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Sample records for carotenoid biosynthetic pathway

  1. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway: thinking in all dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2013-07-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signaling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavor of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and predictability of metabolic engineering of carotenoids rests in the ability to target carotenoids for specific physiological purposes as well as to simultaneously modify carotenoids along with other desired traits. Here, we ask whether predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway is indeed possible. Despite a long history of research on the pathway, at this point in time we can only describe the pathway as a parts list and have almost no knowledge of the location of the complete pathway, how it is assembled, and whether there exists any trafficking of the enzymes or the carotenoids themselves. We discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the "complete" pathway and make the argument that predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway (and other pathways) will require investigation of the three dimensional state of the pathway as it may exist in plastids of different ultrastructures. Along with this message we point out the need to develop new types of visualization tools and resources that better reflect the dynamic nature of biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23683930

  2. THE CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY: THINKING IN ALL DIMENSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2013-01-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signalling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavour of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and...

  3. Introduction of new carotenoids into the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus by combining the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways of Erwinia herbicola and Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, C N; Hundle, B S; Hearst, J E; Lang, H.P.; Gardiner, A.T.; Takaichi, S; Cogdell, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Carotenoids have two major functions in bacterial photosynthesis, photoprotection and accessory light harvesting. The genes encoding many carotenoid biosynthetic pathways have now been mapped and cloned in several different species, and the availability of cloned genes which encode the biosynthesis of carotenoids not found in the photosynthetic genus Rhodobacter opens up the possibility of introducing a wider range of foreign carotenoids into the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus than would ...

  4. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both si

  5. Differential expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes in two contrasting tomato genotypes for lycopene content

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shilpa Pandurangaiah; Kundapura V Ravishankar; Kodthalu S Shivashankar; Avverahally T Sadashiva; Kavitha Pillakenchappa; Sunil Kumar Narayanan

    2016-06-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is one of the model plants to study the carotenoid biosynthesis. In the present study, the fruit carotenoid content were quantified at different developmental stages for two contrasting genotypes viz. IIHR-249-1and IIHR-2866 by UPLC. Lycopene content was high in IIHR-249-1(19.45 mg/100g fresh weight) compared to IIHR-2866 ((1.88 mg/100g fresh weight) at the ripe stage. qPCR was performed for genes that are involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway to study the difference in lycopene content in fruits of both the genotypes. The expression of Phytoene Synthase (PSY) increased by 36 fold and Phytoene desaturase (PDS) increased by 14fold from immature green stage to ripe stage in IIHR-249-1. The expression of Chloroplast lycopene β cyclase (LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene β cyclase (CYC-B) decreased gradually from the initial stage to the ripe stage in IIHR-249-1. IIHR 249-1 showed 3 and 1.8 fold decrease in gene expression for Chloroplast lycopene β cyclase ((LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene β cyclase (CYC-B) .The F2 hybrids derived from IIHR-249-1 and IIHR-2866 were analyzed at the ripe stage for lycopene content. The gene expression of Chloroplast lycopene β cyclase (LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene β cyclase (CYC-B) in high and low lycopene lines from F2 progenies also showed the decrease in transcript levels of both the genes in high lycopene F2 lines. We wish to suggest that the differential expression of Lycopene β -cyclases can be used in marker assisted breeding.

  6. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. Results We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were ort...

  7. Evolutionary origins and functions of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in marine diatoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coesel, S.; Oborník, Miroslav; Varela, J.; Falciatore, A.; Bowler, C.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 8 (2008), s. 1-16. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500220502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : marine diatoms * carotenoid pathway * evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Flower color alteration in Lotus japonicus by modification of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sakae; Nishihara, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Misawa, Norihiko; Ogiwara, Isao; Yamamura, Saburo

    2007-07-01

    To establish a model system for alteration of flower color by carotenoid pigments, we modified the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway of Lotus japonicus using overexpression of the crtW gene isolated from marine bacteria Agrobacterium aurantiacum and encoding beta-carotene ketolase (4,4'-beta-oxygenase) for the production of pink to red color ketocarotenoids. The crtW gene with the transit peptide sequence of the pea Rubisco small subunit under the regulation of the CaMV35S promoter was introduced to L. japonicus. In most of the resulting transgenic plants, the color of flower petals changed from original light yellow to deep yellow or orange while otherwise exhibiting normal phenotype. HPLC and TLC analyses revealed that leaves and flower petals of these plants accumulated novel carotenoids, believed to be ketocarotenoids consisting of including astaxanthin, adonixanthin, canthaxanthin and echinenone. Results indicated that modification of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway is a means of altering flower color in ornamental crops. PMID:17265153

  9. Apocarotenoids: A New Carotenoid-Derived Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Juan Camilo Moreno; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are precursors of carotenoid derived molecules termed apocarotenoids, which include isoprenoids with important functions in plant-environment interactions such as the attraction of pollinators and the defense against pathogens and herbivores. Apocarotenoids also include volatile aromatic compounds that act as repellents, chemoattractants, growth simulators and inhibitors, as well as the phytohormones abscisic acid and strigolactones. In plants, apocarotenoids can be found in several types of plastids (etioplast, leucoplast and chromoplast) and among different plant tissues such as flowers and roots. The structural similarity of some flower and spice isoprenoid volatile organic compounds (β-ionone and safranal) to carotenoids has led to the recent discovery of carotenoid-specific cleavage oxygenases, including carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases and 9-cis-epoxydioxygenases, which tailor and transform carotenoids into apocarotenoids. The great diversity of apocarotenoids is a consequence of the huge amount of carotenoid precursors, the variations in specific cleavage sites and the modifications after cleavage. Lycopene, β-carotene and zeaxanthin are the precursors of the main apocarotenoids described to date, which include bixin, crocin, picrocrocin, abscisic acid, strigolactone and mycorradicin.The current chapter will give rise to an overview of the biosynthesis and function of the most important apocarotenoids in plants, as well as the current knowledge about the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase enzymes involved in these biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27485225

  10. Expression profile of genes coding for carotenoid biosynthetic pathway during ripening and their association with accumulation of lycopene in tomato fruits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shuchi Smita; Ravi Rajwanshi; Sangram Keshari Lenka; Amit Katiyar; Viswanathan Chinnusamy; Kailash Chander Bansal

    2013-12-01

    Fruit ripening process is associated with change in carotenoid profile and accumulation of lycopene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). In this study, we quantified the -carotene and lycopene content at green, breaker and red-ripe stages of fruit ripening in eight tomato genotypes by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the genotypes, lycopene content was found highest in Pusa Rohini and lowest in VRT-32-1. To gain further insight into the regulation of lycopene biosynthesis and accumulation during fruit ripening, expression analysis of nine carotenoid pathway-related genes was carried out in the fruits of high lycopene genotype—Pusa Rohini. We found that expression of phytoene synthase and -carotene hydroxylase-1 was four and thirty-fold higher, respectively, at breaker stage as compared to red-ripe stage of fruit ripening. Changes in the expression level of these genes were associated with a 40% increase in lycopene content at red-ripe stage as compared with breaker stage. Thus, the results from our study suggest the role of specific carotenoid pathway-related genes in accumulation of high lycopene during the fruit ripening processes.

  11. Heterologous Carotenoid-Biosynthetic Enzymes: Functional Complementation and Effects on Carotenoid Profiles in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form syntheti...

  12. Molecular Characterization of Carotenoid Biosynthetic Genes and Carotenoid Accumulation in Lycium chinense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shicheng Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lycium chinense is a shrub that has health benefits and is used as a source of medicines in Asia. In this study, a full-length cDNA clone encoding β-ring carotene hydroxylase (LcCHXB and partial-length cDNA clones encoding phytoene synthase (LcPSY, phytoene desaturase (LcPDS, ξ-carotene desaturase (LcZDS, lycopene β-cyclase (LcLCYB, lycopene ε-cyclase (LcLCYE, ε-ring carotene hydroxylase (LcCHXE, zeaxanthin epoxidase (LcZEP, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (LcCCD1, and 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (LcNCED were identified in L. chinense. The transcripts were constitutively expressed at high levels in leaves, flowers and red fruits, where the carotenoids are mostly distributed. In contrast, most of the carotenoid biosynthetic genes were weakly expressed in the roots and stems, which contained only small amounts of carotenoids. The level of LcLCYE transcripts was very high in leaves and correlated with the abundance of lutein in this plant tissue. During maturation, the levels of lutein and zeaxanthin in L. chinense fruits dramatically increased, concomitant with a rise in the level of β-cryptoxanthin. LcPSY, LcPDS, LcZDS, LcLCYB, and LcCHXE were highly expressed in red fruits, leading to their substantially higher total carotenoid content compared to that in green fruits. Total carotenoid content was high in both the leaves and red fruits of L. chinense. Our findings on the biosynthesis of carotenoids in L. chinense provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and may facilitate the optimization of carotenoid production in L. chinense.

  13. Biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxuan; Zeng, Xinyi; Sun, Chao; Chen, Shilin

    2014-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most extensively investigated medicinal plants, which can produce more than 130 alkaloids, including the powerful antitumor drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here we review the recent advances in the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in C. roseus, and the identification and characterization of the corresponding enzymes involved in this pathway. Strictosidine is the central intermediate in the biosynthesis of different TIAs, which is formed by the condensation of secologanin and tryptamine. Secologanin is derived from terpenoid (isoprenoid) biosynthetic pathway, while tryptamine is derived from indole biosynthetic pathway. Then various specific end products are produced by different routes during downstream process. Although many genes and corresponding enzymes have been characterized in this pathway, our knowledge on the whole TIA biosynthetic pathway still remains largely unknown up to date. Full elucidation of TIA biosynthetic pathway is an important prerequisite to understand the regulation of the TIA biosynthesis in the medicinal plant and to produce valuable TIAs by synthetic biological technology. PMID:25159992

  14. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27007394

  15. A kinetic model for the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model for the first two steps in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. the ACV synthetase (ACVS) and the isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) is proposed. The model is based on Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with non-competitive inhibition of the ACVS by ACV, and competitive inhibition...

  16. A kinetic model for the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model for the first two steps in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. the ACV synthetase (ACVS) and the isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) is proposed. The model is based on Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with non-competitive inhibition of the ACVS by ACV, and competitive inhibition...... of the IPNS by glutathione. The model predicted flux through the pathway corresponds well with the measured rate of penicillin biosynthesis. From the kinetic model the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients are calculated throughout a fed-batch cultivation, and it is found that...

  17. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  18. The flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in plants: function and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavonoids are a class of low molecular weight phenolic compounds that is widely distributed in the plant kingdom. They exhibit a diverse spectrum of biological functions and play an important role in the interaction between plants and their environment. Flavonoids not only protect the plant from the harmful effects of UV irradiation but also play a crucial role in the sexual reproduction process. A special class of flavonoid polymers, the tannins, plays a structural role in the plant. Yet other classes of flavonoids, flavonols and anthocyanins, have been implicated in the attraction of pollinators. Certain flavonoids participate in the interaction between plants and other organisms such as symbiotic bacteria and parasites. This raises the intriguing question as to how these different compounds arose and evolved. Based on taxonomy and molecular analysis of gene expression patterns it is possible to deduce a putative sequence of acquisition of the different branches of the biosynthetic pathway and their regulators. (author)

  19. Overexpression of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High cell density cultures of Pichia pastoris grown on methanol tend to develop yellow colored supernatants, attributed to the release of free flavins. The potential of P. pastoris for flavin overproduction is therefore given, but not pronounced when the yeast is grown on glucose. The aim of this study is to characterize the relative regulatory impact of each riboflavin synthesis gene. Deeper insight into pathway control and the potential of deregulation is established by overexpression of the single genes as well as a combined deregulation of up to all six riboflavin synthesis genes. Results Overexpression of the first gene of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RIB1 is already sufficient to obtain yellow colonies and the accumulation of riboflavin in the supernatant of shake flask cultures growing on glucose. Sequential deregulation of all the genes, by exchange of their native promoter with the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP increases the riboflavin accumulation significantly. Conclusion The regulation of the pathway is distributed over more than one gene. High cell density cultivations of a P. pastoris strain overexpressing all six RIB genes allow the accumulation of 175 mg/L riboflavin in the supernatant. The basis for rational engineering of riboflavin production in P. pastoris has thus been established.

  20. Carotenoid Metabolism: Biosynthesis, Regulation,and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Lu; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are Indispensable to plants and play a critical role in human nutrition and health. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of carotenoid metabolism in plants. The biosynthetic pathway has been extensively studied.Nearly all the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated and characterized from various organisms. In recent years, there is an increasing body of work on the signaling pathways and plastid development, which might provide global control of carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. Herein, we will highlight recent progress on the biosynthesis,regulation, and metabolic engineering of carotenoids in plants, as well as the future research towards elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and metabolic network that control carotenoid metabolism.

  1. Arabidopsis OR proteins are the major post-transcriptional regulators of phytoene synthase in mediating carotenoid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are indispensable natural pigments to plants and humans. Phytoene synthase (PSY), the rate-limiting enzyme in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, and ORANGE (OR), a regulator of chromoplast differentiation and enhancer of carotenoid biosynthesis, represent two key proteins that control caro...

  2. Enhancement of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Transplastomic Tomatoes by Induced Lycopene-to-Provitamin A Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Apel, W.; R. Bock

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are essential pigments of the photosynthetic apparatus and an indispensable component of the human diet. In addition to being potent antioxidants, they also provide the vitamin A precursor beta-carotene. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits, carotenoids accumulate in specialized plastids, the chromoplasts. How the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated and what limits total carotenoid accumulation in fruit chromoplasts is not well understood. Here, we have introduced the ...

  3. Assembly of functional photosystem complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids from the spirilloxanthin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shuang C; Mothersole, David J; Dilbeck, Preston; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Pu; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Grayson, Katie J; Jackson, Philip J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Li, Ying; Holten, Dewey; Neil Hunter, C

    2015-02-01

    Carotenoids protect the photosynthetic apparatus against harmful radicals arising from the presence of both light and oxygen. They also act as accessory pigments for harvesting solar energy, and are required for stable assembly of many light-harvesting complexes. In the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides phytoene desaturase (CrtI) catalyses three sequential desaturations of the colourless carotenoid phytoene, extending the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, N, from three to nine and producing the yellow carotenoid neurosporene; subsequent modifications produce the yellow/red carotenoids spheroidene/spheroidenone (N=10/11). Genomic crtI replacements were used to swap the native three-step Rba. sphaeroides CrtI for the four-step Pantoea agglomerans enzyme, which re-routed carotenoid biosynthesis and culminated in the production of 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin under semi-aerobic conditions. The new carotenoid pathway was elucidated using a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Premature termination of this new pathway by inactivating crtC or crtD produced strains with lycopene or rhodopin as major carotenoids. All of the spirilloxanthin series carotenoids are accepted by the assembly pathways for LH2 and RC-LH1-PufX complexes. The efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer for 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin (15 conjugated CC bonds; N=15) in LH2 complexes is low, at 35%. High energy transfer efficiencies were obtained for neurosporene (N=9; 94%), spheroidene (N=10; 96%) and spheroidenone (N=11; 95%), whereas intermediate values were measured for lycopene (N=11; 64%), rhodopin (N=11; 62%) and spirilloxanthin (N=13; 39%). The variety and stability of these novel Rba. sphaeroides antenna complexes make them useful experimental models for investigating the energy transfer dynamics of carotenoids in bacterial photosynthesis. PMID:25449968

  4. Spook and Spookier code for stage-specific components of the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway in Diptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ono, Hajime; Rewitz, Kim; Shinoda, Tetsu;

    2006-01-01

    that catalyze the terminal hydroxylation steps in the conversion of cholesterol to the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. These P450s are conserved in other insects and each is thought to function throughout development as the sole mediator of a particular biosynthetic step since, where analyzed, each...... Bombyx and Manduca that is expressed in both embryos and larva. These studies suggest an evolutionary split between Diptera and Lepidoptera in how the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway is regulated during development....

  5. Biosynthetic Analysis of the Petrobactin Siderophore Pathway from Bacillus anthracis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung Yeop; Janes, Brian K.; Passalacqua, Karla D; Pfleger, Brian F.; Bergman, Nicholas H; Liu, Haichuan; Håkansson, Kristina; Somu, Ravindranadh V.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Cendrowski, Stephen; Hanna, Philip C.; Sherman, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The asbABCDEF gene cluster from Bacillus anthracis is responsible for biosynthesis of petrobactin, a catecholate siderophore that functions in both iron acquisition and virulence in a murine model of anthrax. We initiated studies to determine the biosynthetic details of petrobactin assembly based on mutational analysis of the asb operon, identification of accumulated intermediates, and addition of exogenous siderophores to asb mutant strains. As a starting point, in-frame deletions of each of...

  6. Phylogenetic and evolutionary patterns in microbial carotenoid biosynthesis are revealed by comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L Klassen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carotenoids are multifunctional, taxonomically widespread and biotechnologically important pigments. Their biosynthesis serves as a model system for understanding the evolution of secondary metabolism. Microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution has hitherto been analyzed primarily from structural and biosynthetic perspectives, with the few phylogenetic analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins using either used limited datasets or lacking methodological rigor. Given the recent accumulation of microbial genome sequences, a reappraisal of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic diversity and evolution from the perspective of comparative genomics is warranted to validate and complement models of microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution based upon structural and biosynthetic data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative genomics were used to identify and analyze in silico microbial carotenoid biosynthetic pathways. Four major phylogenetic lineages of carotenoid biosynthesis are suggested composed of: (i Proteobacteria; (ii Firmicutes; (iii Chlorobi, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes; and (iv Archaea, Bacteroidetes and two separate sub-lineages of Actinobacteria. Using this phylogenetic framework, specific evolutionary mechanisms are proposed for carotenoid desaturase CrtI-family enzymes and carotenoid cyclases. Several phylogenetic lineage-specific evolutionary mechanisms are also suggested, including: (i horizontal gene transfer; (ii gene acquisition followed by differential gene loss; (iii co-evolution with other biochemical structures such as proteorhodopsins; and (iv positive selection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Comparative genomics analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins indicate a much greater taxonomic diversity then that identified based on structural and biosynthetic data, and divides microbial carotenoid biosynthesis into several, well-supported phylogenetic lineages not evident

  7. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing; Manzano, David; Tanić, Nikola;

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew tha...

  8. Characterization of cyanobacterial hydrocarbon composition and distribution of biosynthetic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Cameron Coates

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to naturally produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids. Hydrocarbon compositions of thirty-two strains of cyanobacteria were characterized to reveal novel structural features and insights into hydrocarbon biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. This investigation revealed new double bond (2- and 3-heptadecene and methyl group positions (3-, 4- and 5-methylheptadecane for a variety of strains. Additionally, results from this study and literature reports indicate that hydrocarbon production is a universal phenomenon in cyanobacteria. All cyanobacteria possess the capacity to produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids yet not all accomplish this through the same metabolic pathway. One pathway comprises a two-step conversion of fatty acids first to fatty aldehydes and then alkanes that involves a fatty acyl ACP reductase (FAAR and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO. The second involves a polyketide synthase (PKS pathway that first elongates the acyl chain followed by decarboxylation to produce a terminal alkene (olefin synthase, OLS. Sixty-one strains possessing the FAAR/ADO pathway and twelve strains possessing the OLS pathway were newly identified through bioinformatic analyses. Strains possessing the OLS pathway formed a cohesive phylogenetic clade with the exception of three Moorea strains and Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 6406 which may have acquired the OLS pathway via horizontal gene transfer. Hydrocarbon pathways were identified in one-hundred-forty-two strains of cyanobacteria over a broad phylogenetic range and there were no instances where both the FAAR/ADO and the OLS pathways were found together in the same genome, suggesting an unknown selective pressure maintains one or the other pathway, but not both.

  9. The Phytoene synthase gene family of apple (Malus x domestica) and its role in controlling fruit carotenoid content

    OpenAIRE

    Ampomah-Dwamena, C.; Driedonks, N.J.W.; Lewis, D; Shumskaya, M.; Chen, X Y; Wurtzel, E.T.; Espley, R.V.; Allan, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoid compounds play essential roles in plants such as protecting the photosynthetic apparatus and in hormone signalling. Coloured carotenoids provide yellow, orange and red colour to plant tissues, as well as offering nutritional benefit to humans and animals. The enzyme phytoene synthase (PSY) catalyses the first committed step of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and has been associated with control of pathway flux. We characterised four PSY genes found in the apple genom...

  10. Arabidopsis cytochrome P450 cyp83B1 mutations activate the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Smolen, Gromoslaw; Bender, Judith

    2002-01-01

    In plants, the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway provides a number of important secondary metabolites including the growth regulator indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole glucosinolate defense compounds. Genes encoding tryptophan pathway enzymes are transcriptionally induced by a variety of stress signals, presumably to increase the production of both tryptophan and secondary metabolites during defense responses. To understand the mechanism of transcriptional induction, we isolated altered tryp...

  11. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways. (paper)

  12. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko; Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2012-10-01

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways.

  13. The Biosynthetic Pathways of Tanshinones and Phenolic Acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hui Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites from plants play key roles in human medicine and chemical industries. Due to limited accumulation of secondary metabolites in plants and their important roles, characterization of key enzymes involved in biosynthetic pathway will enable metabolic engineering or synthetic biology to improve or produce the compounds in plants or microorganisms, which provides an alternative for production of these valuable compounds. Salvia miltiorrhiza, containing tanshinones and phenolic acids as its active compounds, has been widely used for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The biosynthetic analysis of secondary metabolites in S. miltiorrhiza has made great progress due to the successful genetic transformation system, simplified hairy roots system, and high-throughput sequencing. The cloned genes in S. miltiorrhiza had provided references for functional characterization of the post-modification steps involved in biosynthesis of tanshinones and phenolic acids, and further utilization of these steps in metabolic engineering. The strategies used in these studies could provide solid foundation for elucidation of biosynthetic pathways of diterpenoids and phenolic acids in other species. The present review systematically summarizes recent advances in biosynthetic pathway analysis of tanshinones and phenolic acids as well as synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications of the rate-limiting genes involved in the secondary metabolism in S. miltiorrhiza.

  14. Localization and interactions between Arabidopsis auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Hawes, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The growth regulator auxin is involved in all key developmental processes in plants. A complex network of a multiplicity of potential biosynthetic pathways as well as transport, signalling plus conjugation and deconjugation lead to a complex and multifaceted system system for auxin function. This raises the question how such a system can be effectively organized and controlled. Here we report that a subset of auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER microsomal fractions also contain a significant percentage of auxin biosynthetic activity. This could point toward a model of auxin function using ER membrane location and subcellular compartmentation for supplementary layers of regulation. Additionally we show specific protein-protein interactions between some of the enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis. PMID:27208541

  15. Apicoplast Biosynthetic Pathways as Possible Targetsfor Combination Therapy of Malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Solomon Tesfaye; Bhanu Prakash; Prati Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria parasite strains resistant to practically all the antimalarial drugs in clinical use is now making itnecessary to discover and develop both new antimalarial drugs and treatments. Recent advances in molecular techniques along withthe availability of genome sequence ofPlasmodiumfalciparum may provide a wide range of novel targets in metabolic pathways likeisoprenoid biosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis and heme biosynthesis in the apicoplast of Plasmodiurn. On the other hand, thecombination therapy approach (currently used to retard the selection of parasite strains resistant to individual components of acombination of drugs) has proved to be a success in the combination of sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, which targets two differentsteps in the folate pathway of malaria parasite. However, after the success of this therapeutic combination, the efficacy of othercombinations of drugs which target different enzymes in a particular metabolic pathway has, apparently, not been reported. Therefore,herein, we review various drug targets so far discovered in apicoplast-related anabolic pathways, especially, with a sharper focus onthe possibility to target more than one enzyme at a time in a particular metabolic pathway of malaria parasites.

  16. Distribution of δ-aminolevulinic acid biosynthetic pathways among phototrophic and related bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two biosynthetic pathways are known for the universal tetrapyrrole precursor, δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA): condensation of glycine and succinyl-CoA to form ALA with the loss of C-1 of glycine as CO2, and conversion of the intact carbon skeleton of glutamate to ALA in a process requiring tRNAGlu, ATP, Mg2+, NADPH, and pyridoxal phosphate. The distribution of the two ALA biosynthetic pathways among various bacterial genera was determined, using cell-free extracts obtained from representative organisms. Evidence for the operation of the glutamate pathway was obtained by the measurement of RNase-sensitive label incorporation from glutamate into ALA using 3,4-[3H]glutamate and 1-[14C]glutamate as substrate. The glycine pathway was indicated by RNase-insensitive incorporation of level from 2-[14C]glycine into ALA. The distribution of the two pathways among the bacteria tested was in general agreement with their previously phylogenetic relationships and clearly indicates that the glutamate pathway is the more ancient process, whereas the glycine pathway probably evolved much later. The glutamate pathway is the more widely utilized one among bacteria, while the glycine pathway is apparently limited to the α subgroup of purple bacteria (including Rhodobacter, Rhodospirillum, and Rhizobium). E. coli was found ALA via the glutamate pathway. The ALA-requiring hemA mutant of E. coli was determined to lack the dehydrogenase activity that utilizes glutamyl-tRNA as a substrate

  17. Reassembled biosynthetic pathway for large-scale carbohydrate synthesis: alpha-Gal epitope producing "superbug".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Zhang, Wei; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Wang, Peng George

    2002-01-01

    A metabolic pathway engineered Escherichia coli strain (superbug) containing one plasmid harboring an artificial gene cluster encoding all the five enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of Galalpha l,3Lac through galactose metabolism has been developed. The plasmid contains a lambda promoter, a c1857 repressor gene, an ampicillin resistance gene, and a T7 terminator. Each gene was preceded by a Shine - Dalgarno sequence for ribosome binding. In a reaction catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli strain, Galalpha 1,3Lac trisaccharide accumulated at concentrations of 14.2 mM (7.2 gL(-1)) in a reaction mixture containing galactose, glucose, lactose, and a catalytic amount of uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose. This work demonstrates that large-scale synthesis of complex oligosaccharides can be achieved economically and efficiently through a single, biosynthetic pathway engineered microorganism. PMID:17590953

  18. Biosynthetic Pathway for the Epipolythiodioxopiperazine Acetylaranotin in Aspergillus terreus Revealed by Genome-based Deletion Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Sanchez, James F.; Chang, ShuLin; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-04-15

    Abstract Epipolythiodioxopiperazines (ETPs) are a class of fungal secondary metabolites derived from cyclic peptides. Acetylaranotin belongs to one structural subgroup of ETPs characterized by the presence of a seven-membered dihydrooxepine ring. Defining the genes involved in acetylaranotin biosynthesis should provide a means to increase production of these compounds and facilitate the engineering of second-generation molecules. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus produces acetylaranotin and related natural products. Using targeted gene deletions, we have identified a cluster of 9 genes including one nonribosomal peptide synthase gene, ataP, that is required for acetylaranotin biosynthesis. Chemical analysis of the wild type and mutant strains enabled us to isolate seventeen natural products that are either intermediates in the normal biosynthetic pathway or shunt products that are produced when the pathway is interrupted through mutation. Nine of the compounds identified in this study are novel natural products. Our data allow us to propose a complete biosynthetic pathway for acetylaranotin and related natural products.

  19. Overexpression of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Pichia pastoris

    OpenAIRE

    Mattanovich Diethard; Marx Hans; Sauer Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background High cell density cultures of Pichia pastoris grown on methanol tend to develop yellow colored supernatants, attributed to the release of free flavins. The potential of P. pastoris for flavin overproduction is therefore given, but not pronounced when the yeast is grown on glucose. The aim of this study is to characterize the relative regulatory impact of each riboflavin synthesis gene. Deeper insight into pathway control and the potential of deregulation is established by ...

  20. Evolution of tryptophan biosynthetic pathway in microbial genomes: a comparative genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, V K; Sarkar, Susmita; Sinha, Somdatta

    2014-03-01

    Biosynthetic pathway evolution needs to consider the evolution of a group of genes that code for enzymes catalysing the multiple chemical reaction steps leading to the final end product. Tryptophan biosynthetic pathway has five chemical reaction steps that are highly conserved in diverse microbial genomes, though the genes of the pathway enzymes show considerable variations in arrangements, operon structure (gene fusion and splitting) and regulation. We use a combined bioinformatic and statistical analyses approach to address the question if the pathway genes from different microbial genomes, belonging to a wide range of groups, show similar evolutionary relationships within and between them. Our analyses involved detailed study of gene organization (fusion/splitting events), base composition, relative synonymous codon usage pattern of the genes, gene expressivity, amino acid usage, etc. to assess inter- and intra-genic variations, between and within the pathway genes, in diverse group of microorganisms. We describe these genetic and genomic variations in the tryptophan pathway genes in different microorganisms to show the similarities across organisms, and compare the same genes across different organisms to find the possible variability arising possibly due to horizontal gene transfers. Such studies form the basis for moving from single gene evolution to pathway evolutionary studies that are important steps towards understanding the systems biology of intracellular pathways. PMID:24592292

  1. A revised biosynthetic pathway for phosphatidylinositol in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morii, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Koga, Yosuke

    2010-11-01

    For the last decade, it has been believed that phosphatidylinositol (PI) in mycobacteria is synthesized from free inositol and CDP-diacylglycerol by PI synthase in the presence of ATP. The role of ATP in this process, however, is not understood. Additionally, the PI synthase activity is extremely low compared with the PI synthase activity of yeast. When CDP-diacylglycerol and [(14)C]1L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate were incubated with the cell wall components of Mycobacterium smegmatis, both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and PI were formed, as identified by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography. PI was formed from PIP by incubation with the cell wall components. Thus, mycobacterial PI was synthesized from CDP-diacylglycerol and myo-inositol 1-phosphate via PIP, which was dephosphorylated to PI. The gene-encoding PIP synthase from four species of mycobacteria was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and PIP synthase activity was confirmed. A very low, but significant level of free [(3)H]inositol was incorporated into PI in mycobacterial cell wall preparations, but not in recombinant E. coli cell homogenates. This activity could be explained by the presence of two minor PI metabolic pathways: PI/inositol exchange reaction and phosphorylation of inositol by ATP prior to entering the PIP synthase pathway. PMID:20798167

  2. In silico tools for the analysis of antibiotic biosynthetic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    Natural products of bacteria and fungi are the most important source for antimicrobial drug leads. For decades, such compounds were exclusively found by chemical/bioactivity-guided screening approaches. The rapid progress in sequencing technologies only recently allowed the development of novel...... screening methods based on the genome sequences of potential producing organisms. The basic principle of such genome mining approaches is to identify genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of such molecules, and to predict the products of the identified pathways. Thus, bioinformatics methods and...... tools are crucial for genome mining. In this review, a comprehensive overview is given on programs and databases for the identification and analysis of antibiotic biosynthesis gene clusters in genomic data....

  3. Contribution of trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress tolerance of Capparis ovata Desf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, S; Ozdemir, F; Bor, M

    2015-03-01

    Trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway are important contributors and regulators of stress responses in plants. Among recent findings for trehalose and its metabolism, the role of signalling in the regulation of growth and development and its potential for use as a storage energy source can be listed. The xerophytic plant Capparis ovata (caper) is well adapted to drought and high temperature stress in arid and semi-arid regions of the Mediterranean. The contribution of trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress responses and tolerance in C. ovata are not known. We investigated the effects of PEG-mediated drought stress in caper plants and analysed physiological parameters and trehalose biosynthetic pathway components, trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP), trehalase activity, trehalose and proline content in drought stress-treated and untreated plants. Our results indicated that trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway contributed to drought stress tolerance of C. ovata. Overall growth and leaf water status were not dramatically affected by drought, as both high relative growth rate and relative water content were recorded even after 14 days of drought stress. Trehalose accumulation increased in parallel to induced TPS and TPP activities and decreased trehalase activity in caper plants on day 14. Constitutive trehalose levels were 28.75 to 74.75 μg·g·FW(-1) , and drought stress significantly induced trehalose accumulation (385.25 μg·g·FW(-1) on day 14) in leaves of caper. On day 14 of drought, proline levels were lower than on day 7. Under drought stress the discrepancy between trehalose and proline accumulation trends might result from the mode of action of these osmoprotectant molecules in C. ovata. PMID:25294040

  4. DNA-guided assembly of biosynthetic pathways promotes improved catalytic efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Benčina, Mojca; Hodnik, Vesna; Mori, Jerneja; Koprivnjak, Tomaž; Gaber, Rok; Tomšič, Nejc; Turnšek, Jernej; Lebar, Tina; Conrado, Robert J.; Jerala, Roman; Glavnik, Vesna; Avbelj, Monika; Vovk, Irena; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic scaffolds that permit spatial and temporal organization of enzymes in living cells are a promising post-translational strategy for controlling the flow of information in both metabolic and signaling pathways. Here, we describe the use of plasmid DNA as a stable, robust and configurable scaffold for arranging biosynthetic enzymes in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. This involved conversion of individual enzymes into custom DNA-binding proteins by genetic fusion to zinc-finger domai...

  5. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis During Fruit Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lado, Joanna; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Rodrigo, María Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are recognized as the main pigments in most fruit crops, providing colours that range from yellow and pink to deep orange and red. Moreover, the edible portion of widely consumed fruits or their derived products represent a major dietary source of carotenoids for animals and humans. Therefore, these pigments are crucial compounds contributing to fruit aesthetic and nutritional quality but may also have protecting and ecophysiological functions in coloured fruits. Among plant organs, fruits display one of the most heterogeneous carotenoids patterns in terms of diversity and abundance. In this chapter a comprehensive list of the carotenoid content and profile in the most commonly cultivated fleshy fruits is reported. The proposed fruit classification systems attending to carotenoid composition are revised and discussed. The regulation of carotenoids in fruits can be rather complex due to the dramatic changes in content and composition during ripening, which are also dependent on the fruit tissue and the developmental stage. In addition, carotenoid accumulation is a dynamic process, associated with the development of chromoplasts during ripening. As a general rule, carotenoid accumulation is highly controlled at the transcriptional level of the structural and accessory proteins of the biosynthetic and degradation pathways, but other mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modifications or the development of sink structures have been recently revealed as crucial factors in determining the levels and stability of these pigments. In this chapter common key metabolic reactions regulating carotenoid composition in fruit tissues are described in addition to others that are restricted to certain species and generate unique carotenoids patterns. The existence of fruit-specific isoforms for key steps such as the phytoene synthase, lycopene β-cyclases or catabolic carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases has allowed an independent regulation of the pathway in fruit tissues

  6. ZEAXANTHIN EPOXIDASE Activity Potentiates Carotenoid Degradation in Maturing Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Jorge, Sabrina; Mehrshahi, Payam; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Lipka, Alexander E; Angelovici, Ruthie; Gore, Michael A; DellaPenna, Dean

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway has enabled altering the composition and content of carotenoids in various plants, but to achieve desired nutritional impacts, the genetic components regulating carotenoid homeostasis in seed, the plant organ consumed in greatest abundance, must be elucidated. We used a combination of linkage mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and pathway-level analysis to identify nine loci that impact the natural variation of seed carotenoids in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ZEAXANTHIN EPOXIDASE (ZEP) was the major contributor to carotenoid composition, with mutants lacking ZEP activity showing a remarkable 6-fold increase in total seed carotenoids relative to the wild type. Natural variation in ZEP gene expression during seed development was identified as the underlying mechanism for fine-tuning carotenoid composition, stability, and ultimately content in Arabidopsis seed. We previously showed that two CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE enzymes, CCD1 and CCD4, are the primary mediators of seed carotenoid degradation, and here we demonstrate that ZEP acts as an upstream control point of carotenoid homeostasis, with ZEP-mediated epoxidation targeting carotenoids for degradation by CCD enzymes. Finally, four of the nine loci/enzymatic activities identified as underlying natural variation in Arabidopsis seed carotenoids also were identified in a recent GWAS of maize (Zea mays) kernel carotenoid variation. This first comparison of the natural variation in seed carotenoids in monocots and dicots suggests a surprising overlap in the genetic architecture of these traits between the two lineages and provides a list of likely candidates to target for selecting seed carotenoid variation in other species. PMID:27208224

  7. A re-evaluation of the archaeal membrane lipid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Laura; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Archaea produce unique membrane lipids in which isoprenoid alkyl chains are bound to glycerol moieties via ether linkages. As cultured representatives of the Archaea have become increasingly available throughout the past decade, archaeal genomic and membrane lipid-composition data have also become available. In this Analysis article, we compare the amino acid sequences of the key enzymes of the archaeal ether-lipid biosynthesis pathway and critically evaluate past studies on the biochemical functions of these enzymes. We propose an alternative archaeal lipid biosynthetic pathway that is based on a 'multiple-key, multiple-lock' mechanism. PMID:24801941

  8. Effect of salt stress on expression of carotenoid pathway genes in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlene Ann Babu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids, the naturally occurring isoprenoids form essential components of photosynthetic antenna and reaction centre complexes. Thus they play a significant role in absorption, dissipation and transfer of light energy for the process of photosynthesis. The effects of salt stress on carotenoid gene expression in tomato leaves were studied. For that tomato plants were subjected to different concentration of salt water. Morphological characters such as plant height, no. of fruits per plant, chlorophyll content and expression of four major carotenoid pathway genes such as phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, zeta carotene desaturase and lycopene beta cyclase were analysed. The quantitative expression analysis using real time PCR has shown a decrease in the expression of all the studied genes as the salt concentration increased. Among the different concentrations of NaCl used for the experiment, it was seen that 200 mM was most detrimental for the carotenoid gene expression. Lycopene beta cyclase, the enzyme that converts lycopene to beta carotene was seen to be highly affected compared to other genes studied showing a 1.87 fold inhibition in its expression at 200 mM NaCl.

  9. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Photosynthetic Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Briardo

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the dazzling diversity of colors displayed by living organisms throughout the tree of life is determined by the presence of carotenoids, which most often provide distinctive yellow, orange and red hues. These metabolites play fundamental roles in nature that extend far beyond their importance as pigments. In photosynthetic lineages, carotenoids are essential to sustain life, since they have been exploited to maximize light harvesting and protect the photosynthetic machinery from photooxidative stress. Consequently, photosynthetic organisms have evolved several mechanisms that adjust the carotenoid metabolism to efficiently cope with constantly fluctuating light environments. This chapter will focus on the current knowledge concerning the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in leaves, which are the primary photosynthetic organs of most land plants. PMID:27485221

  10. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Garavaglia

    Full Text Available Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  11. Narrow-spectrum inhibitors targeting an alternative menaquinone biosynthetic pathway of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsui, Hidenori; Yamaji, Kenzaburo; Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Øverby, Anders; Nakamura, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Nonaka, Kenichi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nakano, Hirofumi

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to identify narrow-spectrum natural compounds that specifically inhibit an alternative menaquinone (MK; vitamin K2) biosynthetic pathway (the futalosine pathway) of Helicobacter pylori. Culture broth samples of 6183 microbes were examined using the paper disc method with different combinations of 2 of the following 3 indicator microorganisms: Bacillus halodurans C-125 and Kitasatospora setae KM-6054(T), which have only the futalosine pathway of MK biosynthesis, and Bacillus subtilis H17, which has only the canonical MK biosynthetic pathway. Most of the active compounds isolated from culture broth samples were from the families of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Only one compound isolated from the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. K12-1112, siamycin I (a 21-residue lasso peptide antibiotic), targeted the futalosine pathway. The inhibitory activities of representative PUFAs and siamycin I against the growth of B. halodurans or K. setae were abrogated by supplementation with MK. Thereafter, the growth of H. pylori strains SS1 and TN2GF4 in broth cultures was dose-dependently suppressed by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or siamycin I, and these inhibitory effects were reduced by supplementation with MK. Daily administration of EPA (100 μM), DHA (100 μM), or siamycin I (2.5 μM) in drinking water reduced the H. pylori SS1 colonization in the gastric mucosa of C57BL/6 mice by 96%, 78%, and 68%, respectively. These data suggest that EPA, DHA, and siamycin I prevented H. pylori infection by inhibiting the futalosine pathway of MK biosynthesis. PMID:27346378

  12. Biosynthetic Pathway of the Reduced Polyketide Product Citreoviridin in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus Revealed by Heterologous Expression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Shyang; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Clay C C

    2016-03-18

    Citreoviridin (1) belongs to a class of F1-ATPase β-subunit inhibitors that are synthesized by highly reducing polyketide synthases. These potent mycotoxins share an α-pyrone polyene structure, and they include aurovertin, verrucosidin, and asteltoxin. The identification of the citreoviridin biosynthetic gene cluster in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus and its reconstitution using heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans are reported. Two intermediates were isolated that allowed the proposal of the biosynthetic pathway of citreoviridin. PMID:26954888

  13. Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Catalyze Early Hydroxylation Steps in the Potato Steroid Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Nakayasu, Masaru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Mizutani, Masaharu; Seki, Hikaru; Saito, Kazuki; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-08-01

    α-Solanine and α-chaconine, steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) found in potato (Solanum tuberosum), are among the best-known secondary metabolites in food crops. At low concentrations in potato tubers, SGAs are distasteful; however, at high concentrations, SGAs are harmful to humans and animals. Here, we show that POTATO GLYCOALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PGA1) and PGA2, two genes that encode cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP72A208 and CYP72A188), are involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway, respectively. The knockdown plants of either PGA1 or PGA2 contained very little SGA, yet vegetative growth and tuber production were not affected. Analyzing metabolites that accumulated in the plants and produced by in vitro enzyme assays revealed that PGA1 and PGA2 catalyzed the 26- and 22-hydroxylation steps, respectively, in the SGA biosynthetic pathway. The PGA-knockdown plants had two unique phenotypic characteristics: The plants were sterile and tubers of these knockdown plants did not sprout during storage. Functional analyses of PGA1 and PGA2 have provided clues for controlling both potato glycoalkaloid biosynthesis and tuber sprouting, two traits that can significantly impact potato breeding and the industry. PMID:27307258

  14. Alterations in the heme biosynthetic pathway as an index of exposure to toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, G.S.; Zelt, D.T.; Cole, S.P.

    1982-07-01

    Under normal circumstances the heme biosynthetic pathway is carefully controlled and porphyrins are formed in only trace amounts. When control mechanisms are disturbed by xenobiotics, porphyrins may be formed and serve as a signal of the interaction between a xenobiotic and the heme biosynthetic pathway. For example, porphyrinuria was an early manifestation of a hexachlorobenzene-induced porphyria outbreak in Turkey. In humans exposed to polybrominated biphenyls and to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin the urinary porphyrin pattern was significantly different from normal in a large number of exposed individuals. The question is raised whether measurement of urinary porphyrin profiles by improved methods will enable an estimate to be made of the extent of exposure to haloaromatic hydrocarbons in the human population. A wide variety of xenobiotics interact with the prosthetic heme of cytochrome P-450 forming novel N-alkylporphyrins. Identification of these N-alkylporphyrins in body fluids might provide a means of assessing exposure to a variety of xenobiotics in human populations.

  15. Indole-3-acetic acid in Fusarium graminearum: Identification of biosynthetic pathways and characterization of physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Rocheleau, Hélène; Qi, Peng-Fei; Zheng, You-Liang; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Ouellet, Thérèse

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a devastating pathogenic fungus causing fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat. This fungus can produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and a very large amount of IAA accumulates in wheat head tissues during the first few days of infection by F. graminearum. Using liquid culture conditions, we have determined that F. graminearum can use tryptamine (TAM) and indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) as biosynthetic intermediates to produce IAA. It is the first time that F. graminearum is shown to use the l-tryptophan-dependent TAM and IAN pathways rather than the indole-3-acetamide or indole-3-pyruvic acid pathways to produce IAA. Our experiments also showed that exogenous IAA was metabolized by F. graminearum. Exogenous IAA, TAM, and IAN inhibited mycelial growth; IAA and IAN also affected the hyphae branching pattern and delayed macroconidium germination. IAA and TAM had a small positive effect on the production of the mycotoxin 15-ADON while IAN inhibited its production. Our results showed that IAA and biosynthetic intermediates had a significant effect on F. graminearum physiology and suggested a new area of exploration for fungicidal compounds. PMID:27567719

  16. A cell-free framework for rapid biosynthetic pathway prototyping and enzyme discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ashty S; Jewett, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    Speeding up design-build-test (DBT) cycles is a fundamental challenge facing biochemical engineering. To address this challenge, we report a new cell-free protein synthesis driven metabolic engineering (CFPS-ME) framework for rapid biosynthetic pathway prototyping. In our framework, cell-free cocktails for synthesizing target small molecules are assembled in a mix-and-match fashion from crude cell lysates either containing selectively enriched pathway enzymes from heterologous overexpression or directly producing pathway enzymes in lysates by CFPS. As a model, we apply our approach to n-butanol biosynthesis showing that Escherichia coli lysates support a highly active 17-step CoA-dependent n-butanol pathway in vitro. The elevated degree of flexibility in the cell-free environment allows us to manipulate physiochemical conditions, access enzymatic nodes, discover new enzymes, and prototype enzyme sets with linear DNA templates to study pathway performance. We anticipate that CFPS-ME will facilitate efforts to define, manipulate, and understand metabolic pathways for accelerated DBT cycles without the need to reengineer organisms. PMID:26996382

  17. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  18. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H.; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway leading to all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not certain whether isomerization was achieved by Z-ISO alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independent...

  19. Trehalose Polyphleates Are Produced by a Glycolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Conserved across Phylogenetically Distant Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaud, Sophie; Laval, Françoise; Lemassu, Anne; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe; Chalut, Christian

    2016-02-18

    Mycobacteria synthesize a variety of structurally related glycolipids with major biological functions. Common themes have emerged for the biosynthesis of these glycolipids, including several families of proteins. Genes encoding these proteins are usually clustered on bacterial chromosomal islets dedicated to the synthesis of one glycolipid family. Here, we investigated the function of a cluster of five genes widely distributed across non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Using defined mutant analysis and in-depth structural characterization of glycolipids from wild-type or mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium abscessus, we established that they are involved in the formation of trehalose polyphleates (TPP), a family of compounds originally described in Mycobacterium phlei. Comparative genomics and lipid analysis of strains distributed along the mycobacterial phylogenetic tree revealed that TPP is synthesized by a large number of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. This work unravels a novel glycolipid biosynthetic pathway in mycobacteria and extends the spectrum of bacteria that produce TPP. PMID:27028886

  20. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E.; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering.

  1. Elucidation of the Vanillin Biosynthetic Pathway in Vanilla planifolia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallage, Nethaji Janeshawari

    harvested pods are processed by curing to stop the natural vegetative process and to initiate the enzymes that are responsible for the formation of the well-known aromatic flavour constituents. Vanillin (3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) is the main flavour component of vanilla extract from cured vanilla...... pods. As vanillin is toxic to living organisms in high concentrations, vanilla plants store vanillin almost entirely as the glucose conjugated form, vanillin-β-D-glucoside. The highest concentration of vanillin glucoside is localized in the inner part of the pod including mesocarp and placenta 6 months...... after the pollination. Subcellular localization of vanillin and its glucoside was speculated to be in the vacuole. Despite the popularity of the flavour, the vanillin biosynthetic pathway has remained elusive, presumably due to lack of genetic and genomic resources during past few decades. The research...

  2. An R2R3-MYB transcription factor regulates carotenoid pigmentation in Mimulus lewisii flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Janelle M; Stanley, Lauren E; LaFountain, Amy M; Frank, Harry A; Liu, Chang; Yuan, Yao-Wu

    2016-02-01

    Carotenoids are yellow, orange, and red pigments that contribute to the beautiful colors and nutritive value of many flowers and fruits. The structural genes in the highly conserved carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been well characterized in multiple plant systems, but little is known about the transcription factors that control the expression of these structural genes. By analyzing a chemically induced mutant of Mimulus lewisii through bulk segregant analysis and transgenic experiments, we have identified an R2R3-MYB, Reduced Carotenoid Pigmentation 1 (RCP1), as the first transcription factor that positively regulates carotenoid biosynthesis during flower development. Loss-of-function mutations in RCP1 lead to down-regulation of all carotenoid biosynthetic genes and reduced carotenoid content in M. lewisii flowers, a phenotype recapitulated by RNA interference in the wild-type background. Overexpression of this gene in the rcp1 mutant background restores carotenoid production and, unexpectedly, results in simultaneous decrease of anthocyanin production in some transgenic lines by down-regulating the expression of an activator of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Identification of transcriptional regulators of carotenoid biosynthesis provides the 'toolbox' genes for understanding the molecular basis of flower color diversification in nature and for potential enhancement of carotenoid production in crop plants via genetic engineering. PMID:26377817

  3. Enrichment of provitamin A content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by introduction of the bacterial carotenoid biosynthetic genes CrtB and CrtI

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Cheng; Zeng, Jian; Li, Yin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Ling; Miao, Yingjie; Deng, Pengyi; Yuan, Cuihong; Ma, Cheng; Chen, Xi; Zang, Mingli; Wang, Qiong; Li, Kexiu; Chang, Junli; Wang, Yuesheng

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid content is a primary determinant of wheat nutritional value and affects its end-use quality. Wheat grains contain very low carotenoid levels and trace amounts of provitamin A content. In order to enrich the carotenoid content in wheat grains, the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (CrtB) and carotene desaturase gene (CrtI) were transformed into the common wheat cultivar Bobwhite. Expression of CrtB or CrtI alone slightly increased the carotenoid content in the grains of transgenic wh...

  4. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh;

    2015-01-01

    anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer׳s disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin...

  5. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27262062

  6. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade.

  7. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Maoka

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine a...

  8. Living with high putrescine: expression of ornithine and arginine biosynthetic pathway genes in high and low putrescine producing poplar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew F; Minocha, Rakesh; Minocha, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    Arginine (Arg) and ornithine (Orn), both derived from glutamate (Glu), are the primary substrates for polyamine (PA) biosynthesis, and also play important roles as substrates and intermediates of overall N metabolism in plants. Their cellular homeostasis is subject to multiple levels of regulation. Using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we studied changes in the expression of all genes of the Orn/Arg biosynthetic pathway in response to up-regulation [via transgenic expression of mouse Orn decarboxylase (mODC)] of PA biosynthesis in poplar (Populus nigra × maximowiczii) cells grown in culture. Cloning and sequencing of poplar genes involved in the Orn/Arg biosynthetic pathway showed that they have high homology with similar genes in other plants. The expression of the genes of Orn, Arg and PA biosynthetic pathway fell into two hierarchical clusters; expression of one did not change in response to high putrescine, while members of the other cluster showed a shift in expression pattern during the 7-day culture cycle. Gene expression of branch point enzymes (N-acetyl-Glu synthase, Orn aminotransferase, Arg decarboxylase, and spermidine synthase) in the sub-pathways, constituted a separate cluster from those involved in intermediary reactions of the pathway (N-acetyl-Glu kinase, N-acetyl-Glu-5-P reductase, N-acetyl-Orn aminotransferase, N (2)-acetylOrn:N-acetyl-Glu acetyltransferase, N (2)-acetyl-Orn deacetylase, Orn transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, carbamoylphosphate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, spermine synthase). We postulate that expression of all genes of the Glu-Orn-Arg pathway is constitutively coordinated and is not influenced by the increase in flux rate through this pathway in response to increased utilization of Orn by mODC; thus the pathway involves mostly biochemical regulation rather than changes in gene expression. We further suggest that Orn itself plays a major role in the

  9. Functional characterization of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase, kaurene synthase and kaurene oxidase in the Salvia miltiorrhiza gibberellin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Tong, Yuru; Cheng, Qiqing; Hu, Yating; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Jian; Teng, Zhongqiu; Gao, Wei; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine for its roots and rhizomes. Its bioactive diterpenoid tanshinones have been reported to have many pharmaceutical activities, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Previous studies found four different diterpenoid biosynthetic pathways from the universal diterpenoid precursor (E,E,E)-geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) in S. miltiorrhiza. Here, we describe the functional characterization of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (SmCPSent), kaurene synthase (SmKS) and kaurene oxidase (SmKO) in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway. SmCPSent catalyzes the cyclization of GGPP to ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CPP), which is converted to ent-kaurene by SmKS. Then, SmKO catalyzes the three-step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid. Our results show that the fused enzyme SmKS-SmCPSent increases ent-kaurene production by several fold compared with separate expression of SmCPSent and SmKS in yeast strains. In this study, we clarify the GA biosynthetic pathway from GGPP to ent-kaurenoic acid and provide a foundation for further characterization of the subsequent enzymes involved in this pathway. These insights may allow for better growth and the improved accumulation of bioactive tanshinones in S. miltiorrhiza through the regulation of the expression of these genes during developmental processes. PMID:26971881

  10. New Insight into the Ochratoxin A Biosynthetic Pathway through Deletion of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Gene in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, A.; Bruno, K. S.; Solfrizzo, M.; Perrone, G.; Mule, G.; Visconti, A.; Baker, S. E.

    2012-09-14

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, is composed of a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and its biosynthetic pathway has not yet been completely elucidated. Most of the knowledge regarding the genetic and enzymatic aspects of OTA biosynthesis has been obtained in Penicillium species. In Aspergillus species only pks genes involved in the initial steps of the pathway have been partially characterized. In our study, the inactivation of a gene encoding a nonribosomal peptide synthetase in OTA producing A. carbonarius ITEM 5010 has removed the ability of the fungus to produce OTA. This is the first report on the involvement of an nrps gene product in OTA biosynthetic pathway in Aspergillus species. The absence of OTA and ochratoxin α-the isocoumaric derivative of OTA, and the concomitant increase of ochratoxin β- the dechloro analog of ochratoxin α- were observed in the liquid culture of transformed strain. The data provide the first evidence that the enzymatic step adding phenylalanine to polyketide dihydroisocoumarin precedes the chlorination step to form OTA in A. carbonarius, and that ochratoxin α is a product of hydrolysis of OTA, giving an interesting new insight in the biosynthetic pathway of the toxin.

