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Sample records for carotenoid balance correlates

  1. Positive carotenoid balance correlates with greater reproductive performance in a wild bird.

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    Rebecca J Safran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carotenoids can confer somatic and reproductive benefits, but most evidence is from captive animal experimentation or single time-point sampling. Another perhaps more informative means by which to assess physiological contributions to animal performance is by tracking an individual's ability to increase or sustain carotenoids or other health-related molecules over time, as these are likely to be temporally variable. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a field study of North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster, we analyzed within-individual changes in carotenoid concentrations by repeatedly sampling the carotenoid profiles of individuals over the course of the breeding season. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid concentrations of individuals are temporally dynamic and that season-long balance of these molecules, rather than single time-point samples, predict reproductive performance. This was true even when controlling for two important variables associated with reproductive outcomes: (1 timing of breeding and (2 sexually selected plumage coloration, which is itself positively correlated with and concomitantly changes with circulating carotenoid concentrations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While reproduction itself is purported to impose health stress on organisms, these data suggest that free-ranging, high-quality individuals can mitigate such costs, by one or several genetic, environmental (diet, or physiological mechanisms. Moreover, the temporal variations in both health-linked physiological measures and morphological traits we uncover here merit further examination in other species, especially when goals include the estimation of signal information content or the costs of trait expression.

  2. Positive Carotenoid Balance Correlates with Greater Reproductive Performance in a Wild Bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Rebecca J.; McGraw, Kevin J.; Wilkins, Matthew R.; Hubbard, Joanna K.; Marling, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Background Carotenoids can confer somatic and reproductive benefits, but most evidence is from captive animal experimentation or single time-point sampling. Another perhaps more informative means by which to assess physiological contributions to animal performance is by tracking an individual's ability to increase or sustain carotenoids or other health-related molecules over time, as these are likely to be temporally variable. Methodology/Principal Findings In a field study of North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster), we analyzed within-individual changes in carotenoid concentrations by repeatedly sampling the carotenoid profiles of individuals over the course of the breeding season. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid concentrations of individuals are temporally dynamic and that season-long balance of these molecules, rather than single time-point samples, predict reproductive performance. This was true even when controlling for two important variables associated with reproductive outcomes: (1) timing of breeding and (2) sexually selected plumage coloration, which is itself positively correlated with and concomitantly changes with circulating carotenoid concentrations. Conclusions/Significance While reproduction itself is purported to impose health stress on organisms, these data suggest that free-ranging, high-quality individuals can mitigate such costs, by one or several genetic, environmental (diet), or physiological mechanisms. Moreover, the temporal variations in both health-linked physiological measures and morphological traits we uncover here merit further examination in other species, especially when goals include the estimation of signal information content or the costs of trait expression. PMID:20195540

  3. Correlations of carotenoid content and transcript abundances for fibrillin and carotenogenic enzymes in Capsicum annum fruit pericarp.

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    Kilcrease, James; Rodriguez-Uribe, Laura; Richins, Richard D; Arcos, Juan Manuel Garcia; Victorino, Jesus; O'Connell, Mary A

    2015-03-01

    The fruits of Capsicum spp. are especially rich sites for carotenoid synthesis and accumulation, with cultivar-specific carotenoid accumulation profiles. Differences in chromoplast structure as well as carotenoid biosynthesis are correlated with distinct carotenoid accumulations and fruit color. In the present study, the inheritance of chromoplast shape, carotenoid accumulation profiles, and transcript levels of four genes were measured. Comparisons of these traits were conducted using fruit from contrasting variants, Costeño Amarillo versus Costeño Red, and from F1 hybrids; crosses between parental lines with novel versions of these traits. Intermediate chromoplast shapes were observed in the F1, but no association between specific carotenoid accumulation and chromoplast shape was detected. Increased total carotenoid content was associated with increased β-carotene and violaxanthin content. Transcript levels for phytoene synthase (Psy) and β-carotene hydroxylase (CrtZ-2) were positively correlated with increased levels of specific carotenoids. No correlation was detected between transcript levels of capsanthin/capsorubin synthase (Ccs) and carotenoid composition or chromoplast shape. Transcript levels of fibrillin, were differentially correlated with specific carotenoids, negatively correlated with accumulation of capsanthin, and positively correlated with violaxanthin. The regulation of carotenoid accumulation in chromoplasts in Capsicum fruit continues to be a complex process with multiple steps for control.

  4. Carotenoid-chlorophyll coupling and fluorescence quenching correlate with protein packing density in grana-thylakoids.

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    Holleboom, Christoph-Peter; Yoo, Sunny; Liao, Pen-Nan; Compton, Ian; Haase, Winfried; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Walla, Peter Jomo

    2013-09-26

    The regulation of light-harvesting in photosynthesis under conditions of varying solar light irradiation is essential for the survival and fitness of plants and algae. It has been proposed that rearrangements of protein distribution in the stacked grana region of thylakoid membranes connected to changes in the electronic pigment-interaction play a key role for this regulation. In particular, carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions seem to be crucial for the down-regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting. So far, it has been difficult to determine the influence of the dense protein packing found in native photosynthetic membrane on these interactions. We investigated the changes of the electronic couplings between carotenoids and chlorophylls and the quenching in grana thylakoids of varying protein packing density by two-photon spectroscopy, conventional chlorophyll fluorometry, low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy, and electron micrographs of freeze-fracture membranes. We observed an increasing carotenoid-chlorophyll coupling and fluorescence quenching with increasing packing density. Simultaneously, the antennas size and excitonic connectivity of Photosystem II increased with increasing quenching and carotenoid-chlorophyll coupling whereas isolated, decoupled LHCII trimers decreased. Two distinct quenching data regimes could be identified that show up at different protein packing densities. In the regime corresponding to higher protein packing densities, quenching is strongly correlated to carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions whereas in the second regime, a weak correlation is apparent with low protein packing densities. Native membranes are in the strong-coupling data regime. Consequently, PSII and LHCII in grana membranes of plants are already quenched by protein crowding. We concluded that this ensures efficient electronic connection of all pigment-protein complexes for intermolecular energy transfer to the reaction centers and allows simultaneously

  5. Evaluation of selenium and carotenoid concentrations of 200 foxtail millet accessions from China and their correlations with agronomic performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Min-xuan; ZHANG Zong-wen; REN Gui-xing; ZHANG Qi; WANG Yin-yue; LU Ping

    2016-01-01

    As selenium and carotenoids are essential micronutrients, the determination of their concentrations in different varieties is important in the breeding of foxtail milet (Setaria italicaL. P.Beauv.). To identify selenium- and carotenoid-enriched foxtail milet varieties and to analyze correlations between trace elements and agronomic traits, we measured the selenium and carotenoid concentrations of 200 Chinese accessions by high-performance liquid chromatography and atomic lfuorescence spectrometry. Our analysis revealed that lutein concentration in 200 foxtail milet accessions folowed normal distribution and average was 3.1 μg g–1. The mean value of zeaxanthin concentration in 200 accessions was 8.6 μg g–1. Lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations were higher in the foxtail milet from Liaoning than in varieties from other locations, with averages of 10.0 and 3.5 μg g–1, respectively. The average measured selenium concentration was 100.3 μg kg–1. The highest average selenium concentration, 110.3 μg kg–1, was found in varieties from Shanxi. Varieties from Inner Mongolia had the lowest average selenium concentration, 84.7 μg kg–1, which was signiifcantly lower (P4.27 μg g–1) and 30 zeaxanthin-enriched ones (>12.63 μg g–1), which corresponded to 14.5 and 15% of tested accessions, respectively. Correlation analysis revealed that selenium concentration was signiifcantly positively correlated with spikelet length (P<0.01), while zeaxanthin concentration was signiifcantly correlated with grass weight (P<0.05) and spikelet length (P<0.01). No correlation was found between lutein concentration and agronomic characters, selenium content or zeaxanthin content. Our results should contribute substantialy to the selection of suitable varieties for the development of plants with desired levels of these nutritionaly important elements. These results wil signiifcantly contribute towards selection of the most suitable varieties for obtaining plants with desired

  6. Balance 1 year after TKA: correlation with clinical variables.

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    Bascuas, Iria; Tejero, Marta; Monleón, Sandra; Boza, Roser; Muniesa, Josep Maria; Belmonte, Roser

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis results in changes that affect balance. It has been reported that osteoarthritis worsens proprioception and increases the risk of falling. The objective of this study was to assess changes in balance among patients with knee osteoarthritis at 1 year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery and its relationship with clinical variables. This prospective, observational study evaluated 44 patients before and 1 year after TKA. Variables analyzed included age, body mass index, pain, range of motion for both knees, bilateral quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength, gait velocity, and Knee Society score. Balance and posture control were assessed using the following computerized posturography tests: the weight bearing test, modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) test, and sit-to-stand test. Pre- and postoperative differences were analyzed using Wilcoxon and chi-square tests, and effect size was measured using standardized response mean. Correlations were assessed by the Spearman test. One year after TKA, some improvement in balance tests was observed. Significant differences were observed in the mCTSIB test: foam surface with open eyes (P≤.001), foam surface with closed eyes (P≤.001), and composite value (P≤.001). Effect size was moderate to high. Age showed significant correlation with mCTSIB composite value changes (-0.369; P=.037). No significant correlations were found between posturographic tests and other analyzed variables. Balance measured by computerized posturography improved 1 year after TKA. Significant changes were observed between open and closed eyes using a foam surface for the mCTSIB test. A mild negative correlation was found between age and posturographic changes.

  7. Relativistic Kinetic-Balance Condition for Explicitly Correlated Basis Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Simmen, Benjamin; Reiher, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the derivation of a kinetic-balance condition for explicitly correlated basis functions employed in semi-classical relativistic calculations. Such a condition is important to ensure variational stability in algorithms based on the first-quantized Dirac theory of 1/2-fermions. We demonstrate that the kinetic-balance condition can be obtained from the row reduction process commonly applied to solve systems of linear equations. The resulting form of kinetic balance establishes a relation for the $4^N$ components of the spinor of an $N$-fermion system to the non-relativistic limit, which is in accordance with recent developments in the field of exact decoupling in relativistic orbital-based many-electron theory.

  8. Balanced synaptic input shapes the correlation between neural spike trains.

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    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Oswald, Anne-Marie M; Urban, Nathaniel N; Doiron, Brent

    2011-12-01

    Stimulus properties, attention, and behavioral context influence correlations between the spike times produced by a pair of neurons. However, the biophysical mechanisms that modulate these correlations are poorly understood. With a combined theoretical and experimental approach, we show that the rate of balanced excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input modulates the magnitude and timescale of pairwise spike train correlation. High rate synaptic inputs promote spike time synchrony rather than long timescale spike rate correlations, while low rate synaptic inputs produce opposite results. This correlation shaping is due to a combination of enhanced high frequency input transfer and reduced firing rate gain in the high input rate state compared to the low state. Our study extends neural modulation from single neuron responses to population activity, a necessary step in understanding how the dynamics and processing of neural activity change across distinct brain states.

  9. Balanced synaptic input shapes the correlation between neural spike trains.

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    Ashok Litwin-Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulus properties, attention, and behavioral context influence correlations between the spike times produced by a pair of neurons. However, the biophysical mechanisms that modulate these correlations are poorly understood. With a combined theoretical and experimental approach, we show that the rate of balanced excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input modulates the magnitude and timescale of pairwise spike train correlation. High rate synaptic inputs promote spike time synchrony rather than long timescale spike rate correlations, while low rate synaptic inputs produce opposite results. This correlation shaping is due to a combination of enhanced high frequency input transfer and reduced firing rate gain in the high input rate state compared to the low state. Our study extends neural modulation from single neuron responses to population activity, a necessary step in understanding how the dynamics and processing of neural activity change across distinct brain states.

  10. Spectroscopic biofeedback on cutaneous carotenoids as part of a prevention program could be effective to raise health awareness in adolescents.

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    Yu, Ruo-Xi; Köcher, Wolfgang; Darvin, Maxim E; Büttner, Monika; Jung, Sora; Lee, Bich Na; Klotter, Christoph; Hurrelmann, Klaus; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    The cutaneous carotenoid concentration correlates with the overall antioxidant status of a person and can be seen as biomarker for nutrition and lifestyle. 50 high school students were spectroscopically measured for their cutaneous carotenoid concentrations initially in a static phase, followed by an intervention phase with biofeedback of their measured values, living a healthy lifestyle and on healthy food this time. The volunteers showed higher carotenoid concentrations than found in previous studies. A significant correlation of healthy lifestyle habits and a high antioxidant status could be determined. Subjects improved their nutritional habits and significantly increased their carotenoid concentration during intervention. Follow-up five months later showed a consolidation of the increase. The investigations show that a healthy diet and a well-balanced lifestyle correlate with a high cutaneous antioxidant concentration and that spectroscopic biofeedback measurement of cutaneous carotenoids as part of an integrated prevention program is a feasible and effective means to raise the health awareness in adolescents.

