence of carotenoids the overall organization of the thylakoid membranes is disturbed: Photosystem II is not formed, photosystem I hardly oligomerizes and the assembly of phycobilisomes remains incomplete. These data underline the importance of carotenoids in the structural and functional organization of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic machinery. PMID:26045333

  19. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Study of major aromatic compounds in port wines from carotenoid degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Antonio César Silva; Monteiro, Judith; Oliveira, Carla; de Pinho, Paula Guedes

    2008-01-01

    The carotenoids degradation and the formation of volatiles were examined by simulating Port wine aging. A two year old red Port wine was saturated with oxygen, supplemented with lutein and b-carotene and kept at 60ºC during 87 h. A similar study was performed in a model wine solution. Results showed that the percentage decrease in lutein levels was, respectively, 79% and 95%, in the wine model solution and in the Port wine, and 55% and 10% for b-carotene, indicating that lutein was more sensi...

  1. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  2. [Recent knowledge about intestinal absorption and cleavage of carotenoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, P; Drai, J; Faure, H; Fayol, V; Galabert, C; Laromiguière, M; Le Moël, G

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge about intestinal absorption and cleavage of carotenoids has rapidly grown during the last years. New facts about carotenoid absorption have emerged while some controversies about cleavage are close to end. The knowledge of the absorption and conversion processes is indispensable to understand and interpret the perturbations that can occur in the metabolism of carotenoids and vitamin A. Recently, it has been shown that the absorption of certain carotenoids is not passive - as believed for a long time - but is a facilitated process that requires, at least for lutein, the class B-type 1 scavenger receptor (SR-B1). Various epidemiological and clinical studies have shown wide variations in carotenoid absorption from one subject to another, such differences are now explained by the structure of the concerned carotenoid, by the nature of the food that is absorbed with the carotenoid, by diverse exogenous factors like the intake of medicines or interfering components, by diet factors, by genetic factors, and by the nutritional status of the subject. Recently, the precise mechanism of beta-carotene cleavage by betabeta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase (EC 1.14.99.36) - formerly called beta-carotene 15,15' dioxygenase (ex EC 1.13.11.21) - has been discovered, and a second enzyme which cleaves asymmetrically the beta-carotene molecule has been found. beta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase only acts on the 15,15' bond, thus forming two molecules of retinal from one molecule of beta-carotene by central cleavage. Even though the betabeta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase is much more active on the beta-carotene molecule, a study has shown that it can act on all carotenoids. Searchers now agree that other enzymes that can catalyse an eccentric cleavage of carotenoids probably exist, but under physiological conditions the betabeta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase is by far the most active, and it is mainly effective in the small bowel mucosa and in the liver. However the

  3. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  4. In Situ Observation of Successive Crystallizations and Metastable Intermediates in the Formation of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Hamish H-M; Wu, Yue; Henke, Sebastian; Cheetham, Anthony K; O'Hare, Dermot; Walton, Richard I

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the driving forces controlling crystallization is essential for the efficient synthesis and design of new materials, particularly metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), where mild solvothermal synthesis often allows access to various phases from the same reagents. Using high-energy in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, we monitor the crystallization of lithium tartrate MOFs, observing the successive crystallization and dissolution of three competing phases in one reaction. By determining rate constants and activation energies, we fully quantify the reaction energy landscape, gaining important predictive power for the choice of reaction conditions. Different reaction rates are explained by the structural relationships between the products and the reactants; larger changes in conformation result in higher activation energies. The methods we demonstrate can easily be applied to other materials, opening the door to a greater understanding of crystallization in general. PMID:26836335

  5. Carotenoids: Actual knowledge on food sources, intakes, stability and bioavailability and their protective role in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiani, Giuseppe; Castón, María Jesús Periago; Catasta, Giovina;

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are one of the major food micronutrients in human diets and the overall objective of this review is to re-examine the role of carotenoids in human nutrition. We have emphasized the attention on the following carotenoids present in food and human tissues: -carotene, -cryptoxanthin......, -carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin; we have reported the major food sources and dietary intake of these compounds. We have tried to summarize positive and negative effects of food processing, storage, cooking on carotenoid content and carotenoid bioavailability. In particular, we have evidenced...... the possibility to improve carotenoids bioavailability in accordance with changes and variations of technology procedures....

  6. Transformation reactions and recycling of carotenoids and chlorins in the Peru upwelling region (15°S, 75°W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeta, Daniel J.; Gagosian, Robert B.

    1984-06-01

    Total chlorins and carotenoids were measured in suspended paniculate matter, sediment trap, and zooplankton fecal pellet samples collected in the Peru upwelling region. Individual carotenoids were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, diatoxanthin, carotene, and peridinin constitute > 95% of the total carotenoid pigments in suspended paniculate matter samples. However, sediment trap and zooplankton fecal pellet samples contained significant amounts of the carotenoid transformation products fucoxanthinol, fucoxanthin 5'-dehydrate, fucoxanthinol 5'-dehydrate, peridininol and peridininol 5'-dehydrate. These samples were further characterized by high values of the ratio fucoxanthinol/total fucopigments ( f/F t) and low values of the ratio total carotenoids /total chlorins. Three reactions are proposed to account for the formation of observed products: heterotrophic ester hydrolysis, chemically mediated epoxide rearrangement, and microbially mediated dehydration. The distribution of specific transformation products within the samples suggests that heterotrophic ester hydrolysis is a general transformation pathway operative in the water column on a wide suite of organic esters. Epoxide rearrangement and dehydration appear to occur over a longer time scale and are more typical of sedimentary environments.

  7. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Suzuki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium polyacrylate solutions. Precise surface transportation and kink incorporation processes of the particles into the colloidal crystals with attractive interactions were observed in situ at the particle level. In particular, contrary to the conventional expectations, the diffusion of particles along steps around a two-dimensional island of the growth interface was not the main route for kink incorporation. This is probably due to the number of bonds between adsorbed particles and particles in a crystal; the number exceeds the limit at which a particle easily exchanges its position to the adjacent one along the step. We also found novel desorption processes of particles from steps to terraces, attributing them to the assistance of attractive forces from additionally adsorbing particles to the particles on the steps.

  8. Effects of white, blue, and red light-emitting diodes on carotenoid biosynthetic gene expression levels and carotenoid accumulation in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeon Bok; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Sun-Ju; Lee, Sanghyun; Chung, Sun-Ok; Park, Sang Un

    2013-12-18

    In this study, the optimum wavelengths of light required for carotenoid biosynthesis were determined by investigating the expression levels of carotenoid biosynthetic genes and carotenoid accumulation in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) exposed to white, blue, and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Most carotenoid biosynthetic genes showed higher expression in sprouts irradiated with white light at 8 days after sowing than in those irradiated with blue and red lights. The dominant carotenoids in tartary buckwheat sprouts were lutein and β-carotene. The richest accumulation of total carotenoids was observed in sprouts grown under white light (1282.63 μg g(-1) dry weight), which was relatively higher than that in sprouts grown under blue and red lights (940.86 and 985.54 μg g(-1), respectively). This study might establish an effective strategy for maximizing the production of carotenoids and other important secondary metabolites in tartary buckwheat sprouts by using LED technology.

  9. Computational crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  10. Computational crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed. PMID:26792536

  11. Formation of a regular domain structure in TGS–TGS + Cr crystals with a profile impurity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belugina, N. V., E-mail: alla@ns.crys.ras.ru; Gainutdinov, R. V.; Tolstikhina, A. L.; Ivanova, E. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Kashevich, I. F. [Vitebsk State University (Belarus); Shut, V. N.; Mozzharov, S. E. [Belarussian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Technical Acoustics (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    A complex investigation of TGS–TGS + Cr crystals with a profile impurity distribution of chromium ions Cr{sup 3+} has been carried out at the macrolevel (measurement of dielectric properties by the method of nematic liquid crystals) and microlevel (domain structure according to atomic force microscopy data). It is established that periodic doped layers are formed only in individual growth pyramids in the regions where the polarization vector has a nonzero component along the normal to the growth faces rather than throughout the entire crystal volume. The domain configuration at the boundary of growth layers with different impurity compositions has been studied by piezoelectric force microscopy. The static unipolarity of layers with and without chromium impurity is approximately identical, whereas the domain-wall density in doped regions is higher than that in undoped ones by a factor of about 7.

  12. Formation mechanism of the low-frequency locally resonant band gap in the two-dimensional ternary phononic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gang; Liu Yao-Zong; Wen Ji-Hong; Yu Dian-Long

    2006-01-01

    The low-frequency band gap and the corresponding vibration modes in two-dimensional ternary locally resonant phononic crystals are restudied successfully with the lumped-mass method. Compared with the work of C. Goffaux and J. Sanchez-Dehesa (Phys. Rev. B 67 14 4301(2003)), it is shown that there exists an error of about 50% in their calculated results of the band structure, and one band is missing in their results. Moreover, the in-plane modes shown in their paper are improper, which results in the wrong conclusion on the mechanism of the ternary locally resonant phononic crystals. Based on the lumped-mass method and better description of the vibration modes according to the band gaps, the locally resonant mechanism in forming the subfrequency gaps is thoroughly analysed. The rule used to judge whether a resonant mode in the phononic crystals can result in a corresponding subfrequency gap is also verified in this ternary case.

  13. Carotenoids as a Source of Antioxidants in the Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana Augusta Odorissi; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, widely distributed fat-soluble pigments, are responsible for the attractive colorations of several fruits and vegetables commonly present in our daily diet. They are particularly abundant in yellow-orange fruits (carrots, tomatoes, pumpkins, peppers, among others) and, although masked by chlorophylls, in dark green leafy vegetables. Several health benefits have been attributed to carotenoids or to foods rich in these pigments, by means of different mechanisms-of-action, including the role as provitamin A of almost 50 different carotenoids and the antioxidant activity that protects cells and tissues from damage of free radicals and singlet oxygen, providing enhancement of the immune function, protection from sunburn reactions and delaying the onset of certain types of cancer. Common food sources and the efficiency of the absorption of carotenoids, analytical approaches used for measurement of their antioxidant effect and an overview of some epidemiological studies that have been performed to assess the beneficial impact of carotenoids in human health are outlined in this chapter.

  14. Carotenoid composition of strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Pelayo, Raúl; Gallardo-Guerrero, Lourdes; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso

    2016-05-15

    The carotenoid composition of strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) fruits has been characterised in detail and quantified for the first time. According to the total carotenoid content (over 340 μg/g dw), mature strawberry tree berries can be classified as fruits with very high carotenoid content (>20 μg/g dw). (all-E)-Violaxanthin and 9Z-violaxanthin were found to be the major carotenoid pigments, accounting for more than 60%, responsible for the bright colour of the flesh of ripe fruits. In addition other 5,6-epoxide carotenoids, such as (all-E)-neoxanthin, (9'Z)-neoxanthin (all-E)-antheraxanthin and lutein 5,6-epoxide, together with (all-E)-lutein, (all-E)-zeaxanthin and (all-E)-β-carotene were found at high levels (>5-20 μg/g dw). The LC-MS (APCI+) analysis of the xanthophyll fraction in their native state (direct extract) revealed that most of them (>90%) were totally esterified with saturated fatty acids (capric, lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic). Monoesters, homodiesters and heterodiesters of (all-E)-violaxanthin and 9Z-violaxanthin were the major pigments. PMID:26775958

  15. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takeshi; Buckup, Tiago; Krause, Marie S; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Motzkus, Marcus

    2016-04-28

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2 to the optically dark state S1. Extending this picture, some additional dark states (3A(g)(-) and 1B(u)(-)) and their interaction with the S2 state have also been suggested to play a major role in the ultrafast deactivation of carotenoids and their properties. Here, we investigate the interaction between such dark and bright electronic excited states of open chain carotenoids, particularly its dependence on the number of conjugated double bonds (N). We focus on the ultrafast wave packet motion on the excited potential surface, which is modified by the interaction between bright and dark electronic states. Such a coupling between electronic states leads to a shift of the vibrational frequency during the excited-state evolution. In this regard, pump-degenerate four-wave mixing (pump-DFWM) is applied to a series of carotenoids with different numbers of conjugated double bonds N = 9, 10, 11 and 13 (neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene and spirilloxanthin, respectively). Moreover, we demonstrate in a closed-chain carotenoid (lutein) that the coupling strength and therefore the vibrational shift can be tailored by changing the energy degeneracy between the 1B(u)(+) and 1B(u)(-) states via solvent interaction.

  16. Carotenoids as a Source of Antioxidants in the Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana Augusta Odorissi; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, widely distributed fat-soluble pigments, are responsible for the attractive colorations of several fruits and vegetables commonly present in our daily diet. They are particularly abundant in yellow-orange fruits (carrots, tomatoes, pumpkins, peppers, among others) and, although masked by chlorophylls, in dark green leafy vegetables. Several health benefits have been attributed to carotenoids or to foods rich in these pigments, by means of different mechanisms-of-action, including the role as provitamin A of almost 50 different carotenoids and the antioxidant activity that protects cells and tissues from damage of free radicals and singlet oxygen, providing enhancement of the immune function, protection from sunburn reactions and delaying the onset of certain types of cancer. Common food sources and the efficiency of the absorption of carotenoids, analytical approaches used for measurement of their antioxidant effect and an overview of some epidemiological studies that have been performed to assess the beneficial impact of carotenoids in human health are outlined in this chapter. PMID:27485230

  17. Tropical bat as mammalian model for skin carotenoid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Ismael; Garrido-Fernández, Juan; Ríos, José; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Rodríguez-Herrera, Bernal; Negro, Juan José

    2016-09-27

    Animals cannot synthesize carotenoid pigments de novo, and must consume them in their diet. Most mammals, including humans, are indiscriminate accumulators of carotenoids but inefficiently distribute them to some tissues and organs, such as skin. This limits the potential capacity of these organisms to benefit from the antioxidant and immunostimulatory functions that carotenoids fulfill. Indeed, to date, no mammal has been known to have evolved physiological mechanisms to incorporate and deposit carotenoids in the skin or hair, and mammals have therefore been assumed to rely entirely on other pigments such as melanins to color their integument. Here we use high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOF/MS) to show that the frugivorous Honduran white bat Ectophylla alba colors its skin bright yellow with the deposition of the xanthophyll lutein. The Honduran white bat is thus a mammalian model that may help developing strategies to improve the assimilation of lutein in humans to avoid macular degeneration. This represents a change of paradigm in animal physiology showing that some mammals actually have the capacity to accumulate dietary carotenoids in the integument. In addition, we have also discovered that the majority of the lutein in the skin of Honduran white bats is present in esterified form with fatty acids, thereby permitting longer-lasting coloration and suggesting bright color traits may have an overlooked role in the visual communication of bats. PMID:27621447

  18. Formation of one-dimensional helical columns and excimerlike excited states by racemic quinoxaline-fused [7]carbohelicenes in the crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hayato; Shinto, Sho; Araki, Yasuyuki; Wada, Takehiko; Sakanoue, Tomo; Takenobu, Taishi; Hasobe, Taku

    2014-08-01

    A series of quinoxaline-fused [7]carbohelicenes (HeQu derivatives) was designed and synthesized to evaluate their structural and photophysical properties in the crystal state. The quinoxaline units were expected to enhance the light-emitting properties and to control the packing structures in the crystal. The electrochemical and spectroscopic properties and excited-state dynamics of these compounds were investigated in detail. The first oxidation potentials of HeQu derivatives are approximately the same as that of unsubstituted reference [7]carbohelicene (Heli), whereas their first reduction potentials are shifted to the positive by about 0.7 V. The steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectra also became redshifted compared to those of Heli. The molecular orbitals and energy levels of the HOMO and LUMO states, calculated by DFT methods, support these trends. Moreover, the absolute fluorescence quantum yields of HeQu derivatives are about four times larger than that of Heli. The structural properties of the aggregated states were analyzed by single-crystal analysis. Introduction of appropriate substituents (i.e., 4-methoxyphenyl) in the HeQu unit enabled the construction of one-dimensional helical columns of racemic HeQu derivatives in the crystal state. Helix formation is based on intracolumn π-stacking between two neighboring [7]carbohelicenes and intercolumn CH⋅⋅⋅N interaction between a nitrogen atom of a quinoxaline unit and a hydrogen atom of a helicene unit. The time-resolved fluorescence spectra of single crystals clearly showed an excimerlike delocalized excited state owing to the short distance between neighboring [7]carbohelicene units.

  19. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Bun Y.;

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored...... thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid...... structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-atocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid...

  20. Lipid Class, Carotenoid, and Toxin Dynamics of Karenia Brevis (Dinophyceae) During Diel Vertical Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karenia brevis’ (Hansen and Moestrup) internal lipid, carotenoid, and toxin concentrations are influenced by its ability to use ambient light and nutrients for growth and reproduction. This project investigated changes of K. brevis toxicity, lipid class and carotenoid concentrat...

  1. Direct quantification of carotenoids in low fat babyfoods via laser photoacoustics and colorimetric index a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doka, O.; Ajtony, Z.; Bicanic, D.D.; Valinger, D.; Vegvari, G.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are important antioxidants found in various foods including those for nutrition of infants. In this investigation, the total carotenoid content (TCC) of nine different commercially available baby foods was quantified using colorimetric index a * obtained via reflectance colorimetry (RC)

  2. Development of carotenoid-enriched vegetables with increased nutritional quality and visual appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a class of red, orange and yellow pigments widely distributed in nature. Biotech approach has been proved to be effective in successfully engineering of carotenoid content in food crops with better health and visual appearance....

  3. Stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste and their use as colorant in fish sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachindra, N M; Mahendrakar, N S

    2010-01-01

    The stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste using organic solvents and vegetable oils as affected by antioxidants and pigment carriers was evaluated during storage under different conditions. Solvent extracted carotenoid incorporated into alginate and starch as carriers was stored in metallised polyester and polypropylene pouches. Oil extracted carotenoids were stored in transparent and amber bottles. Also the use of recovered pigments as colorants in fish sausage was evaluated. Antioxidants, packaging material and storage period had a significant effect (p≤0.001) on the reduction of carotenoid content, while type of carrier had marginal effect (p≥0.05) on solvent extracted carotenoids during storage. Carotenoid content in pigmented oil was significantly affected by antioxidants (p≤0.001), packaging material (p≤0.05) and storage period (p≤0.001). Addition of carotenoid to the sausage enhanced the sensory colour, flavour and overall quality score of sausage and the added carotenoid was stable during processing.

  4. Role of crystallographic anisotropy in the formation of surface layers of single NiTi crystals after ion-plasma alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletika, T. M., E-mail: poletm@ispms.tsc.ru; Girsova, S. L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Meisner, L. L., E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Shulepov, I. A., E-mail: iashulepov@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The structure of the surface and near-surface layers of single crystals of NiTi, differently oriented relative to the direction of ion beam treatment was investigated. The role of the crystallographic orientation in formation of structure of surface layers after ion-plasma alloying was revealed. It was found that the orientation effects of selective sputtering and channeling determine the thickness of the oxide and amorphous layers, the depth of penetration of ions and impurities, the distribution of Ni with depth.

  5. Theoretical study on photophysical properties of 3‧-hydroxyechinenone and the effects of interactions with orange carotenoid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Miho; Mori, Yukie; Takano, Keiko

    2016-03-01

    3‧-Hydroxyechinenone (3‧-hECN) is a chromophore of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP). Excitation of 3‧-hECN bound to OCP to the S2(11Bu+) state yields an emission characteristic of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state. The present computational results indicate that the S1 state of 3‧-hECN is of the 21Ag- character and slightly gains an ICT character through the mixing with the S2(11Bu+) state when the polyene chain is twisted. Formation of hydrogen bonds with OCP enhances the 21Ag-/11Bu+ mixing and hence the ICT character in the S1 state. Such carotenoid-protein interaction may explain the observation of the ICT emission.

  6. Renal tubular injury induced by ischemia promotes the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in rats with hyperoxaluria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanwei; Liu, Wanpeng; Hui, Limei; Zhao, Jianjun; Yang, Xuecheng; Wang, Yonghua; Niu, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    Hyperoxaluria and cell injury are key factors in urolithiasis. Oxalate metabolism may be altered by renal dysfunction and therefore, impact the deposition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals. We investigated the relationship of renal function, oxalate metabolism and CaOx crystal deposition in renal ischemia. One hundred male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. Hyperoxaluria model (Group A and B) was established by feeding rats with 0.75 % ethylene glycol (EG). The left renal pedicle was clamped for 30 min to establish renal ischemia Groups (B and C), while Groups A and D underwent sham operation. Then, serum and urine oxalate (Ox), creatinine (Cr) and urea nitrogen (UN) levels were evaluated by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) and ion mass spectrum (IMS) at days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 14. CaOx crystallization was assessed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). A temporal and significant increase of serum Cr and UN levels was observed in Groups B and C compared to values obtained for Groups A and D (P renal tissue. Our results indicated that renal tubular injury induced by renal ischemia might not affect Ox levels but could promote CaOx crystal retention under hyperoxaluria.

  7. Crystal Structure of α-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM: Insight into Tetramer Formation and Substrate Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Folmer; Abou Hachem, Maher; Larsen, Rene Jonsgaard;

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic bacterium known for its beneficial effects on human health. The importance of α-galactosidases (α-Gals) for growth of probiotic organisms on oligosaccharides of the raffinose family present in many foods is increasingly recognized. Here, the crystal...

  8. Possible wave formation and martensitic transformation of iron particles in copper single crystals during argon ion bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thölén, Anders Ragnar; Li, Chang-Hai; Easterling, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Thin single crystal copper specimens (thickness ~250 nm) containing coherent iron particles (diameter 40–50 nm) have been bombarded with argon ions (5, 80, and 330 keV). During this process some of the iron particles transform to martensite. The transformation was observed near the exposed surface...