  11. Biosynthetic investigation of phomopsins reveals a widespread pathway for ribosomal natural products in Ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Liu, Wan-Qiu; Jia, Youli; Li, Yongzhen; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Zhang, Qi

    2016-03-29

    Production of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) has rarely been reported in fungi, even though organisms of this kingdom have a long history as a prolific source of natural products. Here we report an investigation of the phomopsins, antimitotic mycotoxins. We show that phomopsin is a fungal RiPP and demonstrate the widespread presence of a pathway for the biosynthesis of a family of fungal cyclic RiPPs, which we term dikaritins. We characterize PhomM as an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent α-N-methyltransferase that converts phomopsin A to anN,N-dimethylated congener (phomopsin E), and show that the methyltransferases involved in dikaritin biosynthesis have evolved differently and likely have broad substrate specificities. Genome mining studies identified eight previously unknown dikaritins in different strains, highlighting the untapped capacity of RiPP biosynthesis in fungi and setting the stage for investigating the biological activities and unknown biosynthetic transformations of this family of fungal natural products. PMID:26979951

  12. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available Chalcone synthase (CHS catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1 encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants.

  13. R2R3 MYB transcription factors: key regulators of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czemmel, Stefan; Heppel, Simon C; Bogs, Jochen

    2012-06-01

    Flavonoids compose one of the most abundant and important subgroups of secondary metabolites with more than 6,000 compounds detected so far in higher plants. They are found in various compositions and concentrations in nearly all plant tissues. Besides the attraction of pollinators and dispersers to fruits and flowers, flavonoids also protect against a plethora of stresses including pathogen attack, wounding and UV irradiation. Flavonoid content and composition of fruits such as grapes, bilberries, strawberries and apples as well as food extracts such as green tea, wine and chocolate have been associated with fruit quality including taste, colour and health-promoting effects. To unravel the beneficial potentials of flavonoids on fruit quality, research has been focused recently on the molecular basis of flavonoid biosynthesis and regulation in economically important fruit-producing plants such as grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). Transcription factors and genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes have been characterized, studies that set a benchmark for future research on the regulatory networks controlling flavonoid biosynthesis and diversity. This review summarizes recent advances in the knowledge of regulatory cascades involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in grapevine. Transcriptional regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis during berry development is highlighted, with a particular focus on MYB transcription factors as molecular clocks, key regulators and powerful biotechnological tools to identify novel pathway enzymes to optimize flavonoid content and composition in grapes. PMID:22307206

  14. Metabolic engineering of the astaxanthin-biosynthetic pathway of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.; Verdoes, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    This review describes the different approaches that have been used to manipulate and improve carotenoid production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The red yeast X dendrorhous (formerly known as Phaffia rhodozyma) is one of the microbiological production systems for natural astaxanthin. Astaxanthin

  15. Carotenoids play a positive role in the degradation of heterocycles by Sphingobium yanoikuyae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial oxidative degradation is a potential way of removing pollutants such as heterocycles from the environment. During this process, reactive oxygen species or other oxidants are inevitably produced, and may cause damage to DNA, proteins, and membranes, thereby decreasing the degradation rate. Carotenoids can serve as membrane-integrated antioxidants, protecting cells from oxidative stress. FINDINGS: Several genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway were cloned and characterized from a carbazole-degrading bacterium Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5. In addition, a yellow-pigmented carotenoid synthesized by strain XLDN2-5 was identified as zeaxanthin that was synthesized from β-carotene through β-cryptoxanthin. The amounts of zeaxanthin and hydrogen peroxide produced were significantly and simultaneously enhanced during the biodegradation of heterocycles (carbazole < carbazole + benzothiophene < carbazole + dibenzothiophene. These higher production levels were consistent with the transcriptional increase of the gene encoding phytoene desaturase, one of the key enzymes for carotenoid biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5 can enhance the synthesis of zeaxanthin, one of the carotenoids, which may modulate membrane fluidity and defense against intracellular oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the positive role of carotenoids in the biodegradation of heterocycles, while elucidating the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the Sphingobium genus.

  16. The Or gene enhances carotenoid accumulation and stability during post-harvest storage of potato tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yang, Yong; Xu, Qiang; Owsiany, Katherine; Welsch, Ralf; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Lu, Shan; Van Eck, Joyce; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Failla, Mark; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2012-03-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality. To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability, we investigated transgenic potato tubers that expressed the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene. We found that the Or transgene not only promoted retention of β-carotene level, but also continuously stimulated its accumulation during 5 months of cold storage. In contrast, no increased levels of carotenoids were observed in the tubers of vector-only controls or a yellow-flesh variety during the same period of storage. The increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be associated with the formation of lipoprotein-carotenoid sequestering structures, as well as with the enhanced abundance of phytoene synthase, a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the provitamin A carotenoids stored were shown to be stable during simulated digestion and accessible for uptake by human intestinal absorptive cells. Proteomic analysis identified three major functional groups of proteins (i.e. heat shock proteins, glutathione-S-transferases, and carbohydrate metabolic proteins) that are potentially important in the Or-regulated carotenoid accumulation. Our results show that regulation of carotenoid sequestration capacity is an important mechanism by which carotenoid stability is regulated. Our findings suggest that induction of a proper sink structure formation in staple crops may provide the crops with a unique ability to promote and/or stabilize provitamin A accumulation during plant growth and post-harvest storage. PMID:22155949

  17. Comparative SNP diversity among four Eucalyptus species for genes from secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Foley William J; Maintz Jens; Hui Yeoh Suat; Külheim Carsten; Moran Gavin F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There is little information about the DNA sequence variation within and between closely related plant species. The combination of re-sequencing technologies, large-scale DNA pools and availability of reference gene sequences allowed the extensive characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of four biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of ecologically relevant secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus. With this approach the occurrence and pattern...

  18. Depth-related distribution of a key gene of the tetraether lipid biosynthetic pathway in marine Thaumarchaeota

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva, L.; Schouten, S; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGT) lipids synthesized by Thaumarchaeota has been shown to be temperature-dependent in world oceans. Depth-related differences in the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) of Thaumarchaeota have led to the classification of ‘shallow’ and ‘deep water’ clusters, potentially affecting GDGT distributions. Here, we investigate if this classification is also reflected in a key gene of the thaumarchaeotal lipid biosynthetic pathway codin...

  19. Enhancement of carotenoid biosynthesis in transplastomic tomatoes by induced lycopene-to-provitamin A conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Wiebke; Bock, Ralph

    2009-09-01

    Carotenoids are essential pigments of the photosynthetic apparatus and an indispensable component of the human diet. In addition to being potent antioxidants, they also provide the vitamin A precursor beta-carotene. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits, carotenoids accumulate in specialized plastids, the chromoplasts. How the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated and what limits total carotenoid accumulation in fruit chromoplasts is not well understood. Here, we have introduced the lycopene beta-cyclase genes from the eubacterium Erwinia herbicola and the higher plant daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) into the tomato plastid genome. While expression of the bacterial enzyme did not strongly alter carotenoid composition, expression of the plant enzyme efficiently converted lycopene, the major storage carotenoid of the tomato fruit, into provitamin A (beta-carotene). In green leaves of the transplastomic tomato plants, more lycopene was channeled into the beta-branch of carotenoid biosynthesis, resulting in increased accumulation of xanthophyll cycle pigments and correspondingly reduced accumulation of the alpha-branch xanthophyll lutein. In fruits, most of the lycopene was converted into beta-carotene with provitamin A levels reaching 1 mg per g dry weight. Unexpectedly, transplastomic tomatoes also showed a >50% increase in total carotenoid accumulation, indicating that lycopene beta-cyclase expression enhanced the flux through the pathway in chromoplasts. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and demonstrate the potential of plastids genome engineering for the nutritional enhancement of food crops. PMID:19587100

  20. Genetic manipulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Maresca, Julia A; Yunker, Colleen E;

    2004-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a strict anaerobe and an obligate photoautotroph. On the basis of sequence similarity with known enzymes or sequence motifs, nine open reading frames encoding putative enzymes of carotenoid biosynthesis were identified in the genome sequence of C....... tepidum, and all nine genes were inactivated. Analysis of the carotenoid composition in the resulting mutants allowed the genes encoding the following six enzymes to be identified: phytoene synthase (crtB/CT1386), phytoene desaturase (crtP/CT0807), zeta-carotene desaturase (crtQ/CT1414), gamma......-carotene desaturase (crtU/CT0323), carotenoid 1',2'-hydratase (crtC/CT0301), and carotenoid cis-trans isomerase (crtH/CT0649). Three mutants (CT0180, CT1357, and CT1416 mutants) did not exhibit a discernible phenotype. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in C. tepidum is similar to that in cyanobacteria and plants...

  1. Comparative SNP diversity among four Eucalyptus species for genes from secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley William J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little information about the DNA sequence variation within and between closely related plant species. The combination of re-sequencing technologies, large-scale DNA pools and availability of reference gene sequences allowed the extensive characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes of four biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of ecologically relevant secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus. With this approach the occurrence and patterns of SNP variation for a set of genes can be compared across different species from the same genus. Results In a single GS-FLX run, we sequenced over 103 Mbp and assembled them to approximately 50 kbp of reference sequences. An average sequencing depth of 315 reads per nucleotide site was achieved for all four eucalypt species, Eucalyptus globulus, E. nitens, E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba. We sequenced 23 genes from 1,764 individuals and discovered 8,631 SNPs across the species, with about 1.5 times as many SNPs per kbp in the introns compared to exons. The exons of the two closely related species (E. globulus and E. nitens had similar numbers of SNPs at synonymous and non-synonymous sites. These species also had similar levels of SNP diversity, whereas E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba had much higher SNP diversity. Neither the pathway nor the position in the pathway influenced gene diversity. The four species share between 20 and 43% of the SNPs in these genes. Conclusion By using conservative statistical detection methods, we were confident about the validity of each SNP. With numerous individuals sampled over the geographical range of each species, we discovered one SNP in every 33 bp for E. nitens and one in every 31 bp in E. globulus. In contrast, the more distantly related species contained more SNPs: one in every 16 bp for E. camaldulensis and one in 17 bp for E. loxophleba, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest frequency of SNPs

  2. Metabolic Engineering of Potato Carotenoid Content through Tuber-Specific Overexpression of a Bacterial Mini-Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Gianfranco Diretto; Salim Al-Babili; Raffaela Tavazza; Velia Papacchioli; Peter Beyer; Giovanni Giuliano

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the creation of "Golden Rice", biofortification of plant-derived foods is a promising strategy for the alleviation of nutritional deficiencies. Potato is the most important staple food for mankind after the cereals rice, wheat and maize, and is extremely poor in provitamin A carotenoids. METHODOLOGY: We transformed potato with a mini-pathway of bacterial origin, driving the synthesis of beta-carotene (Provitamin A) from geranylgeranyl diphosphate. Three genes, encoding phyto...

  3. Path analysis suggests phytoene accumulation is the key step limiting the carotenoid pathway in white carrot roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Fernandes Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Two F2 carrot (Daucus carota L. populations (orange rooted Brasilia x very dark orange rooted High Carotene Mass - HCM cross and the dark orange rooted cultivated variety B493 x white rooted wild carrot Queen Anne's Lace - QAL cross with very unrelated genetic backgrounds were used to investigate intrinsic factors limiting carotenoid accumulation in carrots by applying phenotypic correlation and path analysis to study the relationships between major root carotenes, root color and several other morphological traits. Most of the correlations between traits were close and agreed in sign between the two populations. Root weight had a moderate to highly significant positive correlation with leaf length, root length and top and middle root diameter. Although phenotypic correlations failed to identify the order of the substrates and products in the carotenoid pathway the correct order of substrates and products (phytoene -> zeta-carotene -> lycopene was identified in the causal diagram of beta-carotene for the Brasilia x HCM population. Path analysis of beta-carotene synthesis in the B493 x QAL population suggested that selection for root carotenes had little effect on plant morphological traits. Causal model of beta-carotene and lycopene in the B493 x QAL population suggested that phytoene synthesis is the key step limiting the carotenoid pathway in white carrots. Path analysis, first presented by Sewall Wright to study quantitative traits, appears to be a powerful statistical approach for the identification of key compounds in complex pathways.

  4. Changes in the biosynthetic pathways involved in selenium assimilation in wheat from a seleniferous area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    weight), which appear to be the highest selenium concentrations ever recorded in grains for human consumption. Selenium speciation revealed complex changes in the relative dominance of the biosynthetic pathways involved in selenium assimilation when uptake from soil increases. The preliminary results of this study also indicate that actions to limit the exposure of the population in the study area to excessive selenium are needed. On the other hand, it is clear that a proactive approach to tackle the problems of the local agricultural system is needed. Exploring the opportunities for producing naturally enriched products as selenium supplements for human and animal nutrition in areas worldwide with a low selenium status is part of this approach and will continue to be the subject of research.

  5. Metabolic engineering of potato carotenoid content through tuber-specific overexpression of a bacterial mini-pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Diretto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since the creation of "Golden Rice", biofortification of plant-derived foods is a promising strategy for the alleviation of nutritional deficiencies. Potato is the most important staple food for mankind after the cereals rice, wheat and maize, and is extremely poor in provitamin A carotenoids. METHODOLOGY: We transformed potato with a mini-pathway of bacterial origin, driving the synthesis of beta-carotene (Provitamin A from geranylgeranyl diphosphate. Three genes, encoding phytoene synthase (CrtB, phytoene desaturase (CrtI and lycopene beta-cyclase (CrtY from Erwinia, under tuber-specific or constitutive promoter control, were used. 86 independent transgenic lines, containing six different promoter/gene combinations, were produced and analyzed. Extensive regulatory effects on the expression of endogenous genes for carotenoid biosynthesis are observed in transgenic lines. Constitutive expression of the CrtY and/or CrtI genes interferes with the establishment of transgenosis and with the accumulation of leaf carotenoids. Expression of all three genes, under tuber-specific promoter control, results in tubers with a deep yellow ("golden" phenotype without any adverse leaf phenotypes. In these tubers, carotenoids increase approx. 20-fold, to 114 mcg/g dry weight and beta-carotene 3600-fold, to 47 mcg/g dry weight. CONCLUSIONS: This is the highest carotenoid and beta-carotene content reported for biofortified potato as well as for any of the four major staple foods (the next best event being "Golden Rice 2", with 31 mcg/g dry weight beta-carotene. Assuming a beta-carotene to retinol conversion of 6ratio1, this is sufficient to provide 50% of the Recommended Daily Allowance of Vitamin A with 250 gms (fresh weight of "golden" potatoes.

  6. Identification of a dTDP-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that oscillates with the molting cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Likui; Shou, Qingyao; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-06-01

    L-Rhamnose is a common component of cell-wall polysaccharides, glycoproteins and some natural products in bacteria and plants, but is rare in fungi and animals. In the present study, we identify and characterize a biosynthetic pathway for dTDP-rhamnose in Caenorhabditis elegans that is highly conserved across nematode species. We show that RML-1 activates glucose 1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) in the presence of either dTTP or UTP to yield dTDP-glucose or UDP-glucose, respectively. RML-2 is a dTDP-glucose 4,6-dehydratase, converting dTDP-glucose into dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose. Using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that coincubation of dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose with RML-3 (3,5-epimerase) and RML-4 (4-keto-reductase) produces dTDP-rhamnose. RML-4 could only be expressed and purified in an active form through co-expression with a co-regulated protein, RML-5, which forms a complex with RML-4. Analysis of the sugar nucleotide pool in C. elegans established the presence of dTDP-rhamnose in vivo Targeting the expression of the rhamnose biosynthetic genes by RNAi resulted in significant reductions in dTDP-rhamnose, but had no effect on the biosynthesis of a closely related sugar, ascarylose, found in the ascaroside pheromones. Therefore, the rhamnose and ascarylose biosynthetic pathways are distinct. We also show that transcriptional reporters for the rhamnose biosynthetic genes are expressed highly in the embryo, in the hypodermis during molting cycles and in the hypodermal seam cells specifically before the molt to the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. These expression patterns suggest that rhamnose biosynthesis may play an important role in hypodermal development or the production of the cuticle or surface coat during molting. PMID:27009306

  7. 植物类胡萝卜素研究进展%Advances of Carotenoid Research in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯耀兵; 康保珊; 黄进勇

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviewed the advances of research on carotenoid structure,enzyme and genes regulating carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in plant,especially in watermelon. The challenges and prospect of carotenoid research are also discussed.%结合西瓜介绍植物中类胡萝卜素的结构、生物合成途径中的酶及基因、合成调控研究进展,提出目前研究存在的问题,并展望未来的研究方向.

  8. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of the Crucial Cysteine Biosynthetic Pathway Enzyme O-Acetyl Serine Sulfhydrylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Mohit; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is of fundamental importance for the growth, survival, and pathogenicity of the many pathogens. This pathway is present in many species but is absent in mammals. The ability of pathogens to counteract the oxidative defences of a host is critical for the survival of these pathogens during their long latent phases, especially in anaerobic pathogens such as Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania donovani, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Salmonella typhimurium. All of these organisms rely on the de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway to assimilate sulphur and maintain a ready supply of cysteine. The de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway, on account of its being important for the survival of pathogens and at the same time being absent in mammals, is an important drug target for diseases such as amoebiasis, trichomoniasis & tuberculosis. Cysteine biosynthesis is catalysed by two enzymes: serine acetyl transferase (SAT) followed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). OASS is well studied, and with the availability of crystal structures of this enzyme in different conformations, it is a suitable template for structure-based inhibitor development. Moreover, OASS is highly conserved, both structurally and sequence-wise, among the above-mentioned organisms. There have been several reports of inhibitor screening and development against this enzyme from different organisms such as Salmonella typhimurium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Entamoeba histolytica. All of these inhibitors have been reported to display micromolar to nanomolar binding affinities for the open conformation of the enzyme. In this review, we highlight the structural similarities of this enzyme in different organisms and the attempts for inhibitor development so far. We also propose that the intermediate state of the enzyme may be the ideal target for the design of effective highaffinity inhibitors. PMID:26303427

  9. Biochemistry and molecular biology of carotenoid biosynthesis in chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, María del Rocío; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits' yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:24065101

  10. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Gómez-García

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  11. Differential involvement of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathways in pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manulis, S; Haviv-Chesner, A; Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E; Barash, I

    1998-07-01

    Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg), which induces galls on Gypsophila paniculata, harbors two major pathways for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) synthesis, the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) routes, as well as cytokinin biosynthetic genes. Mutants were generated in which the various biosynthetic routes were disrupted separately or jointly in order to assess the contribution of IAA of various origins and cytokinins to pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin biosynthesis caused the largest reduction in gall size. Inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a minor, nonsignificant decrease in pathogenicity. No further reduction in gall size was observed by the simultaneous inactivation of both IAA pathways only or in combination with that of cytokinin production. However, inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a 14-fold reduction in the population of Ehg on bean plants. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin production did not affect epiphytic fitness. While the apparent transcriptional activity of iaaM-inaZ fusion increased slightly in cells of Ehg on bean and gypsophila leaves, compared with that in culture, very high levels of induction were observed in cells injected into gypsophila stems. In contrast, moderate levels of induction of ipdC-inaZ in Ehg were observed on leaves of these plants and in gypsophila stems, when compared with that in culture. These results suggest that the IAM pathway is involved primarily in gall formation and support the main contribution of the IpyA pathway to the epiphytic fitness of this bacterial species. PMID:9650296

  12. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peifer Susanne

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1. Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1 derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization.

  13. Physiological and molecular responses of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway in a drought-resistant Mediterranean shrub, Cistus creticus exposed to water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Falara, Vasiliki; Pateraki, Irene; López-Carbonell, Marta; Cela, Jana; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2009-01-30

    The goal of the present research was to obtain new insights into the mechanisms underlying drought stress resistance in plants. Specifically, we evaluated changes in the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis, together with the levels of the corresponding metabolites (chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols and abscisic acid), in a drought-resistant Mediterranean shrub, Cistus creticus grown under Mediterranean field conditions. Summer drought led to reductions in the relative leaf water content (RWC) by 25%, but did not alter the maximum efficiency of PSII, indicating the absence of damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. While the expression of genes encoding C. creticus chlorophyll a oxygenase/chlorophyll b synthase (CAO) and phytoene synthase (PSY) were not affected by water deficit, the genes encoding homogentisate phytyl-transferase (HPT) and 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) were induced in water-stressed (WS) plants. Drought-induced changes in gene expression were observed at early stages of drought and were strongly correlated with levels of the corresponding metabolites, with simultaneous increases in abscisic acid and alpha-tocopherol levels of up to 4-fold and 62%, respectively. Furthermore, alpha-tocopherol levels were strongly positively correlated with abscisic acid contents, but not with the levels of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. We conclude that the abscisic acid and tocopherol biosynthetic pathway may be regulated at the transcript level in WS C. creticus plants, and that the genes encoding HPT and NCED may play a key role in the drought stress resistance of this Mediterranean shrub by modulating abscisic acid and tocopherol biosynthesis. PMID:18455260

  14. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC=C + NC=O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids. PMID:27285777

  15. Decoding Biosynthetic Pathways in Plants by Pulse-Chase Strategies Using 13CO2 as a Universal Tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelbert Bacher

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 13CO2 pulse-chase experiments monitored by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry can provide 13C-isotopologue compositions in biosynthetic products. Experiments with a variety of plant species have documented that the isotopologue profiles generated with 13CO2 pulse-chase labeling are directly comparable to those that can be generated by the application of [U-13C6]glucose to aseptically growing plants. However, the application of the 13CO2 labeling technology is not subject to the experimental limitations that one has to take into account for experiments with [U-13C6]glucose and can be applied to plants growing under physiological conditions, even in the field. In practical terms, the results of biosynthetic studies with 13CO2 consist of the detection of pairs, triples and occasionally quadruples of 13C atoms that have been jointly contributed to the target metabolite, at an abundance that is well above the stochastic occurrence of such multiples. Notably, the connectivities of jointly transferred 13C multiples can have undergone modification by skeletal rearrangements that can be diagnosed from the isotopologue data. As shown by the examples presented in this review article, the approach turns out to be powerful in decoding the carbon topology of even complex biosynthetic pathways.

  16. Laccase-catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols: from in vivo biosynthetic pathways to green synthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Baldrian, Petr; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2012-05-01

    Laccases are oxidases that contain several copper atoms, and catalyse single-electron oxidations of phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of oxygen to water. The enzymes are particularly widespread in ligninolytic basidiomycetes, but also occur in certain prokaryotes, insects and plants. Depending on the species, laccases are involved in various biosynthetic processes contributing to carbon recycling in land ecosystems and the morphogenesis of biomatrices, wherein low-molecular-weight naturally occurring phenols serve as key enzyme substrates. Studies of these in vivo synthetic pathways have afforded new insights into fungal laccase applicability in green synthetic chemistry. Thus, we here review fungal laccase-catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols that are particularly relevant to the synthesis of fine organic chemicals, and we discuss how the discovered synthetic strategies mimic laccase-involved in vivo pathways, thus enhancing the green nature of such reactions. Laccase-catalysed in vivo processes yield several types of biopolymers, including those of cuticles, lignin, polyflavonoids, humus and the melanin pigments, using natural mono- or poly-phenols as building blocks. The in vivo synthetic pathways involve either phenoxyl radical-mediated coupling or cross-linking reactions, and can be adapted to the design of in vitro oxidative processes involving fungal laccases in organic synthesis; the laccase substrates and the synthetic mechanisms reflect in vivo processes. Notably, such in vitro synthetic pathways can also reproduce physicochemical properties (e.g. those of chromophores, and radical-scavenging, hydration and antimicrobial activities) found in natural biomaterials. Careful study of laccase-associated in vivo metabolic pathways has been rewarded by the discovery of novel green applications for fungal laccases. This review comprehensively summarizes the available data on laccase-catalysed biosynthetic pathways and associated

  17. Mechanistic aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Moïse, Alexander R.

    2014-01-08

    Carotenoid synthesis is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. Carotenoids are tetraterpenes derived through the condensation of the five-carbon (C5) universal isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). A recently developed concept that could explain the role of the poly-cis pathway in carotenoid synthesis is that the intermediates of this pathway have additional physiological roles that extend beyond serving as precursors of lycopene. This concept is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. The feedback regulation of early carotenoid synthetic genes in response to a block in upstream metabolism represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the mechanism and regulation of carotenoid synthesis and of metabolic regulation in general. The molecular details of a signaling pathway that regulates carotenogenesis in response to the levels of carotenoid precursors are still unclear.

  18. Metabolic engineering Corynebacterium glutamicum for the L-lysine production by increasing the flux into L-lysine biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Han, Mei; Zhang, Junlan; Guo, Yanfeng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-09-01

    The experiments presented here were based on the conclusions of our previous results. In order to avoid introduction of expression plasmid and to balance the NADH/NAD ratio, the NADH biosynthetic enzyme, i.e., NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GADPH), was replaced by NADP-dependent GADPH, which was used to biosynthesize NADPH rather than NADH. The results indicated that the NADH/NAD ratio significantly decreased, and glucose consumption and L-lysine production drastically improved. Moreover, increasing the flux through L-lysine biosynthetic pathway and disruption of ilvN and hom, which involve in the branched amino acid and L-methionine biosynthesis, further improved L-lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Compared to the original strain C. glutamicum Lys5, the L-lysine production and glucose conversion efficiency (α) were enhanced to 81.0 ± 6.59 mM and 36.45% by the resulting strain C. glutamicum Lys5-8 in shake flask. In addition, the by-products (i.e., L-threonine, L-methionine and L-valine) were significantly decreased as results of genetic modification in homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) and acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS). In fed-batch fermentation, C. glutamicum Lys5-8 began to produce L-lysine at post-exponential growth phase and continuously increased over 36 h to a final titer of 896 ± 33.41 mM. The L-lysine productivity was 2.73 g l(-1) h(-1) and the α was 47.06% after 48 h. However, the attenuation of MurE was not beneficial to increase the L-lysine production because of decreasing the cell growth. Based on the above-mentioned results, we get the following conclusions: cofactor NADPH, precursor, the flux through L-lysine biosynthetic pathway and DCW are beneficial to improve L-lysine production in C. glutamicum. PMID:24879631

  19. Dothistroma pini, a Forest Pathogen, Contains Homologs of Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Pathway Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Ganley, Rebecca J.; Gillman, Carmel J.; Brendon J. Monahan; Seconi, Janet M.

    2002-01-01

    Homologs of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes have been identified in the pine needle pathogen Dothistroma pini. D. pini produces dothistromin, a difuranoanthraquinone toxin with structural similarity to the aflatoxin precursor versicolorin B. Previous studies with purified dothistromin suggest a possible role for this toxin in pathogenicity. By using an aflatoxin gene as a hybridization probe, a genomic D. pini clone was identified that contained four dot genes with similarity to genes in aflatox...

  20. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  1. Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Catalyze Early Hydroxylation Steps in the Potato Steroid Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Masaru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    α-Solanine and α-chaconine, steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) found in potato (Solanum tuberosum), are among the best-known secondary metabolites in food crops. At low concentrations in potato tubers, SGAs are distasteful; however, at high concentrations, SGAs are harmful to humans and animals. Here, we show that POTATO GLYCOALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PGA1) and PGA2, two genes that encode cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP72A208 and CYP72A188), are involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway, respectively. The knockdown plants of either PGA1 or PGA2 contained very little SGA, yet vegetative growth and tuber production were not affected. Analyzing metabolites that accumulated in the plants and produced by in vitro enzyme assays revealed that PGA1 and PGA2 catalyzed the 26- and 22-hydroxylation steps, respectively, in the SGA biosynthetic pathway. The PGA-knockdown plants had two unique phenotypic characteristics: The plants were sterile and tubers of these knockdown plants did not sprout during storage. Functional analyses of PGA1 and PGA2 have provided clues for controlling both potato glycoalkaloid biosynthesis and tuber sprouting, two traits that can significantly impact potato breeding and the industry. PMID:27307258

  2. Carotenoid excited states: Mystery of the dark states and their roles in relaxation pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš

    Messina : Universitá di Messina, 2008. s. 36. [ESF Workshop on Ultrafast Excited-State Processes in Condensed Phases. 18.06.2008-21.06.2008, Santa Tecla] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Formation of norisoprenoid flavor compounds in carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots: characterization of a cyclic-specific carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid pigments that upon oxidative cleavage lead to the production of norisoprenoids that have profound effect on flavor and aromas of agricultural produce. The biosynthetic pathway to norisoprenoids in carrots (Daucus carota L.) is still widely unknown. We found that geranial i...

  4. Differential selection on carotenoid biosynthesis genes as a function of gene position in the metabolic pathway: a study on the carrot and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Clotault

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history.

  5. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J C; Cerda, A; Simpson, K; Lopez-Diaz, I; Carrera, E; Handford, M; Stange, C

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition. PMID:26893492

  6. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between the carotenoid profile and the expression of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes is discussed. Finally, recent results of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of carotenoid contents and expression levels of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes in citrus fruit are shown. PMID:27069398

  7. A red pigment synthesized by an Aspergillus parasiticus mutant as a possible new intermediate in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M E; Herce, M D; Blanco, J L; Suárez, G

    1994-11-01

    The isolation of a red pigment from an Aspergillus parasiticus mutant obtained by 366 nm u.v. light treatment of A. parasiticus NRRL 2999 is described. Studies of conversion in aflatoxin B1 and G1 suggest that the red pigment could be a possible new intermediate in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway not described to date, and this has been verified by studies in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The solubility and stability characteristics under refrigeration storage, and the influence of the temperature and the pH on its production by the A. parasiticus mutant were also studied. It grew best at 30 degrees C and pH 6. The red pigment was most soluble in ethyl acetate. The results obtained in water are emphasized where there was high stability. PMID:8002480

  8. Evolutionary origins, molecular cloning and expression of carotenoid hydroxylases in eukaryotic photosynthetic algae

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Hongli; Yu, Xiaona; Wang, Yan; Cui, Yulin; Li, Xueqin; Liu, Zhaopu; Qin, Song

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthophylls, oxygenated derivatives of carotenes, play critical roles in photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants. Although the xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway of algae is largely unknown, it is of particular interest because they have a very complicated evolutionary history. Carotenoid hydroxylase (CHY) is an important protein that plays essential roles in xanthophylls biosynthesis. With the availability of 18 sequenced algal genomes, we performed a c...

  9. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-Methyl-D-Erythritol 4-Phosphate (MEP) and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl-phosphate (IPP) in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisi...

  10. Carotenoids in Microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Vitalia; Escobar, Carolina; Galarza, Janeth; Gimpel, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of isoprenoids synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms as well as by some non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi with broad applications in food, feed and cosmetics, and also in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. Microalgae represent an important source of high-value products, which include carotenoids, among others. Carotenoids play key roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis and in the protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against photooxidative damage. Carotenoids are generally divided into carotenes and xanthophyls, but accumulation in microalgae can also be classified as primary (essential for survival) and secondary (by exposure to specific stimuli).In this chapter, we outline the high value carotenoids produced by commercially important microalgae, their production pathways, the improved production rates that can be achieved by genetic engineering as well as their biotechnological applications. PMID:27485224

  11. Engineering a novel biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli for production of renewable ethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Brian; Zhang, Haoran; De Mey, Marjan; Lim, Chin Giaw; Li, Zheng-Jun; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is an important commodity chemical with broad industrial applications. It is presently produced from petroleum or natural gas feedstocks in processes requiring consumption of significant quantities of non-renewable resources. Here, we report a novel pathway for biosynthesis of EG from the renewable sugar glucose in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli. Serine-to-EG conversion was first achieved through a pathway comprising serine decarboxylase, ethanolamine oxidase, and glycolaldehyde reductase. Serine provision in E. coli was then enhanced by overexpression of the serine-biosynthesis pathway. The integration of these two parts into the complete EG-biosynthesis pathway in E. coli allowed for production of 4.1 g/L EG at a cumulative yield of 0.14 g-EG/g-glucose, establishing a foundation for a promising biotechnology. PMID:26221864

  12. Biosynthetic pathways in Methanospirillum hungatei as determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    OpenAIRE

    Ekiel, I; Smith, I C; Sprott, G D

    1983-01-01

    The main metabolic pathways in Methanospirillum hungatei GP1 were followed by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, with 13C-labeled acetate and CO2 as carbon sources. The labeling patterns found in carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleosides were consistent with the formation of pyruvate from acetate and CO2 as the first step in biosynthesis. Carbohydrates are formed by the glucogenic pathway, and no scrambling of label was observed, indicating that the oxidative or reductive pentose...

  13. The Biosynthetic Pathways for Shikimate and Aromatic Amino Acids in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Tzin, Vered; Galili, Gad

    2010-01-01

    The aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan in plants are not only essential components of protein synthesis, but also serve as precursors for a wide range of secondary metabolites that are important for plant growth as well as for human nutrition and health. The aromatic amino acids are synthesized via the shikimate pathway followed by the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic pathway, with chorismate serving as a major branch point intermediate metabolite. Yet, the regu...

  14. Bioenergetic coupling between membrane transport systems and biosynthetic pathways essential for cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it has been shown that there exists a point in the cell cycle (approximately 2 h prior to S phase entry) when (Na+/K+)ATPase pump activity is no longer needed for progression through the cycle. These data suggests that pump activity is critical in the biosynthetic processes which enables the cell to proceed through the G1 phase. A scheme is proposed which is currently being tested that (Na+/K+)ATPase pump activity serves as the driving force in the regulation of other membrane transport processes critical for cell proliferation. For example, in post-confluent quiescent C3H-10T1/2 fibroblasts, when [K+]/sub o/ is lowered just below the K/sub m/ of the pump for K+ there is a 10-fold increase in 3H-uridine uptake into both acid soluble and insoluble cell fractions. By modulation of the pump in this manner, glucose utilization is enhanced whereas inhibition of the pump by ouabain suppresses glucose utilization. In both methods of affecting the pump, 3H-leucine incorporation is inhibited. Electron acceptors that influence the redox state of the cell have been shown to both stimulate or inhibit cell cycle progression. Under conditions where [K+]/sub o/ is lowered, the nucleoside uptake responses observed were modified by electron acceptors depending on the ability to oxidize NAD(P)H directly or to interact with a cytochrome-like component, (e.g. phenazine methosulfate) reversed the enhanced uridine uptake and p-phenylene diamine further enhanced the uridine uptake response. These findings suggest that a plasma membrane redox system (presumably cyt-c like) is linked to nucleoside transport which is subject to (Na+/K+)ATPase activity

  15. Triterpenoid Saponin Biosynthetic Pathway Profiling and Candidate Gene Mining of the Ilex asprella Root Using RNA-Seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiasheng Zheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ilex asprella, which contains abundant α-amyrin type triterpenoid saponins, is an anti-influenza herbal drug widely used in south China. In this work, we first analysed the transcriptome of the I. asprella root using RNA-Seq, which provided a dataset for functional gene mining. mRNA was isolated from the total RNA of the I. asprella root and reverse-transcribed into cDNA. Then, the cDNA library was sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq™ 2000, which generated 55,028,452 clean reads. De novo assembly of these reads generated 51,865 unigenes, in which 39,269 unigenes were annotated (75.71% yield. According to the structures of the triterpenoid saponins of I. asprella, a putative biosynthetic pathway downstream of 2,3-oxidosqualene was proposed and candidate unigenes in the transcriptome data that were potentially involved in the pathway were screened using homology-based BLAST and phylogenetic analysis. Further amplification and functional analysis of these putative unigenes will provide insight into the biosynthesis of Ilex triterpenoid saponins.

  16. Targeted Gene Disruption of the Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptomyces sp. US24 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Sioud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously isolated a new actinomycete strain from Tunisian soil called Streptomyces sp. US24, and have shown that it produces two bioactive molecules including a Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro diketopiperazine (DKP. To identify the structural genes responsible for the synthesis of this DKP derivative, a PCR amplification (696 bp was carried out using the Streptomyces sp. US24 genomic DNA as template and two degenerate oligonucleotides designed by analogy with genes encoding peptide synthetases (NRPS. The detection of DKP derivative biosynthetic pathway of the Streptomyces sp. US24 strain was then achieved by gene disruption via homologous recombination using a suicide vector derived from the conjugative plasmid pSET152 and containing the PCR product. Chromatography analysis, biological tests and spectroscopic studies of supernatant cultures of the wild-type Streptomyces sp. US24 strain and three mutants obtained by this gene targeting disruption approach showed that the amplified DNA fragment is required for Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro biosynthesis in Streptomyces sp. US24 strain. This DKP derivative seems to be produced either directly via a nonribosomal pathway or as a side product in the course of nonribosomal synthesis of a longer peptide.

  17. Regulatory role of hexosamine biosynthetic pathway on hepatic cancer stem cell marker CD133 under low glucose conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hai; Liu, Tengfei; Ming, Xiaoyan; Tang, Zhi; Fu, Li; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kanawati, Basem; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Cai, Zongwei

    2016-02-01

    Cancer was hypothesized to be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs), but the metabolic determinants of CSC-like phenotype still remain elusive. Here, we present that hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) at least in part rescues cancer cell fate with inactivation of glycolysis. Firstly, metabolomic analysis profiled cellular metabolome in CSCs of hepatocellular carcinoma using CD133 cell-surface marker. The metabolic signatures of CD133-positive subpopulation compared to CD133-negative cells highlighted HBP as one of the distinct metabolic pathways, prompting us to uncover the role of HBP in maintenance of CSC-like phenotype. To address this, CSC-like phenotypes and cell survival were investigated in cancer cells under low glucose conditions. As a result, HBP inhibitor azaserine reduced CD133-positive subpopulation and CD133 expression under high glucose condition. Furthermore, treatment of N-Acetylglucosamine in part restores CD133-positive subpopulation when either 2.5 mM glucose in culture media or glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose in HCC cell lines was applied, enhancing CD133 expression as well as promoting cancer cell survival. Together, HBP might be a key metabolic determinant in the functions of hepatic CSC marker CD133.

  18. The Or Gene Enhances Carotenoid Accumulation and Stability During Post-Harvest Storage of Potato Tubers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Mark Failla; Theodore W.Thannhauser; Yong Yang; Qiang Xu; Katherine Owsiany; Ralf Welsch; Chureeporn Chitchumroonchokchai; Shan Lu; Joyce Van Eck; Xiu-Xin Deng

    2012-01-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality.To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability,we investigated transgenic potato tubers that expressed the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene.We found that the Or transgene not only promoted retention of β-carotene level,but also continuously stimulated its accumulation during 5 months of cold storage.In contrast,no increased levels of carotenoids were observed in the tubers of vector-only controls or a yellowflesh variety during the same period of storage.The increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be associated with the formation of lipoprotein-carotenoid sequestering structures,as well as with the enhanced abundance of phytoene synthase,a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway.Furthermore,the provitamin A carotenoids stored were shown to be stable during simulated digestion and accessible for uptake by human intestinal absorptive cells.Proteomic analysis identified three major functional groups of proteins (i.e.heat shock proteins,glutathione-S-transferases,and carbohydrate metabolic proteins) that are potentially important in the Or-regulated carotenoid accumulation.Our results show that regulation of carotenoid sequestration capacity is an important mechanism by which carotenoid stability is regulated.Our findings suggest that induction of a proper sink structure formation in staple crops may provide the crops with a unique ability to promote and/or stabilize provitamin A accumulation during plant growth and post-harvest storage.

  19. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Corniani

    Full Text Available The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisic acid and gibberellins. Consequently, disruption of this pathway is harmful to plants. We developed an in vivo bioassay that can measure the carbon flow through the carotenoid pathway. Leaf cuttings are incubated in the presence of a phytoene desaturase inhibitor to induce phytoene accumulation. Any compound reducing the level of phytoene accumulation is likely to interfere with either one of the steps in the MEP pathway or the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate. This concept was tested with known inhibitors of steps of the MEP pathway. The specificity of this in vivo bioassay was also verified by testing representative herbicides known to target processes outside of the MEP and carotenoid pathways. This assay enables the rapid screen of new inhibitors of enzymes preceding the synthesis of phytoene, though there are some limitations related to the non-specific effect of some inhibitors on this assay.

  20. De novo transcriptome assembly and the putative biosynthetic pathway of steroidal sapogenins of Dioscorea composita.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    Full Text Available The plant Dioscorea composita has important applications in the medical and energy industries, and can be used for the extraction of steroidal sapogenins (important raw materials for the synthesis of steroidal drugs and bioethanol production. However, little is known at the genetic level about how sapogenins are biosynthesized in this plant. Using Illumina deep sequencing, 62,341 unigenes were obtained by assembling its transcriptome, and 27,720 unigenes were annotated. Of these, 8,022 unigenes were mapped to 243 specific pathways, and 531 unigenes were identified to be involved in 24 secondary metabolic pathways. 35 enzymes, which were encoded by 79 unigenes, were related to the biosynthesis of steroidal sapogenins in this transcriptome database, covering almost all the nodes in the steroidal pathway. The results of real-time PCR experiments on ten related transcripts (HMGR, MK, SQLE, FPPS, DXS, CAS, HMED, CYP51, DHCR7, and DHCR24 indicated that sapogenins were mainly biosynthesized by the mevalonate pathway. The expression of these ten transcripts in the tuber and leaves was found to be much higher than in the stem. Also, expression in the shoots was low. The nucleotide and protein sequences and conserved domains of four related genes (HMGR, CAS, SQS, and SMT1 were highly conserved between D. composita and D. zingiberensis; but expression of these four genes is greater in D. composita. However, there is no expression of these key enzymes in potato and no steroidal sapogenins are synthesized.

  1. De novo transcriptome assembly and the putative biosynthetic pathway of steroidal sapogenins of Dioscorea composita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Dijia; Wang, Yuqi; Xie, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The plant Dioscorea composita has important applications in the medical and energy industries, and can be used for the extraction of steroidal sapogenins (important raw materials for the synthesis of steroidal drugs) and bioethanol production. However, little is known at the genetic level about how sapogenins are biosynthesized in this plant. Using Illumina deep sequencing, 62,341 unigenes were obtained by assembling its transcriptome, and 27,720 unigenes were annotated. Of these, 8,022 unigenes were mapped to 243 specific pathways, and 531 unigenes were identified to be involved in 24 secondary metabolic pathways. 35 enzymes, which were encoded by 79 unigenes, were related to the biosynthesis of steroidal sapogenins in this transcriptome database, covering almost all the nodes in the steroidal pathway. The results of real-time PCR experiments on ten related transcripts (HMGR, MK, SQLE, FPPS, DXS, CAS, HMED, CYP51, DHCR7, and DHCR24) indicated that sapogenins were mainly biosynthesized by the mevalonate pathway. The expression of these ten transcripts in the tuber and leaves was found to be much higher than in the stem. Also, expression in the shoots was low. The nucleotide and protein sequences and conserved domains of four related genes (HMGR, CAS, SQS, and SMT1) were highly conserved between D. composita and D. zingiberensis; but expression of these four genes is greater in D. composita. However, there is no expression of these key enzymes in potato and no steroidal sapogenins are synthesized. PMID:25860891

  2. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between

  3. Yeast artificial chromosomes employed for random assembly of biosynthetic pathways and production of diverse compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Partha P

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural products are an important source of drugs and other commercially interesting compounds, however their isolation and production is often difficult. Metabolic engineering, mainly in bacteria and yeast, has sought to circumvent some of the associated problems but also this approach is impeded by technical limitations. Here we describe a novel strategy for production of diverse natural products, comprising the expression of an unprecedented large number of biosynthetic genes in a heterologous host. Results As an example, genes from different sources, representing enzymes of a seven step flavonoid pathway, were individually cloned into yeast expression cassettes, which were then randomly combined on Yeast Artificial Chromosomes and used, in a single transformation of yeast, to create a variety of flavonoid producing pathways. Randomly picked clones were analysed, and approximately half of them showed production of the flavanone naringenin, and a third of them produced the flavonol kaempferol in various amounts. This reflected the assembly of 5–7 step multi-species pathways converting the yeast metabolites phenylalanine and/or tyrosine into flavonoids, normally only produced by plants. Other flavonoids were also produced that were either direct intermediates or derivatives thereof. Feeding natural and unnatural, halogenated precursors to these recombinant clones demonstrated the potential to further diversify the type of molecules that can be produced with this technology. Conclusion The technology has many potential uses but is particularly suited for generating high numbers of structurally diverse compounds, some of which may not be amenable to chemical synthesis, thus greatly facilitating access to a huge chemical space in the search for new commercially interesting compounds

  4. Functional analysis of aromatic biosynthetic pathways in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Henares, M Antonia; García-Salamanca, Adela; Molina-Henares, A Jesús; de la Torre, Jesús; Herrera, M Carmen; Ramos, Juan L; Duque, Estrella

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a non-pathogenic prototrophic bacterium with high potential for biotechnological applications. Despite all that is known about this strain, the biosynthesis of essential chemicals has not been fully analysed and auxotroph mutants are scarce. We carried out massive mini-Tn5 random mutagenesis and screened for auxotrophs that require aromatic amino acids. The biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids was analysed in detail including physical and transcriptional organization of genes, complementation assays and feeding experiments to establish pathway intermediates. There is a single pathway from chorismate leading to the biosynthesis of tryptophan, whereas the biosynthesis of phenylalanine and tyrosine is achieved through multiple convergent pathways. Genes for tryptophan biosynthesis are grouped in unlinked regions with the trpBA and trpGDE genes organized as operons and the trpI, trpE and trpF genes organized as single transcriptional units. The pheA and tyrA gene-encoding multifunctional enzymes for phenylalanine and tyrosine biosynthesis are linked in the chromosome and form an operon with the serC gene involved in serine biosynthesis. The last step in the biosynthesis of these two amino acids requires an amino transferase activity for which multiple tyrB-like genes are present in the host chromosome. PMID:21261884

  5. Hijacking the Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway to Promote EMT-Mediated Neoplastic Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparra, Kekoa; Tran, Phuoc T.; Zachara, Natasha E.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved program necessary for orchestrating distant cell migration during embryonic development. Multiple studies in cancer have demonstrated a critical role for EMT during the initial stages of tumorigenesis and later during tumor invasion. Transcription factors (TFs) such as SNAIL, TWIST, and ZEB are master EMT regulators that are aberrantly overexpressed in many malignancies. Recent evidence correlates EMT-related transcriptomic alterations with metabolic reprograming in cancer. Metabolic alterations may allow cancer to adapt to environmental stressors, supporting the irregular macromolecular demand of rapid proliferation. One potential metabolic pathway of increasing importance is the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP). The HBP utilizes glycolytic intermediates to generate the metabolite UDP–GlcNAc. This and other charged nucleotide sugars serve as the basis for biosynthesis of glycoproteins and other glycoconjugates. Recent reports in the field of glycobiology have cultivated great curiosity within the cancer research community. However, specific mechanistic relationships between the HBP and fundamental pathways of cancer, such as EMT, have yet to be elucidated. Altered protein glycosylation downstream of the HBP is well positioned to mediate many cellular changes associated with EMT including cell–cell adhesion, responsiveness to growth factors, immune system evasion, and signal transduction programs. Here, we outline some of the basics of the HBP and putative roles the HBP may have in driving EMT-related cancer processes. With novel appreciation of the HBP’s connection to EMT, we hope to illuminate the potential for new therapeutic targets of cancer. PMID:27148477

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Biosynthetic Gene Clusters and Pathways for Three Structurally Related Antitumor Antibiotics Bleomycin, Tallysomycin and Zorbamycin†

    OpenAIRE

    Galm, Ute; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Wang, Liyan; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Unsin, Claudia; Tao, Meifeng; Coughlin, Jane M.; Shen, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthetic gene clusters for the glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics bleomycin (BLM), tallysomycin (TLM), and zorbamycin (ZBM) have been recently cloned and characterized from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003, Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158, and Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, respectively. The striking similarities and differences among the biosynthetic gene clusters for the three structurally related glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics prompted us to compare and...

  7. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria: Structural and Evolutionary Scenarios Based on Comparative Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwei Liang , Fangqing Zhao , Wei Wei , Zhangxiao Wen , Song Qin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are widely distributed pigments in nature and their biosynthetic pathway has been extensively studied in various organisms. The recent access to the overwhelming amount genomic data of cyanobacteria has given birth to a novel approach called comparative genomics. The putative enzymes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria were determined by similarity-based tools. The reconstruction of biosynthetic pathway was based on the related enzymes. It is interesting to find that nearly all the cyanobacteria share quite similar pathway to synthesize β-carotene except for Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421. The enzymes, crtE-B-P-Qb-L, involved in the upstream pathway are more conserved than the subsequent ones (crtW-R. In addition, many carotenoid synthesis enzymes exhibit diversity in structure and function. Such examples in the families of ζ –carotene desaturase, lycopene cylases and carotene ketolases were described in this article. When we mapped these crt genes to the cyanobacterial genomes, the crt genes showed great structural variation among species. All of them are dispersed on the whole chromosome in contrast to the linear adjacent distribution of the crt gene cluster in other eubacteria. Moreover, in unicellular cyanobacteria, each step of the carotenogenic pathway is usually catalyzed by one gene product, whereas multiple ketolase genes are found in filamentous cyanobacteria. Such increased numbers of crt genes and their correlation to the ecological adaptation were carefully discussed.

  8. The Structure of L-Tyrosine 2,3-Aminomutase frmo the C-1027 Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson,C.; Montavon, T.; Van Lanen, S.; Shen, B.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The SgcC4 L-tyrosine 2,3-aminomutase (SgTAM) catalyzes the formation of (S)-{beta}-tyrosine in the biosynthetic pathway of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. SgTAM is homologous to the histidine ammonia lyase family of enzymes whose activity is dependent on the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) cofactor. Unlike the lyase enzymes, SgTAM catalyzes additional chemical transformations resulting in an overall stereospecific 1,2-amino shift in the substrate L-tyrosine to generate (S)-{beta}-tyrosine. Previously, we provided kinetic, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data supporting the presence of MIO in the active site of SgTAM [Christenson, S. D.; Wu, W.; Spies, A.; Shen, B.; and Toney, M. D. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 12708-12718]. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of an MIO-containing aminomutase, SgTAM, and confirm the structural homology of SgTAM to ammonia lyases. Comparison of the structure of SgTAM to the L-tyrosine ammonia lyase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides provides insight into the structural basis for aminomutase activity. The results show that SgTAM has a closed active site well suited to retain ammonia and minimize the formation of lyase elimination products. The amino acid determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis can be predicted from the structure, setting the framework for detailed mechanistic investigations.

  9. The structure of L-tyrosine 2,3-aminomutase from the C-1027 enediyne antitumor antibiotic biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Carl V; Montavon, Timothy J; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben; Bruner, Steven D

    2007-06-19

    The SgcC4 l-tyrosine 2,3-aminomutase (SgTAM) catalyzes the formation of (S)-beta-tyrosine in the biosynthetic pathway of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. SgTAM is homologous to the histidine ammonia lyase family of enzymes whose activity is dependent on the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) cofactor. Unlike the lyase enzymes, SgTAM catalyzes additional chemical transformations resulting in an overall stereospecific 1,2-amino shift in the substrate l-tyrosine to generate (S)-beta-tyrosine. Previously, we provided kinetic, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data supporting the presence of MIO in the active site of SgTAM [Christenson, S. D.; Wu, W.; Spies, A.; Shen, B.; and Toney, M. D. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 12708-12718]. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of an MIO-containing aminomutase, SgTAM, and confirm the structural homology of SgTAM to ammonia lyases. Comparison of the structure of SgTAM to the l-tyrosine ammonia lyase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides provides insight into the structural basis for aminomutase activity. The results show that SgTAM has a closed active site well suited to retain ammonia and minimize the formation of lyase elimination products. The amino acid determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis can be predicted from the structure, setting the framework for detailed mechanistic investigations. PMID:17516659

  10. Selectively improving nikkomycin Z production by blocking the imidazolone biosynthetic pathway of nikkomycin X and uracil feeding in Streptomyces ansochromogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Haihua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nikkomycins are a group of peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics and act as potent inhibitors of chitin synthases in fungi and insects. Nikkomycin X and Z are the main components produced by Streptomyces ansochromogenes. Of them, nikkomycin Z is a promising antifungal agent with clinical significance. Since highly structural similarities between nikkomycin Z and X, separation of nikkomycin Z from the culture medium of S. ansochromogenes is difficult. Thus, generating a nikkomycin Z selectively producing strain is vital to scale up the nikkomycin Z yields for clinical trials. Results A nikkomycin Z producing strain (sanPDM was constructed by blocking the imidazolone biosynthetic pathway of nikkomycin X via genetic manipulation and yielded 300 mg/L nikkomycin Z and abolished the nikkomycin X production. To further increase the yield of nikkomycin Z, the effects of different precursors on its production were investigated. Precursors of nucleoside moiety (uracil or uridine had a stimulatory effect on nikkomycin Z production while precursors of peptidyl moiety (L-lysine and L-glutamate had no effect. sanPDM produced the maximum yields of nikkomycin Z (800 mg/L in the presence of uracil at the concentration of 2 g/L and it was approximately 2.6-fold higher than that of the parent strain. Conclusion A high nikkomycin Z selectively producing was obtained by genetic manipulation combined with precursors feeding. The strategy presented here might be applicable in other bacteria to selectively produce targeted antibiotics.