  11. Correlation between lipid and carotenoid synthesis and photosynthetic capacity in Haematococcus pluvialis grown under high light and nitrogen deprivation stress

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    Liang, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, H. pluvialis has been demonstrated to have significant potential for biofuel production. To explore the correlation between total lipid content and other physiological parameters under s tress conditions, the responses of H. pluvialis to high light intensity (HL, nitrogen deprivation (-N, and high light intensity with nitrogen deprivation (HL-N were investigated. The total lipid content in the control cells was 12.01% dw, whereas that of the cells exposed to HL, -N, and HL-N conditions was 56.92, 46.71, and 46.87% dw, respectively. The fatty acid profile was similar under all conditions, with the main components including palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid. A good correlation was found between individual carotenoid and total lipids, regardless of culture conditions. P hotosynthetic parameters and lipid content were also found to be well-correlated.Recientemente, H. pluvialis ha demostrado tener un gran potencial para la producción de biocombustibles. Para explorar la correlación entre el contenido total de lípidos y otros parámetros fisiológicos en condiciones de estrés, se investigaron las respuestas de H. pluvialis a una alta intensidad de luz (HL, una privación de nitrógeno (-N, y ambos, alta intensidad de la luz con privación de nitrógeno (HL-N. El contenido total de lípidos de las células control fue de 12,01% dw, mientras que el de las células expuestas a HL, N, y condiciones de HL-N fue de 56,92, 46,71, y 46,87% dw, respectivamente. El perfil de ácidos grasos fue similar para todas las condiciones, cuyos componentes principales fueron los ácidos palmítico, linoleico y linolénico. Se encontró una buena correlación entre carotenoides y lípidos totales individuales, independientemente de las condiciones de cultivo. También se encontró una buena correlación entre los parámetros fotosintéticos y el contenido de lípidos.

  12. Correlation of electronic carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions and fluorescence quenching with the aggregation of native LHC II and chlorophyll deficient mutants

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    Liao, Pen-Nan; Bode, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Wilk, Laura [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hafi, Nour [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Walla, Peter J., E-mail: pwalla@gwdg.de [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-07-19

    The aggregation dependent correlation between fluorescence quenching and the electronic carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions, {phi}{sub Coupling}{sup Car S{sub 1}-Chl}, as measured by comparing chlorophyll fluorescence observed after two- and one-photon excitation, has been investigated using native LHC II samples as well as mutants lacking Chl 2 and Chl 13. For native LHC II the same linear correlation between {phi}{sub Coupling}{sup Car S{sub 1}-Chl} and the fluorescence quenching was observed as previously reported for the pH and Zea-dependent quenching of LHC II . In order to elucidate which carotenoid-chlorophyll pair might dominate this correlation we also investigated the mutants lacking Chl 2 and Chl 13. However, also with these mutants the same linear correlation as for native LHC II was observed. This provides indication that these two chlorophylls play only a minor role for the observed effects. Nevertheless, we also conclude that this does not exclude that their neighboured carotenoids, lutein 1 and neoxanthin, might interact electronically with other chlorophylls close by.

  13. Offset balancing in pseudo-correlation radiometers for CMB measurements

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    Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Seiffert, M.; Kettle, D.; Roddis, N.; Wilkinson, A.; Meinhold, P.

    2003-11-01

    Radiometeric CMB measurements need to be highly stable and this stability is best obtained with differential receivers. The residual 1/f noise in the differential output is strongly dependent on the radiometer input offset which can be cancelled using various balancing strategies. In this paper we discuss a software method implemented in the PLANCK-LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which uses a tunable gain modulation factor, r, in the sky-load difference. Numerical simulations and experimental data show how proper tuning of the parameter r ensures a very stable differential output with knee frequencies of the order of few mHz. Various approaches to calculate r using the radiometer total power data are discussed with some examples relevant to PLANCK-LFI. Although the paper focuses on pseudo-correlation receivers and the examples are relative to PLANCK-LFI, the proposed method and its analysis is general and can be applied to a large class of differential radiometric receivers.

  14. Offset balancing in pseudo-correlation radiometers for CMB measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mennella, A; Seiffert, M; Kettle, D; Roddis, N; Wilkinson, A; Meinhold, P; Mennella, Aniello; Bersanelli, Marco; Seiffert, Michael; Kettle, Danielle; Roddis, Neil; Wilkinson, Althea; Meinhold, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Radiometeric CMB measurements need to be highly stable and this stability is best obtained with differential receivers. The residual 1/f noise in the differential output is strongly dependent on the radiometer input offset which can be cancelled using various balancing strategies. In this paper we discuss a software method implemented in the Planck-LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which uses a tunable "gain modulation factor, r, in the sky-load difference. Numerical simulations and experimental data show how proper tuning of the parameter r ensures a very stable differential output with knee frequencies of the order of few mHz. Various approaches to calculate r using the radiometer total power data are discussed with some examples relevant to Planck-LFI. Although the paper focuses on pseudo-correlation receivers and the examples are relative to Planck-LFI, the proposed method and its analysis is general and can be applied to a large class of differential radiometric receivers.

  15. Correlation between static balance and functional autonomy in elderly women.

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    de Noronha Ribeiro Daniel, Fernanda; de Souza Vale, Rodrigo Gomes; Giani, Tania Santos; Bacellar, Silvia; Escobar, Tatiane; Stoutenberg, Mark; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify the correlation between static balance and functional autonomy in elderly women. The sample was a random selection of 32 sedentary elderly women (mean age=67.47 ± 7.37 years, body mass index=BMI=27.30 ± 5.07 kg/m(2)), who live in the city of Teresina in the state of Piauí, Brazil. Static balance was analyzed by stabilometric assessment using an electronic baropodometer which measured the average of the amplitude of postural oscillations in the right (RLD) and left (LLD) lateral displacements, anterior (AD) and posterior (PD) displacements, and in the elliptical area (EA) formed by the body's center of gravity. Functional autonomy was evaluated by a battery of tests from the LADEG protocol which is composed of: a 10 m walk (10 mW), getting up from a seated position (GSP), getting up from the prone position (GPP), getting up from a chair and movement around the house (GCMH), and putting on and taking off a shirt (PTS). The Spearman's correlation coefficient (r) indicated a positive and significant correlation between GPP and LLD (r=0.382; p=0.031), GPP and PD (r=0.398; p=0.024) and GPP and EA (r=0.368; p=0.038). These results show that sedentary elderly women who spent the greatest amount of time performing the GPP test achieved the largest mean amplitude of displacement leading to greater levels of instability.

  16. The Importance of Carotenoid Dose in Supplementation Studies with Songbirds.

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    Koch, Rebecca E; Wilson, Alan E; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoid coloration is the one of the most frequently studied ornamental traits in animals. Many studies of carotenoid coloration test the associations between carotenoid coloration and measures of performance, such as immunocompetence and oxidative state, proceeding from the premise that carotenoids are limited resources. Such studies commonly involve supplementing the diets of captive birds with carotenoids. In many cases, however, the amount of carotenoid administered is poorly justified, and even supposedly carotenoid-limited diets may saturate birds' systems. To quantify the relationships among the amount of carotenoids administered in experiments, levels of circulating carotenoids, and quantities of carotenoids deposited into colored ornaments, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 published studies that supplemented carotenoids to one of seven songbird species. We used allometric scaling equations to estimate the per-gram carotenoid consumption of each study's subjects, and we used meta-regression to evaluate the effects of this carotenoid dose on differences in coloration and plasma carotenoid levels between supplemented and control groups of birds. After accounting for supplementation duration and species, we observed a significant positive correlation between carotenoid intake and response of plasma carotenoid level to supplementation. The presence of supplemental carotenoids also tended to increase the expression of ornamental coloration, but the magnitude of the carotenoid dose did not significantly affect how strongly coloration changed with supplementation. Further, coloration effect sizes had no significant relationship with plasma carotenoid effect sizes. We also found significant heterogeneity in responses among studies and species, and the parameters used to measure color significantly affected response to supplementation. Our results emphasize the importance of performing dosage trials to determine what supplementation levels provide limited

  17. Key to Xenobiotic Carotenoids

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    Hans-Richard Sliwka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A listing of carotenoids with heteroatoms (X = F, Cl, Br, I, Si, N, S, Se, Fe directly attached to the carotenoid carbon skeleton has been compiled. The 178 listed carotenoids with C,H,X atoms demonstrate that the classical division of carotenoids into hydrocarbon carotenoids (C,H and xanthophylls (C,H,O has become obsolete.

  18. BALANCE FUNCTIONS : Multiplicity and transverse momentum dependence of the charge dependent correlations in ALICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Manso, A.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of charge-dependent correlations between positively and negatively charged particles as a function of pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle, known as the \\emph{balance functions}, provide insight to the properties of matter created in high-energy collisions. The balance functions are ar

  19. Shape Abnormalities of the Caudate Nucleus Correlate with Poorer Gait and Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macfarlane, Matthew D; Looi, Jeffrey C L; Walterfang, Mark

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Functional deficits seen in several neurodegenerative disorders have been linked with dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits and with associated shape alterations in striatal structures. The severity of visible white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging has been...... found to correlate with poorer performance on measures of gait and balance. This study aimed to determine whether striatal volume and shape changes were correlated with gait dysfunction. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging scans and clinical gait/balance data (scores from the Short Physical Performance...

  20. CORRELATION OF ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION WITH DYNAMIC BALANCE IN YOUNG NORMAL INDIVIDUALS

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    Pranali Suryavanshi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was to examine correlation of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion with dynamic balance in young normal individuals. A cross sectional study has been done on 60 females by convenient sampling. The study was to examine dorsiflexion ROM by using star excursion balance test. It was performed in all directions for three trials. Distance was recorded with measure tape. Ankle ROM was performed by weight bearing lunge. Individuals who demonstrate impairments in dorsiflexion ROM may also demonstrate difficulty with portions of the SEBT. There is significant positive correlation in between dorsiflexion range of motion and star excursion balance test in anterior and postero lateral direction.

  1. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

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    Takashi Maoka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade.

  2. The Delicate Balance of Static and Dynamic Electron Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Christopher J; Reiher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Multi-configurational approaches yield universal wave function parameterizations that can qualitatively well describe electronic structures along reaction pathways. For quantitative results, multi-reference perturbation theory is required to capture dynamic electron correlation from the otherwise neglected virtual orbitals. Still, the overall accuracy suffers from the finite size and choice of the active orbital space and peculiarities of the perturbation theory. Fortunately, the electronic wave functions at equilibrium structures of reactants and products can often be well described by single-reference methods and hence are accessible to accurate coupled cluster calculations. Here, we calculate the heterolytic double dissociation energy of four 3d-metallocenes with the complete active space self-consistent field method and compare to highly accurate coupled cluster data. Our coupled cluster data are well within the experimental error bars. This accuracy can also be approached by complete active space calcula...

  3. BALANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, H.

    1953-01-01

    A torsional-type analytical balance designed to arrive at its equilibrium point more quickly than previous balances is described. In order to prevent external heat sources creating air currents inside the balance casing that would reiard the attainment of equilibrium conditions, a relatively thick casing shaped as an inverted U is placed over the load support arms and the balance beam. This casing is of a metal of good thernnal conductivity characteristics, such as copper or aluminum, in order that heat applied to one portion of the balance is quickly conducted to all other sensitive areas, thus effectively preventing the fornnation of air currents caused by unequal heating of the balance.

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN OBESITY, SAGITTAL BALANCE AND CLINICAL OUTCOME IN SPINAL FUSION

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    Marcel Machado da Motta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To correlate obesity with radiographic parameters of spinal and spinopelvic balance in patients undergoing spinal arthrodesis, and to correlate obesity with clinical outcome of these patients.Methods:Observational retrospective study including patients who underwent spinal arthrodesis, with minimum follow-up period of three months. We measured waist circumference, as well as height and weight to calculate body mass index (BMI and obtained radiographs of the total column. The clinical parameters studied were pain by visual analog scale (VAS and the Oswestry questionnaire (ODI. Obesity correlated with radiographic parameters of the sagittal and spinopelvic balance and postoperative clinical parameters.Results:32 patients were analyzed. The higher the BMI, the greater the value of VAS found, but without statistical significance (p=0.83. There was also no correlation between BMI and the ODI questionnaire. Analyzing the abdominal circumference, there was no correlation between the VAS and ODI. There was no correlation between BMI or waist circumference and the radiographic parameters of global spinopelvic sagittal alignment. Regarding the postoperative results, there was no correlation between the mean BMI and waist circumference and the postoperative results for ODI and VAS (p=0.75 and p=0.7, respectively.Conclusions:The clinical outcomes of patients who undergone spinal fusion were not affected by the BMI and waist circumference. Also, there was no correlation between radiographic parameters of spinal and spinopelvic sagittal balance with obesity in patients previously treated with arthrodesis of the spine.

  5. Development of a rapid, simple assay of plasma total carotenoids

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    Donaldson Michael

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasma total carotenoids can be used as an indicator of risk of chronic disease. Laboratory analysis of individual carotenoids by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC is time consuming, expensive, and not amenable to use beyond a research laboratory. The aim of this research is to establish a rapid, simple, and inexpensive spectrophotometric assay of plasma total carotenoids that has a very strong correlation with HPLC carotenoid profile analysis. Results Plasma total carotenoids from 29 volunteers ranged in concentration from 1.2 to 7.4 μM, as analyzed by HPLC. A linear correlation was found between the absorbance at 448 nm of an alcohol / heptane extract of the plasma and plasma total carotenoids analyzed by HPLC, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.989. The average coefficient of variation for the spectrophotometric assay was 6.5% for the plasma samples. The limit of detection was about 0.3 μM and was linear up to about 34 μM without dilution. Correlations between the integrals of the absorption spectra in the range of carotenoid absorption and total plasma carotenoid concentration gave similar results to the absorbance correlation. Spectrophotometric assay results also agreed with the calculated expected absorbance based on published extinction coefficients for the individual carotenoids, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.988. Conclusion The spectrophotometric assay of total carotenoids strongly correlated with HPLC analysis of carotenoids of the same plasma samples and expected absorbance values based on extinction coefficients. This rapid, simple, inexpensive assay, when coupled with the carotenoid health index, may be useful for nutrition intervention studies, population cohort studies, and public health interventions.