  9. Carotenoid limitation of sexual coloration along an environmental gradient in guppies

    OpenAIRE

    Grether, G. F; Hudon, J; Millie, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids produce most of the brilliant orange and yellow colours seen in animals, but animals cannot synthesize these pigments and must rely on dietary sources. The idea that carotenoids make good signals because they are a scarce limiting resource was proposed two decades ago and has become the leading hypothesis for the role of carotenoids in animal communication. To our knowledge, until now, however, there has been no direct evidence that carotenoids are a limiting resource in nature. W...

  10. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.)

    OpenAIRE

    María del Rocío Gómez-García; Neftalí Ochoa-Alejo

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ be...

  11. Enhancement of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Transplastomic Tomatoes by Induced Lycopene-to-Provitamin A Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Apel, W.; R. Bock

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are essential pigments of the photosynthetic apparatus and an indispensable component of the human diet. In addition to being potent antioxidants, they also provide the vitamin A precursor beta-carotene. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits, carotenoids accumulate in specialized plastids, the chromoplasts. How the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated and what limits total carotenoid accumulation in fruit chromoplasts is not well understood. Here, we have introduced the ...

  12. Microscale extraction method for HPLC carotenoid analysis in vegetable matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Pacheco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate simple, efficient analytical methods that are also fast, clean, and economical, and are capable of producing reliable results for a large number of samples, a micro scale extraction method for analysis of carotenoids in vegetable matrices was developed. The efficiency of this adapted method was checked by comparing the results obtained from vegetable matrices, based on extraction equivalence, time required and reagents. Six matrices were used: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., carrot (Daucus carota L., sweet potato with orange pulp (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam., pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch., watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. flour. Quantification of the total carotenoids was made by spectrophotometry. Quantification and determination of carotenoid profiles were formulated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with photodiode array detection. Microscale extraction was faster, cheaper and cleaner than the commonly used one, and advantageous for analytical laboratories.

  13. Noninvasive measurements of carotenoids in bovine udder by reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E.; Müller, Kerstin E.; Lademann, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    For a long time, the antioxidative status in cattle has been discussed as an indicator for stress conditions resulting from disease or exertion. Until now, invasive approaches have been necessary to obtain blood samples or biopsy materials and gain insights into the antioxidative status of cattle. Due to these efforts and the costs of the analyses, serial sampling is feasible in an experimental setting, but not for measurements on a routine basis. The present study focuses on the feasibility of an innovative, noninvasive spectroscopic technique that allows in vivo measurements of carotenoids in the skin by reflection spectroscopy. To this end, in a first trial, repeated measurements of the carotenoid concentration of the udder skin were performed on 25 healthy cattle from different breeds. Carotenoid concentrations showed highly significant differences between individual animals (Ptest) differed significantly (P<0.005), with higher concentrations observed in robust cows.

  14. Effect of a Transverse Magnetic Field on Stray Grain Formation of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weidong; Liu, Huan; Lan, Jian; Li, Chuanjun; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-08-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on stray grain formation during directional solidification of superalloy was investigated. Experimental results indicated that the transverse magnetic field effectively suppressed the stray grain formation on the side the primary dendrite diverges from the mold wall. Moreover, the quenched experimental results indicated that the solid/liquid interface shape was obviously changed in a transverse magnetic field. The effect of a transverse magnetic field on stray grain formation was discussed.

  15. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1–0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10–19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3–78.8 cm2 (V-s)−1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4–287 cm2 (V-s)−1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications. (papers)

  16. [The effect of beta-ionine on biosynthesis of carotenes by Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlova, A N; Alekseeva, L N; Nefelova, M V

    1977-01-01

    Biosynthesis of carotenoids by a growing culture of Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides is totally inhibited by beta-ionone added at different concentrations, at various time of the cultural growth, and in various combinations with oil. The inhibition of carotenoid synthesis by beta-ionone is of a specific character since the biomass growth under the same conditions does not increase.

  17. Differential effects of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol on carotenoid deposition in an avian sexually selected signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, Stefania; Dijkstra, Cor; Tagliavini, James; Goerlich, Vivian C.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that carotenoid-based traits are under the control of testosterone (T) by up-regulation of carotenoid carriers (lipoproteins) and/or tissue-specific uptake of carotenoids. T can be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2), and variation in conversion

  18. The contribution of various foods to intake of vitamin A and carotenoids in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    This study presents data on dietary intake of specific carotenoids in the Netherlands, based on a recently developed food composition database for carotenoids. Regularly eaten vegetables, the main dietary source of carotenoids, were sampled comprehensively and analysed with modern analytic methods.

  19. Identification of carotenoids from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie eYatsunami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The carotenoids produced by extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica were extracted and identified by their chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic characteristics (UV-Vis and mass spectrometry. The composition (mol% was 68.1% bacterioruberin, 22.5% monoanhydrobacterioruberin, 9.3% bisanhydrobacterioruberin, < 0.1% isopentenyldehydrorhodopin, and trace amounts of lycopene and phytoene. The in vitro scavenging capacity of a carotenoid, bacterioruberin, extracted from Ha. japonica cells against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals was evaluated. The antioxidant capacity of bacterioruberin was much higher than that of β-carotene.

  20. Estabilidad del Carotenoide Licopeno en Tomates en Conserva Lycopene Carotenoide Stability in Canned Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia L Ordóñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la estabilidad del carotenoide licopeno durante el proceso de elaboración de conservas de tomates peritas y evaluar la misma durante su almacenamiento como producto terminado. Se trabajó con muestras provenientes de elaboraciones industriales extraídas en distintos puntos del proceso: tomates frescos, en la boquilla de alimentación de la línea; tomate pelado, a la salida de la peladora termofísica y producto terminado a la salida del esterilizador-enfriador, de distintos lotes de elaboración y en tres ocasiones durante la temporada 2007. El producto terminado, envasado en hojalata, fue evaluado durante un año, cada tres meses. El licopeno fue extraído con una mezcla de hexano-acetona-etanol y determinado por espectrofotometría visible a 472nm. Los resultados se analizaron estadísticamente mostrando que la esterilización industrial produce liberación celular del licopeno.The objective of this work was to determine lycopene carotenoid stability during manufacturing process in canned peeled whole tomatoes and during its storage as final product. Samples were taken during industrial manufacturing at different process points: fresh tomatoes when they were feeding to process line, peeled tomatoes from thermophysical peeler and finished product after it passed the cooker-cooler. Samples were obtained from different manufacturing lots at three times during the 2007 harvesting season. Canned tomatoes were analyzed every three months, during one year. Lycopene was extracted with hexane-acetone-ethyl alcohol and measured by spectrophotometry at 472 nm. Statistical analysis of the results shows that industrial sterilization produces cell release of lycopene.

  1. Synthesis of YAG:Ce3+ Phosphor by Polyacrylamide Gel Method and Promoting Action of α-Al2O3 Seed Crystal on Phase Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yongxiu; Li Yinyi; Min Yulin; Wu Yanli; Cheng Changming; Zhou Xuezhen; Gu Ziying

    2005-01-01

    YAG:Ce3+ phosphor particles were prepared using polyacrylamide gel method. The structure evolution of powders during annealing process was followed by X-ray diffraction determination. It is found that some intermediate phases, including θ-Al2O3, YAM and YAP, are formed when calcining polyacrylamide gel, however, the pure YAG phase can be formed directly when calcining polyacrylamide gel with α-Al2O3 as seed crystal. These facts show that the existence of α-Al2O3 seed crystal can block the formation of θ-Al2O3, YAM and YAP, and accelerate its reaction with Y2O3 to form YAG phase directly at lower temperature. The emission peak of prepared YAG:Ce3+ phosphor is wide with maximum at 550 nm and the exitation band has two peaks, the major one is around at 460 nm, which matches the blue emission of GaN LED and is suitable for the assemble of white LED. Some fluxes can enhance the photoluminescence intensity of phosphor particles, that can be attributed both to the improvement of crystallization processes of YAG and to the stabilization of trivalence cerium ion in YAG:Ce3+.

  2. About the mechanism for paramagnetic centers formation under the radiolysis of RbNO{sub 3} and CsNO{sub 3} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anan’ev, V., E-mail: eprlab@kemsu.ru; Pak, V.

    2014-05-01

    The accumulation of paramagnetic centers – NO{sub 2}{sup ·} and O{sup ·−} in RbNO{sub 3} and CsNO{sub 3} crystals under γ-irradiation at 310 K and their thermal stability has been studied. The values of the initial radiation chemical yield of NO{sub 2}{sup ·} were calculated to be ∼2.5 × 10{sup −2} (100 eV){sup −1} in both nitrates. These values for O{sup ·−} are equal to 0.05 and 0.38 (100 eV){sup −1} for RbNO{sub 3} and CsNO{sub 3}, respectively. The heating of irradiated crystals results in the decay of NO{sub 2}{sup ·} and O{sup ·−} centers with simultaneously appearance of the ozonide ion. The mechanism for paramagnetic centers formation under γ-irradiation of RbNO{sub 3} and CsNO{sub 3} crystals has been discussed.

  3. Influence of clusters in melt on the subsequent glass-formation and crystallization of Fe-Si-B metallic glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoxiong Zhou; Bangshao Dong; Rui Xiang; Guangqiang Zhang; Jingyu Qin; Xiufang Bian

    2015-01-01

    The liquid structure of seven representative Fe–Si–B alloys has been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation focusing on the role of clusters in terms of glass-forming ability (GFA) and crystallization. It is demonstrated that the type of primary phase precipitated from amorphous state under heat treatment is determined by the relative fraction and role of various clusters in melt. The alloy melt shows higher stability and resultantly larger GFA when there is no dominant cluster or several clusters coexist, which explains the different GFAs and crystallization processes at various ratios of Si and B in the Fe–Si–B system. The close correlation among clusters, crystalline phase and GFA is also studied.

  4. Influence of clusters in melt on the subsequent glass-formation and crystallization of Fe–Si–B metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxiong Zhou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The liquid structure of seven representative Fe–Si–B alloys has been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation focusing on the role of clusters in terms of glass-forming ability (GFA and crystallization. It is demonstrated that the type of primary phase precipitated from amorphous state under heat treatment is determined by the relative fraction and role of various clusters in melt. The alloy melt shows higher stability and resultantly larger GFA when there is no dominant cluster or several clusters coexist, which explains the different GFAs and crystallization processes at various ratios of Si and B in the Fe–Si–B system. The close correlation among clusters, crystalline phase and GFA is also studied.

  5. The binding of zinc ions to Emericella nidulans endo-β-1,4-galactanase is essential for crystal formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otten, Harm; Michalak, Malwina; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard;

    2013-01-01

    belonging to GH53. It also revealed 15 zinc ions bound to the protein, one of which is located in the active site, where it is coordinated by residues Glu136 and Glu246 which comprise the catalytic machinery. The majority of the zinc ions are located on the surface of the enzyme, in some cases with side...... chains from two different molecules as ligands, thus explaining why the presence of zinc ions was essential for crystallization....

  6. Formation of liquid crystal multi-domains with different threshold voltages by varying the surface anchoring energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jin, Huillian; Kim, Jung-Wook; Kim, Ki-Han; Park, Byung Wok; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Hoon; Shin, Ki-Chul; Kim, Hee Seop

    2012-09-01

    We propose methods to obtain multi-domains with different threshold voltages for vertically aligned liquid crystal displays without additional transistors or capacitors. We exposed an ultraviolet light through a photomask and spatially varied the surface anchoring energy by partially decomposing the polyimide or inducing the adsorption of reactive monomers. The threshold voltage was reduced with smaller surface anchoring, and the reduction of the threshold could be qualitatively interpreted using a model describing a weak anchoring condition.

  7. From surface science to catalysis: The importance of methoxy and formate species on Cu single crystals and industrial catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.; Waugh, K. C.

    2016-08-01

    Early work from the Madix group identified a number of simple surface intermediate species which have proved to be of significance for industrial catalytic processes. Two of these intermediates are the methoxy and formate surface species. We discuss the formation and behavior of these on copper surfaces, and go on to highlight their role in two important industrial reactions, namely methanol synthesis and the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. The formate is the pivotal intermediate for methanol synthesis and is formed from the reaction of CO2 and H2, whereas it is important to avoid the formation of that intermediate for selective methanol oxidation, which proceeds through dehydrogenation of the methoxy species.

  8. Distribution of carotenoids in endosperm, germ, and aleurone fractions of cereal grain kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndolo, Victoria U; Beta, Trust

    2013-08-15

    To compare the distribution of carotenoids across the grain, non-corn and corn cereals were hand dissected into endosperm, germ and aleurone fractions. Total carotenoid content (TCC) and carotenoid composition were analysed using spectrophotometry and HPLC. Cereal carotenoid composition was similar; however, concentrations varied significantly (paleurone layer had zeaxanthin levels 2- to 5-fold higher than lutein among the cereals. Positive significant correlations (paleurone layer. Our findings suggest that the aleurone of wheat, oat, corn and germ of barley have significantly enhanced carotenoid levels.

  9. Formation mechanisms of nano and microcones by laser radiation on surfaces of Si, Ge, and SiGe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvid, Artur; Onufrijevs, Pavels; Jarimaviciute-Gudaitiene, Renata; Dauksta, Edvins; Prosycevas, Igoris

    2013-06-01

    In this work we study the mechanisms of laser radiation interaction with elementary semiconductors such as Si and Ge and their solid solution SiGe. As a result of this investigation, the mechanisms of nanocones and microcones formation on a surface of semiconductor were proposed. We have shown the possibility to control the size and the shape of cones both by the laser. The main reason for the formation of nanocones is the mechanical compressive stresses due to the atoms' redistribution caused by the gradient of temperature induced by strongly absorbed laser radiation. According to our investigation, the nanocone formation mechanism in semiconductors is characterized by two stages. The first stage is characterized by formation of a p-n junction for elementary semiconductors or of a Ge/Si heterojunction for SiGe solid solution. The generation and redistribution of intrinsic point defects in elementary semiconductors and Ge atoms concentration on the irradiated surface of SiGe solid solution in temperature gradient field take place at this stage due to the thermogradient effect which is caused by strongly absorbed laser radiation. The second stage is characterized by formation of nanocones due to mechanical plastic deformation of the compressed Ge layer on Si. Moreover, a new 1D-graded band gap structure in elementary semiconductors due to quantum confinement effect was formed. For the formation of microcones Ni/Si structure was used. The mechanism of the formation of microcones is characterized by two stages as well. The first stage is the melting of Ni film after irradiation by laser beam and formation of Ni islands due to surface tension force. The second step is the melting of Ni and subsequent manifestations of Marangoni effect with the growth of microcones.

  10. Pigments of Staphylococcus aureus, a series of triterpenoid carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J H; Wilmoth, G J

    1981-01-01

    The pigments of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated and purified, and their chemical structures were determined. All of the 17 compounds identified were triterpenoid carotenoids possessing a C30 chain instead of the C40 carotenoid structure found in most other organisms. The main pigment, staphyloxanthin, was shown to be alpha-D-glucopyranosyl 1-O-(4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4-oate) 6-O-(12-methyltetradecanoate), in which glucose is esterified with both a triterpenoid carotenoid carboxylic acid and a C15 fatty acid. It is accompanied by isomers containing other hexoses and homologs containing C17 fatty acids. The carotenes 4,4'-diapophytoene, 4,4'-diapophytofluene, 4-4'-diapophytofluene, 4-4'-diapo-zeta-carotene, 4,4'-diapo-7,8,11,12-tetrahydrolycopene, and 4,4'-diaponeurosporene and the xanthophylls 4,4'-diaponeurosporenal, 4,4'-diaponeurosporenoic acid, and glucosyl diaponeurosporenoate were also identified, together with some of their isomers or breakdown products. The symmetrical 4,4'-diapo- structure was adopted for these triterpenoid carotenoids, but an alternative unsymmetrical 8'-apo-structure could not be excluded. PMID:7275936

  11. Vitamins, carotenoids, dietary fiber, and the risk of gastric carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botterweck, A.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Numerous components of fruit and vegetables are considered to decrease the risk of gastric carcinoma. In the current prospective study, the authors examined the association between the intake of vitamins, carotenoids, and dietary fiber and vitamin supplement use and the incidence rate of

  12. Mallow carotenoids determined by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow (corchorus olitorius) is a green vegetable, which is widely consumed either fresh or dry by Middle East population. This study was carried out to determine the contents of major carotenoids quantitatively in mallow, by using a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a Bis...

  13. Colour and carotenoid changes of pasteurised orange juice during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Scheling; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Tomic, Jovana; Santiago, Jihan Santanina; Lemmens, Lien; Panozzo, Agnese; Grauwet, Tara; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2015-03-15

    The correlation of carotenoid changes with colour degradation of pasteurised single strength orange juice was investigated at 20, 28, 35 and 42°C for a total of 32 weeks of storage. Changes in colour were assessed using the CIELAB system and were kinetically described by a zero-order model. L(∗), a(∗), b(∗), ΔE(∗), Cab(∗) and hab were significantly changed during storage (pcolour parameters were 64-73 kJ mol(-1). Several carotenoids showed important changes and appeared to have different susceptibilities to storage. A decrease of β-cryptoxanthin was observed at higher temperatures, whereas antheraxanthin started to decrease at lower temperatures. Depending on the time and temperature, changes in carotenoids could be due to isomerisation reactions, which may lead to a perceptible colour change. Although the contribution of carotenoids was recognised to some extent, other reactions seem of major importance for colour degradation of orange juice during storage.

  14. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC=C + NC=O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids. PMID:27285777

  15. Blue-violet light irradiation dose dependently decreases carotenoids in human skin, which indicates the generation of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Beyer, Marc; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to ultraviolet and infrared irradiation, which are known to facilitate cutaneous photoaging, immunosuppression, or tumour emergence due to formation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species, potentially similar effects of visible light on the human skin are still poorly characterized. Using a blue-violet light irradiation source and aiming to characterize its potential influence on the antioxidant status of the human skin, the cutaneous carotenoid concentration was measured noninvasively in nine healthy volunteers using resonance Raman spectroscopy following irradiation. The dose-dependent significant degradation of carotenoids was measured to be 13.5% and 21.2% directly after irradiation at 50 J/cm² and 100 J/cm² (P skin. In all volunteers the cutaneous carotenoid concentration dropped down in a manner similar to that caused by the infrared or ultraviolet irradiations, leading to the conclusion that also blue-violet light at high doses could represent a comparably adverse factor for human skin.

  16. Carotenoid metabolic profiling and transcriptome-genome mining reveal functional equivalence among blue-pigmented copepods and appendicularia

    KAUST Repository

    Mojib, Nazia

    2014-06-01

    The tropical oligotrophic oceanic areas are characterized by high water transparency and annual solar radiation. Under these conditions, a large number of phylogenetically diverse mesozooplankton species living in the surface waters (neuston) are found to be blue pigmented. In the present study, we focused on understanding the metabolic and genetic basis of the observed blue phenotype functional equivalence between the blue-pigmented organisms from the phylum Arthropoda, subclass Copepoda (Acartia fossae) and the phylum Chordata, class Appendicularia (Oikopleura dioica) in the Red Sea. Previous studies have shown that carotenoid–protein complexes are responsible for blue coloration in crustaceans. Therefore, we performed carotenoid metabolic profiling using both targeted and nontargeted (high-resolution mass spectrometry) approaches in four different blue-pigmented genera of copepods and one blue-pigmented species of appendicularia. Astaxanthin was found to be the principal carotenoid in all the species. The pathway analysis showed that all the species can synthesize astaxanthin from β-carotene, ingested from dietary sources, via 3-hydroxyechinenone, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin, adonirubin or adonixanthin. Further, using de novo assembled transcriptome of blue A. fossae (subclass Copepoda), we identified highly expressed homologous β-carotene hydroxylase enzymes and putative carotenoid-binding proteins responsible for astaxanthin formation and the blue phenotype. In blue O. dioica (class Appendicularia), corresponding putative genes were identified from the reference genome. Collectively, our data provide molecular evidences for the bioconversion and accumulation of blue astaxanthin–protein complexes underpinning the observed ecological functional equivalence and adaptive convergence among neustonic mesozooplankton.

  17. Na+-Translocating Rhodopsin from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 Does Not Contain Carotenoid Antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsova, Y V; Arutyunyan, A M; Bogachev, A V

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoid-binding properties of Na+-translocating rhodopsin (NaR) from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 were studied. Carotenoids were extracted from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 cells. It was found that zeaxanthin is the predominant carotenoid of this bacterium. Incubation of recombinant NaR purified from Escherichia coli cells with carotenoids from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 did not result in any changes in optical absorption or circular dichroism spectra, indicating the absence of binding of the carotenoids by NaR. The same results were obtained using salinixanthin as the carotenoid. These data along with genome analysis of Dokdonia sp. PRO95 and other flavobacteria indicate that NaR from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 and possibly the other flavobacterial Na+-translocating rhodopsins do not contain a carotenoid antenna. PMID:27293099

  18. Carotenoids of Sea Angels Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis from the Perspective of the Food Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea angels, Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis, are small, floating sea slugs belonging to Gastropoda, and their gonads are a bright orange-red color. Sea angels feed exclusively on a small herbivorous sea snail, Limacina helicina. Carotenoids in C. limacina, P. doliiformis, and L. helicina were investigated for comparative biochemical points of view. β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, and diatoxanthin were found to be major carotenoids in L. helicina. L. helicina accumulated dietary algal carotenoids without modification. On the other hand, keto-carotenoids, such as pectenolone, 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin, and adonixanthin were identified as major carotenoids in the sea angels C. limacina and P. doliiformis. Sea angels oxidatively metabolize dietary carotenoids and accumulate them in their gonads. Carotenoids in the gonads of sea angels might protect against oxidative stress and enhance reproduction.