  11. Crystal Structure of Baeyer−Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Enzyme of the Mithramycin Biosynthetic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beam, Miranda P.; Bosserman, Mary A.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Wehenkel, Marie; Rohr, Jurgen; Kentucky

    2009-06-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), mostly flavoproteins, were shown to be powerful biocatalysts for synthetic organic chemistry applications and were also suggested to play key roles for the biosyntheses of various natural products. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of MtmOIV, a 56 kDa homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent monooxygenase, which catalyzes the key frame-modifying step of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway and currently the only BVMO proven to react with its natural substrate via a Baeyer-Villiger reaction. MtmOIV's structure was determined by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement to a resolution of 2.9 A. MtmOIV cleaves a C-C bond, essential for the conversion of the biologically inactive precursor, premithramycin B, into the active drug mithramycin. The MtmOIV structure combined with substrate docking calculations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments identifies several residues that participate in cofactor and substrate binding. Future experimentation aimed at broadening the substrate specificity of the enzyme could facilitate the generation of chemically diverse mithramycin analogues through combinatorial biosynthesis.

  12. Depth-related distribution of a key gene of the tetraether lipid biosynthetic pathway in marine Thaumarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Laura; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGT) lipids synthesized by Thaumarchaeota has been shown to be temperature-dependent in world oceans. Depth-related differences in the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) of Thaumarchaeota have led to the classification of 'shallow' and 'deep water' clusters, potentially affecting GDGT distributions. Here, we investigate if this classification is also reflected in a key gene of the thaumarchaeotal lipid biosynthetic pathway coding for geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate (GGGP) synthase. We investigated metagenomic databases, suspended particulate matter and surface sediment of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone. These revealed significant differences in amoA and GGGP synthase between 'shallow' and 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota. Intriguingly, amoA and GGGP synthase sequences of benthic Thaumarchaeota clustered with the 'shallow water' rather than with 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota. This suggests that pressure and temperature are unlikely factors that drive the differentiation, and suggests an important role of ammonia concentration that is higher in benthic and 'shallow water' niches. Analysis of the relative abundance of GDGTs in the Arabian Sea and in globally distributed surface sediments showed differences in GDGT distributions from subsurface to deep waters that may be explained by differences in the GGGP synthase, suggesting a genetic control on GDGT distributions. PMID:24813867

  13. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding β-amyrin synthase in the glycyrrhizic acid biosynthetic pathway in Glycyrrhiza uralensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhiza uralensis is considered to be one of the most important herbs in traditional Chinese medicine due to its numerous pharmacological effects particularly its ability to relieve cough and act as a mucolytic. Based on previous research, these effects are mediated by a number of active ingredients, especially glycyrrhizic acid (GA. In the present study, a gene encoding β-amyrin synthase (β-AS involved in GA biosynthesis in G. uralensis has been cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cloned enzyme showed similar activity to native enzymes isolated from other Glycyrrhiza species to catalyze the conversion of 2,3-oxidosqualene into β-amyrin. In fact the β-AS gene is particularly important in the GA biosynthetic pathway in G. uralensis. The complete sequence of the enzyme was determined and a phylogenetic tree based on the β-AS gene of G. uralensis and 20 other species was created. This showed that Glycyrrhiza glabra had the closest kinship with G. uralensis. The results of this work will be useful in determining how to improve the efficacy of G. uralensis by improving its GA content and in exploring the biosynthesis of GA in vitro.

  14. Colorful World of Microbes: Carotenoids and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwaha Kirti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cells accumulate pigments under certain culture conditions, which have very important industrial applications. Microorganisms can serve as sources of carotenoids, the most widespread group of naturally occurring pigments. More than 750 structurally different yellow, orange, and red colored molecules are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes with an estimated market of $ 919 million by 2015. Carotenoids protect cells against photooxidative damage and hence found important applications in environment, food and nutrition, disease control, and as potent antimicrobial agents. In addition to many research advances, this paper reviews concerns with recent evaluations, applications of microbial pigments, and recommendations for future researches with an understanding of evolution and biosynthetic pathways along with other relevant aspects.

  15. A specialized flavone biosynthetic pathway has evolved in the medicinal plant, Scutellaria baicalensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Gang; Hill, Lionel; Weng, Jing-Ke; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Xue, Hongwei; Martin, Cathie

    2016-01-01

    Wogonin and baicalein are bioactive flavones in the popular Chinese herbal remedy Huang-Qin (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi). These specialized flavones lack a 4′-hydroxyl group on the B ring (4′-deoxyflavones) and induce apoptosis in a wide spectrum of human tumor cells in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo in different mouse tumor models. Root-specific flavones (RSFs) from Scutellaria have a variety of reported additional beneficial effects including antioxidant and antiviral properties. We describe the characterization of a new pathway for the synthesis of these compounds, in which pinocembrin (a 4′-deoxyflavanone) serves as a key intermediate. Although two genes encoding flavone synthase II (FNSII) are expressed in the roots of S. baicalensis, FNSII-1 has broad specificity for flavanones as substrates, whereas FNSII-2 is specific for pinocembrin. FNSII-2 is responsible for the synthesis of 4′-deoxyRSFs, such as chrysin and wogonin, wogonoside, baicalein, and baicalin, which are synthesized from chrysin. A gene encoding a cinnamic acid–specific coenzyme A ligase (SbCLL-7), which is highly expressed in roots, is required for the synthesis of RSFs by FNSII-2, as demonstrated by gene silencing. A specific isoform of chalcone synthase (SbCHS-2) that is highly expressed in roots producing RSFs is also required for the synthesis of chrysin. Our studies reveal a recently evolved pathway for biosynthesis of specific, bioactive 4′-deoxyflavones in the roots of S. baicalensis.

  16. A specialized flavone biosynthetic pathway has evolved in the medicinal plant, Scutellaria baicalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Gang; Hill, Lionel; Weng, Jing-Ke; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Xue, Hongwei; Martin, Cathie

    2016-04-01

    Wogonin and baicalein are bioactive flavones in the popular Chinese herbal remedy Huang-Qin (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi). These specialized flavones lack a 4'-hydroxyl group on the B ring (4'-deoxyflavones) and induce apoptosis in a wide spectrum of human tumor cells in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo in different mouse tumor models. Root-specific flavones (RSFs) from Scutellaria have a variety of reported additional beneficial effects including antioxidant and antiviral properties. We describe the characterization of a new pathway for the synthesis of these compounds, in which pinocembrin (a 4'-deoxyflavanone) serves as a key intermediate. Although two genes encoding flavone synthase II (FNSII) are expressed in the roots of S. baicalensis, FNSII-1 has broad specificity for flavanones as substrates, whereas FNSII-2 is specific for pinocembrin. FNSII-2 is responsible for the synthesis of 4'-deoxyRSFs, such as chrysin and wogonin, wogonoside, baicalein, and baicalin, which are synthesized from chrysin. A gene encoding a cinnamic acid-specific coenzyme A ligase (SbCLL-7), which is highly expressed in roots, is required for the synthesis of RSFs by FNSII-2, as demonstrated by gene silencing. A specific isoform of chalcone synthase (SbCHS-2) that is highly expressed in roots producing RSFs is also required for the synthesis of chrysin. Our studies reveal a recently evolved pathway for biosynthesis of specific, bioactive 4'-deoxyflavones in the roots of S. baicalensis. PMID:27152350

  17. Orthogonal Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway Improves Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Dawn T; HamediRad, Mohammad; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-17

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are a form of biodiesel that can be microbially produced via a transesterification reaction of fatty acids with ethanol. The titer of microbially produced FAEEs can be greatly reduced by unbalanced metabolism and an insufficient supply of fatty acids, resulting in a commercially inviable process. Here, we report on a pathway engineering strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhancing the titer of microbially produced FAEEs by providing the cells with an orthogonal route for fatty acid synthesis. The fatty acids generated from this heterologous pathway would supply the FAEE production, safeguarding endogenous fatty acids for cellular metabolism and growth. We investigated the heterologous expression of a Type-I fatty acid synthase (FAS) from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes coupled with WS/DGAT, the wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme that catalyzes the transesterification reaction with ethanol. Strains harboring the orthologous fatty acid synthesis yielded a 6.3-fold increase in FAEE titer compared to strains without the heterologous FAS. Variations in fatty acid chain length and degree of saturation can affect the quality of the biodiesel; therefore, we also investigated the diversity of the fatty acid production profile of FAS enzymes from other Actinomyces organisms. PMID:25594225

  18. Use of the valine biosynthetic pathway to convert glucose into isobutanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savrasova, Ekaterina A; Kivero, Aleksander D; Shakulov, Rustem S; Stoynova, Nataliya V

    2011-09-01

    Microbiological synthesis of higher alcohols (1-butanol, isobutanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, etc.) from plant biomass is critically important due to their advantages over ethanol as a motor fuel. In recent years, the use of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis pathways together with heterologous Ehrlich pathway enzyme system (Hazelwood et al. in Appl Environ Microbiol 74:2259-2266, 2008) has been proposed by the Liao group as an alternative approach to aerobic production of higher alcohols as new-generation biofuels (Atsumi et al. in Nature 451:86-90, 2008; Atsumi et al. in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 85:651-657, 2010; Cann and Liao in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 81:89-98, 2008; Connor and Liao in Appl Environ Microbiol 74:5769-5775, 2008; Shen and Liao in Metab Eng 10:312-320, 2008; Yan and Liao in J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol 36:471-479, 2009). On the basis of these remarkable investigations, we re-engineered Escherichia coli valine-producing strain H-81, which possess overexpressed ilvGMED operon, for the aerobic conversion of sugar into isobutanol. To redirect valine biosynthesis to the production of alcohol, we also--as has been demonstrated previously (Atsumi et al. in Nature 451:86-90, 2008; Atsumi et al. in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 85:651-657, 2010; Cann and Liao in Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 81:89-98, 2008; Connor and Liao in Appl Environ Microbiol 74:5769-5775, 2008; Shen and Liao in Metab Eng 10:312-320, 2008; Yan and Liao in J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol 36:471-479, 2009)--used enzymes of Ehrlich pathway. In particular, in our study, the following heterologous proteins were exploited: branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylase (BCKAD) encoded by the kdcA gene from Lactococcus lactis with rare codons substituted, and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) encoded by the ADH2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that expression of both of these genes in the valine-producing strain H-81 results in accumulation of isobutanol instead of valine. Expression of BCKAD

  19. Arctic mustard flower color polymorphism controlled by petal-specific downregulation at the threshold of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A Dick

    Full Text Available Intra- and interspecific variation in flower color is a hallmark of angiosperm diversity. The evolutionary forces underlying the variety of flower colors can be nearly as diverse as the colors themselves. In addition to pollinator preferences, non-pollinator agents of selection can have a major influence on the evolution of flower color polymorphisms, especially when the pigments in question are also expressed in vegetative tissues. In such cases, identifying the target(s of selection starts with determining the biochemical and molecular basis for the flower color variation and examining any pleiotropic effects manifested in vegetative tissues. Herein, we describe a widespread purple-white flower color polymorphism in the mustard Parrya nudicaulis spanning Alaska. The frequency of white-flowered individuals increases with increasing growing-season temperature, consistent with the role of anthocyanin pigments in stress tolerance. White petals fail to produce the stress responsive flavonoid intermediates in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway (ABP, suggesting an early pathway blockage. Petal cDNA sequences did not reveal blockages in any of the eight enzyme-coding genes in white-flowered individuals, nor any color differentiating SNPs. A qRT-PCR analysis of white petals identified a 24-fold reduction in chalcone synthase (CHS at the threshold of the ABP, but no change in CHS expression in leaves and sepals. This arctic species has avoided the deleterious effects associated with the loss of flavonoid intermediates in vegetative tissues by decoupling CHS expression in petals and leaves, yet the correlation of flower color and climate suggests that the loss of flavonoids in the petals alone may affect the tolerance of white-flowered individuals to colder environments.

  20. Metabolic Reprogramming by Hexosamine Biosynthetic and Golgi N-Glycan Branching Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczko, Michael C; Pawling, Judy; Chen, Rui; Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Yau, Kevin; Copeland, Julia K; Zhang, Cunjie; Surendra, Anu; Guttman, David S; Figeys, Daniel; Dennis, James W

    2016-01-01

    De novo uridine-diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) biosynthesis requires glucose, glutamine, acetyl-CoA and uridine, however GlcNAc salvaged from glycoconjugate turnover and dietary sources also makes a significant contribution to the intracellular pool. Herein we ask whether dietary GlcNAc regulates nutrient transport and intermediate metabolism in C57BL/6 mice by increasing UDP-GlcNAc and in turn Golgi N-glycan branching. GlcNAc added to the drinking water showed a dose-dependent increase in growth of young mice, while in mature adult mice fat and body-weight increased without affecting calorie-intake, activity, energy expenditure, or the microbiome. Oral GlcNAc increased hepatic UDP-GlcNAc and N-glycan branching on hepatic glycoproteins. Glucose homeostasis, hepatic glycogen, lipid metabolism and response to fasting were altered with GlcNAc treatment. In cultured cells GlcNAc enhanced uptake of glucose, glutamine and fatty-acids, and enhanced lipid synthesis, while inhibition of Golgi N-glycan branching blocked GlcNAc-dependent lipid accumulation. The N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase enzymes of the N-glycan branching pathway (Mgat1,2,4,5) display multistep ultrasensitivity to UDP-GlcNAc, as well as branching-dependent compensation. Indeed, oral GlcNAc rescued fat accumulation in lean Mgat5(-/-) mice and in cultured Mgat5(-/-) hepatocytes, consistent with N-glycan branching compensation. Our results suggest GlcNAc reprograms cellular metabolism by enhancing nutrient uptake and lipid storage through the UDP-GlcNAc supply to N-glycan branching pathway. PMID:26972830

  1. High isoprenoid flux Escherichia coli as a host for carotenoids production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Wonchul

    2012-01-01

    A noncarotenogenic microbe E. coli was engineered for high production of carotenoids. To increase the isoprenoid flux, the chromosomal native promoters of the rate-controlling steps (dxs, idi and ispDispF) in the isoprenoid pathway were replaced with a strong bacteriophage T5 promoter (P(T5)) by using the λ-Red recombinase system in combination with the Flp/FRT site-specific recombination system for marker excision and P1 transduction for gene trait stacking. The resulting high isoprenoid flux E. coli can be used as a starting strain to produce various carotenoids by introducing heterologous carotenoid genes. In this study, the high isoprenoid flux E. coli was transformed with a plasmid carrying the β-carotene biosynthetic genes from Pantoea stewartii for β-carotene production. PMID:22144352

  2. 1. Improving the Yield of Biodiesel from Microalgae and Other Lipids. 2. Studies of the Wax Ester Biosynthetic Pathway and Potential Biotechnological Application

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlen, Bradley D.

    2012-01-01

    The production of biofuels and oleochemicals from renewable sources offers an opportunity to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. The work contained in this dissertation has focused on developing and improving methods for the production of biodiesel from non-traditional feedstocks and understanding biosynthetic pathways that result in the production of oleochemicals and fuels. Pure vegetable oil can account for 70-80% of the total cost of biodiesel production. Many low-cost oils contain ...

  3. Cytochrome P450 promiscuity leads to a bifurcating biosynthetic pathway for tanshinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Ma, Xiaohui; Cai, Yuan; Ma, Ying; Zhan, Zhilai; Zhou, Yongjin J; Liu, Wujun; Guan, Mengxin; Yang, Jian; Cui, Guanghong; Kang, Liping; Yang, Lei; Shen, Ye; Tang, Jinfu; Lin, Huixin; Ma, Xiaojing; Jin, Baolong; Liu, Zhenming; Peters, Reuben J; Zhao, Zongbao K; Huang, Luqi

    2016-04-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) play a key role in generating the structural diversity of terpenoids, the largest group of plant natural products. However, functional characterization of CYPs has been challenging because of the expansive families found in plant genomes, diverse reactivity and inaccessibility of their substrates and products. Here we present the characterization of two CYPs, CYP76AH3 and CYP76AK1, which act sequentially to form a bifurcating pathway for the biosynthesis of tanshinones, the oxygenated diterpenoids from the Chinese medicinal plant Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza). These CYPs had similar transcription profiles to that of the known gene responsible for tanshinone production in elicited Danshen hairy roots. Biochemical and RNA interference studies demonstrated that both CYPs are promiscuous. CYP76AH3 oxidizes ferruginol at two different carbon centers, and CYP76AK1 hydroxylates C-20 of two of the resulting intermediates. Together, these convert ferruginol into 11,20-dihydroxy ferruginol and 11,20-dihydroxy sugiol en route to tanshinones. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these CYPs by engineering yeast for heterologous production of six oxygenated diterpenoids, which in turn enabled structural characterization of three novel compounds produced by CYP-mediated oxidation. Our results highlight the incorporation of multiple CYPs into diterpenoid metabolic engineering, and a continuing trend of CYP promiscuity generating complex networks in terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:26682704

  4. Divergent non-heme iron enzymes in the nogalamycin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, Vilja; Selvaraj, Brinda; Niiranen, Laila; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-05-10

    Nogalamycin, an aromatic polyketide displaying high cytotoxicity, has a unique structure, with one of the carbohydrate units covalently attached to the aglycone via an additional carbon-carbon bond. The underlying chemistry, which implies a particularly challenging reaction requiring activation of an aliphatic carbon atom, has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unusual C5''-C2 carbocyclization is catalyzed by the non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)-dependent SnoK in the biosynthesis of the anthracycline nogalamycin. The data are consistent with a mechanistic proposal whereby the Fe(IV) = O center abstracts the H5'' atom from the amino sugar of the substrate, with subsequent attack of the aromatic C2 carbon on the radical center. We further show that, in the same metabolic pathway, the homologous SnoN (38% sequence identity) catalyzes an epimerization step at the adjacent C4'' carbon, most likely via a radical mechanism involving the Fe(IV) = O center. SnoK and SnoN have surprisingly similar active site architectures considering the markedly different chemistries catalyzed by the enzymes. Structural studies reveal that the differences are achieved by minor changes in the alignment of the substrates in front of the reactive ferryl-oxo species. Our findings significantly expand the repertoire of reactions reported for this important protein family and provide an illustrative example of enzyme evolution. PMID:27114534

  5. Involvement of the Octadecanoid Pathway and Protein Phosphorylation in Fungal Elicitor-Induced Expression of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthetic Genes in Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Frank L.H.; Parchmann, Stefanie; Mueller, Martin J.; Kijne, Jan W.; Memelink, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Two key genes in terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis, Tdc and Str, encoding tryptophan decarboxylase and strictosidine synthase, respectively, are coordinately induced by fungal elicitors in suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells. We have studied the roles of the jasmonate biosynthetic pathway and of protein phosphorylation in signal transduction initiated by a partially purified elicitor from yeast extract. In addition to activating Tdc and Str gene expression, the elicitor also induced the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid. The jasmonate precursor α-linolenic acid or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) itself induced Tdc and Str gene expression when added exogenously . Diethyldithiocarbamic acid, an inhibitor of jasmonate biosynthesis, blocked both the elicitor-induced formation of jasmonic acid and the activation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic genes. The protein kinase inhibitor K-252a abolished both elicitor-induced jasmonate biosynthesis and MeJA-induced Tdc and Str gene expression. Analysis of the expression of Str promoter/gusA fusions in transgenic C. roseus cells showed that the elicitor and MeJA act at the transcriptional level. These results demonstrate that the jasmonate biosynthetic pathway is an integral part of the elicitor-triggered signal transduction pathway that results in the coordinate expression of the Tdc and Str genes and that protein kinases act both upstream and downstream of jasmonates. PMID:10198087

  6. Reconstitution of the costunolide biosynthetic pathway in yeast and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Liu

    Full Text Available The sesquiterpene costunolide has a broad range of biological activities and is the parent compound for many other biologically active sesquiterpenes such as parthenolide. Two enzymes of the pathway leading to costunolide have been previously characterized: germacrene A synthase (GAS and germacrene A oxidase (GAO, which together catalyse the biosynthesis of germacra-1(10,4,11(13-trien-12-oic acid. However, the gene responsible for the last step toward costunolide has not been characterized until now. Here we show that chicory costunolide synthase (CiCOS, CYP71BL3, can catalyse the oxidation of germacra-1(10,4,11(13-trien-12-oic acid to yield costunolide. Co-expression of feverfew GAS (TpGAS, chicory GAO (CiGAO, and chicory COS (CiCOS in yeast resulted in the biosynthesis of costunolide. The catalytic activity of TpGAS, CiGAO and CiCOS was also verified in planta by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Mitochondrial targeting of TpGAS resulted in a significant increase in the production of germacrene A compared with the native cytosolic targeting. When the N. benthamiana leaves were co-infiltrated with TpGAS and CiGAO, germacrene A almost completely disappeared as a result of the presence of CiGAO. Transient expression of TpGAS, CiGAO and CiCOS in N. benthamiana leaves resulted in costunolide production of up to 60 ng.g(-1 FW. In addition, two new compounds were formed that were identified as costunolide-glutathione and costunolide-cysteine conjugates.

  7. Coordinated Regulation of Gene Expression for Carotenoid Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Hu Sun; Cheng-Qian Liu; Yuan-Yuan Hui; Wen-Kai Wu; Zhi-Gang Zhou; Shan Lu

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are important plant pigments for both light harvesting and photooxidation protection.Using the model system of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii,we characterized the regulation of gene expression for carotenoid metabolism by quantifying changes in the transcript abundance of dxs,dxr and ipi in the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate pathway and of ggps,psy,pds,lcyb and bchy,directly involved in carotenoid metabolism,under different photoperiod,light and metabolite treatments.The expression of these genes fluctuated with light/dark shifting.Light treatment also promoted the accumulation of transcripts of all these genes.Of the genes studied,dxs,ggps and lcyb displayed the typical circadian pattern by retaining a rhythmic fluctuation of transcript abundance under both constant light and constant dark entrainments.The expression of these genes could also be regulated by metabolic intermediates.For example,ggps was significantly suppressed by a geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate supplement and ipi was upregulated by isopentenyl pyrophosphate.Furthermore,CrOr,a C.reinhardtii homolog of the recently characterized Or gene that accounts for carotenoid accumulation,also showed co-expression with carotenoid biosynthetic genes such as pds and lcyb.Our data suggest a coordinated regulation on carotenoid metabolism in C.reinhardtii at the transcriptional level.

  8. Carotenoid Distribution in Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaíno, Jennifer; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring red, orange and yellow pigments that are synthesized by plants and some microorganisms and fulfill many important physiological functions. This chapter describes the distribution of carotenoid in microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea, microalgae, filamentous fungi and yeasts. We will also focus on their functional aspects and applications, such as their nutritional value, their benefits for human and animal health and their potential protection against free radicals. The central metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of carotenoids is described as the three following principal steps: (i) the synthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate and the formation of dimethylallyl pyrophosphate, (ii) the synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate and (iii) the synthesis of carotenoids per se, highlighting the differences that have been found in several carotenogenic organisms and providing an evolutionary perspective. Finally, as an example, the synthesis of the xanthophyll astaxanthin is discussed. PMID:27485217

  9. The Distribution of Coumarins and Furanocoumarins in Citrus Species Closely Matches Citrus Phylogeny and Reflects the Organization of Biosynthetic Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugrand-Judek, Audray; Olry, Alexandre; Hehn, Alain; Costantino, Gilles; Ollitrault, Patrick; Froelicher, Yann; Bourgaud, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Citrus plants are able to produce defense compounds such as coumarins and furanocoumarins to cope with herbivorous insects and pathogens. In humans, these chemical compounds are strong photosensitizers and can interact with medications, leading to the “grapefruit juice effect”. Removing coumarins and furanocoumarins from food and cosmetics imply additional costs and might alter product quality. Thus, the selection of Citrus cultivars displaying low coumarin and furanocoumarin contents constitutes a valuable alternative. In this study, we performed ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analyses to determine the contents of these compounds within the peel and the pulp of 61 Citrus species representative of the genetic diversity all Citrus. Generally, Citrus peel contains larger diversity and higher concentrations of coumarin/furanocoumarin than the pulp of the same fruits. According to the chemotypes found in the peel, Citrus species can be separated into 4 groups that correspond to the 4 ancestral taxa (pummelos, mandarins, citrons and papedas) and extended with their respective secondary species descendants. Three of the 4 ancestral taxa (pummelos, citrons and papedas) synthesize high amounts of these compounds, whereas mandarins appear practically devoid of them. Additionally, all ancestral taxa and their hybrids are logically organized according to the coumarin and furanocoumarin pathways described in the literature. This organization allows hypotheses to be drawn regarding the biosynthetic origin of compounds for which the biogenesis remains unresolved. Determining coumarin and furanocoumarin contents is also helpful for hypothesizing the origin of Citrus species for which the phylogeny is presently not firmly established. Finally, this work also notes favorable hybridization schemes that will lead to low coumarin and furanocoumarin contents, and we propose to select mandarins and Ichang papeda as Citrus varieties for use in

  10. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. ► Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. ► CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. ► ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. ► A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded—and led to—gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  11. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Liao, Chien-Wei [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Department of Parasitology, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Xing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Biomedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fan, Chia-Kwung [Department of Parasitology, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Xing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Inaoka, Daniel Ken [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Masayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanaka, Akiko [Systems and Structural Biology Center, RIKEN, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  12. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor associated with regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Rosaceae (on linr)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kui-Lin; Bolitho, Karen; Grafton, Karryn; Kortstee, A.J.; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; McGhie, T.K.; Espley, R.V.; Hellens, R.P.; Allan, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The control of plant anthocyanin accumulation is via transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes. A key activator appears to be an R2R3 MYB transcription factor. In apple fruit, skin anthocyanin levels are controlled by a gene called MYBA or MYB1, while the

  13. Increased glycopeptide production after overexpression of shikimate pathway genes being part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykær, Jette; Nielsen, Jens; Wohlleben, W.;

    2010-01-01

    Amycolatopsis balhimycina produces the vancomycin-analogue balhimycin. The strain therefore serves as a model strain for glycopeptide antibiotic production. Previous characterisation of the balhimycin biosynthetic cluster had shown that the border sequences contained both, a putative 3-deoxy-d-ar...

  14. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  15. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  16. Biosynthesis of monoterpenoids in higher plants. The biosynthetic pathway leading to the monoterpenoids from amino acids with a carbon-skeleton similar to mevalonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tange, K. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-09-01

    Radioisotopically labeled L-valine, DL-alanine, sodium acetate, and DL-mevalonic acid were incorporated into linalool by the intact plant of Cinnamomum camphora Sieb. var. linalooliferum Fujita and into geraniol and citronellol by that of Pelargonium roseum Bourbon. The uptake of leucine and valine resulted in the preferential location of the radioactivity on the 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety of these acyclic monoterpenoids, whereas the uptake of alanine resulted in the preferential location on the isopentenyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety, much as in the cases of mevalonic acid and sodium acetate. A biosynthetic pathway leading to the monoterpenoids from the amino acids is discussed.

  17. Laccase‐catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols: from in vivo biosynthetic pathways to green synthetic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Jong‐Rok; Baldrian, Petr; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Chang, Yoon‐Seok

    2012-01-01

    Summary Laccases are oxidases that contain several copper atoms, and catalyse single‐electron oxidations of phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of oxygen to water. The enzymes are particularly widespread in ligninolytic basidiomycetes, but also occur in certain prokaryotes, insects and plants. Depending on the species, laccases are involved in various biosynthetic processes contributing to carbon recycling in land ecosystems and the morphogenesis of biomatrices, wherein low‐molecula...

  18. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor associated with regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Rosaceae (on linr)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kui-Lin; Bolitho, Karen; Grafton, Karryn; Kortstee, A J; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; McGhie, T.K.; Espley, R.V.; Hellens, R.P.; Allan, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The control of plant anthocyanin accumulation is via transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes. A key activator appears to be an R2R3 MYB transcription factor. In apple fruit, skin anthocyanin levels are controlled by a gene called MYBA or MYB1, while the gene determining fruit flesh and foliage anthocyanin has been termed MYB10. In order to further understand tissue-specific anthocyanin regulation we have isolated orthologous MYB genes from all th...

  19. Recent advances in tobacco carotenoid metabolism research and its application in genetic engineering%烟草类胡萝卜素代谢的遗传及基因工程研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永霞; 冯琦; 王景; 崔红; 刘国顺

    2013-01-01

    综述了烟草类胡萝卜素合成和降解途径所涉及的关键基因的分离、功能分析、分子调控及类胡萝卜素代谢的调节和基因工程研究进展,同时对烟草类胡萝卜素代谢的研究方向和应用前景进行了讨论和展望.%Advances in research of biosynthetic and degradation pathway of carotenoid,and hence its related carotenogenic gene as well as carotenoid dioxygenase gene were reviewed. Metabolic manipulation of carotenoid was summarized. Strategies, problems and achievements of genetic manipulation of carotenoid metabolism were discussed.

  20. A R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates the Flavonol Biosynthetic Pathway in a Traditional Chinese Medicinal Plant, Epimedium sagittatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenjun; Khaldun, A. B. M.; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Chanjuan; Lv, Haiyan; Yuan, Ling; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Flavonols as plant secondary metabolites with vital roles in plant development and defense against UV light, have been demonstrated to be the main bioactive components (BCs) in the genus Epimedium plants, several species of which are used as materials for Herba Epimedii, an important traditional Chinese medicine. The flavonol biosynthetic pathway genes had been already isolated from Epimedium sagittatum, but a R2R3-MYB transcription factor regulating the flavonol synthesis has not been functionally characterized so far in Epimedium plants. In this study, we isolated and characterized the R2R3-MYB transcription factor EsMYBF1 involved in regulation of the flavonol biosynthetic pathway from E. sagittatum. Sequence analysis indicated that EsMYBF1 belongs to the subgroup 7 of R2R3-MYB family which contains the flavonol-specific MYB regulators identified to date. Transient reporter assay showed that EsMYBF1 strongly activated the promoters of EsF3H (flavanone 3-hydroxylase) and EsFLS (flavonol synthase), but not the promoters of EsDFRs (dihydroflavonol 4-reductase) and EsANS (anthocyanidin synthase) in transiently transformed Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Both yeast two-hybrid assay and transient reporter assay validated EsMYBF1 to be independent of EsTT8, or AtTT8 bHLH regulators of the flavonoid pathway as cofactors. Ectopic expression of EsMYBF1 in transgenic tobacco resulted in the increased flavonol content and the decreased anthocyanin content in flowers. Correspondingly, the structural genes involved in flavonol synthesis were upregulated in the EsMYBF1 overexpression lines, including NtCHS (chalcone synthase), NtCHI (chalcone isomerase), NtF3H and NtFLS, whereas the late biosynthetic genes of the anthocyanin pathway (NtDFR and NtANS) were remarkably downregulated, compared to the controls. These results suggest that EsMYBF1 is a flavonol-specific R2R3-MYB regulator, and involved in regulation of the biosynthesis of the flavonol-derived BCs in E. sagittatum. Thus

  1. A R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates the Flavonol Biosynthetic Pathway in a Traditional Chinese Medicinal Plant, Epimedium sagittatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenjun; Khaldun, A B M; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Chanjuan; Lv, Haiyan; Yuan, Ling; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Flavonols as plant secondary metabolites with vital roles in plant development and defense against UV light, have been demonstrated to be the main bioactive components (BCs) in the genus Epimedium plants, several species of which are used as materials for Herba Epimedii, an important traditional Chinese medicine. The flavonol biosynthetic pathway genes had been already isolated from Epimedium sagittatum, but a R2R3-MYB transcription factor regulating the flavonol synthesis has not been functionally characterized so far in Epimedium plants. In this study, we isolated and characterized the R2R3-MYB transcription factor EsMYBF1 involved in regulation of the flavonol biosynthetic pathway from E. sagittatum. Sequence analysis indicated that EsMYBF1 belongs to the subgroup 7 of R2R3-MYB family which contains the flavonol-specific MYB regulators identified to date. Transient reporter assay showed that EsMYBF1 strongly activated the promoters of EsF3H (flavanone 3-hydroxylase) and EsFLS (flavonol synthase), but not the promoters of EsDFRs (dihydroflavonol 4-reductase) and EsANS (anthocyanidin synthase) in transiently transformed Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Both yeast two-hybrid assay and transient reporter assay validated EsMYBF1 to be independent of EsTT8, or AtTT8 bHLH regulators of the flavonoid pathway as cofactors. Ectopic expression of EsMYBF1 in transgenic tobacco resulted in the increased flavonol content and the decreased anthocyanin content in flowers. Correspondingly, the structural genes involved in flavonol synthesis were upregulated in the EsMYBF1 overexpression lines, including NtCHS (chalcone synthase), NtCHI (chalcone isomerase), NtF3H and NtFLS, whereas the late biosynthetic genes of the anthocyanin pathway (NtDFR and NtANS) were remarkably downregulated, compared to the controls. These results suggest that EsMYBF1 is a flavonol-specific R2R3-MYB regulator, and involved in regulation of the biosynthesis of the flavonol-derived BCs in E. sagittatum. Thus

  2. Genome mining of astaxanthin biosynthetic genes from Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 for heterologous overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Zhou, Yuanjie; Li, Xiaowei; Zhu, Fayin; Cheng, Yongbo; Liu, Yi; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    As a highly valued keto-carotenoid, astaxanthin is widely used in nutritional supplements and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, the demand for biosynthetic astaxanthin and improved efficiency of astaxanthin biosynthesis has driven the investigation of metabolic engineering of native astaxanthin producers and heterologous hosts. However, microbial resources for astaxanthin are limited. In this study, we found that the α-Proteobacterium Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 could produce astaxanthin naturally. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify the astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway using a combined PacBio-Illumina approach. The putative astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway in Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 was predicted. For further confirmation, a high-efficiency targeted engineering carotenoid synthesis platform was constructed in E. coli for identifying the functional roles of candidate genes. All genes involved in astaxanthin biosynthesis showed discrete distributions on the chromosome. Moreover, the overexpression of exogenous E. coli idi in Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 increased astaxanthin production by 5.4-fold. This study described a new astaxanthin producer and provided more biosynthesis components for bioengineering of astaxanthin in the future. PMID:26580858

  3. New Role of Rosea1 in Regulating Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway in Hairy Root of Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the transcriptional regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in hairy roots system by ectopically expressing Rosea1 and Delila and we found something different from previous research. The RT-PCR results revealed that Rosea1 could activate early and late biosynthetic genes tested, including CHS, DFR and ANS. Delila enhanced the expression of CHS weakly, but did not influence DFR or ANS. The two regulators, Rosea1 and Delila, failed to interplay each other. It was speculated that Delila would be ineffective in the absence of Rosea1, another MYB factor specifically controlling CHS may exist. This investigation provided a new way to increase anthocyanin content by over expressing a MYB factor, potentially to be used in the field of agriculture and food

  4. Expression of the bacterial type III effector DspA/E in Saccharomyces cerevisiae down-regulates the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway leading to growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamer, Sabrina; Guillas, Isabelle; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Kunz, Caroline; Hall, Michael N; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2014-06-27

    Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium responsible for fire blight, relies on a type III secretion system and a single injected effector, DspA/E, to induce disease in host plants. DspA/E belongs to the widespread AvrE family of type III effectors that suppress plant defense responses and promote bacterial growth following infection. Ectopic expression of DspA/E in plant or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is toxic, indicating that DspA/E likely targets a cellular process conserved between yeast and plant. To unravel the mode of action of DspA/E, we screened the Euroscarf S. cerevisiae library for mutants resistant to DspA/E-induced growth arrest. The most resistant mutants (Δsur4, Δfen1, Δipt1, Δskn1, Δcsg1, Δcsg2, Δorm1, and Δorm2) were impaired in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Exogenously supplied sphingolipid precursors such as the long chain bases (LCBs) phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine also suppressed the DspA/E-induced yeast growth defect. Expression of DspA/E in yeast down-regulated LCB biosynthesis and induced a rapid decrease in LCB levels, indicating that serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, was repressed. SPT down-regulation was mediated by dephosphorylation and activation of Orm proteins that negatively regulate SPT. A Δcdc55 mutation affecting Cdc55-PP2A protein phosphatase activity prevented Orm dephosphorylation and suppressed DspA/E-induced growth arrest. PMID:24828506

  5. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  6. Key to xenobiotic carotenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Richard Sliwka; Vassilia Partali

    2012-01-01

    A listing of carotenoids with heteroatoms (X = F, Cl, Br, I, Si, N, S, Se, Fe) directly attached to the carotenoid carbon skeleton has been compiled. The 178 listed carotenoids with C,H,X atoms demonstrate that the classical division of carotenoids into hydrocarbon carotenoids (C,H) and xanthophylls (C,H,O) has become obsolete.

  7. OsWOX3A is involved in negative feedback regulation of the gibberellic acid biosynthetic pathway in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hwan; Kang, Kiyoon; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, In-Jung; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2016-04-01

    The plant-specific WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) nuclear proteins have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of many developmental processes. Among the rice (Oryza sativa) WOX proteins, a loss of OsWOX3A function in narrow leaf2 (nal2) nal3 double mutants (termed nal2/3) causes pleiotropic effects, such as narrow and curly leaves, opened spikelets, narrow grains, more tillers, and fewer lateral roots, but almost normal plant height. To examine OsWOX3A function in more detail, transgenic rice overexpressing OsWOX3A (OsWOX3A-OX) were generated; unexpectedly, all of them consistently exhibited severe dwarfism with very short and wide leaves, a phenotype that resembles that of gibberellic acid (GA)-deficient or GA-insensitive mutants. Exogenous GA3 treatment fully rescued the developmental defects of OsWOX3A-OX plants, suggesting that constitutive overexpression of OsWOX3A downregulates GA biosynthesis. Quantitative analysis of GA intermediates revealed significantly reduced levels of GA20 and bioactive GA1 in OsWOX3A-OX, possibly due to downregulation of the expression of KAO, which encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase, a GA biosynthetic enzyme. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that OsWOX3A directly interacts with the KAO promoter. OsWOX3A expression is drastically and temporarily upregulated by GA3 and downregulated by paclobutrazol, a blocker of GA biosynthesis. These data indicate that OsWOX3A is a GA-responsive gene and functions in the negative feedback regulation of the GA biosynthetic pathway for GA homeostasis to maintain the threshold levels of endogenous GA intermediates throughout development. PMID:26767749

  8. A new member of the 4-methylideneimidazole-5-one–containing aminomutase family from the enediyne kedarcidin biosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Huang, Tingting; Shen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    4-Methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO)-containing aminomutases catalyze the conversion of l-α-amino acids to β-amino acids with either an (R) or an (S) configuration. l-Phenylalanine and l-tyrosine are the only two natural substrates identified to date. The enediyne chromophore of the chromoprotein antitumor antibiotic kedarcidin (KED) harbors an (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine moiety reminiscent of the (S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-β-tyrosine moiety of the C-1027 enediyne chromophore, the biosynthesis of which uncovered the first known MIO-containing aminomutase, SgcC4. Comparative analysis of the KED and C-1027 biosynthetic gene clusters inspired the proposal for (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine biosynthesis starting from 2-aza-l-tyrosine, featuring KedY4 as a putative MIO-containing aminomutase. Here we report the biochemical characterization of KedY4, confirming its proposed role in KED biosynthesis. KedY4 is an MIO-containing aminomutase that stereospecifically catalyzes the conversion of 2-aza-l-tyrosine to (R)-2-aza-β-tyrosine, exhibiting no detectable activity toward 2-aza-l-phenylalanine or l-tyrosine as an alternative substrate. In contrast, SgcC4, which stereospecifically catalyzes the conversion of l-tyrosine to (S)-β-tyrosine in C-1027 biosynthesis, exhibits minimal activity with 2-aza-l-tyrosine as an alternative substrate but generating (S)-2-aza-β-tyrosine, a product with the opposite stereochemistry of KedY4. This report of KedY4 broadens the scope of known substrates for the MIO-containing aminomutase family, and comparative studies of KedY4 and SgcC4 provide an outstanding opportunity to examine how MIO-containing aminomutases control substrate specificity and product enantioselectivity. PMID:23633564

  9. Phytoene desaturase is localized exclusively in the chloroplast and up-regulated at the mRNA level during accumulation of secondary carotenoids in Haematococcus pluvialis (Volvocales, chlorophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, K; Eckert, M; Hirschberg, J; Hagen, C

    2000-04-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow is known for its massive accumulation of ketocarotenoids under various stress conditions. Therefore, this microalga is one of the favored organisms for biotechnological production of these antioxidative compounds. Astaxanthin makes up the main part of the secondary carotenoids and is accumulated mostly in an esterified form in extraplastidic lipid vesicles. We have studied phytoene desaturase, an early enzyme of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. The increase in the phytoene desaturase protein levels that occurs following induction is accompanied by a corresponding increase of its mRNA during the accumulation period, indicating that phytoene desaturase is regulated at the mRNA level. We also investigated the localization of the enzyme by western-blot analysis of cell fractions and by immunogold labeling of ultrathin sections for electron microscopy. In spite of the fact that secondary carotenoids accumulate outside the chloroplast, no extra pathway specific for secondary carotenoid biosynthesis in H. pluvialis was found, at least at this early stage in the biosynthesis. A transport process of carotenoids from the site of biosynthesis (chloroplast) to the site of accumulation (cytoplasmatic located lipid vesicles) is implicated. PMID:10759523

  10. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2015-08-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids, which are essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway for all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not known whether Z-ISO catalyzes isomerization alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-trans isomerization of the 15-15' carbon-carbon double bond in 9,15,9'-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the subsequent biosynthetic-pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large hydrophobic compound in a membrane was previously undescribed. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially uses a new chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  11. Characterization of TDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-glucose-3,4-ketoisomerase from the D-mycaminose biosynthetic pathway of Streptomyces fradiae: in vitro activity and substrate specificity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melançon, Charles E; Hong, Lin; White, Jess A; Liu, Yung-nan; Liu, Hung-wen

    2007-01-16

    Deoxysugars are critical structural elements for the bioactivity of many natural products. Ongoing work on elucidating a variety of deoxysugar biosynthetic pathways has paved the way for manipulation of these pathways for the generation of structurally diverse glycosylated natural products. In the course of this work, the biosynthesis of d-mycaminose in the tylosin pathway of Streptomyces fradiae was investigated. Attempts to reconstitute the entire mycaminose biosynthetic machinery in a heterologous host led to the discovery of a previously overlooked gene, tyl1a, encoding an enzyme thought to convert TDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-glucose to TDP-3-keto-6-deoxy-d-glucose, a 3,4-ketoisomerization reaction in the pathway. Tyl1a has now been overexpressed, purified, and assayed, and its activity has been verified by product analysis. Incubation of Tyl1a and the C-3 aminotransferase TylB, the next enzyme in the pathway, produced TDP-3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-glucose, confirming that these two enzymes act sequentially. Steady state kinetic parameters of the Tyl1a-catalyzed reaction were determined, and the ability of Tyl1a and TylB to process a C-2 deoxygenated substrate and a CDP-linked substrate was also demonstrated. Enzymes catalyzing 3,4-ketoisomerization of hexoses represent a new class of enzymes involved in unusual sugar biosynthesis. The fact that Tyl1a exhibits a relaxed substrate specificity holds potential for future deoxysugar biosynthetic engineering endeavors. PMID:17209568

  12. A novel deconvolution method for modeling UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine biosynthetic pathways based on 13C mass isotopologue profiles under non-steady-state conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belshoff Alex C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stable isotope tracing is a powerful technique for following the fate of individual atoms through metabolic pathways. Measuring isotopic enrichment in metabolites provides quantitative insights into the biosynthetic network and enables flux analysis as a function of external perturbations. NMR and mass spectrometry are the techniques of choice for global profiling of stable isotope labeling patterns in cellular metabolites. However, meaningful biochemical interpretation of the labeling data requires both quantitative analysis and complex modeling. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach that involved acquiring and modeling the timecourses of 13C isotopologue data for UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc synthesized from [U-13C]-glucose in human prostate cancer LnCaP-LN3 cells. UDP-GlcNAc is an activated building block for protein glycosylation, which is an important regulatory mechanism in the development of many prominent human diseases including cancer and diabetes. Results We utilized a stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM approach to determine the timecourse of 13C incorporation from [U-13C]-glucose into UDP-GlcNAc in LnCaP-LN3 cells. 13C Positional isotopomers and isotopologues of UDP-GlcNAc were determined by high resolution NMR and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. A novel simulated annealing/genetic algorithm, called 'Genetic Algorithm for Isotopologues in Metabolic Systems' (GAIMS was developed to find the optimal solutions to a set of simultaneous equations that represent the isotopologue compositions, which is a mixture of isotopomer species. The best model was selected based on information theory. The output comprises the timecourse of the individual labeled species, which was deconvoluted into labeled metabolic units, namely glucose, ribose, acetyl and uracil. The performance of the algorithm was demonstrated by validating the computed fractional 13C enrichment in these subunits

  13. Pederin-type pathways of uncultivated bacterial symbionts: analysis of o-methyltransferases and generation of a biosynthetic hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Katrin; Engeser, Marianne; Blunt, John W; Munro, Murray H G; Piel, Jörn

    2009-03-01

    The complex polyketide pederin is a potent antitumor agent isolated from Paederus spp. rove beetles. We have previously isolated a set of genes from a bacterial endosymbiont that are good candidates for pederin biosynthesis. To biochemically study this pathway, we expressed three methyltransferases from the putative pederin pathway and used the partially unmethylated analogue mycalamide A from the marine sponge Mycale hentscheli as test substrate. Analysis by high-resolution MS/MS and NMR revealed that PedO regiospecifically methylates the marine compound to generate the nonnatural hybrid compound 18-O-methylmycalamide A with increased cytotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first biochemical evidence that invertebrates can obtain defensive complex polyketides from bacterial symbionts. PMID:19206228

  14. A cautionary tale of structure-guided inhibitor development against an essential enzyme in the aspartate-biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Thangavelu, Bharani; Bhansali, Pravin; Viola, Ronald E

    2014-12-01

    The aspartate pathway is essential for the production of the amino acids required for protein synthesis and of the metabolites needed in bacterial development. This pathway also leads to the production of several classes of quorum-sensing molecules that can trigger virulence in certain microorganisms. The second enzyme in this pathway, aspartate β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH), is absolutely required for bacterial survival and has been targeted for the design of selective inhibitors. Fragment-library screening has identified a new set of inhibitors that, while they do not resemble the substrates for this reaction, have been shown to bind at the active site of ASADH. Structure-guided development of these lead compounds has produced moderate inhibitors of the target enzyme, with some selectivity observed between the Gram-negative and Gram-positive orthologs of ASADH. However, many of these inhibitor analogs and derivatives have not yet achieved the expected enhanced affinity. Structural characterization of these enzyme-inhibitor complexes has provided detailed explanations for the barriers that interfere with optimal binding. Despite binding in the same active-site region, significant changes are observed in the orientation of these bound inhibitors that are caused by relatively modest structural alterations. Taken together, these studies present a cautionary tale for issues that can arise in the systematic approach to the modification of lead compounds that are being used to develop potent inhibitors. PMID:25478842

  15. In silico analysis and expression profiling of miRNAs targeting genes of steviol glycosides biosynthetic pathway and their relationship with steviol glycosides content in different tissues of Stevia rebaudiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifi, Monica; Nasrullah, Nazima; Ahmad, Malik Mobeen; Ali, Athar; Khan, Jawaid A; Abdin, M Z

    2015-09-01

    miRNAs are emerging as potential regulators of the gene expression. Their proven promising role in regulating biosynthetic pathways related gene networks may hold the key to understand the genetic regulation of these pathways which may assist in selection and manipulation to get high performing plant genotypes with better secondary metabolites yields and increased biomass. miRNAs associated with genes of steviol glycosides biosynthetic pathway, however, have not been identified so far. In this study miRNAs targeting genes of steviol glycosides biosynthetic pathway were identified for the first time whose precursors were potentially generated from ESTs and nucleotide sequences of Stevia rebaudiana. Thereafter, stem-loop coupled real time PCR based expressions of these miRNAs in different tissues of Stevia rebaudiana were investigated and their relationship pattern was analysed with the expression levels of their target mRNAs as well as steviol glycoside contents. All the miRNAs investigated showed differential expressions in all the three tissues studied, viz. leaves, flowers and stems. Out of the eleven miRNAs validated, the expression levels of nine miRNAs (miR319a, miR319b, miR319c, miR319d, miR319e, miR319f, miR319h, miRstv_7, miRstv_9) were found to be inversely related, while expression levels of the two, i.e. miR319g and miRstv_11 on the contrary, showed direct relation with the expression levels of their target mRNAs and steviol glycoside contents in the leaves, flowers and stems. This study provides a platform for better understanding of the steviol glycosides biosynthetic pathway and these miRNAs can further be employed to manipulate the biosynthesis of these metabolites to enhance their contents and yield in S. rebaudiana. PMID:26042546

  16. Gene transcript profiles of the TIA biosynthetic pathway in response to ethylene and copper reveal their interactive role in modulating TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Jia; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Research on transcriptional regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis of the medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus, has largely been focused on gene function and not clustering analysis of multiple genes at the transcript level. Here, more than ten key genes encoding key enzyme of alkaloid synthesis in TIA biosynthetic pathways were chosen to investigate the integrative responses to exogenous elicitor ethylene and copper (Cu) at both transcriptional and metabolic levels. The ethylene-induced gene transcripts in leaves and roots, respectively, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the results showed the overall expression of TIA pathway genes indicated as the Q value followed a standard normal distribution after ethylene treatments. Peak gene expression was at 15-30 μM of ethephon, and the pre-mature leaf had a higher Q value than the immature or mature leaf and root. Treatment with elicitor Cu found that Cu up-regulated overall TIA gene expression more in roots than in leaves. The combined effects of Cu and ethephon on TIA gene expression were stronger than their separate effects. It has been documented that TIA gene expression is tightly regulated by the transcriptional factor (TF) ethylene responsive factor (ERF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis for the genes of C. roseus showed that expression of the MPK gene correlated with strictosidine synthase (STR) and strictosidine b-D-glucosidase(SGD). In addition, ERF expression correlated with expression of secologanin synthase (SLS) and tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), specifically in roots, whereas MPK and myelocytomatosis oncogene (MYC) correlated with STR and SGD genes. In conclusion, the ERF regulates the upstream pathway genes in response to heavy metal Cu mainly in C. roseus roots, while the MPK mainly participates in regulating the STR gene in response to ethylene in pre-mature leaf. Interestingly, the

  17. Strigolactones, a novel carotenoid-derived plant hormone

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Babili, Salim

    2015-04-29

    Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived plant hormones and signaling molecules. When released into the soil, SLs indicate the presence of a host to symbiotic fungi and root parasitic plants. In planta, they regulate several developmental processes that adapt plant architecture to nutrient availability. Highly branched/tillered mutants in Arabidopsis, pea, and rice have enabled the identification of four SL biosynthetic enzymes: a cis/trans-carotene isomerase, two carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, and a cytochrome P450 (MAX1). In vitro and in vivo enzyme assays and analysis of mutants have shown that the pathway involves a combination of new reactions leading to carlactone, which is converted by a rice MAX1 homolog into an SL parent molecule with a tricyclic lactone moiety. In this review, we focus on SL biosynthesis, describe the hormonal and environmental factors that determine this process, and discuss SL transport and downstream signaling as well as the role of SLs in regulating plant development. ©2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  18. Method development and analysis of free HS and HS in proteoglycans from pre- and postmenopausal women: Evidence for biosynthetic pathway changes in sulfotransferase and sulfatase enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Miller, Rebecca L.; Leary, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is one of the most complex and informative biopolymers found on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix as either free HS fragments or constituents of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). Analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains in human serum at the disaccharide level has great potential for early disease diagnosis and prognosis, however, the low concentration of HS in human serum, together with the complexity of the serum matrix, limits the information on HS. In this study, we present and validate the development of a new sensitive method for in-depth compositional analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains. This protocol involved several steps including weak anion exchange chromatography, ultrafiltration and solid phase extraction for enhanced detection prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Using this protocol, a total of 51 serum samples from 26 premenopausal and 25 postmenopausal women were analyzed. Statistically significant differences in heparin/HS disaccharide profiles were observed. The proportion of N-acetylation and N-sulfation in both free HS and HSPG sugar chains were significantly different between pre- and postmenopausal women, indicating changes in N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferases (NDSTs), the enzymes involved in the initial step of the biosynthetic pathway. Differences in the proportion of 6-O-sulfation suggest that 6-O-sulfotransferase and/or 6-O-sulfatase enzymes may also be implicated. PMID:23659730

  19. Production of the Streptomyces scabies coronafacoyl phytotoxins involves a novel biosynthetic pathway with an F420 -dependent oxidoreductase and a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, Luke; Altowairish, Mead S; Fyans, Joanna K; Bignell, Dawn R D

    2016-07-01

    Coronafacoyl phytotoxins are secondary metabolites that are produced by various phytopathogenic bacteria, including several pathovars of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae as well as the Gram-positive potato scab pathogen Streptomyces scabies. The phytotoxins are composed of the polyketide coronafacic acid (CFA) linked via an amide bond to amino acids or amino acid derivatives, and their biosynthesis involves the cfa and cfa-like gene clusters that are found in P. syringae and S. scabies, respectively. The S. scabies cfa-like gene cluster was previously reported to contain several genes that are absent from the P. syringae cfa gene cluster, including one (oxr) encoding a putative F420 -dependent oxidoreductase, and another (sdr) encoding a predicted short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Using gene deletion analysis, we demonstrated that both oxr and sdr are required for normal production of the S. scabies coronafacoyl phytotoxins, and structural analysis of metabolites that accumulated in the Δsdr mutant cultures revealed that Sdr is directly involved in the biosynthesis of the CFA moiety. Our results suggest that S. scabies and P. syringae use distinct biosynthetic pathways for producing coronafacoyl phytotoxins, which are important mediators of host-pathogen interactions in various plant pathosystems. PMID:26991928

  20. Inhibition of green tea and the catechins against 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the key enzyme of the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Xian; Liu, Hui; Tian, Fang-Lin; Li, Fei-Fei; Li, Heng; Gao, Wen-Yun

    2016-09-01

    1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) is the first committed enzyme in the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway and also a validated antimicrobial target. Green tea which is rich in polyphenolic components such as the catechins, possesses a plenty of pharmacological activities, in particular an antibacterial effect. To uncover the antibacterial mechanism of green tea and to seek new DXR inhibitors from natural sources, the DXR inhibitory activity of green tea and its main antimicrobial catechins were investigated in this study. The results show that the raw extract of green tea and its ethyl acetate fraction are able to suppress DXR activity explicitly. Further determination of the DXR inhibitory capacity of eight catechin compounds demonstrates that the most active compound is gallocatechin gallate that is able to inhibit around 50% activity of DXR at 25μM. Based on these data, the primary structure-activity relationship of the catechins against DXR is discussed. This study would be very helpful to elucidate the antimicrobial mechanism of green tea and the catechins and also would be very useful to direct the rational utilization of them as food additives. PMID:27439219

  1. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction properties of Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase MtmOIV from the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway in Streptomyces argillaceus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chenchen; Gibson, Miranda; Rohr, Jurgen, E-mail: jrohr2@email.uky.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0082 (United States); Oliveira, Marcos A., E-mail: jrohr2@email.uky.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0082 (United States); Center for Structural Biology, University of Kentucky (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Crystals of the type I Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) MtmOIV from the biosynthetic pathway of mithramycin were obtained; the crystals diffracted to 2.69 Å resolution and belong to the monoclinic space group C2 (a = 143.5, b = 114.2, c = 137.8 Å β = 102.5°). Light scattering indicates that MtmOIV is a dimer of 127 kDa in solution, while in the crystalline state the data are consistent with two dimers in the asymmetric unit. The Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase MtmOIV from Streptomyces argillaceus is a 56 kDa FAD-dependent and NADPH-dependent enzyme that is responsible for the key frame-modifying step in the biosynthesis of the natural product mithramycin. Crystals of MtmOIV were flash-cooled and diffracted to 2.69 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation on beamline SER-CAT 22-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. Crystals of MtmOIV are monoclinic and light-scattering data reveal that the enzyme forms dimers in solution. The rotation function suggests the presence of two dimers in the asymmetric unit. l-Selenomethionine-incorporated MtmOIV has been obtained. Structural solution combining molecular-replacement phases and anomalous phases from selenium is in progress.