  6. Carotenoids intake and asthma prevalence in Thai children

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    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several antioxidant nutrients have been described to inversely correlate with asthma. In order to quantify the intake of these substances, it is possible to measure skin levels by Raman spectroscopy, a novel non-invasive technique that can also be used in children. This cross-sectional school-based study involved 423 children from a rural area of Thailand. Asthmatic children were diagnosed according to a Health Interview for Asthma Control questionnaire. Skin carotenoid levels were measured with Raman spectroscopy. Demographic data were obtained by directly interviewing children and their parents, whereas anthropometric parameters were measured by trained staff. Intake of carotenoids, vitamin A and C were evaluated by a food frequency questionnaire. Overall incidence of asthma in Thai schoolchildren (aged 3.5-17.8 years was 17.3%. There was no significant difference in dietary intake of carotenoids and vitamin A and C, and skin carotenoid level between asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. Skin carotenoid level significantly correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake (P<0.05. Carotenoids and vitamin A and C intakes, and skin carotenoid levels were not associated with the risk of asthma in Thai children. Skin carotenoids correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake in mild to moderate degrees. Raman spectroscopy was confirmed to be a useful tool to determine antioxidant skin levels.

  7. Is leg muscle strength correlated with functional balance and mobility among inpatients in geriatric rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselgren, Låtta; Olsson, Lillemor Lundin; Nyberg, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Determinants of functional balance and mobility have rarely been investigated in geriatric wards. This study examined if leg muscle strength correlates to functional balance and mobility among geriatric inpatients. Fifty inpatients, 29 women and 21 men (mean age 79.6 years) were included. Functional balance was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and mobility was assessed with the Physiotherapy Clinical Outcome Variable Scale (COVS). Strength in the leg extension muscles was measured as 1 Repetition Maximum (1RM) in a leg press and strength in the ankle muscles was measured with Medical Research Council grades (MRC, 0-5). The sum scores, and most of the single items, of the BBS and the COVS significantly correlated to 1RM/body weight, ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion. In a stepwise multiple regression, ankle dorsiflexion and 1RM/body weight together accounted for 39% of the variance of the BBS and 41% of the variance of the COVS. Estimated values of the BBS and the COVS can be calculated from the equation. In clinical work, the knowledge about how leg muscle strength associates with balance and mobility may be useful in analyzing underlying causes of reduced balance and mobility function, and in planning rehabilitation programs.

  8. Mobility and Balance and Their Correlation with Physiological Factors in Elderly with Different Foot Postures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyah Mohd Said

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determines (1 the correlation between mobility and balance performances with physiological factors and (2 the relationship between foot postures with anthropometric characteristics and lower limb characteristics among elderly with neutral, pronated, and supinated foot. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in community-dwelling elderly (age: 69.86 ± 5.62 years. Participants were grouped into neutral (n=16, pronated (n=14, and supinated (n=14 foot based on the foot posture index classification. Anthropometric data (height, weight, and BMI, lower limb strength (5-STS and endurance (30 s chair rise test, mobility (TUG, and balance (FSST were determined. Data were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Body weight was negatively and moderately correlated (rs=-0.552, P<0.05 with mobility in supinated foot; moderate-to-high positive linear rank correlation was found between lower limb strength and mobility (rs=0.551 to 0.804, P<0.05 for pronated and neutral foot. Lower limb endurance was negatively and linearly correlated with mobility in pronated (rs=-0.699 and neutral (rs=-0.573 foot. No correlation was observed in balance performance with physiological factors in any of the foot postures. We can conclude that muscle function may be the most important feature to make movement possible in older persons regardless of the type of foot postures.

  9. Carotenoids and health in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna J; Lyner, Natalie; McKinley, Michelle C

    2015-01-01

    As the proportion of older people increases, so will chronic disease incidence and the proportion of the population living with disability. Therefore, new approaches to maintain health for as long as possible in this age group are required. Carotenoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds found predominantly in fruit and vegetables that have been proposed to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Such properties may impact on the risk diseases which predominate in older people, and also ageing-related physiological changes. Working out the effect of carotenoid intake versus fruit and vegetable intake is difficult, and the strong correlation between individual carotenoid intakes also complicates any attempt to examine individual carotenoid health effects. Similarly, research to determine whether carotenoids consumed as supplements have similar benefits to increased dietary intake through whole foods, is still required. However, reviewing the recent evidence suggests that carotenoid intake and status are relatively consistently associated with reduced CVD risk, although β-carotene supplementation does not reduce CVD risk and increases lung cancer risk. Increased lycopene intake may reduce prostate cancer progression, with a potential role for carotenoids at other cancer sites. Lutein and zeaxanthin have a plausible role in the maintenance of eye health, whilst an association between carotenoid intake and cognitive and physical health appears possible, although research is limited to date. Given this accruing evidence base to support a specific role for certain carotenoids and ageing, current dietary advice to consume a diet rich in fruit and vegetables would appear prudent, and efforts maintained to encourage increased intake.

  10. Hydrophilic Carotenoids: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Agócs

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are substantially hydrophobic antioxidants. Hydrophobicity is this context is rather a disadvantage, because their utilization in medicine as antioxidants or in food chemistry as colorants would require some water dispersibility for their effective uptake or use in many other ways. In the past 15 years several attempts were made to synthetize partially hydrophilic carotenoids. This review compiles the recently synthetized hydrophilic carotenoid derivatives.

  11. Balance functions: Multiplicity and transverse momentum dependence of the charge dependent correlations in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078856; Snellings, Raimond; Christakoglou, Panos

    The measurement of charge-dependent correlations between positively and negatively charged particles as a function of pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle, known as the balance functions, provide insight to the properties of matter created in high-energy collisions. The balance functions are argued to probe the creation time of the particles and are also sensitive to the collective motion of the system. In this thesis, I present the results of the measured balance functions in p--Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02~TeV obtained with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The results are compared with balance functions measured in pp and Pb--Pb collisions at √s=7~TeV and √sNN = 2.76~TeV$, respectively. The width of the balance functions in both pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle for non-identified charged particles decreases with increasing multiplicity in all three systems, for particles with low transverse momentum value pT < 2~GeV/c. For higher values of transverse momentum the balance functions become narrower and...

  12. A correlational study of scoliosis and trunk balance in adult patients with mandibular deviation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuncheng Zhou

    Full Text Available Previous studies have confirmed that patients with mandibular deviation often have abnormal morphology of their cervical vertebrae. However, the relationship between mandibular deviation, scoliosis, and trunk balance has not been studied. Currently, mandibular deviation is usually treated as a single pathology, which leads to poor clinical efficiency. We investigated the relationship of spine coronal morphology and trunk balance in adult patients with mandibular deviation, and compared the finding to those in healthy volunteers. 35 adult patients with skeletal mandibular deviation and 10 healthy volunteers underwent anterior X-ray films of the head and posteroanterior X-ray films of the spine. Landmarks and lines were drawn and measured on these films. The axis distance method was used to measure the degree of scoliosis and the balance angle method was used to measure trunk balance. The relationship of mandibular deviation, spine coronal morphology and trunk balance was evaluated with the Pearson correlation method. The spine coronal morphology of patients with mandibular deviation demonstrated an "S" type curve, while a straight line parallel with the gravity line was found in the control group (significant difference, p1°, while the control group had a normal trunk balance (imbalance angle <1°. There was a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.01. The degree of scoliosis and shoulder imbalance correlated with the degree of mandibular deviation, and presented a linear trend. The direction of mandibular deviation was the same as that of the lateral bending of thoracolumbar vertebrae, which was opposite to the direction of lateral bending of cervical vertebrae. Our study shows the degree of mandibular deviation has a high correlation with the degree of scoliosis and trunk imbalance, all the three deformities should be clinically evaluated in the management of mandibular deviation.

  13. Clinical Correlates of Awareness for Balance, Function, and Memory: Evidence for the Modality Specificity of Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. O'Connell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness in dementia is increasingly recognized not only as multifactorial, but also as domain specific. We demonstrate differential clinical correlates for awareness of daily function, awareness of memory, and the novel exploration of awareness of balance. Awareness of function was higher for participants with mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and non-aMCI than for those with dementia (due to Alzheimer disease; AD and non-AD, whereas awareness of memory was higher for both non-aMCI and non-AD dementia patients than for those with aMCI or AD. Balance awareness did not differ based on diagnostic subgroup. Awareness of function was associated with instrumental activities of daily living and caregiver burden. In contrast, awareness of balance was associated with fall history, balance confidence, and instrumental activities of daily living. Clinical correlates of awareness of memory depended on diagnostic group: associations held with neuropsychological variables for non-AD dementia, but for patients with AD dementia, depression and instrumental activities of daily living were clinical correlates of memory awareness. Together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that awareness and dementia are not unitary and are, instead, modality specific.

  14. Plasma carotenoids as biomarkers of intake of fruits and vegetables : individual-level correlations in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Delaimy, WK; Ferrari, P; Slimani, N; Pala, [No Value; Johansson, [No Value; Nilsson, S; Mattisson, [No Value; Wirfalt, E; Galasso, R; Palli, D; Vineis, P; Tumino, R; Dorronsoro, M; Pera, G; Ocke, MC; Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB; Overvad, K; Chirlaque, MAD; Trichopoulou, A; Naska, A; Tjonneland, A; Olsen, A; Lund, E; Alsaker, EHR; Barricarte, A; Kesse, E; Boutron-Ruault, MC; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Key, TJ; Spencer, E; Bingham, S; Welch, AA; Sanchez-Perez, MJ; Nagel, G; Linseisen, J; Quiros, [No Value; Peeters, PHM; van Gils, CH; Boeing, H; van Kappel, AL; Steghens, JP; Riboli, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim in this study was to assess the association between individual plasma carotenoid levels (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin) and fruit and vegetable intakes recorded by a calibrated food questionnaire (FQ) and 24- h dietary recall recor

  15. Correlation of accelerometry with clinical balance tests in older fallers and non-fallers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Maura

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: falls are a common cause of injury and decreased functional independence in the older adult. Diagnosis and treatment of fallers require tools that accurately assess physiological parameters associated with balance. Validated clinical tools include the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG); however, the BBS tends to be subjective in nature, while the TUG quantifies an individuals functional impairment but requires further subjective evaluation for balance assessment. Other quantitative alternatives to date require expensive, sophisticated equipment. Measurement of the acceleration of centre of mass, with relatively inexpensive, lightweight, body-mounted accelerometers is a potential solution to this problem. OBJECTIVES: to determine (i) if accelerometry correlates with standard clinical tests (BBS and TUG), (ii) to characterise accelerometer responses to increasingly difficult challenges to balance and (iii) to characterise acceleration patterns between fallers and non-fallers. Study design and setting: torso accelerations were measured at the level of L3 using a tri-axial accelerometer under four conditions; standing unsupported with eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC) and on a mat with eyes open (MAT EO) and closed (MAT EC). Older patients (n = 21, 8 males, 13 females) with a mean age of 78 (SD +\\/- 7.6) years who attended a day hospital were recruited for this study. Patients were identified as fallers or non-fallers based on a comprehensive falls history. MEASUREMENTS: Spearman\\'s rank correlation analysis examined the relationship between acceleration root mean square (RMS) data and the BBS while Pearson\\'s correlation was used with TUG scores. Differences in accelerometer RMS between fallers and non-fallers and between test conditions were examined using t-test and non-parametric alternatives where appropriate. RESULTS: there was a stepwise increase in accelerometer RMS with increasing task complexity, and the accelerometer

  16. Retention based bio accessibility of carotenoids in green leafy vegetables: effect of different Indian culinary practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeenivasa J Rao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: Green Leafy Vegetables (GLV is pigment-rich and nutritionally relevant functional food sources with unique phytochemical constituents that include carotenoids which are precursors for vitamin A and protect cells from oxidation and cellular damage. Cooking processes and other factors such as temperature, light and alteration in moisture content generally promote either isomerization (trans to cis form or oxidative degradation of carotenoids to epoxides. Rationale: Studies pertaining to the effect of cooking methods on dietary carotenoids bio accessibility and their retention percent are scarce, particularly in an Indian Diasporas. Objective: Present study was to determine the carotenoids retention based bio accessibility in GLV such as amaranth (Amaranthus gangeticus, spinach (Spinacia oleracea and curry leaves (Murraya koenigii, when subjected to domestic cooking methods of microwave cooking, sautéing, pressure cooking, steaming and deep frying in oil, for a time duration of 8 and 12 minutes, either with lid closed or open. Method: The retention based bio accessibility of carotenoids were quantified by rapid separation liquid chromatography (RSLC using RP-C-18 column (150mm×4.6µ with 70% acetonitrile, 20% dichlomethane and 10% methanol for 20 minutes at flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. Results: The maximum retention based bio accessibility of total carotenoids and β-carotene were observed with micro wave cooking, steaming and sautéing methods. (Spinach: 57.88% and 55.92%, Amaranth: 56.15% and 57.49%, Curry leaves: 50.55% and 52.66% respectively. Conclusion: The reduction in the contents of carotenes in GLVs in correlation to various cooking methods are discussed which would be valuable for food researchers, nutritionists as well as health practitioners and dietitians, in developing and promoting nutritionally balanced diets and minimize vitamin A deficiency in Indian context.