  19. Novel targeted approach to better understand how natural structural barriers govern carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility in vegetable-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Paola; Lemmens, Lien; Ribas-Agustí, Albert; Sosa, Carola; Met, Kristof; de Dieu Umutoni, Jean; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2013-12-01

    An experimental approach, allowing us to understand the effect of natural structural barriers (cell walls, chromoplast substructures) on carotenoid bioaccessibility, was developed. Different fractions with different levels of carotenoid bio-encapsulation (carotenoid-enriched oil, chromoplasts, small cell clusters, and large cell clusters) were isolated from different types of carrots and tomatoes. An in vitro method was used to determine carotenoid bioaccessibility. In the present work, a significant decrease in carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility could be observed with an increasing level of bio-encapsulation. Differences in cell wall material and chromoplast substructure between matrices influenced carotenoid release and inclusion in micelles. For carrots, cell walls and chromoplast substructure were important barriers for carotenoid bioaccessibility while, in tomatoes, the chromoplast substructure represented the most important barrier governing bioaccessibility. The highest increase in carotenoid bioaccessibility, for all matrices, was obtained after transferring carotenoids into the oil phase, a system lacking cell walls and chromoplast substructures that could hamper carotenoid release.

  20. The antioxidant potential of carotenoid extract from Phaffia rhodozyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gramza-Michałowska

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carotenoids are components playing an important role in biological systems, starting with light protection, immunoenhancement, protection against carcinogens and finishing with antioxidant activity. Food additives market is based mainly on synthetic additives; however, higher consumer awareness has resulted in an increased use of natural substances. One of the potentially antioxidant compounds could be a lipid soluble carotenoid – astaxanthin (xanthophyll, found in the microbial world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential of carotenoid extract from Phaffia rhodozyma extract. Material and methods. Carotenoids extracted from Phaffia rhodozyma and the astaxanthin standard was selected for the investigations. Antioxidant potential was evaluated by radical scavenging activity (DPPH• and ABTS•+ radicals and in lipid oxidative stability measurements (Rancimat, Oxidograph and Schaal oven tests. Results. It was found that the examined extracts presented a significantly higher ability to scavenge the DPPH• radical in comparison to the ABTS•+ radical. Evaluations of linoleic acid emulsion oxidative stability showed a higher antioxidant effect of the Phaffia rhodozyma extract than that of astaxanthin during 19 h of incubation. That potential however, was not detected in linoleic acid emulsion incubated for 96 h, where both additives accelerated oxidation process. In bulk sunflower oil a protective effect of Phaffia rhodozyma extract was observed. In both Rancimat and Oxidograph tests antioxidant activity measured using the induction period was evaluated. However, results of the Schaal oven test indicated that a 144 h incubation of sunflower oil offered a significantly better protection of the lipid against oxidation when the Phaffia rhodozyma extract was added. Conclusions. On the basis of recorded results it was found that the Phaffia rhodozyma carotenoid extract showed moderate antioxidant properties

  1. Evaluation of carotenoid contents in irradiated buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jaqueline M. da; Coelho, Maysa J.; Lima, Keila S.C.; Lima, Antonio L.S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: maysa@ime.eb.br; Godoy, Ronoel L.O.; Pacheco, Sidney [EMBRAPA Agroindustria de Alimentos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronoel@ctaa.embrapa.br; Ferreira, Rubemar S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste CRCN-CO/CNEN, Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil); E-mail: rferreira@cnen.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.), a typical Brazilian fruit, can be found at north, northeast and center-west regions in Brazil. It has a high nutritional value and is considered an excellent source of vitamin A precursors, called carotenoids, showing a majority of {beta}-carotene. It can be used in many regional dishes. In this study, Buriti in natura was treated with gamma irradiation, deriving from a cavity type research irradiator which has a Cs-137 radiation source, with the doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. The objective is to evaluate the irradiation effects on nutritional quality maintenance and conservation of Buriti, focusing in optimizer the processing conditions and increase consumption as a way to fight vitamin A deficiency. Clinical, biological and dietetic studies have indicated that the lack of vitamin A is the main cause of night blindness and xerophthalmia. The use of food irradiation is growing and represents an economic benefit to the agriculture through the reduction of post harvesting losses. The irradiated fruits and the control group were evaluated through the total carotenoids analysis, by spectrophotometry, and the carotenoids (a and b-carotene and luteine) determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). ANOVA was used to treat the results. The results show that buriti is an excellent source of total carotenoids, with a concentration of 44500 {mu}g/100 g in the pulp (70% of {beta}-carotene). The reduction of carotenoids contents due to the irradiation process does not compromise its nutritional quality that is still very above of recommendations, being the dose of 0.5 kGy more appropriate. (author)

  2. Artistic Crystal Creations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In this inquiry-based, integrative art and science activity, Grade 5-8 students use multicolored Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) crystallizing solutions to reveal beautiful, cylindrical, 3-dimensional, needle-shaped structures. Through observations of the crystal art, students analyze factors that contribute to crystal size and formation, compare…

  3. Mesoporous MEL, BEA, and FAU zeolite crystals obtained by in situ formation of carbon template over metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Ali, Zahra Nasrudin; Mentzel, Uffe Vie;

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of hierarchical zeolite materials with MEL, BEA and FAU structures. The synthesis is based on the carbon templating method with an in situ-generated carbon template. Through the decomposition of methane and deposition of coke over nickel nanopart......Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of hierarchical zeolite materials with MEL, BEA and FAU structures. The synthesis is based on the carbon templating method with an in situ-generated carbon template. Through the decomposition of methane and deposition of coke over nickel...... nanoparticles supported on silica, a carbon–silica composite is obtained and exploited as a combined carbon template/silica source for the zeolite synthesis. The mesoporous zeolite materials were all prepared by hydrothermal crystallization in alkaline media followed by removal of the carbon template...... by combustion, which results in zeolite single crystals with intracrystalline pore volumes of up to 0.44 cm3 g−1. The prepared zeolite structures are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM and N2 physisorption measurements. ....

  4. Study of 'Redhaven' peach and its white-fleshed mutant suggests a key role of CCD4 carotenoid dioxygenase in carotenoid and norisoprenoid volatile metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartarini Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are plant metabolites which are not only essential in photosynthesis but also important quality factors in determining the pigmentation and aroma of flowers and fruits. To investigate the regulation of carotenoid metabolism, as related to norisoprenoids and other volatile compounds in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch., and the role of carotenoid dioxygenases in determining differences in flesh color phenotype and volatile composition, the expression patterns of relevant carotenoid genes and metabolites were studied during fruit development along with volatile compound content. Two contrasted cultivars, the yellow-fleshed 'Redhaven' (RH and its white-fleshed mutant 'Redhaven Bianca' (RHB were examined. Results The two genotypes displayed marked differences in the accumulation of carotenoid pigments in mesocarp tissues. Lower carotenoid levels and higher levels of norisoprenoid volatiles were observed in RHB, which might be explained by differential activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD enzymes. In fact, the ccd4 transcript levels were dramatically higher at late ripening stages in RHB with respect to RH. The two genotypes also showed differences in the expression patterns of several carotenoid and isoprenoid transcripts, compatible with a feed-back regulation of these transcripts. Abamine SG - an inhibitor of CCD enzymes - decreased the levels of both isoprenoid and non-isoprenoid volatiles in RHB fruits, indicating a complex regulation of volatile production. Conclusions Differential expression of ccd4 is likely to be the major determinant in the accumulation of carotenoids and carotenoid-derived volatiles in peach fruit flesh. More in general, dioxygenases appear to be key factors controlling volatile composition in peach fruit, since abamine SG-treated 'Redhaven Bianca' fruits had strongly reduced levels of norisoprenoids and other volatile classes. Comparative functional studies of peach carotenoid

  5. Generation of Absolute Controlled Crystal Chirality by the Removal of Crystal Water from Achiral Crystal of Nucleobase Cytosine

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Tsuneomi; Hakoda, Yuko; Mineki, Hiroko; Suzuki, Kenta; Soai, Kenso

    2010-01-01

    The enantioselective formation of chiral crystal of achiral nucleobase cytosine was achieved mediated by the crystal direction selective dehydration of crystal water in the achiral crystal of cytosine monohydrate (P21/c). Heat transfer from the enantiotopic face of the single crystal of cytosine monohydrate afforded the enantiomorphous crystal of anhydrous cytosine.

  6. Spontaneous helix formation in non-chiral bent-core liquid crystals with fast linear electro-optic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenilayam, Sithara P.; Panarin, Yuri P.; Vij, Jagdish K.; Panov, Vitaly P.; Lehmann, Anne; Poppe, Marco; Prehm, Marko; Tschierske, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent one of the foundations of modern communication and photonic technologies. Present display technologies are based mainly on nematic LCs, which suffer from limited response time for use in active colour sequential displays and limited image grey scale. Herein we report the first observation of a spontaneously formed helix in a polar tilted smectic LC phase (SmC phase) of achiral bent-core (BC) molecules with the axis of helix lying parallel to the layer normal and a pitch much shorter than the optical wavelength. This new phase shows fast (~30 μs) grey-scale switching due to the deformation of the helix by the electric field. Even more importantly, defect-free alignment is easily achieved for the first time for a BC mesogen, thus providing potential use in large-scale devices with fast linear and thresholdless electro-optical response.

  7. Accelerated rogue waves generated by soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum formation in photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Driben, Rodislav

    2012-01-01

    Soliton fusion is a fascinating and delicate phenomenon that manifests itself in optical fibers in case of interaction between co-propagating solitons with small temporal and wavelengths separation. We show that the mechanism of acceleration of trailing soliton by dispersive waves radiated from the preceding one provides necessary conditions for soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers. As a result of fusion large intensity robust light structures arise and propagate over significant distances. In presence of small random noise the delicate condition for the effective fusion between solitons can easily be broken, making the fusion induced giant waves a rare statistical event. Thus oblong-shaped giant accelerated waves become excellent candidates for optical rogue waves.

  8. Crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: Insights into the molecular basis of formation of a dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Ching-Ting; Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-23

    Dihydropyrimidinase, a tetrameric metalloenzyme, is a member of the cyclic amidohydrolase family, which also includes allantoinase, dihydroorotase, hydantoinase, and imidase. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure of P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase reveals a classic (β/α)8-barrel structure core embedding the catalytic dimetal center and a β-sandwich domain, which is commonly found in the architecture of dihydropyrimidinases. In contrast to all dihydropyrimidinases, P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase forms a dimer, rather than a tetramer, both in the crystalline state and in the solution. Basing on sequence analysis and structural comparison of the C-terminal region and the dimer-dimer interface between P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase and Thermus sp. dihydropyrimidinase, we propose a working model to explain why this enzyme cannot be a tetramer. PMID:27576201

  9. Wavelength Dependence of Laser-Induced Bulk Damage Morphology in KDP Crystal: Determination of the Damage Formation Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guo-Hang; ZHAO Yuan-An; LI Da-Wei; XIAO Qi-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Wet etch process is applied to expose the bulk damage sites in KDP crystals to the surface for the examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy.The damage sites induced by 1064 nm laser consist of three distinct regions:a core,an outer region of modified material,and some oriented cracks.Laser irradiated with 355 nm results in an increase of damage density,a decrease of core diameter and,rarely,occurrence of the crack.WavelengKey Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser,Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics Chinese Academy of Sciences,Shanghai 201800th dependence of the damage feature suggests that a repulsive force exists among the adjacent plasmas,which prevents further expansion of plasma and decreases the size of plasma. The deposited energy absorbed by the smaller plasma may not be able to generate the crack.

  10. Crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: Insights into the molecular basis of formation of a dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Ching-Ting; Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-23

    Dihydropyrimidinase, a tetrameric metalloenzyme, is a member of the cyclic amidohydrolase family, which also includes allantoinase, dihydroorotase, hydantoinase, and imidase. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure of P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase reveals a classic (β/α)8-barrel structure core embedding the catalytic dimetal center and a β-sandwich domain, which is commonly found in the architecture of dihydropyrimidinases. In contrast to all dihydropyrimidinases, P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase forms a dimer, rather than a tetramer, both in the crystalline state and in the solution. Basing on sequence analysis and structural comparison of the C-terminal region and the dimer-dimer interface between P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase and Thermus sp. dihydropyrimidinase, we propose a working model to explain why this enzyme cannot be a tetramer.

  11. The crystal structure of TrxA(CACA): Insights into the formation of a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster in an Escherichia coli thioredoxin mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collet, Jean-Francois; Peisach, Daniel; Bardwell, James C.A.; Xu, Zhaohui [Michigan

    2010-07-13

    Escherichia coli thioredoxin is a small monomeric protein that reduces disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic proteins. Two cysteine residues present in a conserved CGPC motif are essential for this activity. Recently, we identified mutations of this motif that changed thioredoxin into a homodimer bridged by a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster. When exported to the periplasm, these thioredoxin mutants could restore disulfide bond formation in strains lacking the entire periplasmic oxidative pathway. Essential for the assembly of the iron-sulfur was an additional cysteine that replaced the proline at position three of the CGPC motif. We solved the crystalline structure at 2.3 {angstrom} for one of these variants, TrxA(CACA). The mutant protein crystallized as a dimer in which the iron-sulfur cluster is replaced by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. The catalytic site, which forms the dimer interface, crystallized in two different conformations. In one of them, the replacement of the CGPC motif by CACA has a dramatic effect on the structure and causes the unraveling of an extended {alpha}-helix. In both conformations, the second cysteine residue of the CACA motif is surface-exposed, which contrasts with wildtype thioredoxin where the second cysteine of the CXXC motif is buried. This exposure of a pair of vicinal cysteine residues apparently allows thioredoxin to acquire an iron-sulfur cofactor at its active site, and thus a new activity and mechanism of action.

  12. Atomic force microscopy studies on growth mechanisms and defect formations on {l_brace}110{r_brace} faces of cadmium mercury thiocyanate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, X.N.; Xu, D.; Yuan, D.R.; Sun, D.L.; Lu, M.K.; Zhang, G.H.; Guo, S.Y. [Shandong Univ., Jinan, SD (China). Inst. of Crystal Materials

    2001-07-01

    Growth mechanisms and defect formations on {l_brace}110{r_brace} faces of cadmium mercury thiocyanate crystals grown at 30 C ({sigma} = 0.24) were investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that, under this condition, spiral dislocation controlled mechanism and 2D nucleation mechanism operates simultaneously and equally during growth, which is completely different from the traditional 2D nucleation and dislocation source controlled mechanisms. A number of 2D nucleus are formed at the large step terraces generated by dislocation sources, leading to the unequal growth rates of the elementary steps and thereby ''step bunches'' are caused. Various defects are formed under this growth condition, which is assumed to result from the incongruence between the steps generated by different sources. A new kind of 2D defect, corresponding to one growth layer in height, was observed for the first time. (orig.)

  13. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    KAUST Repository

    Ilg, Andrea

    2014-06-25

    The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B), which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-. trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ilg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B, which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents.

  15. Carotenoid absorption, chylomicron response curves, the influence of β-carotene supplementation on immune function and the measurement of natural killer cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of β-carotene from raw, uncooked vegetables can be very low. Particle size of uncooked foods is particularly important; β-carotene absorption from pureed or finely chopped vegetables is considerably higher than from whole or sliced raw vegetables. Cooking procedures (boiling/steaming) improves the chemical extractability of carotenoids from foods and also appears to improve absorption. Dietary fat stimulates bile flow from the gall bladder which facilitates the emulsification of fat and fat soluble dietary components into lipid micelles within the small intestine. Without micelle formation carotenoids are very poorly absorbed. Several studies have shown that the absence of dietary fat or very low fat diets substantially reduces β-carotene absorption in human volunteers. Carotenoid absorption is thought to be a passive process. The assumption is that carotenoids within lipid micelles come into contact with the intestinal epithelial cell membranes and that transport from micelles to the plasma membrane and cytosol of the cell occur together with the transport of fatty acids. β-carotene appears simultaneously in lymph with newly absorbed fat from a meal and thus it is assumed that they move together across the plasma membrane and within the mucosal cell

  16. Opposing effects of oxidative challenge and carotenoids on antioxidant status and condition-dependent sexual signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomášek, Oldřich; Gabrielová, Barbora; Kačer, Petr; Maršík, Petr; Svobodová, Jana; Syslová, Kamila; Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Several recent hypotheses consider oxidative stress to be a primary constraint ensuring honesty of condition-dependent carotenoid-based signalling. The key testable difference between these hypotheses is the assumed importance of carotenoids for redox homeostasis, with carotenoids being either antioxidant, pro-oxidant or unimportant. We tested the role of carotenoids in redox balance and sexual signalling by exposing adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to oxidative challenge (diquat dibromide) and manipulating carotenoid intake. As the current controversy over the importance of carotenoids as antioxidants could stem from the hydrophilic basis of commonly-used antioxidant assays, we used the novel measure of in vivo lipophilic antioxidant capacity. Oxidative challenge reduced beak pigmentation but elicited an increase in antioxidant capacity suggesting resource reallocation from signalling to redox homeostasis. Carotenoids counteracted the effect of oxidative challenge on lipophilic (but not hydrophilic) antioxidant capacity, thereby supporting carotenoid antioxidant function in vivo. This is inconsistent with hypotheses proposing that signalling honesty is maintained through either ROS-induced carotenoid degradation or the pro-oxidant effect of high levels of carotenoid-cleavage products acting as a physiological handicap. Our data further suggest that assessment of lipophilic antioxidant capacity is necessary to fully understand the role of redox processes in ecology and evolution. PMID:27000655

  17. Utilization of Microemulsions from Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz to Improve Carotenoid Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nai-Hsing; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids have been known to reduce the risk of several diseases including cancer and cardiovascular. However, carotenoids are unstable and susceptible to degradation. Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz (R. nasutus), a Chinese medicinal herb rich in carotenoids, was reported to possess vital biological activities such as anti-cancer. This study intends to isolate carotenoids from R. nasutus by column chromatography, identify and quantify by HPLC-MS, and prepare carotenoid microemulsions for determination of absolute bioavailability in rats. Initially, carotenoid fraction was isolated using 250 mL ethyl acetate poured into an open-column packed with magnesium oxide-diatomaceous earth (1:3, w/w). Fourteen carotenoids including internal standard β-apo-8'-carotenal were resolved within 62 min by a YMC C30 column and gradient mobile phase of methanol-acetonitrile-water (82:14:4, v/v/v) and methylene chloride. Highly stable carotenoid microemulsions were prepared using a mixture of Capryol(TM)90, Transcutol®HP, Tween 80 and deionized water, with the mean particle being 10.4 nm for oral administration and 10.7 nm for intravenous injection. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that the absolute bioavailability of carotenoids in microemulsions and dispersion was 0.45% and 0.11%, respectively, while a much higher value of 6.25% and 1.57% were shown for lutein, demonstrating 4-fold enhancement in bioavailability upon incorporation of R. nasutus carotenoids into a microemulsion system. PMID:27150134

  18. Determination of carotenoids in yellow maize, the effects of saponification and food preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzhingi, Tawanda; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Russell, Robert M; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Qin, Jian; Tang, Guangwen

    2008-05-01

    Maize is an important staple food consumed by millions of people in many countries. Yellow maize naturally contains carotenoids which not only provide provitamin A carotenoids but also xanthophylls, which are known to be important for eye health. This study was aimed at 1) evaluating the effect of saponification during extraction of yellow maize carotenoids, 2) determining the major carotenoids in 36 genotypes of yellow maize by high-performance liquid chromatography with a C30 column, and 3) determining the effect of cooking on the carotenoid content of yellow maize. The major carotenoids in yellow maize were identified as all-trans lutein, cis-isomers of lutein, all-trans zeaxanthin, alpha- and beta-cryptoxanthin, all-trans beta-carotene, 9-cis beta-carotene, and 13-cis beta-carotene. Our results indicated that carotenoid extraction without saponification showed a significantly higher yield than that obtained using saponification. Results of the current study indicate that yellow maize is a good source of provitamin A carotenoids and xanthophylls. Cooking by boiling yellow maize at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes increased the carotenoid concentration, while baking at 450 degrees F for 25 minutes decreased the carotenoid concentrations by almost 70% as compared to the uncooked yellow maize flour.

  19. Accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenogenic genes in peach fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shifeng; Liang, Minhua; Shi, Liyu; Shao, Jiarong; Song, Chunbo; Bian, Kun; Chen, Wei; Yang, Zhenfeng

    2017-01-01

    To understand better the regulatory mechanism of the carotenoid accumulation, the expression profile of relevant carotenoid genes and metabolites were compared between two peach cultivars with different colors during fruit development. Meanwhile, the change pattern of carotenoid content and expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in peaches after harvest in response to blue light were also investigated. As compared to the yellow fleshed-cultivar 'Jinli', lower carotenoid levels were observed in skin and pulp in white peach cultivar 'Hujing', which might be explained by differentially expression of PpCCD4 gene. With respect to 'Jinli', the carotenoid accumulation during fruit development in fruit skin was partially linked with the transcriptional regulation of PpFPPS, PpGGPS, PpLCYB and PpCHYB. However, in the pulp, the accumulation might be also associated with the increased transcriptions of PpPDS, along with the above four genes. Blue light treatment induced carotenoid accumulation in 'Jinli' peaches during storage. In addition, the treated-fruit displayed higher expression of all the eight genes analysed with a lesser extent on PpCCD4, which suggested that the much more increased carotenoid synthesis rate could result in the higher carotenoid content in blue light-treated fruit. The results presented herein contribute to further elucidating the regulatory mechanism of carotenoid accumulation in peach fruit. PMID:27507458

  20. Simulation of stray grain formation at the platform during Ni-base single crystal superalloy DD403 casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-feng Gao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of stray grain formation at the platform of turbine blade simulator and the effect of withdrawal rate (V on the stray grain phenomenon have been investigated using a macro-scale ProCAST coupled with a 3D Cellular Automaton Finite Element (CAFE model. The results indicate that the stray grains nucleate at the edges of platform at V =150 μm·s-1 and 200 μm·s-1. Using ProCAST computer simulation software, it was proven that the stray grain formation is significantly dependent on the undercooling and the temperature field distribution in the platform. The macroscopic curvature of the liquidus isotherm becomes markedly concave with an increase in the withdrawal rate. The probability of stray grain formation at the edges of platform can be increased by increasing the withdrawal rate in the range of 70 μm·s-1 to 200 μm·s-1.