  2. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathways of 2Н- and 13С-Labeled Amino Acids by an Obligate Methylotrophic Bacterium Methylobacillus Flagellatum and a Facultative Methylotrophic Bacterium Brevibacterium Methylicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available By the method of electron impact mass-spectrometry was studied the pathways of biosynthesis of 2H, 13C-labeled amino acids of a facultative methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum and an obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatum obtained on growth media containing as a source of stable isotopes [2H]methanol, [13C]methanol and 2H2O. For mass-spectrometric analysis the multicomponential mixtures of 2H- and 13C-labeled amino acids, derived from cultural media and protein hydrolysates after hydrolysis in 6 M 2HСl (3 % phenol and 2 M Ва(OH2 were modified into N-benzyloxycarbonyl-derivatives of amino acids as well as into methyl esters of N-5-(dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl chloride (dansyl derivatives of [2H, 13С]amino acids, which were preparative separated using a method of reverse-phase HCLP. Biosynthetically obtained 2H- and 13C-labeled amino acids represented the mixtures differing in quantities of isotopes incorporated into molecule. The levels of 2H and 13С enrichment of secreted amino acids and amino acid resigues of protein were found to vary from 20,0 atom % to L-leucine/isoleucine up to 97,5 atom % for L-alanine depending on concentration of 2H- and 13C-labelled substrates.

  3. Improvement of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027 production by manipulating its biosynthetic pathway regulation in Streptomyces globisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihua; Yin, Min; Horsman, Geoff P; Shen, Ben

    2011-03-25

    The production of C-1027 in Streptomyces globisporus was previously increased 2- to 3-fold by manipulating three pathway-specific activators, SgcR1, SgcR2, and SgcR3. In this study, we have further characterized two putative C-1027 regulatory genes, sgcE1 and sgcR, by in vivo inactivation. The HxlR family DNA-binding protein SgcE1 was not essential for C-1027 biosynthesis, since inactivation of sgcE1 showed no effect on C-1027 production. In contrast, the proposed repressive role of the sgcR gene was confirmed by a 3-fold increase in C-1027 production in the ΔsgcR mutant S. globisporus SB1022 strain relative to the wild-type strain. Considering SgcR shows no significant similarity to any protein of known function, it may be representative of a new family of regulatory proteins. Finally, overexpression of the previously characterized activator sgcR1 in S. globisporus SB1022 increased the C-1027 yield to 37.5 ± 7.7 mg/L, which is about 7-fold higher than the wild-type strain. PMID:21250756

  4. Analysis of biochemical compounds and differentially expressed genes of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in variegated peach flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, D; Liu, H L; Chen, Y N; Wan, Z B; Zhuge, Q; Li, S X

    2015-01-01

    Variegated plants are highly valuable in the floricultural market, yet the genetic mechanism underlying this attractive phenomenon has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we identified and measured different compounds in pink and white flower petals of peach (Prunus persica) by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. No cyanidin-based or pelargonidin-based compounds were detected in white petals, but high levels of these compounds were found in pink petals. Additionally, we sequenced and analyzed the expression of six key structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway (CHI, CHS, DFR, F3'H, ANS, and UFGT) in both white and pink petals. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed all six genes to be expressed at greatly reduced levels in white flower petals, relative to pink. No allelic variations were found in the transcribed sequences. However, alignment of transcribed and genomic sequences of the ANS gene detected alternative splicing, resulting in transcripts of 1.071 and 942 bp. Only the longer transcript was observed in white flower petals. Since ANS is the key intermediate enzyme catalyzing the colorless leucopelargonidin and leucocyanidin to substrates required for completion of anthocyanin biosynthesis, the ANS gene is implicated in flower color variegation and should be explored in future studies. This article, together with a previous transcriptome study, elucidates the mechanism underlying peach flower color variegation in terms of the key structural genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:26535657

  5. Crystal Structure of Vancosaminyltransferase GtfD from the Vancomycin Biosynthetic Pathway: Interactions with Acceptor and Nucleotide Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulichak, A.M.; Lu, W.; Losey, H.C.; Walsh, C.T.; Garavito, R.M. (Harvard-Med); (MSU)

    2010-03-08

    The TDP-vancosaminyltransferase GtfD catalyzes the attachment of L-vancosamine to a monoglucosylated heptapeptide intermediate during the final stage of vancomycin biosynthesis. Glycosyltransferases from this and similar antibiotic pathways are potential tools for the design of new compounds that are effective against vancomycin resistant bacterial strains. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of GtfD as a complex with TDP and the natural glycopeptide substrate at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. GtfD, a member of the bidomain GT-B glycosyltransferase superfamily, binds TDP in the interdomain cleft, while the aglycone acceptor binds in a deep crevice in the N-terminal domain. However, the two domains are more interdependent in terms of substrate binding and overall structure than was evident in the structures of closely related glycosyltransferases GtfA and GtfB. Structural and kinetic analyses support the identification of Asp13 as a catalytic general base, with a possible secondary role for Thr10. Several residues have also been identified as being involved in donor sugar binding and recognition.

  6. Improvement of hairy root cultures and plants by changing biosynthetic pathways leading to pharmaceutical metabolites: strategies and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Jahn, Linda; Lippert, Annemarie; Püschel, Joachim; Walter, Antje

    2014-11-01

    A plethora of bioactive plant metabolites has been explored for pharmaceutical, food chemistry and agricultural applications. The chemical synthesis of these structures is often difficult, so plants are favorably used as producers. While whole plants can serve as a source for secondary metabolites and can be also improved by metabolic engineering, more often cell or organ cultures of relevant plant species are of interest. It should be noted that only in few cases the production for commercial application in such cultures has been achieved. Their genetic manipulation is sometimes faster and the production of a specific metabolite is more reliable, because of less environmental influences. In addition, upscaling in bioreactors is nowadays possible for many of these cultures, so some are already used in industry. There are approaches to alter the profile of metabolites not only by using plant genes, but also by using bacterial genes encoding modifying enzymes. Also, strategies to cope with unwanted or even toxic compounds are available. The need for metabolic engineering of plant secondary metabolite pathways is increasing with the rising demand for (novel) compounds with new bioactive properties. Here, we give some examples of recent developments for the metabolic engineering of plants and organ cultures, which can be used in the production of metabolites with interesting properties. PMID:24699436

  7. Regulatory Network of Secondary Metabolism in Brassica rapa: Insight into the Glucosinolate Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Dunia Pino Del Carpio; Ram Kumar Basnet; Danny Arends; Ke Lin; Ric C H De Vos; Dorota Muth; Jan Kodde; Kim Boutilier; Johan Bucher; Xiaowu Wang; Ritsert Jansen; Guusje Bonnema

    2014-01-01

    Brassica rapa studies towards metabolic variation have largely been focused on the profiling of the diversity of metabolic compounds in specific crop types or regional varieties, but none aimed to identify genes with regulatory function in metabolite composition. Here we followed a genetical genomics approach to identify regulatory genes for six biosynthetic pathways of health-related phytochemicals, i.e carotenoids, tocopherols, folates, glucosinolates, flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. Leave...

  8. Violet/blue chrysanthemums--metabolic engineering of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway results in novel petal colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugliera, Filippa; Tao, Guo-Qing; Tems, Ursula; Kalc, Gianna; Mouradova, Ekaterina; Price, Kym; Stevenson, Kim; Nakamura, Noriko; Stacey, Iolanda; Katsumoto, Yukihisa; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Mason, John G

    2013-10-01

    Chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum×morifolium Ramat.) are an important cut-flower and potted plant crop in the horticultural industry world wide. Chrysanthemums express the flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) gene and thus accumulate anthocyanins derived from cyanidin in their inflorescences which appear pink/red. Delphinidin-based anthocyanins are lacking due to the deficiency of a flavonoid 3', 5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), and so violet/blue chrysanthemum flower colors are not found. In this study, together with optimization of transgene expression and selection of the host cultivars and gene source, F3'5'H genes have been successfully utilized to produce transgenic bluish chrysanthemums that accumulate delphinidin-based anthocyanins. HPLC analysis and feeding experiments with a delphinidin precursor identified 16 cultivars of chrysanthemums out of 75 that were predicted to turn bluish upon delphinidin accumulation. A selection of eight cultivars were successfully transformed with F3'5'H genes under the control of different promoters. A pansy F3'5'H gene under the control of a chalcone synthase promoter fragment from rose resulted in the effective diversion of the anthocyanin pathway to produce delphinidin in transgenic chrysanthemum flower petals. The resultant petal color was bluish, with 40% of total anthocyanidins attributed to delphinidin. Increased delphinidin levels (up to 80%) were further achieved by hairpin RNA interference-mediated silencing of the endogenous F3'H gene. The resulting petal colors were novel bluish hues, not possible by hybridization breeding. This is the first report of the production of anthocyanins derived from delphinidin in chrysanthemum petals leading to novel flower color. PMID:23926066

  9. Structural and Functional Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni PseG: a Udp-sugarhydrolase from the Pseudaminic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Rangarajan; A Proteau; Q Cui; S Logan; Z Potetinova; D Whitfield; E Purisima; M Cygler; A Matte; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Flagella of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are important virulence determinants, whose proper assembly and function are dependent upon glycosylation at multiple positions by sialic acid-like sugars, such as 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-nonulosonic acid (pseudaminic acid (Pse)). The fourth enzymatic step in the pseudaminic acid pathway, the hydrolysis of UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-{beta}-l-altropyranose to generate 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-l-altropyranose, is performed by the nucleotide sugar hydrolase PseG. To better understand the molecular basis of the PseG catalytic reaction, we have determined the crystal structures of C. jejuni PseG in apo-form and as a complex with its UDP product at 1.8 and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In addition, molecular modeling was utilized to provide insight into the structure of the PseG-substrate complex. This modeling identifies a His{sup 17}-coordinated water molecule as the putative nucleophile and suggests the UDP-sugar substrate adopts a twist-boat conformation upon binding to PseG, enhancing the exposure of the anomeric bond cleaved and favoring inversion at C-1. Furthermore, based on these structures a series of amino acid substitution derivatives were constructed, altering residues within the active site, and each was kinetically characterized to examine its contribution to PseG catalysis. In conjunction with structural comparisons, the almost complete inactivation of the PseG H17F and H17L derivatives suggests that His{sup 17} functions as an active site base, thereby activating the nucleophilic water molecule for attack of the anomeric C-O bond of the UDP-sugar. As the PseG structure reveals similarity to those of glycosyltransferase family-28 members, in particular that of Escherichia coli MurG, these findings may also be of relevance for the mechanistic understanding of this important enzyme family.

  10. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering for Marine Carotenoids: New Opportunities and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Chonglong Wang; Jung-Hun Kim; Seon-Won Kim

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of diverse pigments with important biological roles such as light capture and antioxidative activities. Many novel carotenoids have been isolated from marine organisms to date and have shown various utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. In this review, we summarize the pathways and enzymes of carotenoid synthesis and discuss various modifications of marine carotenoids. The advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for carotenoid production ...

  11. Potential implications for epigenetic regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis during root and shoot development

    OpenAIRE

    Cazzonelli, Christopher Ian; Yin, Kuide; Pogson, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Major regulators of carotenoid biosynthesis have remained rather elusive even though the flux through the branch in the carotenoid pathway can affect plant development in response to environmental stimuli, such as light. Our recent investigations demonstrated that the production of the most abundant carotenoid in plants, lutein, is regulated by carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO) activity at a rate-limiting step of this branch point in carotenoid biosynthesis. CRTISO is required to isomerase cis-ca...

  12. Primitive Extracellular Lipid Components on the Surface of the Charophytic Alga Klebsormidium flaccidum and Their Possible Biosynthetic Pathways as Deduced from the Genome Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Satoshi; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Kato, Tsubasa; Yuno-Ohta, Naoko; Nobusawa, Takashi; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Klebsormidium flaccidum is a charophytic alga living in terrestrial and semiaquatic environments. K. flaccidum grows in various habitats, such as low-temperature areas and under desiccated conditions, because of its ability to tolerate harsh environments. Wax and cuticle polymers that contribute to the cuticle layer of plants are important for the survival of land plants, as they protect against those harsh environmental conditions and were probably critical for the transition from aquatic microorganism to land plants. Bryophytes, non-vascular land plants, have similar, but simpler, extracellular waxes and polyester backbones than those of vascular plants. The presence of waxes in terrestrial algae, especially in charophytes, which are the closest algae to land plants, could provide clues in elucidating the mechanism of land colonization by plants. Here, we compared genes involved in the lipid biosynthetic pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana to the K. flaccidum and the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genomes, and identified wax-related genes in both algae. A simple and easy extraction method was developed for the recovery of the surface lipids from K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Although these algae have wax components, their surface lipids were largely different from those of land plants. We also investigated aliphatic substances in the cell wall fraction of K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Many of the fatty acids were determined to be lipophilic monomers in K. flaccidum, and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that their possible binding mode was distinct from that of A. thaliana. Thus, we propose that K. flaccidum has a cuticle-like hydrophobic layer composed of lipids and glycoproteins, with a different composition from the cutin polymer typically found in land plant cuticles.

  13. Primitive Extracellular Lipid Components on the Surface of the Charophytic Alga Klebsormidium flaccidum and Their Possible Biosynthetic Pathways as Deduced from the Genome Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Satoshi; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Kato, Tsubasa; Yuno-Ohta, Naoko; Nobusawa, Takashi; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Klebsormidium flaccidum is a charophytic alga living in terrestrial and semiaquatic environments. K. flaccidum grows in various habitats, such as low-temperature areas and under desiccated conditions, because of its ability to tolerate harsh environments. Wax and cuticle polymers that contribute to the cuticle layer of plants are important for the survival of land plants, as they protect against those harsh environmental conditions and were probably critical for the transition from aquatic microorganism to land plants. Bryophytes, non-vascular land plants, have similar, but simpler, extracellular waxes and polyester backbones than those of vascular plants. The presence of waxes in terrestrial algae, especially in charophytes, which are the closest algae to land plants, could provide clues in elucidating the mechanism of land colonization by plants. Here, we compared genes involved in the lipid biosynthetic pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana to the K. flaccidum and the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genomes, and identified wax-related genes in both algae. A simple and easy extraction method was developed for the recovery of the surface lipids from K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Although these algae have wax components, their surface lipids were largely different from those of land plants. We also investigated aliphatic substances in the cell wall fraction of K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Many of the fatty acids were determined to be lipophilic monomers in K. flaccidum, and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that their possible binding mode was distinct from that of A. thaliana. Thus, we propose that K. flaccidum has a cuticle-like hydrophobic layer composed of lipids and glycoproteins, with a different composition from the cutin polymer typically found in land plant cuticles. PMID:27446179

  14. Primitive extracellular lipid components on the surface of the charophytic alga Klebsormidium flaccidum and their possible biosynthetic pathways as deduced from the genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eKondo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Klebsormidium flaccidum is a charophytic alga living in terrestrial and semiaquatic environments. K. flaccidum grows in various habitats, such as low-temperature areas and under desiccated conditions, because of its ability to tolerate harsh environments. Wax and cuticle polymers that contribute to the cuticle layer of plants are important for the survival of land plants, as they protect against those harsh environmental conditions and were probably critical for the transition from aquatic microorganism to land plants. Bryophytes, non-vascular land plants, have similar, but simpler, extracellular waxes and polyester backbones than those of vascular plants. The presence of waxes in terrestrial algae, especially in charophytes, which are the closest algae to land plants, could provide clues in elucidating the mechanism of land colonization by plants. Here, we compared genes involved in the lipid biosynthetic pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana to the K. flaccidum and the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genomes, and identified wax-related genes in both algae. A simple and easy extraction method was developed for the recovery of the surface lipids from K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Although these algae have wax components, their surface lipids were largely different from those of land plants. We also investigated aliphatic substances in the cell wall fraction of K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Many of the fatty acids were determined to be lipophilic monomers in K. flaccidum, and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that their possible binding mode was distinct from that of A. thaliana. Thus, we propose that K. flaccidum has a cuticle-like hydrophobic layer composed of lipids and glycoproteins, with a different composition from the cutin polymer typically found in land plant cuticles.

  15. Application of two bicistronic systems involving 2A and IRES sequences to the biosynthesis of carotenoids in rice endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sun-Hwa; Liang, Ying Shi; Jung, Harin; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Suh, Seok-Cheol; Kweon, Soon-Jong; Kim, Dong-Hern; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2010-10-01

    Coordination of multiple transgenes is essential for metabolic engineering of biosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the utilization of two bicistronic systems involving the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus and the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence from the crucifer-infecting tobamovirus to the biosynthesis of carotenoids in rice endosperm. Two carotenoid biosynthetic genes, phytoene synthase (Psy) from Capsicum and carotene desaturase (CrtI) from Pantoea, were linked via either the synthetic 2A sequence that was optimized for rice codons or the IRES sequence under control of the rice globulin promoter, generating PAC (Psy-2A-CrtI) and PIC (Psy-IRES-CrtI) constructs, respectively. The transgenic endosperm of PAC rice had a more intense golden color than did PIC rice, demonstrating that 2A was more efficient than IRES in coordinating gene expression. The 2A and IRES constructs were equally effective in driving transgene transcription. However, immunoblot analysis of CRTI, a protein encoded by the downstream open reading frame of the bicistronic constructs, revealed that 2A was ninefold more effective than IRES in driving translation. The PAC endosperms accumulated an average of 1.3 μg/g of total carotenoids, which was ninefold higher than was observed for PIC endosperms. In particular, accumulation of β-carotene was much higher in PAC endosperms than in PIC endosperms. Collectively, these results demonstrate that both 2A and IRES systems can coordinate the expression of two biosynthetic genes, with the 2A system exhibiting greater efficiency. Thus, the 2A expression system described herein is an effective new tool for multigene stacking in crop biotechnology. PMID:20649940

  16. Studying of Biosynthetic Pathways of 2H-labeled Purine Ribonucleoside Inosine in a Chemoheterotrophic Bacterium Bacillus subtilis B-3157 by FAB Mass-Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with studying biosynthetic pathways of 2H-labeled purine ribonucleoside inosine excreted into liquid microbial culture (LC by Gram-positive chemoheterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis B-3157 while growing of this bacterium on heavy water (HW medium with 2% (v/v hydrolysate of deuterated biomass of the methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum B-5662 as a source of 2H-labeled growth substrates. Isolation of 2H-labeled inosine from LC was performed by adsorption/desorption on activated carbon with following extraction by 0,3 M ammonium–formate buffer (pH = 8,9, crystallization in 80% (v/v EtOH, and ion exchange chromatography (IEC on a column with AG50WX 4 cation exchange resin equilibrated with 0,3 M ammonium–formate buffer and 0,045 M NH4Cl. The investigation of deuterium incorporation into the inosine molecule by FAB method demonstrated incorporation of 5 deuterium atoms into the molecule (the total level of deuterium enrichment – 65,5 atom% 2H with 3 deuterium atoms being included into the ribose and 2 deuterium atoms – into the hypoxanthine residue of the molecule. Three non-exchangeable deuterium atoms were incorporated into the ribose residue owing to the preservation in this bacterium the minor pathways of de novo glucose biosynthesis in 2H2O-medium. These non-exchangeable deuterium atoms in the ribose residue were originated from HMP shunt reactions, while two other deuterium atoms at C2, C8-positions in the hypoxanthine residue were synthesized from [2H]amino acids, primarily glutamine and glycine, that originated from deuterated hydrolysate. A glycoside proton at -N9-glycosidic bond could be replaced with deuterium via the reaction of СО2 elimination at the stage of ribulose-5-monophosphate formation from 3-keto-6-phosphogluconic acid with subsequent proton (deuteron attachment at the С1-position of ribulose-5-monophosphate. Two other protons at C2(C3 and C4 positions in ribose residue could be

  17. Genetic and metabolomic dissection of the ergothioneine and selenoneine biosynthetic pathway in the fission yeast, S. pombe, and construction of an overproduction system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Pluskal

    Full Text Available Ergothioneine is a small, sulfur-containing metabolite (229 Da synthesized by various species of bacteria and fungi, which can accumulate to millimolar levels in tissues or cells (e.g. erythrocytes of higher eukaryotes. It is commonly marketed as a dietary supplement due to its proposed protective and antioxidative functions. In this study we report the genes forming the two-step ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We identified the first gene, egt1+ (SPBC1604.01, by sequence homology to previously published genes from Neurospora crassa and Mycobacterium smegmatis. We showed, using metabolomic analysis, that the Δegt1 deletion mutant completely lacked ergothioneine and its precursors (trimethyl histidine/hercynine and hercynylcysteine sulfoxide. Since the second step of ergothioneine biosynthesis has not been characterized in eukaryotes, we examined four putative homologs (Nfs1/SPBC21D10.11c, SPAC11D3.10, SPCC777.03c, and SPBC660.12c of the corresponding mycobacterial enzyme EgtE. Among deletion mutants of these genes, only one (ΔSPBC660.12c, designated Δegt2 showed a substantial decrease in ergothioneine, accompanied by accumulation of its immediate precursor, hercynylcysteine sulfoxide. Ergothioneine-deficient strains exhibited no phenotypic defects during vegetative growth or quiescence. To effectively study the role of ergothioneine, we constructed an egt1+ overexpression system by replacing its native promoter with the nmt1+ promoter, which is inducible in the absence of thiamine. We employed three versions of the nmt1 promoter with increasing strength of expression and confirmed corresponding accumulations of ergothioneine. We quantified the intracellular concentration of ergothioneine in S. pombe (0.3, 157.4, 41.6, and up to 1606.3 µM in vegetative, nitrogen-starved, glucose-starved, and egt1+-overexpressing cells, respectively and described its gradual accumulation under long

  18. Coherent spectroscopy and carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niklas Christensson, N.; Chábera, P.; Pascher, T.; Dietzek, B.; Polívka, Tomáš; Yartsev, A.; Pullerits, T.

    Nové Hrady : Academic and University Center, 2008. s. 24. [ESF Workshop on Novel Methods in Exploring Carotenoid Excited State Dynamics. 21.09.2008-25.09.2008, Nové Hrady] Keywords : carotenoids * biophysics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. Hydrophilic Carotenoids: Recent Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Attila Agócs; József Deli; Veronika Nagy; Magdolna Háda

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids are substantially hydrophobic antioxidants. Hydrophobicity is this context is rather a disadvantage, because their utilization in medicine as antioxidants or in food chemistry as colorants would require some water dispersibility for their effective uptake or use in many other ways. In the past 15 years several attempts were made to synthetize partially hydrophilic carotenoids. This review compiles the recently synthetized hydrophilic carotenoid derivatives.

  20. Transcription of Genes in the Biosynthetic Pathway for Fumonisin Mycotoxins Is Epigenetically and Differentially Regulated in the Fungal Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    OpenAIRE

    Visentin, I.; Montis, V.; Doll, K.; Alabouvette, C.; Tamietti, G.; Karlovsky, P.; Cardinale, F.

    2011-01-01

    When the fungal pathogen Gibberella moniliformis (anamorph, Fusarium verticillioides) colonizes maize and maize-based products, it produces class B fumonisin (FB) mycotoxins, which are a significant threat to human and animal health. FB biosynthetic enzymes and accessory proteins are encoded by a set of clustered and cotranscribed genes collectively named FUM, whose molecular regulation is beginning to be unraveled by researchers. FB accumulation correlates with the amount of transcripts from...

  1. Characterization of the TDP-d-ravidosamine biosynthetic pathway: one-pot enzymatic synthesis of TDP-d-ravidosamine from thymidine-5-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate†

    OpenAIRE

    Kharel, Madan K.; Lian, Hui; Rohr, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Ravidomycin V and related compounds, e.g., FE35A-B, exhibit potent anticancer activities against various cancer cell lines in the presence of visible light. The amino sugar moieties (d-ravidosamine and its analogues, respectively) in these molecules contribute to the higher potencies of ravidomycin and analogues when compared to closely related compounds with neutral or branched sugars. Within the ravidomycin V biosynthetic gene cluster, five putative genes encoding NDP-d-ravidosamine biosynt...

  2. Research Progress of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloids (TIAs) Biosynthetic Pathway of Catharanthus roseus%长春花萜类吲哚生物碱的生物合成途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢世海; 王荃; 潘琪芳; 赵静雅; 唐克轩

    2012-01-01

    There are more than 130 types of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (L. ) G. Don. In this review, the upstream and downstream of the biosynthesis of these alkaloids in C. roseus, and related studies were summarized. During upstream pathway, tryptamine which came from indole biosynthetic pathway and secologamn which came from monoterpenoid pathway were synthesized into 3a(S)-Strictosidine which is the common precurors of different TIAs by the corresponding enzymatic catalysis. Then various TIAs were found from 3α(S)-Strictosidine by enzymes during downstream process. The TIAs biosynthetic pathway in C. roseus were outlined in the article in order to provide useful information for the researchers who are interested in terpenoid indole alkaloids biosynthetic pathway and metabolic regulation.%药用植物长春花含有130余种萜类吲哚生物碱,该文对近年来国内外有关长春花生物碱合成的上游和下游阶段及其相关研究进行详细的归纳总结.长春花上游合成途径中在相应的酶促作用下由吲哚途径产生的色胺和由类萜途径产生的裂环马钱子苷在异胡豆苷合成酶的催化作用下形成了所有长春花TIAs的共同前体物质3α-异胡豆苷,3α-异胡豆苷再由下游途径的各种酶促作用下生成种类各异的长春花TIAs.通过对长春花TIAs合成途径的阐述,为萜类吲哚生物碱合成及其代谢调控的相关研究提供参考.

  3. Hydrophilic Carotenoids: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Agócs

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are substantially hydrophobic antioxidants. Hydrophobicity is this context is rather a disadvantage, because their utilization in medicine as antioxidants or in food chemistry as colorants would require some water dispersibility for their effective uptake or use in many other ways. In the past 15 years several attempts were made to synthetize partially hydrophilic carotenoids. This review compiles the recently synthetized hydrophilic carotenoid derivatives.

  4. Biosynthesis of Carotenoids in Plants: Enzymes and Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Saavedra, Carolina; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most important biocolor isoprenoids responsible for yellow, orange and red colors found in nature. In plants, they are synthesized in plastids of photosynthetic and sink organs and are essential molecules for photosynthesis, photo-oxidative damage protection and phytohormone synthesis. Carotenoids also play important roles in human health and nutrition acting as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Biochemical and biophysical approaches in different plants models have provided significant advances in understanding the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in plants as well as the key points of regulation in their biosynthesis. To date, different plant models have been used to characterize the key genes and their regulation, which has increased the knowledge of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in plants. In this chapter a description of each step in the carotenoid synthesis pathway is presented and discussed. PMID:27485218

  5. Encapsulation of Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Henelyta S.; Schuchmann, Heike P.; Engel, Robert; Walz, Elke; Briviba, Karlis

    Carotenoids are natural pigments, which are synthesized by microorganisms and plants. More than 600 naturally occurring carotenoids have been found in the nature. The main sources of carotenoids are fruits, vegetables, leaves, peppers, and certain types of fishes, sea foods, and birds. Carotenoids may protect cells against photosensitization and work as light-absorbing pigments during photosynthesis. Some carotenoids may inhibit the destructive effect of reactive oxygen species. Due to the antioxidative properties of carotenoids, many investigations regarding their protective effects against cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, as well as other degenerative illnesses, have been carried out in the last years (Briviba et al. 2004; Krinsky et al. 2004; Kirsh et al. 2006). A diet rich in carotenoids may also contribute to photoprotection against UV radiation (Stahl et al. 2006). In vitro studies have shown that carotenoids such as β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene stimulate bone formation and mineralization. The results may be related to prevention of osteoporosis (Kim et al. 2003; Yamaguchi and Uchiyama 2003; 2004; Yamaguchi et al. 2005).

  6. Carotenoid metabolism in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. Th...

  7. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  8. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light acclimation in a marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Olimpio Montero; Alberto Sánchez-Guijo; Luis M Lubián; Gonzalo Martínez-Rodríguez

    2012-09-01

    Time course of carotenoid and membrane lipid variation during high light (HL) acclimation (about 85 mol m−2 s−1), after transfer from low light (LL) (5–10 μmol m−2 s−1), was determined in a marine Synechococcus strain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to diode array detector (DAD) or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used for compound separation and detection. Myxoxanthophyll rose within a time interval of 8 h to 24 h after the onset of exposure to HL. -carotene content started to decrease after 4 h of the onset of exposure to HL. Zeaxanthin content rose with exposure to HL, but it was only significant after 24 h of exposure. Carotenoid changes are in agreement with a coordinated activity of the enzymes of the myxoxanthophyll biosynthetic pathway, with no rate-limiting intermediate steps. Lipid analysis showed all species with a C18:3/C16:0 composition increased their content, the changes of PG(18:3/16:0) and MGDG(18:3/16:0) being primarily significant. Major lipid changes were also found to occur within 24 h. These changes might suggest reduction and reorganization of the thylakoid membrane structure. Hypotheses are also drawn on the role played by lipid molecule shape and their possible effect in membrane fluidity and protein accommodation.

  9. Manipulation of Carotenoid Content in Plants to Improve Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Enriqueta; Rodrigo, Maria Jesús; Zacarias, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are essential components for human nutrition and health, mainly due to their antioxidant and pro-vitamin A activity. Foods with enhanced carotenoid content and composition are essential to ensure carotenoid feasibility in malnourished population of many countries around the world, which is critical to alleviate vitamin A deficiency and other health-related disorders. The pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis is currently well understood, key steps of the pathways in different plant species have been characterized and the corresponding genes identified, as well as other regulatory elements. This enables the manipulation and improvement of carotenoid content and composition in order to control the nutritional value of a number of agronomical important staple crops. Biotechnological and genetic engineering-based strategies to manipulate carotenoid metabolism have been successfully implemented in many crops, with Golden rice as the most relevant example of β-carotene improvement in one of the more widely consumed foods. Conventional breeding strategies have been also adopted in the bio-fortification of carotenoid in staple foods that are highly consumed in developing countries, including maize, cassava and sweet potatoes, to alleviate nutrition-related problems. The objective of the chapter is to summarize major breakthroughs and advances in the enhancement of carotenoid content and composition in agronomical and nutritional important crops, with special emphasis to their potential impact and benefits in human nutrition and health. PMID:27485228

  10. Carotenoids and Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Uragami, Chiasa; Cogdell, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous and essential pigments in photosynthesis. They absorb in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum and transfer the absorbed energy to (bacterio-)chlorophylls, and so expand the wavelength range of light that is able to drive photosynthesis. This is an example of singlet-singlet energy transfer, and so carotenoids serve to enhance the overall efficiency of photosynthetic light reactions. Carotenoids also act to protect photosynthetic organisms from the harmful effects of excess exposure to light. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoids plays a key role in this photoprotective reaction. In the light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria and chlorophytes, carotenoids have an additional role of structural stabilization of those complexes. In this article we review what is currently known about how carotenoids discharge these functions. The molecular architecture of photosynthetic systems will be outlined first to provide a basis from which to describe carotenoid photochemistry, which underlies most of their important functions in photosynthesis. PMID:27485220

  11. ASTAXANTHIN: A POTENTIAL CAROTENOID

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotika Dhankhar et al.

    2012-01-01

    Astaxanthin, a member of the carotenoid family, is a dark-red pigment which is the main carotenoid found in the marine world of algae and aquatic animals. Astaxanthin, is present in many types of seafood, including salmon, trout, red sea bream, shrimp and lobster, as well as in birds such as flamingo and quail. Synthetic Astaxanthin dominates the world market but recent interest in natural sources of the pigment has increased substantially. Common sources of natural Astaxanthin, are the gree...

  12. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ω70 promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs

  13. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  14. Dietary factors that affect carotenoid bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van het K.

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects of increased vegetable consumption. To better understand the potential benefits of carotenoids, we investigated the bioavailability of carotenoids from vegetables and dietary factors which might influence carotenoid bioavailability.In a

  15. New Biosynthetic Step in the Melanin Pathway of Wangiella (Exophiala) dermatitidis: Evidence for 2-Acetyl-1,3,6,8-Tetrahydroxynaphthalene as a Novel Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The predominant cell wall melanin of Wangiella dermatitidis, a black fungal pathogen of humans, is synthesized from 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (D2HN). An early precursor, 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene (T4HN), in the pathway leading to D2HN is reportedly produced as a pentaketide directly by an iter...

  16. Anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Ning; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Liu, Bo; Zheng, Shuning; Liang, Jianli; Wang, Xiaowu

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthocyanins are a group of flavonoid compounds. As a group of important secondary metabolites, they perform several key biological functions in plants. Anthocyanins also play beneficial health roles as potentially protective factors against cancer and heart disease. To elucidate the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Brassica rapa, we conducted comparative genomic analyses between Arabidopsis thaliana and B. rapa on a genome-wide level. Results In total, we identified 73 genes in...

  17. The astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside biosynthesis pathway in Sphingomonas sp. PB304

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Jin Ho; Lee, Bun Yeol;

    2014-01-01

    A major carotenoid in Sphingomonas sp. PB304, originally isolated from a river in Daejon City, South Korea, was identified as astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside. Gene clusters encoding the astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside biosynthetic enzymes were identified by screening Sphingomonas sp. PB304 fosmid...... of astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside in Sphingomonas sp. PB304, a putative corresponding gene in the carotenoid biosynthetic gene cluster, and high amino acid sequence homology to the existing glycosyltransferases. Therefore, we propose that astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside can be synthesized in Sphingomonas sp. PB304...

  18. Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps of Antimalarial Compound FR-900098

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes, Tyler W.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Metcalf, William W.; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-01-01

    FR-900098 is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of malaria. Here we report the heterologous production of this compound in E. coli by re-constructing the entire biosynthetic pathway using a three plasmid system. Based on this system, whole cell feeding assays in combination with in vitro enzymatic activity assays reveal an unprecedented functional role of nucleotide conjugation and lead to the complete elucidation of the previously unassigned late biosynthetic steps. These stud...

  19. The Simultaneous Repression of CCR and CAD, Two Enzymes of the Lignin Biosynthetic Pathway, Results in Sterility and Dwarfism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johanne Thévenin; Brigitte Pollet; Bruno Letarnec; Luc Saulnier; Lionel Gissot; Alessandra Maia-Grondard; Catherine Lapierre; Lise Jouanina

    2011-01-01

    Cinnamoyl CoA reductase(CCR)and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase(CAD)catalyze the last steps of monolignol biosynthesis.In Arabidopsis,one CCR gene(CCR1,At1g15950)and two CAD genes(CAD C At3g19450 and CAD D At4g34230)are involved in this pathway.A triple cad c cad d ccr1 mutant,named ccc,was obtained.This mutant displays a severe dwarf phenotype and male sterility.The lignin content in ccc mature stems is reduced to 50% of the wild-type level.In addition,stem lignin structure is severely affected,as shown by the dramatic enrichment in resistant inter-unit bonds and incorporation into the polymer of monolignol precursors such as coniferaldehyde,sinapaldehyde,and ferulic acid.Male sterility is due to the lack of lignification in the anther endothecium,which causes the failure of anther dehiscence and of pollen release.The ccc hypolignified stems accumulate higher amounts of flavonol glycosides,sinapoyl malate and feruloyl malate,which suggests a redirection of the phenolic pathway.Therefore,the absence of CAD and CCR,key enzymes of the monolignol pathway,has more severe consequences on the phenotype than the individual absence of each of them.Induction of another CCR(CCR2,At1g80820)and another CAD(CAD1,At4g39330)does not compensate the absence of the main CCR and CAD activities.This lack of CCR and CAD activities not only impacts lignification,but also severely affects the development of the plants.These consequences must be carefully considered when trying to reduce the lignin content of plants in order to facilitate the lignocellulose-to-bioethanol conversion process.

  20. Conserved enzymes mediate the early reactions of carotenoid biosynthesis in nonphotosynthetic and photosynthetic prokaryotes.

    OpenAIRE

    G. A. Armstrong; Alberti, M; Hearst, J E

    1990-01-01

    Carotenoids comprise one of the most widespread classes of pigments found in nature. The first reactions of C40 carotenoid biosynthesis proceed through common intermediates in all organisms, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of early enzymes from this pathway. We report here the nucleotide sequence of three genes from the carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster of Erwinia herbicola, a nonphotosynthetic epiphytic bacterium, which encode homologs of the CrtB, CrtE, and CrtI proteins of Rhod...

  1. Carotenoid-induced non-photochemical quenching in the cyanobacterial chlorophyll synthase-HliC/D complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Tronina, Tomasz; Liu, Haijun; Staleva, Hristina; Komenda, Josef; Sobotka, Roman; Blankenship, Robert E; Polívka, Tomáš

    2016-09-01

    Chl synthase (ChlG) is an important enzyme of the Chl biosynthetic pathway catalyzing attachment of phytol/geranylgeraniol tail to the chlorophyllide molecule. Here we have investigated the Flag-tagged ChlG (f.ChlG) in a complex with two different high-light inducible proteins (Hlips) HliD and HliC. The f.ChlG-Hlips complex binds a Chl a and three different carotenoids, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and myxoxanthophyll. Application of ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy performed at room and cryogenic temperatures revealed excited-state dynamics of complex-bound pigments. After excitation of Chl a in the complex, excited Chl a is efficiently quenched by a nearby carotenoid molecule via energy transfer from the Chl a Qy state to the carotenoid S1 state. The kinetic analysis of the spectroscopic data revealed that quenching occurs with a time constant of ~2ps and its efficiency is temperature independent. Even though due to its long conjugation myxoxanthophyll appears to be energetically best suited for role of Chl a quencher, based on comparative analysis and spectroscopic data we propose that β-carotene bound to Hlips acts as the quencher rather than myxoxanthophyll and zeaxanthin, which are bound at the f.ChlG and Hlips interface. The S1 state lifetime of the quencher has been determined to be 13ps at room temperature and 21ps at 77K. These results demonstrate that Hlips act as a conserved functional module that prevents photodamage of protein complexes during photosystem assembly or Chl biosynthesis. PMID:27133505

  2. Characterization of SpnQ from the spinosyn biosynthetic pathway of Saccharopolyspora spinosa: mechanistic and evolutionary implications for C-3 deoxygenation in deoxysugar biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lin; Zhao, Zongbao; Liu, Hung-wen

    2006-11-01

    The C-3 deoxygenation step in the biosynthesis of d-forosamine (4-N,N-dimethylamino-2,3,4,6-tetradeoxy-d-threo-hexopyranose), a constituent of spinosyn produced by Saccharopolyspora spinosa, was investigated. The spnQ gene, proposed to encode a TDP-4-keto-2,6-dideoxy-d-glucose 3-dehydratase was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli. Characterization of the purified enzyme established that it is a PMP and iron-sulfur containing enzyme which catalyzes the C-3 deoxygenation in a reductase-dependent manner similar to that of the previously well characterized hexose 3-dehydrase E1 from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. However, unlike E1, which has evolved to work with a specific reductase partner present in its gene cluster, SpnQ lacks a specific reductase, and works efficiently with general cellular reductases ferredoxin/ferredoxin reductase or flavodoxin/flavodoxin reductase. SpnQ also catalyzes C-4 transamination in the absence of an electron transfer intermediary and in the presence of PLP and l-glutamate. Under the same conditions, both E1 and the related hexose 3-dehydrase, ColD, catalyze C-3 deoxygenation. Thus, SpnQ possesses important features which distinguish it from other well studied homologues, suggesting unique evolutionary pathways for each of the three hexose 3-dehydrases studied thus far. PMID:17076492

  3. Testing the carotenoid trade-off hypothesis in the polychromatic Midas cichlid, Amphilophus citrinellus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Susan M; Nieves-Puigdoller, Katherine; Brown, Alexandria C; McGraw, Kevin J; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2010-01-01

    Many animals use carotenoid pigments derived from their diet for coloration and immunity. The carotenoid trade-off hypothesis predicts that, under conditions of carotenoid scarcity, individuals may be forced to allocate limited carotenoids to either coloration or immunity. In polychromatic species, the pattern of allocation may differ among individuals. We tested the carotenoid trade-off hypothesis in the Midas cichlid, Amphilophus citrinellus, a species with two ontogenetic color morphs, barred and gold, the latter of which is the result of carotenoid expression. We performed a diet-supplementation experiment in which cichlids of both color morphs were assigned to one of two diet treatments that differed only in carotenoid content (beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin). We measured integument color using spectrometry, quantified carotenoid concentrations in tissue and plasma, and assessed innate immunity using lysozyme activity and alternative complement pathway assays. In both color morphs, dietary carotenoid supplementation elevated plasma carotenoid circulation but failed to affect skin coloration. Consistent with observable differences in integument coloration, we found that gold fish sequestered more carotenoids in skin tissue than barred fish, but barred fish had higher concentrations of carotenoids in plasma than gold fish. Neither measure of innate immunity differed between gold and barred fish, or as a function of dietary carotenoid supplementation. Lysozyme activity, but not complement activity, was strongly affected by body condition. Our data show that a diet low in carotenoids is sufficient to maintain both coloration and innate immunity in Midas cichlids. Our data also suggest that the developmental transition from the barred to gold morph is not accompanied by a decrease in innate immunity in this species. PMID:20151818

  4. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  5. The astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside biosynthesis pathway in Sphingomonas sp. PB304.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Jin Ho; Lee, Bun Yeol; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2014-12-01

    A major carotenoid in Sphingomonas sp. PB304, originally isolated from a river in Daejon City, South Korea, was identified as astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside. Gene clusters encoding the astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside biosynthetic enzymes were identified by screening Sphingomonas sp. PB304 fosmid libraries using degenerate probes that harbor highly conserved sequences from the Sphigomonas elodea-derived crtI and Nostoc sp. PCC 7120-dervied crtW genes. Selected positive gene clusters were fully sequenced and annotated, revealing genes encoding six putative carotenogenic enzymes: phytoene synthase (CrtB), phytoene desaturase (CrtI), lycopene cyclase (CrtY), carotene hydroxylase (CrtZ), carotene ketolase (CrtW), and glycosyltransferase (CrtX). All of the carotenogenic enzymes, except for CrtX, were functional in the recombinant host Escherichia coli expressing synthetic carotenogenic modules from Pantoea agglomerans. CrtX did not take up UDP-glucose or GDP-fucose as sugar substrates during the in vitro reaction. Although no direct experimental evidence was obtained for the function of Sphingomonas sp. PB304 CrtX, it can be categorized as a putative deoxyglycosyltransferase based on the presence of astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside in Sphingomonas sp. PB304, a putative corresponding gene in the carotenoid biosynthetic gene cluster, and high amino acid sequence homology to the existing glycosyltransferases. Therefore, we propose that astaxanthin dideoxyglycoside can be synthesized in Sphingomonas sp. PB304 via sequential reactions of six pathway enzymes, including CrtX on the phytoene intermediate. PMID:25193422

  6. HPLC-MS/MS analyses show that the near-Starchless aps1 and pgm leaves accumulate wild type levels of ADPglucose: further evidence for the occurrence of important ADPglucose biosynthetic pathway(s alternative to the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif Bahaji

    Full Text Available In leaves, it is widely assumed that starch is the end-product of a metabolic pathway exclusively taking place in the chloroplast that (a involves plastidic phosphoglucomutase (pPGM, ADPglucose (ADPG pyrophosphorylase (AGP and starch synthase (SS, and (b is linked to the Calvin-Benson cycle by means of the plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI. This view also implies that AGP is the sole enzyme producing the starch precursor molecule, ADPG. However, mounting evidence has been compiled pointing to the occurrence of important sources, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, of ADPG. To further explore this possibility, in this work two independent laboratories have carried out HPLC-MS/MS analyses of ADPG content in leaves of the near-starchless pgm and aps1 mutants impaired in pPGM and AGP, respectively, and in leaves of double aps1/pgm mutants grown under two different culture conditions. We also measured the ADPG content in wild type (WT and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid two different ADPG cleaving enzymes, and in aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC, a bacterial AGP. Furthermore, we measured the ADPG content in ss3/ss4/aps1 mutants impaired in starch granule initiation and chloroplastic ADPG synthesis. We found that, irrespective of their starch contents, pgm and aps1 leaves, WT and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid ADPG cleaving enzymes, and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC accumulate WT ADPG content. In clear contrast, ss3/ss4/aps1 leaves accumulated ca. 300 fold-more ADPG than WT leaves. The overall data showed that, in Arabidopsis leaves, (a there are important ADPG biosynthetic pathways, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, (b pPGM and AGP are not major determinants of intracellular ADPG content, and (c the contribution of the chloroplastic ADPG pool to the total ADPG pool is low.

  7. Carotenoid dynamics in Atlantic salmon

    OpenAIRE

    Omholt Stig W; Våge Dag; Øyehaug Leiv; Rajasingh Hannah

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Carotenoids are pigment molecules produced mainly in plants and heavily exploited by a wide range of organisms higher up in the food-chain. The fundamental processes regulating how carotenoids are absorbed and metabolized in vertebrates are still not fully understood. We try to further this understanding here by presenting a dynamic ODE (ordinary differential equation) model to describe and analyse the uptake, deposition, and utilization of a carotenoid at the whole-organi...

  8. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  9. How carotenoids protect bacterial photosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cogdell, R J; Howard, T. D.; Bittl, R.; Schlodder, E; Geisenheimer, I; Lubitz, W.

    2000-01-01

    The essential function of carotenoids in photosynthesis is to act as photoprotective agents, preventing chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls from sensitizing harmful photodestructive reactions in the presence of oxygen. Based upon recent structural studies on reaction centres and antenna complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria, the detailed organization of the carotenoids is described. Then with specific reference to bacterial antenna complexes the details of the photoprotective role, ...

  10. Efficient light-harvesting using non-carbonyl carotenoids: Energy transfer dynamics in the VCP complex from Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keşan, Gürkan; Litvín, Radek; Bína, David; Durchan, Milan; Šlouf, Václav; Polívka, Tomáš

    2016-04-01

    Violaxanthin-chlorophyll a protein (VCP) from Nannochloropsis oceanica is a Chl a-only member of the LHC family of light-harvesting proteins. VCP binds carotenoids violaxanthin (Vio), vaucheriaxanthin (Vau), and vaucheriaxanthin-ester (Vau-ester). Here we report on energy transfer pathways in the VCP complex. The overall carotenoid-to-Chla energy transfer has efficiency over 90%. Based on their energy transfer properties, the carotenoids in VCP can be divided into two groups; blue carotenoids with the lowest energy absorption band around 480nm and red carotenoids with absorption extended up to 530nm. Both carotenoid groups transfer energy efficiently from their S2 states, reaching efficiencies of ~70% (blue) and ~60% (red). The S1 pathway, however, is efficient only for the red carotenoid pool for which two S1 routes characterized by 0.33 and 2.4ps time constants were identified. For the blue carotenoids the S1-mediated pathway is represented only by a minor route likely involving a hot S1 state. The relaxed S1 state of blue carotenoids decays to the ground state within 21ps. Presence of a fraction of non-transferring red carotenoids with the S1 lifetime of 13ps indicates some specific carotenoid-protein interaction that must shorten the intrinsic S1 lifetime of Vio and/or Vau whose S1 lifetimes in methanol are 26 and 29ps, respectively. The VCP complex from N. oceanica is the first example of a light-harvesting complex binding only non-carbonyl carotenoids with carotenoid-to-chlorophyll energy transfer efficiency over 90%. PMID:26744091

  11. Dark excited states of carotenoids: Consensus and controversy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Sundström, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 477, 1-3 (2009), s. 1-11. ISSN 0009-2614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * excited states * relaxation pathways * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.291, year: 2009

  12. ASTAXANTHIN: A POTENTIAL CAROTENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Dhankhar et al.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a member of the carotenoid family, is a dark-red pigment which is the main carotenoid found in the marine world of algae and aquatic animals. Astaxanthin, is present in many types of seafood, including salmon, trout, red sea bream, shrimp and lobster, as well as in birds such as flamingo and quail. Synthetic Astaxanthin dominates the world market but recent interest in natural sources of the pigment has increased substantially. Common sources of natural Astaxanthin, are the green algae haematococcus pluvialis, the red yeast, Phaffia rhodozyma, as well as crustacean byproducts. Astaxanthin possesses unusual antioxidant property which has caused a surge in the nutraceutical market of the encapsulated products. Numerous studies have shown that astaxanthin has potential health-promoting effects in the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as cancers, chronic inflammatory diseases, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, cardiovascular diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, liver diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, eye diseases, skin diseases, exercise-induced fatigue, male infertility, and renal failure. In this article, the currently available scientific literature regarding the most significant activities of astaxanthin is reviewed.

  13. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kevin; Cerda, Ariel; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota) is one of the most important vegetable cultivated worldwide and the main source of dietary provitamin A. Contrary to other plants, almost all carrot varieties accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids in the root, resulting in a wide variety of colors, including those with purple, yellow, white, red and orange roots. During the first weeks of development the root, grown in darkness, is thin and pale and devoid of carotenoids. At the second month, the thickening of the root and the accumulation of carotenoids begins, and it reaches its highest level at 3 months of development. This normal root thickening and carotenoid accumulation can be completely altered when roots are grown in light, in which chromoplasts differentiation is redirected to chloroplasts development in accordance with an altered carotenoid profile. Here we discuss the current evidence on the biosynthesis of carotenoid in carrot roots in response to environmental cues that has contributed to our understanding of the mechanism that regulates the accumulation of carotenoids, as well as the carotenogenic gene expression and root development in D. carota. PMID:27485223

  14. Food Predictors of Plasma Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J. Hendrickson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Empirical prediction models that weight food frequency questionnaire (FFQ food items by their relation to nutrient biomarker concentrations may estimate nutrient exposure better than nutrient intakes derived from food composition databases. Carotenoids may especially benefit because contributing foods vary in bioavailability and assessment validity. Our objective was to develop empirical prediction models for the major plasma carotenoids and total carotenoids and evaluate their validity compared with dietary intakes calculated from standard food composition tables. 4180 nonsmoking women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS blood subcohort with previously measured plasma carotenoids were randomly divided into training (n = 2787 and testing (n = 1393 subsets. Empirical prediction models were developed in the training subset by stepwise selection from foods contributing ≥0.5% to intake of the relevant carotenoid. Spearman correlations between predicted and measured plasma concentrations were compared to Spearman correlations between dietary intake and measured plasma concentrations for each carotenoid. Three to 12 foods were selected for the α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids prediction models. In the testing subset, Spearman correlations with measured plasma concentrations for the calculated dietary intakes and predicted plasma concentrations, respectively, were 0.31 and 0.37 for α-carotene, 0.29 and 0.31 for β-carotene, 0.36 and 0.41 for β-cryptoxanthin, 0.28 and 0.31 for lutein/zeaxanthin, 0.22 and 0.23 for lycopene, and 0.22 and 0.27 for total carotenoids. Empirical prediction models may modestly improve assessment of some carotenoids, particularly α-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin.