  17. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  18. Encapsulation of Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Henelyta S.; Schuchmann, Heike P.; Engel, Robert; Walz, Elke; Briviba, Karlis

    Carotenoids are natural pigments, which are synthesized by microorganisms and plants. More than 600 naturally occurring carotenoids have been found in the nature. The main sources of carotenoids are fruits, vegetables, leaves, peppers, and certain types of fishes, sea foods, and birds. Carotenoids may protect cells against photosensitization and work as light-absorbing pigments during photosynthesis. Some carotenoids may inhibit the destructive effect of reactive oxygen species. Due to the antioxidative properties of carotenoids, many investigations regarding their protective effects against cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, as well as other degenerative illnesses, have been carried out in the last years (Briviba et al. 2004; Krinsky et al. 2004; Kirsh et al. 2006). A diet rich in carotenoids may also contribute to photoprotection against UV radiation (Stahl et al. 2006). In vitro studies have shown that carotenoids such as β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene stimulate bone formation and mineralization. The results may be related to prevention of osteoporosis (Kim et al. 2003; Yamaguchi and Uchiyama 2003; 2004; Yamaguchi et al. 2005).

  19. Carotenoid metabolism in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. Th...

  20. Correlation between movement complexity during static standing and balance function in institutionalized older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Momoko; Ikezoe, Tome; Kamiya, Midori; Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Sample entropy (SampEn) is an analysis to evaluate movement complexity of the center of pressure (COP). A lower value of SampEn indicates lower complexity of COP variability, that is, rigidity, and lower degrees of freedom. Previous studies reported the association of increased SampEn with improved standing balance ability in young subjects. However, no studies have examined these relationships among older adults. Thus, we aimed to investigate the relationship between SampEn and standing balance ability in older adults. Subjects and methods The subjects were 33 institutionalized older adults (aged 82.2±6.5 years). COP during static standing was measured. The standard deviation (SD) values of COP and SampEn in the sagittal and frontal planes were calculated using time series data. One-leg standing test (OLST), functional reach (FR) test, and lateral reach (LR) test were also measured to evaluate standing balance ability. Results OLST, FR, and LR were 6.5±8.3 s, 19.8±5.9 cm, and 18.2±6.4 cm, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis revealed that SampEn in the sagittal plane significantly correlated with OLST (r=−0.35) and FR (r=−0.36). However, SampEn in the frontal plane and SD of COP in both sagittal and frontal planes had no relationship with any of the clinical balance tests. Conclusion Lower SampEn implies rigidity for postural control. In the present study, it was found that lower SampEn in the sagittal plane was related to a higher balance function, which suggests that older adults utilized body rigidity to maintain postural stability as a compensative strategy.

  1. Carotenoids and Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Uragami, Chiasa; Cogdell, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous and essential pigments in photosynthesis. They absorb in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum and transfer the absorbed energy to (bacterio-)chlorophylls, and so expand the wavelength range of light that is able to drive photosynthesis. This is an example of singlet-singlet energy transfer, and so carotenoids serve to enhance the overall efficiency of photosynthetic light reactions. Carotenoids also act to protect photosynthetic organisms from the harmful effects of excess exposure to light. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoids plays a key role in this photoprotective reaction. In the light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria and chlorophytes, carotenoids have an additional role of structural stabilization of those complexes. In this article we review what is currently known about how carotenoids discharge these functions. The molecular architecture of photosynthetic systems will be outlined first to provide a basis from which to describe carotenoid photochemistry, which underlies most of their important functions in photosynthesis.

  2. Cross-correlation of output fluctuation and system-balancing cost in photovoltaic integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Ikeda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors analysed the cross-correlation of photovoltaic (PV output fluctuation for the actual PV output time series data in both the Tokyo area and the whole of Japan using the principal component analysis with the random matrix theory. Based on the obtained cross-correlation coefficients, the forecast error for PV output was estimated with/without considering the cross-correlations. Then the operation schedule of thermal plants is calculated to integrate PV output using the proposed unit commitment model with the estimated forecast error. The system-balancing cost of PV system was also estimated with or without demand response. Finally, validity of the concept of ‘local production for local consumption of renewable energy’ and alternative policy implications were discussed.

  3. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  4. Genetic correlation between days until start of luteal activity and milk yield, energy balance, and live weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerkamp, R.F.; Oldenbroek, J.K.; Gaast, van der H.J.; Werf, van der J.H.J.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic correlations among fertility and measures of energy balance, dry matter intake, and live weight (change). Data from 622 first lactation cows (fed ad libitum a complete ration) included milk, fat, and protein yields; energy balance; and live weights

  5. Correlation of the Y-Balance Test with Lower-limb Strength of Adult Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between Y-balance test (YBT) distance and the lower-limb strength of adult women. [Subjects] Forty women aged 45 to 80 years volunteered for this study. [Methods] The participants were tested for maximal muscle strength of the lower limbs (hip extensors, hip flexors, hip abductors, knee extensors, knee flexors, and ankle dorsiflexors) and YBT distances in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to quantify the linear relationships between YBT distances and lower-limb strength. [Results] Hip extensor and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with YBT anterior distance. Hip extensor, hip abductor, and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with the YBT posteromedial distance. Hip extensor and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with YBT posterolateral distance. [Conclusion] There was a weak correlation between lower-limb strength (hip extensors, hip abductors, and knee flexors) and dynamic postural control as measured by the YBT.

  6. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Palm Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puah C. Wei

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of carotenoids from crude palm oil was carried out in a dynamic (flow- through supercritical fluid extraction system. The carotenoids obtained were quantified using off-line UV-visible spectrophotometry. The effects of operating pressure and temperature, flow rate of the supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2, sample size of feed used on the solubility of palm carotenoids were investigated. The results showed that the extraction of carotenoids was governed by its solubility in the SC-CO2 and can be enhanced by increasing pressure at a constant temperature or decreasing temperature at a constant pressure. Increasing the flow rate and decreasing the sample size can reduce the extraction time but do not enhance the solubility. Palm carotenoids have very low solubility in SC-CO2 in the range of 1.31 x 10-4 g kg-1 to 1.58 x 10-3 g kg-1 for the conditions investigated in this study. The experimental data obtained were compared with those published by other workers and correlated by a density-based equation as proposed by Chrastil.

  7. Carotenoid Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ray K.; White, David C.

    1970-01-01

    The carotenoid pigments of Staphylococcus aureus U-71 were identified as phytoene; ζ-carotene; δ-carotene; phytofluenol; a phytofluenol-like carotenoid, rubixanthin; and three rubixanthin-like carotenoids after extraction, saponification, chromatographic separation, and determination of their absorption spectra. There was no evidence of carotenoid esters or glycoside ethers in the extract before saponification. During the aerobic growth cycle the total carotenoids increased from 45 to 1,000 nmoles per g (dry weight), with the greatest increases in the polar, hydroxylated carotenoids. During the anaerobic growth cycle, the total carotenoids increased from 20 nmoles per g (dry weight) to 80 nmoles per g (dry weight), and only traces of the polar carotenoids were formed. Light had no effect on carotenoid synthesis. About 0.14% of the mevalonate-2-14C added to the culture was incorporated into the carotenoids during each bacterial doubling. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The incorporation and turnover of 14C indicated the carotenes were sequentially desaturated and hydroxylated to form the polar carotenoids. PMID:5423369

  8. The effects of dietary carotenoid supplementation and retinal carotenoid accumulation on vision-mediated foraging in the house finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Toomey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For many bird species, vision is the primary sensory modality used to locate and assess food items. The health and spectral sensitivities of the avian visual system are influenced by diet-derived carotenoid pigments that accumulate in the retina. Among wild House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus, we have found that retinal carotenoid accumulation varies significantly among individuals and is related to dietary carotenoid intake. If diet-induced changes in retinal carotenoid accumulation alter spectral sensitivity, then they have the potential to affect visually mediated foraging performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two experiments, we measured foraging performance of house finches with dietarily manipulated retinal carotenoid levels. We tested each bird's ability to extract visually contrasting food items from a matrix of inedible distracters under high-contrast (full and dimmer low-contrast (red-filtered lighting conditions. In experiment one, zeaxanthin-supplemented birds had significantly increased retinal carotenoid levels, but declined in foraging performance in the high-contrast condition relative to astaxanthin-supplemented birds that showed no change in retinal carotenoid accumulation. In experiments one and two combined, we found that retinal carotenoid concentrations predicted relative foraging performance in the low- vs. high-contrast light conditions in a curvilinear pattern. Performance was positively correlated with retinal carotenoid accumulation among birds with low to medium levels of accumulation (∼0.5-1.5 µg/retina, but declined among birds with very high levels (>2.0 µg/retina. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that carotenoid-mediated spectral filtering enhances color discrimination, but that this improvement is traded off against a reduction in sensitivity that can compromise visual discrimination. Thus, retinal carotenoid levels may be optimized to meet the visual demands of specific

  9. Mechanistic aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Moïse, Alexander R.

    2014-01-08

    Carotenoid synthesis is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. Carotenoids are tetraterpenes derived through the condensation of the five-carbon (C5) universal isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). A recently developed concept that could explain the role of the poly-cis pathway in carotenoid synthesis is that the intermediates of this pathway have additional physiological roles that extend beyond serving as precursors of lycopene. This concept is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. The feedback regulation of early carotenoid synthetic genes in response to a block in upstream metabolism represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the mechanism and regulation of carotenoid synthesis and of metabolic regulation in general. The molecular details of a signaling pathway that regulates carotenogenesis in response to the levels of carotenoid precursors are still unclear.

  10. Molecular factors controlling photosynthetic light harvesting by carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polívka, Tomás; Frank, Harry A

    2010-08-17

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photoinduced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in the proximity of chlorophylls. A few three-dimensional structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates the elucidation of correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids

  11. Distribution of carotenoids in endosperm, germ, and aleurone fractions of cereal grain kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndolo, Victoria U; Beta, Trust

    2013-08-15

    To compare the distribution of carotenoids across the grain, non-corn and corn cereals were hand dissected into endosperm, germ and aleurone fractions. Total carotenoid content (TCC) and carotenoid composition were analysed using spectrophotometry and HPLC. Cereal carotenoid composition was similar; however, concentrations varied significantly (paleurone layer had zeaxanthin levels 2- to 5-fold higher than lutein among the cereals. Positive significant correlations (paleurone layer. Our findings suggest that the aleurone of wheat, oat, corn and germ of barley have significantly enhanced carotenoid levels.

  12. Carotenoid fluorescence in Dunaliella salina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinegris, D.M.M.; Es, van M.A.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Dunaliella salina is a halotolerant green alga that is well known for its carotenoid producing capacity. The produced carotenoids are mainly stored in lipid globules. For various research purposes, such as production and extraction kinetics, we would like to determine and/or localise the carotenoid

  13. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation.

  14. Carotenoid profiling in tubers of different potato (Solanum sp) cultivars: accumulation of carotenoids mediated by xanthophyll esterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Orozco, Rebeca; Gallardo-Guerrero, Lourdes; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso

    2013-12-01

    The carotenoid profile of sixty potato cultivars (commercial, bred, old and native cultivars) has been characterised in order to provide information to be used in selective breeding programs directed to improve the nutritional value of this important staple food. Cultivars were segregated into three groups according to the major pigment in the carotenoid profile: violaxanthin (37 cultivars; especially those with higher carotenoid content), lutein (16 cultivars), and neoxanthin (7 cultivars). Other minor carotenoids were antheraxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin and β-carotene, while zeaxanthin was absent in all sample. The total carotenoid content ranged from 50.0 to 1552.0 μg/100 g dry wt, with an average value of about 435.3 μg/100 g dry wt. Sipancachi, Poluya and Chaucha native cultivars showed the highest carotenoid content (1020.0, 1478.2 and 1551.2 μg/100 g dry wt, respectively). Xanthophyll esters were present in most cultivars, mainly as diesterified forms, being observed a direct correlation between the carotenoid content and the esterified fraction, suggesting that the esterification process facilitates the accumulation of these lipophilic compounds within the plastids. Therefore, the presence of xanthophyll esters should be a phenotypic character to be included in the breeding studies, and more efforts should be dedicated to the understanding of the biochemical process leading to this structural modification of carotenoids in plants.