  1. Slow positrons in metal single crystals. I. Positronium formation at Ag(100), Ag(111), and Cu(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1980-07-01

    Monoenergetic positrons, with an incident energy of 0 --5 keV, were focused onto Ag(100), Ag(111), and Cu(111) surfaces with submonolayer contamination, and positronium formation was studied as a function of sample temperature from 300 to 1200 K. The data were fitted with a simple positron diffusion model including surface and vacancy trapping, assuming that positronium is formed only at the surface. The formation of part of the positronium fraction is found to be a temperature-activated process which is identified as detrapping from a surface state, and an estimate of the binding energy in this trap is deduced. The diffusion length is found to be only slightly temperature dependent between room temperature and the onset of vacancy trapping. At the higher sample temperatures positron trapping at thermally generated vacancies is observed by the decrease in the positron diffusion length at the higher incident voltages. A vacancy formation energy is extracted from the data and is generally found to be lower than the values obtained from bulk measurements.

  2. Effects of experimental brood size manipulation and gender on carotenoid levels of Eurasian kestrels Falco tinnunculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Laaksonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals use carotenoid-pigments for coloration, as antioxidants and as enhancers of the immune system. Carotenoid-dependent colours can thus signal individual quality and carotenoids have also been suggested to mediate life-history trade-offs. METHODOLOGY: To examine trade-offs in carotenoid allocation between parents and the young, or between skin coloration and plasma of the parents at different levels of brood demand, we manipulated brood sizes of Eurasian kestrels (Falco tinnunculus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Brood size manipulation had no overall effect on plasma carotenoid levels or skin hue of parents, but female parents had twice the plasma carotenoid levels of males. Males work physically harder than females and they might thus also use more carotenoids against oxidative stress than females. Alternatively, females could be gaining back the carotenoid stores they depleted during egg-laying by eating primarily carotenoid-rich food items during the early nestling stage. Fledglings in enlarged broods had higher plasma carotenoid concentrations than those in reduced broods. This difference was not explained by diet. In light of recent evidence from other species, we suggest it might instead be due to fledglings in enlarged broods having higher testosterone levels, which in turn increased plasma carotenoid levels. The partial cross-foster design of our experiment revealed evidence for origin effects (genetic or maternal on carotenoid levels of fledglings, but no origin-environment interaction. SIGNIFICANCE: These results from wild birds differ from studies in captivity, and thus offer new insights into carotenoid physiology in relation to division of parental care and demands of the brood.

  3. Characterization of carotenoid-protein complexes and gene expression analysis associated with carotenoid sequestration in pigmented cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoid-protein complex separation by size exclusion chromatography, protein fractionation by SDS-PAGE, and shotgun PROTEOMICS technology were used to identify and characterize carotenoid associated proteins (CAPs) of chromoplast-enriched suspensions from cassava intense yellow storage root. A no...

  4. Ozone-induced responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae: metabolic cross-talk between volatile organic compounds and calcium oxalate crystal formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Cardoso-Gustavson

    Full Text Available Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC, specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA, mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC in the defence against ozone (O3 oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3 that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3.

  5. Ozone-induced responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): metabolic cross-talk between volatile organic compounds and calcium oxalate crystal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3. PMID:25165889

  6. Ozone-induced responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): metabolic cross-talk between volatile organic compounds and calcium oxalate crystal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3.

  7. Ozone-Induced Responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): Metabolic Cross-Talk between Volatile Organic Compounds and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3. PMID:25165889

  8. The effect of solar radiation on beta-carotene and other carotenoid content in carrot roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three following cultivars of carrot - Napoli F1, Fantazja, Kazan F1 - were grown in the years 1998-00. The seeds were sown in ridges from the end of April until the beginning of June. Throughout the growth period the total solar radiation was recorded by an automatic system. Every 2 weeks, the leaf area index and the amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were calculated. Correlation was found between solar radiation and beta-carotene as well as other carotenoid content in carrot roots. It was found that beta-carotene content depended mainly on the amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation by single carrot plants, and not by area unit. Differences in beta-carotene content in carrot cultivars were caused by the time of root formation, rate of beta-carotene production, and total absorbed PAR (PARa)

  9. Effects of organic and conventional growth systems on the content of carotenoids in carrot roots, and on intake and plasma status of carotenoids in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Malene; Bysted, Anette; Madsen, K. H.;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for organic food products has increased during the last decades due to their probable health effects, among others. A higher content of secondary metabolites such as carotenoids in organic food products has been claimed, though not documented, to contribute to increased...... health effects of organic foods. The aim was to study the impact of organic and conventional agricultural systems on the content of carotenoids in carrots and human diets. In addition, a human cross-over study was performed, measuring the plasma status of carotenoids in humans consuming diets made from...... crops from these agricultural systems. RESULTS: The content of carotenoids in carrot roots and human diets was not significantly affected by the agricultural production system or year, despite differences in fertilisation strategy and levels. The plasma status of carotenoids increased significantly...

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  11. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  12. Crystal structure of tetrameric form of human lysyl-tRNA synthetase: Implications for multisynthetase complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Min; Ignatov, Michael; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei (OSU); (Scripps)

    2008-09-17

    In mammals, many aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are bound together in a multisynthetase complex (MSC) as a reservoir of procytokines and regulation molecules for functions beyond aminoacylation. The {alpha}{sub 2} homodimeric lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) is tightly bound in the MSC and, under specific conditions, is secreted to trigger a proinflammatory response. Results by others suggest that {alpha}{sub 2} LysRS is tightly bound into the core of the MSC with homodimeric {beta}{sub 2} p38, a scaffolding protein that itself is multifunctional. Not understood is how the two dimeric proteins combine to make a presumptive {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer and, in particular, the location of the surfaces on LysRS that would accommodate the p38 interactions. Here we present a 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of a tetrameric form of human LysRS. The relatively loose (as seen in solution) tetramer interface is assembled from two eukaryote-specific sequences, one in the catalytic- and another in the anticodon-binding domain. This same interface is predicted to provide unique determinants for interaction with p38. The analyses suggest how the core of the MSC is assembled and, more generally, that interactions and functions of synthetases can be built and regulated through dynamic protein-protein interfaces. These interfaces are created from small adaptations to what is otherwise a highly conserved (through evolution) polypeptide sequence.

  13. Resonance Raman measurements of carotenoids using light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D; Eyring, N J; Fralick, J F; Stevenson, D N; Ferguson, S B

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact commercial instrument for measuring carotenoids in skin tissue. The instrument uses two light emitting diodes (LEDs) for dual-wavelength excitation and four photomultiplier tubes for multichannel detection. Bandpass filters are used to select the excitation and detection wavelengths. The f/1.3 optical system has high optical throughput and single photon sensitivity, both of which are crucial in LED-based Raman measurements. We employ a signal processing technique that compensates for detector drift and error. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the LED Raman instrument compares favorably to laser-based Raman spectrometers. This compact, portable instrument is used for non-invasive measurement of carotenoid molecules in human skin with a repeatability better than 10%.

  14. The very early events following photoexcitation of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Yoshizawa, Masayuki; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; De Silvestri, Sandro; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J

    2004-10-01

    The recent availability of laser pulses with 10-20 fs duration, tunable throughout the visible and near infrared wavelengths, has facilitated the investigation, with unprecedented temporal resolution, into the very early events of energy relaxation in carotenoids [Science 298 (2002) 2395; Synth. Metals 139 (2003) 893]. This has enabled us to clearly demonstrate the existence of an additional intermediate state, Sx, lying between the S2 (1(1)Bu+) and S1 (2(1)Ag-) states. In addition, by applying time-resolved stimulated Raman spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution, it has also been shown that vibrational relaxation in electronic excited states plays an important role in these interconversions. In this mini-review, we describe briefly the current understanding of Sx and the other intermediate excited states that can be formed by relaxation from S2, mainly focusing attention on the above two topics. Emphasis is also placed on some of the major remaining unsolved issues in carotenoid photochemistry.

  15. Colorful World of Microbes: Carotenoids and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwaha Kirti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cells accumulate pigments under certain culture conditions, which have very important industrial applications. Microorganisms can serve as sources of carotenoids, the most widespread group of naturally occurring pigments. More than 750 structurally different yellow, orange, and red colored molecules are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes with an estimated market of $ 919 million by 2015. Carotenoids protect cells against photooxidative damage and hence found important applications in environment, food and nutrition, disease control, and as potent antimicrobial agents. In addition to many research advances, this paper reviews concerns with recent evaluations, applications of microbial pigments, and recommendations for future researches with an understanding of evolution and biosynthetic pathways along with other relevant aspects.

  16. Análise de trilha para carotenoides em milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara de Almeida Rios

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ainda que sejam considerados os aspectos de magnitude e significância, o estudo de correlações entre caracteres por si só não garante causa e efeito entre eles. Dessa forma, o objetivo deste trabalho foi desdobrar as correlações fenotípicas em seus efeitos diretos e indiretos, pela análise de trilha, considerando o perfil de carotenoides em genótipos de milho. Foram utilizados dados obtidos do ensaio nacional de cultivares de milho conduzido pela Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, no ano agrícola 2004/2005, com média de 10 genótipos em cinco ambientes. Avaliaram-se os teores de carotenoides totais (CT, α e β-carotenos, luteína, zeaxantina e β-criptoxantina. A xantofila zeaxantina apresenta o maior efeito direto sobre β-caroteno. As altas correlações entre β-caroteno e carotenoides totais e entre β-caroteno e β-criptoxantina são devidas ao efeito indireto, via zeaxantina. A seleção direta de genótipos com altos teores de β-caroteno apresenta-se como a alternativa de maior efetividade, mas se outras frações de carotenoides também forem consideradas, esquemas de seleção simultânea de caracteres, por meio da utilização de índices de seleção, mostram-se mais eficientes na obtenção de genótipos com altos teores de β-caroteno do que a resposta correlacionada.

  17. THE CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY: THINKING IN ALL DIMENSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2013-01-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signalling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavour of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and...

  18. Study of RP HPLC Retention Behaviours in Analysis of Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligor, M; Kováčová, J; Gadzała-Kopciuch, R M; Studzińska, S; Bocian, Sz; Lehotay, J; Buszewski, B

    2014-01-01

    For determination of selected carotenoids, various types of columns for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with different properties have been used. The characteristics of the laboratory-used packing material containing monomeric alkyl-bonded phases (C18, C30) and phenyl as well as phenyl-hexyl stationary phases were studied. The retention data of the examined compounds were used to determine the hydrophobicity and silanol activity of stationary phases applied in the study. The presence of the polar and carboxyl groups in the structure of the bonded ligand strongly influences the polarity of the stationary phase. Columns were compared according to methylene selectivity using a series of benzene homologues. The measurements were done using a methanol-water mobile phase. Knowledge of the properties of the applied stationary phase provided the possibility to predict the RP HPLC retention behaviours in analysis of carotenoids including lutein, lycopene and β-carotene. The composition of the mobile phase, the addition of triethylamine and the type of stationary phase had been taken into account in designing the method of carotenoid identification. Also a monolithic column characterised by low hydrodynamic resistance, high porosity and high permeability was applied. The presented results show that the coverage density of the bonded ligands on silica gel packings and length of the linkage strongly influence the carotenoid retention behaviours. In our study, the highest retention parameters for lutein, lycopene and β-carotene were observed for C30 and C18 stationary phase. This effect corresponds with pore size of column packing greater than 100 Å and carbon content higher than 11 %. PMID:25089049

  19. Identification and Quantification of Major Carotenoids in Some Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar M. El-Qudah

    2009-01-01

    An HPLC study of 6 raw vegetables (Okra, green beans, eggplant zucchini, carrot and tomato) most frequently consumed worldwide was carried out to determine their carotenoid composition. The samples were purchased from supermarket in the city of Boston, USA. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin and lutein were contained in all samples except tomato for neoxanthin, carrot and tomato for violaxanthin and carrot for lutein. β-carotene was contained in all samples while α-carotene was contained only...

  20. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Ermakov, Igor V.; M Sharifzadeh; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with incr...

  1. Comparison of the colony formation and crystal violet cell proliferation assays to determine cellular radiosensitivity in a repair-deficient MCF10A cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersickel, Veerle [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Campus Heymans, De Pintelaan 185 (6B3), 9000 Gent (Belgium); Slabbert, Jacobus [NRF iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerated Based Sciences), PO box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); Thierens, Hubert [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Campus Heymans, De Pintelaan 185 (6B3), 9000 Gent (Belgium); Vral, Anne, E-mail: anne.Vral@UGent.b [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Campus Heymans, De Pintelaan 185 (6B3), 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2011-01-15

    Colony formation as measured by the in vitro clonogenic assay is a very important endpoint to determine cellular radiosensitivity and tumor response to radiotherapy. In the framework of assessing in vitro cellular radiosensitivity, proliferation assays could represent an attractive alternative to the clonogenic assay for cell lines that do not form proper colonies. In the present study, we compared cellular radiosensitivity measurements obtained by the crystal violet (CV) cell proliferation assay and the standard colony formation assay in repair-deficient and-proficient human MCF10A cell lines. Compared to the clonogenic assay, the CV cell proliferation assay yielded higher surviving fractions for the same radiation dose. This is reflected in larger mean inactivation dose values - a parameter that reflects the area under the survival curve. However, as the dose modifying factors obtained by both assays are comparable, the CV cell proliferation assay can be used to compare the in vitro cellular radiosensitivity of cell lines that lack the ability to form well-defined colonies.

  2. Tea aroma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Tang Ho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Besides water, tea is one of the most popular beverages around the world. The chemical ingredients and biological activities of tea have been summarized recently. The current review summarizes tea aroma compounds and their formation in green, black, and oolong tea. The flavor of tea can be divided into two categories: taste (non-volatile compounds and aroma (volatile compounds. All of these aroma molecules are generated from carotenoids, lipids, glycosides, etc. precursors, and also from Maillard reaction. In the current review, we focus on the formation mechanism of main aromas during the tea manufacturing process.

  3. 天然食物链中的类胡萝卜素%Carotenoids in natural food chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨博媛; 惠伯棣

    2013-01-01

    类胡萝卜素是生物体中一类细胞次生代谢产物,是人类膳食中的健康功能因子.在自然界中,人类食物中的类胡萝卜素可以在种生物体内合成,也可以经过多种生物体一起加工而合成.本文在阐述类胡萝卜素在自然界中不同生物体(如藻类、细菌、酵母、真菌、高等植物和低等动物)内组成特点的基础上,根据各生物体在天然食物链上的位置,详细描述了类胡萝卜素的起始合成、中间产物转移和后期加工..在这些过程中,各生物体对类胡萝卜素的选择性吸收和代谢修饰对最终产物的形成具有重要影响.本文最终得出的结论对更好地认识人类膳食中的类胡萝卜素资源具有一定的意义.%Carotenoids are a group of secondary metabolites from the cells and health functional factors. This article reviews Carotenoid composition from different organisms such as alga,higher plants,bacteria,yeasts,fungi and lower animals in Nature. According to the position of each organism in natural food chain,the paper outlined the original biosynthesis ,metabolites transportation and modification of carotenoids. In those processes,the selective absorption and metabolism modification of carotenoids by the organisms had a significant influence on the formation of final products. This article gives a better understanding of carotenoid in our daily diets.

  4. Crystallization from Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  5. Crystal Structure of the Nonerythroid [alpha]-Spectrin Tetramerization Site Reveals Differences between Erythroid and Nonerythroid Spectrin Tetramer Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Shahila; Song, Yuanli; Witek, Marta; Long, Fei; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.; Fung, Leslie W.-M. (UIC)

    2010-06-21

    We have solved the crystal structure of a segment of nonerythroid {alpha}-spectrin ({alpha}II) consisting of the first 147 residues to a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}. We find that the structure of this segment is generally similar to a corresponding segment from erythroid {alpha}-spectrin ({alpha}I) but exhibits unique differences with functional significance. Specific features include the following: (i) an irregular and frayed first helix (Helix C{prime}); (ii) a helical conformation in the junction region connecting Helix C{prime} with the first structural domain (D1); (iii) a long A1B1 loop in D1; and (iv) specific inter-helix hydrogen bonds/salt bridges that stabilize D1. Our findings suggest that the hydrogen bond networks contribute to structural domain stability, and thus rigidity, in {alpha}II, and the lack of such hydrogen bond networks in {alpha}I leads to flexibility in {alpha}I. We have previously shown the junction region connecting Helix C{prime} to D1 to be unstructured in {alpha}I (Park, S., Caffrey, M. S., Johnson, M. E., and Fung, L. W. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21837-21844) and now find it to be helical in {alpha}II, an important difference for {alpha}-spectrin association with {beta}-spectrin in forming tetramers. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation studies of the structure of the tetramerization site, a triple helical bundle of partial domain helices, show that mutations in {alpha}-spectrin will affect Helix C{prime} structural flexibility and/or the junction region conformation and may alter the equilibrium between spectrin dimers and tetramers in cells. Mutations leading to reduced levels of functional tetramers in cells may potentially lead to abnormal neuronal functions.

  6. Tomato waste: Carotenoids content, antioxidant and cell growth activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajčić, Sladjana; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Djilas, Sonja; Mandić, Anamarija; Četojević-Simin, Dragana

    2015-04-01

    The carotenoid content, antioxidant and cell growth activities of tomato waste extracts, obtained from five different tomato genotypes, was investigated. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify the main carotenoids present in tomato waste extracts. The antioxidant activity of tomato waste extracts was tested using spectrophotometric methods, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The highest DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.057 mg/ml) was obtained for Bačka extract. The Knjaz extract showed the best reducing power (IC50 = 2.12 mg/ml). Cell growth effects were determined in HeLa, MCF7 and MRC-5 cell lines by sulforhodamine B test. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in all cell lines at higher concentrations (⩾ 0.125 mg/ml). The carotenoid contents exhibited a strong correlation with antioxidant and anti-proliferation activity. The results obtained indicated that tomato waste should be regarded as potential nutraceutic resource and may be used as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25442547

  7. Biotechnological conversion of spent coffee grounds into polyhydroxyalkanoates and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obruca, Stanislav; Benesova, Pavla; Kucera, Dan; Petrik, Sinisa; Marova, Ivana

    2015-12-25

    Coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages and has been growing steadily in commercial importance. Nowadays, coffee is the second largest traded commodity in the world, after petroleum. Hence, coffee industry is responsible for the generation of large amounts of waste, especially spent coffee grounds (SCG). Various attempts to valorize this waste stream of coffee industry were made. This article summarizes our research and publications aiming at the conversion of SCG into valuable products - polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and carotenoids. At first, oil extracted from SCG (approx. 15 wt% oil in SCG) can be efficiently (YP/S=0.82 g/g) converted into PHA employing Cupriavidus necator H16. Further, the solid residues after oil extraction can be hydrolyzed (by the combination of chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis) yielding fermentable sugars, which can be further used as a substrate for the production of PHAs employing Bacillus megaterium (YP/S=0.04 g/g) or Burkholderia cepacia (YP/S=0.24 g/g). Alternatively, SCG hydrolysate can be used as a substrate for biotechnological production of carotenoids by carotenogenic yeast Sporobolomyces roseus. Solid residues after either oil extraction or hydrolysis can be used as fuel in industrial boilers to generate heat and energy. Therefore, entire biomass of SCG can be used for sustainable production of PHAs and/or carotenoids employing bio-refinery approach. PMID:25721970

  8. Biotechnological conversion of spent coffee grounds into polyhydroxyalkanoates and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obruca, Stanislav; Benesova, Pavla; Kucera, Dan; Petrik, Sinisa; Marova, Ivana

    2015-12-25

    Coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages and has been growing steadily in commercial importance. Nowadays, coffee is the second largest traded commodity in the world, after petroleum. Hence, coffee industry is responsible for the generation of large amounts of waste, especially spent coffee grounds (SCG). Various attempts to valorize this waste stream of coffee industry were made. This article summarizes our research and publications aiming at the conversion of SCG into valuable products - polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and carotenoids. At first, oil extracted from SCG (approx. 15 wt% oil in SCG) can be efficiently (YP/S=0.82 g/g) converted into PHA employing Cupriavidus necator H16. Further, the solid residues after oil extraction can be hydrolyzed (by the combination of chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis) yielding fermentable sugars, which can be further used as a substrate for the production of PHAs employing Bacillus megaterium (YP/S=0.04 g/g) or Burkholderia cepacia (YP/S=0.24 g/g). Alternatively, SCG hydrolysate can be used as a substrate for biotechnological production of carotenoids by carotenogenic yeast Sporobolomyces roseus. Solid residues after either oil extraction or hydrolysis can be used as fuel in industrial boilers to generate heat and energy. Therefore, entire biomass of SCG can be used for sustainable production of PHAs and/or carotenoids employing bio-refinery approach.

  9. The role of carotenoids on the risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Kenneth R

    2003-02-01

    Smoking prevention and cessation remain the primary methods of reducing the incidence of lung cancer. The limited success of efforts towards smoking cessation have led to increasing interest in the role of nutrition in lung cancer prevention. One class of nutrients that has attracted attention as potential chemopreventive agents is the carotenoids, especially beta-carotene, due to their antioxidant properties. In vitro, carotenoids exert antioxidant functions and inhibit carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation, inhibit plasma membrane lipid oxidation, and cause upregulated expression of connexin 43. These in vitro results suggest that carotenoids have intrinsic cancer chemopreventive action in humans. Many cohort and case-control study data have shown an inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer, although several more recent studies have cast doubt on these findings. Different effects of various dietary nutrients on lung cancer risk have been observed. Several prospective intervention trials were undertaken to examine the effect of supplementation on the risk of lung cancer. Some of these studies demonstrated an increased incidence and mortality from lung cancer in those receiving supplementation. Many hypotheses have emerged as to the reasons for these findings.