  15. Reconstitution of Biosynthetic Machinery for the Synthesis of the Highly Elaborated Indole Diterpene Penitrem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chengwei; Tagami, Koichi; Minami, Atsushi;

    2015-01-01

    KULNJ). Importantly, without conventional gene disruption, reconstitution of the biosynthetic machinery provided sufficient data to determine the pathway. It was thus demonstrated that the Aspergillus oryzae reconstitution system is a powerful method for studying the biosynthesis of complex natural products....

  16. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vega, José M.; Inés Garbayo; Francisco Bédmar; María Cuaresma; Carlos Vílchez; Eduardo Forján

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesised by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functions of carotenoids relevant for life on earth. Biological properties of carotenoids allow for wide range of commercial applications. Indeed, recent interest in the carotenoids has be...

  17. Carotenoid photoprotection in Diaptomus kenai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hairston, N.G. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    Red copepods have been reported from a wide variety of aquatic environments. The red color is produced by a carotenoid pigment, in most cases astaxanthin and its esters, that the copepods cannot form de novo but derive from ingested pigments such as beta-carotene. In an earlier study, the adaptive advantage of carotenoid pigmentation was investigated. Copepods containing large amounts of astaxanthin had significantly better survival than copepods containing small amounts of the pigment when exposed to light of an intensity and color similar to that occurring in the lakes from which they were taken. This result suggested that the carotenoid pigment protected the copepods from photodamage by visible light. Here a second example of carotenoid photoprotection involving the copepod Diaptomus kenai found in fresh-water mountain lakes is described. Information on the vertical distributions of D. sicilis and D. nevadensis in relation to their pigmentation is summarized, as these data will be presented elsewhere.

  18. Production and glucosylation of C50 and C 40 carotenoids by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Sabine A E; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Netzer, Roman; Stafnes, Marit; Brautaset, Trygve; Wendisch, Volker F

    2014-02-01

    The yellow-pigmented soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 is accumulating the cyclic C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin and its glucosides. Carotenoid pathway engineering was previously shown to allow for efficient lycopene production. Here, engineering of C. glutamicum for production of endogenous decaprenoxanthin as well as of the heterologous C50 carotenoids C.p.450 and sarcinaxanthin is described. Plasmid-borne overexpression of genes for lycopene cyclization and hydroxylation from C. glutamicum, Dietzia sp., and Micrococcus luteus, in a lycopene-producing platform strain constructed here, resulted in accumulation of these three C50 carotenoids to concentrations of about 3-4 mg/g CDW. Chromosomal deletion of a putative carotenoid glycosyltransferase gene cg0730/crtX in these strains entailed production of non-glucosylated derivatives of decaprenoxanthin, C.p.450, and sarcinaxanthin, respectively. Upon introduction of glucosyltransferase genes from M. luteus, C. glutamicum, and Pantoea ananatis, these hydroxylated C50 carotenoids were glucosylated. We here also demonstrate production of the C40 carotenoids β-carotene and zeaxanthin in recombinant C. glutamicum strains and co-expression of the P. ananatis crtX gene was used to obtain glucosylated zeaxanthin. Together, our results show that C. glutamicum is a potentially valuable host for production of a wide range of glucosylated C40 and C50 carotenoids. PMID:24270893

  19. The kiwifruit lycopene beta-cyclase plays a significant role in carotenoid accumulation in fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; McGhie, Tony; Wibisono, Reginald; Montefiori, Mirco; Hellens, Roger P.; Allan, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    The composition of carotenoids, along with anthocyanins and chlorophyll, accounts for the distinctive range of colour found in the Actinidia (kiwifruit) species. Lutein and beta-carotene are the most abundant carotenoids found during fruit development, with beta-carotene concentration increasing rapidly during fruit maturation and ripening. In addition, the accumulation of beta-carotene and lutein is influenced by the temperature at which harvested fruit are stored. Expression analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes among different genotypes and fruit developmental stages identified Actinidia lycopene beta-cyclase (LCY-β) as the gene whose expression pattern appeared to be associated with both total carotenoid and beta-carotene accumulation. Phytoene desaturase (PDS) expression was the least variable among the different genotypes, while zeta carotene desaturase (ZDS), beta-carotene hydroxylase (CRH-β), and epsilon carotene hydroxylase (CRH-ϵ) showed some variation in gene expression. The LCY-β gene was functionally tested in bacteria and shown to convert lycopene and delta-carotene to beta-carotene and alpha-carotene respectively. This indicates that the accumulation of beta-carotene, the major carotenoid in these kiwifruit species, appears to be controlled by the level of expression of LCY-β gene. PMID:19574250

  20. The kiwifruit lycopene beta-cyclase plays a significant role in carotenoid accumulation in fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; McGhie, Tony; Wibisono, Reginald; Montefiori, Mirco; Hellens, Roger P; Allan, Andrew C

    2009-01-01

    The composition of carotenoids, along with anthocyanins and chlorophyll, accounts for the distinctive range of colour found in the Actinidia (kiwifruit) species. Lutein and beta-carotene are the most abundant carotenoids found during fruit development, with beta-carotene concentration increasing rapidly during fruit maturation and ripening. In addition, the accumulation of beta-carotene and lutein is influenced by the temperature at which harvested fruit are stored. Expression analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes among different genotypes and fruit developmental stages identified Actinidia lycopene beta-cyclase (LCY-beta) as the gene whose expression pattern appeared to be associated with both total carotenoid and beta-carotene accumulation. Phytoene desaturase (PDS) expression was the least variable among the different genotypes, while zeta carotene desaturase (ZDS), beta-carotene hydroxylase (CRH-beta), and epsilon carotene hydroxylase (CRH-epsilon) showed some variation in gene expression. The LCY-beta gene was functionally tested in bacteria and shown to convert lycopene and delta-carotene to beta-carotene and alpha-carotene respectively. This indicates that the accumulation of beta-carotene, the major carotenoid in these kiwifruit species, appears to be controlled by the level of expression of LCY-beta gene. PMID:19574250

  1. Carotenoid dynamics in Atlantic salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omholt Stig W

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are pigment molecules produced mainly in plants and heavily exploited by a wide range of organisms higher up in the food-chain. The fundamental processes regulating how carotenoids are absorbed and metabolized in vertebrates are still not fully understood. We try to further this understanding here by presenting a dynamic ODE (ordinary differential equation model to describe and analyse the uptake, deposition, and utilization of a carotenoid at the whole-organism level. The model focuses on the pigment astaxanthin in Atlantic salmon because of the commercial importance of understanding carotenoid dynamics in this species, and because deposition of carotenoids in the flesh is likely to play an important life history role in anadromous salmonids. Results The model is capable of mimicking feed experiments analyzing astaxanthin uptake and retention over short and long time periods (hours, days and years under various conditions. A sensitivity analysis of the model provides information on where to look for possible genetic determinants underlying the observed phenotypic variation in muscle carotenoid retention. Finally, the model framework is used to predict that a specific regulatory system controlling the release of astaxanthin from the muscle is not likely to exist, and that the release of the pigment into the blood is instead caused by the androgen-initiated autolytic degradation of the muscle in the sexually mature salmon. Conclusion The results show that a dynamic model describing a complex trait can be instrumental in the early stages of a project trying to uncover underlying determinants. The model provides a heuristic basis for an experimental research programme, as well as defining a scaffold for modelling carotenoid dynamics in mammalian systems.

  2. Potential production of carotenoids from Neurospora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI PRIATNI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Priatni S. 2014. Review: Potential production of carotenoids from Neurospora. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 63-68. Carotenoids are abundant and widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. Commercial use of carotenoids competes between microorganisms and synthetic manufacture. Carotenoids production can be increased by improving the efficiency of carotenoid synthesis in microbes. Some of the cultural and environmental stimulants are positively affecting the carotenoid content of carotenogenic strains such as Neurospora. Neurospora is a fungus that exhibits the formation of spores and conidia, the part of the cell for carotenoids biosynthesis. The Indonesian traditional fermented food, red peanut cake or oncom, especially in West Java, is produced from legume residues of Neurospora sp. This fungus has been isolated and identified as Neurospora intermedia. In order to apply this pigment for food and cosmetic colorants, encapsulation techniques of carotenoids have been developed to improve its solubility and stability.

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis and Systematic Mining of Genes Involved in Biosynthetic Pathway of Triterpenoid Saponins in Ilex Asprella%岗梅转录组及其乌索烷型三萜皂苷生物合成相关酶基因的发掘

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑夏生; 罗秀秀; 徐晖; 詹若挺; 陈蔚文

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to screen candidate genes involved in the triterpenoid saponins biosynthetic pathway of the Ilex asprella root. The Illumina platform was applied to perform transcriptomic sequencing of I. asprella root, followed by a series of bioinformatics analysis. The results showed that a total of 272 candidate unigenes were anno-tated to be involved in the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid in the transcriptome of I. asprella root, including 72 u-nigenes for the upstream pathway and 26 unigenes for cyclization, oxidation and glycosylation in the downstream pathway. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out to further analyze the evolution relationship of some candidate uni-genes and their homologous genes. Two genes IaA S1 and IaA S2 were proved to be mixed amyrin synthases in yeast expression system. Moreover, IaA S1 was identified to one of the rare ASs with α-amyrin as the major product. It was concluded that a series of candidate genes, which might be involved in the biosynthetic pathway of triterpenoid saponins, were screened out from the transcriptome of I. asprella root. Further investigation of these candidate genes will provide insight into their actual functions in the triterpenoid saponins biosynthetic pathway in I. asprella.%目的:发掘与岗梅乌索烷型三萜皂苷生物合成相关的酶基因。方法:利用Illumina测序平台对岗梅根进行转录组测序,通过基因注释、同源分析、系统发生分析等生物信息学手段,发掘可能参与合成的单基因簇(Unigenes)。结果:在岗梅根转录组中发现了272条与萜类生物合成相关的Unigenes。这其中包括72条可能参与萜类生物合成上游途径的Unigenes,以及26条可能与三萜合成途径下游母核合成、氧化和糖基化相关的Unigenes。对其中部分Unigenes进行系统发生分析,进一步揭示了这些Unigenes与同源基因间的进化关系。利用酵母表达系统,鉴定了两个香树酯醇合酶IaAS1

  4. A high-quality carrot genome assembly provides new insights into carotenoid accumulation and asterid genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorizzo, Massimo; Ellison, Shelby; Senalik, Douglas; Zeng, Peng; Satapoomin, Pimchanok; Huang, Jiaying; Bowman, Megan; Iovene, Marina; Sanseverino, Walter; Cavagnaro, Pablo; Yildiz, Mehtap; Macko-Podgórni, Alicja; Moranska, Emilia; Grzebelus, Ewa; Grzebelus, Dariusz; Ashrafi, Hamid; Zheng, Zhijun; Cheng, Shifeng; Spooner, David; Van Deynze, Allen; Simon, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    We report a high-quality chromosome-scale assembly and analysis of the carrot (Daucus carota) genome, the first sequenced genome to include a comparative evolutionary analysis among members of the euasterid II clade. We characterized two new polyploidization events, both occurring after the divergence of carrot from members of the Asterales order, clarifying the evolutionary scenario before and after radiation of the two main asterid clades. Large- and small-scale lineage-specific duplications have contributed to the expansion of gene families, including those with roles in flowering time, defense response, flavor, and pigment accumulation. We identified a candidate gene, DCAR_032551, that conditions carotenoid accumulation (Y) in carrot taproot and is coexpressed with several isoprenoid biosynthetic genes. The primary mechanism regulating carotenoid accumulation in carrot taproot is not at the biosynthetic level. We hypothesize that DCAR_032551 regulates upstream photosystem development and functional processes, including photomorphogenesis and root de-etiolation. PMID:27158781

  5. Regulatory mechanisms underlying oil palm fruit mesocarp maturation, ripening, and functional specialization in lipid and carotenoid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranbarger, Timothy J; Dussert, Stéphane; Joët, Thierry; Argout, Xavier; Summo, Marilyne; Champion, Antony; Cros, David; Omore, Alphonse; Nouy, Bruno; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2011-06-01

    Fruit provide essential nutrients and vitamins for the human diet. Not only is the lipid-rich fleshy mesocarp tissue of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) fruit the main source of edible oil for the world, but it is also the richest dietary source of provitamin A. This study examines the transcriptional basis of these two outstanding metabolic characters in the oil palm mesocarp. Morphological, cellular, biochemical, and hormonal features defined key phases of mesocarp development. A 454 pyrosequencing-derived transcriptome was then assembled for the developmental phases preceding and during maturation and ripening, when high rates of lipid and carotenoid biosynthesis occur. A total of 2,629 contigs with differential representation revealed coordination of metabolic and regulatory components. Further analysis focused on the fatty acid and triacylglycerol assembly pathways and during carotenogenesis. Notably, a contig similar to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed oil transcription factor WRINKLED1 was identified with a transcript profile coordinated with those of several fatty acid biosynthetic genes and the high rates of lipid accumulation, suggesting some common regulatory features between seeds and fruits. We also focused on transcriptional regulatory networks of the fruit, in particular those related to ethylene transcriptional and GLOBOSA/PISTILLATA-like proteins in the mesocarp and a central role for ethylene-coordinated transcriptional regulation of type VII ethylene response factors during ripening. Our results suggest that divergence has occurred in the regulatory components in this monocot fruit compared with those identified in the dicot tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fleshy fruit model. PMID:21487046

  6. Regulatory network of secondary metabolism in Brassica rapa: insight into the glucosinolate pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunia Pino Del Carpio

    Full Text Available Brassica rapa studies towards metabolic variation have largely been focused on the profiling of the diversity of metabolic compounds in specific crop types or regional varieties, but none aimed to identify genes with regulatory function in metabolite composition. Here we followed a genetical genomics approach to identify regulatory genes for six biosynthetic pathways of health-related phytochemicals, i.e carotenoids, tocopherols, folates, glucosinolates, flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. Leaves from six weeks-old plants of a Brassica rapa doubled haploid population, consisting of 92 genotypes, were profiled for their secondary metabolite composition, using both targeted and LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics approaches. Furthermore, the same population was profiled for transcript variation using a microarray containing EST sequences mainly derived from three Brassica species: B. napus, B. rapa and B. oleracea. The biochemical pathway analysis was based on the network analyses of both metabolite QTLs (mQTLs and transcript QTLs (eQTLs. Co-localization of mQTLs and eQTLs lead to the identification of candidate regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols and glucosinolates. We subsequently focused on the well-characterized glucosinolate pathway and revealed two hotspots of co-localization of eQTLs with mQTLs in linkage groups A03 and A09. Our results indicate that such a large-scale genetical genomics approach combining transcriptomics and metabolomics data can provide new insights into the genetic regulation of metabolite composition of Brassica vegetables.

  7. Precise cloning and tandem integration of large polyketide biosynthetic gene cluster using Streptomyces artificial chromosome system

    OpenAIRE

    Nah, Hee-Ju; Woo, Min-Woo; Choi, Si-Sun; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct cloning combined with heterologous expression of a secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene cluster has become a useful strategy for production improvement and pathway modification of potentially valuable natural products present at minute quantities in original isolates of actinomycetes. However, precise cloning and efficient overexpression of an entire biosynthetic gene cluster remains challenging due to the ineffectiveness of current genetic systems in manipulating large-si...

  8. Spectroscopic Studies of Carotenoid-to-Bacteriochlorophyll Energy Transfer in LHRC Photosynthetic Complex from Roseiflexus castenholzii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Collins, Aaron M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); LaFountain, Amy M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Enriquez, Miriam M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Frank, Harry A. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blankenship, R. E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-06-14

    Carotenoids present in the photosynthetic light-harvesting reaction center (LHRC) complex from chlorosome lacking filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus castenholzii were purified and characterized for their photochemical properties. The LHRC from anaerobically grown cells contains five different carotenoids, methoxy-keto-myxocoxanthin, γ-carotene, and its three derivatives, whereas the LHRC from aerobically grown cells contains only three carotenoid pigments with methoxy-keto-myxocoxanthin being the dominant one. The spectroscopic properties and dynamics of excited singlet states of the carotenoids were studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy in organic solvent and in the intact LHRC complex. Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy performed in the near-infrared (NIR) on purified carotenoids combined with steady-state absorption spectroscopy led to the precise determination of values of the energies of the S1(21Ag-) excited state. Global and single wavelength fitting of the ultrafast spectral and temporal data sets of the carotenoids in solvents and in the LHRC revealed the pathways of de-excitation of the carotenoid excited states.

  9. Metabolic Profiling in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L. subsp. pekinensis) Cultivars Reveals that Glucosinolate Content Is Correlated with Carotenoid Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-A; Jung, Young-Ho; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Park, Sang Un; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2016-06-01

    A total of 38 bioactive compounds, including glucosinolates, carotenoids, tocopherols, sterols, and policosanols, were characterized from nine varieties of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. subsp. pekinensis) to determine their phytochemical diversity and analyze their abundance relationships. The metabolite profiles were evaluated with principal component analysis (PCA), Pearson correlation analysis, and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). PCA and HCA identified two distinct varieties of Chinese cabbage (Cheonsangcheonha and Waldongcheonha) with higher levels of glucosinolates and carotenoids. Pairwise comparisons of the 38 metabolites were calculated using Pearson correlation coefficients. The HCA, which used the correlation coefficients, clustered metabolites that are derived from closely related biochemical pathways. Significant correlations were discovered between chlorophyll and carotenoids. Additionally, aliphatic glucosinolate and carotenoid levels were positively correlated. The Cheonsangcheonha and Waldongcheonha varieties appear to be good candidates for breeding because they have high glucosinolate and carotenoid levels. PMID:27172980

  10. Carotenoids in Adipose Tissue Biology and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, M Luisa; Canas, Jose A; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Cell, animal and human studies dealing with carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives as nutritional regulators of adipose tissue biology with implications for the etiology and management of obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases are reviewed. Most studied carotenoids in this context are β-carotene, cryptoxanthin, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, together with β-carotene-derived retinoids and some other apocarotenoids. Studies indicate an impact of these compounds on essential aspects of adipose tissue biology including the control of adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis), adipocyte metabolism, oxidative stress and the production of adipose tissue-derived regulatory signals and inflammatory mediators. Specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives restrain adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy while enhancing fat oxidation and energy dissipation in brown and white adipocytes, and counteract obesity in animal models. Intake, blood levels and adipocyte content of carotenoids are reduced in human obesity. Specifically designed human intervention studies in the field, though still sparse, indicate a beneficial effect of carotenoid supplementation in the accrual of abdominal adiposity. In summary, studies support a role of specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives in the prevention of excess adiposity, and suggest that carotenoid requirements may be dependent on body composition. PMID:27485231

  11. 钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株构建及其缺失对精氨酸生物合成途径相关基因转录水平的影响%Construction of Corynebacterium crenatum AS 1.542△argR and analysis of transcriptional levels of the related genes of arginine biosynthetic pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪岚; 汤立; 焦海涛; 徐峰; 熊勇华

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] ArgR, coded by the argR gene from Corynebacterium crenatum AS 1. 542, acts as a negative regulator in arginine biosynthetic pathway. However, the effect of argR on transcriptional levels of the related biosynthetic genes has not been reported. Here, we constructed a deletion mutant of argR gene; C. Crenatum AS 1.542 △argR using marker-less knockout technology, and compared the changes of transcriptional levels of the arginine biosynthetic genes between the mutant strain and the wild-type strain. [Methods] We used marker-less knockout technology to construct C. Crenatum AS 1. 542△argR and analyzed the changes of the relate genes at the transcriptional level using real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. [Results] C. Crenatum AS 1. 542△argR was successfully obtained and the transcriptional level of arginine biosynthetic genes in this mutant increased significantly with an average of about 162. 1 folds. [Conclusion] The arginine biosynthetic genes in C. Crenatum are clearly controlled by the negative regulator ArgR. However, the deletion of this regulator does not result in a clear change in arginine production in the bacteria.%[目的]钝齿棒杆菌AS 1.542中argR基因编码的蛋白ArgR在精氨酸生物合成途径中扮演负调控的角色,但其对相关基因在转录水平的影响还未见报道.因此,本课题组构建了钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株,并在转录水平上比较野生株与缺失株精氨酸生物合成途径相关基因的变化.[方法]采用无痕敲除的方法构建了钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株,并采用荧光定量PCR方法分析缺失株和野生株精氨酸生物合成途径相关基因在转录水平的变化.[结果]利用pK18mobsacB质粒中蔗糖致死基因sacB反向筛选标记及PCR方法成功筛选到钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株;荧光定量PCR结果表明,argR基因缺失株精氨酸生物合成途径中相关基因在转录水平获得大量提高,平均约上调162.13倍.[结论]

  12. Highly efficient energy transfer from a carbonyl carotenoid to chlorophyll a in the main light harvesting complex of Chromera velia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durchan, Milan; Keşan, Gürkan; Slouf, Václav; Fuciman, Marcel; Staleva, Hristina; Tichý, Josef; Litvín, Radek; Bína, David; Vácha, František; Polívka, Tomáš

    2014-10-01

    We report on energy transfer pathways in the main light-harvesting complex of photosynthetic relative of apicomplexan parasites, Chromera velia. This complex, denoted CLH, belongs to the family of FCP proteins and contains chlorophyll (Chl) a, violaxanthin, and the so far unidentified carbonyl carotenoid related to isofucoxanthin. The overall carotenoid-to-Chl-a energy transfer exhibits efficiency over 90% which is the largest among the FCP-like proteins studied so far. Three spectroscopically different isofucoxanthin-like molecules were identified in CLH, each having slightly different energy transfer efficiency that increases from isofucoxanthin-like molecules absorbing in the blue part of the spectrum to those absorbing in the reddest part of spectrum. Part of the energy transfer from carotenoids proceeds via the ultrafast S2 channel of both the violaxanthin and isofucoxanthin-like carotenoid, but major energy transfer pathway proceeds via the S1/ICT state of the isofucoxanthin-like carotenoid. Two S1/ICT-mediated channels characterized by time constants of ~0.5 and ~4ps were found. For the isofucoxanthin-like carotenoid excited at 480nm the slower channel dominates, while those excited at 540nm employs predominantly the fast 0.5ps channel. Comparing these data with the excited-state properties of the isofucoxanthin-like carotenoid in solution we conclude that, contrary to other members of the FCP family employing carbonyl carotenoids, CLH complex suppresses the charge transfer character of the S1/ICT state of the isofucoxanthin-like carotenoid to achieve the high carotenoid-to-Chl-a energy transfer efficiency. PMID:24928296

  13. Accessing natural product biosynthetic processes by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumpus, Stefanie B; Kelleher, Neil L

    2008-10-01

    Two important classes of natural products are made by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs). With most biosynthetic intermediates covalently tethered during biogenesis, protein mass spectrometry (MS) has proven invaluable for their interrogation. New mass spectrometric assay formats (such as selective cofactor ejection and proteomics style LC-MS) are showcased here in the context of functional insights into new breeds of NRPS/PKS enzymes, including the first characterization of an 'iterative' PKS, the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotics, the study of a new strategy for PKS initiation via a GNAT-like mechanism, and the analysis of branching strategies in the so-called 'AT-less' NRPS/PKS hybrid systems. The future of MS analysis of NRPS and PKS biosynthetic pathways lies in adoption and development of methods that continue bridging enzymology with proteomics as both fields continue their post-genomic acceleration. PMID:18706516

  14. Microalgae as Sources of Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Xavier Malcata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine microalgae constitute a natural source of a variety of drugs for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications—which encompass carotenoids, among others. A growing body of experimental evidence has confirmed that these compounds can play important roles in prevention (and even treatment of human diseases and health conditions, e.g., cancer, cardiovascular problems, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy, cataracts and some neurological disorders. The underlying features that may account for such favorable biological activities are their intrinsic antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumoral features. In this invited review, the most important issues regarding synthesis of carotenoids by microalgae are described and discussed—from both physiological and processing points of view. Current gaps of knowledge, as well as technological opportunities in the near future relating to this growing field of interest, are also put forward in a critical manner.

  15. Carotenoid content and root color of cultivated carrot: a candidate-gene association study using an original broad unstructured population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Jourdan

    Full Text Available Accumulated in large amounts in carrot, carotenoids are an important product quality attribute and therefore a major breeding trait. However, the knowledge of carotenoid accumulation genetic control in this root vegetable is still limited. In order to identify the genetic variants linked to this character, we performed an association mapping study with a candidate gene approach. We developed an original unstructured population with a broad genetic basis to avoid the pitfall of false positive detection due to population stratification. We genotyped 109 SNPs located in 17 candidate genes – mostly carotenoid biosynthesis genes – on 380 individuals, and tested the association with carotenoid contents and color components. Total carotenoids and β-carotene contents were significantly associated with genes zeaxanthin epoxydase (ZEP, phytoene desaturase (PDS and carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO while α-carotene was associated with CRTISO and plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX genes. Color components were associated most significantly with ZEP. Our results suggest the involvement of the couple PDS/PTOX and ZEP in carotenoid accumulation, as the result of the metabolic and catabolic activities respectively. This study brings new insights in the understanding of the carotenoid pathway in non-photosynthetic organs.

  16. Carotenoid changes of intact watermelons after storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Collins, Julie K

    2006-08-01

    Watermelon contains lycopene, a red carotenoid pigment that has strong antioxidant properties. The lycopene content of watermelon is substantial, contributing 8-20 mg per 180 g serving. There are no reports on carotenoid changes in whole watermelon during storage. Three types of watermelon, open-pollinated seeded, hybrid seeded, and seedless types, were stored at 5, 13, and 21 degrees C for 14 days and flesh color, composition, and carotenoid content were compared to those of fruit not stored. Watermelons stored at 21 degrees C had increased pH, chroma, and carotenoid content compared to fresh fruit. Compared to fresh fruit, watermelons stored at 21 degrees C gained 11-40% in lycopene and 50-139% in beta-carotene, whereas fruit held at 13 degrees C changed little in carotenoid content. These results indicate that carotenoid biosynthesis in watermelons can be affected by temperature and storage. PMID:16881688

  17. Carotenoids content and sunlight susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An environmental pink pigmented bacterium was isolated and identified as Rhodococcus sp. Pigmentation mutants were obtained by chemical mutagenesis. Pigments present in the wild type strain (RMB90), in a pale yellow mutant (RMB91) and in two mutants exhibiting increased pigmentation (RMB92 and RMB93), were extracted with chloroform-methanol and analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Survival of these strains after exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet radiation from artificial sources was studied under different physiological and irradiation conditions. The ability of RMB91 to survive sunlight exposure was reduced with respect to that of RMB90. Resistance was similar in both strains when bacteria grew in the presence of a carotenoid synthesis inhibitor, which had no effect on survival of RMB91. Reduced sunlight resistance in RMB91 was also observed during irradiations under N2. Using artificial radiation sources, non pigmented bacteria were less resistant to UVA, but not to UVB or UVC. Lethal effects of sunlight and UVA on RMB92 and RMB93 were increased with respect to the wild type strain. Carotenoids protect Rhodococcus sp against deleterious effects of sunlight. In non-photosynthetic bacteria studied to date, photo protection by carotenoids was dependent on [O2]. This is not the case with Rhodococcus sp RMB90, suggesting the occurrence of a different mechanism for protection. UVA radiation seems to playa key role in photo-damage. (author)

  18. Allometric deviations of plasma carotenoids in raptors

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Guillermo; Bautista, Luis M.; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso; Lambertucci, Guillermo W.; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.; Hiraldo, Fernando; Donázar, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Because large species ingest proportionally less food than small ones, it may be predicted that they should incorporate relatively fewer carotenoids to a proportionally equal volume of blood. However, some species may increase their levels of circulating carotenoids by ingesting unusual food. We tested whether the plasma concentration of carotenoids scales to the three-quarter power of mass in nine predatory and scavenger raptor species. No significant allometric relationships were found due ...

  19. Carotenoids in Aquaculture: Fish and Crustaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkeng, Bjorn

    This Chapter deals with selected topics on the use of carotenoids for colouration in aquaculture and incudes examples from ecological studies which support our understanding of functions and actions of carotenoids and colouration in fishes and crustaceans. Animal colours may be physical or structural in origin [1], e.g. Tyndall blues and iridescent diffraction colours, or they may be due to pigments, including carotenoids (Chapter 10).

  20. Carotenoids in Algae: Distributions, Biosyntheses and Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Shinichi Takaichi

    2011-01-01

    For photosynthesis, phototrophic organisms necessarily synthesize not only chlorophylls but also carotenoids. Many kinds of carotenoids are found in algae and, recently, taxonomic studies of algae have been developed. In this review, the relationship between the distribution of carotenoids and the phylogeny of oxygenic phototrophs in sea and fresh water, including cyanobacteria, red algae, brown algae and green algae, is summarized. These phototrophs contain division- or class-specific carote...

  1. Increased lysine production by flux coupling of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the lysine biosynthetic pathway--metabolic engineering of the availability of succinyl-CoA in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Stefanie; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate increased lysine production by flux coupling using the industrial work horse bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, which was mediated by the targeted interruption of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle at the level of succinyl-CoA synthetase. The succinylase branch of the lysine production pathway functions as the bridging reaction to convert succinyl-CoA to succinate in this aerobic bacterium. The mutant C. glutamicum ΔsucCD showed a 60% increase in the yield of lysine when compared to the advanced lysine producer which was used as parent strain. This mutant was highly vital and exhibited only a slightly reduced specific growth rate. Metabolic flux analysis with (13)C isotope studies confirmed that the increase in lysine production was mediated by pathway coupling. The novel strain exhibited an exceptional flux profile, which was closer to the optimum performance predicted by in silico pathway analysis than to the large set of lysine-producing strains analyzed thus far. Fluxomics and transcriptomics were applied as further targets for next-level strain engineering to identify the back-up mechanisms that were activated upon deletion of the enzyme in the mutant strain. It seemed likely that the cells partly recruited the glyoxylate shunt as a by-pass route. Additionally, the α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase pathway emerged as the potential compensation mechanism. This novel strategy appears equally promising for Escherichia coli, which is used in the industrial production of lysine, wherein this bacterium synthesizes lysine exclusively by succinyl-CoA activation of pathway intermediates. The channeling of a high flux pathway into a production pathway by pathway coupling is an interesting metabolic engineering strategy that can be explored to optimize bio-production in the future. PMID:22871505

  2. Fermentative production of carotenoids from marine actinomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ashokkumar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In marine actinomycetes, carotenoid production occurs in constitutive, light-dependent or cryptic manner. The present work deals with the fermentative production of carotenoids from marine actinomycetes."nMaterials and Methods: Marine actinomycetes namely Streptomyces strain AQBMM35 was isolated from the marine sponge Mycale mytilorum collected from South West coast of India using ISP media. The Streptomyces isolates were characterized for their colony characteristics, morphological properties, physiological and biochemical properties and were tentatively identified. Fermentation of the strain under fluorescent white light was carried out for the production of carotenoids. UV spectrum, TLC and HPLC analysis were done for the confirmation of carotenoids."nResults: The characteristics studied strongly suggest that the strain AQBMM35 belongs to the genus Streptomyces sp. It has been found that Streptomyces strain (AQBMM35 fermenting under fluorescent white light produced carotenoids. Spectrophotometric analysis of the carotenoid fraction revealed a peak at 280 nm. TLC analysis of the carotenoid extract showed the presence of phytoene (Rf of 0.81. HPLC confirmed the production of phytoene when compared with standards."nConclusion: The fermenting sponge-associated Streptomyces isolate (AQBMM35 produced carotenoids namely phytoene. If this symbiotic Streptomyces strain, from which secondary metabolite like carotenoids are derived, can be cultured under light, then it can be used for mass production of precursor pigment and it can be used as an antioxidant and also as a food additive.

  3. Characterization of a SAM-dependent fluorinase from a latent biosynthetic pathway for fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine formation in Nocardia brasiliensis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2tz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaya Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorination has been widely used in chemical synthesis, but is rare in nature. The only known biological fluorination scope is represented by the fl pathway from Streptomyces cattleya that produces fluoroacetate (FAc and 4-fluorothreonine (4-FT. Here we report the identification of a novel pathway for FAc and 4-FT biosynthesis from the actinomycetoma-causing pathogen Nocardia brasiliensis ATCC 700358. The new pathway shares overall conservation with the fl pathway in S. cattleya. Biochemical characterization of the conserved domains revealed a novel fluorinase NobA that can biosynthesize 5’-fluoro-5’-deoxyadenosine (5’-FDA from inorganic fluoride and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM. The NobA shows similar halide specificity and characteristics to the fluorination enzyme FlA of the fl pathway. Kinetic parameters for fluoride (Km 4153 μM, kcat 0.073 min-1 and SAM (Km 416 μM, kcat 0.139 min-1 have been determined, revealing that NobA is slightly (2.3 fold slower than FlA. Upon sequence comparison, we finally identified a distinct loop region in the fluorinases that probably accounts for the disparity of fluorination activity.

  4. Biosynthetic porphyrins and the origin of photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, D.; Ley, A.; Mercer-Smith, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Since the prebiotic atmosphere was anaerobic, if not reducing, a useful function of primordial photosynthesis would have been to photooxidize reduced substrates such as Fe(+2), S(-2) or reduced organic molecules and to emit hydrogen. Experiments have shown that the early biogenic pigments uroporphyrin and coproporphyrin do photooxidize organic compounds and emit hydrogen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. These experiments were carried out in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH under anaerobic atmosphere, and quantum yields near 10-2 were obtained. Thus relevant prebiotic conditions were maintained. Rather then to further optimize conditions, attempts were made to replace the platinum catalyst by a more prebiotically suitable catalyst. Trials with an Fe4S4(SR)4 cluster, in analogy to the present hydrogenase and nitrogenase, were not successful. However, experiments using cobalt complexes to catalyze the formation of hydrogen are promising. In analogy with biological photosynthetic systems which group pigments, electron transfer molecules and enzymes in clusters for efficiency, it was found that binding the biogenic porphyrins to the polyvinyl alcohol used to support the platinum catalyst did increase the quantum yield of the reaction. It was also found that ultraviolet light can serve to photo-oxidize porphyrinogens to porphyrins under anaerobic conditions. Thus the formation of the colorless porphyriogens by the extraordinarily simple biosynthetic pathway would not be a problem because of the prevalence of UV light in the prebiotic, anoxic atmosphere.

  5. Complete genome sequence of carotenoid-producing Microbacterium sp. strain PAMC28756 isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, So-Ra; Kim, Ki-Hwa; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2016-05-20

    Microbacterium sp. strain PAMC28756, of the family Microbacteriaceae, was isolated from Stereocaulon sp., an Antarctic lichen. Complete genome sequencing of Microbacterium sp. PAMC28756 revealed, for the first time in the genus Microbacterium, a series of key genes involved in C50 carotenoid biosynthesis. An analysis of the Microbacterium sp. PAMC28756 genome will lead to a better understanding of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, the sequence data will provide novel insight into UV radiation resistance in extremely cold environments. PMID:27015978

  6. Engineering of the aspartate family biosynthetic pathway in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) by transformation with heterologous genes encoding feed-back-insensitive aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Galili, G; Knudsen, S;

    1996-01-01

    In prokaryotes and plants the synthesis of the essential amino acids lysine and threonine is predominantly regulated by feed-back inhibition of aspartate kinase (AK) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHPS). In order to modify the flux through the aspartate family pathway in barley and enhance the...

  7. Excited-state properties of hydrophilic carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chábera, P.; Naqvi, K.R.; Melo, T.B.; Sliwka, H.R.; Partali, V.; Lockwood, S.; Nodolski, G.; Polívka, Tomáš

    Nové Hrady : Academic and University Center, 2008. s. 40. [ESF Workshop on Novel Methods in Exploring Carotenoid Excited State Dynamics. 21.09.2008-25.09.2008, Nové Hrady] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * biophysics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. Method of producing purified carotenoid compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggink, Laura (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of producing a carotenoid in solid form includes culturing a strain of Chlorophyta algae cells in a minimal inorganic medium and separating the algae comprising a solid form of carotenoid. In one embodiment f the invention, the strain of Chlorophyta algae cells includes a strain f Chlamydomonas algae cells.

  9. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors in many horticultural crops attribute to overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegeta...

  10. The Role of Carotenoids in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theognosia Vergou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The human skin, as the boundary organ between the human body and the environment, is under the constant influence of free radicals (FR, both from the outside in and from the inside out. Carotenoids are known to be powerful antioxidant substances playing an essential role in the reactions of neutralization of FR (mainly reactive oxygen species ROS. Carotenoid molecules present in the tissue are capable of neutralizing several attacks of FR, especially ROS, and are then destroyed. Human skin contains carotenoids, such as α-, γ-, β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and their isomers, which serve the living cells as a protection against oxidation. Recent studies have reported the possibility to investigate carotenoids in human skin quickly and non-invasively by spectroscopic means. Results obtained from in-vivo studies on human skin have shown that carotenoids are vital components of the antioxidative protective system of the human skin and could serve as marker substances for the overall antioxidative status. Reflecting the nutritional and stress situation of volunteers, carotenoids must be administered by means of antioxidant-rich products, e.g., in the form of fruit and vegetables. Carotenoids are degraded by stress factors of any type, inter alia, sun radiation, contact with environmental hazards, illness, etc. The kinetics of the accumulation and degradation of carotenoids in the skin have been investigated.

  11. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilchez, C.; Forján, E.; Cuaresma, M.; Bédmar, F.; Garbayo, I.; Vega, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functi

  12. Seed-specific overexpression of phytoene synthase: increase in carotenoids and other metabolic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker; Sheehy; Daley; Colburn; Ke

    1999-11-01

    A bacterial phytoene synthase (crtB) gene was overexpressed in a seed-specific manner and the protein product targeted to the plastid in Brassica napus (canola). The resultant embryos from these transgenic plants were visibly orange and the mature seed contained up to a 50-fold increase in carotenoids. The predominant carotenoids accumulating in the seeds of the transgenic plants were alpha and beta-carotene. Other precursors such as phytoene were also detected. Lutein, the predominant carotenoid in control seeds, was not substantially increased in the transgenics. The total amount of carotenoids in these seeds is now equivalent to or greater than those seen in the mesocarp of oil palm. Other metabolites in the isoprenoid pathway were examined in these seeds. Sterol levels remained essentially the same, while tocopherol levels decreased significantly as compared to non-transgenic controls. Chlorophyll levels were also reduced in developing transgenic seed. Additionally, the fatty acyl composition was altered with the transgenic seeds having a relatively higher percentage of the 18 : 1 (oleic acid) component and a decreased percentage of the 18 : 2 (linoleic acid) and 18 : 3 (linolenic acid) components. This dramatic increase in flux through the carotenoid pathway and the other metabolic effects are discussed. PMID:10607293

  13. The intake of carotenoids in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Jakobsen, Jette; Andersen, N. L.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the intake of carotenoids in the Danish population Danish fruits and vegetables were screened with an HPLC method consisting of extraction with ethanol:tetrahydrofuran, separation by reversed phase HPLC with the mobile phase acetonitril:methanol:dichlormethan, triethylamin, BHT...... in the foods the mean intake and intake distribution of the carotenoids were calculated. Carrots and tomatoes have both high contents of carotenoids (8,450 mu g/100 g alpha- + beta-carotene and 4,790 mu g/100 g lycopene, respectively) and high intakes (19 and 15 g/day, respectively) and were responsible for 47......% and 32%, respectively, of the mean intake of carotenoids of 4.8 mg/day A median value of 4.1 mg/day was found indicating skewed intake distributions. The difference between men and women was 0.4 mg/day (p carotenoids, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene, contributed...

  14. Quantification of trichothecene biosynthetic genes during the growth cycle of Fusarium sporotrichioides in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several species of phytopathogenic fungi, and are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis. The genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of T-2 toxin in Fusarium sporotrichioides have been characterized and are located in four identi...

  15. Structures and Analysis of Carotenoid Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2016-01-01

    Modifications of the usual C40 linear and symmetrical carotenoid skeleton give rise to a wide array of structures of carotenes and xanthophylls in plant tissues. These include acyclic, monocyclic and dicyclic carotenoids, along with hydroxy and epoxy xanthophylls and apocarotenoids. Carotenols can be unesterified or esterified (monoester) in one or two (diester) hydroxyl groups with fatty acids. E-Z isomerization increases the array of possible plant carotenoids even further. Screening and especially quantitative analysis are being carried out worldwide. Visible absorption spectrometry and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy have been used for the initial estimation of the total carotenoid content or the principal carotenoid content when large numbers of samples needed to be analyzed within a short time, as would be the case in breeding programs. Although inherently difficult, quantitative analysis of the individual carotenoids is essential. Knowledge of the sources of errors and means to avoid them has led to a large body of reliable quantitative compositional data on carotenoids. Reverse-phase HPLC with a photodiode array detector has been the preferred analytical technique, but UHPLC is increasingly employed. HPLC-MS has been used mainly for identification and NMR has been useful in unequivocally identifying geometric isomers. PMID:27485219

  16. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloz, Miroslav [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pillai, Smitha [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Kodis, Gerdenis [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gust, Devens [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Thomas A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); van Grondelle, Rienk [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kennis, John T. M. [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-04-14

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S1 signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S1 state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)1Pc to Car S1 energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between 1Pc and Car S1 and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment

  17. Origin of saxitoxin biosynthetic genes in cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Moustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP is a potentially fatal syndrome associated with the consumption of shellfish that have accumulated saxitoxin (STX. STX is produced by microscopic marine dinoflagellate algae. Little is known about the origin and spread of saxitoxin genes in these under-studied eukaryotes. Fortuitously, some freshwater cyanobacteria also produce STX, providing an ideal model for studying its biosynthesis. Here we focus on saxitoxin-producing cyanobacteria and their non-toxic sisters to elucidate the origin of genes involved in the putative STX biosynthetic pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a draft genome assembly of the saxitoxin-producing (STX+ cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis ACBU02 and searched for 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes (named sxtA to sxtZ that were recently identified in the toxic strain Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii T3. We also generated a draft assembly of the non-toxic (STX- sister Anabaena circinalis ACFR02 to aid the identification of saxitoxin-specific genes. Comparative phylogenomic analyses revealed that nine putative STX genes were horizontally transferred from non-cyanobacterial sources, whereas one key gene (sxtA originated in STX+ cyanobacteria via two independent horizontal transfers followed by fusion. In total, of the 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes, 13 are of cyanobacterial provenance and are monophyletic among the STX+ taxa, four are shared amongst STX+ and STX-cyanobacteria, and the remaining nine genes are specific to STX+ cyanobacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide evidence that the assembly of STX genes in ACBU02 involved multiple HGT events from different sources followed presumably by coordination of the expression of foreign and native genes in the common ancestor of STX+ cyanobacteria. The ability to produce saxitoxin was subsequently lost multiple independent times resulting in a nested relationship of STX+ and STX- strains among Anabaena

  18. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments in solar saltern microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Joan; Grimalt, Joan O.; de Wit, Rutger; Keely, Brendan J.; Maxwell, James R.

    1994-11-01

    The distributions of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and their degradation products have been studied in two microbial mat systems developed in the calcite and calcite/gypsum evaporite domains of a solar saltern system. Phormidium valderianum and Microcoleus chthonoplastes are the dominant cyanobacterial species, respectively, and large amounts of Chloroflexus-like bacteria occur in the carbonate/gypsum mat. In both systems, the major pigments are chlorophyll a, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and myxoxanthophyll, which originate from these mat-building cyanobacteria. This common feature contrasts with differences in other pigments that are specific for each mat community. Thus, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin, reflecting diatom inputs, are only found in the calcite mat, whereas the calcite/gypsum mat contains high concentrations of bacteriochlorophylls c produced by the multicellular green filamentous bacteria. In both cases, the depth concentration profiles (0-30 and 0-40 mm) show a relatively good preservation of the cyanobacterial carotenoids, zeaxanthin, β-carotene, myxoxanthophyll, and echinenone. This contrasts with the extensive biodegradation of cyanobacterial remains observed microscopically. Fucoxanthin in the calcite mat is also transformed at a faster rate than the cyanobacterial carotenoids. Chlorophyll a, the major pigment in both mats, exhibits different transformation pathways. In the calcite/gypsum mat, it is transformed via C-13 2 carbomethoxy defunctionalization prior to loss of the phytyl chain, leading to the formation of pyrophaeophytin a and, subsequently, pyrophaeophorbide a. On the other hand, the occurrence of the enzyme chlorophyllase, attributed to diatoms in the calcite mat, gives rise to extensive phytyl hydrolysis, with the formation of chlorophyllide a, pyrophaeophorbide a and, in minor proportion, phaeophorbide a. Studies of the sources of the photosynthetic pigments and of their transformation pathways in such simplified ecosystems provide a

  19. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  20. Carotenoid maintenance handicap and the physiology of carotenoid-based signalisation of health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Despite a reasonable scientific interest in sexual selection, the general principles of health signalisation via ornamental traits remain still unresolved in many aspects. This is also true for the mechanism preserving honesty of carotenoid-based signals. Although it is widely accepted that this type of ornamentation reflects an allocation trade-off between the physiological utilisation of carotenoids (mainly in antioxidative processes) and their deposition in ornaments, some recent evidence suggests more complex interactions. Here, we further develop the models currently proposed to explain the honesty of carotenoid-based signalisation of heath status by adding the handicap principle concept regulated by testosterone. We propose that under certain circumstances carotenoids may be dangerous for the organism because they easily transform into toxic cleavage products. When reserves of other protective antioxidants are insufficient, physiological trade-offs may exist between maintenance of carotenoids for ornament expression and their removal from the body. Furthermore, we suggest that testosterone which enhances ornamentation by increasing carotenoid bioavailability may also promote oxidative stress and hence lower antioxidant reserves. The presence of high levels of carotenoids required for high-quality ornament expression may therefore represent a handicap and only individuals in prime health could afford to produce elaborate colourful ornaments. Although further testing is needed, this ‘carotenoid maintenance handicap’ hypothesis may offer a new insight into the physiological aspects of the relationship between carotenoid function, immunity and ornamentation.

  1. Availability of non-carotenoid antioxidants affects the expression of a carotenoid-based sexual ornament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Thomas W; Blount, Jonathan D; Lindström, Jan; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2007-08-22

    Carotenoids are responsible for much of the yellow, orange and red pigmentation in the animal kingdom, and the importance of such coloration as an honest signal of individual quality has received widespread attention. In particular, owing to the multiple roles of carotenoids as pigments, antioxidants and immunostimulants, carotenoid-based coloration has been suggested to advertise an individual's antioxidant or immune defence capacity. However, it has recently been argued that carotenoid-based signals may in fact be advertising the availability of different antioxidants, many of which (including various vitamins, antioxidant enzymes and minerals) are colourless and so would be uninformative as components of a visual signal, yet often have greater biological activity than carotenoids. We tested this hypothesis by feeding male sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) a diet containing a fixed level of carotenoids and either low or high, but biologically realistic levels of the colourless antioxidant vitamins C and E. High-antioxidant diet males produced significantly more intensely coloured (but not larger) carotenoid-based regions of nuptial coloration and were preferred over size-matched males of the opposite diet treatment in mate-choice trials. Furthermore, there were positive correlations between an individual's somatic antioxidant activity and signal intensity. Our data suggest that carotenoid-based ornaments may honestly signal an individual's availability of non-carotenoid antioxidants, allowing females to make adaptive mate-choice decisions. PMID:17472903

  2. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between t...

  3. Carotenoid production and gene expression in an astaxanthin-overproducing Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous mutant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelblanco-Matiz, Lina M; Barbachano-Torres, Alejandra; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C; Cerda García-Rojas, Carlos M; Flores-Ortiz, César M; Barahona-Crisóstomo, Salvador K; Baeza-Cancino, Marcelo E; Alcaíno-Gorman, Jennifer; Cifuentes-Guzmán, Víctor H

    2015-12-01

    The primary carotenoid synthesized by Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is astaxanthin, which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture. Cell growth kinetics and carotenoid production were correlated with the mRNA levels of the idi, crtE, crtYB, crtI, crtS and crtR genes, and the changes in gene sequence between the wild-type and a carotenoid overproducer XR4 mutant strain were identified. At the late stationary phase, the total carotenoid content in XR4 was fivefold higher than that of the wild-type strain. Additionally, the mRNA levels of crtE and crtS increased during the XR4 growth and were three times higher than the wild-type strain in the late stationary phase. Moreover, the nucleotide sequences of crtYB, crtI and crtR exhibited differences between the strains. Both the higher crtE and crtS transcript levels and the crtYB, crtI and crtR mutations can, at least in part, act to up-regulate the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in the XR4 strain. PMID:26377586

  4. Conserved enzymes mediate the early reactions of carotenoid biosynthesis in nonphotosynthetic and photosynthetic prokaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Hearst, J.E. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Alberti, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Carotenoids comprise one of the most widespread classes of pigments found in nature. The first reactions of C{sub 40} carotenoid biosynthesis proceed through common intermediates in all organisms, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of early enzymes from this pathway. The authors report here the nucleotide sequence of three genes from the carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster of Erwinia herbicola, a nonphotosynthetic epiphytic bacterium, which encode homologs of the CrtB, CrtE, and CrtI proteins of Rhodobacter capsulatus, a purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium. CrtB (prephytoene pyrophosphate synthase), CrtE (phytoene synthase), and CrtI (phytoene dehydrogenase) are required for the first three reactions specific to the carotenoid branch of general isoprenoid metabolism. All three dehydrogenases possess a hydrophobic N-terminal domain containing a putative ADP-binding {beta}{alpha}{beta} fold characteristic of enzymes known to bind FAD or NAD(P) cofactors. These data indicate the structural conservation of early carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes in evolutionary diverse organisms.

  5. Lycopene Accumulation Affects the Biosynthesis of Some Carotenoid-related Volatiles Independent of Ethylene in Tomato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Gao; Hongliang Zhu; Yi Shao; Anjun Chen; Chengwen Lu; Benzhong Zhu; Yunbo Luo

    2008-01-01

    For elucidating the regulatory mechanism of ethylene on carotenoid-related volatiles (open chain) compounds and the relationship between lycopene and carotenoid-related volatiles,transgenic tomato fruits in which ACC synthase was suppressed were used.The transgenic tomato fruit showed a significant reduction of lycopene and aroma volatiles with low ethylene production.6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one,6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol and geranylacetone,which were suspected to be lycopene degradation products,were lower than those in wild type tomato fruits.In order to identify whether lycopene accumulation effects the biosynthesis of some carotenoid-related volatiles independent of ethylene in tomato or not,the capability of both wild type and transgenic tomato fruits discs to convert lycopene into carotenoid-related volatiles was evaluated.The data showed that external lycopene could convert into 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol in vivo,Indicating that the strong inhibition of ethylene production had no effect on enzymes in the biosynthesis pathway of some carotenoid-related volatiles.Therefore,in ACS-suppression transgenic tomato fruits,the low levels of 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one,6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol was due to decreased lycopene accumulation,not ethylene production.Ethylene only affected the accumulation of lycopene,and then indirectly influenceed the level of lycopene-related volatiles.

  6. Bioactivity-guided genome mining reveals the lomaiviticin biosynthetic gene cluster in Salinispora tropica

    OpenAIRE

    Kersten, Roland D.; Lane, Amy L.; Nett, Markus; Richter, Taylor K. S.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of genome sequences has become routine in guiding the discovery and identification of microbial natural products and their biosynthetic pathways. In silico prediction of molecular features, such as metabolic building blocks, physico-chemical properties or biological functions, from orphan gene clusters has opened up the characterization of many new chemo- and genotypes in genome mining approaches. Here, we guided our genome mining of two predicted enediyne pathways in Salinispora trop...

  7. Excited-state properties of hydrophilic carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuciman, M.; Chábera, P.; Naqvi, K.R.; Melo, T.B.; Sliwka, H.R.; Partali, V.; Lockwood, S.; Jackson, H.L.; Polívka, Tomáš

    - : -, 2009. s. 408. ISBN N. [International Conference on Photochemistry /24./. 19.07.2009-24.07.2009, Toledo] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * excited-state dynamics * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. Study on Erythritol Biosynthetic Pathway and The Optimization Strategy Abroad%国外对赤藓糖醇生物合成途径及优化策略的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雨; 秦海青; 邱学良; 王成福; 高永旭; 李毅; 吴庆国

    2013-01-01

    赤藓糖醇是一种四碳醇,是应用于食品和医药工业的天然甜味剂。由于赤藓糖醇具有特殊的营养特性,它作为功能糖被应用于食品中,给糖尿病人和肥胖患者带来了福音。在国外,工业上一般采用Aureobasidium sp.和Pseudozyma tsukubaensis等突变的高渗酵母生产赤藓糖醇。由于生产效率高,成本适中,它还被用作生产其他糖的原料。本文主要综述了赤藓糖醇的理化性质、生物合成途径以及提高微生物赤藓糖醇生产力的策略。%Erythritol, a four-carbon polyol, is a biological sweetener with applications in food and pharmaceutical industries .It is also used as a functional sugar substitute in special foods for people with diabetes and obesity because of its unique nutritional properties .In abroad , Erythritol is produced by microbial methods using mostly osmophilic yeasts and has been produced commercially using mutant strains of Aureobasidium sp.and Pseudozyma tsukubaensis.Due to the high yield and productivity in the industrial scale of production , erythritol serves as an inexpensive starting material for the production of other sugars .This review focuses on the physicochemical properties of erythritol , pathway of erythritol biosynthesis and strategies used to enhance erythritol productivity in microbes .