  15. THE ANALYSIS OF PATELLA FEMORAL (Q ANGLE’S CORRELATION BETWEEN LEG STRENGTH AND BALANCE IN ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kürşat HAZAR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the analyze of patella femoral (q angle’s correlation between leg strength and balance in athletes with different genders.50 female and 75 male athletes, average of age 20,120±,961, who are receiving education in departments related to Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University Faculty of Sports Science in total 125 regularly practicing and participating in sports competitions athletes voluntarily took part in. Stature, weight, Q angle, medial condyle and medial malleolus space, dynamic balance, leg strength and flexibility values of the participants in the study research study group have been carried out respectively. Comparison of Q angles, balance, strength and flexibility values according to gender has been conducted with t test in SPSS program, Q angle values of the athletes’ relationship with age, stature, weight and fitness age, with Pearson Correlation Test, it is analyzed that if there’s a relationship between position right-left feet Q angle values in standing& supine position and medial condyle, medial malleolus, balance values, leg strength, flexibility and relative strength values. It is determined that there is a significant difference between left foot Q angles in standing& supine position and right foot Q angles in standing& supine position, and relative strength and medial condyle angles when considered Q angle values of the participants according to gender (p<0,01. It is determined that there is a significant negative correlation between female athletes’ supine position right and left feet Q angle value and fitness age. There is a significant negative correlation between age, medial malleolus, weight and medial condyle, as well (p<0,05. It is determined that while there is a positive correlation between female athletes’ both standing & supine positions and both legs Q angles; there is a negative correlation between balance and relative strength values. It is seen that there is a significant negative

  16. Density functional with full exact exchange, balanced nonlocality of correlations, and constraint satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Jianmin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perdew, John P [TULANE UNIV; Staroverov, Viktor N [UNIV OF WESTERN ONTARIO; Scuseria, Gustavo E [RICE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We construct a nonlocal density functional approximation with full exact exchange, while preserving the constraint-satisfaction approach and justified error cancellations of simpler semilocal functionals. This is achieved by interpolating between different approximations suitable for two extreme regions of the electron density. In a 'normal' region, the exact exchange-correlation hole density around an electron is semilocal because its spatial range is reduced by correlation and because it integrates over a narrow range to -1. These regions are well described by popular semilocal approximations (many of which have been constructed nonempirically), because of proper accuracy for a slowly-varying density or because of error cancellation between exchange and correlation. 'Abnormal' regions, where non locality is unveiled, include those in which exchange can dominate correlation (one-electron, nonuniform high-density, and rapidly-varying limits), and those open subsystems of fluctuating electron number over which the exact exchange-correlation hole integrates to a value greater than -1. Regions between these extremes are described by a hybrid functional mixing exact and semi local exchange energy densities locally (i.e., with a mixing fraction that is a function of position r and a functional of the density). Because our mixing fraction tends to 1 in the high-density limit, we employ full exact exchange according to the rigorous definition of the exchange component of any exchange-correlation energy functional. Use of full exact exchange permits the satisfaction of many exact constraints, but the nonlocality of exchange also requires balanced nonlocality of correlation. We find that this nonlocality can demand at least five empirical parameters (corresponding roughly to the four kinds of abnormal regions). Our local hybrid functional is perhaps the first accurate size-consistent density functional with full exact exchange. It satisfies other known

  17. Reliability of dynamic sitting balance tests and their correlations with functional mobility for wheelchair users with chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring the dynamic sitting balance of wheelchair users with spinal cord injury. The balance tests were performed in nine patients with chronic spinal cord injury (average of 17.2 years postinjury between levels C6 and L1, while they were sitting in their wheelchairs and on a standardized stool (unsupported sitting, twice, 7 days apart. Limits of stability (LOS and sequential weight shifting (SWS were designed in this study. The balance tests measured participants' volitional weight shifting in multiple directions within their base of support. Their mobility scores on the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III were correlated with the balance test results. The LOS results showed moderate to excellent test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.673 to 0.990 for both the wheelchair and the unsupported sitting. The SWS results showed moderate to excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.688 to 0.952. The LOS results correlated significantly with the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III mobility scores only in case of unsupported sitting, but the SWS test results showed significant correlations in both sitting conditions. To sum up, the sitting LOS and SWS tests are reliable and valid tools for assessing the dynamic sitting balance control of patients with spinal cord injury.

  18. Carotenoids in white- and red-fleshed loquat fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun-Hua; Xu, Chang-Jie; Sun, Chong-De; Li, Xian; Chen, Kun-Song

    2007-09-19

    Fruits of 23 loquat ( Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) cultivars, of which 11 were white-fleshed and 12 red-fleshed, were analyzed for color, carotenoid content, and vitamin A values. Color differences between two loquat groups were observed in the peel as well as in the flesh. beta-Carotene and lutein were the major carotenoids in the peel, which accounted for about 60% of the total colored carotenoids in both red- and white-fleshed cultivars. beta-Cryptoxanthin and, in some red-fleshed cultivars, beta-carotene were the most abundant carotenoids in the flesh, and in total, they accounted for over half of the colored carotenoids. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin, luteoxanthin, 9- cis-violaxanthin, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeta-carotene were also identified, while zeaxanthin, alpha-carotene, and lycopene were undetectable. Xanthophylls were highly esterified. On average, 1.3- and 10.8-fold higher levels of colored carotenoids were observed in the peel and flesh tissue of red-fleshed cultivars, respectively. The percentage of beta-carotene among colored carotenoids was higher in both the peel and the flesh of red-fleshed cultivars. Correlations between the levels of total colored carotenoids and the color indices were analyzed. The a* and the ratio of a*/ b* were positively correlated with the total content of colored carotenoids, while L*, b*, and H degrees correlated negatively. Vitamin A values, as retinol equivalents (RE), of loquat flesh were 0.49 and 8.77 microg/g DW (8.46 and 136.41 microg/100 g FW) on average for white- and red-fleshed cultivars, respectively. The RE values for the red-fleshed fruits were higher than fruits such as mango, red watermelon, papaya, and orange as reported in the literature, suggesting that loquat is an excellent source of provitamin A.

  19. Stability of bacterial carotenoids in the presence of iron in a model of the gastric compartment - comparison with dietary reference carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-04-15

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria, Bacillus indicus HU36 and Bacillus firmus GB1 are sources of carotenoids (∼fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments and ∼thirteen distinct pink pigments, respectively). They are glycosides of oxygenated lycopene derivatives (apo-lycopenoids) and are assumed to be more heat- and gastric-stable than common carotenoids. In this study, the oxidation by O2 of the bacterial carotenoids was initiated by free iron (Fe(II) and Fe(III)) or by heme iron (metmyoglobin) in a mildly acidic aqueous solution mimicking the gastro-intestinal compartment and compared to the oxidation of the common dietary carotenoids β-carotene, lycopene and astaxanthin. Under these conditions, all bacterial carotenoids appear more stable in the presence of heme iron vs. free iron. Carotenoid autoxidation initiated by Fe(II) is relatively fast and likely involves reactive oxygen-iron species derived from Fe(II) and O2. By contrast, the corresponding reaction with Fe(III) is kinetically blocked by the slow preliminary reduction of Fe(III) into Fe(II) by the carotenoids. The stability of carotenoids toward autoxidation increases as follows: β-carotenecarotenoids react more quickly than reference carotenoids with Fe(III), but much more slowly than the reference carotenoids with Fe(II). This reaction is correlated with the structure of the carotenoids, which can have opposite effects in a micellar system: bacterial carotenoids with electro-attracting terminal groups have a lower reducing capacity than β-carotene and lycopene. However, their polar head favours their location close to the interface of micelles, in closer contact with oxidative species. Kinetic analyses of the iron-induced autoxidation of astaxanthin and HU36 carotenoids has been performed and gives insights in the underlying mechanisms.

  20. Carotenoids and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, Sari; Nurmi, Tarja; Mursu, Jaakko; Rissanen, Tiina H

    2006-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in Western countries. Nutrition has a significant role in the prevention of many chronic diseases such as CVD, cancers, and degenerative brain diseases. The major risk and protective factors in the diet are well recognized, but interesting new candidates continue to appear. It is well known that a greater intake of fruit and vegetables can help prevent heart diseases and mortality. Because fruit, berries, and vegetables are chemically complex foods, it is difficult to pinpoint any single nutrient that contributes the most to the cardioprotective effects. Several potential components that are found in fruit, berries, and vegetables are probably involved in the protective effects against CVD. Potential beneficial substances include antioxidant vitamins, folate, fiber, and potassium. Antioxidant compounds found in fruit and vegetables, such as vitamin C, carotenoids, and flavonoids, may influence the risk of CVD by preventing the oxidation of cholesterol in arteries. In this review, the role of main dietary carotenoids, ie, lycopene, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin, in the prevention of heart diseases is discussed. Although it is clear that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables can help prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with heart diseases, more information is needed to ascertain the association between the intake of single nutrients, such as carotenoids, and the risk of CVD. Currently, the consumption of carotenoids in pharmaceutical forms for the treatment or prevention of heart diseases cannot be recommended.

  1. Plastids and carotenoid accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastids are ubiquitously in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids except proplastids can synth...

  2. Modulation of the carotenoid bioaccessibility through liposomal encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chen; Zhang, Yating; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Shuqin

    2014-11-01

    The low bioaccessibility of carotenoids is currently a challenge to their incorporation in pharmaceutics, nutraceuticals and functional foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulating effects of liposome encapsulation on the bioaccessibility, and its relationship with carotenoid structure and incorporated concentration. The physical stability of liposomes, lipid digestibility, carotenoids release and bioaccessibility were investigated during incubation in a simulated gastrointestinal tract. Analysis on the liposome size and morphology showed that after digestion, the majority of particles maintained spherical shape with only an increase of size in liposomes loading β-carotene or lutein. However, a large proportion of heterogeneous particles were visible in the micelle phase of liposomes loading lycopene or canthaxanthin. It was also found that the release of lutein and β-carotene from liposomes was inhibited in a simulated gastric fluid, while was slow and sustained in a simulated intestinal fluid. By contrast, lycopene and canthaxanthin exhibited fast and considerable release in the gastrointestinal media. Both carotenoid bioaccessibility and micellization content decreased with the increase of incorporated concentration. Anyway, the bioaccessibility of carotenoids after encapsulated in liposomes was in the following order: lutein>β-carotene>lycopene>canthaxanthin. Bivariate correlation analysis revealed that carotenoid bioaccessibility depended strongly on the incorporating ability of carotenoids into a lipid bilayer, loading content, and nature of the system.

  3. Glacier annual balance measurement, prediction, forecasting and climate correlations, North Cascades, Washington 1984–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Pelto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available North Cascade glacier annual balance measured on 10 glaciers from 1984–2006 yielded mean annual balance (ba of –0.54 m/a, and –12.38 m cumulatively. This is a significant loss for glaciers that average 30–60 m in thickness, representing 20–40% of their entire volume. Two observed glaciers, Lewis Glacier and Spider Glacier, no longer exist. The ba of North Cascade glaciers is reliably calculated based on 1 April snowpack water equivalent and ablation season temperature. 1 May forecasting of ba using the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Multivariate El Nino Southern Oscillation circulation indices correctly determined the sign of mass balance in 42 of 47 years. Glacier annual balance forecasting is an important step for summer water resource management in glacier runoff dominated stream systems. The forecast for North Cascade glaciers in 2007 is for a negative annual balance.

  4. Tissue-Specific Apocarotenoid Glycosylation Contributes to Carotenoid Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lätari, Kira; Wüst, Florian; Hübner, Michaela; Schaub, Patrick; Beisel, Kim Gabriele; Matsubara, Shizue; Beyer, Peter; Welsch, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Attaining defined steady-state carotenoid levels requires balancing of the rates governing their synthesis and metabolism. Phytoene formation mediated by phytoene synthase (PSY) is rate limiting in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, whereas carotenoid catabolism involves a multitude of nonenzymatic and enzymatic processes. We investigated carotenoid and apocarotenoid formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in response to enhanced pathway flux upon PSY overexpression. This resulted in a dramatic accumulation of mainly β-carotene in roots and nongreen calli, whereas carotenoids remained unchanged in leaves. We show that, in chloroplasts, surplus PSY was partially soluble, localized in the stroma and, therefore, inactive, whereas the membrane-bound portion mediated a doubling of phytoene synthesis rates. Increased pathway flux was not compensated by enhanced generation of long-chain apocarotenals but resulted in higher levels of C13 apocarotenoid glycosides (AGs). Using mutant lines deficient in carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs), we identified CCD4 as being mainly responsible for the majority of AGs formed. Moreover, changed AG patterns in the carotene hydroxylase mutants lutein deficient1 (lut1) and lut5 exhibiting altered leaf carotenoids allowed us to define specific xanthophyll species as precursors for the apocarotenoid aglycons detected. In contrast to leaves, carotenoid hyperaccumulating roots contained higher levels of β-carotene-derived apocarotenals, whereas AGs were absent. These contrasting responses are associated with tissue-specific capacities to synthesize xanthophylls, which thus determine the modes of carotenoid accumulation and apocarotenoid formation.

  5. Carotenoid-Based Colours Reflect the Stress Response in the Common Lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitze, Patrick S.; Cote, Julien; San-Jose, Luis Martin; Meylan, Sandrine; Isaksson, Caroline; Andersson, Staffan; Rossi, Jean-Marc; Clobert, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Under chronic stress, carotenoid-based colouration has often been shown to fade. However, the ecological and physiological mechanisms that govern colouration still remain largely unknown. Colour changes may be directly induced by the stressor (for example through reduced carotenoid intake) or due to the activation of the physiological stress response (PSR, e.g. due to increased blood corticosterone concentrations). Here, we tested whether blood corticosterone concentration affected carotenoid-based colouration, and whether a trade-off between colouration and PSR existed. Using the common lizard (Lacerta vivipara), we correlatively and experimentally showed that elevated blood corticosterone levels are associated with increased redness of the lizard's belly. In this study, the effects of corticosterone did not depend on carotenoid ingestion, indicating the absence of a trade-off between colouration and PSR for carotenoids. While carotenoid ingestion increased blood carotenoid concentration, colouration was not modified. This suggests that carotenoid-based colouration of common lizards is not severely limited by dietary carotenoid intake. Together with earlier studies, these findings suggest that the common lizard's carotenoid-based colouration may be a composite trait, consisting of fixed (e.g. genetic) and environmentally elements, the latter reflecting the lizard's PSR. PMID:19352507

  6. Carotenoid-based colours reflect the stress response in the common lizard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S Fitze

    Full Text Available Under chronic stress, carotenoid-based colouration has often been shown to fade. However, the ecological and physiological mechanisms that govern colouration still remain largely unknown. Colour changes may be directly induced by the stressor (for example through reduced carotenoid intake or due to the activation of the physiological stress response (PSR, e.g. due to increased blood corticosterone concentrations. Here, we tested whether blood corticosterone concentration affected carotenoid-based colouration, and whether a trade-off between colouration and PSR existed. Using the common lizard (Lacerta vivipara, we correlatively and experimentally showed that elevated blood corticosterone levels are associated with increased redness of the lizard's belly. In this study, the effects of corticosterone did not depend on carotenoid ingestion, indicating the absence of a trade-off between colouration and PSR for carotenoids. While carotenoid ingestion increased blood carotenoid concentration, colouration was not modified. This suggests that carotenoid-based colouration of common lizards is not severely limited by dietary carotenoid intake. Together with earlier studies, these findings suggest that the common lizard's carotenoid-based colouration may be a composite trait, consisting of fixed (e.g. genetic and environmentally elements, the latter reflecting the lizard's PSR.