  10. Analysis on Carotenoids Content and Other Quality Traits of 185 Wheat Varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHOU; Yuanyuan WU; Wenyin ZHENG; Wenming ZHANG; Wenshang GUO; Danian YAO

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide the reference of improving the nutritional quality traits in carotenoids and screening its resources of wheat varieties, 185 wheat varieties or lines were selected as materials to test the carotenoids content, lipoxygenase activ-ity, whiteness, yel owness and some other quality traits of whole mil in wheat.The results showed that there were highly significant variations in lipoxygenase activity , carotenoids content, whiteness and yel owness among those sample of wheat vari-eties; carotenoids content was significantly and positively correlated with yel owness. Cluster analysis was performed based on carotenoids content clustered al the vari-eties or lines into three major groups. Additional y, carotenoids were discussed in the application of nutritional quality improvement in wheat.

  11. Absorption of Carotenoids and Mechanisms Involved in Their Health-Related Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Victoria-Campos, Claudia I; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids participate in the normal metabolism and function of the human body. They are involved in the prevention of several diseases, especially those related to the inflammation syndrome. Their main mechanisms of action are associated to their potent antioxidant activity and capacity to regulate the expression of specific genes and proteins. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid metabolites may explain several processes where the participation of their parent carotenoids was unclear. The health benefits of carotenoids strongly depend on their absorption and transformation during gastrointestinal digestion. The estimation of the 'bioaccessibility' of carotenoids through in vitro models have made possible the evaluation of the effect of a large number of factors on key stages of carotenoid digestion and intestinal absorption. The bioaccessibility of these compounds allows us to have a clear idea of their potential bioavailability, a term that implicitly involves the biological activity of these compounds. PMID:27485232

  12. Influence of orally taken carotenoids on the antioxidative status of the skin, the radical protection function of the skin and the skin lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the bioavailability and the antioxidant effect of orally administered carotenoids on the skin were examined. For this purpose different spectroscopic methods were used. A double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted in 22 subjects over a time period of 20 weeks. The aim of this work was to develop an in vivo method to enable studying the antioxidative and protective effects of naturally occurring antioxidants against radical formation by visible and near infrared (Vi...

  13. Two-Dimensional Skyrmion Lattice Formation in a Nematic Liquid Crystal Consisting of Highly Bent Banana Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sungmin; Lee, Eun-Woo; Li, Tianqi; Liang, Xiaobin; Tokita, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Ken; Watanabe, Junji

    2016-09-12

    We synthesized a novel banana-shaped molecule based on a 1,7-naphthalene central core that exhibits a distinct mesomorphism of the nematic-to-nematic phase transition. Both the X-ray profile and direct imaging of atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations clearly indicates the formation of an anomalous nematic phase possessing a two-dimensional (2D) tetragonal lattice with a large edge (ca. 59 Å) directed perpendicular to the director in the low-temperature nematic phase. One plausible model is proposed by an analogy of skyrmion lattice in which two types of cylinders formed from left- and right-handed twist-bend helices stack into a 2D tetragonal lattice, diminishing the inversion domain wall. PMID:27511324

  14. Theoretical studies of the electrochromic response of carotenoids in photosynthetic membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kakitani, T; Honig, B.; Crofts, A R

    1982-01-01

    Molecular orbital calculations are carried out on a number of carotenoids in the presence of an external charge and a constant electric field. The external charge is used to represent the strong permanent field that is believed to polarize carotenoids in photosynthetic membranes and thus to account for their linear response to the transmembrane potential. Our calculations show that the in vitro leads to in vivo spectral shifts of carotenoids (approximately 25 nm) can be produced by a charge i...

  15. The nature and the content of carotenoid pigments from faded leaves of Aesculus hippocastanum L.

    OpenAIRE

    Gino ROSCA; Sanda CRAPATUREANU; Socaciu, Carmen; Gavrila NEAMTU

    1995-01-01

    Faded leaves of Aesculus hippocastanum L. harvested in October and November have a high and various content of carotenoids. The content of lutein and zeaxanthin is much higher in faded leaves than in the green ones, that is why they are recommended as an important natural source for extraction (at an industrial level) of the mentioned carotenoids. Faded leaves have a low biological value, because they have a low content of provitaminic A carotenoids. They have also a low content of hydrocarbo...

  16. Nematode parasites reduce carotenoid-based signalling in male red grouse

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Padilla, Jesús; Mougeot, François; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Gary R. Bortolotti

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids determine the yellow–red colours of many ornaments, which often function as signals of quality. Carotenoid-based signalling may reliably advertise health and should be particularly sensitive to parasite infections. Nematodes are among the commonest parasites of vertebrates, with well-documented negative effects on their hosts. However, to date, little is known about the effects that these parasites may have on carotenoid-based signalling. Tetraonid birds (grouse) exhibit supra-orb...

  17. Studies on carotenoids and oxidative stability of winter squash seed and soybean oils

    OpenAIRE

    Helmy, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Winter squash seed and soybean oils were extracted with commercial hexane. Carotenoids and other pigments m the oils were studied using spectrophotometric and thin layer chromatographic analysis. Three types of pigments were identified: carotenoids. mainly lutein and β-carotene, chlorophyll and some unidentified pigments. Carotenoids content were 70, 60, 0 ppm in crude, refined and bleached winter squash seed oil, and 80, 65, 0 ppm in crude, refined and bleached soybean oil respectively. ...

  18. Conserved enzymes mediate the early reactions of carotenoid biosynthesis in nonphotosynthetic and photosynthetic prokaryotes.

    OpenAIRE

    G. A. Armstrong; Alberti, M; Hearst, J E

    1990-01-01

    Carotenoids comprise one of the most widespread classes of pigments found in nature. The first reactions of C40 carotenoid biosynthesis proceed through common intermediates in all organisms, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of early enzymes from this pathway. We report here the nucleotide sequence of three genes from the carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster of Erwinia herbicola, a nonphotosynthetic epiphytic bacterium, which encode homologs of the CrtB, CrtE, and CrtI proteins of Rhod...

  19. Investigations of carotenoids in fungi. III. Fructifications of some species from the genus Suillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazyli Czeczuga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Using column and thin-layer chromatography the occurrence of carotenoids and their content was determined in fructifications of 5 species from the genus Suillus. 21 carotenoids were found, among them 3 which had not hitherto been detected in fungi (auroxanthin, 3,4-dihydroxy-α-carotene and myxoxantophyll. Moreover quantitative and qualitative differences were found in the content of carotenoids in fructifications of Boletus luteus which may be of importance in their taxonomy.

  20. Absorption of Vitamin A and Carotenoids by the Enterocyte: Focus on Transport Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Reboul

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in most developing countries, especially in children and pregnant women. It is thus a priority in health policy to improve preformed vitamin A and/or provitamin A carotenoid status in these individuals. A more accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intestinal vitamin A absorption is a key step in this direction. It was long thought that β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet), and thus all carotenoids, were abs...

  1. Potential Role of Carotenoids as Antioxidants in Human Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Fiedor; Květoslava Burda

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids constitute a ubiquitous group of isoprenoid pigments. They are very efficient physical quenchers of singlet oxygen and scavengers of other reactive oxygen species. Carotenoids can also act as chemical quenchers undergoing irreversible oxygenation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these reactions are still not fully understood, especially in the context of the anti- and pro-oxidant activity of carotenoids, which, although not synthesized by humans and animals, are also present i...

  2. Serum Carotenoids Reduce Progression of Early Atherosclerosis in the Carotid Artery Wall among Eastern Finnish Men

    OpenAIRE

    Jouni Karppi; Sudhir Kurl; Kimmo Ronkainen; Jussi Kauhanen; Laukkanen, Jari A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between conce...

  3. Plasma carotenoid levels in passerines are related to infection by (some parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi eFiguerola

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plumage coloration plays an important role in intra and inter-sexual competition in birds. Many of the yellow, orange or red colours present in birds are carotenoid dependent. Carotenoids can not be synthetized de novo by birds and consequently should be obtained through their diet, and access to carotenoids may differ between individuals and species. In addition to ornamentation, carotenoids are important for bird physiology and it has been proposed that a trade-off in their allocation to these two functions occurs. Under this scenario parasites may play a central role in maintaining the honesty of plumage as a signaling system by increasing the demands for carotenoids for infection or damage control and/or by reducing carotenoid absorption in the intestines. We analyzed the relationship between (1 carotenoid concentrations in plasma and (2 blood and intestinal parasite richness and abundance in 22 species of passerines sampled in spring. Loads of different groups of parasites were unrelated so conclusions drawn from examining a particular group of parasites cannot be extrapolated to the whole community of pathogens and parasites inhabiting a host. At intraspecific level plasma carotenoid concentration was negatively related to the richness of intestinal parasites and the abundance of some groups of intestinal parasites, at interspecific level plasma carotenoid concentration was negatively related with the abundance of intestinal parasites. No relationship at intra- nor interpecific level was found between carotenoids and blood parasites. The results suggest that intestinal parasites play an important role in the evolution and maintenance of carotenoid-derived sexually selected ornamentations probably through a negative impact on the uptake of carotenoids at the gut.

  4. Specific carotenoid pigments in the diet and a bit of oxidative stress in the recipe for producing red carotenoid-based signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de Blas, Esther; Mateo, Rafael; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Colorful ornaments have been the focus of sexual selection studies since the work of Darwin. Yellow to red coloration is often produced by carotenoid pigments. Different hypotheses have been formulated to explain the evolution of these traits as signals of individual quality. Many of these hypotheses involve the existence of a signal production cost. The carotenoids necessary for signaling can only be obtained from food. In this line, carotenoid-based signals could reveal an individual's capacity to find sufficient dietary pigments. However, the ingested carotenoids are often yellow and became transformed by the organism to produce pigments of more intense color (red ketocarotenoids). Biotransformation should involve oxidation reactions, although the exact mechanism is poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that carotenoid biotransformation could be costly because a certain level of oxidative stress is required to correctly perform the conversion. The carotenoid-based signals could thus reveal the efficiency of the owner in successfully managing this challenge. In a bird with ketocarotenoid-based ornaments (the red-legged partridge; Alectoris rufa), the availability of different carotenoids in the diet (i.e. astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein) and oxidative stress were manipulated. The carotenoid composition was analyzed and quantified in the ornaments, blood, liver and fat. A number of oxidative stress biomarkers were also measured in the same tissues. First, we found that color and pigment levels in the ornaments depended on food levels of those carotenoids used as substrates in biotransformation. Second, we found that birds exposed to mild levels of a free radical generator (diquat) developed redder bills and deposited higher amounts of ketocarotenoids (astaxanthin) in ornaments. Moreover, the same diquat-exposed birds also showed a weaker resistance to hemolysis when their erythrocytes were exposed to free radicals, with females also enduring higher oxidative

  5. Evaluation of antigenotoxic effects of carotenoids from green algae Chlorococcum humicola using human lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bhagavathy S; Sumathi P

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To identify the available phytochemicals and carotenoids in the selected green algae and evaluate the potential genotoxic/antigenotoxic effect using lymphocytes. Methods:Organic solvent extracts of Chlorococcum humicola (C. humicola) were used for the phytochemical analysis. The available carotenoids were assessed by HPLC, and LC-MS analysis. The genotoxicity was induced by the benzo(a)pyrene in the lymphocyte culture, the genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of algal carotenoids with and without genotoxic inducer were evaluated by chromosomal aberration (CA), sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus assay (MN). Results: The results of the analysis showed that the algae were rich in carotenoids and fatty acids. In the total carotenoids lutein,β-carotene and α-carotene were found to be present in higher concentration. The frequency of CA and SCE increased by benzo(a)pyrene were significantly decreased by the carotenoids (P<0.05 for CA, P<0.001 for SCE). The MN frequencies of the cells were significantly decreased by the treatment with carotenoids when compared with the positive controls (P<0.05). Conclusions:The findings of the present study demonstrate that, the green algae C. humicola is a rich source of bioactive compounds especially carotenoids which effectively fight against environmental genotoxic agents, the carotenoids itself is not a genotoxic substance and should be further considered for its beneficial effects.

  6. The nature and the content of carotenoid pigments from faded leaves of Aesculus hippocastanum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino ROSCA

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Faded leaves of Aesculus hippocastanum L. harvested in October and November have a high and various content of carotenoids. The content of lutein and zeaxanthin is much higher in faded leaves than in the green ones, that is why they are recommended as an important natural source for extraction (at an industrial level of the mentioned carotenoids. Faded leaves have a low biological value, because they have a low content of provitaminic A carotenoids. They have also a low content of hydrocarbon carotenoids, but a high hydroxylic and epoxydic content.

  7. Resonant Raman detectors for noninvasive assessment of carotenoid antioxidants in human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia R.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Bernstein, P. S.

    2003-07-01

    Carotenoid antioxidants form an important part of the human body's anti-oxidant system and are thought to play an important role in disease prevention. Studies have shown an inverse correlation between high dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of certain cancers, heart disease and degenerative diseases. For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are present in high concentrations in the human retina, are thought to prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the Western world. We have developed various clinical prototype instruments, based on resonance Raman spectroscopy, that are able to measure carotenoid levels directly in the tissue of interest. At present we use the Raman technology to quantify carotenoid levels in the human retina, in skin, and in the oral cavity. We use resonant excitation of the π-conjugated molecules in the visible wavelength range and detect the molecules' carbon-carbon stretch frequencies. The spectral properties of the various carotenoids can be explored to selectively measure in some cases individual carotenoid species linked ot the prevention of cancer, in human skin. The instrumentation involves home-built, compact, high-throughput Raman systems capable of measuring physiological carotenoid concentrations in human subjects rapidly and quantitatively. The instruments have been demonstrated for field use and screening of tissue carotenoid status in large populations. In Epidemiology, the technology holds promise as a novel, noninvasive and objective biomarker of fruit and vegetable uptake.

  8. Distribution of retinal cone photoreceptor oil droplets, and identification of associated carotenoids in crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Lutfur; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Maeda, Isamu; Tanaka, Hideuki; Sugita, Shoei

    2010-06-01

    The topography of cone oil droplets and their carotenoids were investigated in the retina of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). Fresh retina was sampled for the study of retinal cone oil droplets, and extracted retinal carotenoids were saponified using methods adapted from a recent study, then identified with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To assess the effects of saponification conditions on carotenoid recovery from crow retina, we varied base concentration and total time of saponification across a wide range of conditions, and again used HPLC to compare carotenoid concentrations. Based on colors, at least four types of oil droplets were recognized, i.e., red, orange, green, and translucent, across the retina. With an average of 91,202 /mm(2), density gradually declines in an eccentric manner from optic disc. In retina, the density and size of droplets are inversely related. In the peripheral zone, oil droplets were significantly larger than those of the central area. The proportion of orange oil droplets (33%) was higher in the central area, whereas green was predominant in other areas. Three types of carotenoid (astaxanthin, galloxanthin and lutein), together with one unknown carotenoid, were recovered from the crow retina; astaxanthin was the dominant carotenoid among them. The recovery of carotenoids was affected by saponification conditions. Astaxanthin was well recovered in weak alkali (0.06 M KOH), in contrast, xanthophyllic carotenoids were best recovered in strong alkali (0.6 M KOH) after 12 h of saponification at freeze temperature.

  9. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se H; Kim, Moon S; Lee, Bun Y; Lee, Pyung C

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-α-tocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid 4,4'-diapotorulene on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results demonstrate that a series of structurally novel carotenoids possessing biologically beneficial properties can be synthesized in E. coli. PMID:26902326

  10. Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy reveals a carotenoid dark state in purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Mulvaney, Rachel M; Cogdell, Richard J; Scholes, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Although the energy transfer processes in natural light-harvesting systems have been intensively studied for the past 60 years, certain details of the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. We performed broadband two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy measurements on light-harvesting proteins from purple bacteria and isolated carotenoids in order to characterize in more detail the excited-state manifold of carotenoids, which channel energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules. The data revealed a well-resolved signal consistent with a previously postulated carotenoid dark state, the presence of which was confirmed by global kinetic analysis. The results point to this state's role in mediating energy flow from carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll.

  11. Biochemistry and molecular biology of carotenoid biosynthesis in chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, María del Rocío; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits' yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:24065101

  12. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Gómez-García

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  13. Enhancement of carotenoid biosynthesis in transplastomic tomatoes by induced lycopene-to-provitamin A conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Wiebke; Bock, Ralph

    2009-09-01

    Carotenoids are essential pigments of the photosynthetic apparatus and an indispensable component of the human diet. In addition to being potent antioxidants, they also provide the vitamin A precursor beta-carotene. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits, carotenoids accumulate in specialized plastids, the chromoplasts. How the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated and what limits total carotenoid accumulation in fruit chromoplasts is not well understood. Here, we have introduced the lycopene beta-cyclase genes from the eubacterium Erwinia herbicola and the higher plant daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) into the tomato plastid genome. While expression of the bacterial enzyme did not strongly alter carotenoid composition, expression of the plant enzyme efficiently converted lycopene, the major storage carotenoid of the tomato fruit, into provitamin A (beta-carotene). In green leaves of the transplastomic tomato plants, more lycopene was channeled into the beta-branch of carotenoid biosynthesis, resulting in increased accumulation of xanthophyll cycle pigments and correspondingly reduced accumulation of the alpha-branch xanthophyll lutein. In fruits, most of the lycopene was converted into beta-carotene with provitamin A levels reaching 1 mg per g dry weight. Unexpectedly, transplastomic tomatoes also showed a >50% increase in total carotenoid accumulation, indicating that lycopene beta-cyclase expression enhanced the flux through the pathway in chromoplasts. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and demonstrate the potential of plastids genome engineering for the nutritional enhancement of food crops. PMID:19587100

  14. An R2R3-MYB transcription factor regulates carotenoid pigmentation in Mimulus lewisii flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Janelle M; Stanley, Lauren E; LaFountain, Amy M; Frank, Harry A; Liu, Chang; Yuan, Yao-Wu

    2016-02-01

    Carotenoids are yellow, orange, and red pigments that contribute to the beautiful colors and nutritive value of many flowers and fruits. The structural genes in the highly conserved carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been well characterized in multiple plant systems, but little is known about the transcription factors that control the expression of these structural genes. By analyzing a chemically induced mutant of Mimulus lewisii through bulk segregant analysis and transgenic experiments, we have identified an R2R3-MYB, Reduced Carotenoid Pigmentation 1 (RCP1), as the first transcription factor that positively regulates carotenoid biosynthesis during flower development. Loss-of-function mutations in RCP1 lead to down-regulation of all carotenoid biosynthetic genes and reduced carotenoid content in M. lewisii flowers, a phenotype recapitulated by RNA interference in the wild-type background. Overexpression of this gene in the rcp1 mutant background restores carotenoid production and, unexpectedly, results in simultaneous decrease of anthocyanin production in some transgenic lines by down-regulating the expression of an activator of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Identification of transcriptional regulators of carotenoid biosynthesis provides the 'toolbox' genes for understanding the molecular basis of flower color diversification in nature and for potential enhancement of carotenoid production in crop plants via genetic engineering. PMID:26377817

  15. Carotenoids production: microorganisms as source of natural dyes Produção de carotenoides: microrganismos como fonte de pigmentos naturais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Valduga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are natural dyes synthesized by plants, algae and microorganisms. Application in many sectors can be found, as food dyeing and supplementation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and animal feed. Recent investigations have shown their ability to reduce the risks for many degenerative diseases like cancer, heart diseases, cataract and macular degeneration. An advantage of microbial carotenoids is the fact that the cultivation in controlled conditions is not dependent of climate, season or soil composition. In this review the advances in bio-production of carotenoids are presented, discussing the main factors that influence the microbial production of these dyes in different systems.

  16. Composição de carotenoides em canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth Baehni Carotenoids composition of canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth Baehni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia da Silveira Agostini Costa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O canistel (P. campechiana é uma fruta nativa da América Central e México, ainda pouco conhecida no Brasil. Apresenta uma polpa amarelo-alaranjada, rica em carotenoides, que tem despertado interesse como potencial de vitamina A. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o teor de carotenoides e o valor provitamina A na polpa de canistel, assim como os teores de umidade e lipídeos na polpa e na semente. Os carotenoides foram separados por cromatografia em coluna aberta. O conteúdo de carotenoides totais foi de 226 ± 4 μg/g. Violaxantina e neoxantina foram os carotenóides predominantes, somando 196 ± 5 μg/g. seguidos por zetacaroteno, betacaroteno 5,6-epóxido, betacaroteno e fitoflueno. A semente foi a parte do fruto que apresentou maior teor de lipídeos totais, com 4,6 ± 0,2 %, e a polpa, 0,61 ± 0,03 %. Os resultados indicam que o canistel apresenta teores de carotenóides totais muito elevados e pode ser considerado uma boa fonte de provitamina A (59 ± 6 RAE/100g, se comparado com outras frutas normalmente consumidas. No entanto, os principais carotenoides encontrados em sua polpa são destituídos de atividade provitamina A.Canistel (Pouteria campechiana is a native fruit from Central America and Mexico. This fruit still not known in Brazil, presents an orange-yellow pulp rich in carotenoids, which has attracted interest as a potential source of vitamin A. The purpose of this study was to determine the carotenoids content and pro-vitamin A values in the pulp of canistel, as well as the percentage of moisture and lipids in the pulp and seeds. Carotenoids were separated by open column chromatography. The content of total carotenoids was 226 ± 4 μg/g. Violaxantin and neoxantin were the predominant carotenoids with 196 ± 5 μg/g followed by zeta-carotene, beta-carotene 5,6-epoxide, beta-carotene and phytofluene. The seeds presented higher levels of total lipids with 4.6 ± 0.2 %, while pulp had 0.61 ± 0.03 % of total lipid. These

  17. Novel carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase catalyzes the first dedicated step in saffron crocin biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Frusciante, Sarah

    2014-08-05

    Crocus sativus stigmas are the source of the saffron spice and accumulate the apocarotenoids crocetin, crocins, picrocrocin, and safranal, responsible for its color, taste, and aroma. Through deep transcriptome sequencing, we identified a novel dioxygenase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 (CCD2), expressed early during stigma development and closely related to, but distinct from, the CCD1 dioxygenase family. CCD2 is the only identified member of a novel CCD clade, presents the structural features of a bona fide CCD, and is able to cleave zeaxanthin, the presumed precursor of saffron apocarotenoids, both in Escherichia coli and in maize endosperm. The cleavage products, identified through high-resolution mass spectrometry and comigration with authentic standards, are crocetin dialdehyde and crocetin, respectively. In vitro assays show that CCD2 cleaves sequentially the 7,8 and 7′,8′ double bonds adjacent to a 3-OH-β-ionone ring and that the conversion of zeaxanthin to crocetin dialdehyde proceeds via the C30 intermediate 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal. In contrast, zeaxanthin cleavage dioxygenase (ZCD), an enzyme previously claimed to mediate crocetin formation, did not cleave zeaxanthin or 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal in the test systems used. Sequence comparison and structure prediction suggest that ZCD is an N-truncated CCD4 form, lacking one blade of the β-propeller structure conserved in all CCDs. These results constitute strong evidence that CCD2 catalyzes the first dedicated step in crocin biosynthesis. Similar to CCD1, CCD2 has a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that it may cleave carotenoids localized in the chromoplast outer envelope.