  9. Latin American food sources of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Amaya, D B

    1999-09-01

    Latin America has a wide variety of carotenogenic foods, notable for the diversity and high levels of carotenoids. A part of this natural wealth has been analyzed. Carrot, red palm oil and some cultivars of squash and pumpkin are sources of both beta-carotene and alpha-carotene. beta-carotene is the principal carotenoid of the palm fruits burití, tucumã and bocaiuva, other fruits such as loquat, marolo and West Indian cherry, and sweet potato. Buriti also has high amounts of alpha-carotene and gamma-carotene. beta-Cryptoxanthin is the major carotenoid in caja, nectarine, orange-fleshed papaya, orange, peach, tangerine and the tree tomato. Lycopene predominates in tomato, red-fleshed papaya, guava, pitanga and watermelon. Pitanga also has substantial amounts of beta-cryptoxanthin, gamma-carotene and rubixanthin. Zeaxanthin, principal carotenoid of corn, is also predominant only in piquí. delta-Carotene is the main carotenoid of the peach palm and zeta-carotene of passion fruit. Lutein and beta-carotene, in high concentrations, are encountered in the numerous leafy vegetables of the region, as well as in other green vegetables and in some varieties of squash and pumpkin. Violaxanthin is the principal carotenoid of mango and mamey and is also found in appreciable amounts in green vegetables. Quantitative, in some cases also qualitative, differences exist among cultivars of the same food. Generally, carotenoids are in greater concentrations in the peel than in the pulp, increase considerably during ripening and are in higher levels in foods produced in hot places. Other Latin America indigenous carotenogenic foods must be investigated before they are supplanted by introduced crops, which are often poorer sources of carotenoids. PMID:10971848

  10. Marine Carotenoids and Cardiovascular Risk Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Speranza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine carotenoids are important bioactive compounds with physiological activities related to prevention of degenerative diseases.found principally in plants, with potential antioxidant biological properties deriving from their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. They are substances with very special and remarkable properties that no other groups of substances possess and that form the basis of their many, varied functions and actions in all kinds of living organisms. The potential beneficial effects of marine carotenoids have been studied particularly in astaxanthin and fucoxanthin as they are the major marine carotenoids. Both these two carotenoids show strong antioxidant activity attributed to quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. The potential role of these carotenoids as dietary anti-oxidants has been suggested to be one of the main mechanisms for their preventive effects against cancer and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this short review is to examine the published studies concerning the use of the two marine carotenoids, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Characteristics and biosynthetic pathway of melanin in Ascochyta anemones%白头翁叶斑病菌黑色素的理化性质及其生物合成途径初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏丹; 吕国忠; 周如军; 杨红; 傅俊范

    2014-01-01

    对白头翁叶斑病菌胞壁结合黑色素和胞外黑色素进行了理化性质和红外光谱扫描测定,结果表明两者具有相似的理化性质,均易溶于KOH、H2 O2和NaClO,不溶于水、乙醇和丙酮。红外光谱分析表明,白头翁叶斑病菌YS-24菌株的胞壁结合黑色素与胞外黑色素为同一种类型的黑色素。DHN黑色素的特异性抑制剂—三环唑,对白头翁叶斑病菌黑色素的产生有明显的抑制作用;以白头翁叶斑病菌基因组DNA为模板,通过PCR扩增,得到了聚酮体合成酶基因的同源片段AaPKS,初步推断白头翁叶斑病菌黑色素合成属于DHN途径。%The characteristics of melanin,extracted from cell wall and fermented filtrate of Ascochyta anemones, were determined by diagnostic test and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that they have similar physical and chemical properties,and they are soluble in KOH,H2 O2 and NaClO,but not in water,ethanol and acetone. Infrared spectrum analysis showed that the wall-bound melanin and extracellular melanin belonged to the same type. Tricyclazole,a specific inhibitor of DHN melanin synthesis,could inhibit the fungal melanin’s biosynthesis of A.anemones. The homologous fragment of polyketide synthase gene (AaPKS)was amplified by PCR using A.anemones genomic DNA as a template. The results suggested that the melanin in A.anemones might be synthe-sized from DHN pathway.

  12. Effect of carotenoid structure on excited state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chábera, P.; Fuciman, M.; Hříbek, P.; Polívka, Tomáš

    Messina : Universitá di Messina, 2008. s. 53. [ESF Workshop on Ultrafast Excited-State Processes in Condensed Phases. 18.06.2008-21.06.2008, Santa Tecla] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * carotenoid structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Carotenoid-enriched transgenic corn delivers bioavailable carotenoids to poultry and protects them against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogareda, Carmina; Moreno, Jose A; Angulo, Eduardo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Portero, Manuel; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are health-promoting organic molecules that act as antioxidants and essential nutrients. We show that chickens raised on a diet enriched with an engineered corn variety containing very high levels of four key carotenoids (β-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and lutein) are healthy and accumulate more bioavailable carotenoids in peripheral tissues, muscle, skin and fat, and more retinol in the liver, than birds fed on standard corn diets (including commercial corn supplemented with colour additives). Birds were challenged with the protozoan parasite Eimeria tenella and those on the high-carotenoid diet grew normally, suffered only mild disease symptoms (diarrhoea, footpad dermatitis and digital ulcers) and had lower faecal oocyst counts than birds on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid-rich corn maintains poultry health and increases the nutritional value of poultry products without the use of feed additives. PMID:25846059

  14. Structural Insights Into the Evolutionary Paths of Oxylipin Biosynthetic Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.-S.; Nioche, P.; Hamberg, M.; Raman, C.S.

    2009-05-20

    The oxylipin pathway generates not only prostaglandin-like jasmonates but also green leaf volatiles (GLVs), which confer characteristic aromas to fruits and vegetables. Although allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase are atypical cytochrome P450 family members involved in the synthesis of jasmonates and GLVs, respectively, it is unknown how these enzymes rearrange their hydroperoxide substrates into different products. Here we present the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AOS, free and in complex with substrate or intermediate analogues. The structures reveal an unusual active site poised to control the reactivity of an epoxyallylic radical and its cation by means of interactions with an aromatic {pi}-system. Replacing the amino acid involved in these steps by a non-polar residue markedly reduces AOS activity and, unexpectedly, is both necessary and sufficient for converting AOS into a GLV biosynthetic enzyme. Furthermore, by combining our structural data with bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, we have discovered previously unknown hydroperoxide lyase in plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, AOS in coral, and epoxyalcohol synthase in amphioxus. These results indicate that oxylipin biosynthetic genes were present in the last common ancestor of plants and animals, but were subsequently lost in all metazoan lineages except Placozoa, Cnidaria and Cephalochordata.

  15. Environmental effects shape the maternal transfer of carotenoids and vitamin E to the yolk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Wendt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Maternal effects occur when the phenotype of the offspring is influenced by the phenotype of the mother, which in turn depends on her heritable state as well as on influences from the current and past environmental conditions. All of these pathways may, therefore, form significant sources of variation in maternal effects. Here, we focused on the maternal transfer of carotenoids and vitamin E to the egg yolk, using canaries as a model species. Maternal yolk carotenoids and vitamin E are known to generate significant phenotypic variation in offspring, representing examples of maternal effects. We studied the intra-individual consistency in deposition patterns across two years and the mother-daughter resemblance across two generations in order to estimate the level of heritable variation. The effects of the current environmental conditions were studied via a food supplementation experiment, while the consequences of past environmental conditions were estimated on the basis of the early growth trajectories. Results There was a significant effect of the current environmental conditions on the yolk carotenoid and vitamin E deposition, but this effect varied between antioxidant components. The deposition of yolk carotenoids and vitamin E were linked to the process of yolk formation. Past environmental conditions did not contribute to the variation in yolk carotenoid and vitamin E levels nor did we find significant heritable variation. Conclusions The transfer of carotenoids or vitamin E may be an example where current environmental variation is largely passed from the mother to the offspring, despite the numerous intermediate physiological steps that are involved. Differences in the effect of the environmental conditions as experienced by the mother during laying may be due to differences in availability as well as physiological processes such as competitive exclusion or selective absorption.

  16. Heterologous stable expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes using the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Søren Spanner; King, Brian Christopher; Zhan, Xin; Simonsen, Henrik Toft; Hamberger, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Heterologous and stable expression of genes encoding terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes in planta is an important tool for functional characterization and is an attractive alternative to expression in microbial hosts for biotechnological production. Despite improvements to the procedure, such as streamlining of large scale Agrobacterium infiltration and upregulation of the upstream pathways, transient in planta heterologous expression quickly reaches limitations when used for production of terpenoids. Stable integration of transgenes into the nuclear genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens has already been widely recognized as a viable alternative for industrial-scale production of biopharmaceuticals. For expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, and reconstruction of heterologous pathways, Physcomitrella has unique attributes that makes it a very promising biotechnological host. These features include a high native tolerance to terpenoids, a simple endogenous terpenoid profile, convenient genome editing using homologous recombination, and cultivation techniques that allow up-scaling from single cells in microtiter plates to industrial photo-bioreactors. Beyond its use for functional characterization of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, engineered Physcomitrella can be a green biotechnological platform for production of terpenoids. Here, we describe two complementary and simple procedures for stable nuclear transformation of Physcomitrella with terpenoid biosynthetic genes, selection and cultivation of transgenic lines, and metabolite analysis of terpenoids produced in transgenic moss lines. We also provide tools for metabolic engineering through genome editing using homologous recombination. PMID:24777804

  17. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein, and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD.

  18. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Palm Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puah C. Wei

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of carotenoids from crude palm oil was carried out in a dynamic (flow- through supercritical fluid extraction system. The carotenoids obtained were quantified using off-line UV-visible spectrophotometry. The effects of operating pressure and temperature, flow rate of the supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2, sample size of feed used on the solubility of palm carotenoids were investigated. The results showed that the extraction of carotenoids was governed by its solubility in the SC-CO2 and can be enhanced by increasing pressure at a constant temperature or decreasing temperature at a constant pressure. Increasing the flow rate and decreasing the sample size can reduce the extraction time but do not enhance the solubility. Palm carotenoids have very low solubility in SC-CO2 in the range of 1.31 x 10-4 g kg-1 to 1.58 x 10-3 g kg-1 for the conditions investigated in this study. The experimental data obtained were compared with those published by other workers and correlated by a density-based equation as proposed by Chrastil.

  19. Dietary carotenoids predict plumage coloration in wild house finches.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Geoffrey E.; Inouye, Caron Y; Montgomerie, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Carotenoid pigments are a widespread source of ornamental coloration in vertebrates and expression of carotenoid-based colour displays has been shown to serve as an important criterion in female mate choice in birds and fishes. Unlike other integumentary pigments, carotenoids cannot be synthesized; they must be ingested. Carotenoid-based coloration is condition-dependent and has been shown to be affected by both parasites and nutritional condition. A controversial hypothesis is that the expre...

  20. Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway Mutations Cause Neuromuscular Transmission Defect

    OpenAIRE

    Senderek, Jan; Müller, Juliane S.; Dusl, Marina; Strom, Tim M.; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Diepolder, Irmgard; Laval, Steven H.; Maxwell, Susan; Cossins, Judy; Krause, Sabine; Muelas, Nuria; Vilchez, Juan J.; Colomer, Jaume; Mallebrera, Cecilia Jimenez; Nascimento, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are synapses that transmit impulses from motor neurons to skeletal muscle fibers leading to muscle contraction. Study of hereditary disorders of neuromuscular transmission, termed congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS), has helped elucidate fundamental processes influencing development and function of the nerve-muscle synapse. Using genetic linkage, we find 18 different biallelic mutations in the gene encoding glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1)...

  1. Fusarium Mycotoxins: Biosynthetic Pathways and Role in Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat and barley is a devastating disease that has reached global proportions. Not only does this disease result in lower yields, but the mycotoxins produced by the fungus affect the quality of the grain. Fusarium sp. can produce a number of mycotoxins, including tric...

  2. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L; Sander, Guy W; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Toward this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a "fine-tune" regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression. PMID:26483828

  3. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yao eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Towards this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a fine-tune regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression.

  4. Carotenoid content of 50 watermelon cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Collins, Julie K; Davis, Angela R; Roberts, Warren

    2006-04-01

    The lycopene content of 50 commercial cultivars of seeded and seedless red-fleshed watermelons was determined. Scanning colorimetric and spectrophotometric assays of total lycopene were used to separate watermelon cultivars into low (90 mg/kg fw). Cultivars varied greatly in lycopene content, ranging from 33 to 100 mg/kg. Most of the seeded hybrid cultivars had average lycopene contents. Sixteen of the 33 seedless types had lycopene contents in the high and very high ranges. All-trans-lycopene was the predominant carotenoid (84-97%) in all watermelon cultivars measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, but the germplasm differed in the relative amounts of cis-lycopene, beta-carotene, and phytofluene. Red-fleshed watermelon genotypes vary extensively in carotenoid content and offer opportunities for developing watermelons with specifically enhanced carotenoids. PMID:16569049

  5. Photodegradation of carotenoids in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodegradation of vitamins in vitro is responsible for large losses of these nutrients in foods, beverages, and semisynthetic liquid formula diets. In vivo photodegradation of vitamins has been reported for riboflavin in jaundiced infants exposed to blue light and for folate in patients with chronic psoriasis given photochemotherapy. Two recent studies of normal subjects have also shown that photodegradation of carotenoids in plasma occurs with cumulative exposure of the skin to an artificial light source having maximal spectral emission in the UVA range. Females showed a larger effect of the UV light on their plasma carotenoid levels than males. These observations have identified a need for further investigation of the role of sunlight exposure as a determinant of plasma carotenoid levels and vitamin A status in human subjects

  6. Comprehensive curation and analysis of fungal biosynthetic gene clusters of published natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong Fuga; Tsai, Kathleen J S; Harvey, Colin J B; Li, James Jian; Ary, Beatrice E; Berlew, Erin E; Boehman, Brenna L; Findley, David M; Friant, Alexandra G; Gardner, Christopher A; Gould, Michael P; Ha, Jae H; Lilley, Brenna K; McKinstry, Emily L; Nawal, Saadia; Parry, Robert C; Rothchild, Kristina W; Silbert, Samantha D; Tentilucci, Michael D; Thurston, Alana M; Wai, Rebecca B; Yoon, Yongjin; Aiyar, Raeka S; Medema, Marnix H; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms produce a wide range of natural products (NPs) with clinically and agriculturally relevant biological activities. In bacteria and fungi, genes encoding successive steps in a biosynthetic pathway tend to be clustered on the chromosome as biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Historically, "activity-guided" approaches to NP discovery have focused on bioactivity screening of NPs produced by culturable microbes. In contrast, recent "genome mining" approaches first identify candidate BGCs, express these biosynthetic genes using synthetic biology methods, and finally test for the production of NPs. Fungal genome mining efforts and the exploration of novel sequence and NP space are limited, however, by the lack of a comprehensive catalog of BGCs encoding experimentally-validated products. In this study, we generated a comprehensive reference set of fungal NPs whose biosynthetic gene clusters are described in the published literature. To generate this dataset, we first identified NCBI records that included both a peer-reviewed article and an associated nucleotide record. We filtered these records by text and homology criteria to identify putative NP-related articles and BGCs. Next, we manually curated the resulting articles, chemical structures, and protein sequences. The resulting catalog contains 197 unique NP compounds covering several major classes of fungal NPs, including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, and alkaloids. The distribution of articles published per compound shows a bias toward the study of certain popular compounds, such as the aflatoxins. Phylogenetic analysis of biosynthetic genes suggests that much chemical and enzymatic diversity remains to be discovered in fungi. Our catalog was incorporated into the recently launched Minimum Information about Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) repository to create the largest known set of fungal BGCs and associated NPs, a resource that we anticipate will guide future genome mining and

  7. Dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, I.; Cadier, E.; Beulens, J. W J; van der A, D. L.; Spijkerman, A. M W; van der Schouw, Y. T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Carotenoids may reduce diabetes risk, due to their antioxidant properties. However, the association between dietary carotenoids intake and type 2 diabetes risk is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether higher dietary carotenoid intakes assoc

  8. The fate of carotenoids in sediments: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koopmans, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Despite carotenoids being abundant natural products, there are only scattered literature reports of carotenoid derivatives (mainly in the form of their 'perhydro' derivatives) in ancient sediments and petroleum. This was thought to be due to the sensitivity of carotenoids toward oxygen and their pre

  9. Dehydrolutein: a metabolically derived carotenoid never observed in raptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David COSTANTINI; Vittorio BERTACCHE; Barbara PASTURA; Anthony TURK

    2009-01-01

    @@ Carotenoids are fat-soluble pigments synthesised by photosynthetic organisms (Brush, 1990). Conversely, animals are incapable of synthesizing carotenoids de novo, and they must obtain them through their diet. However, some animal species are able to make some alterations to the basic chemical structure, converting ingested carotenoids into more oxidized and differently coloured forms (Schiedt, 1998).

  10. Dietary factors that affect the bioavailability of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van het K.H.; West, C.E.; Weststrate, J.A.; Hautvast, J.G.A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects of increased vegetable consumption. Various dietary factors have an effect on the bioavailability of carotenoids. The type of food matrix in which carotenoids are located is a major factor. The bioavailability of ß-carotene from vegetab

  11. Regulation of carotenoid accumulation and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in citrus juice sacs in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Kato, Masaya; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Takagi, Toshihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Nesumi, Hirohisa

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms regulating carotenoid accumulation in citrus, a culture system was set up in vitro with juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.), Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck), and Lisbon lemon (Citrus limon Burm.f.). The juice sacs of all the three varieties enlarged gradually with carotenoid accumulation. The changing patterns of carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in juice sac...

  12. Carotenoid-protein interaction alters the S1 energy of hydroxyechinenone in the Orange Carotenoid Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Chábera, P.; Kerfeld, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1827, č. 3 (2013), s. 248-254. ISSN 0005-2728 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : orange-carotenoid protein * excited states * photoprotection Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  13. Characterization of the cobalamin (vitamin B12) biosynthetic genes of Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, J R; Lawrence, J. G.; Rubenfield, M; Kieffer-Higgins, S; Church, G M

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) de novo under anaerobic conditions. Of the 30 cobalamin synthetic genes, 25 are clustered in one operon, cob, and are arranged in three groups, each group encoding enzymes for a biochemically distinct portion of the biosynthetic pathway. We have determined the DNA sequence for the promoter region and the proximal 17.1 kb of the cob operon. This sequence includes 20 translationally coupled genes that encode the enzymes involved in part...

  14. The carotenoid-continuum: carotenoid-based plumage ranges from conspicuous to cryptic and back again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Mark L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are frequently used by birds to colour their plumage with green, yellow, orange or red hues, and carotenoid-based colours are considered honest signals of quality, although they may have other functions, such as crypsis. It is usually assumed that red through yellow colours have a signalling function while green is cryptic. Here we challenge this notion using the yellow and green colouration of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus, great tits (Parus major and greenfinches (Carduelis chloris as a model. Results The relationship between colouration (chroma, computed using visual sensitivities of conspecifics and detectability (contrast against natural backgrounds as perceived by conspecifics and avian predators followed a similar curvilinear pattern for yellow and green plumage with minimum detectability at intermediate levels of carotenoid deposition. Thus, for yellow and green plumage, colours at or close to the point of minimum detectability may aid in crypsis. This may be the case for blue and great tit green and yellow plumage, and greenfinch green plumage, all of which had comparably low levels of detectability, while greenfinch yellow plumage was more chromatic and detectable. As yellow and green blue tit colouration are strongly affected by carotenoid availability during moult, variation in pigment availability between habitats may affect the degree of background-matching or the costliness of producing cryptic plumage. Conclusions Increasing carotenoid-deposition in the integument does not always lead to more conspicuous colours. In some cases, such as in blue or great tits, carotenoid deposition may be selected through enhanced background-matching, which in turn suggests that producing cryptic plumage may entail costs. We stress however, that our data do not rule out a signalling function of carotenoid-based plumage in tits. Rather, it shows that alternative functions are plausible and that assuming a signalling

  15. Carotenoids from Haloarchaea and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Baños, Montserrat; Garbayo, Inés; Vílchez, Carlos; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    The production of pigments by halophilic archaea has been analysed during the last half a century. The main reasons that sustains this research are: (i) many haloarchaeal species possess high carotenoids production availability; (ii) downstream processes related to carotenoid isolation from haloarchaea is relatively quick, easy and cheap; (iii) carotenoids production by haloarchaea can be improved by genetic modification or even by modifying several cultivation aspects such as nutrition, growth pH, temperature, etc.; (iv) carotenoids are needed to support plant and animal life and human well-being; and (v) carotenoids are compounds highly demanded by pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food markets. Several studies about carotenoid production by haloarchaea have been reported so far, most of them focused on pigments isolation or carotenoids production under different culture conditions. However, the understanding of carotenoid metabolism, regulation, and roles of carotenoid derivatives in this group of extreme microorganisms remains mostly unrevealed. The uses of those haloarchaeal pigments have also been poorly explored. This work summarises what has been described so far about carotenoids production by haloarchaea and their potential uses in biotechnology and biomedicine. In particular, new scientific evidence of improved carotenoid production by one of the better known haloarchaeon (Haloferax mediterranei) is also discussed. PMID:26308012

  16. Two distinct pathways for essential metabolic precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Seto, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a diverse group of molecules found in all organisms, where they perform such important biological functions as hormone signaling (e.g., steroids) in mammals, antioxidation (e.g., carotenoids) in plants, electron transport (e.g., ubiquinone), and cell wall biosynthesis intermediates in bacteria. All isoprenoids are synthesized by the consecutive condensation of the five-carbon monomer isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to its isomer, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The biosynthet...

  17. Biologically active polymers from spontaneous carotenoid oxidation: a new frontier in carotenoid activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Johnston

    Full Text Available In animals carotenoids show biological activity unrelated to vitamin A that has been considered to arise directly from the behavior of the parent compound, particularly as an antioxidant. However, the very property that confers antioxidant activity on some carotenoids in plants also confers susceptibility to oxidative transformation. As an alternative, it has been suggested that carotenoid oxidative breakdown or metabolic products could be the actual agents of activity in animals. However, an important and neglected aspect of the behavior of the highly unsaturated carotenoids is their potential to undergo addition of oxygen to form copolymers. Recently we reported that spontaneous oxidation of ß-carotene transforms it into a product dominated by ß-carotene-oxygen copolymers. We now report that the polymeric product is biologically active. Results suggest an overall ability to prime innate immune function to more rapidly respond to subsequent microbial challenges. An underlying structural resemblance to sporopollenin, found in the outer shell of spores and pollen, may allow the polymer to modulate innate immune responses through interactions with the pattern recognition receptor system. Oxygen copolymer formation appears common to all carotenoids, is anticipated to be widespread, and the products may contribute to the health benefits of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables.

  18. Energy transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophylls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, H.A.; Polívka, Tomáš

    Dordrecht : Springer, 2008 - (Hunter, C.; Daldal, F.; Thurnauer, M.; Beatty, J.), s. 218-230 ISBN 978-1-4020-8814-8. - (Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration. 28) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * Energy transfer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. Excited state properties of aryl carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuciman, M.; Chábera, P.; Župčanová, Anita; Hříbek, P.; Arellano, J.B.; Vácha, František; Pšenčík, J.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 13 (2010), s. 3112-3120. ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * excited-states * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2010

  20. Carotenoid excited states - beyond the standard model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš

    Göttingen : University of Göttingen, 2007. s. 25. [CERC3 Young Chemists Workshop "Time-resolved methods for studies of chemical reactions". 25.04.2007-27.04.2007, Göttingen] Keywords : Carotenoids Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. Long-lived coherence in carotenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use two-colour vibronic coherence spectroscopy to observe long-lived vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state of carotenoid molecules, with decoherence times in excess of 1 ps. Lycopene and spheroidene were studied isolated in solution, and within the LH2 light-harvesting complex extracted from purple bacteria. The vibrational coherence time is shown to increase significantly for the carotenoid in the complex, providing further support to previous assertions that long-lived electronic coherences in light-harvesting complexes are facilitated by in-phase motion of the chromophores and surrounding proteins. Using this technique, we are also able to follow the evolution of excited state coherences and find that for carotenoids in the light-harvesting complex the (S2|S0) superposition remains coherent for more than 70 fs. In addition to the implications of this long electronic decoherence time, the extended coherence allows us to observe the evolution of the excited state wavepacket. These experiments reveal an enhancement of the vibronic coupling to the first vibrational level of the C-C stretching mode and/or methyl-rocking mode in the ground electronic state 70 fs after the initial excitation. These observations open the door to future experiments and modelling that may be able to resolve the relaxation dynamics of carotenoids in solution and in natural light-harvesting systems.

  2. Continuous production of carotenoids from Dunaliella salina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinegris, D.M.M.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    During the in situ extraction of ß-carotene from Dunaliella salina, the causal relationship between carotenoid extraction and cell death indicated that cell growth and cell death should be at equilibrium for a continuous in situ extraction process. In a flat-panel photobioreactor that was operated a

  3. Genomics of pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic loci : evidence for conservation and whole-operon mobility within Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Rodrigo; van Aarle, Ingrid M.; Mendes, Rodrigo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) is a tryptophan-derived secondary metabolite produced by a narrow range of Gram-negative bacteria. The PRN biosynthesis by rhizobacteria presumably has a key role in their life strategies and in the biocontrol of plant diseases. The biosynthetic operon that encodes the pathway tha

  4. What are carotenoids signaling? Immunostimulatory effects of dietary vitamin E, but not of carotenoids, in Iberian green lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopena, Renata; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    In spite that carotenoid-based sexual ornaments are one of the most popular research topics in sexual selection of animals, the antioxidant and immunostimulatory role of carotenoids, presumably signaled by these colorful ornaments, is still controversial. It has been suggested that the function of carotenoids might not be as an antioxidant per se, but that colorful carotenoids may indirectly reflect the levels of nonpigmentary antioxidants, such as melatonin or vitamin E. We experimentally fed male Iberian green lizards ( Lacerta schreiberi) additional carotenoids or vitamin E alone, or a combination of carotenoids and vitamin E dissolved in soybean oil, whereas a control group only received soybean oil. We examined the effects of the dietary supplementations on phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin-swelling immune response and body condition. Lizards that were supplemented with vitamin E alone or a combination of vitamin E and carotenoids had greater immune responses than control lizards, but animals supplemented with carotenoids alone had lower immune responses than lizards supplemented with vitamin E and did not differ from control lizards. These results support the hypothesis that carotenoids in green lizards are not effective as immunostimulants, but that they may be visually signaling the immunostimulatory effects of non-pigmentary vitamin E. In contrast, lizards supplemented with carotenoids alone have higher body condition gains than lizards in the other experimental groups, suggesting that carotenoids may be still important to improve condition.

  5. Effect of red light irradiation on skin coloration and carotenoid composition of stored ''Miyauchi'' iyo (Citrus iyo hort. ex Tanaka) tangor fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of red light irradiation on skin color development and carotenoid composition of stylar end of Miyauchi iyo (citrus iyo hort. ex Tanaka) tangor fruit was examined during storage. Both increase in a and a/b value and decrease in b value were enhanced by the irradiation. The a/b values of the fruit exposed were higher than those of control during the whole storage period. HPLC analyses also revealed the increase in total carotenoids content, of which the carotenoids that were tentatively named B and F most greatly accumulated. Similar tendencies were observed at equator and stem end portions. These results indicate that red light irradiation is involved in not only acceleration of overall color development but also enhancement of red color pigmentation by influencing a certain specific pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis

  6. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ilg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B, which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents.

  7. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    KAUST Repository

    Ilg, Andrea

    2014-06-25

    The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B), which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-. trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents. © 2014 The Authors.

  8. Mate choice for a male carotenoid-based ornament is linked to female dietary carotenoid intake and accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomey Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coevolution of male traits and female mate preferences has led to the elaboration and diversification of sexually selected traits; however the mechanisms that mediate trait-preference coevolution are largely unknown. Carotenoid acquisition and accumulation are key determinants of the expression of male sexually selected carotenoid-based coloration and a primary mechanism maintaining the honest information content of these signals. Carotenoids also influence female health and reproduction in ways that may alter the costs and benefits of mate choice behaviours and thus provide a potential biochemical link between the expression of male traits and female preferences. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the dietary carotenoid levels of captive female house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus and assessed their mate choice behavior in response to color-manipulated male finches. Results Females preferred to associate with red males, but carotenoid supplementation did not influence the direction or strength of this preference. Females receiving a low-carotenoid diet were less responsive to males in general, and discrimination among the colorful males was positively linked to female plasma carotenoid levels at the beginning of the study when the diet of all birds was carotenoid-limited. Conclusions Although female preference for red males was not influenced by carotenoid intake, changes in mating responsiveness and discrimination linked to female carotenoid status may alter how this preference is translated into choice. The reddest males, with the most carotenoid rich plumage, tend to pair early in the breeding season. If carotenoid-related variations in female choice behaviour shift the timing of pairing, then they have the potential to promote assortative mating by carotenoid status and drive the evolution of carotenoid-based male plumage coloration.

  9. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Mori

    Full Text Available NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT, which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS. First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide. In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  10. Probing phosphorylation by non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes using 1H–31P–31P correlation NMR spectroscopy†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Ananya; Shah, Meha H.; Bitok, J. Kipchirchir; Hassis-LeBeau, Maria E.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2009-01-01

    The biogenesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) is accomplished by the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants, bacteria and parasites, making it a potential target for the development of anti-infective agents and herbicides. The biosynthetic enzymes comprising this pathway catalyze intriguing chemical transformations on diphosphate scaffolds, offering an opportunity to generate novel analogs in this synthetically challenging compound class...

  11. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms. PMID:26750123

  12. Carotenoids intake and asthma prevalence in Thai children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several antioxidant nutrients have been described to inversely correlate with asthma. In order to quantify the intake of these substances, it is possible to measure skin levels by Raman spectroscopy, a novel non-invasive technique that can also be used in children. This cross-sectional school-based study involved 423 children from a rural area of Thailand. Asthmatic children were diagnosed according to a Health Interview for Asthma Control questionnaire. Skin carotenoid levels were measured with Raman spectroscopy. Demographic data were obtained by directly interviewing children and their parents, whereas anthropometric parameters were measured by trained staff. Intake of carotenoids, vitamin A and C were evaluated by a food frequency questionnaire. Overall incidence of asthma in Thai schoolchildren (aged 3.5-17.8 years was 17.3%. There was no significant difference in dietary intake of carotenoids and vitamin A and C, and skin carotenoid level between asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. Skin carotenoid level significantly correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake (P<0.05. Carotenoids and vitamin A and C intakes, and skin carotenoid levels were not associated with the risk of asthma in Thai children. Skin carotenoids correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake in mild to moderate degrees. Raman spectroscopy was confirmed to be a useful tool to determine antioxidant skin levels.

  13. Vibrational relaxation pathways in the electronic excited state of carotenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intra- and inter-molecular vibrational relaxation in the electronic excited state (1Bu+) of spheroidene derivative (the number of conjugated double bonds, n=8) has been investigated at room temperature by means of femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy based on an optical-Kerr-gate technique. Depending on the photo-excitation either to the 1Bu+(v=1) or 1Bu+(v=2) vibronic level, remarkable differences were observed in hot luminescence spectra related to the vibrational relaxation process of high- and low-frequency modes. Under the excitation to the 1Bu+(v=2) state hot luminescence from the 1Bu+(v=1) state was observed as a dominant feature of the time-resolved spectra while the dynamic Stokes shift originating from the low-frequency-modes dynamics was clearly observed under the excitation to the 1Bu+(v=1). These observations of the excitation energy dependence of time-resolved fluorescence spectra were discussed by analyzing the Franck-Condon factors of transitions from v=0,1, and 2 levels of high-frequency modes

  14. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  15. Enhancement of carotenoid production by disrupting the C22-sterol desaturase gene (CYP61 in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loto Iris

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a basidiomycetous yeast that synthesizes astaxanthin, which is a carotenoid with a great biotechnological impact. The ergosterol and carotenoid synthesis pathways are derived from the mevalonate pathway, and in both pathways, cytochrome P450 enzymes are involved. Results In this study, we isolated and described the X. dendrorhous CYP61 gene, which encodes a cytochrome P450 involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. This gene is composed of nine exons and encodes a 526 amino acid polypeptide that shares significant percentages of identity and similitude with the C22-sterol desaturase, CYP61, from other fungi. Mutants derived from different parental strains were obtained by disrupting the CYP61 gene with an antibiotic selection marker. These mutants were not able to produce ergosterol and accumulated ergosta-5,8,22-trien-3-ol and ergosta-5,8-dien-3-ol. Interestingly, all of the mutants had a more intense red color phenotype than their respective parental strains. The carotenoid composition was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by RP-HPLC, revealing that the carotenoid content was higher in the mutant strains without major changes in their composition. The expression of the HMGR gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in the mevalonate pathway (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, was analyzed by RT-qPCR showing that its transcript levels are higher in the CYP61 mutants. Conclusions These results suggest that in X. dendrorhous, ergosterol regulates HMGR gene expression by a negative feedback mechanism and in this way; it contributes in the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthesis.

  16. Enrichment of carotenoids in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) by metabolic engineering with introduction of bacterial phytoene synthase gene crtB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Watanabe, Mio; Choi, Song-Kang; Teramoto, Maki; Ohyama, Kanji; Misawa, Norihiko

    2008-06-01

    Linseed flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an industrially important oil crop, which includes large amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3) and lignan in its seed oil. We report here the metabolic engineering of flax plants to increase carotenoid amount in seeds. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of flax was performed to express the phytoene synthase gene (crtB) derived from the soil bacterium Pantoea ananatis (formerly called Erwinia uredovora 20D3) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S constitutive promoter or the Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid elongase 1 gene (FAE1) seed-specific promoter. As a result, eight transgenic flax plants were generated. They formed orange seeds (embryos), in which phytoene, alpha-carotene, and beta-carotene were newly accumulated in addition to increased amounts of lutein, while untransformed flax plants formed light-yellow seeds, in which only lutein was detected. Interestingly, despite the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, the expression of crtB was not observed in the leaves but in the seeds in the transgenic flax plants. Total carotenoid amounts in these seeds were 65.4-156.3 microg/g fresh weight, which corresponded to 7.8- to 18.6-fold increase, compared with those of untransformed controls. These results suggest that the flux of phytoene synthesis from geranylgeranyl diphosphate was first promoted by the expressed crtB gene product (CrtB), and then phytoene was consecutively decomposed to the downstream metabolites alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lutein, as catalyzed by endogenous carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in seeds. The transgenic flaxseeds enriched with the carotenoids could be valuable as nutritional sources for human health. PMID:18640603

  17. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Wlodarczyk, Artur Jacek; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Perestrello Ramos H de Jesus, Maria; King, Brian Christopher; Bakowski, Kamil; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-07-01

    Chloroplasts in plants and algae and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals and complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression of the appropriate pathways, but this requires optimization of carbon flux and reducing power, and a thorough understanding of regulatory pathways. Secretion or storage of the compounds produced can be exploited for the isolation or confinement of the desired compounds. In this review, we explore the use of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the levels of production to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons derived from the photosynthetic light reactions, appears to be non-limiting, but redirection of the fixed carbon via precursor molecules presents a challenge. We also discuss the available synthetic biology tools and the need to expand the molecular toolbox to facilitate cellular reprogramming for increased production yields in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:27005523

  18. Emergent biosynthetic capacity in simple microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Chao Chiu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity--instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a "Goldilocks" principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together

  19. A genomics based discovery of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borui Pi

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites (SMs produced by Aspergillus have been extensively studied for their crucial roles in human health, medicine and industrial production. However, the resulting information is almost exclusively derived from a few model organisms, including A. nidulans and A. fumigatus, but little is known about rare pathogens. In this study, we performed a genomics based discovery of SM biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus, a rare human pathogen. A total of 52 gene clusters were identified in the draft genome of A. ustus 3.3904, such as the sterigmatocystin biosynthesis pathway that was commonly found in Aspergillus species. In addition, several SM biosynthetic gene clusters were firstly identified in Aspergillus that were possibly acquired by horizontal gene transfer, including the vrt cluster that is responsible for viridicatumtoxin production. Comparative genomics revealed that A. ustus shared the largest number of SM biosynthetic gene clusters with A. nidulans, but much fewer with other Aspergilli like A. niger and A. oryzae. These findings would help to understand the diversity and evolution of SM biosynthesis pathways in genus Aspergillus, and we hope they will also promote the development of fungal identification methodology in clinic.

  20. Growth conditions affect carotenoid-based plumage coloration of great tit nestlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrak, P.; Vellau, Helen; Ots, Indrek; Møller, Anders Pape

    Carotenoid-based integument colour in animals has been hypothesised to signal individual phenotypic quality because it reliably reflects either foraging efficiency or health status. We investigated whether carotenoid-derived yellow plumage coloration of fledgling great tits (Parus major) reflects their nestling history. Great tit fledglings reared in a poor year (1998) or in the urban habitat were less yellow than these reared in a good year (1999) or in the forest. The origin of nestlings also affected their coloration since nestlings from a city population did not improve their coloration when transferred to the forest. Brood size manipulation affected fledgling colour, but only in the rural population, where nestlings from reduced broods developed more yellow coloration than nestlings from increased and control broods. Effect of brood size manipulation on fledgling plumage colour was independent of the body mass, indicating that growth environment affects fledgling body mass and plumage colour by different pathways.

  1. Evidence of Epigenetic Mechanisms Affecting Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Jacobo; Beltrán, Jesús; Nuñez, Jonathan; Chavarriaga, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are able to regulate plant development by generating non-Mendelian allelic interactions. An example of these are the responses to environmenal stimuli that result in phenotypic variability and transgression amongst important crop traits. The need to predict phenotypes from genotypes to understand the molecular basis of the genotype-by-environment interaction is a research priority. Today, with the recent discoveries in the field of epigenetics, this challenge goes beyond analyzing how DNA sequences change. Here we review examples of epigenetic regulation of genes involved in carotenoid synthesis and degradation, cases in which histone- and/or DNA-methylation, and RNA silencing at the posttranscriptional level affect carotenoids in plants. PMID:27485227

  2. Macular and serum carotenoid concentrations in patients with malabsorption syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew S; Zhao, Da You; Bernstein, Paul S

    2008-03-01

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to protect the human macula by absorbing blue light and quenching free radicals. Intestinal malabsorption syndromes such as celiac and Crohn's disease are known to cause deficiencies of lipid-soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that subjects with nutrient malabsorption syndromes will demonstrate lower carotenoid levels in the macula and blood, and that these lower levels may correlate with early-onset maculopathy. Resonance Raman spectrographic (RRS) measurements of macular carotenoid levels were collected from subjects with and without a history of malabsorption syndromes. Carotenoids were extracted from serum and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Subjects with malabsorption (n = 22) had 37% lower levels of macular carotenoids on average versus controls (n = 25, P maculopathy were not observed. We conclude that intestinal malabsorption results in lower macular carotenoid levels. PMID:19081745

  3. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  4. A Unified Picture of S* in Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevičius, Vytautas; Abramavicius, Darius; Polívka, Tomáš; Galestian Pour, Arpa; Hauer, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    In π-conjugated chain molecules such as carotenoids, coupling between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom is of central importance. It governs both dynamic and static properties, such as the time scales of excited state relaxation as well as absorption spectra. In this work, we treat vibronic dynamics in carotenoids on four electronic states (|S0⟩, |S1⟩, |S2⟩, and |Sn⟩) in a physically rigorous framework. This model explains all features previously associated with the intensely debated S* state. Besides successfully fitting transient absorption data of a zeaxanthin homologue, this model also accounts for previous results from global target analysis and chain length-dependent studies. Additionally, we are able to incorporate findings from pump-deplete-probe experiments, which were incompatible to any pre-existing model. Thus, we present the first comprehensive and unified interpretation of S*-related features, explaining them by vibronic transitions on either S1, S0, or both, depending on the chain length of the investigated carotenoid. PMID:27509302

  5. Study of transitory forms of carotenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to explain the biological role of the carotenoids their transitory forms were studied with an apparatus measuring the small (∼10-3) short-lived (100 ns to 1 ms) optical density variations obtained by excitation with a ruby laser. Two forms were studied: a) Triplet state 3Car. - This state (t1/2∼6 μs) is obtained not by direct excitation but by T-T energy transfer from chlorophyll, in different media (chloroplasts, pigments in solution or in micelle). Two arguments can be advanced to explain in terms of triplet energy transfer an essential biological role of carotenoids, protection against photodynamic effects: - the energy level of 3Car is lower than that of the singlet of oxygen; - in vivo the T-T transfer from chlorophyll to the carotenoids is very fast: 30 ns.. b) Radical cation Car+. - This form is obtained by electron transfer from carotene to the triplet of Toluidine Blue, in ethanol. Car+ (t1/2∼200 μs) shows a strong absorption band at 910 nm. The properties of Car+ are discussed in relation to other polyene derivatives and to hydrocarbon ions. Car+ could be involved in certain biological electron transfers. (author)

  6. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki; Parisa Sadighara; Ramin Nabizadeh Nodehi; Mahmood Alimohammadi; Naiema Vakili Saatloo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal) treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged. ...

  7. Structure of the principal carotenoid pigment of Cellulomonas biazotea.

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, O B; Montes, A R; Andrewes, A G

    1980-01-01

    The yellow-pigmented Cellulomonas biazotea, ATCC 486, contains a mixture of carotenoids. The principal compound is a decapreno carotenoid (C50H72O2) tentatively characterized as 2,2'-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-butenyl)-gamma,gamma-carotene on the basis of electronic absorption, infrared, proton magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometries. The carotenoid is presumed to be identical to sarcinaxanthin from Sarcina lutea pro-synon. Micrococcus luteus and, therefore, is isomeric with decaprenoxanthi...

  8. Dietary carotenoids in normal and pathological tissues of corpus uteri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Wołczyński

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids and retinyl esters are the source of vitamin A in the human body and its natural derivatives takes part in the regulation of cell replication and differentiation in the human endometrium, may induce the leiomyoma growth and has a role in differentiation of endometrial adenocarcinoma. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the presence of carotenoids in tissues from the normal uterus and from various tumors of the uterine corpus, as well as to compare the total content, major carotenoids and % of carotenoids belonging to the provitamin A group between the tissues examined. Using three independent methods of chromatography (CC, TLC, HPLC we analysed 140 human samples. We identified 13 carotenoids belonging to the eg. provitamin A group and epoxy carotenoids. In all the samples beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, neoxanthin, violaxanthin and mutatoxanthin were isolated. In normal tissues, the mean carotenoid content was the highest in the follicular phase endometrium (9.9 microg/g, while the highest percentage of carotenoids belonging to provitamin A group was found in the luteal phase (18.2%. In the pathological group, the highest mean values were demonstrated for epithelial lesions (8.0 microg/g, and within this group - in endometrioid adenocarcinoma (10.8 microg/g. In both groups, violaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein epoxide and mutatoxanthin were the predominant carotenoids. We have demonstrated that all uterine tissues show a concentration of beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, being the source of vitamin A. The highest total values of carotenoids obtained in the group of endometrioid adenocarcinoma seem to confirm certain enzymatic defects in carotenoid metabolism in the course of the neoplastic process or some metabolic modifications. The finding of astaxanthin - the major antioxidant among carotenoids - in 63% of tissues examined is also significant.

  9. Specific appetite for carotenoids in a colorful bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Senar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since carotenoids have physiological functions necessary for maintaining health, individuals should be selected to actively seek and develop a specific appetite for these compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Great tits Parus major in a diet choice experiment, both in captivity and the field, preferred carotenoid-enriched diets to control diets. The food items did not differ in any other aspects measured besides carotenoid content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Specific appetite for carotenoids is here demonstrated for the first time, placing these compounds on a par with essential nutrients as sodium or calcium.

  10. Carboidratos e carotenoides totais em duas variedades de mangarito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sato Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição de carboidratos e carotenoides em rizomas mãe e filhos das variedades de mangarito (Xanthosoma riedelianum pequeno e gigante. Amostras dos rizomas coletadas ao longo do ciclo cultural e após 90 dias de armazenamento foram avaliadas quanto aos teores de carboidratos e carotenoides totais. Os rizomas apresentaram aumento no teor de carboidratos, e o rizoma-mãe da variedade pequeno apresentou acréscimos lineares no teor de carotenoides, ao longo do cultivo. O armazenamento reduz os teores de carboidratos e de carotenoides totais em todos os rizomas.

  11. Cyclisation and aromatisation of carotenoids during sediment diagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Koster, J; Baas, M.; Koopmans, M.; Kaam-Peters, H.M.E. van; Geenevasen, J.A.J.; Kruk, C.

    1995-01-01

    A novel diaryl isoprenoid with an additional aromatic ring, formed from the diaromatic carotenoid isorenieratene by cyclisation and aromatisation during sediment diagenesis, is identified in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks.

  12. A Rapid Method for the Extraction and Analysis of Carotenoids and Other Hydrophobic Substances Suitable for Systems Biology Studies with Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sawodny

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid, and inexpensive extraction method for carotenoids and other non-polar compounds present in phototrophic bacteria has been developed. The method, which has been extensively tested on the phototrophic purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, is suitable for extracting large numbers of samples, which is common in systems biology studies, and yields material suitable for subsequent analysis using HPLC and mass spectroscopy. The procedure is particularly suitable for carotenoids and other terpenoids, including quinones, bacteriochlorophyll a and bacteriopheophytin a, and is also useful for the analysis of polar phospholipids. The extraction procedure requires only a single step extraction with a hexane/methanol/water mixture, followed by HPLC using a Spherisorb C18 column, with a mobile phase consisting of acetone-water and a non-linear gradient of 50%–100% acetone. The method was employed for examining the carotenoid composition observed during microaerophilic growth of R. rubrum strains, and was able to determine 18 carotenoids, 4 isoprenoid-quinones, bacteriochlorophyll a and bacteriopheophytin a as well as four different phosphatidylglycerol species of different acyl chain compositions. The analytical procedure was used to examine the dynamics of carotenoid biosynthesis in the major and minor pathways operating simultaneously in a carotenoid biosynthesis mutant of R. rubrum.

  13. Carotenoids in Staple Cereals: Metabolism, Regulation, and Genetic Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shengnan; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids play a critical role in animal and human health. Animals and humans are unable to synthesize carotenoids de novo, and therefore rely upon diet as sources of these compounds. However, major staple cereals often contain only small amounts of carotenoids in their grains. Consequently, there is considerable interest in genetic manipulation of carotenoid content in cereal grain. In this review, we focus on carotenoid metabolism and regulation in non-green plant tissues, as well as genetic manipulation in staple cereals such as rice, maize, and wheat. Significant progress has been made in three aspects: (1) seven carotenogenes play vital roles in carotenoid regulation in non-green plant tissues, including 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase influencing isoprenoid precursor supply, phytoene synthase, β-cyclase, and ε-cyclase controlling biosynthesis, 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases responsible for degradation, and orange gene conditioning sequestration sink; (2) provitamin A-biofortified crops, such as rice and maize, were developed by either metabolic engineering or marker-assisted breeding; (3) quantitative trait loci for carotenoid content on chromosomes 3B, 7A, and 7B were consistently identified, eight carotenogenes including 23 loci were detected, and 10 gene-specific markers for carotenoid accumulation were developed and applied in wheat improvement. A comprehensive and deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid metabolism in crops will be beneficial in improving our precision in improving carotenoid contents. Genomic selection and gene editing are emerging as transformative technologies for provitamin A biofortification. PMID:27559339

  14. Carotenoids in Staple Cereals: Metabolism, Regulation, and Genetic Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shengnan; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids play a critical role in animal and human health. Animals and humans are unable to synthesize carotenoids de novo, and therefore rely upon diet as sources of these compounds. However, major staple cereals often contain only small amounts of carotenoids in their grains. Consequently, there is considerable interest in genetic manipulation of carotenoid content in cereal grain. In this review, we focus on carotenoid metabolism and regulation in non-green plant tissues, as well as genetic manipulation in staple cereals such as rice, maize, and wheat. Significant progress has been made in three aspects: (1) seven carotenogenes play vital roles in carotenoid regulation in non-green plant tissues, including 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase influencing isoprenoid precursor supply, phytoene synthase, β-cyclase, and ε-cyclase controlling biosynthesis, 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases responsible for degradation, and orange gene conditioning sequestration sink; (2) provitamin A-biofortified crops, such as rice and maize, were developed by either metabolic engineering or marker-assisted breeding; (3) quantitative trait loci for carotenoid content on chromosomes 3B, 7A, and 7B were consistently identified, eight carotenogenes including 23 loci were detected, and 10 gene-specific markers for carotenoid accumulation were developed and applied in wheat improvement. A comprehensive and deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid metabolism in crops will be beneficial in improving our precision in improving carotenoid contents. Genomic selection and gene editing are emerging as transformative technologies for provitamin A biofortification. PMID:27559339

  15. Effect of carotenoid structure on excited-state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chábera, P.; Fuciman, M.; Hříbek, P.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2009), s. 8795-8703. ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : excited-state dynamics * carbonyl carotenoids * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.116, year: 2009

  16. On the substrate- and stereospecificity of the plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Strigolactones are phytohormones synthesized from carotenoids via a stereospecific pathway involving the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 7 (CCD7) and 8. CCD7 cleaves 9-cis-β-carotene to form a supposedly 9-cis-configured β-apo-10′-carotenal. CCD8 converts this intermediate through a combination of yet undetermined reactions into the strigolactone-like compound carlactone. Here, we investigated the substrate and stereo-specificity of the Arabidopsis and pea CCD7 and determined the stereo-configuration of the β-apo-10′-carotenal intermediate by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Our data unequivocally demonstrate the 9-cis-configuration of the intermediate. Both CCD7s cleave different 9-cis-carotenoids, yielding hydroxylated 9-cis-apo-10′-carotenals that may lead to hydroxylated carlactones, but show highest affinity for 9-cis-β-carotene. © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolation and characterization of Carotenoid biosynthesis genes from Pantoea agglomerans pv. millettiae Wist 801

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantoea agglomerans pv. millettiae produces a yellow pigment and is the causal agent of wisteria stem galls. We cloned and sequenced a 6.8-kb DNA fragment containing the yellow pigment gene. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that this clone contains five open reading frames (ORFs) transcribed in the same direction, and one terminal ORF transcribed in the opposite orientation. Comparison of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of these ORFs showed that they correspond to the carotenoid biosynthesis (crt) genes crtE, -X, -Y, -I, -B and -Z, respectively, in P. ananatis pv. uredovora 20D3, and P. agglomerans strains Eho 10 and Eho 13. It was suggested that the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway of P. agglomerans pv. millettiae is basically identical to that of the three other Pantoea strains. When the crt genes from P. agglomerans pv. millettiae were expressed in E. coli WP2, this bacterium also displayed a yellow phenotype. The carotenoid pigments are known for their ability to protect various organisms against UV-induced damage, however, there were no significant differences in mutagenesis and survival after UV irradiation between yellow-pigmented and non-pigmented E. coli WP2 strains

  18. The effects of dietary carotenoid supplementation and retinal carotenoid accumulation on vision-mediated foraging in the house finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Toomey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For many bird species, vision is the primary sensory modality used to locate and assess food items. The health and spectral sensitivities of the avian visual system are influenced by diet-derived carotenoid pigments that accumulate in the retina. Among wild House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus, we have found that retinal carotenoid accumulation varies significantly among individuals and is related to dietary carotenoid intake. If diet-induced changes in retinal carotenoid accumulation alter spectral sensitivity, then they have the potential to affect visually mediated foraging performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two experiments, we measured foraging performance of house finches with dietarily manipulated retinal carotenoid levels. We tested each bird's ability to extract visually contrasting food items from a matrix of inedible distracters under high-contrast (full and dimmer low-contrast (red-filtered lighting conditions. In experiment one, zeaxanthin-supplemented birds had significantly increased retinal carotenoid levels, but declined in foraging performance in the high-contrast condition relative to astaxanthin-supplemented birds that showed no change in retinal carotenoid accumulation. In experiments one and two combined, we found that retinal carotenoid concentrations predicted relative foraging performance in the low- vs. high-contrast light conditions in a curvilinear pattern. Performance was positively correlated with retinal carotenoid accumulation among birds with low to medium levels of accumulation (∼0.5-1.5 µg/retina, but declined among birds with very high levels (>2.0 µg/retina. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that carotenoid-mediated spectral filtering enhances color discrimination, but that this improvement is traded off against a reduction in sensitivity that can compromise visual discrimination. Thus, retinal carotenoid levels may be optimized to meet the visual demands of specific

  19. Genotype and Environment Effects on Carotenoid Content of Broccoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are secondary plant metabolites in vegetables reported to confer various positive health-promoting effects when consumed. Brassica oleracea L. vegetables are recognized as excellent sources of dietary carotenoids. Broccoli has emerged as the most important B. oleracea crop in the US an...