  7. Carotenoid-based colours reflect the stress response in the common lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitze, Patrick S; Cote, Julien; San-Jose, Luis Martin; Meylan, Sandrine; Isaksson, Caroline; Andersson, Staffan; Rossi, Jean-Marc; Clobert, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Under chronic stress, carotenoid-based colouration has often been shown to fade. However, the ecological and physiological mechanisms that govern colouration still remain largely unknown. Colour changes may be directly induced by the stressor (for example through reduced carotenoid intake) or due to the activation of the physiological stress response (PSR, e.g. due to increased blood corticosterone concentrations). Here, we tested whether blood corticosterone concentration affected carotenoid-based colouration, and whether a trade-off between colouration and PSR existed. Using the common lizard (Lacerta vivipara), we correlatively and experimentally showed that elevated blood corticosterone levels are associated with increased redness of the lizard's belly. In this study, the effects of corticosterone did not depend on carotenoid ingestion, indicating the absence of a trade-off between colouration and PSR for carotenoids. While carotenoid ingestion increased blood carotenoid concentration, colouration was not modified. This suggests that carotenoid-based colouration of common lizards is not severely limited by dietary carotenoid intake. Together with earlier studies, these findings suggest that the common lizard's carotenoid-based colouration may be a composite trait, consisting of fixed (e.g. genetic) and environmentally elements, the latter reflecting the lizard's PSR.

  8. Correlation between center of pressure and functional balance in non-faller elderly practitioners of Tai Chi Chuan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo; Salgado-Méndez, Rodrigo; Castro-Ramírez, Rodolfo

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between center of pressure and functional balance in non-faller elderly practitioners of Tai Chi. [Subjects and Methods] For the study, nine non-faller elderly practitioners of Tai Chi who were able to maintain a standing posture and walk independently were recruited. Timed one-leg standing and timed up-and-go tests were used as functional balance tests and force platform to measure the center of pressure. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated for the timed up-and-go/timed one-leg standing test scores and center of pressure parameter values. [Results] None of the correlations was statistically significant, but moderate correlations were observed between the pairs timed one-leg standing/sway area of center of pressure, timed one-leg standing/standard deviation of center of pressure in the mediolateral direction, timed one-leg standing/mean velocity of center of pressure in the anteroposterior direction, and timed up-and-go test sway area of center of pressure. [Conclusion] Timed one-leg standing is more appropriate than timed up-and-go test for the measurement of functional balance in non-faller elderly practitioners of Tai Chi.

  9. Correlates of Bone Mineral Density and Sagittal Spinal Balance in the Aged

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and sagittal spinal balance in the Korean elderly population. Methods The retrospective study included subjects aged 60 years and above, who had whole-spine lateral radiography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) within a year's gap between each other. Sagittal vertical axis (SVA) for evaluation of sagittal spinal balance and five spinopelvic parameters were measured through radiography. The presence of compr...

  10. Carotenoids and lung cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the molecular actions of carotenoids is critical for human studies involving carotenoids for prevention of lung cancer and cancers at other tissue sites. While the original hypothesis prompting the beta-carotene intervention trials was that beta-carotene exerts beneficial effects thro...

  11. Analysis on Carotenoids Content and Other Quality Traits of 185 Wheat Varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHOU; Yuanyuan WU; Wenyin ZHENG; Wenming ZHANG; Wenshang GUO; Danian YAO

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide the reference of improving the nutritional quality traits in carotenoids and screening its resources of wheat varieties, 185 wheat varieties or lines were selected as materials to test the carotenoids content, lipoxygenase activ-ity, whiteness, yel owness and some other quality traits of whole mil in wheat.The results showed that there were highly significant variations in lipoxygenase activity , carotenoids content, whiteness and yel owness among those sample of wheat vari-eties; carotenoids content was significantly and positively correlated with yel owness. Cluster analysis was performed based on carotenoids content clustered al the vari-eties or lines into three major groups. Additional y, carotenoids were discussed in the application of nutritional quality improvement in wheat.

  12. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  13. ASTAXANTHIN: A POTENTIAL CAROTENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Dhankhar et al.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a member of the carotenoid family, is a dark-red pigment which is the main carotenoid found in the marine world of algae and aquatic animals. Astaxanthin, is present in many types of seafood, including salmon, trout, red sea bream, shrimp and lobster, as well as in birds such as flamingo and quail. Synthetic Astaxanthin dominates the world market but recent interest in natural sources of the pigment has increased substantially. Common sources of natural Astaxanthin, are the green algae haematococcus pluvialis, the red yeast, Phaffia rhodozyma, as well as crustacean byproducts. Astaxanthin possesses unusual antioxidant property which has caused a surge in the nutraceutical market of the encapsulated products. Numerous studies have shown that astaxanthin has potential health-promoting effects in the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as cancers, chronic inflammatory diseases, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, cardiovascular diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, liver diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, eye diseases, skin diseases, exercise-induced fatigue, male infertility, and renal failure. In this article, the currently available scientific literature regarding the most significant activities of astaxanthin is reviewed.

  14. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  15. Identification and expression analysis of candidate genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in chickpea seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Rezaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant carotenoids have a key role in preventing various diseases in human because of their antioxidant and provitamin A properties. Chickpea is a good source of carotenoid among legumes and its diverse germplasm and genome accessibility makes it a good model for carotenogenesis studies. The structure, location and copy numbers of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis were retrieved from the chickpea genome. The majority of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs within these genes across five diverse chickpea cultivars was synonymous mutation. We examined the expression of the carotenogenesis genes and their association with carotenoid concentration at different seed development stages of five chickpea cultivars. Total carotenoid concentration ranged from 22 μg g-1 in yellow cotyledon kabuli to 44 μg g-1 in green cotyledon desi at 32 days post anthesis (DPA. The majority of carotenoids in chickpea seeds consists of lutein and zeaxanthin. The expression of the selected 19 genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis pathway showed common pattern across five cultivars with higher expression at 8 and/or 16 DPA then dropped considerably at 24 and 32 DPA. Almost all genes were up-regulated in CDC Jade cultivar. Correlation analysis between gene expression and carotenoid concentration showed that the genes involved in the primary step of carotenoid biosynthesis pathway including carotenoid desaturase and isomerase positively correlated with various carotenoid components in chickpea seeds. A negative correlation was found between hydroxylation activity and provitamin A concentration in the seeds. The highest provitamin A concentration including β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin were found in green cotyledon chickpea cultivars.

  16. Coupled heat/mass-balance model for analyzing correlation between excess AlF3 concentration and aluminum electrolyte temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-bo; QU Xiang-dong; ZHOU Jie-min

    2009-01-01

    The influence of aluminum electrolyte component on its temperature is an important issue within the field of aluminum reduction with pre-baked cells. The characteristic correlation between excess AlF3 concentration and aluminum electrolyte temperature was explored through the modeling of heat and mass transfer processes in industrial pre-baked aluminum reduction cells. A coupled heat/mass-balance model was derived theoretically from the mass and energy balance of an electrolysis cell, and then was simplified properly into a practical expression. The model demonstrates that if environmental temperature and Al2O3 concentration keep constant, the excess AlF3 concentration decreases with the aluminum electrolyte temperature linearly and its decrease rate is dependent on the heat transfer property of aluminum electrolyte, side wall and cell shell. Secondly, experiments were conducted on site with two industrial cells in an aluminum electrolysis plant. Excess AlF3 concentration and aluminum electrolyte temperature were obtained simultaneously together with other parameters such as Al2O3, CaF2, MgF2 and LiF concentrations. Results show that the maximum absolute error between the tested value and the calculated value of excess AlF3 concentration using the proposed model is less than 2%. This reveals that the coupled heat/mass-balance model can appropriately characterize the correlation between excess AlF3 concentration and aluminum electrolyte temperature with good accuracy and practicability.

  17. Resonant Raman detectors for noninvasive assessment of carotenoid antioxidants in human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia R.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Bernstein, P. S.

    2003-07-01

    Carotenoid antioxidants form an important part of the human body's anti-oxidant system and are thought to play an important role in disease prevention. Studies have shown an inverse correlation between high dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of certain cancers, heart disease and degenerative diseases. For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are present in high concentrations in the human retina, are thought to prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the Western world. We have developed various clinical prototype instruments, based on resonance Raman spectroscopy, that are able to measure carotenoid levels directly in the tissue of interest. At present we use the Raman technology to quantify carotenoid levels in the human retina, in skin, and in the oral cavity. We use resonant excitation of the π-conjugated molecules in the visible wavelength range and detect the molecules' carbon-carbon stretch frequencies. The spectral properties of the various carotenoids can be explored to selectively measure in some cases individual carotenoid species linked ot the prevention of cancer, in human skin. The instrumentation involves home-built, compact, high-throughput Raman systems capable of measuring physiological carotenoid concentrations in human subjects rapidly and quantitatively. The instruments have been demonstrated for field use and screening of tissue carotenoid status in large populations. In Epidemiology, the technology holds promise as a novel, noninvasive and objective biomarker of fruit and vegetable uptake.

  18. Molecular characterisation and the light-dark regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Yeon Bok; Lee, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Un

    2013-12-15

    Seven partial-length cDNAs and 1 full-length cDNA that were involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and 2 partial-length cDNAs that encoded carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases were first isolated and characterised in 2 tartary buckwheat cultivars (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.), Hokkai T8 and Hokkai T10. They were constitutively expressed at high levels in the leaves and flowers, where carotenoids are mostly distributed. During the seed development of tartary buckwheat, an inverse correlation between transcription level of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase and carotenoid content was observed. The light-grown sprouts exhibited higher levels of expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in T10 and carotenoid content in both T8 and T10 compared to the dark-grown sprouts. The predominant carotenoids in tartary buckwheat were lutein and β-carotene, and very abundant amounts of these carotenoids were found in light-grown sprouts. This study might broaden our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and indicates targets for increasing the production of carotenoids in tartary buckwheat.

  19. Influencia del secado lento a baja temperatura en el contenido carotenoide de dos variedades de pimiento (Capsicum annuum L.. Balance biosintético y/o degradativo en función de las condiciones de procesado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minguez-Mosquera, M. I.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of drying process at low temperature of two varieties of pepper for paprika (Capsicum annuum L. cv Jaranda and Jariza according to the traditional techniques of La Vera region is carried out controlling simultaneously the characteristics of the fruits before and after of the dehydration process and the conditions used. Correspondences have been found between the initial moisture of the fruits, the drying parameters (temperature and time, and the increase and/or loss (including its corresponding quantity in carotenoid pigment content. The favorable conditions to produce a pigment content increase, that indicates the existence of a biosynthetic process, are those including a healthy raw material with high moisture values and temperature of dried moderate - low (50 ºC without extending unnecessarily the dehydration time (just to obtain the adequate texture for the grinding.Se realiza un estudio del proceso de secado de dos variedades de pimiento pimentonero (Capsicum annuum L. cv Jaranda y cv Jariza efectuado a baja temperatura según las técnicas tradicionales de la comarca de La Vera. El control de las características de los frutos antes y después del procesado y de las condiciones de deshidratación en seis procesos de secado han permitido establecer una correspondencia entre la humedad inicial de los frutos, los parámetros de secado (temperatura y tiempo, y la ganancia y/o pérdida (y su correspondiente cuantía en el contenido inicial de pigmentos carotenoides. Las condiciones favorables a una ganancia en pigmentos (que indica la existencia de un proceso biosintético son aquellas en las que se parte de frutos sanos, con altos valores de humedad, temperatura de secado moderada - baja (menor de 50 ºC y sin extender innecesariamente el tiempo de procesado (sólo hasta conseguir la textura adecuada para la molienda.

  20. Carotenoid photoprotection in Diaptomus kenai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hairston, N.G. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    Red copepods have been reported from a wide variety of aquatic environments. The red color is produced by a carotenoid pigment, in most cases astaxanthin and its esters, that the copepods cannot form de novo but derive from ingested pigments such as beta-carotene. In an earlier study, the adaptive advantage of carotenoid pigmentation was investigated. Copepods containing large amounts of astaxanthin had significantly better survival than copepods containing small amounts of the pigment when exposed to light of an intensity and color similar to that occurring in the lakes from which they were taken. This result suggested that the carotenoid pigment protected the copepods from photodamage by visible light. Here a second example of carotenoid photoprotection involving the copepod Diaptomus kenai found in fresh-water mountain lakes is described. Information on the vertical distributions of D. sicilis and D. nevadensis in relation to their pigmentation is summarized, as these data will be presented elsewhere.

  1. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Vega

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functions of carotenoids relevant for life on earth. Biological properties of carotenoids allow for a wide range of commercial applications. Indeed, recent interest in the carotenoids has been mainly for their nutraceutical properties. A large number of scientific studies have confirmed the benefits of carotenoids to health and their use for this purpose is growing rapidly. In addition, carotenoids have traditionally been used in food and animal feed for their color properties. Carotenoids are also known to improve consumer perception of quality; an example is the addition of carotenoids to fish feed to impart color to farmed salmon.