  18. Phylogenetic and evolutionary patterns in microbial carotenoid biosynthesis are revealed by comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L Klassen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carotenoids are multifunctional, taxonomically widespread and biotechnologically important pigments. Their biosynthesis serves as a model system for understanding the evolution of secondary metabolism. Microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution has hitherto been analyzed primarily from structural and biosynthetic perspectives, with the few phylogenetic analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins using either used limited datasets or lacking methodological rigor. Given the recent accumulation of microbial genome sequences, a reappraisal of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic diversity and evolution from the perspective of comparative genomics is warranted to validate and complement models of microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution based upon structural and biosynthetic data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative genomics were used to identify and analyze in silico microbial carotenoid biosynthetic pathways. Four major phylogenetic lineages of carotenoid biosynthesis are suggested composed of: (i Proteobacteria; (ii Firmicutes; (iii Chlorobi, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes; and (iv Archaea, Bacteroidetes and two separate sub-lineages of Actinobacteria. Using this phylogenetic framework, specific evolutionary mechanisms are proposed for carotenoid desaturase CrtI-family enzymes and carotenoid cyclases. Several phylogenetic lineage-specific evolutionary mechanisms are also suggested, including: (i horizontal gene transfer; (ii gene acquisition followed by differential gene loss; (iii co-evolution with other biochemical structures such as proteorhodopsins; and (iv positive selection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Comparative genomics analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins indicate a much greater taxonomic diversity then that identified based on structural and biosynthetic data, and divides microbial carotenoid biosynthesis into several, well-supported phylogenetic lineages not evident

  19. Age-Related Relationships between Innate Immunity and Plasma Carotenoids in an Obligate Avian Scavenger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel López-Rull

    Full Text Available Variation in immunity is influenced by allocation trade-offs that are expected to change between age-classes as a result of the different environmental and physiological conditions that individuals encounter over their lifetime. One such trade-off occurs with carotenoids, which must be acquired with food and are involved in a variety of physiological functions. Nonetheless, relationships between immunity and carotenoids in species where these micronutrients are scarce due to diet are poorly studied. Among birds, vultures show the lowest concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a diet based on carrion. Here, we investigated variations in the relationships between innate immunity (hemagglutination by natural antibodies and hemolysis by complement proteins, pathogen infection and plasma carotenoids in nestling and adult griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus in the wild. Nestlings showed lower hemolysis, higher total carotenoid concentration and higher pathogen infection than adults. Hemolysis was negatively related to carotenoid concentration only in nestlings. A differential carotenoid allocation to immunity due to the incomplete development of the immune system of nestlings compared with adults is suggested linked to, or regardless of, potential differences in parasite infection, which requires experimental testing. We also found that individuals with more severe pathogen infections showed lower hemagglutination than those with a lower intensity infection irrespective of their age and carotenoid level. These results are consistent with the idea that intraspecific relationships between innate immunity and carotenoids may change across ontogeny, even in species lacking carotenoid-based coloration. Thus, even low concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a scavenger diet can be essential to the development and activation of the immune system in growing birds.

  20. Formation of Hematite fine crystals by hydrothermal alteration of synthetic Martian basalt, static and fluid flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.; Isobe, H.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration made by Martian rovers and probes provided enormous information on the composition of the Martian surface materials. Origin and formation processes of the Martian surface materials should be various depending on topography and history of the Martian crust. Especially, iron minerals in the Martian soil should have essential role to characterize surface environment of the "red planet". In the present study, experimental reproduction of the Martian soil was carried out by hydrothermal alteration of the synthetic iron-rich basaltic rock. Experimental conditions for temperature and fluid composition followed Isobe and Yoshizawa (2010). Static alteration experiments are carried out at 100 °C and 150 °C, and mass ratio of the starting material to the pH1.0 sulfuric acid solution is 1:50. Run durations are 1, 2, 4 or 8 weeks. Appropriate mass of dry ice was sealed in the experimental vessels to expel atmospheric oxygen with CO2. For the static experiments, powdered starting materials were charged in PFA vial to keep textures of the run products. For the fluid flow experiments, we constructed closed loop with Teflon tube inclined approximately 45°. One of the vertical tube is charged with crushed synthetic basalt and heated approximately 150°C by aluminum block with ribbon heater. Surlfuric acid solution flows through the tube from bottom to top and cooled at the end of the aluminum block. Cooled solution returns to the bottom of the heated tube through another vertical tube without heating block. In the static condition run products, characteristic iron mineral particles are formed for 100°C and 150°C concordant with Isobe and Yoshizawa (2010). These iron minerals distributed not only inside the starting material powder but also on the surface of the reaction vessel and the PFA vial in the reactive solution. The surface of the reaction vessel shows orange and reddish color on 100°C and 150°C run products, respectively. By SEM observation, dissolution of

  1. KAROTENOID DARI MAKROALGAE DAN MIKROALGAE: POTENSI KESEHATAN APLIKASI DAN BIOTEKNOLOGI [Carotenoids from Macroalgae and Microalgae: Health Potential, Application and Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenawaty Limantara3

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Algae, both micro and macroalgae, is one of the largest producers of carotenoids. The major composition of carotenoid on algae are β-carotene, astaxanthin, luthein, zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, and fucoxanthin which have important roles for human health. Carotenoids were produced by several microalgae species such as Dunaliella sallina, Haemotococcus pluvialis, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Spirulina platensis, Nannnochloropsis oculata, and also from some macroalgae species such as Kappaphycus alvarezii, Sargassum sp, and Caulerpa sp. Carotenoids from algae has been proven as a powerful antioxidant and may prevent some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular, and cancer. Carotenoid also has been applied as a natural dye and dietary supplements. Biotechnology has been developed to increase the production of carotenoids from micro- and macroalgae. The large-scale cultivation of microalgae, either in open or closed system are shown to increase carotenoid production. During cultivation, some stress conditions can be specifically manipulated to optimize carotenoid production from microalgae.

  2. Relative crystal stability of Al{sub x}FeNiCrCo high entropy alloys from XRD analysis and formation energy calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasiewicz, K.; Cieslak, J.; Kaprzyk, S.; Tobola, J., E-mail: tobola@ftj.agh.edu.pl

    2015-11-05

    Electronic structure of Al{sub x}FeNiCrCo (x ≤ 3) high-entropy alloys (HEAs) was calculated using the Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA). Total energy minimization was performed for bcc and fcc structures in each alloy composition. The phase stability was investigated from the total energy analysis, which finally allowed to determine the bcc–fcc phase transition for aluminium concentration close to 13 at%. It inspired us to synthesize Al{sub x}FeNiCrCo (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5) using two procedures based on arc melting and sintering to allow for observation of entropy effect on phase formation. The XRD measurements evidently proved an occurence of fcc or bcc structure and their coexistence, depending on Al concentration and temperature. This finding remains in good agreement with theoretical results from free energy analysis, when accounting for KKR-CPA total energy as well as entropy terms. Furthermore, the structure preference, from fcc to bcc HEAs, with increasing Al content was discussed in view of total and atomic-dependent density of states computed in non-magnetic and paramagnetic-like states. - Highlights: • Crystal stability and electronic properties of high entropy alloys from KKR-CPA. • Influence of configuration entropy on phase preference (or coexistence). • Effect of configuration entropy on phase stability: arc melting viz. sintering. • Ab initio calculations (accounting for disorder) of phase preference in HEA.

  3. Effect of mixing, concentration and temperature on the formation of mesostructured solutions and their role in the nucleation of DL-valine crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawor-Baczynska, Anna; Moore, Barry D; Sefcik, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We report investigations on the formation of mesostructured solutions in DL-valine-water-2-propanol mixtures, and the crystallization of DL-valine from these solutions. Mesostructured liquid phases, similar to those previously observed in aqueous solutions of glycine and DL-alanine, were observed using Dynamic Light Scattering and Brownian microscopy, in both undersaturated and supersaturated solutions below a certain transition temperature. Careful experimentation was used to demonstrate that the optically clear mesostructured liquid phase, comprising colloidal mesoscale clusters dispersed within bulk solution, is thermodynamically stable and present in equilibrium with the solid phase at saturation conditions. Solutions prepared by slow cooling contained mesoscale clusters with a narrow size distribution and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of around 200 nm. Solutions of identical composition prepared by rapid isothermal mixing of valine aqueous solutions with 2-propanol contained mesoscale clusters which were significantly larger than those observed in slowly cooled solutions. The presence of larger mesoscale clusters was found to correspond to faster nucleation. Observed induction times were strongly dependent on the rapid initial mixing step, although solutions were left undisturbed afterwards and the induction times observed were up to two orders of magnitude longer than the initial mixing period. We propose that mesoscale clusters above a certain critical size are likely to be the location of productive nucleation events.

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, formation mechanism and electrochemical property of V{sub 3}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O single-crystal nanobelts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yifu [Engineering Research Center of Organosilicon Compound and Material, Ministry of Education of China, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Luojiashan, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu Xinghai, E-mail: liuxh@whu.edu.cn [School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Xie Guangyong [Key Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials Science of the State Ethnic Affairs Commission and Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yu Lei; Yi Shengping; Hu Mingjie [Engineering Research Center of Organosilicon Compound and Material, Ministry of Education of China, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Luojiashan, Wuhan 430072 (China); Huang Chi, E-mail: chihuang@whu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Organosilicon Compound and Material, Ministry of Education of China, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Luojiashan, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2010-11-25

    Single-crystal V{sub 3}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O nanobelts have been successfully synthesized in a large-scale by ethanol reducing of the commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5} powder via a facile hydrothermal approach, without any templates and surfactants. The as-prepared V{sub 3}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O nanobelts are up to several tens of micrometers in length, about 100 nm in width and about 20 nm in thickness in average, respectively. The 'Hydrating-Reducing-Exfoliating-Splitting' (HRES) mechanism was proposed to describe the formation of the V{sub 3}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O nanobelts. In our research progress, it was found that the ratio of EtOH/H{sub 2}O, the reaction time and categories of the reducing agents had significant effects on the morphology and composition of as-obtained products. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of V{sub 3}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O nanobelts were preformed and the results revealed that a lithium battery using those nanobelts as the positive electrode exhibited a high initial discharge capacity of 373 mAh/g.

  5. Large-scale high-quality 2D silica crystals: dip-drawing formation and decoration with gold nanorods and nanospheres for SERS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-quality colloidal crystals (CCs) are important for use in photonic research and as templates for large-scale plasmonic SERS substrates. We investigated how variations in temperature, colloid concentration, and dip-drawing parameters (rate, incubation time, etc) affect the structure of 2D CCs formed by highly monodisperse silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) synthesized in an l-arginine solution and regrown by a modified Stöber method. The best quality 2D CCs were obtained with aqueous 12 wt% colloids at a temperature of 25 °C, an incubation time of 1 min, and a drawing rate of 50 mm min−1. Assembling of gold nanorods (GNRs) on 2D CCs resulted in the formation of ring-like chains with a preferential tail-to-tail orientation along the hexagonal boundaries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such nanostructures have been prepared. Owing to the preferential tail-to-tail packing of GNRs, 2D SiNP CC + GNR substrates demonstrated an analytical SERS enhancement of about 8000, which was 10 to 15 times higher than that for self-assembled GNRs on a silicon wafer. In addition, the analytical SERS enhancement was almost 60 times lower after replacing the nanorods in 2D SiNP CC + GNR substrates with 25 nm gold nanospheres. (paper)

  6. Relationship between Carotenoids, Retinol, and Estradiol Levels in Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maggio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In vitro evidence suggests anti-estrogenic properties for retinol and carotenoids, supporting a chemo-preventive role of these phytochemicals in estrogen-dependent cancers. During aging there are significant reductions in retinol and carotenoid concentrations, whereas estradiol levels decline during menopause and progressively increase from the age of 65. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis of a potential relationship between circulating levels of retinol, carotenoids, and estradiol (E2 in a cohort of late post-menopausal women. Methods. We examined 512 women ≥ 65 years from the InCHIANTI study. Retinol, α-caroten, β-caroten, β-criptoxantin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene levels were assayed at enrollment (1998–2000 by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Estradiol and testosterone (T levels were assessed by Radioimmunometry (RIA and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio (T/E2, as a proxy of aromatase activity, was also calculated. General linear models adjusted for age (Model 1 and further adjusted for other confounders including Body Mass Index (BMI BMI, smoking, intake of energy, lipids, and vitamin A; C-Reactive Protein, insulin, total cholesterol, liver function, and testosterone (Model 2 were used to investigate the relationship between retinol, carotenoids, and E2 levels. To address the independent relationship between carotenoids and E2 levels, factors significantly associated with E2 in Model 2 were also included in a fully adjusted Model 3. Results. After adjustment for age, α-carotene (β ± SE = −0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.02 and β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.0007 were significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels. α-Carotene was also significantly and positively associated with T/E2 ratio (β ± SE = 0.07 ± 0.03, p = 0.01. After adjustment for other confounders (Model 2, the inverse relationship between α-carotene (β ± SE = −1.59 ± 0.61, p = 0.01, β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.29

  7. L10 ordered phase formation in FePt, FePd, CoPt, and CoPd alloy thin films epitaxially grown on MgO(001) single-crystal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Ouchi, Shouhei; Kirino, Fumiyoshi; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2012-04-01

    The FePt, FePd, CoPt, and CoPd epitaxial thin films are prepared on MgO(001) single-crystal substrates by ultrahigh vacuum RF magnetron sputtering. The effects of the magnetic material and the substrate temperature on the film growth, the film structure, and the magnetic properties are investigated. The L10 ordered phase formation is observed for FePt, FePd, and CoPt films prepared at temperatures higher than 200, 400, and 600 °C, respectively, whereas that is not recognized for CoPd films. The L10-FePd(001) single-crystal films with the c-axis normal to the substrate surface are formed, whereas the FePt and CoPt epitaxial films include L10(100) crystals whose c-axis is parallel to the substrate surface, in addition to the L10(001) crystals. Upon increasing the substrate temperature, the ordering degree increases. A higher ordering parameter is observed in the order of FePd > FePt > CoPt. The magnetic properties are influenced by the crystal structure, the crystallographic orientation of the L10 crystal, and the ordering degree.

  8. Orange carotenoid protein burrows into the phycobilisome to provide photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dvir; Tal, Ofir; Jallet, Denis; Wilson, Adjélé; Kirilovsky, Diana; Adir, Noam

    2016-03-22

    In cyanobacteria, photoprotection from overexcitation of photochemical centers can be obtained by excitation energy dissipation at the level of the phycobilisome (PBS), the cyanobacterial antenna, induced by the orange carotenoid protein (OCP). A single photoactivated OCP bound to the core of the PBS affords almost total energy dissipation. The precise mechanism of OCP energy dissipation is yet to be fully determined, and one question is how the carotenoid can approach any core phycocyanobilin chromophore at a distance that can promote efficient energy quenching. We have performed intersubunit cross-linking using glutaraldehyde of the OCP and PBS followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) to identify cross-linked residues. The only residues of the OCP that cross-link with the PBS are situated in the linker region, between the N- and C-terminal domains and a single C-terminal residue. These links have enabled us to construct a model of the site of OCP binding that differs from previous models. We suggest that the N-terminal domain of the OCP burrows tightly into the PBS while leaving the OCP C-terminal domain on the exterior of the complex. Further analysis shows that the position of the small core linker protein ApcC is shifted within the cylinder cavity, serving to stabilize the interaction between the OCP and the PBS. This is confirmed by a ΔApcC mutant. Penetration of the N-terminal domain can bring the OCP carotenoid to within 5-10 Å of core chromophores; however, alteration of the core structure may be the actual source of energy dissipation. PMID:26957606

  9. Clorofilas y carotenoides: del screening a la bioactividad tisular

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Gálvez, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    La funcionalidad de clorofilas y carotenoides surge a partir de los efectos derivados de su función, su acción y su asociación. Con estos pigmentos fotosintéticos se ha realizado un amplio screening de sus propiedades funcionales en sistemas in vitro y condiciones modelo, destacando su capacidad antioxidante y anti-mutagénica así como la inducción de eventos ligados a la diferenciación y proliferación celular. Como con la mayoría de compuestos funcionales, el establecimiento concreto de la bi...

  10. Analysis of Carotenoid Production by Halorubrum sp. TBZ126; an Extremely Halophilic Archeon from Urmia Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziri, Davood; Hamidi, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Salar; Tarhriz, Vahideh; Maleki Zanjani, Bahram; Nazemyieh, Hossein; Hejazi, Mohammd Amin; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotenoids are of great interest in many scientific disciplines because of their wide distribution, diverse functions and interesting properties. The present report describes a new natural source for carotenoid production. Methods: Halorubrum sp., TBZ126, an extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from Urmia Lack following culture of water sample on marine agar medium and incubation at 30 °C. Then single colonies were cultivated in broth media. After that the cells were collected and carotenoids were extracted with acetone-methanol (7:3 v/v). The identification of carotenoids was performed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) in the presence of antimony pentachloride (SbCl5). The production profile was analyzed using liquid-chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) techniques. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolate were carried out and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: LC-MS analytical results revealed that produced carotenoids are bacterioruberin, lycopene and β-carotene. Bacterioruberin was found to be the predominant produced carotenoid. 16S rRNA analysis showed that TBZ126 has 100% similarity with Halorubrum chaoviator Halo-G*T (AM048786). Conclusion: Halorubrum sp. TBZ126, isolated from Urmia Lake has high capacity in the production of carotenoids. This extremely halophilic archaeon could be considered as a prokaryotic candidate for carotenoid production source for future studies. PMID:24409411

  11. CAROTENOID RETENTION IN MINIMALLY PROCESSED BIOFORTIFIED GREEN CORN STORED UNDER RETAIL MARKETING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Alves Barbosa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Storing processed food products can cause alterations in their chemical compositions. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate carotenoid retention in the kernels of minimally processed normal and vitamin A precursor (proVA-biofortified green corn ears that were packaged in polystyrene trays covered with commercial film or in multilayered polynylon packaging material and were stored. Throughout the storage period, the carotenoids were extracted from the corn kernels using organic solvents and were quantified using HPLC. A completely factorial design including three factors (cultivar, packaging and storage period was applied for analysis. The green kernels of maize cultivars BRS1030 and BRS4104 exhibited similar carotenoid profiles, with zeaxanthin being the main carotenoid. Higher concentrations of the carotenoids lutein, β-cryptoxanthin, and β-carotene, the total carotenoids and the total vitamin A precursor carotenoids were detected in the green kernels of the biofortified BRS4104 maize. The packaging method did not affect carotenoid retention in the kernels of minimally processed green corn ears during the storage period.

  12. Hepatoprotection by carotenoids in isoniazid-rifampicin induced hepatic injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, S V; Pal, R; Vaiphei, K; Ola, R P; Singh, K

    2010-10-01

    This study evaluates the hepatoprotective effect of carotenoids against isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF). Thirty-six adult rats were divided into the following 4 groups: (1) control group treated with normal saline; (2) INH + RIF group treated with 50 mg·(kg body mass)-1·day-1 of INH and RIF each; (3) INH + RIF+ carotenoids group treated with 50 mg·(kg body mass)-1·day-1 of INH and RIF each and 10 mg·(kg body mass)-1·day-1 of carotenoids; and (4) carotenoids group treated with 10 mg·(kg body mass)-1·day-1 of carotenoids for 28 days intragastrically. Oxidative stress and antioxidant levels in liver and blood, liver histology and change in transaminases were measured in all the above-mentioned groups. There was an increase in lipid peroxidation with a reduction in thiols, catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the liver and blood of rats accompanied by an increase in transaminases, bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase. Treatment with carotenoids along with INH + RIF partially reversed lipid peroxidation, thiols, catalase, and SOD in the liver and blood of rats. Elevated levels of the enzymes in serum were also reversed partially by this treatment. The degree of necrosis, portal triaditis, and inflammation were also lowered in the carotenoids group. In conclusion, carotenoids supplementation in INH + RIF treated rats showed partial protection.

  13. Separation of the Carotenoid Bixin from Annatto Seeds Using Thin-Layer and Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James V.; Ramos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment the carotenoid bixin is isolated from annatto ("Bixa orellana") seeds using column chromatography. The experiment has several key advantages over previous pigment separation experiments. First, unlike other experiments significant quantities of the carotenoid (typically 20 to 25 mg) can be isolated from small quantities of plant…

  14. Tomato fruit carotenoid biosynthesis is adjusted to actual ripening progression by a light-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Briardo; D'Andrea, Lucio; Ruiz-Sola, M Aguila; Botterweg, Esther; Pulido, Pablo; Andilla, Jordi; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds that are essential for plants to protect the photosynthetic apparatus against excess light. They also function as health-promoting natural pigments that provide colors to ripe fruit, promoting seed dispersal by animals. Work in Arabidopsis thaliana unveiled that transcription factors of the phytochrome-interacting factor (PIF) family regulate carotenoid gene expression in response to environmental signals (i.e. light and temperature), including those created when sunlight reflects from or passes though nearby vegetation or canopy (referred to as shade). Here we show that PIFs use a virtually identical mechanism to modulate carotenoid biosynthesis during fruit ripening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). However, instead of integrating environmental information, PIF-mediated signaling pathways appear to fulfill a completely new function in the fruit. As tomatoes ripen, they turn from green to red due to chlorophyll breakdown and carotenoid accumulation. When sunlight passes through the flesh of green fruit, a self-shading effect within the tissue maintains high levels of PIFs that directly repress the master gene of the fruit carotenoid pathway, preventing undue production of carotenoids. This effect is attenuated as chlorophyll degrades, causing degradation of PIF proteins and boosting carotenoid biosynthesis as ripening progresses. Thus, shade signaling components may have been co-opted in tomato fruit to provide information on the actual stage of ripening (based on the pigment profile of the fruit at each moment) and thus finely coordinate fruit color change. We show how this mechanism may be manipulated to obtain carotenoid-enriched fruits.