  20. Regulatory control of carotenoid accumulation in winter squash during storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postharvest storage of fruits and vegetables is often required and frequently results in nutritional quality change. In this study, we investigated carotenoid storage plastids, carotenoid content, and its regulation during 3-month storage of winter squash butternut fruits. We showed that storage imp...

  1. Chemical and Spectroscopic Studies of Carotenoids and Related Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Lutnæs, Bjart Frode

    2004-01-01

    Structure elucidation of charge delocalised carotenoid mono- and dications by NMR and VIS/NIR spectroscopy. Studies of the nucleophilic reactions of these cations. Studies of the β,β-carotene-iodine complex. Isolation and anmalysis of new carotenoid glucoside esters from extremophilic bacteria.

  2. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged. Results: Alcalase extraction produced (234.00±2.00 mg/L carotenoid and NaOH extraction produced (170.00±1.53 mg/L carotenoid. Based on the samples analyzed, alcalase enzyme showed more efficiency than NaOH extraction to achieve carotenoids from shrimp waste. Conclusions: It can be concluded that using alcalase enzyme for carotenoids extraction can produce higher carotenoids concentration than NaOH extraction method. So alcalase enzyme method can be used for achieving this kind of antioxidant.

  3. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  4. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki; Parisa Sadighara; Ramin Nabizadeh Nodehi; Mahmood Alimohammadi; Naiema Vakili Saatloo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal) treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged.Results:Alcalase extraction produced (234.00±2.00) mg/L carotenoid and NaOH extraction produced (170.00±1.53) mg/L carotenoid. Based on the samples analyzed, alcalase enzyme showed more efficiency than NaOH extraction to achieve carotenoids from shrimp waste.Conclusions:It can be concluded that using alcalase enzyme for carotenoids extraction can produce higher carotenoids concentration than NaOH extraction method. So alcalase enzyme method can be used for achieving this kind of antioxidant.

  5. Biosynthesis and Function of Carotenoid in Plant%植物类胡萝卜素生物合成及功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍培; 季静; 王罡; 关春峰

    2011-01-01

    详述了植物类胡萝卜素生物合成途径,并从突破类胡萝卜素合成途径中上游瓶颈限制、类胡萝卜素代谢各分支途径的改造、提高植物细胞对类胡萝卜素物质积累能力三个方面探讨了类胡萝卜素生物合成酶基因在植物基因工程中的研究现状,最后对植物类胡萝卜素代谢的研究前景进行了展望.%The carotenoids are a major class of organic pigments produced in plants. As such they have been the focus of multidisciplinary research programs aiming to understand how they are synthesized in plants. The development of plant carotenoids biosynthesis is summarized from three aspects: breakthrough the bottlenecks in the carotenoids upstream pathway; improving the carotenoids metabolic pathways branch; enhancing storage capacity for carotenoids accumulation in plant cell. Finally, some challenges and future research directions are outlined.

  6. Importancia nutricional de los pigmentos carotenoides

    OpenAIRE

    Meléndez Martínez, Antonio Jesús; Vicario Romero, Isabel; Heredia Mira, Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Los pigmentos carotenoides son compuestos responsables de la coloración de gran número de alimentos vegetales y animales, como zanahorias, zumo de naranja, tomates, salmón y yema del huevo. Desde hace muchos años, se sabe que algunos de estos compuestos, como a y b-caroteno, así como la b-criptoxantina, son provitaminas A. No obstante, estudios recientes han puesto de manifiesto las propiedades antioxidantes de estos pigmentos, así como su eficacia en la prevención de ciertas enfermedades del...

  7. Carotenoids and health signalling in animals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinkler, Michal; Svobodová, J.; Maršík, Petr; Albrecht, Tomáš

    Hauppauge : Nova Science Publishers, 2011 - (Yamaguchi, M.), s. 189-234 ISBN 978-1-61209-713-8 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/1281; GA ČR GA206/08/0640; GA ČR GAP505/10/1871; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : carotenoids * condition * diseases * health * ornamentation * oxidative stress * parasites * sexual signalling Subject RIV: EG - Zoology https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=22091

  8. The intake of carotenoids in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Jakobsen, Jette; Andersen, N. L.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the intake of carotenoids in the Danish population Danish fruits and vegetables were screened with an HPLC method consisting of extraction with ethanol:tetrahydrofuran, separation by reversed phase HPLC with the mobile phase acetonitril:methanol:dichlormethan, triethylamin, BHT and...... detection at 450 nm. Food intakes were estimated by the national dietary surveys (1995) from 7 days' food registration (n = 1837 adults), which allows the whole diet to be described by the mean intake and intake distribution of 207 raw or semiprepared foods. By multiplication with the mean content in the...

  9. A flower-specific Myb protein activates transcription of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablowski, R W; Moyano, E; Culianez-Macia, F A; Schuch, W; Martin, C; Bevan, M

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of flavonoid pigments in flowers requires the co-ordinated expression of genes encoding enzymes in th phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway. Some cis-elements involved in the transcriptional control of these genes have been defined. We report binding of petal-specific activities from tobacco and Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) to an element conserved in promoters of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and implicated in expression in flowers. These binding activities were inhibited by antibodies raised against Myb305, a flower-specific Myb protein previously cloned from Antirrhinum by sequence homology. Myb305 bound to the same element and formed a DNA-protein complex with the same mobility as the Antirrhinum petal protein in electrophoretic mobility shift experiments. Myb305 activated expression from its binding site in yeast and in tobacco protoplasts. In protoplasts, activation also required a G-box-like element, suggesting co-operation with other elements and factors. The results strongly suggest a role for Myb305-related proteins in the activation of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes in flowers. This is consistent with the genetically demonstrated role of plant Myb proteins in the regulation of genes involved in flavonoid synthesis. PMID:8306956

  10. Carotenoids and Their Isomers: Color Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Jiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages.

  11. Carotenoids in Marine Invertebrates Living along the Kuroshio Current Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Sakagami

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids of the corals Acropora japonica, A. secale, and A. hyacinthus, the tridacnid clam Tridacna squamosa, the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, and the small sea snail Drupella fragum were investigated. The corals and the tridacnid clam are filter feeders and are associated with symbiotic zooxanthellae. Peridinin and pyrrhoxanthin, which originated from symbiotic zooxanthellae, were found to be major carotenoids in corals and the tridacnid clam. The crown-of-thorns starfish and the sea snail D. fragum are carnivorous and mainly feed on corals. Peridinin-3-acyl esters were major carotenoids in the sea snail D. fragum. On the other hand, ketocarotenoids such as 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin and astaxanthin were major carotenoids in the crown-of-thorns starfish. Carotenoids found in these marine animals closely reflected not only their metabolism but also their food chains.

  12. Metabolism of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during ripening of raspberry fruit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekwilder, J; van der Meer, IM; Simicb, A;

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are important lipophilic antioxidants in fruits. Apocarotenoids such as α-ionone and β-ionone, which are breakdown products of carotenoids, are important for the flavor characteristics of raspberry fruit, and have also been suggested to have beneficial effects on human health. Raspberry...... is one of the few fruits where fruit ripening is accompanied by the massive production of apocarotenoids. In this paper, changes in levels of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening are described. In addition, the isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a carotenoid...... cleavage dioxygenase (CCD), which putatively mediates the degradation of carotenoids to apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening, is reported. Such information helps us to better understand how these compounds are produced in plants and may also enable us to develop novel strategies for improved...

  13. On the role of labile oxocomplexes in carotenoids antioxidant activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early stages of the interaction of carotenoids and molecular oxygen are studied and role of its interaction in the processes responsible for radiation resistance of carotenoids, superoxide dismutase activity to the singlet oxygen quenching. Ethanol and aqueous solutions of the carotenoids (phosphate buffer with pH 7.5) were exposed to accelerated electron flux at pulse regime and dose rate (0.7-2.0)x1017 eV/ml imp in the dark and in case of combined effect of radiation and light. It is concluded that at the early stages of processes with the participation of carotenoids the formation of reversible complexes with charge transfer plays the important role. Properties and reaction capability of these complexes are determined by the peculiarities in chemical structure of carotenoid molecules

  14. Variation in Content of Carotenoids and Vitamin C in Carrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana MATĚJKOVÁ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carrots are the most popular and wide-spread of all root vegetables, and are the principal source of carotenoids in human diet. The purpose of this study was to examine differences between cultivars and the effect of storage regarding the carotenoid and vitamin C content in carrots. Six carrot cultivars were used in this study, ranging from early to late ones. Observed carotenoid content ranged from 60 mg kg-1 to 134 mg kg-1. Significantly higher levels of carotenoids were found in late and moderately late cultivars in comparison to early ones. Vitamin C content in these cultivars ranged from 54 mg kg-1 to 132 mg kg-1. Significantly higher contents of vitamin C were also found in the late cultivars. 30-day storage resulted in a significant reduction in vitamin C content, on average of 47%. There was also a reduction in the carotenoids content, but to a lesser extent, on average of 11%.

  15. Biosynthetic origin of acetic acid using SNIF-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this work is to describe the use of the technique Site-Specific Natural Isotopic Fractionation of hydrogen (SNIF-NMR), using 2H and 1H NMR spectroscopy, to investigate the biosynthetic origin of acetic acid in commercial samples of Brazilian vinegar. This method is based on the deuterium to hydrogen ratio at a specific position (methyl group) of acetic acid obtained by fermentation, through different biosynthetic mechanisms, which result in different isotopic ratios. We measured the isotopic ratio of vinegars obtained through C3, C4, and CAM biosynthetic mechanisms, blends of C3 and C4 (agrins) and synthetic acetic acid. (author)

  16. Intraspecific Variation in Carotenoids of Brassica oleracea var. sabellica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageney, Vera; Baldermann, Susanne; Albach, Dirk C

    2016-04-27

    Carotenoids are best known as a source of natural antioxidants. Physiologically, carotenoids are part of the photoprotection in plants as they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important source of carotenoids in European food is Brassica oleracea. Focusing on the most abundant carotenoids, we estimated the contents of ß-carotene, (9Z)-neoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein as well as those of chlorophylls a and b to assess their variability in Brassica oleracea var. sabellica. Our analyses included more than 30 cultivars categorized in five distinct sets grouped according to morphological characteristics or geographical origin. Our results demonstrated specific carotenoid patterns characteristic for American, Italian, and red-colored kale cultivars. Moreover, we demonstrated a tendency of high zeaxanthin proportions under traditional harvest conditions, which accord to low-temperature regimes. We also compared the carotenoid patterns of self-generated hybrid lines. Corresponding findings indicated that crossbreeding has a high potential for carotenoid content optimization in kale. PMID:27045759

  17. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  18. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian colour vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Matthew B; Collins, Aaron M; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Corbo, Joseph C

    2015-10-01

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Thus, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering. PMID:26446559

  19. The Capability of Rhodotorula slooffiae to Produce Carotenoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Sadat Naghavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rhodotorula is characterized by the absence of ballistoconidia, fermentation ability, and starch-like compounds. Biology of the species is not well-identified; therefore molecular identification is required. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region can be used for the identification of the majority of Basidiomycetous species. Carotenoids which are natural pigments can be synthesized by some genera of yeasts such as Rhodotorula. The increase of demand for carotenoids obtained from natural sources has promoted major efforts to recognize potential microbial sources. The aims of this study were to identify a strain isolated from leather wastewater and to investigate its carotenoid production ability. The effect of 2 different medium (Semi-synthetic medium (MMS and yeast malt extract medium (YM on biomass and carotenoid production was studied. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region in addition to morphological and biochemical characterization to identify the strain was carried out. To isolate the carotenoid pigment, cells were suspended in acetone and broken using a homogenizer, followed by centrifugation and supernatant was separated; thus pigments were measured spectrophotometrically at 450 nM using the extinction coefficient E1%450=2500. Results: Identification processes represented strain SG006 as a Rhodotorula slooffiae. The sequence was deposited in the Gene Bank database with accession number JX997835. The results showed that SG006 are able to produce carotenoid and MMS medium promoted carotenoid production. Conclusion: We found that Rhodotorula slooffiae showed the ability to produce carotenoid. However, further work is needed to optimize of the amount of product and to characterize the carotenoids.

  20. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  1. Carotenoid maintenance handicap and the physiology of carotenoid-based signalisation of health

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 1 (2010), s. 19-28. ISSN 0028-1042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0851; GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR GA206/08/1281 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Carotenoids * Ornamentation * Oxidative stress * Testosterone * Trade-off Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.250, year: 2010

  2. Carotenoid composition in oils obtained from palm fruits from the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, M. F.G.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The oils obtained from native palm fruits are considered new sources of high added value phytochemicals, making it necessary to know the composition of the less studied species in order to evaluate their economic potential. The objective of this study is to identify and quantify the arotenoids in palm fruit oils from the Brazilian Amazon: bacaba (Oenocarpus bacaba, buriti (Mauritia flexuosa, inajá (Maximiliana maripa, pupunha (Bactris gasipaes and tucumã (Astrocaryum vulgare, by means of liquid phase extraction and HPLC-UV-vis. analysis. The results showed an extremely variable carotenoid content, from 13 mg·kg−1 in bacaba oil to more than 1000 mg·kg−1 in the tucumã one. The oils obtained from buriti, pupunha and tucumã displayed high concentrations of ß-carotene, corresponding to fruits with the series ß, ß dominant metabolism. Upon analyzing the carotenoid profile in bacaba oil for the first time, an extraordinary dominance of the ß, ε pathway was observed, proving them to be oils with high lutein and α-carotene contents. Although the ß, ß pathway dominates in inajá oil, the exclusive and high lycopene content implies that LCY-E is barely active in these fruits, in contrast to what has been evidenced so far. It is therefore of the utmost importance to characterize these new potential sources of carotenoids.Los aceites obtenidos a partir de frutos de palmeras nativas son considerados nuevas fuentes de fitoquímicos con alto valor añadido siendo necesario conocer la composición de las especies menos exploradas para evaluar su potencial económico. El objetivo de este estudio es identificar y cuantificar los carotenoides en aceites defrutos de palmeras provenientes de la Amazonia Brasileña: bacaba (Oenocarpus bacaba, uriti (Mauritia flexuosa, inajá (Maximiliana maripa, pupunha (Bactris gasipaes y tucumã (Astrocaryum vulgare, mediante extracción líquido:líquido y análisis por HPLC UV-vis. Los resultados mostraron un

  3. Carboidratos e carotenoides totais em duas variedades de mangarito

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Sato Ferreira; Mário Puiatti; Ariana Mota Pereira; Paulo Roberto Cecon; Aline da Silva Bhering; Teresa Drummond Correia Mendes

    2014-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição de carboidratos e carotenoides em rizomas mãe e filhos das variedades de mangarito (Xanthosoma riedelianum) pequeno e gigante. Amostras dos rizomas coletadas ao longo do ciclo cultural e após 90 dias de armazenamento foram avaliadas quanto aos teores de carboidratos e carotenoides totais. Os rizomas apresentaram aumento no teor de carboidratos, e o rizoma-mãe da variedade pequeno apresentou acréscimos lineares no teor de carotenoides, ao long...

  4. Cloning and Characterization of a Lycium chinense Carotenoid Isomerase Gene Enhancing Carotenoid Accumulation in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李招娣; 季静; 王罡

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoid isomerase(CRTISO)is a key enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of cis-lycopene to all-trans lycopene. In this study, we isolated and characterized the CRTISO gene from Lycium chinense (LcCRTISO) for the first time. The open reading frame of LcCRTISO was 1 815 bp encoding a protein of 604 amino acids with a molecular mass of 66.24 kDa. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the LcCRTISO had a high level of simi-larity to other CRTISO. Phylogenetic analysis displayed that LcCRTISO kept a closer relationship with the CRTISO of plants than with those of other species. Semi-quantitative PCR analysis indicated that LcCRTISO gene was expressed in all tissues tested with the highest expression in maturing fruits. The overexpression of LcCRTISO gene in transgenic tobacco resulted in an increase of total carotenoids in the leaves withβ-carotene and lutein being the predominants. The results obtained here clearly suggested that the LcCRTISO gene was a promising candidate for carotenoid production.

  5. Individual carotenoid content of SRM 1548 total diet and influence of storage temperature, lyophilization, and irradiation on dietary carotenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified version of the AOAC procedure for the extraction of carotenoids from mixed feeds was coupled with an isocratic reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) method to measure individual carotenoids in SRM 1548 total diet and in a high-carotenoid mixed diet (HCMD). The major carotenoids identified in SRM 1548 were lycopene, beta-carotene, lutein, alpha-carotene, and zeaxanthin in descending order of concentration. The concentration of all carotenoids in SRM 1548 decreased as storage temperature increased. Significant differences in carotenoid concentrations occurred between -80 and 4 degrees C storage temperatures. Lyophilization of the HCMD significantly decreased beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations and produced an apparent increase in xanthophyll concentrations. Exposure to gamma-irradiation significantly decreased alpha-carotene and beta-carotene concentrations and led to an apparent increase in P-cryptoxanthin. SRM 1548 was found to be unsuitable for use as a reference material for carotenoid measurements, while HCMD has greater potential as a reference material

  6. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Eamonn; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Beatty, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary supplementation with these carotenoids might prevent, delay, or modify the course of ARM. This article discusses the scientific rationale supporting the hypothesis that L and Z are protective against ARM, and presents the recent evidence germane to this theory. PMID:17160199

  7. Transformation reactions and recycling of carotenoids and chlorins in the Peru upwelling region (15°S, 75°W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeta, Daniel J.; Gagosian, Robert B.

    1984-06-01

    Total chlorins and carotenoids were measured in suspended paniculate matter, sediment trap, and zooplankton fecal pellet samples collected in the Peru upwelling region. Individual carotenoids were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, diatoxanthin, carotene, and peridinin constitute > 95% of the total carotenoid pigments in suspended paniculate matter samples. However, sediment trap and zooplankton fecal pellet samples contained significant amounts of the carotenoid transformation products fucoxanthinol, fucoxanthin 5'-dehydrate, fucoxanthinol 5'-dehydrate, peridininol and peridininol 5'-dehydrate. These samples were further characterized by high values of the ratio fucoxanthinol/total fucopigments ( f/F t) and low values of the ratio total carotenoids /total chlorins. Three reactions are proposed to account for the formation of observed products: heterotrophic ester hydrolysis, chemically mediated epoxide rearrangement, and microbially mediated dehydration. The distribution of specific transformation products within the samples suggests that heterotrophic ester hydrolysis is a general transformation pathway operative in the water column on a wide suite of organic esters. Epoxide rearrangement and dehydration appear to occur over a longer time scale and are more typical of sedimentary environments.

  8. Regulation of orange carotenoid protein activity in cyanobacterial photoprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurotte, A.; Lopez Igual, R.; Wilson, A.; Comolet, L.; Bourcier de Carbon, C.; Xiao, F.; Kirilovsky, D.

    2015-01-01

    Plants, algae, and cyanobacteria have developed mechanisms to decrease the energy arriving at reaction centers to protect themselves from high irradiance. In cyanobacteria, the photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) and the Fluorescence Recovery Protein are essential elements in this mechanism.

  9. Thraustochytrids as production organisms for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), squalene, and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, Inga Marie; Ertesvåg, Helga; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Liu, Bin; Brautaset, Trygve; Vadstein, Olav; Ellingsen, Trond E

    2016-05-01

    Thraustochytrids have been applied for industrial production of the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic (DHA) since the 1990s. During more than 20 years of research on this group of marine, heterotrophic microorganisms, considerable increases in DHA productivities have been obtained by process and medium optimization. Strains of thraustochytrids also produce high levels of squalene and carotenoids, two other commercially interesting compounds with a rapidly growing market potential, but where yet few studies on process optimization have been reported. Thraustochytrids use two pathways for fatty acid synthesis. The saturated fatty acids are produced by the standard fatty acid synthesis, while DHA is synthesized by a polyketide synthase. However, fundamental knowledge about the relationship between the two pathways is still lacking. In the present review, we extract main findings from the high number of reports on process optimization for DHA production and interpret these in the light of the current knowledge of DHA synthesis in thraustochytrids and lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms in general. We also summarize published reports on squalene and carotenoid production and review the current status on strain improvement, which has been hampered by the yet very few published genome sequences and the lack of tools for gene transfer to the organisms. As more sequences now are becoming available, targets for strain improvement can be identified and open for a system-level metabolic engineering for improved productivities. PMID:27041691

  10. Carotenoids and Their Isomers: Color Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Yueming Jiang; Amin Ismail; Kin-Weng Kong; Hock-Eng Khoo; K. Nagendra Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables d...

  11. Biochemical Study on the Carotenoids in the Anemonefish, Amphiprion spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Yoshito; Yamamoto, Atsushi; KAMATA, Tadashi; Simpson, Kenneth L.; タナカ, ヨシト; ヤマモト, アツシ; カマタ, タダシ; 田中, 淑人; 山本, 任; 釜田, 忠; シンプソン, ケネス L.

    1992-01-01

    The carotenoid compositions of four species of wild anemonefish, Amphiprion ocellaris, A. biacleatus, A. frenatus and A. clarkii, were analyzed. Alltrans-zeaxanthin was found to be a dominant pigment followed by cis-isomers of zeaxanthin in all four species of anemonefish. Astaxanthin was also isolated as a major carotenoid in these species except A. clarkii, in which no astaxanthin was detected. Astaxanthin, however, was isolated from the eggs of A. clarkii. A feeding experiment was co...

  12. Macular and serum carotenoid concentrations in patients with malabsorption syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Matthew S.; Zhao, Da You; Bernstein, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to protect the human macula by absorbing blue light and quenching free radicals. Intestinal malabsorption syndromes such as celiac and Crohn’s disease are known to cause deficiencies of lipid-soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that subjects with nutrient malabsorption syndromes will demonstrate lower carotenoid levels in the macula and blood, and that these lower levels may correlate with early-onset maculopathy. Resonance Raman spectrographi...

  13. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Alessandra Gammone; Graziano Riccioni; Nicolantonio D'Orazio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus,...

  14. Carotenoids are essential for the assembly of cyanobacterial photosynthetic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Tünde N; Chukhutsina, Volha; Domonkos, Ildikó; Knoppová, Jana; Komenda, Josef; Kis, Mihály; Lénárt, Zsófia; Garab, Győző; Kovács, László; Gombos, Zoltán; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-10-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids (carotenes and xanthophylls) are important for light harvesting, photoprotection and structural stability of a variety of pigment-protein complexes. Here, we investigated the consequences of altered carotenoid composition for the functional organization of photosynthetic complexes in wild-type and various mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Although it is generally accepted that xanthophylls do not play a role in cyanobacterial photosynthesis in low-light conditions, we have found that the absence of xanthophylls leads to reduced oligomerization of photosystems I and II. This is remarkable because these complexes do not bind xanthophylls. Oligomerization is even more disturbed in crtH mutant cells, which show limited carotenoid synthesis; in these cells also the phycobilisomes are distorted despite the fact that these extramembranous light-harvesting complexes do not contain carotenoids. The number of phycocyanin rods connected to the phycobilisome core is strongly reduced leading to high amounts of unattached phycocyanin units. In the absence of carotenoids the overall organization of the thylakoid membranes is disturbed: Photosystem II is not formed, photosystem I hardly oligomerizes and the assembly of phycobilisomes remains incomplete. These data underline the importance of carotenoids in the structural and functional organization of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic machinery. PMID:26045333

  15. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes. PMID:26972005

  17. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  18. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  19. Spectroscopic properties of the carotenoid 3´-hydroxyechinenone in the orange carotenoid protein from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira maxima

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Kerfeld, C.A.; Pascher, T.; Sundström, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 10 (2007), s. 3994-4003. ISSN 0006-2960 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * Spectroscopic properties Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2007

  20. 动物组织中类胡萝卜素分析、分布的研究进展%Process on Analysis and Distribution Research of Carotenoids in Animal Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛峰; 李晨; 潘思轶

    2011-01-01

    对动物组织中类胡萝卜素的分析、分布和类胡萝卜素特异性结合蛋白的研究进行了综述.动物组织中类胡萝卜素的提取主要采用混合有机溶剂提取;分析检测主要采用反相高效液相色谱法和二极管阵列检测器;类胡萝卜素主要由小肠黏膜吸收;脂蛋白被认为参与类胡萝卜素的转运;β-胡萝卜素可经生物转化生成视黄醇;动物各组织对类胡萝卜素表现出选择性吸收,且这种选择性吸收因物种不同而差异显著;类胡萝卜素在吸收过程中相互之间存在交互作用,且这种交互作用主要发生在碳氢类胡萝卜素和含氧类胡萝卜素之间;类胡萝卜素的选择性吸收与交互作用被认为与组织中某种特异性结合蛋白的存在相关.%The carotenoids analysis and distribution in animal tissues and the study of carotenoids binding protein were reviewed in this article. Complete extraction of carotenoids from animal tissues was reported by using slightly polar solvents plus non -polar solvents;Reversed Phase High Pedormance Liquid Chromatography, coupling a photodiode array detector,was most often employed in routine use to analyze the carotenoids;carotenoids were absorbed by the mucosa of the small intestine;lipoproteins played an important role in transportation of carotenoids;the various pathways of β - carotene biotransformation were either known or suspected of occurring in mammalian tissues, and pathways known or proposed were involved in the conversion of β - carotene to retinoids; selective absorption of carotenoids was found in animal tissues and there were obvious variabilities in the selective absorption of carotenoid among animal species;the interactions between carotenoids were found during the process of absorption and antagonistic effects had been reported between the hydrocarbon carotenoids and oxycarotenoids;special carotenoids binding proteins had been isolated and purified from animal tissues, which

  1. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2011-05-19

    Background: The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana.Results: A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR) but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA). Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs) and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced and uncoupled from that of

  2. Stress and developmental responses of terpenoid biosynthetic genes in Cistus creticus subsp. creticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, Irene; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2010-06-01

    Plants, and specially species adapted in non-friendly environments, produce secondary metabolites that help them to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses. These metabolites could be of great pharmaceutical interest because several of those show cytotoxic, antibacterial or antioxidant activities. Leaves' trichomes of Cistus creticus ssp. creticus, a Mediterranean xerophytic shrub, excrete a resin rich in several labdane-type diterpenes with verified in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic and cytostatic activity against human cancer cell lines. Bearing in mind the properties and possible future exploitation of these natural products, it seemed interesting to study their biosynthesis and its regulation, initially at the molecular level. For this purpose, genes encoding enzymes participating in the early steps of the terpenoids biosynthetic pathways were isolated and their gene expression patterns were investigated in different organs and in response to various stresses and defence signals. The genes studied were the CcHMGR from the mevalonate pathway, CcDXS and CcDXR from the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and the two geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (CcGGDPS1 and 2) previously characterized from this species. The present work indicates that the leaf trichomes are very active biosynthetically as far as it concerns terpenoids biosynthesis, and the terpenoid production from this tissue seems to be transcriptionally regulated. Moreover, the CcHMGR and CcDXS genes (the rate-limiting steps of the isoprenoids' pathways) showed an increase during mechanical wounding and application of defence signals (like meJA and SA), which is possible to reflect an increased need of the plant tissues for the corresponding metabolites. PMID:20364257

  3. Diversity, physiology, and evolution of avian plumage carotenoids and the role of carotenoid-protein interactions in plumage color appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFountain, Amy M; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    The diversity of vibrant plumage colors in birds has evolved as a direct result of social and environmental pressures. To fully understand these underlying pressures it is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms for the creation of novel plumage colors which include the metabolic transformations of dietary carotenoids and spectral tuning of the molecules within the feather protein environment. Recent advances in this field have greatly expanded the number and breadth of avian species for which plumage pigmentation has been characterized, making it possible to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of carotenoid usage in plumage. Resonance Raman and classical Raman spectroscopic techniques have been employed with great effect in the study of carotenoids in situ. The application of these methods have two benefits: to identify carotenoids in feathers that are unavailable for destructive sampling; and to study the spectral tuning resulting from the interaction between the carotenoids and the proteins to which they are bound. This review presents a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the molecular factors controlling the coloration of avian carotenoid plumage obtained through the application of both bioanalytical and spectroscopic methodologies. PMID:25637658

  4. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  5. Carotenoids: Actual knowledge on food sources, intakes, stability and bioavailability and their protective role in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiani, Giuseppe; Castón, María Jesús Periago; Catasta, Giovina;

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are one of the major food micronutrients in human diets and the overall objective of this review is to re-examine the role of carotenoids in human nutrition. We have emphasized the attention on the following carotenoids present in food and human tissues: -carotene, -cryptoxanthin......, -carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin; we have reported the major food sources and dietary intake of these compounds. We have tried to summarize positive and negative effects of food processing, storage, cooking on carotenoid content and carotenoid bioavailability. In particular, we have evidenced...... the possibility to improve carotenoids bioavailability in accordance with changes and variations of technology procedures....

  6. Subcloning of the enterobactin biosynthetic gene entB: Expression, purification, characterization, and substrate specificity of isochorismatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Escherichia coli entB, coding for the enterobactin biosynthetic enzyme isochorismatase, has been subcloned into the multicopy plasmid pKK223-3 under the control of the tac promoter. The resulting recombinant plasmid pFR1 expresses isochorismatase amounting to over 50% of the total cellular protein. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity and a convenient assay developed. The enzyme has a Km for isochorismate of 14.7 μM and a turnover number of 600 min-1. By use of 1H NMR spectroscopy, the progress of the reaction was followed with the expected formation of 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybenzoate product. Several substrate analogues were also utilized by the enzyme including chorismic acid, the immediate precursor to isochorismic acid in the enterobactin biosynthetic pathway

  7. Improving carotenoid extraction from tomato waste by pulsed electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JavierRaso

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the influence of the application of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF of different intensities (3-7 kV/cm and 0-300 μs on the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel and pulp in a mixture of hexane:acetone:ethanol was studied with the aim of increasing extraction yield or reducing the percentage of the less green solvents in the extraction medium. According to the cellular disintegration index, the optimum treatment time for the permeabilization of tomato peel and pulp at different electric field strengths was 90 µs. The PEF permeabilization of tomato pulp did not significantly increase the carotenoid extraction. However, a PEF-treatment at 5 kV/cm improved the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel by 39 % as compared with the control in a mixture of hexane:ethanol:acetone (50:25:25. Further increments of electric field from 5 to 7 kV/cm did not increase significantly the extraction of carotenoids. . The presence of acetone in the solvent mixture did not positively affect the carotenoid extraction when the tomato peels were PEF-treated. Response surface methodology was used to determine the potential of PEF for reducing the percentage of hexane in a hexane:ethanol mixture. The application of a PEF-treatment allowed reducing the hexane percentage from 45 to 30 % without affecting the carotenoid extraction yield. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts obtained from tomato peel was correlated with the carotenoid concentration and it was not affected by the PEF-treatment.

  8. Recent patents on the extraction of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggi, Ezio

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the patents that have been presented during the last decade related to the extraction of carotenoids from various forms of organic matter (fruit, vegetables, animals), with an emphasis on the methods and mechanisms exploited by these technologies, and on technical solutions for the practical problems related to these technologies. I present and classify 29 methods related to the extraction processes (physical, mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic). The large number of processes for extraction by means of supercritical fluids and the growing number of large-scale industrial plants suggest a positive trend towards using this technique that is currently slowed by its cost. This trend should be reinforced by growing restrictions imposed on the use of most organic solvents for extraction of food products and by increasingly strict waste management regulations that are indirectly promoting the use of extraction processes that leave the residual (post-extraction) matrix substantially free from solvents and compounds that must subsequently be removed or treated. None of the reviewed approaches is the best answer for every extractable compound and source, so each should be considered as one of several alternatives, including the use of a combination of extraction approaches. PMID:20653552

  9. Anthrose Biosynthetic Operon of Bacillus anthracis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Shengli; McPherson, Sylvia A.; Tan, Li; Chesnokova, Olga N.; Turnbough, Charles L.; Pritchard, David G.

    2008-01-01

    The exosporium of Bacillus anthracis spores consists of a basal layer and an external hair-like nap. The nap is composed primarily of the glycoprotein BclA, which contains a collagen-like region with multiple copies of a pentasaccharide side chain. This oligosaccharide possesses an unusual terminal sugar called anthrose, followed by three rhamnose residues and a protein-bound N-acetylgalactosamine. Based on the structure of anthrose, we proposed an enzymatic pathway for its biosynthesis. Exam...

  10. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Barton

    Full Text Available Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental

  11. Receptor binding of biosynthetic human insulin on isolated pig hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammeltoft, S.

    Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) and pancreatic human insulin were compared with respect to receptor binding in a heterologous assay system: displacement of pork A14-/sup 125/I-monoiodoinsulin from receptors on pig hepatocytes. The concentrations of human insulin giving half-maximal displacement were identical for both preparations, i.e., 0.5 nM. Their relative potency was 1.01 +/- 0.14 (SD, N . 5), suggesting that biosynthetic and pancreatic human insulin exert the same biologic activity.

  12. Receptor binding of biosynthetic human insulin on isolated pig hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) and pancreatic human insulin were compared with respect to receptor binding in a heterologous assay system: displacement of pork A14-125I-monoiodoinsulin from receptors on pig hepatocytes. The concentrations of human insulin giving half-maximal displacement were identical for both preparations, i.e., 0.5 nM. Their relative potency was 1.01 +/- 0.14 (SD, N . 5), suggesting that biosynthetic and pancreatic human insulin exert the same biologic activity

  13. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol) have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:26437420

  14. Carotenoid composition of strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Pelayo, Raúl; Gallardo-Guerrero, Lourdes; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso

    2016-05-15

    The carotenoid composition of strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) fruits has been characterised in detail and quantified for the first time. According to the total carotenoid content (over 340 μg/g dw), mature strawberry tree berries can be classified as fruits with very high carotenoid content (>20 μg/g dw). (all-E)-Violaxanthin and 9Z-violaxanthin were found to be the major carotenoid pigments, accounting for more than 60%, responsible for the bright colour of the flesh of ripe fruits. In addition other 5,6-epoxide carotenoids, such as (all-E)-neoxanthin, (9'Z)-neoxanthin (all-E)-antheraxanthin and lutein 5,6-epoxide, together with (all-E)-lutein, (all-E)-zeaxanthin and (all-E)-β-carotene were found at high levels (>5-20 μg/g dw). The LC-MS (APCI+) analysis of the xanthophyll fraction in their native state (direct extract) revealed that most of them (>90%) were totally esterified with saturated fatty acids (capric, lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic). Monoesters, homodiesters and heterodiesters of (all-E)-violaxanthin and 9Z-violaxanthin were the major pigments. PMID:26775958

  15. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases.

  16. Carotenoids as a Source of Antioxidants in the Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana Augusta Odorissi; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, widely distributed fat-soluble pigments, are responsible for the attractive colorations of several fruits and vegetables commonly present in our daily diet. They are particularly abundant in yellow-orange fruits (carrots, tomatoes, pumpkins, peppers, among others) and, although masked by chlorophylls, in dark green leafy vegetables. Several health benefits have been attributed to carotenoids or to foods rich in these pigments, by means of different mechanisms-of-action, including the role as provitamin A of almost 50 different carotenoids and the antioxidant activity that protects cells and tissues from damage of free radicals and singlet oxygen, providing enhancement of the immune function, protection from sunburn reactions and delaying the onset of certain types of cancer. Common food sources and the efficiency of the absorption of carotenoids, analytical approaches used for measurement of their antioxidant effect and an overview of some epidemiological studies that have been performed to assess the beneficial impact of carotenoids in human health are outlined in this chapter. PMID:27485230

  17. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takeshi; Buckup, Tiago; Krause, Marie S; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Motzkus, Marcus

    2016-04-20

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2 to the optically dark state S1. Extending this picture, some additional dark states (3A and 1B) and their interaction with the S2 state have also been suggested to play a major role in the ultrafast deactivation of carotenoids and their properties. Here, we investigate the interaction between such dark and bright electronic excited states of open chain carotenoids, particularly its dependence on the number of conjugated double bonds (N). We focus on the ultrafast wave packet motion on the excited potential surface, which is modified by the interaction between bright and dark electronic states. Such a coupling between electronic states leads to a shift of the vibrational frequency during the excited-state evolution. In this regard, pump-degenerate four-wave mixing (pump-DFWM) is applied to a series of carotenoids with different numbers of conjugated double bonds N = 9, 10, 11 and 13 (neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene and spirilloxanthin, respectively). Moreover, we demonstrate in a closed-chain carotenoid (lutein) that the coupling strength and therefore the vibrational shift can be tailored by changing the energy degeneracy between the 1B and 1B states via solvent interaction. PMID:27055720

  18. An update on microbial carotenoid production: application of recent metabolic engineering tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amitabha; Yoon, Sang-Hwal; Lee, Sook-Hee; Kim, Jae-Yean; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kim, Seon-Won

    2007-12-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous pigments synthesized by plants, fungi, algae, and bacteria. Industrially, carotenoids are used in pharmaceuticals, neutraceuticals, and animal feed additives, as well as colorants in cosmetics and foods. Scientific interest in dietary carotenoids has increased in recent years because of their beneficial effects on human health, such as lowering the risk of cancer and enhancement of immune system function, which are attributed to their antioxidant potential. The availability of carotenoid genes from carotenogenic microbes has made possible the synthesis of carotenoids in non-carotenogenic microbes. The increasing interest in microbial sources of carotenoid is related to consumer preferences for natural additives and the potential cost effectiveness of creating carotenoids via microbial biotechnology. In this review, we will describe the recent progress made in metabolic engineering of non-carotenogenic microorganisms with particular focus on the potential of Escherichia coli for improved carotenoid productivity. PMID:17912511

  19. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Bun Y.;

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored...... thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid...... structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-atocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid...

  20. Near-infrared transient absorption study of the orange carotenoid protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Chábera, P.; Sundström, V.; Kerfeld, C.A.

    Nové Hrady : Academic and University Center, 2008. s. 34. [ESF Workshop on Novel Methods in Exploring Carotenoid Excited State Dynamics. 21.09.2008-25.09.2008, Nové Hrady] Keywords : carotenoids Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. Direct quantification of carotenoids in low fat babyfoods via laser photoacoustics and colorimetric index a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doka, O.; Ajtony, Z.; Bicanic, D.D.; Valinger, D.; Vegvari, G.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are important antioxidants found in various foods including those for nutrition of infants. In this investigation, the total carotenoid content (TCC) of nine different commercially available baby foods was quantified using colorimetric index a * obtained via reflectance colorimetry (RC)

  2. Development of carotenoid-enriched vegetables with increased nutritional quality and visual appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a class of red, orange and yellow pigments widely distributed in nature. Biotech approach has been proved to be effective in successfully engineering of carotenoid content in food crops with better health and visual appearance....

  3. The Or gene enhances carotenoid accumulation and stability during post-harvest storage of potato tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality. To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability, we investigated transgenic potato tubers that express the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene...

  4. 类胡萝卜素的生理作用研究%Research of Physiological Roles of Carotenoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑春红; 郭江峰; 王青; 贾龙略; 茆旋

    2016-01-01

    类胡萝卜素是一类广泛存在于自然界的脂溶性色素,体内外研究表明具有抗氧化、抗凋亡和抗癌作用。流行病学研究表明,富含类胡萝卜素的水果和蔬菜等食物能够降低慢性疾病的风险,例如老年性黄斑病变、心血管疾病以及各种癌症。类胡萝卜素通过作用于细胞内信号通路,从而影响基因表达和蛋白质翻译。随着科学技术的发展,类胡萝卜素的生物活性对预防慢性疾病的调控机制,特别是分子方面相关的蛋白表达和生理研究日趋深入。文章简述了类胡萝卜素在细胞内信号传导途径、体内外生理作用以及对人类健康的重要意义。%Carotenoids represent the most abundant lipid-soluble phytochemicals that are ubiq-uitously present in the nature. In vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that they have antioxidant, antiapoptotic , and anticancer properties. Several epidemiologic studies have shown that diets rich in fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of developing several chronic diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration, cardiovascular disease, and many kinds of cancers. Recently, carotenoids are found to influence gene expression and protein translation by acting on the intracellular signaling cascades. With the development of science and technology, roles of carotenoids in preventing chron-ic diseases have been elucidated, especially in molecular aspects, such as proteins expression and physiological researches related to carotenoids. The present review provides an insight into signaling pathways of carotenoids and the physiological roles of carotenoids in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Metabolic and functional diversity of saponins, biosynthetic intermediates and semi-synthetic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tessa; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K; Osbourn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Saponins are widely distributed plant natural products with vast structural and functional diversity. They are typically composed of a hydrophobic aglycone, which is extensively decorated with functional groups prior to the addition of hydrophilic sugar moieties, to result in surface-active amphipathic compounds. The saponins are broadly classified as triterpenoids, steroids or steroidal glycoalkaloids, based on the aglycone structure from which they are derived. The saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates display a variety of biological activities of interest to the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food sectors. Although their relevance in industrial applications has long been recognized, their role in plants is underexplored. Recent research on modulating native pathway flux in saponin biosynthesis has demonstrated the roles of saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates in plant growth and development. Here, we review the literature on the effects of these molecules on plant physiology, which collectively implicate them in plant primary processes. The industrial uses and potential of saponins are discussed with respect to structure and activity, highlighting the undoubted value of these molecules as therapeutics. PMID:25286183

  6. Genome mining of the sordarin biosynthetic gene cluster from Sordaria araneosa Cain ATCC 36386: characterization of cycloaraneosene synthase and GDP-6-deoxyaltrose transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Matsuura, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takaaki; Fukushima, Masayuki; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    Sordarin is a glycoside antibiotic with a unique tetracyclic diterpene aglycone structure called sordaricin. To understand its intriguing biosynthetic pathway that may include a Diels-Alder-type [4+2]cycloaddition, genome mining of the gene cluster from the draft genome sequence of the producer strain, Sordaria araneosa Cain ATCC 36386, was carried out. A contiguous 67 kb gene cluster consisting of 20 open reading frames encoding a putative diterpene cyclase, a glycosyltransferase, a type I polyketide synthase, and six cytochrome P450 monooxygenases were identified. In vitro enzymatic analysis of the putative diterpene cyclase SdnA showed that it catalyzes the transformation of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to cycloaraneosene, a known biosynthetic intermediate of sordarin. Furthermore, a putative glycosyltransferase SdnJ was found to catalyze the glycosylation of sordaricin in the presence of GDP-6-deoxy-d-altrose to give 4'-O-demethylsordarin. These results suggest that the identified sdn gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of sordarin. Based on the isolated potential biosynthetic intermediates and bioinformatics analysis, a plausible biosynthetic pathway for sordarin is proposed. PMID:27072286

  7. Carotenoid limitation of sexual coloration along an environmental gradient in guppies

    OpenAIRE

    Grether, G. F; Hudon, J; Millie, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids produce most of the brilliant orange and yellow colours seen in animals, but animals cannot synthesize these pigments and must rely on dietary sources. The idea that carotenoids make good signals because they are a scarce limiting resource was proposed two decades ago and has become the leading hypothesis for the role of carotenoids in animal communication. To our knowledge, until now, however, there has been no direct evidence that carotenoids are a limiting resource in nature. W...

  8. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.)

    OpenAIRE

    María del Rocío Gómez-García; Neftalí Ochoa-Alejo

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ be...

  9. Carotenoid metabolic profiling and transcriptome-genome mining reveal functional equivalence among blue-pigmented copepods and appendicularia

    KAUST Repository

    Mojib, Nazia

    2014-06-01

    The tropical oligotrophic oceanic areas are characterized by high water transparency and annual solar radiation. Under these conditions, a large number of phylogenetically diverse mesozooplankton species living in the surface waters (neuston) are found to be blue pigmented. In the present study, we focused on understanding the metabolic and genetic basis of the observed blue phenotype functional equivalence between the blue-pigmented organisms from the phylum Arthropoda, subclass Copepoda (Acartia fossae) and the phylum Chordata, class Appendicularia (Oikopleura dioica) in the Red Sea. Previous studies have shown that carotenoid–protein complexes are responsible for blue coloration in crustaceans. Therefore, we performed carotenoid metabolic profiling using both targeted and nontargeted (high-resolution mass spectrometry) approaches in four different blue-pigmented genera of copepods and one blue-pigmented species of appendicularia. Astaxanthin was found to be the principal carotenoid in all the species. The pathway analysis showed that all the species can synthesize astaxanthin from β-carotene, ingested from dietary sources, via 3-hydroxyechinenone, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin, adonirubin or adonixanthin. Further, using de novo assembled transcriptome of blue A. fossae (subclass Copepoda), we identified highly expressed homologous β-carotene hydroxylase enzymes and putative carotenoid-binding proteins responsible for astaxanthin formation and the blue phenotype. In blue O. dioica (class Appendicularia), corresponding putative genes were identified from the reference genome. Collectively, our data provide molecular evidences for the bioconversion and accumulation of blue astaxanthin–protein complexes underpinning the observed ecological functional equivalence and adaptive convergence among neustonic mesozooplankton.

  10. Graviresponsiveness and abscisic-acid content of roots of carotenoid-deficient mutants of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Smith, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The abscisic-acid (ABA) content of roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with an analysis sensitivity of 6 ng ABA g-1 fresh weight (FW). Roots of normal seedlings of the same lines were characterized by the following amounts of ABA (as ng ABA g-1 FW, +/- standard deviation): w-3, 279 +/- 43; vp-5, 237 +/- 26; vp-7, 338 +/- 61. We did not detect any ABA in roots of any of the mutants. Thus, the lack of carotenoids in these mutants correlated positively with the apparent absence of ABA. Primary roots of normal and mutant seedlings were positively gravitropic, with no significant differences in the curvatures of roots of normal as compared with mutant seedlings. These results indicate that ABA 1) is synthesized in maize roots via the carotenoid pathway, and 2) is not necessary for positive gravitropism by primary roots of Z. mays.

  11. Role of PPARγ in the nutritional and pharmacological actions of carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao WE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wen-en Zhao,1 Guoqing Shi,2 Huihui Gu,1,3 Nguyen Ba Ngoc1,4 1School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, 2School of Food and Bioengineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, 3School of Life Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China; 4Faculty of Food Industry, College of Food Industry, Da Nang, Vietnam Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ has been shown to play an important role in the biological effects of carotenoids. The PPARγ-signaling pathway is involved in the anticancer effects of carotenoids. Activation of PPARγ partly contributes to the growth-inhibitory effects of carotenoids (β-carotene, astaxanthin, bixin, capsanthin, lutein, and lycopene on breast cancer MCF7 cells, leukemia K562 cells, prostate cancer (LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cells, and esophageal squamous cancer EC109 cells. PPARγ is the master regulator of adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. Downregulated PPARγ and PPARγ-target genes have been associated with the suppressive effects of β-carotene and lycopene on 3T3L1 and C3H10T1/2 adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. ß-Carotene is cleaved centrally into retinaldehyde by BCO1, the encoding gene being a PPARγ-target gene. Retinaldehyde can be oxidized to retinoic acid and also be reduced to retinol. β-Carotene can also be cleaved asymmetrically into β-apocarotenals and β-apocarotenones by BCO2. The inhibitory effects of β-carotene on the development of adiposity and lipid storage are dependent substantially on BCO1-mediated production of retinoids. The effects of β-carotene on body adiposity were absent in BCO1-knockout mice. Retinoid metabolism is connected with the activity of PPARγ in the control of body-fat reserves. Retinoic acid, retinaldehyde, retinol, and β-apocarotenals exert suppressive effects on preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis via downregulation of PPARγ expression in cell culture. The

  12. Microscale extraction method for HPLC carotenoid analysis in vegetable matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Pacheco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate simple, efficient analytical methods that are also fast, clean, and economical, and are capable of producing reliable results for a large number of samples, a micro scale extraction method for analysis of carotenoids in vegetable matrices was developed. The efficiency of this adapted method was checked by comparing the results obtained from vegetable matrices, based on extraction equivalence, time required and reagents. Six matrices were used: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., carrot (Daucus carota L., sweet potato with orange pulp (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam., pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch., watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. flour. Quantification of the total carotenoids was made by spectrophotometry. Quantification and determination of carotenoid profiles were formulated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with photodiode array detection. Microscale extraction was faster, cheaper and cleaner than the commonly used one, and advantageous for analytical laboratories.

  13. Noninvasive measurements of carotenoids in bovine udder by reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E.; Müller, Kerstin E.; Lademann, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    For a long time, the antioxidative status in cattle has been discussed as an indicator for stress conditions resulting from disease or exertion. Until now, invasive approaches have been necessary to obtain blood samples or biopsy materials and gain insights into the antioxidative status of cattle. Due to these efforts and the costs of the analyses, serial sampling is feasible in an experimental setting, but not for measurements on a routine basis. The present study focuses on the feasibility of an innovative, noninvasive spectroscopic technique that allows in vivo measurements of carotenoids in the skin by reflection spectroscopy. To this end, in a first trial, repeated measurements of the carotenoid concentration of the udder skin were performed on 25 healthy cattle from different breeds. Carotenoid concentrations showed highly significant differences between individual animals (Ptest) differed significantly (P<0.005), with higher concentrations observed in robust cows.

  14. Dual responsive physical networks from asymmetric biosynthetic triblock copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.H.T.

    2013-01-01

      The aim of the project is to develop biosynthetically produced amino acid polymers which are composed of three distinct blocks A-C-B, each with a separate function. A is a first self-assembling block capable of ‘recognizing’ (upon a trigger) other A blocks; C is an inert, random

  15. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  16. Refinement of the manumycin-type antibiotics biosynthetic model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petříček, Miroslav; Yu, T.-W.; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Petříčková, Kateřina; Krištůfek, Václav

    Newcastle upon Tyne: International Commitee, UK body, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, 2007. s. 167. [International Symposium on the Biology of Actinomycetes /14./. 26.08.2007-30.08.2007, The Sage Gateshead] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : manumycin-type antibiotics * biosynthetic model Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  17. Variation in the Trichothecene Mycotoxin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are produced by some plant pathogenic species of the fungus Fusarium and can contribute to its virulence on some plants. In Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes are encoded at three loci: the single-gene TRI101 locus; the two-gene ...

  18. Evaluation of Extraction Methods for the Analysis of Carotenoids for Different Vegetable Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Stancuta Scrob; Sevastita Muste; Crina Muresan; Anca Farcas; Sonia Socaci; Romina Vlaic

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different solvents were used to achieve the maximum extractibility of total carotenoids. The extracted total carotenoids were estimated using UV- visible spectrophotometer. Carotenoids from vegetable matrix can be used as a food colorant, food additive, cosmetics, antioxidants and nutraceuticals.

  19. The contribution of various foods to intake of vitamin A and carotenoids in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    This study presents data on dietary intake of specific carotenoids in the Netherlands, based on a recently developed food composition database for carotenoids. Regularly eaten vegetables, the main dietary source of carotenoids, were sampled comprehensively and analysed with modern analytic methods.

  20. Identification of carotenoids from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie eYatsunami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The carotenoids produced by extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica were extracted and identified by their chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic characteristics (UV-Vis and mass spectrometry. The composition (mol% was 68.1% bacterioruberin, 22.5% monoanhydrobacterioruberin, 9.3% bisanhydrobacterioruberin, < 0.1% isopentenyldehydrorhodopin, and trace amounts of lycopene and phytoene. The in vitro scavenging capacity of a carotenoid, bacterioruberin, extracted from Ha. japonica cells against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals was evaluated. The antioxidant capacity of bacterioruberin was much higher than that of β-carotene.

  1. Recent advances in biosynthetic modeling of nitric oxide reductases and insights gained from nuclear resonance vibrational and other spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Reed, Julian; Sage, Timothy; Branagan, Nicole C.; Petrik, Igor D.; Miner, Kyle D.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. Ercan; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-05

    This Forum Article focuses on recent advances in structural and spectroscopic studies of biosynthetic models of nitric oxide reductases (NORs). NORs are complex metalloenzymes found in the denitrification pathway of Earth's nitrogen cycle where they catalyze the proton-dependent twoelectron reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N2O). While much progress has been made in biochemical and biophysical studies of native NORs and their variants, a. clear mechanistic understanding of this important metalloenzyme related to its function is still elusive. We report herein UV vis and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) studies of mononitrosylated intermediates of the NOR reaction of a biosynthetic model. The ability to selectively substitute metals at either heme or nonheme metal sites allows the introduction of independent 57Fe probe atoms at either site, as well as allowing the preparation of analogues of stable reaction intermediates by replacing either metal with a redox inactive metal. Together with previous structural and spectroscopic results, we summarize insights gained from studying these biosynthetic models toward understanding structural features responsible for the NOR activity and its mechanism. As a result, the outlook on NOR modeling is also discussed, with an emphasis on the design of models capable of catalytic turnovers designed based on close mimics of the secondary coordination sphere of native NORs.