  2. Dynamic parameters of balance which correlate to elderly persons with a history of falls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse W Muir

    Full Text Available Poor balance in older persons contributes to a rise in fall risk and serious injury, yet no consensus has developed on which measures of postural sway can identify those at greatest risk of falling. Postural sway was measured in 161 elderly individuals (81.8y±7.4, 24 of which had at least one self-reported fall in the prior six months, and compared to sway measured in 37 young adults (34.9y±7.1. Center of pressure (COP was measured during 4 minutes of quiet stance with eyes opened. In the elderly with fall history, all measures but one were worse than those taken from young adults (e.g., maximal COP velocity was 2.7× greater in fallers than young adults; p<0.05, while three measures of balance were significantly worse in fallers as compared to older persons with no recent fall history (COP Displacement, Short Term Diffusion Coefficient, and Critical Displacement. Variance of elderly subjects' COP measures from the young adult cohort were weighted to establish a balance score ("B-score" algorithm designed to distinguish subjects with a fall history from those more sure on their feet. Relative to a young adult B-score of zero, elderly "non-fallers" had a B-score of 0.334, compared to 0.645 for those with a fall history (p<0.001. A weighted amalgam of postural sway elements may identify individuals at greatest risk of falling, allowing interventions to target those with greatest need of attention.

  3. Improving carotenoid extraction from tomato waste by pulsed electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eLuengo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the influence of the application of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF of different intensities (3-7 kV/cm and 0-300 μs on the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel and pulp in a mixture of hexane:acetone:ethanol was studied with the aim of increasing extraction yield or reducing the percentage of the less green solvents in the extraction medium. According to the cellular disintegration index, the optimum treatment time for the permeabilization of tomato peel and pulp at different electric field strengths was 90 µs. The PEF permeabilization of tomato pulp did not significantly increase the carotenoid extraction. However, a PEF-treatment at 5 kV/cm improved the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel by 39 % as compared with the control in a mixture of hexane:ethanol:acetone (50:25:25. Further increments of electric field from 5 to 7 kV/cm did not increase significantly the extraction of carotenoids. . The presence of acetone in the solvent mixture did not positively affect the carotenoid extraction when the tomato peels were PEF-treated. Response surface methodology was used to determine the potential of PEF for reducing the percentage of hexane in a hexane:ethanol mixture. The application of a PEF-treatment allowed reducing the hexane percentage from 45 to 30 % without affecting the carotenoid extraction yield. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts obtained from tomato peel was correlated with the carotenoid concentration and it was not affected by the PEF-treatment.

  4. Correlation between the selective control assessment of lower extremity and pediatric balance scale scores in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoungwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the Selective Control Assessment of Lower Extremity (SCALE) and Pediatric Balance Scales (PBS) in children with spastic cerebral palsy and further to test whether the SCALE is a valid tool to predict the PBS. [Subjects and Methods] A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the SCALE and PBS in 23 children (9 females, 14 males, GMFCS level I–III) with spastic cerebral palsy. [Results] Both the SCALE and PBS scores for children with spastic hemiplegia were significantly higher than those for children with spastic diplegia. The scores for SCALE items were low for distal parts. The PBS items that were difficult for the participants to perform were items 8, 9, 10, and 14 with the highest difficulty experienced for item 8 followed by items 9, 10, and 14. The correlation coefficient (0.797) between the SCALE and PBS scores was statistically significant. The correlations between each SCALE item and the PBS scores were also statistically significant. SCALE items were significantly correlated with two PBS dimensions (standing and postural change). [Conclusion] In SCALE assessment, more severe deficits were observed in the distal parts. Standing and postural changes in the PBS method were difficult for the participants to perform. The two tests, that is, the SCALE and PBS, were highly correlated. Therefore, the SCALE is useful to prediction of PBS outcomes and is also applicable as a prognostic indicator for treatment planning. PMID:26834323

  5. Oxidative stress and the effect of parasites on a carotenoid-based ornament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougeot, F; Martínez-Padilla, J; Blount, J D; Pérez-Rodríguez, L; Webster, L M I; Piertney, S B

    2010-02-01

    Oxidative stress, the physiological condition whereby the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species overwhelms the capacity of antioxidant defences, causes damage to key bio-molecules. It has been implicated in many diseases, and is proposed as a reliable currency in the trade-off between individual health and ornamentation. Whether oxidative stress mediates the expression of carotenoid-based signals, which are among the commonest signals of many birds, fish and reptiles, remains controversial. In the present study, we explored interactions between parasites, oxidative stress and the carotenoid-based ornamentation of red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus. We tested whether removing nematode parasites influenced both oxidative balance (levels of oxidative damage and circulating antioxidant defences) and carotenoid-based ornamentation. At the treatment group level, parasite purging enhanced the size and colouration of ornaments but did not significantly affect circulating carotenoids, antioxidant defences or oxidative damage. However, relative changes in these traits among individuals indicated that males with a greater number of parasites prior to treatment (parasite purging) showed a greater increase in the levels of circulating carotenoids and antioxidants, and a greater decrease in oxidative damage, than those with initially fewer parasites. At the individual level, a greater increase in carotenoid pigmentation was associated with a greater reduction in oxidative damage. Therefore, an individual's ability to express a carotenoid-based ornament appeared to be linked to its current oxidative balance and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Our experimental results suggest that oxidative stress can mediate the impact of parasites on carotenoid-based signals, and we discuss possible mechanisms linking carotenoid-based ornaments to oxidative stress.

  6. Optical detection of carotenoid antioxidants in human bone and surrounding tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Ermakova, Maia R; Rosenberg, Thomas D; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-11-01

    Carotenoids are known to play an important role in health and disease state of living human tissue based on their antioxidant and optical filtering functions. In this study, we show that carotenoids exist in human bone and surrounding fatty tissue both in significant and individually variable concentrations. Measurements of biopsied tissue samples with molecule-specific Raman spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography reveal that all carotenoids that are known to exist in human skin are also present in human bone. This includes all carotenes, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. We propose quantitative reflection imaging as a noncontact optical method suitable for the measurement of composite carotenoid levels in bone and surrounding tissue exposed during open surgeries such as total knee arthroplasty, and as a proof of concept, demonstrate carotenoid measurements in biopsied bone samples. This will allow one to establish potential correlations between internal tissue carotenoid levels and levels in skin and to potentially use already existing optical skin carotenoid tests as surrogate marker for bone carotenoid status.

  7. Modulating effect of lipid bilayer-carotenoid interactions on the property of liposome encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuqin; Tan, Chen; Zhang, Yating; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Qin, Fang

    2015-04-01

    Liposomes have become an attractive alternative to encapsulate carotenoids to improve their solubility, stability and bioavailability. The interaction mechanism of carotenoid with lipid bilayer is one of the major concerns in improving the delivery efficiency of liposomes. In this study, the microstructure and carotenoid encapsulation efficiency of liposomes composed of native phospholipid (egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, EYPC) and nonionic surfactant Tween 80 were investigated by atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Subsequently, the effects of carotenoid incorporation on the physical properties of liposomal membrane were performed by Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, and electron paramagnetic resonance. Results showed that the incorporation of carotenoids affected the liposomes morphology, size and size distribution to various extents. Analysis on the Raman characteristic peaks of carotenoids revealed that lutein exhibited the strongest incorporating ability into liposomes, followed by β-carotene, lycopene, and canthaxanthin. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that carotenoids modulated the dynamics, structure and hydrophobicity of liposomal membrane, highly depending on their molecular structures and incorporated concentration. These modulations were closely correlated with the stabilization of liposomes, including mediating particle aggregation and fusion. These findings should guide the rationale designing for liposomal encapsulation technology to efficiently deliver carotenoids in pharmaceutics, nutraceuticals and functional foods.

  8. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number

  9. Functional Brain Activation in Response to a Clinical Vestibular Test Correlates with Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; DeDios, Yiri; Kofman, Igor S.; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain fMRI activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: Skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either a vestibulo-spinal reflex [saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)], or an ocular muscle response [utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)]. Research suggests that the skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for subjects than the high decibel tones required to elicit VEMPs. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of brain activity. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that pneumatically powered skull taps would elicit a similar pattern of brain activity as shown in previous studies. Our results provide the first evidence of using pneumatically powered skull taps to elicit vestibular activity inside the MRI scanner. A conjunction analysis revealed that skull taps elicit overlapping activation with auditory tone bursts in the canonical vestibular cortical regions. Further, our postural control assessments revealed that greater amplitude of brain activation in response to vestibular stimulation was associated with better balance control for both techniques. Additionally, we found that skull taps elicit more robust vestibular activity compared to auditory tone bursts, with less reported aversive effects, highlighting the utility of this approach for future clinical and basic science research. PMID:28344549

  10. Effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene and carotenoid content of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, A; Tiwari, B K; Tuohy, M G; O'Donnell, C P; Brunton, N

    2011-09-01

    The effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene (falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate) and carotenoid compounds of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs was investigated. Ultrasound pretreatment followed by hot air drying (UPHD) at the highest amplitude and treatment time investigated resulted in higher retention of polyacetylenes and carotenoids in dried carrot discs than blanching followed by hot air drying. Freeze dried samples had a higher retention of polyacetylene and carotenoid compounds compared to hot air dried samples. Color parameters were strongly correlated with carotenoids (p<0.05). This study shows that ultrasound pretreatment is a potential alternative to conventional blanching treatment in the drying of carrots.

  11. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mirre J P; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in coloration has to be traded off against its physiological functions; carotenoids are antioxidants and increase immunocompetence. This trade-off is hypothesized to underlie the honesty of carotenoid-dependent coloration, signaling the "handicap" of allocating carotenoids away from somatic maintenance toward sexual display. Utilizing recent advances in modeling adaptive evolution, we used a comparative approach to investigate the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels using a species-level phylogeny of 178 bird species. We find that the evolutionary optimum for carotenoid levels is higher in lineages that evolved carotenoid-dependent coloration, with strong attraction toward this optimum. Hence, carotenoids do not appear to be limiting, given that higher carotenoid levels readily evolve in response to the evolution of carotenoid-dependent coloration. These findings challenge the assumption that carotenoids are a scarce resource and thus also challenge the hypothesis that physiological resource value of carotenoids underlies honesty of carotenoid-dependent traits. Therefore, the comparative evidence suggests that other factors, such as the acquisition and incorporation of carotenoids, are involved in maintaining signal honesty.

  12. Lysophosphatidylcholine enhances carotenoid uptake from mixed micelles by Caco-2 human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, T; Kushiro, M; Zhang, H; Nara, E; Ono, H; Nagao, A

    2001-11-01

    Despite the interest in the beneficial roles of dietary carotenoids in human health, little is known about their solubilization from foods to mixed bile micelles during digestion and the intestinal uptake from the micelles. We investigated the absorption of carotenoids solubilized in mixed micelles by differentiated Caco-2 human intestinal cells, which is a useful model for studying the absorption of dietary compounds by intestinal cells. The micelles were composed of 1 micromol/L carotenoids, 2 mmol/L sodium taurocholate, 100 micromol/L monoacylglycerol, 33.3 micromol/L fatty acid and phospholipid (0-200 micromol/L). The phospholipid content of micelles had profound effects on the cellular uptake of carotenoids. Uptake of micellar beta-carotene and lutein was greatly suppressed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) in a dose-dependent manner, whereas lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), the lipolysis product of PC by phospholipase A2 (PLA2), markedly enhanced both beta-carotene and lutein uptake. The addition of PLA2 from porcine pancreas to the medium also enhanced the uptake of carotenoids from micelles containing PC. Caco-2 cells could take up 15 dietary carotenoids, including epoxy carotenoids, such as violaxanthin, neoxanthin and fucoxanthin, from micellar carotenoids, and the uptakes showed a linear correlation with their lipophilicity, defined as the distribution coefficient in 1-octanol/water (log P(ow)). These results suggest that pancreatic PLA2 and lysoPC are important in regulating the absorption of carotenoids in the digestive tract and support a simple diffusion mechanism for carotenoid absorption by the intestinal epithelium.

  13. Correlation between the gross motor performance measurement and pediatric balance scale with respect to movement disorder in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Ahn, So-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether the Gross Motor Performance Measurement is useful in predicting the future score of the Pediatric Balance Scale, this study examined the correlation between the 2 measurement tools with respect to movement disorder in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 38 study subjects with cerebral palsy were divided into 3 groups (spastic, dyskinetic, and ataxic) by means of systematic proportional stratified sampling in accordance with the characteristics of their movement disorders. [Results] The spastic Pediatric Balance Scale had an intermediate level of positive correlation with dissociated movement (r=0.411), alignment (r=0.518), and weight shift (r=0.461). The dyskinetic Pediatric Balance Scale had a strong positive correlation with dissociated movement (r=0.905), coordination (r=0.882), alignment (r=0.930), and stability (r=0.924). The ataxic Pediatric Balance Scale had an intermediate level of positive correlation with the overall Gross Motor Performance Measurement (r=0.636), and a strong positive correlation with dissociated movement (r=0.866), coordination (r=0.871) and stability (r=0.984). [Conclusion] Gross Motor Performance Measurement is important in evaluating the quality of movement, and can be considered an excellent supplementary tool in predicting functional balance. PMID:27630414

  14. Correlation between the gross motor performance measurement and pediatric balance scale with respect to movement disorder in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Ahn, So-Yoon

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether the Gross Motor Performance Measurement is useful in predicting the future score of the Pediatric Balance Scale, this study examined the correlation between the 2 measurement tools with respect to movement disorder in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 38 study subjects with cerebral palsy were divided into 3 groups (spastic, dyskinetic, and ataxic) by means of systematic proportional stratified sampling in accordance with the characteristics of their movement disorders. [Results] The spastic Pediatric Balance Scale had an intermediate level of positive correlation with dissociated movement (r=0.411), alignment (r=0.518), and weight shift (r=0.461). The dyskinetic Pediatric Balance Scale had a strong positive correlation with dissociated movement (r=0.905), coordination (r=0.882), alignment (r=0.930), and stability (r=0.924). The ataxic Pediatric Balance Scale had an intermediate level of positive correlation with the overall Gross Motor Performance Measurement (r=0.636), and a strong positive correlation with dissociated movement (r=0.866), coordination (r=0.871) and stability (r=0.984). [Conclusion] Gross Motor Performance Measurement is important in evaluating the quality of movement, and can be considered an excellent supplementary tool in predicting functional balance.