  15. Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-11-19

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

  16. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both si

  17. Optical detection of carotenoid antioxidants in human bone and surrounding tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Ermakova, Maia R; Rosenberg, Thomas D; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-11-01

    Carotenoids are known to play an important role in health and disease state of living human tissue based on their antioxidant and optical filtering functions. In this study, we show that carotenoids exist in human bone and surrounding fatty tissue both in significant and individually variable concentrations. Measurements of biopsied tissue samples with molecule-specific Raman spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography reveal that all carotenoids that are known to exist in human skin are also present in human bone. This includes all carotenes, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. We propose quantitative reflection imaging as a noncontact optical method suitable for the measurement of composite carotenoid levels in bone and surrounding tissue exposed during open surgeries such as total knee arthroplasty, and as a proof of concept, demonstrate carotenoid measurements in biopsied bone samples. This will allow one to establish potential correlations between internal tissue carotenoid levels and levels in skin and to potentially use already existing optical skin carotenoid tests as surrogate marker for bone carotenoid status.

  18. Critical assessment of three high performance liquid chromatography analytical methods for food carotenoid quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, M.G.; Oliveira, L.; Camoes, M.F.G.F.C.; Nunes, B.; Versloot, P.; Hulshof, P.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Three sets of extraction/saponification/HPLC conditions for food carotenoid quantification were technically and economically compared. Samples were analysed for carotenoids a-carotene, ß-carotene, ß-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene, and zeaxanthin. All methods demonstrated good performance in the ana

  19. More than meets the eye: from carotenoid biosynthesis to new insights into apocarotenoid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a class of isoprenoid compounds synthesized almost exclusively in plants and are involved in a myriad of roles including the provision of flower and fruit pigmentation for the attraction of pollinators and seed dispersing organisms. While carotenoids are essential throughout plant de...

  20. Dietary carotenoids and risk of colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männistö, S.; Yaun, S.S.; Hunter, D.J.; Spiegelman, D.; Adami, H.O.; Albanes, D.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Buring, J.E.; Cerhan, J.R.; Colditz, G.A.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Fuchs, C.S.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Harnack, L.; Leitzmann, M.; McCullough, M.L.; Miller, A.B.; Rohan, T.E.; Schatzkin, A.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Zhang, S.M.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids have been hypothesized to protect against epithelial cancers. The authors analyzed the associations between intakes of specific carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin, and lycopene) and risk of colorectal cancer using the primary data

  1. Dietary Carotenoids and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Seven Cohort Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männistö, S.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Albanes, D.; Anderson, K.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Cerhan, J.R.; Colditz, G.; Feskanich, D.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Miller, A.B.; Rohan, T.E.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Hunter, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intervention trials with supplemental β-carotene have observed either no effect or a harmful effect on lung cancer risk. Because food composition databases for specific carotenoids have only become available recently, epidemiological evidence relating usual dietary levels of these carotenoids with l

  2. Photooxidative stress stimulates illegitimate recombination and mutability in carotenoid-less mutants of Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchane, S; Picaud, M; Vernotte, C; Astier, C

    1997-08-01

    Carotenoids are essential to protection against photooxidative damage in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. In a previous study, we reported the disruption of crtD and crtC carotenoid genes in the purple bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus, resulting in mutants that synthesized carotenoid intermediates. Here, carotenoid-less mutants have been constructed by disruption of the crtB gene. To study the biological role of carotenoids in photoprotection, the wild-type and the three carotenoid mutants were grown under different conditions. When exposed to photooxidative stress, only the carotenoid-less strains (crtB-) gave rise with a high frequency to four classes of mutants. In the first class, carotenoid biosynthesis was partially restored. The second class corresponded to photosynthetic-deficient mutants. The third class corresponded to mutants in which the LHI antenna level was decreased. In the fourth class, synthesis of the photosynthetic apparatus was inhibited only in aerobiosis. Molecular analyses indicated that the oxidative stress induced mutations and illegitimate recombination. Illegitimate recombination events produced either functional or non-functional chimeric genes. The R. gelatinosus crtB- strain could be very useful for studies of the SOS response and of illegitimate recombination induced by oxidants in bacteria.

  3. Carotenoids located in human lymphocyte subpopulations and natural killer cells by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppels, G.J.; Garritsen, H.S.P.; Kummer, J.A.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The presence and subcellular location of carotenoids in human lymphocyte sub-populations (CD4+, CD8+, T-cell receptor-γδ+, and CD19+ ) and natural killer cells (CD16+ ) were studied by means of Raman microspectroscopy. In CD4+ lymphocytes a high concentration (10-3M) of carotenoids was found in the

  4. Context-dependent effects of carotenoid supplementation on reproduction in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Briga, Michael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid-dependent sexual coloration is one of the best-studied sexual signals, but how the honesty of such signals is maintained remains uncertain. The main hypotheses focus on acquisition limits and physiological use of carotenoids in immune function and regulating oxidative stress. A hypothesis

  5. Arabidopsis OR proteins are the major post-transcriptional regulators of phytoene synthase in mediating carotenoid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are indispensable natural pigments to plants and humans. Phytoene synthase (PSY), the rate-limiting enzyme in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, and ORANGE (OR), a regulator of chromoplast differentiation and enhancer of carotenoid biosynthesis, represent two key proteins that control caro...

  6. Identification of catalytically important residues of the carotenoid 1,2-hydratases from Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiseni, A.; Otten, L.G.; Arends, I.W.C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoid 1,2-hydratases (CrtC) catalyze the selective addition of water to an isolated carbon–carbon double bond. Although their involvement in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well understood, little is known about the mechanism by which these hydratases transform carotenoids such as lycope

  7. Chronic alcohol intake up-regulates hepatic expressions of carotenoid cleavage enzymes and peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptors in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excessive and chronic alcohol intake leads to a lower hepatic vitamin A status by interfering with vitamin A metabolism.Dietary provitamin A carotenoids can be converted into vitamin A mainly by carotenoid 15,15’-monooxygenase 1 (CMO1) and, to a lesser degree, carotenoid 9910’-monooxygenase 2 (CMO2)...

  8. Genetic manipulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Maresca, Julia A; Yunker, Colleen E;

    2004-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a strict anaerobe and an obligate photoautotroph. On the basis of sequence similarity with known enzymes or sequence motifs, nine open reading frames encoding putative enzymes of carotenoid biosynthesis were identified in the genome sequence of C....... tepidum, and all nine genes were inactivated. Analysis of the carotenoid composition in the resulting mutants allowed the genes encoding the following six enzymes to be identified: phytoene synthase (crtB/CT1386), phytoene desaturase (crtP/CT0807), zeta-carotene desaturase (crtQ/CT1414), gamma......-carotene desaturase (crtU/CT0323), carotenoid 1',2'-hydratase (crtC/CT0301), and carotenoid cis-trans isomerase (crtH/CT0649). Three mutants (CT0180, CT1357, and CT1416 mutants) did not exhibit a discernible phenotype. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in C. tepidum is similar to that in cyanobacteria and plants...

  9. The Quest for Golden Bananas: Investigating Carotenoid Regulation in a Fe'i Group Musa Cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buah, Stephen; Mlalazi, Bulukani; Khanna, Harjeet; Dale, James L; Mortimer, Cara L

    2016-04-27

    The regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in a high-carotenoid-accumulating Fe'i group Musa cultivar, "Asupina", has been examined and compared to that of a low-carotenoid-accumulating cultivar, "Cavendish", to understand the molecular basis underlying carotenogenesis during banana fruit development. Comparisons in the accumulation of carotenoid species, expression of isoprenoid genes, and product sequestration are reported. Key differences between the cultivars include greater carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (CCD4) expression in "Cavendish" and the conversion of amyloplasts to chromoplasts during fruit ripening in "Asupina". Chromoplast development coincided with a reduction in dry matter content and fruit firmness. Chromoplasts were not observed in "Cavendish" fruits. Such information should provide important insights for future developments in the biofortification and breeding of banana.

  10. New and Rare Carotenoids Isolated from Marine Bacteria and Their Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Shindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria have not been examined as extensively as land bacteria. We screened carotenoids from orange or red pigments-producing marine bacteria belonging to rare or novel species. The new acyclic carotenoids with a C30 aglycone, diapolycopenedioc acid xylosylesters A–C and methyl 5-glucosyl-5,6-dihydro-apo-4,4′-lycopenoate, were isolated from the novel Gram-negative bacterium Rubritalea squalenifaciens, which belongs to phylum Verrucomicrobia, as well as the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Planococcus maritimus strain iso-3 belonging to the class Bacilli, phylum Firmicutes, respectively. The rare monocyclic C40 carotenoids, (3R-saproxanthin and (3R,2′S-myxol, were isolated from novel species of Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes. In this review, we report the structures and antioxidant activities of these carotenoids, and consider relationships between bacterial phyla and carotenoid structures.

  11. Inclusions in DKDP crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The shape and the size of inclusions in DKDP crystal have been observed and measured microscopically.Three kinds of inclusions were found and the components of the inclusions were measured. The formation mechanisms were proposed and discussed.``

  12. Assembly of functional photosystem complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids from the spirilloxanthin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shuang C; Mothersole, David J; Dilbeck, Preston; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Pu; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Grayson, Katie J; Jackson, Philip J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Li, Ying; Holten, Dewey; Neil Hunter, C

    2015-02-01

    Carotenoids protect the photosynthetic apparatus against harmful radicals arising from the presence of both light and oxygen. They also act as accessory pigments for harvesting solar energy, and are required for stable assembly of many light-harvesting complexes. In the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides phytoene desaturase (CrtI) catalyses three sequential desaturations of the colourless carotenoid phytoene, extending the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, N, from three to nine and producing the yellow carotenoid neurosporene; subsequent modifications produce the yellow/red carotenoids spheroidene/spheroidenone (N=10/11). Genomic crtI replacements were used to swap the native three-step Rba. sphaeroides CrtI for the four-step Pantoea agglomerans enzyme, which re-routed carotenoid biosynthesis and culminated in the production of 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin under semi-aerobic conditions. The new carotenoid pathway was elucidated using a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Premature termination of this new pathway by inactivating crtC or crtD produced strains with lycopene or rhodopin as major carotenoids. All of the spirilloxanthin series carotenoids are accepted by the assembly pathways for LH2 and RC-LH1-PufX complexes. The efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer for 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin (15 conjugated CC bonds; N=15) in LH2 complexes is low, at 35%. High energy transfer efficiencies were obtained for neurosporene (N=9; 94%), spheroidene (N=10; 96%) and spheroidenone (N=11; 95%), whereas intermediate values were measured for lycopene (N=11; 64%), rhodopin (N=11; 62%) and spirilloxanthin (N=13; 39%). The variety and stability of these novel Rba. sphaeroides antenna complexes make them useful experimental models for investigating the energy transfer dynamics of carotenoids in bacterial photosynthesis.

  13. Carotenoid supplementation positively affects the expression of a non-visual sexual signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain J-M Van Hout

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of pigments which are widely used by animals for the expression of yellow-to-red colour signals, such as bill or plumage colour. Since they also have been shown to promote immunocompetence and to function as antioxidants, many studies have investigated a potential allocation trade-off with respect to carotenoid-based signals within the context of sexual selection. Although an effect of carotenoids on non-visual (e.g. acoustic signals involved in sexual selection has been hypothesized, this has to date not been investigated. First, we examined a potential effect of dietary carotenoid supplementation on overall song rate during the non-breeding season in captive male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris. After only 3-7 days, we found a significant (body-mass independent positive effect of carotenoid availability on overall song rate. Secondly, as a number of studies suggest that carotenoids could affect the modulation of sexual signals by plasma levels of the steroid hormone testosterone (T, we used the same birds to subsequently investigate whether carotenoid availability affects the increase in (nestbox-oriented song rate induced by experimentally elevated plasma T levels. Our results suggest that carotenoids may enhance the positive effect of elevated plasma T levels on nestbox-oriented song rate. Moreover, while non-supplemented starlings responded to T-implantation with an increase in both overall song rate and nestbox-oriented song, carotenoid-supplemented starlings instead shifted song production towards (reproductively relevant nestbox-oriented song, without increasing overall song rate. Given that song rate is an acoustic signal rather than a visual signal, our findings therefore indicate that the role of carotenoids in (sexual signalling need not be dependent on their function as pigments.

  14. Utilization of Microemulsions from Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz to Improve Carotenoid Bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nai-Hsing; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids have been known to reduce the risk of several diseases including cancer and cardiovascular. However, carotenoids are unstable and susceptible to degradation. Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz (R. nasutus), a Chinese medicinal herb rich in carotenoids, was reported to possess vital biological activities such as anti-cancer. This study intends to isolate carotenoids from R. nasutus by column chromatography, identify and quantify by HPLC-MS, and prepare carotenoid microemulsions for determination of absolute bioavailability in rats. Initially, carotenoid fraction was isolated using 250 mL ethyl acetate poured into an open-column packed with magnesium oxide-diatomaceous earth (1:3, w/w). Fourteen carotenoids including internal standard β-apo-8′-carotenal were resolved within 62 min by a YMC C30 column and gradient mobile phase of methanol-acetonitrile-water (82:14:4, v/v/v) and methylene chloride. Highly stable carotenoid microemulsions were prepared using a mixture of CapryolTM90, Transcutol®HP, Tween 80 and deionized water, with the mean particle being 10.4 nm for oral administration and 10.7 nm for intravenous injection. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that the absolute bioavailability of carotenoids in microemulsions and dispersion was 0.45% and 0.11%, respectively, while a much higher value of 6.25% and 1.57% were shown for lutein, demonstrating 4-fold enhancement in bioavailability upon incorporation of R. nasutus carotenoids into a microemulsion system. PMID:27150134

  15. Developing an emulsifier system to improve the bioaccessibility of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Elisabet; Rincón, Francisco; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2008-11-12

    Food emulsion designs, with the aim of delivering lipophilic bioactive compounds, should include an estimate of their bioaccessibility to support the claimed effect. With this goal in mind, in vitro digestion models and experimental design of mixtures were used as analytical tools to measure this parameter and to optimize the formulation of an O/W emulsion, including carotenoids as functional ingredients. Two experimental stages were applied. First, a screening phase was completed to detect the critical factors that exerted a significant effect on the response (bioaccessibility). During this phase, we observed that the response was modified mainly by secondary effects such as synergies and antagonisms of the emulsifying mixture. A group of four emulsifiers was selected at this phase to perform the second experimental stage, the optimization phase. This allowed us to obtain the mixture that produced the maximum carotenoid bioaccessibility. This formulation had emulsifying properties of the liposugars, acyl- and polyacyl-glycerides, as well as the synergistic effect arising from the combination of materials; this maximized the response. The analytical approach applied in this work is of interest for food designers for screening and controlling the bioaccessibility of bioactive compounds in a given matrix and, consequently, selecting the formulation conditions for higher bioaccessibilities. PMID:18937490

  16. Strigolactones, a novel carotenoid-derived plant hormone

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Babili, Salim

    2015-04-29

    Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived plant hormones and signaling molecules. When released into the soil, SLs indicate the presence of a host to symbiotic fungi and root parasitic plants. In planta, they regulate several developmental processes that adapt plant architecture to nutrient availability. Highly branched/tillered mutants in Arabidopsis, pea, and rice have enabled the identification of four SL biosynthetic enzymes: a cis/trans-carotene isomerase, two carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, and a cytochrome P450 (MAX1). In vitro and in vivo enzyme assays and analysis of mutants have shown that the pathway involves a combination of new reactions leading to carlactone, which is converted by a rice MAX1 homolog into an SL parent molecule with a tricyclic lactone moiety. In this review, we focus on SL biosynthesis, describe the hormonal and environmental factors that determine this process, and discuss SL transport and downstream signaling as well as the role of SLs in regulating plant development. ©2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  17. Unusual Formation of Precursors for Crystallization of Ultra-High Performance Polypropylene and Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Fibers by Utilization of Ecologically Friendly Horizontal Isothermal Bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Huseyin

    structural development and the production of ultra-high performance as-spun and drawn polypropylene (PP) filaments were investigated. Two different commercial fiber forming PP polymers were used with the melt flow rate of 4.1 and 36 g/10 min. The results demonstrate surprisingly different precursor morphologies for each type of polymer at their optimum process condition. Interestingly, the all treated fibers demonstrated the similar fiber performance having tenacity of about 7 g/d and modulus of 75 g/d for as-spun fibers. After fiber drawing with DR of 1.49, tenacity greater than 12 g/d and modulus higher than 190 g/d were observed. The mean value for the modulus after the drawing process for the high melt flow rate is about 196 g/d. The theoretical modulus of PP is 35--42 GPa17, 275-330 g/d, which demonstrates the hIB fiber's modulus performance is approaching its theoretical maximum values. A key aspect of the third section of this study was to obtain ultra-high performance poly(ethylene terephthalate) fibers (PET) by utilizing a low molecular weight polymer via hIB method. The resulted fibers showed the efficient polymer chain orientation and the highly crystalline and ordered structures. The highest tenacity of more than 8 and 10 g/d were observed for the as-spun and drawn fibers, respectively, after only 1.28 draw ratios. The significant effect of the temperature of hIB spinning system on the fibrillar structure and the precursor's formation of the as-spun fibers was demonstrated. The melting temperature increased 8.51 °C from 254.05 to 262.56 °C when untreated and treated fibers are compared. The most important contribution of this study is that all these various types of polymer precursors for crystallization with different molecular weights after the baths treatments were highly oriented, yet non-crystallized or just showed the initial stages of crystallization. By a subsequent hot drawing process with the low draw ratio (DR< 1.5), the treated fibers showed a well

  18. The three-level ripples induced by femtosecond laser on a 6H-SiC single crystal and the formation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Tao, Wenjun; Gong, Min; Ye, Junyi; Dai, Ye; Ma, Guohong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a line-scanning irradiation of 6H-SiC single crystal by a femtosecond laser focus was implemented for laser fluence of 2.2 J/cm2 at different scanning velocities from 1000 down to 100 μm/s. The morphology of the obtained ablation lines characterized by a scanning electron microscope shows that there progressively appear three-level ripples with average period of about 222, 600 nm and that between them. Possible formation mechanisms for these three-level ripples were analyzed by numerical simulation employing finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD). Analysis shows that as Obara proposed, the interference of incident wave with the wave scattered by scratches possibly left by fine polishing is the most possible reason for inducing 222 nm-period and 600 nm-period ripples. Main discussions were focused on the orientation characteristics of ripples. Both isolated scratches and crossed scratches with different orientation angles were considered for evaluating their role in field redistribution. The detailed simulations indicate that for scratches oriented 90° with respect to laser polarization generate a pair of strongest ripple-like optical field enhancement compared to scratches with other orientation angles. It is these advantages of 90°-oriented scratch in field enhancement that make the final ripple perpendicular to laser polarization most competitive and finally left on the surface. This complements the physical picture of Obara et al. in terms of their negligence in addressing the orientation characteristics of ripples. Further FDTD simulation of the interaction of incident wave with as-formed 600 nm-period ripples shows that the optical field enhancement located between any two adjacent 600 nm-period ripples is the driving force for splitting 600 nm-period ripples into the third ripples with period between 222 and 600 nm.

  19. 陶瓷单晶(100)基底上外延生长Pt薄膜%Formation of Epitaxial Platinum Films on Ceramics-(100) Single Crystal Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵昆; 黄康权; 张丽

    2004-01-01

    用对靶溅射技术在MgAl2O4 (100) (MAO) 和SrTiO3 (100) (STO)单晶基底上制备Pt薄膜.基底温度为700℃时,Pt薄膜外延生长为(200)取向,Pt/STO 薄膜的电阻率很低,而Pt/MAO 薄膜表现出高电阻特征.此外,Pt (50nm)/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 (50nm)/STO的制备和研究表明,在包括庞磁电阻材料的器件设计中,Pt是一种较好的电极材料.%Thin platinum (Pt) films were prepared on single-crystal substrates MgAl2O4 (100) (MAO) and SrTiO3 (100) (STO) by a facing-target sputtering technique. The films prepared at higher substrate temperature (Ts= 700℃) were grown epitaxially with (200) orientation on SrTiO3 (100) and MgAl2O4 (100). Different from the lower resistivity of Pt/STO film, Pt/MAO film shows a very higher resistivity and the temperature dependence of the resistance exhibits insulator behavior because of the pinhole formation. We also grew epitaxial Pt (50 nm)/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 (50nm)/STO structure, indicating that Pt is a good electrode for devices involving colossal magnetoresistance materials.