  2. antiSMASH 3.0-a comprehensive resource for the genome mining of biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tilmann; Blin, Kai; Duddela, Srikanth; Krug, Daniel; Kim, Hyun Uk; Bruccoleri, Robert; Lee, Sang Yup; Fischbach, Michael A; Müller, Rolf; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Medema, Marnix H

    2015-07-01

    Microbial secondary metabolism constitutes a rich source of antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, insecticides and other high-value chemicals. Genome mining of gene clusters that encode the biosynthetic pathways for these metabolites has become a key methodology for novel compound discovery. In 2011, we introduced antiSMASH, a web server and stand-alone tool for the automatic genomic identification and analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters, available at http://antismash.secondarymetabolites.org. Here, we present version 3.0 of antiSMASH, which has undergone major improvements. A full integration of the recently published ClusterFinder algorithm now allows using this probabilistic algorithm to detect putative gene clusters of unknown types. Also, a new dereplication variant of the ClusterBlast module now identifies similarities of identified clusters to any of 1172 clusters with known end products. At the enzyme level, active sites of key biosynthetic enzymes are now pinpointed through a curated pattern-matching procedure and Enzyme Commission numbers are assigned to functionally classify all enzyme-coding genes. Additionally, chemical structure prediction has been improved by incorporating polyketide reduction states. Finally, in order for users to be able to organize and analyze multiple antiSMASH outputs in a private setting, a new XML output module allows offline editing of antiSMASH annotations within the Geneious software. PMID:25948579

  3. Red Anthocyanins and Yellow Carotenoids Form the Color of Orange-Flower Gentian (Gentiana lutea L. var. aurantiaca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Judit; Sheng, Yanmin; Gómez Gómez, Lourdes; Veiga, Tania; Ni, Xiuzhen; Farré, Gemma; Capell, Teresa; Guitián, Javier; Guitián, Pablo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2016-01-01

    Flower color is an important characteristic that determines the commercial value of ornamental plants. Gentian flowers occur in a limited range of colors because this species is not widely cultivated as a cut flower. Gentiana lutea L. var. aurantiaca (abbr, aurantiaca) is characterized by its orange flowers, but the specific pigments responsible for this coloration are unknown. We therefore investigated the carotenoid and flavonoid composition of petals during flower development in the orange-flowered gentian variety of aurantiaca and the yellow-flowered variety of G. lutea L. var. lutea (abbr, lutea). We observed minor varietal differences in the concentration of carotenoids at the early and final stages, but only aurantiaca petals accumulated pelargonidin glycosides, whereas these compounds were not found in lutea petals. We cloned and sequenced the anthocyanin biosynthetic gene fragments from petals, and analyzed the expression of these genes in the petals of both varieties to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for the differences in petal color. Comparisons of deduced amino acid sequences encoded by the isolated anthocyanin cDNA fragments indicated that chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), anthocyanidin synthase 1 (ANS1) and ANS2 are identical in both aurantiaca and lutea varieties whereas minor amino acid differences of the deduced flavonone 3-hydroxylase (F3H) and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) between both varieties were observed. The aurantiaca petals expressed substantially higher levels of transcripts representing CHS, F3H, DFR, ANS and UDP-glucose:flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase genes, compared to lutea petals. Pelargonidin glycoside synthesis in aurantiaca petals therefore appears to reflect the higher steady-state levels of pelargonidin synthesis transcripts. Moreover, possible changes in the substrate specificity of DFR enzymes may represent additional mechanisms for producing red pelargonidin glycosides in petals of

  4. Estabilidad del Carotenoide Licopeno en Tomates en Conserva Lycopene Carotenoide Stability in Canned Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia L Ordóñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la estabilidad del carotenoide licopeno durante el proceso de elaboración de conservas de tomates peritas y evaluar la misma durante su almacenamiento como producto terminado. Se trabajó con muestras provenientes de elaboraciones industriales extraídas en distintos puntos del proceso: tomates frescos, en la boquilla de alimentación de la línea; tomate pelado, a la salida de la peladora termofísica y producto terminado a la salida del esterilizador-enfriador, de distintos lotes de elaboración y en tres ocasiones durante la temporada 2007. El producto terminado, envasado en hojalata, fue evaluado durante un año, cada tres meses. El licopeno fue extraído con una mezcla de hexano-acetona-etanol y determinado por espectrofotometría visible a 472nm. Los resultados se analizaron estadísticamente mostrando que la esterilización industrial produce liberación celular del licopeno.The objective of this work was to determine lycopene carotenoid stability during manufacturing process in canned peeled whole tomatoes and during its storage as final product. Samples were taken during industrial manufacturing at different process points: fresh tomatoes when they were feeding to process line, peeled tomatoes from thermophysical peeler and finished product after it passed the cooker-cooler. Samples were obtained from different manufacturing lots at three times during the 2007 harvesting season. Canned tomatoes were analyzed every three months, during one year. Lycopene was extracted with hexane-acetone-ethyl alcohol and measured by spectrophotometry at 472 nm. Statistical analysis of the results shows that industrial sterilization produces cell release of lycopene.

  5. Biosynthetic origin of the isoprene units in chromenes of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic studies involving the incorporation of [1-13C]-D-glucose into intact leaves of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae) have indicated that both the mevalonate (MVA) and the pyruvate-triose (MEP) non-mevalonate pathways are implicated in the biosynthesis of isoprene moieties present in methyl 2,2-dimethyl-2H-1-chromene-6-carboxylate (1) and methyl 2,2-dimethyl-8-(3'-methyl- 2'-butenyl)-2H-1-chromene-6-carboxylate (2). The pattern of incorporation of label from [1- 13C]-D-glucose into these chromenes was determined by quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy. The results confirmed that biosynthetic compartment of 1 and 2 could either be the plastid and/ or the cytosol or, possibly, an additional compartment such as the plastid inter-membrane space. (author)

  6. Functional characterization of various algal carotenoid ketolases reveals that ketolating zeaxanthin efficiently is essential for high production of astaxanthin in transgenic Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Yu-Juan; Huang, Jun-Chao; Liu, Jin; Li, Yin; Jiang, Yue; Xu, Zeng-Fu; Sandmann, Gerhard; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Extending the carotenoid pathway to astaxanthin in plants is of scientific and industrial interest. However, expression of a microbial β-carotene ketolase (BKT) that catalyses the formation of ketocarotenoids in transgenic plants typically results in low levels of astaxanthin. The low efficiency of BKTs in ketolating zeaxanthin to astaxanthin is proposed to be the major limitation for astaxanthin accumulation in engineered plants. To verify this hypothesis, several algal BKTs were functionall...

  7. Genomics of pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic loci: evidence for conservation and whole-operon mobility within gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rodrigo; van Aarle, Ingrid M; Mendes, Rodrigo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) is a tryptophan-derived secondary metabolite produced by a narrow range of gram-negative bacteria. The PRN biosynthesis by rhizobacteria presumably has a key role in their life strategies and in the biocontrol of plant diseases. The biosynthetic operon that encodes the pathway that converts tryptophan to PRN is composed of four genes, prnA through D, whose diversity, genomic context and spread over bacterial genomes are poorly understood. Therefore, we launched an endeavour aimed at retrieving, by in vitro and in silico means, diverse bacteria carrying the prnABCD biosynthetic loci in their genomes. Analysis of polymorphisms of the prnD gene sequences revealed a high level of conservation between Burkholderia, Pseudomonas and Serratia spp. derived sequences. Whole-operon- and prnD-based phylogeny resulted in tree topologies that are incongruent with the taxonomic status of the evaluated strains as predicted by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The genomic composition of c. 20 kb DNA fragments containing the PRN operon varied in different strains. Highly conserved and distinct transposase-encoding genes surrounding the PRN biosynthetic operons of Burkholderia pseudomallei strains were found. A prnABCD-deprived genomic region in B. pseudomallei strain K96243 contained the same gene composition as, and shared high homology with, the flanking regions of the PRN operon in B. pseudomallei strains 668, 1106a and 1710b. Our results strongly suggest that the PRN biosynthetic operon is mobile. The extent, frequency and promiscuity of this mobility remain to be understood. PMID:18793314

  8. Mutagenesis as a Functional Genomics Platform for Pharmaceutical Alkaloid Biosynthetic Gene Discovery in Opium Poppy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) accumulates the analgesic benzyl-isoquinoline alkaloids morphine, codeine and thebaine, and remains one of the world's most important medicinal plants. The development of varieties that accumulate valuable compounds, such as thebaine and codeine, but not morphine precludes the illicit synthesis of heroin (O,O-diacetylmorphine) and has led to the establishment of alternative cash crops. Novel cDNAs encoding a growing number of biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated, and various -omics resources including EST databases and DNA microarray chips have been established. However, the full potential of functional genomics as a tool for gene discovery in opium poppy remains limited by the relative inefficiency of genetic transformation protocols, which also restricts the application of metabolic engineering for both experimental and commercial purposes. We are establishing an effective functional genomics initiative based on induced mutagenesis and recently developed reverse genetics methodology, such as TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes), with the aim of identifying biosynthetic genes that can be used to engineer opium poppy for the production of copious levels of high-value pharmaceutical alkaloids. Mutagenesis involves the treatment of seeds with ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) or by fast-neutron bombardment (FNB). In preliminary experiments with EMS-treated seeds, the screening of 1,250 independent M2 plants led to the isolation of four mutants that displayed two distinctly altered alkaloid profiles. Two lines accumulated the central pathway intermediate reticuline and relatively low levels of morphine, codeine and thebaine compared to wild-type plants. Two other lines showed the unusual accumulation in the latex of the antimicrobial alkaloid sanguinarine, which is the product of a branch pathway distinct from that leading to morphine. The present status of -omics resources and functional genomics platforms available to

  9. Mutagenesis as a functional genomics platform for pharmaceutical alkaloid biosynthetic gene discovery in opium poppy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) accumulates the analgesic alkaloids morphine, codeine and thebaine, and remains one of the world's most important medicinal plants. The development of varieties that accumulate valuable compounds, such as thebaine and codeine, but not morphine precludes the illicit synthesis of heroin (O,O-diacetylmorphine) and has created opportunities to establish alternative cash crops. Novel cDNAs encoding more than a dozen biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated, and substantial EST databases and DNA microarray chips have been established. The full potential of functional genomics as a tool for gene discovery in opium poppy remains limited by the relative inefficiency of genetic transformation protocols, which also restricts the application of metabolic engineering for both experimental and commercial purposes. We are establishing an effective functional genomics initiative based on induced mutagenesis and TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) and with the aim of identifying biosynthetic genes that can be used to engineer opium poppy to produce copious levels of high-value pharmaceutical alkaloids. Mutagenesis involves the treatment of seeds by fast-neutron bombardment (FNB) or with ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). Mutagenized opium poppy plants are cultivated in a secure underground growth facility in partnership with a Canadian biotechnology company. In preliminary experiments with EMS-treated seeds, the screening of 1,250 independent M2 plants led to the isolation of four mutants that displayed two distinctly altered alkaloid profiles. Two lines accumulated the central pathway intermediate (S)- reticuline and only low levels of morphine, codeine and thebaine. Two other lines showed the unusual accumulation of the antimicrobial alkaloid sanguinarine, which is the product of a branch pathway distinct from that leading to morphine, in the latex. The present status of -omics resources and functional genomics platforms available to

  10. Molecular Factors Controlling Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Frank, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 8 (2010), s. 1125-1134. ISSN 0001-4842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * energy transfer * photosynthesis * light-harvesting Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 21.840, year: 2010

  11. Femtosecond carotenoid to retinal energy transfer in xanthorhodopsin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Balashov, S.P.; Chábera, P.; Imasheva, E.S.; Yartsev, A.; Sundström, V.; Lanyi, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 6 (2009), s. 2268-2277. ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : energy transfer * carotenoids * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2009

  12. Photon echo spectroscopy reveals structure-dynamics relationships in carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Christensson, N.; Polívka, Tomáš; Yartsev, A.; Pullerits, T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 24 (2009), s. 1-14. ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : electron correlations * energy gap * excited states * carotenoids Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  13. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and Charge Transfer Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation describes the development and implementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probe apparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation of investigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specific attention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highly symmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes the development and construction of the experimental apparatus used throughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss the investigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resulting from a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of its methyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we are able to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provide evidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT) type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1 state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of the carotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidence for the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systems and found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigation of the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsible for the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allows for a more detailed understanding of the importance of structural dynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting

  14. Carotenoids are essential for the assembly of cyanobacterial photosynthetic complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tóth, T. N.; Chukhutsina, V.; Knoppová, Jana; Komenda, Josef; Kis, M.; Lenart, Z.; Garab, G.; Kovács, L.; Gombos, Z.; van Amerongen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1847, č. 10 (2015), s. 1153-1165. ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Carotenoid deficiency * Cyanobacterial photosynthesis * Phycobilisome Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.353, year: 2014

  15. Na+-Translocating Rhodopsin from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 Does Not Contain Carotenoid Antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsova, Y V; Arutyunyan, A M; Bogachev, A V

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoid-binding properties of Na+-translocating rhodopsin (NaR) from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 were studied. Carotenoids were extracted from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 cells. It was found that zeaxanthin is the predominant carotenoid of this bacterium. Incubation of recombinant NaR purified from Escherichia coli cells with carotenoids from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 did not result in any changes in optical absorption or circular dichroism spectra, indicating the absence of binding of the carotenoids by NaR. The same results were obtained using salinixanthin as the carotenoid. These data along with genome analysis of Dokdonia sp. PRO95 and other flavobacteria indicate that NaR from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 and possibly the other flavobacterial Na+-translocating rhodopsins do not contain a carotenoid antenna. PMID:27293099

  16. Carotenoids of Sea Angels Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis from the Perspective of the Food Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea angels, Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis, are small, floating sea slugs belonging to Gastropoda, and their gonads are a bright orange-red color. Sea angels feed exclusively on a small herbivorous sea snail, Limacina helicina. Carotenoids in C. limacina, P. doliiformis, and L. helicina were investigated for comparative biochemical points of view. β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, and diatoxanthin were found to be major carotenoids in L. helicina. L. helicina accumulated dietary algal carotenoids without modification. On the other hand, keto-carotenoids, such as pectenolone, 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin, and adonixanthin were identified as major carotenoids in the sea angels C. limacina and P. doliiformis. Sea angels oxidatively metabolize dietary carotenoids and accumulate them in their gonads. Carotenoids in the gonads of sea angels might protect against oxidative stress and enhance reproduction.

  17. Evaluation of carotenoid contents in irradiated buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jaqueline M. da; Coelho, Maysa J.; Lima, Keila S.C.; Lima, Antonio L.S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: maysa@ime.eb.br; Godoy, Ronoel L.O.; Pacheco, Sidney [EMBRAPA Agroindustria de Alimentos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronoel@ctaa.embrapa.br; Ferreira, Rubemar S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste CRCN-CO/CNEN, Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil); E-mail: rferreira@cnen.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.), a typical Brazilian fruit, can be found at north, northeast and center-west regions in Brazil. It has a high nutritional value and is considered an excellent source of vitamin A precursors, called carotenoids, showing a majority of {beta}-carotene. It can be used in many regional dishes. In this study, Buriti in natura was treated with gamma irradiation, deriving from a cavity type research irradiator which has a Cs-137 radiation source, with the doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. The objective is to evaluate the irradiation effects on nutritional quality maintenance and conservation of Buriti, focusing in optimizer the processing conditions and increase consumption as a way to fight vitamin A deficiency. Clinical, biological and dietetic studies have indicated that the lack of vitamin A is the main cause of night blindness and xerophthalmia. The use of food irradiation is growing and represents an economic benefit to the agriculture through the reduction of post harvesting losses. The irradiated fruits and the control group were evaluated through the total carotenoids analysis, by spectrophotometry, and the carotenoids (a and b-carotene and luteine) determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). ANOVA was used to treat the results. The results show that buriti is an excellent source of total carotenoids, with a concentration of 44500 {mu}g/100 g in the pulp (70% of {beta}-carotene). The reduction of carotenoids contents due to the irradiation process does not compromise its nutritional quality that is still very above of recommendations, being the dose of 0.5 kGy more appropriate. (author)

  18. The antioxidant potential of carotenoid extract from Phaffia rhodozyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gramza-Michałowska

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carotenoids are components playing an important role in biological systems, starting with light protection, immunoenhancement, protection against carcinogens and finishing with antioxidant activity. Food additives market is based mainly on synthetic additives; however, higher consumer awareness has resulted in an increased use of natural substances. One of the potentially antioxidant compounds could be a lipid soluble carotenoid – astaxanthin (xanthophyll, found in the microbial world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential of carotenoid extract from Phaffia rhodozyma extract. Material and methods. Carotenoids extracted from Phaffia rhodozyma and the astaxanthin standard was selected for the investigations. Antioxidant potential was evaluated by radical scavenging activity (DPPH• and ABTS•+ radicals and in lipid oxidative stability measurements (Rancimat, Oxidograph and Schaal oven tests. Results. It was found that the examined extracts presented a significantly higher ability to scavenge the DPPH• radical in comparison to the ABTS•+ radical. Evaluations of linoleic acid emulsion oxidative stability showed a higher antioxidant effect of the Phaffia rhodozyma extract than that of astaxanthin during 19 h of incubation. That potential however, was not detected in linoleic acid emulsion incubated for 96 h, where both additives accelerated oxidation process. In bulk sunflower oil a protective effect of Phaffia rhodozyma extract was observed. In both Rancimat and Oxidograph tests antioxidant activity measured using the induction period was evaluated. However, results of the Schaal oven test indicated that a 144 h incubation of sunflower oil offered a significantly better protection of the lipid against oxidation when the Phaffia rhodozyma extract was added. Conclusions. On the basis of recorded results it was found that the Phaffia rhodozyma carotenoid extract showed moderate antioxidant properties

  19. Evaluation of carotenoid contents in irradiated buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.), a typical Brazilian fruit, can be found at north, northeast and center-west regions in Brazil. It has a high nutritional value and is considered an excellent source of vitamin A precursors, called carotenoids, showing a majority of β-carotene. It can be used in many regional dishes. In this study, Buriti in natura was treated with gamma irradiation, deriving from a cavity type research irradiator which has a Cs-137 radiation source, with the doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. The objective is to evaluate the irradiation effects on nutritional quality maintenance and conservation of Buriti, focusing in optimizer the processing conditions and increase consumption as a way to fight vitamin A deficiency. Clinical, biological and dietetic studies have indicated that the lack of vitamin A is the main cause of night blindness and xerophthalmia. The use of food irradiation is growing and represents an economic benefit to the agriculture through the reduction of post harvesting losses. The irradiated fruits and the control group were evaluated through the total carotenoids analysis, by spectrophotometry, and the carotenoids (a and b-carotene and luteine) determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). ANOVA was used to treat the results. The results show that buriti is an excellent source of total carotenoids, with a concentration of 44500 μg/100 g in the pulp (70% of β-carotene). The reduction of carotenoids contents due to the irradiation process does not compromise its nutritional quality that is still very above of recommendations, being the dose of 0.5 kGy more appropriate. (author)

  20. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  1. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Bech Lukassen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine. Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1, a polyketide synthase (PKS2, a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster.

  2. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-07-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  3. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina...... of these amino acids for targeted stress-tolerant enzyme bioengineering.......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...

  4. Heterogeneity of the serine synthetic pathway in Entamoeba species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoko; Makiuchi, Takashi; Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) catalyzes the third step of the phosphorylated serine biosynthetic pathway, and occurred multiple times in evolution, while enzymes catalyzing the first and second steps in the pathway have single respective origins. In the present study, we examined the existence of PSP among genus Entamoeba including a human enteric parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. E. histolytica as well as majority of Entamoeba species have the first and second enzymes, but lacks PSP. In contrast, a reptilian enteric parasite, Entamoeba invadens possesses canonical PSP. Thus, there are variations in the existence of the serine biosynthetic ability among Entamoeba species. PMID:27268730

  5. 高血糖通过HBP途径增加 SD大鼠子宫内膜细胞内β-catenin稳定性%Glucose enhances the stability ofβ-catenin via hexosamine biosynthetic pathway in endometrium of SD rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周福兴; 陈颖; 刘高伟; 刘海霞; 李娜; 马芮; 陈必良

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of hyperglycemia enhancing the stability of β-catenin in endometrial cells via hexosamin biosynthetic pathyway (HBP).Methods Female SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: normal control (NC) group, fasting ( FASTING) group, high sugar and high fat ( HSHF) group, glucosamine ( GLN) group and glucose ( GLU) group.Rats in the HSHF group were given high glucose and high fat diet , while the other groups were given normal diet .After 8 weeks’ feeding rats in HSHF group and NC group were executed and endometrium of them were collected .Rats in FASTING group were executed after 24h.GLN group and GLU group was lavaged with glucosamine (2.50g/kg) and glucose (5g/kg) after fasting for 24 hours.Three hours later the rats were executed.Then endometrium of rats in each gorup was collected to detect expressions of protein and genes .Results Compared with NC group, fasting blood glucose level increased remarkably in HSHF group (t value ranged 2.34 -2.78, both P0.05).Western blot detection results showed that the expressions of β-catenin and O-GlcNAc in GLN group and GLU group were remarkably higher than those in FASTING group (t value ranged 3.44-5.08, respectively, all P0.05).RT-PCR detetion revealed that the difference in Ctnnb1 expression was not significant between HSHF group and NC group (t=0.43, P>0.05), but the expressions of CyclinD1 and Axin2 were remarkably higher in HSHF group than in NC group (t value was 4.48 and 5.26, respectively, both P<0.05). Conclusion Hyperglycemia can enhance O-GlcNAc level of β-catenin via HBP , and thus elevate its stability to help the accululation of β-catenin, which causes abnormal proliferation by consitent action on downstream target genes .%目的:探讨高血糖通过HBP途径增加子宫内膜细胞内β-catenin稳定性的相关机制。方法50只SD雌性大鼠随机分为正常对照组、禁食组、高糖高脂组、葡萄糖胺组和葡萄糖组。高

  6. Pictet–Spengler reaction-based biosynthetic machinery in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wei; Ge, Hui Ming; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Nan; Mei, Ya Ning; Jiang, Rong; Li, Sui Jun; Chen, Chao Jun; Jiao, Rui Hua; Xu, Qiang; Ng, Seik Weng; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The Pictet–Spengler (PS) reaction constructs many important phytochemicals such as morphine and camptothecin, but it has not yet been noticed in the fungal kingdom. Here, the startup of the PS reaction-based silent fungal biosynthetic machinery is presented to generate unforeseeably “unnatural” natural products of unprecedented carbon skeletons with antibacterial and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. The gene-implied enzyme inhibition strategy is introduced to facilitate understandi...

  7. Enhancement of epidermal regeneration by biosynthetic epidermal growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal regeneration depends on mitosis and migration of keratinocytes. Epidermal growth factor is known to stimulate growth of keratinocytes in vitro, thus it might be expected to promote wound healing. The results of this study show that topical application of biosynthetic human epidermal growth factor accelerates epidermal regeneration in split-thickness wounds and partial-thickness burns. The significant enhancement of epidermal regeneration suggests the potential for clinical use of ep...

  8. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    OpenAIRE

    Mie Bech Lukassen; Wagma Saei; Teis Esben Sondergaard; Anu Tamminen; Abhishek Kumar; Frank Kempken; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Jens Laurids Sørensen

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus n...

  9. The cobalamin (coenzyme B12) biosynthetic genes of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, J. G.; Roth, J R

    1995-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Escherichia coli synthesizes cobalamin (coenzyme B12) only when provided with the complex intermediate cobinamide. Three cobalamin biosynthetic genes have been cloned from Escherichia coli K-12, and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The three genes form an operon (cob) under the control of several promoters and are induced by cobinamide, a precursor of cobalamin. The cob operon of E. coli comprises the cobU gene, encoding the bifunctional cobinamide kinase...

  10. Biosynthetic origin of mycobacterial cell wall arabinosyl residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Scherman, M.; Weston, A; Duncan, K; Whittington, A; Upton, R; Deng, L.; Comber, R; Friedrich, J D; McNeil, M

    1995-01-01

    Designing new drugs that inhibit the biosynthesis of the D-arabinan moiety of the mycobacterial cell wall arabinogalactan is one important basic approach for treatment of mycobacterial diseases. However, the biosynthetic origin of the D-arabinosyl monosaccharide residues themselves is not known. To obtain information on this issue, mycobacteria growing in culture were fed glucose labeled with 14C or 3H in specific positions. The resulting radiolabeled cell walls were isolated and hydrolyzed, ...

  11. Insights into the evolution of macrolactam biosynthesis through cloning and comparative analysis of the biosynthetic gene cluster for a novel macrocyclic lactam, ML-449.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Hanne; Degnes, Kristin F; Dikiy, Alexander; Fjaervik, Espen; Klinkenberg, Geir; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2010-01-01

    A new compound, designated ML-449, structurally similar to the known 20-membered macrolactam BE-14106, was isolated from a marine sediment-derived Streptomyces sp. Cloning and sequencing of the 83-kb ML-449 biosynthetic gene cluster revealed its high level of similarity to the BE-14106 gene cluster. Comparison of the respective biosynthetic pathways indicated that the difference in the compounds' structures stems from the incorporation of one extra acetate unit during the synthesis of the acyl side chain. A phylogenetic analysis of the beta-ketosynthase (KS) domains from polyketide synthases involved in the biosynthesis of macrolactams pointed to a common ancestry for the two clusters. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrated the formation of a macrolactam-specific subclade for the majority of the KS domains from several macrolactam-biosynthetic gene clusters, indicating a closer relationship between macrolactam clusters than with the macrolactone clusters included in the analysis. Some KS domains from the ML-449, BE-14106, and salinilactam gene clusters did, however, show a closer relationship with KS domains from the polyene macrolide clusters, suggesting potential acquisition rather than duplication of certain PKS genes. Comparison of the ML-449, BE-14106, vicenistatin, and salinilactam biosynthetic gene clusters indicated an evolutionary relationship between them and provided new insights into the processes governing the evolution of small-ring macrolactam biosynthesis. PMID:19854930

  12. Insights into the Evolution of Macrolactam Biosynthesis through Cloning and Comparative Analysis of the Biosynthetic Gene Cluster for a Novel Macrocyclic Lactam, ML-449 ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Hanne; Degnes, Kristin F.; Dikiy, Alexander; Fjærvik, Espen; Klinkenberg, Geir; Zotchev, Sergey B.

    2010-01-01

    A new compound, designated ML-449, structurally similar to the known 20-membered macrolactam BE-14106, was isolated from a marine sediment-derived Streptomyces sp. Cloning and sequencing of the 83-kb ML-449 biosynthetic gene cluster revealed its high level of similarity to the BE-14106 gene cluster. Comparison of the respective biosynthetic pathways indicated that the difference in the compounds' structures stems from the incorporation of one extra acetate unit during the synthesis of the acyl side chain. A phylogenetic analysis of the β-ketosynthase (KS) domains from polyketide synthases involved in the biosynthesis of macrolactams pointed to a common ancestry for the two clusters. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrated the formation of a macrolactam-specific subclade for the majority of the KS domains from several macrolactam-biosynthetic gene clusters, indicating a closer relationship between macrolactam clusters than with the macrolactone clusters included in the analysis. Some KS domains from the ML-449, BE-14106, and salinilactam gene clusters did, however, show a closer relationship with KS domains from the polyene macrolide clusters, suggesting potential acquisition rather than duplication of certain PKS genes. Comparison of the ML-449, BE-14106, vicenistatin, and salinilactam biosynthetic gene clusters indicated an evolutionary relationship between them and provided new insights into the processes governing the evolution of small-ring macrolactam biosynthesis. PMID:19854930

  13. Study of 'Redhaven' peach and its white-fleshed mutant suggests a key role of CCD4 carotenoid dioxygenase in carotenoid and norisoprenoid volatile metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartarini Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are plant metabolites which are not only essential in photosynthesis but also important quality factors in determining the pigmentation and aroma of flowers and fruits. To investigate the regulation of carotenoid metabolism, as related to norisoprenoids and other volatile compounds in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch., and the role of carotenoid dioxygenases in determining differences in flesh color phenotype and volatile composition, the expression patterns of relevant carotenoid genes and metabolites were studied during fruit development along with volatile compound content. Two contrasted cultivars, the yellow-fleshed 'Redhaven' (RH and its white-fleshed mutant 'Redhaven Bianca' (RHB were examined. Results The two genotypes displayed marked differences in the accumulation of carotenoid pigments in mesocarp tissues. Lower carotenoid levels and higher levels of norisoprenoid volatiles were observed in RHB, which might be explained by differential activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD enzymes. In fact, the ccd4 transcript levels were dramatically higher at late ripening stages in RHB with respect to RH. The two genotypes also showed differences in the expression patterns of several carotenoid and isoprenoid transcripts, compatible with a feed-back regulation of these transcripts. Abamine SG - an inhibitor of CCD enzymes - decreased the levels of both isoprenoid and non-isoprenoid volatiles in RHB fruits, indicating a complex regulation of volatile production. Conclusions Differential expression of ccd4 is likely to be the major determinant in the accumulation of carotenoids and carotenoid-derived volatiles in peach fruit flesh. More in general, dioxygenases appear to be key factors controlling volatile composition in peach fruit, since abamine SG-treated 'Redhaven Bianca' fruits had strongly reduced levels of norisoprenoids and other volatile classes. Comparative functional studies of peach carotenoid

  14. Advances in the Plant Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Pathway and Its Metabolic Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan LIU; Hong WANG; He-Chun YE; Guo-Feng LI

    2005-01-01

    Although the cytosolic isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway, mavolonate pathway, in plants has been known for many years, a new plastidial 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) pathway was identified in the past few years and its related intermediates, enzymes, and genes have been characterized quite recently.With a deep insight into the biosynthetic pathway of isoprenoids, investigations into the metabolic engineering of isoprenoid biosynthesis have started to prosper. In the present article, recent advances in the discoveries and regulatory roles of new genes and enzymes in the plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis path way are reviewed and examples of the metabolic engineering of cytosolic and plastidial isoprenoids biosnthesis are discussed.

  15. Phylogenomic Analysis of Natural Products Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Allows Discovery of Arseno-Organic Metabolites in Model Streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Kopp, Johannes Florian; Martínez-Guerrero, Christian; Yáñez-Guerra, Luis Alfonso; Selem-Mojica, Nelly; Ramos-Aboites, Hilda; Feldmann, Jörg; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Natural products from microbes have provided humans with beneficial antibiotics for millennia. However, a decline in the pace of antibiotic discovery exerts pressure on human health as antibiotic resistance spreads, a challenge that may better faced by unveiling chemical diversity produced by microbes. Current microbial genome mining approaches have revitalized research into antibiotics, but the empirical nature of these methods limits the chemical space that is explored. Here, we address the problem of finding novel pathways by incorporating evolutionary principles into genome mining. We recapitulated the evolutionary history of twenty-three enzyme families previously uninvestigated in the context of natural product biosynthesis in Actinobacteria, the most proficient producers of natural products. Our genome evolutionary analyses where based on the assumption that expanded—repurposed enzyme families—from central metabolism, occur frequently and thus have the potential to catalyze new conversions in the context of natural products biosynthesis. Our analyses led to the discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters coding for hidden chemical diversity, as validated by comparing our predictions with those from state-of-the-art genome mining tools; as well as experimentally demonstrating the existence of a biosynthetic pathway for arseno-organic metabolites in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, Using a gene knockout and metabolite profile combined strategy. As our approach does not rely solely on sequence similarity searches of previously identified biosynthetic enzymes, these results establish the basis for the development of an evolutionary-driven genome mining tool termed EvoMining that complements current platforms. We anticipate that by doing so real ‘chemical dark matter’ will be unveiled. PMID:27289100

  16. Phylogenomic Analysis of Natural Products Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Allows Discovery of Arseno-Organic Metabolites in Model Streptomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Kopp, Johannes Florian; Martínez-Guerrero, Christian; Yáñez-Guerra, Luis Alfonso; Selem-Mojica, Nelly; Ramos-Aboites, Hilda; Feldmann, Jörg; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Natural products from microbes have provided humans with beneficial antibiotics for millennia. However, a decline in the pace of antibiotic discovery exerts pressure on human health as antibiotic resistance spreads, a challenge that may better faced by unveiling chemical diversity produced by microbes. Current microbial genome mining approaches have revitalized research into antibiotics, but the empirical nature of these methods limits the chemical space that is explored.Here, we address the problem of finding novel pathways by incorporating evolutionary principles into genome mining. We recapitulated the evolutionary history of twenty-three enzyme families previously uninvestigated in the context of natural product biosynthesis in Actinobacteria, the most proficient producers of natural products. Our genome evolutionary analyses where based on the assumption that expanded-repurposed enzyme families-from central metabolism, occur frequently and thus have the potential to catalyze new conversions in the context of natural products biosynthesis. Our analyses led to the discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters coding for hidden chemical diversity, as validated by comparing our predictions with those from state-of-the-art genome mining tools; as well as experimentally demonstrating the existence of a biosynthetic pathway for arseno-organic metabolites in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, Using a gene knockout and metabolite profile combined strategy.As our approach does not rely solely on sequence similarity searches of previously identified biosynthetic enzymes, these results establish the basis for the development of an evolutionary-driven genome mining tool termed EvoMining that complements current platforms. We anticipate that by doing so real 'chemical dark matter' will be unveiled. PMID:27289100

  17. Accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenogenic genes in peach fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shifeng; Liang, Minhua; Shi, Liyu; Shao, Jiarong; Song, Chunbo; Bian, Kun; Chen, Wei; Yang, Zhenfeng

    2017-01-01

    To understand better the regulatory mechanism of the carotenoid accumulation, the expression profile of relevant carotenoid genes and metabolites were compared between two peach cultivars with different colors during fruit development. Meanwhile, the change pattern of carotenoid content and expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in peaches after harvest in response to blue light were also investigated. As compared to the yellow fleshed-cultivar 'Jinli', lower carotenoid levels were observed in skin and pulp in white peach cultivar 'Hujing', which might be explained by differentially expression of PpCCD4 gene. With respect to 'Jinli', the carotenoid accumulation during fruit development in fruit skin was partially linked with the transcriptional regulation of PpFPPS, PpGGPS, PpLCYB and PpCHYB. However, in the pulp, the accumulation might be also associated with the increased transcriptions of PpPDS, along with the above four genes. Blue light treatment induced carotenoid accumulation in 'Jinli' peaches during storage. In addition, the treated-fruit displayed higher expression of all the eight genes analysed with a lesser extent on PpCCD4, which suggested that the much more increased carotenoid synthesis rate could result in the higher carotenoid content in blue light-treated fruit. The results presented herein contribute to further elucidating the regulatory mechanism of carotenoid accumulation in peach fruit. PMID:27507458

  18. Utilization of Microemulsions from Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz to Improve Carotenoid Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nai-Hsing; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids have been known to reduce the risk of several diseases including cancer and cardiovascular. However, carotenoids are unstable and susceptible to degradation. Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz (R. nasutus), a Chinese medicinal herb rich in carotenoids, was reported to possess vital biological activities such as anti-cancer. This study intends to isolate carotenoids from R. nasutus by column chromatography, identify and quantify by HPLC-MS, and prepare carotenoid microemulsions for determination of absolute bioavailability in rats. Initially, carotenoid fraction was isolated using 250 mL ethyl acetate poured into an open-column packed with magnesium oxide-diatomaceous earth (1:3, w/w). Fourteen carotenoids including internal standard β-apo-8'-carotenal were resolved within 62 min by a YMC C30 column and gradient mobile phase of methanol-acetonitrile-water (82:14:4, v/v/v) and methylene chloride. Highly stable carotenoid microemulsions were prepared using a mixture of Capryol(TM)90, Transcutol®HP, Tween 80 and deionized water, with the mean particle being 10.4 nm for oral administration and 10.7 nm for intravenous injection. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that the absolute bioavailability of carotenoids in microemulsions and dispersion was 0.45% and 0.11%, respectively, while a much higher value of 6.25% and 1.57% were shown for lutein, demonstrating 4-fold enhancement in bioavailability upon incorporation of R. nasutus carotenoids into a microemulsion system. PMID:27150134

  19. Carotenoids and amphibians: effects on life history and susceptibility to the infectious pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, Rickey D; Gervasi, Stephanie S; Murray, Cindy; French, Beverly J; Bradley, Paul W; Urbina, Jenny; Blaustein, Andrew R; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are considered beneficial nutrients because they provide increased immune capacity. Although carotenoid research has been conducted in many vertebrates, little research has been done in amphibians, a group that is experiencing global population declines from numerous causes, including disease. We raised two amphibian species through metamorphosis on three carotenoid diets to quantify the effects on life-history traits and post-metamorphic susceptibility to a fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis; Bd). Increased carotenoids had no effect on survival to metamorphosis in gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) but caused lower survival to metamorphosis in wood frogs [Lithobates sylvaticus (Rana sylvatica)]. Increased carotenoids caused both species to experience slower development and growth. When exposed to Bd after metamorphosis, wood frogs experienced high mortality, and the carotenoid diets had no mitigating effects. Gray treefrogs were less susceptible to Bd, which prevented an assessment of whether carotenoids could mitigate the effects of Bd. Moreover, carotenoids had no effect on pathogen load. As one of only a few studies examining the effects of carotenoids on amphibians and the first to examine potential interactions with Bd, our results suggest that carotenoids do not always serve amphibians in the many positive ways that have become the paradigm in other vertebrates. PMID:27293690

  20. Opposing effects of oxidative challenge and carotenoids on antioxidant status and condition-dependent sexual signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomášek, Oldřich; Gabrielová, Barbora; Kačer, Petr; Maršík, Petr; Svobodová, Jana; Syslová, Kamila; Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Several recent hypotheses consider oxidative stress to be a primary constraint ensuring honesty of condition-dependent carotenoid-based signalling. The key testable difference between these hypotheses is the assumed importance of carotenoids for redox homeostasis, with carotenoids being either antioxidant, pro-oxidant or unimportant. We tested the role of carotenoids in redox balance and sexual signalling by exposing adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to oxidative challenge (diquat dibromide) and manipulating carotenoid intake. As the current controversy over the importance of carotenoids as antioxidants could stem from the hydrophilic basis of commonly-used antioxidant assays, we used the novel measure of in vivo lipophilic antioxidant capacity. Oxidative challenge reduced beak pigmentation but elicited an increase in antioxidant capacity suggesting resource reallocation from signalling to redox homeostasis. Carotenoids counteracted the effect of oxidative challenge on lipophilic (but not hydrophilic) antioxidant capacity, thereby supporting carotenoid antioxidant function in vivo. This is inconsistent with hypotheses proposing that signalling honesty is maintained through either ROS-induced carotenoid degradation or the pro-oxidant effect of high levels of carotenoid-cleavage products acting as a physiological handicap. Our data further suggest that assessment of lipophilic antioxidant capacity is necessary to fully understand the role of redox processes in ecology and evolution. PMID:27000655

  1. Effects of experimental brood size manipulation and gender on carotenoid levels of Eurasian kestrels Falco tinnunculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Laaksonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals use carotenoid-pigments for coloration, as antioxidants and as enhancers of the immune system. Carotenoid-dependent colours can thus signal individual quality and carotenoids have also been suggested to mediate life-history trade-offs. METHODOLOGY: To examine trade-offs in carotenoid allocation between parents and the young, or between skin coloration and plasma of the parents at different levels of brood demand, we manipulated brood sizes of Eurasian kestrels (Falco tinnunculus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Brood size manipulation had no overall effect on plasma carotenoid levels or skin hue of parents, but female parents had twice the plasma carotenoid levels of males. Males work physically harder than females and they might thus also use more carotenoids against oxidative stress than females. Alternatively, females could be gaining back the carotenoid stores they depleted during egg-laying by eating primarily carotenoid-rich food items during the early nestling stage. Fledglings in enlarged broods had higher plasma carotenoid concentrations than those in reduced broods. This difference was not explained by diet. In light of recent evidence from other species, we suggest it might instead be due to fledglings in enlarged broods having higher testosterone levels, which in turn increased plasma carotenoid levels. The partial cross-foster design of our experiment revealed evidence for origin effects (genetic or maternal on carotenoid levels of fledglings, but no origin-environment interaction. SIGNIFICANCE: These results from wild birds differ from studies in captivity, and thus offer new insights into carotenoid physiology in relation to division of parental care and demands of the brood.

  2. Characterization of carotenoid-protein complexes and gene expression analysis associated with carotenoid sequestration in pigmented cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoid-protein complex separation by size exclusion chromatography, protein fractionation by SDS-PAGE, and shotgun PROTEOMICS technology were used to identify and characterize carotenoid associated proteins (CAPs) of chromoplast-enriched suspensions from cassava intense yellow storage root. A no...

  3. Analysis of occludin trafficking, demonstrating continuous endocytosis, degradation, recycling and biosynthetic secretory trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Fletcher

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs link adjacent cells and are critical for maintenance of apical-basolateral polarity in epithelial monolayers. The TJ protein occludin functions in disparate processes, including wound healing and Hepatitis C Virus infection. Little is known about steady-state occludin trafficking into and out of the plasma membrane. Therefore, we determined the mechanisms responsible for occludin turnover in confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial monolayers. Using various biotin-based trafficking assays we observed continuous and rapid endocytosis of plasma membrane localised occludin (the majority internalised within 30 minutes. By 120 minutes a significant reduction in internalised occludin was observed. Inhibition of lysosomal function attenuated the reduction in occludin signal post-endocytosis and promoted co-localisation with the late endocytic system. Using a similar method we demonstrated that ∼20% of internalised occludin was transported back to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, significant co-localisation between internalised occludin and recycling endosomal compartments was observed. We then quantified the extent to which occludin synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane contributes to plasma membrane occludin homeostasis, identifying inhibition of protein synthesis led to decreased plasma membrane localised occludin. Significant co-localisation between occludin and the biosynthetic secretory pathway was demonstrated. Thus, under steady-state conditions occludin undergoes turnover via a continuous cycle of endocytosis, recycling and degradation, with degradation compensated for by biosynthetic exocytic trafficking. We developed a mathematical model to describe the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of occludin, utilising experimental data to provide quantitative estimates for the rates of these processes.

  4. Betacyanin biosynthetic genes and enzymes are differentially induced by (abiotic stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Casique-Arroyo

    Full Text Available An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT, two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively, and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT, plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1 were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the

  5. Effects of organic and conventional growth systems on the content of carotenoids in carrot roots, and on intake and plasma status of carotenoids in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Malene; Bysted, Anette; Madsen, K. H.;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for organic food products has increased during the last decades due to their probable health effects, among others. A higher content of secondary metabolites such as carotenoids in organic food products has been claimed, though not documented, to contribute to increased...... health effects of organic foods. The aim was to study the impact of organic and conventional agricultural systems on the content of carotenoids in carrots and human diets. In addition, a human cross-over study was performed, measuring the plasma status of carotenoids in humans consuming diets made from...... crops from these agricultural systems. RESULTS: The content of carotenoids in carrot roots and human diets was not significantly affected by the agricultural production system or year, despite differences in fertilisation strategy and levels. The plasma status of carotenoids increased significantly...

  6. Resonance Raman measurements of carotenoids using light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D; Eyring, N J; Fralick, J F; Stevenson, D N; Ferguson, S B

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact commercial instrument for measuring carotenoids in skin tissue. The instrument uses two light emitting diodes (LEDs) for dual-wavelength excitation and four photomultiplier tubes for multichannel detection. Bandpass filters are used to select the excitation and detection wavelengths. The f/1.3 optical system has high optical throughput and single photon sensitivity, both of which are crucial in LED-based Raman measurements. We employ a signal processing technique that compensates for detector drift and error. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the LED Raman instrument compares favorably to laser-based Raman spectrometers. This compact, portable instrument is used for non-invasive measurement of carotenoid molecules in human skin with a repeatability better than 10%.

  7. Absorption of Carotenoids and Mechanisms Involved in Their Health-Related Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Victoria-Campos, Claudia I; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids participate in the normal metabolism and function of the human body. They are involved in the prevention of several diseases, especially those related to the inflammation syndrome. Their main mechanisms of action are associated to their potent antioxidant activity and capacity to regulate the expression of specific genes and proteins. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid metabolites may explain several processes where the participation of their parent carotenoids was unclear. The health benefits of carotenoids strongly depend on their absorption and transformation during gastrointestinal digestion. The estimation of the 'bioaccessibility' of carotenoids through in vitro models have made possible the evaluation of the effect of a large number of factors on key stages of carotenoid digestion and intestinal absorption. The bioaccessibility of these compounds allows us to have a clear idea of their potential bioavailability, a term that implicitly involves the biological activity of these compounds. PMID:27485232

  8. Analysis on Carotenoids Content and Other Quality Traits of 185 Wheat Varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHOU; Yuanyuan WU; Wenyin ZHENG; Wenming ZHANG; Wenshang GUO; Danian YAO

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide the reference of improving the nutritional quality traits in carotenoids and screening its resources of wheat varieties, 185 wheat varieties or lines were selected as materials to test the carotenoids content, lipoxygenase activ-ity, whiteness, yel owness and some other quality traits of whole mil in wheat.The results showed that there were highly significant variations in lipoxygenase activity , carotenoids content, whiteness and yel owness among those sample of wheat vari-eties; carotenoids content was significantly and positively correlated with yel owness. Cluster analysis was performed based on carotenoids content clustered al the vari-eties or lines into three major groups. Additional y, carotenoids were discussed in the application of nutritional quality improvement in wheat.

  9. Microscale extraction method for HPLC carotenoid analysis in vegetable matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Sidney Pacheco; Fernanda Marques Peixoto; Renata Galhardo Borguini; Luzimar da Silva de Mattos do Nascimento; Claudio Roberto Ribeiro Bobeda; Manuela Cristina Pessanha de Araújo Santiago; Ronoel Luiz de Oliveira Godoy

    2014-01-01

    In order to generate simple, efficient analytical methods that are also fast, clean, and economical, and are capable of producing reliable results for a large number of samples, a micro scale extraction method for analysis of carotenoids in vegetable matrices was developed. The efficiency of this adapted method was checked by comparing the results obtained from vegetable matrices, based on extraction equivalence, time required and reagents. Six matrices were used: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum...

  10. Carotenoids and skin coloration in a social raptor

    OpenAIRE

    Blas, Julio; Cabezas, Sonia; Figuerola, Jordi; López, Lidia; Tanferna, Alessandro; Hiraldo, F.; Sergio, Fabrizio; Negro, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    [IN] The outcome of social and sexual competition in animals is typically mediated through the expression of body traits. Conspicuous characters such as yellow, orange, and red colorations in skin, scales, and feathers are often posited as quality-dependent signals, because such colors are made of dietary carotenoids and their use for signaling conflicts with health functions. Raptors often lack brightly colored feathers but most diurnal species display intense orange and yellow hues in the c...

  11. Identification and Quantification of Major Carotenoids in Some Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar M. El-Qudah

    2009-01-01

    An HPLC study of 6 raw vegetables (Okra, green beans, eggplant zucchini, carrot and tomato) most frequently consumed worldwide was carried out to determine their carotenoid composition. The samples were purchased from supermarket in the city of Boston, USA. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin and lutein were contained in all samples except tomato for neoxanthin, carrot and tomato for violaxanthin and carrot for lutein. β-carotene was contained in all samples while α-carotene was contained only...

  12. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Ermakov, Igor V.; M Sharifzadeh; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with incr...

  13. Structures and Properties of Stabilized Vitamin and Carotenoid Dry Powders

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Victor E.; Gerber, Francoise

    1991-01-01

    The development of special formulated forms of vitamin and carotenoid dry powders solved most of the technical problems encountered in handling the original pure crystalline or oily compounds. Various procedures to obtain stabilized products have been introduced on an industrial scale for feed , food and pharmaceutical purposes. Proven modes of manufacture of formulated dry powders includes the numerous spraying processes for emulsions, dispersions or solutions, and the production of adsorbat...

  14. Study of RP HPLC Retention Behaviours in Analysis of Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligor, M; Kováčová, J; Gadzała-Kopciuch, R M; Studzińska, S; Bocian, Sz; Lehotay, J; Buszewski, B

    2014-01-01

    For determination of selected carotenoids, various types of columns for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with different properties have been used. The characteristics of the laboratory-used packing material containing monomeric alkyl-bonded phases (C18, C30) and phenyl as well as phenyl-hexyl stationary phases were studied. The retention data of the examined compounds were used to determine the hydrophobicity and silanol activity of stationary phases applied in the study. The presence of the polar and carboxyl groups in the structure of the bonded ligand strongly influences the polarity of the stationary phase. Columns were compared according to methylene selectivity using a series of benzene homologues. The measurements were done using a methanol-water mobile phase. Knowledge of the properties of the applied stationary phase provided the possibility to predict the RP HPLC retention behaviours in analysis of carotenoids including lutein, lycopene and β-carotene. The composition of the mobile phase, the addition of triethylamine and the type of stationary phase had been taken into account in designing the method of carotenoid identification. Also a monolithic column characterised by low hydrodynamic resistance, high porosity and high permeability was applied. The presented results show that the coverage density of the bonded ligands on silica gel packings and length of the linkage strongly influence the carotenoid retention behaviours. In our study, the highest retention parameters for lutein, lycopene and β-carotene were observed for C30 and C18 stationary phase. This effect corresponds with pore size of column packing greater than 100 Å and carbon content higher than 11 %. PMID:25089049

  15. Biosynthetic chlorination of the piperazate residue in kutzneride biosynthesis by KthP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Heemstra, John R; Forseth, Ry R; Neumann, Christopher S; Manaviazar, Soraya; Schroeder, Frank C; Hale, Karl J; Walsh, Christopher T

    2011-07-12

    Kutznerides 2 and 8 of the cyclic hexadepsipeptide family of antifungal natural products from the soil actinomycete Kutzneria sp. 744 contain two sets of chlorinated residues, a 6,7-dichlorohexahydropyrroloindole moiety derived from dichlorotryptophan and a 5-chloropiperazate moiety, as well as a methylcyclopropylglycine residue that may arise from isoleucine via a cryptic chlorination pathway. Previous studies identified KtzD, KtzQ, and KtzR as three halogenases in the kutzneride pathway but left no candidate for installing the C5 chlorine on piperazate. On the basis of analysis of the complete genome sequence of Kutzneria, we now identify a fourth halogenase in the pathway whose gene is separated from the defined kutzneride cluster by 12 open reading frames. KthP (kutzneride halogenase for piperazate) is a mononuclear nonheme iron halogenase that acts on the piperazyl ring tethered by a thioester linkage to the holo forms of thiolation domains. MS analysis of the protein-bound product confirmed chlorination of the piperazate framework from the (3S)- but not the (3R)-piperazyl-S-pantetheinyl thiolation proteins. After thioesterase-mediated release, nuclear magnetic resonance was used to assign the free imino acid as (3S,5S)-5-chloropiperazate, distinct from the 3S,5R stereoisomer reported in the mature kutznerides. These results demonstrate that a fourth halogenase, KthP, is active in the kutzneride biosynthetic pathway and suggest further processing of the (3S,5S)-5-chloropiperazate during subsequent incorporation into the kutzneride depsipeptide frameworks. PMID:21648411

  16. Evolution of the Structure and Chromosomal Distribution of Histidine Biosynthetic Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fani, Renato; Mori, Elena; Tamburini, Elena; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    A database of more than 100 histidine biosynthetic genes from different organisms belonging to the three primary domains has been analyzed, including those found in the now completely sequenced genomes of Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Synechocystis sp., Methanococcus jannaschii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquity of his genes suggests that it is a highly conserved pathway that was probably already present in the last common ancestor of all extant life. The chromosomal distribution of the his genes shows that the enterobacterial histidine operon structure is not the only possible organization, and that there is a diversity of gene arrays for the his pathway. Analysis of the available sequences shows that gene fusions (like those involved in the origin of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium hisIE and hisB gene structures) are not universal. In contrast, the elongation event that led to the extant hisA gene from two homologous ancestral modules, as well as the subsequent paralogous duplication that originated hisF, appear to be irreversible and are conserved in all known organisms. The available evidence supports the hypothesis that histidine biosynthesis was assembled by a gene recruitment process.

  17. Tomato waste: Carotenoids content, antioxidant and cell growth activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajčić, Sladjana; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Djilas, Sonja; Mandić, Anamarija; Četojević-Simin, Dragana

    2015-04-01

    The carotenoid content, antioxidant and cell growth activities of tomato waste extracts, obtained from five different tomato genotypes, was investigated. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify the main carotenoids present in tomato waste extracts. The antioxidant activity of tomato waste extracts was tested using spectrophotometric methods, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The highest DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.057 mg/ml) was obtained for Bačka extract. The Knjaz extract showed the best reducing power (IC50 = 2.12 mg/ml). Cell growth effects were determined in HeLa, MCF7 and MRC-5 cell lines by sulforhodamine B test. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in all cell lines at higher concentrations (⩾ 0.125 mg/ml). The carotenoid contents exhibited a strong correlation with antioxidant and anti-proliferation activity. The results obtained indicated that tomato waste should be regarded as potential nutraceutic resource and may be used as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25442547

  18. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Nematode parasites reduce carotenoid-based signalling in male red grouse

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Padilla, Jesús; Mougeot, François; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Gary R. Bortolotti

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids determine the yellow–red colours of many ornaments, which often function as signals of quality. Carotenoid-based signalling may reliably advertise health and should be particularly sensitive to parasite infections. Nematodes are among the commonest parasites of vertebrates, with well-documented negative effects on their hosts. However, to date, little is known about the effects that these parasites may have on carotenoid-based signalling. Tetraonid birds (grouse) exhibit supra-orb...

  20. Carotenoids in Eggs and Plasma of Red-Legged Partridges: Effects of Diet and Reproductive Output

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolotti, Gary R.; Negro, Juan J.; Surai, Peter F; Prieto, Paloma

    2003-01-01

    Carotenoids are important dietary constituents in birds. They serve as pigments and play numerous physiological roles in both the laying hen and developing embryo. However, factors determining the absorption of carotenoids and their allocation to different functions are numerous and complex, and causal relationships are generally poorly known. Our objective was to determine the degree to which carotenoid levels in egg yolks and the plasma of hens were influenced by differences in diet and ...