  20. Silica and Pyroxene in IVA Irons; Possible Formation of the IVA Magma by Impact Melting and Reduction of L-LL-Chondrite Materials Followed by Crystallization and Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.; Matsunami, Yoshiyuki; Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Group IVA is a large magmatic group of iron meteorites. The mean DELTA O-17 (= delta O-17 - 0.52(raised dot) delta O-18) of the silicates is approx. plus or minus 1.2%o, similar to the highest values in L chondrites and the lowest values in LL chondrites; delta O-18 values are also in the L/LL range. This strongly suggests that IVA irons formed by melting L-LL parental material, but the mean Ni content of IVA irons (83 mg/g) is much lower than that of a presumed L-LL parent (approx. 170 mg/g) and the low-Ca pyroxene present in two IVA meteorites is Fs13, much lower than the Fs20-29 values in L and LL chondrites. Thus, formation from L-LL precursors requires extensive addition of metallic Fe, probably produced by reduction of FeS and FeO. Group IVA also has S/Ni, Ga/Ni, and Ge/Ni ratios that are much lower than those in L-LL chondrites or any chondrite group that preserves nebular compositions, implying loss of these volatile elements during asteroidal processing. We suggest that these reduction and loss processes occurred near the surface of the asteroid during impact heating, and resulted partly from reduction by C, and partly from the thermal dissociation of FeS and FeO with loss of O and S. The hot (approx. 1770 K) low-viscosity melt quickly moved through channels in the porous asteroid to form a core. Two members of the IVA group, Sao Joao Nepomuceno (hereafter, SJN) and Steinbach, contain moderate amounts of orthopyroxene and silica, and minor amounts of low-Ca clinopyroxene. Even though SJN formed after approx. 26% crystallization and Steinbach formed after approx. 77% Crystallization of the IVA core, both could have originated within several tens of meters of the core-mantle interface if 99% of the crystallization occurred from the center outwards. Two other members of the group (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) contain tabular tridymite, which we infer to have initially formed as veins deposited from a cooling SiO-rich vapor. The silicates were clearly introduced

  1. Effects of magnetic pre-alignment of nano-powders on formation of high textured barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystals via a magnetic forming and liquid participation sintering route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Junliang, E-mail: liujunliang@yzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmental Materials and Engineering of Jiangsu Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Zeng, Yanwei [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang, Xingkai [Key Laboratory of Environmental Materials and Engineering of Jiangsu Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Zhang, Ming [Key Laboratory of Environmental Materials and Engineering of Jiangsu Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Testing Center of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highly textured barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width is believed to be a potential gyromagnetic material for self-biased microwave devices. To fabricate barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with a high grain orientation degree, a magnetic forming and liquid participation sintering route has been developed. In this paper, the effects of the pre-alignment of the starting nano-powders on the formation of barium quasi-single crystal structures have been investigated. The results indicated that: the crystallites with large sizes and small specific surfaces were easily aligned for they got higher driving forces and lower resistances during magnetic forming. The average restricting magnetic field was about 4.647 kOe to overcome the average friction barrier between crystallites. The pre-aligned crystallites in magnetic forming acted as the “crystal seeds” for oriented growth of the un-aligned crystallites during liquid participation sintering to achieve a high grain orientation. To effectively promote the grain orientation degrees of the sintered pellets, the grain orientation degrees of the green compacts must be higher than a limited value of 15.0%. Barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with a high grain orientation degree of 98.6% was successfully fabricated after sintering the green compact with its grain orientation degree of 51.1%. - Highlights: • Aligned particles acted as “crystal seeds” for un-aligned ones' oriented growth. • Magnetic field of 4.647 kOe was needed to overcome crystallites' friction barrier. • GOD dramatically increased after sintering if starting GOD exceeded to 15.0%. • Quasi-single crystal was prepared by sintering green compact with GOD of 51.1%.

  2. Carotenoid-based coloration, condition, and immune responsiveness in the nestlings of a sexually dimorphic bird of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternalski, Audrey; Mougeot, François; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In many birds, nestlings exhibit brightly colored traits that are pigmented by carotenoids. Carotenoids are diet limited and also serve important health-related physiological functions. The proximate mechanisms behind the expression of these carotenoid-pigmented traits are still poorly known, especially in nestlings with sexual size dimorphism. In these nestlings, intrabrood competition levels and growth strategies likely differ between sexes, and this may in turn influence carotenoid allocation rules. We used dietary carotenoid supplementation to test whether wild marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus) nestlings were carotenoid limited and whether carotenoid allocation strategies varied between sexes, which differ in their size and growth strategies. When supplemented, nestlings used the supplemental carotenoids to increase their coloration independently of their sex. We showed that the condition dependence of the carotenoid level and the response to an immune challenge (phytohemagglutinin test) differed between sexes, possibly because sexual size dimorphism influences growth strategies and/or intrabrood competition levels and access to different types of food. In this species, which often feeds on mammals, a trade-off likely exists between food quantity (energy) and quality (carotenoid content). Finally, carotenoid-based coloration expressed in marsh harrier nestlings appeared to be indicative of immune responsiveness rather than condition, therefore potentially advertising to parents nestling quality or value rather than nutritional need. PMID:22705486

  3. Is oxidative status influenced by dietary carotenoid and physical activity after moult in the great tit (Parus major)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Decencière, Beatriz; Perret, Samuel; Karadas, Filiz; Meylan, Sandrine; Biard, Clotilde

    2015-07-01

    In the context of sexual and natural selection, an allocation trade-off for carotenoid pigments may exist because of their obligate dietary origin and their role both in the antioxidant and immune systems and in the production of coloured signals in various taxa, particularly birds. When birds have expended large amounts of carotenoids to feather growth such as after autumn moult, bird health and oxidative status might be more constrained. We tested this hypothesis in a bird species with carotenoid-based plumage colour, by manipulating dietary carotenoids and physical activity, which can decrease antioxidant capacity and increase reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) concentration. Great tits were captured after moult and kept in aviaries, under three treatments: physical handicap and dietary supplementation with carotenoids, physical handicap and control diet, and no handicap and control diet. We measured plasma composition (antioxidant capacity, ROM concentration, and vitamin A, vitamin E and total carotenoid concentrations), immune system activation (blood sedimentation) and stress response (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio) and predicted that handicap treatment should influence these negatively and carotenoid supplementation positively. Coloration of yellow feathers was also measured. Carotenoid supplementation increased total plasma carotenoid concentration, decreased feather carotenoid chroma and marginally increased ROM concentration. Handicap increased blood sedimentation only in males but had no clear influence on oxidative stress, which contradicted previous studies. Further studies are needed to investigate how physical activity and carotenoid availability might interact and influence oxidative stress outside the moult period, and their combined potential influence on attractiveness and reproductive investment later during the breeding season.

  4. Molecular characterisation and the light-dark regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Yeon Bok; Lee, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Un

    2013-12-15

    Seven partial-length cDNAs and 1 full-length cDNA that were involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and 2 partial-length cDNAs that encoded carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases were first isolated and characterised in 2 tartary buckwheat cultivars (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.), Hokkai T8 and Hokkai T10. They were constitutively expressed at high levels in the leaves and flowers, where carotenoids are mostly distributed. During the seed development of tartary buckwheat, an inverse correlation between transcription level of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase and carotenoid content was observed. The light-grown sprouts exhibited higher levels of expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in T10 and carotenoid content in both T8 and T10 compared to the dark-grown sprouts. The predominant carotenoids in tartary buckwheat were lutein and β-carotene, and very abundant amounts of these carotenoids were found in light-grown sprouts. This study might broaden our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and indicates targets for increasing the production of carotenoids in tartary buckwheat.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative differences in carotenoid composition among Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita maxima, and Cucurbita pepo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Meleiro, Cristiane H; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2007-05-16

    Squashes and pumpkins are important dietary sources of carotenoids worldwide. The carotenoid composition has been determined, but reported data have been highly variable, both qualitatively and quantitatively. In the present work, the carotenoid composition of squashes and pumpkins currently marketed in Campinas, Brazil, were determined by HPLC-DAD, complemented by HPLC-MS for identification. Cucurbita moschata 'Menina Brasileira' and C. moschata 'Goianinha' had similar profiles, with beta-carotene and alpha-carotene as the major carotenoids. The hybrid 'Tetsukabuto' resembled the Cucurbita pepo 'Mogango', lutein and beta-carotene being the principal carotenoids. Cucurbita maxima 'Exposição' had a different profile, with the predominance of violaxanthin, followed by beta-carotene and lutein. Combining data from the current study with those in the literature, profiles for the Cucurbita species could be observed. The principal carotenoids in C. moschata were beta-carotene and alpha-carotene, whlereas lutein and beta-carotene dominate in C. maxima and C. pepo. It appears that hydroxylation is a control point in carotenoid biosynthesis.

  6. Serum carotenoids reduce progression of early atherosclerosis in the carotid artery wall among Eastern Finnish men.

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    Jouni Karppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between concentrations of serum carotenoids, and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall was explored in 840 middle-aged men (aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries were performed at baseline and 7-year follow-up. Serum levels of carotenoids were analyzed at baseline. Changes in mean and maximum intima media thickness of carotid artery wall were related to baseline serum carotenoid levels in covariance analyses adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: In a covariance analysis with adjustment for age, ultrasound sonographer, maximum intima media thickness, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, physical activity, serum LDL cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease, antihypertensive medication and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 7-year change in maximum intima media thickness was inversely associated with lycopene (p = 0.005, α-carotene (p = 0.002 and β-carotene (p = 0.019, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that high serum concentrations of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis.

  7. Spectroscopic Studies of Carotenoid-to-Bacteriochlorophyll Energy Transfer in LHRC Photosynthetic Complex from Roseiflexus castenholzii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Collins, Aaron M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); LaFountain, Amy M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Enriquez, Miriam M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Frank, Harry A. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blankenship, R. E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-06-14

    Carotenoids present in the photosynthetic light-harvesting reaction center (LHRC) complex from chlorosome lacking filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus castenholzii were purified and characterized for their photochemical properties. The LHRC from anaerobically grown cells contains five different carotenoids, methoxy-keto-myxocoxanthin, γ-carotene, and its three derivatives, whereas the LHRC from aerobically grown cells contains only three carotenoid pigments with methoxy-keto-myxocoxanthin being the dominant one. The spectroscopic properties and dynamics of excited singlet states of the carotenoids were studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy in organic solvent and in the intact LHRC complex. Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy performed in the near-infrared (NIR) on purified carotenoids combined with steady-state absorption spectroscopy led to the precise determination of values of the energies of the S1(21Ag-) excited state. Global and single wavelength fitting of the ultrafast spectral and temporal data sets of the carotenoids in solvents and in the LHRC revealed the pathways of de-excitation of the carotenoid excited states.

  8. Carotenoids play a positive role in the degradation of heterocycles by Sphingobium yanoikuyae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial oxidative degradation is a potential way of removing pollutants such as heterocycles from the environment. During this process, reactive oxygen species or other oxidants are inevitably produced, and may cause damage to DNA, proteins, and membranes, thereby decreasing the degradation rate. Carotenoids can serve as membrane-integrated antioxidants, protecting cells from oxidative stress. FINDINGS: Several genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway were cloned and characterized from a carbazole-degrading bacterium Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5. In addition, a yellow-pigmented carotenoid synthesized by strain XLDN2-5 was identified as zeaxanthin that was synthesized from β-carotene through β-cryptoxanthin. The amounts of zeaxanthin and hydrogen peroxide produced were significantly and simultaneously enhanced during the biodegradation of heterocycles (carbazole < carbazole + benzothiophene < carbazole + dibenzothiophene. These higher production levels were consistent with the transcriptional increase of the gene encoding phytoene desaturase, one of the key enzymes for carotenoid biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5 can enhance the synthesis of zeaxanthin, one of the carotenoids, which may modulate membrane fluidity and defense against intracellular oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the positive role of carotenoids in the biodegradation of heterocycles, while elucidating the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the Sphingobium genus.

  9. Storage at low temperature differentially affects the colour and carotenoid composition of two cultivars of banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facundo, Heliofabia Virginia De Vasconcelos; Gurak, Poliana Deyse; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2015-03-01

    Different storage conditions can induce changes in the colour and carotenoid profiles and levels in some fruits. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of low temperature storage on the colour and carotenoid synthesis in two banana cultivars: Prata and Nanicão. For this purpose, the carotenoids from the banana pulp were determined by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS, and the colour of the banana skin was determined by a colorimeter method. Ten carotenoids were identified, of which the major carotenoids were all-trans-lutein, all-trans-α-carotene and all-trans-β-carotene in both cultivars. The effect of the low temperatures was subjected to linear regression analysis. In cv. Prata, all-trans-α-carotene and all-trans-β-carotene were significantly affected by low temperature (p0.05). The accumulation of carotenoids in this group may be because the metabolic pathways using these carotenoids were affected by storage at low temperatures. The colour of the fruits was not negatively affected by the low temperatures (p>0.05).

  10. Effect of alcoholic fermentation on the carotenoid composition and provitamin A content of orange juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Isabel; Escudero-López, Blanca; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso; Martín, Francisco; Fernández-Pachón, María-Soledad

    2014-01-29

    Orange juice is considered a rich source of carotenoids, which are thought to have diverse biological functions. In recent years, a fermentation process has been carried out in fruits resulting in products that provide higher concentrations of bioactive compounds than their original substrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a controlled alcoholic fermentation process (15 days) on the carotenoid composition of orange juice. Twenty-two carotenoids were identified in samples. The carotenoid profile was not modified as result of the fermentation. Total carotenoid content and provitamin A value significantly increased from day 0 (5.37 mg/L and 75.32 RAEs/L, respectively) until day 15 (6.65 mg/L and 90.57 RAEs/L, respectively), probably due to a better extractability of the carotenoids from the food matrix as a result of processing. Therefore, the novel beverage produced could provide a rich source of carotenoids and exert healthy effects similar to those of orange juice.

  11. Regular consumption of fresh orange juice increases human skin carotenoid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenti, Roberto; Perrone, Anna; Livrea, Maria Antonietta; Lo Bianco, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Dermal carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status in the body. This study aimed to determine whether regular consumption of orange juice could increase dermal carotenoids. Two types of orange juice, obtained from regularly (CI) and partially (PRD) irrigated trees, were tested to reveal any possible association between juice and dermal carotenoids. Soluble solids, titratable acidity, and total carotenoids were quantified in the juice; skin carotenoid score (SCS) was assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Carotenoid content was 7.3% higher in PRD than in CI juice, inducing no difference in SCS. In a first trial with daily juice intakes for 25 days, SCS increased linearly (10%) in the individual with higher initial SCS, and exponentially (15%) in the individual with lower initial SCS. In a second trial, SCS showed a 6.5% increase after 18 days of drinking juice every other day, but returned to initial values three days after last intake. Skin carotenoids can be increased by regular consumption of fresh orange juice, while their persistence may depend on the accumulation level, environmental conditions or living habits.

  12. Characterization of chromoplasts and carotenoids of red- and yellow-fleshed papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiggert, Ralf M; Steingass, Christof B; Heller, Annerose; Esquivel, Patricia; Carle, Reinhold

    2011-11-01

    Chromoplast morphology and ultrastructure of red- and yellow-fleshed papaya (Carica papaya L.) were investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. Carotenoid analyses by LC-MS revealed striking similarity of nutritionally relevant carotenoid profiles in both the red and yellow varieties. However, while yellow fruits contained only trace amounts of lycopene, the latter was found to be predominant in red papaya (51% of total carotenoids). Comparison of the pigment-loaded chromoplast ultrastructures disclosed tubular plastids to be abundant in yellow papaya, whereas larger crystalloid substructures characterized most frequent red papaya chromoplasts. Exclusively existent in red papaya, such crystalloid structures were associated with lycopene accumulation. Non-globular carotenoid deposition was derived from simple solubility calculations based on carotenoid and lipid contents of the differently colored fruit pulps. Since the physical state of carotenoid deposition may be decisive regarding their bioavailability, chromoplasts from lycopene-rich tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) were also assessed and compared to red papaya. Besides interesting analogies, various distinctions were ascertained resulting in the prediction of enhanced lycopene bioavailability from red papaya. In addition, the developmental pathway of red papaya chromoplasts was investigated during fruit ripening and carotenogenesis. In the early maturation stage of white-fleshed papaya, undifferentiated proplastids and globular plastids were predominant, corresponding to incipient carotenoid biosynthesis. Since intermediate plastids, e.g., amyloplasts or chloroplasts, were absent, chromoplasts are likely to emerge directly from proplastids.

  13. Carotenoids in Rhodoplanes species: variation of compositions and substrate specificity of predicted carotenogenesis enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V; Okamura, Keiko; Hiraishi, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Phototrophic bacteria necessarily contain carotenoids for photosynthesis, and accumulate unusual carotenoids in some cases. The carotenoids in all established species of Rhodoplanes (Rpl.), a representative of phototrophic genera, were identified using spectroscopic methods. The major carotenoid was spirilloxanthin in Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus, and rhodopin in "Rpl. cryptolactis". Rpl. elegans contained rhodopin, anhydrorhodovibrin, and spirilloxanthin. Rpl. pokkaliisoli contained not only rhodopin but also 1,1'-dihydroxylycopene and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin. These variations in carotenoid composition suggested that Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus had normal substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes of CrtC (acyclic carotene 1,2-hydratase), CrtD (acyclic carotenoid 3,4-desaturase), and CrtF (acyclic 1-hydroxycarotenoid methyltransferase). On the other hand, CrtC of Rpl. elegans, CrtD of "Rpl. cryptolactis", and CrtC, CrtD, and CrtF of Rpl. pokkaliisoli might have different characteristics from the usual activity of these normal enzymes in the normal spirilloxanthin pathway. These results suggest that the variation of carotenoids among the species of Rhodoplanes results from modified substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes involved.

  14. Carotenoid-based nestling colouration and parental favouritism in the great tit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirren, Barbara; Fitze, Patrick S; Richner, Heinz

    2005-04-01

    While elaborate carotenoid-based traits in adult birds may have evolved as honest signals of individual quality in the context of sexual selection or other social interactions, the function of carotenoid-based colours in juveniles is less well understood. We investigated the hypothesis that carotenoid-based nestling colouration has evolved in response to parental preference of intensely coloured offspring during food provisioning. In a field experiment, we manipulated nestling plumage colouration by a carotenoid-supplementation and analysed the parental food provisioning behaviour before feather appearance and at the end of the nestling stage. Carotenoids per se did not influence the nestling's begging behaviour or parental feeding decisions and we found no evidence that carotenoid-based colouration in nestling great tits has a signalling function in parent-offspring interactions. Parents did not discriminate between intensely coloured and control offspring in their food provisioning and in accordance with this finding intensely coloured nestlings were not heavier or larger at the end of the nestling stage. Alternative explanations for the evolution of carotenoid-based colours in nestling birds are discussed. PMID:15678330

  15. A carotenoid-deficient mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, is defective in root colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Bible

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically-important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343.

  16. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; Schadt, Christopher W; Jawdy, Sara S; Weston, David J; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; Bohn, Paul W; Coutinho, Teresa A; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of IAA. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343. PMID:27148182

  17. 丝胶对碳酸钙晶体生长的调控作用研究%Study on the regulation and control of silk sericin on the crystal formation of Calcium Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁少; 王海龙; 须苏菊; 孔祥东

    2012-01-01

    以水溶性丝胶为有机模板调控碳酸钙晶体生长,探讨了丝胶质量浓度差异对晶体生长的影响作用.采用场发射扫描电镜(FESEM)、X射线衍射(XRD)、红外光谱(FTIR)对所制备的样品进行表征.结果表明:通过控制丝胶质量浓度可调控碳酸钙的晶体生长,引起晶体形貌与尺寸的显著变化,并抑制碳酸钙特定晶面的生长.制备了刺球状碳酸钙和片层结构组装而成的类正方体碳酸钙,并对其形成机理进行了初步探讨,结果表明丝胶与无机晶体之间存在复杂的相互作用,丝胶对碳酸钙晶体的生长具有调制作用.%This study uses silk sericin as organic template to regulate the crystal formation of calcium carbonate in the presence of protein, discusses the mass concentration of silk sericin on the crystal growth. The obtained samples are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The result shows that controlling the the mass concentration of silk sericin can regulate the crystal growth of calcium carbonate, significantly change the appearance and size of crystal and restrain the specific crystal growth of calcium carbonate. Cube-like calcium carbonate formed by thorn spherical calcium carbonate aggregates and lamellar structure was prepared, the formation mechanism of which is discussed preliminarily. The result shows that interaction between silk sericin and mineral crystal was very complex and silk sericin had a significant effect on the formation of calcium carbonate crystal.

  18. Carotenoid and polyphenol bioaccessibility and cellular uptake from plum and cabbage varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulmann, Anouk; André, Christelle M; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Hoffmann, Lucien; Bohn, Torsten

    2016-04-15

    Plum and cabbage are rich in carotenoids and polyphenols. However, their bioactivity depends on their release and intestinal uptake. Four varieties of Brassicaceae (Duchy, Scots Kale, Kale, Kalorama) and Prunus (Cherry Plum, Plum 620, Ersinger, Italian Plum) were studied; bioaccessibility following in vitro digestion, cellular uptake (Caco-2 vs. co-culture cell model: Caco-2:HT-29-MTX (90:10%) and colonic fermentation were determined for carotenoids/polyphenols; the influence of certain kitchen preparations was likewise studied. Carotenoids were non-significantly influenced by the latter, while for polyphenols, boiling and steaming significantly reduced total phenolics (pfuture.

  19. Noninvasive laser Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; McClane, Robert W.

    2001-05-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel non- invasive optical technology to measure carotenoid antioxidants in human skin of healthy volunteers. Using blue-green laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra are obtained which are superimposed on a large skin autofluorescence background. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 30 seconds, and the required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Our technique can be used for rapid screening of carotenoid antioxidant levels in large populations and may have applications for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  20. [Substrate specificity of carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase from Deinococcus radiodurans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongtao; Tian, Bing; Shen, Shaochuan; Hu, Yuejin

    2010-10-01

    To examine the substrate specificity of carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase (DR2250) from Deinococcus radiodurans, we amplified the dr2250 gene by using PCR methods. The PCR products were digested by Hind III-BamH I and ligated into the vector pUC19, yielding recombinant vector pUC-CRTD. We analyzed the carotenoids of E. coli transformants containing pACCRT-EBI(Eu) and (or) pRK-CRTC and (or) pUC-CRTD. Our results demonstrated that DR2250 had substrate specificity on the carotenoids with hydroxyl group at C1 (1').