  15. Functional Balance and Motor Impairment Correlations with Gait Parameters during Timed Up and Go Test across Three Attentional Loading Conditions in Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidzir Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether stroke survivor’s gait performance during dual-task Timed Up and Go (TUG test is correlated with the level of functional balance and motor impairment. Thirty stroke survivors (22 men, 8 women were recruited for this study. The level of functional balance (Berg Balance Scale and motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer assessment lower extremity were assessed prior to the TUG test. TUG test was conducted under three attentional loading conditions (single, dual motor, and dual-cognitive. The time and number of steps were used to quantify gait parameters. The Spearmen’s rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between these variables. There was moderate to strong negative correlation between functional balance and gait parameters (range −0.53 to −0.73, P<0.05. There was a weak negative correlation observed between the time taken to complete the single task and motor impairment (rs=-0.43; P=0.02 dual motor task and motor impairment (rs=-0.41; P=0.02. However, there were no significant correlations between lower limb motor impairment and the number of steps in all conditions. These findings suggest that functional balance may be an influential domain of successful dual-task TUG in stroke.

  16. Observations of Correlated Behavior of Two Light Torsion Balances and a Paraconical Pendulum in Separate Locations during the Solar Eclipse of January 26th, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Pugach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On January 26th, 2009, simultaneous observations of the reactions of two very light torsion balances (Kiev, Ukraine and a paraconical pendulum (Suceava, Romania, 440 km away were performed during a solar eclipse that was not visible at those locations but only in the Indian Ocean. Significant correlation between the behavior of the torsion balances and the pendulum was observed. The conclusion is that a solar eclipse influences the reactions of torsion balances and pendulums, even in areas of the Earth where it is not optically visible.

  17. Correlation of Local FOXP3-Expressing T Cells and Th1-Th2 Balance in Perennial Allergic Nasal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Shirasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg play some important roles in allergic rhinitis. The most specific marker for Treg is FOXP3, a recently identified transcription factor that is essential for Treg development. In order to clarify the levels of Treg in allergic nasal mucosa, we studied the relationship between FOXP3-expressing cells and Th1-Th2 balance in nasal mucosa by means of immunohistochemistry. Human turbinates were obtained after turbinectomy from 26 patients (14 patients with perennial allergic rhinitis and 12 patients with nonallergic rhinitis. To identify the cells expressing the FOXP3 protein, double immunostaining was performed by using anti-FOXP3 antibody and anti-CD3 antibody. There was no significant difference in the percentage of FOXP3+CD3+ cells among CD3+ cells in the nasal mucosa of two groups. The proportion of FOXP3+CD3+ cells tend to be correlated positively with GATA3+CD3+ cells/T-bet+CD3+ cells ratio (=0.56, =0.04. A positive correlation with GATA3+CD3+/T-bet+CD3+ ratio and FOXP3+CD3+/CD3+ ratio suggests the role of local regulatory T cells as a minimal control of the chronic allergen exposure in nasal mucosa.

  18. Raman spectroscopy technology to monitor the carotenoids in skin of thalassemia patients: a novel non-invasive tool relating oxidative stress with iron burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Perrone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we approach the relationship between redox state and iron overload by noninvasive instrumental techniques. Intracardiac, liver iron and liver fibrosis have been monitored in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients by magnetic resonance imaging and hepatic transient elastography examinations. These measurements have been matched with a non-invasive, and yet unexplored in clinical practice, evaluation of body’s oxidative stress through measurement of antioxidant carotenoids in skin, by a spectroscopic method based on Raman technology (RRS. The global body’s antioxidant status results from a balance between the level of antioxidants in cells and body fluids, including blood, and pro-oxidant species endogenously produced or coming from external sources. On this basis, the level of skin carotenoids can be considered a biomarker of the entire antioxidant status. In our work the use of RRS method provided information on the redox state of thalassemia patients, which was correlated with the iron status of the patients. Due to the highly adverse effects of accumulated iron, the novel, simple, non-invasive RRS to monitor dermal carotenoids with high compliance of the patients may be a useful tool for the management of thalassemia patients.

  19. Antioxidant protection and plasma carotenoids of incubating great tits (Parus major L.) in relation to health state and breeding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummeleht, Lea; Mägi, Marko; Kilgas, Priit; Mänd, Raivo; Hõrak, Peeter

    2006-10-01

    Carotenoids are biologically active pigments, which are important for animals due to their dual role in health maintenance and ornamental signalling. In adult birds, immunostimulatory properties of carotenoids have been repeatedly demonstrated while much less is known about the importance of carotenoids as antioxidants. We studied the relationships between plasma carotenoid levels, as well as total antioxidant protection, and various hemato-serological health state indices in female great tits (Parus major L.), incubating their second clutches in two contrasting (coniferous and deciduous) habitats in southwest Estonia. To manipulate reproductive effort, four eggs were removed from half of the clutches during laying to stimulate females to lay additional eggs. However, egg removal had no effect on the final number of eggs laid. Plasma carotenoid levels increased seasonally in parallel with caterpillar food availability. However, no between-habitat differences in carotenoid levels, total antioxidant capacity, or indices of health state could be found despite the apparently better feeding conditions in the coniferous habitat. No correlation was detected between plasma carotenoid levels and measures of total antioxidant capacity, which suggests that at least for the adult birds feeding on naturally carotenoid-rich diet, antioxidant function of carotenoids is not of primary importance. A strong non-linear association between the measures of antioxidant protection and leukocytic markers of inflammation was found, which suggests that measures of total antioxidant capacity deserve further attention in ecophysiological studies as potential indicators of immunopathology.

  20. Colour and carotenoid changes of pasteurised orange juice during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Scheling; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Tomic, Jovana; Santiago, Jihan Santanina; Lemmens, Lien; Panozzo, Agnese; Grauwet, Tara; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2015-03-15

    The correlation of carotenoid changes with colour degradation of pasteurised single strength orange juice was investigated at 20, 28, 35 and 42°C for a total of 32 weeks of storage. Changes in colour were assessed using the CIELAB system and were kinetically described by a zero-order model. L(∗), a(∗), b(∗), ΔE(∗), Cab(∗) and hab were significantly changed during storage (pcolour parameters were 64-73 kJ mol(-1). Several carotenoids showed important changes and appeared to have different susceptibilities to storage. A decrease of β-cryptoxanthin was observed at higher temperatures, whereas antheraxanthin started to decrease at lower temperatures. Depending on the time and temperature, changes in carotenoids could be due to isomerisation reactions, which may lead to a perceptible colour change. Although the contribution of carotenoids was recognised to some extent, other reactions seem of major importance for colour degradation of orange juice during storage.

  1. Differential effects of environment on potato phenylpropanoid and carotenoid expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payyavula Raja S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant secondary metabolites, including phenylpropanoids and carotenoids, are stress inducible, have important roles in potato physiology and influence the nutritional value of potatoes. The type and magnitude of environmental effects on tuber phytonutrients is unclear, especially under modern agricultural management that minimizes stress. Understanding factors that influence tuber secondary metabolism could facilitate production of more nutritious crops. Metabolite pools of over forty tuber phenylpropanoids and carotenoids, along with the expression of twenty structural genes, were measured in high-phenylpropanoid purple potatoes grown in environmentally diverse locations in North America (Alaska, Texas and Florida. Results Phenylpropanoids, including chlorogenic acid (CGA, were higher in samples from the northern latitudes, as was the expression of phenylpropanoid genes including phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, which had over a ten-fold difference in relative abundance. Phenylpropanoid gene expression appeared coordinately regulated and was well correlated with metabolite pools, except for hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinatehydroxcinnamoyl transferase (HQT; r = -0.24. In silico promoter analysis identified two cis-acting elements in the HQT promoter not found in the other phenylpropanoid genes. Anthocyanins were more abundant in Alaskan samples and correlated with flavonoid genes including DFR (r = 0.91, UFGT (r = 0.94 and F3H (r = 0.77. The most abundant anthocyanin was petunidin-3-coum-rutinoside-5-glu, which ranged from 4.7 mg g-1 in Alaska to 2.3 mg g-1 in Texas. Positive correlations between tuber sucrose and anthocyanins (r = 0.85, suggested a stimulatory effect of sucrose. Smaller variation was observed in total carotenoids, but marked differences occurred in individual carotenoids, which had over a ten-fold range. Violaxanthin, lutein or zeaxanthin were the predominant carotenoids in tubers from Alaska, Texas and Florida

  2. Carotenoids in a Corynebacterineae, Gordonia terrae AIST-1: carotenoid glucosyl mycoloyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Maoka, Takashi; Akimoto, Naoshige; Carmona, Marvelisa L; Yamaoka, Yukiho

    2008-10-01

    We isolated a strain of Corynebacterineae from surface seawater from the Inland Sea of Japan. This strain, AIST-1, was determined to be a strain of Gordonia terrae based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The colony was red-colored, and the pigments were identified to be carotenoid derivatives. The structures of two major carotenoids were (2'S)-deoxymyxol 1'-glucoside, a dihydroxyl derivative of gamma-carotene with 12 conjugated double bonds, and (2'S)-4-ketodeoxymyxol 1'-glucoside. Their glucosyl acyl esters and mycoloyl esters were also identified. While these carotenoid moieties have been found in only a few other bacteria, the carotenoid mycoloyl esters are novel carotenoid derivatives. The type strain of G. terrae NBRC 10016T also contained the same carotenoids, but the composition of the two carotenoid glucosides was low and the total carotenoid content was less than one tenth of that of strain AIST-1.

  3. Changes in carotenoid profiles and in the expression pattern of the genes in carotenoid metabolisms during fruit development and ripening in four watermelon cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Pin; Li, Na; Liu, Hui; Gu, Huihui; Zhao, Wen-En

    2015-05-01

    Changes in carotenoid profiles during fruit ripening were investigated in four watermelon cultivars: red-fleshed "CN66", pink-fleshed "CN62", yellow-fleshed "ZXG381" and white-fleshed "ZXG507". The expression pattern of twelve genes (GGPS, PSY, PSY-A, PDS, ZDS, CRTISO, LCYB, CHYB, ZEP, NCED1, NCED2 and NCED3) was analysed. In "CN66" and "CN62", lycopene appeared at 12 DAP and became a main carotenoid increased at the later stages. The transcript levels of carotenogenic genes in "CN66" sharply increased during 18-30 DAP, and concomitantly, fruit accumulated the massive amounts of carotenoids. In "ZXG381", violaxanthin and lutein contents were positively correlated, respectively, with CHYB and ZEP transcript levels during fruit ripening. The trace amounts of carotenoids in "ZXG507" were accompanied with the low transcript levels of most biosynthetic genes. The results suggest that differential transcriptional regulation of carotenoid metabolic genes is very important in determining the amount and type of specific carotenoids accumulated during fruit development and ripening.

  4. Charge correlations using the balance function in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelev, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Adam, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Adamová, D. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Řež u Prahy (Czech Republic); Adare, A.M. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Aggarwal, M.M. [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Aglieri Rinella, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Agnello, M. [Sezione INFN, Turin (Italy); Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Agocs, A.G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Agostinelli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Università and Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Ahammed, Z. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A. [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Ahn, S.U. [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, S.A. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ajaz, M. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Akindinov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, D. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alessandro, B. [Sezione INFN, Turin (Italy); Alici, A. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Centro Fermi – Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”, Rome (Italy); Alkin, A. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); and others

    2013-06-25

    In high-energy heavy-ion collisions, the correlations between the emitted particles can be used as a probe to gain insight into the charge creation mechanisms. In this Letter, we report the first results of such studies using the electric charge balance function in the relative pseudorapidity (Δη) and azimuthal angle (Δφ) in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The width of the balance function decreases with growing centrality (i.e. for more central collisions) in both projections. This centrality dependence is not reproduced by HIJING, while AMPT, a model which incorporates strings and parton rescattering, exhibits qualitative agreement with the measured correlations in Δφ but fails to describe the correlations in Δη. A thermal blast-wave model incorporating local charge conservation and tuned to describe the p{sub T} spectra and v{sub 2} measurements reported by ALICE, is used to fit the centrality dependence of the width of the balance function and to extract the average separation of balancing charges at freeze-out. The comparison of our results with measurements at lower energies reveals an ordering with √(s{sub NN}): the balance functions become narrower with increasing energy for all centralities. This is consistent with the effect of larger radial flow at the LHC energies but also with the late stage creation scenario of balancing charges. However, the relative decrease of the balance function widths in Δη and Δφ with centrality from the highest SPS to the LHC energy exhibits only small differences. This observation cannot be interpreted solely within the framework where the majority of the charge is produced at a later stage in the evolution of the heavy-ion collision.

  5. Carotenoids in Aquaculture: Fish and Crustaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkeng, Bjorn

    This Chapter deals with selected topics on the use of carotenoids for colouration in aquaculture and incudes examples from ecological studies which support our understanding of functions and actions of carotenoids and colouration in fishes and crustaceans. Animal colours may be physical or structural in origin [1], e.g. Tyndall blues and iridescent diffraction colours, or they may be due to pigments, including carotenoids (Chapter 10).

  6. Foraging for carotenoids: do colorful male hihi target carotenoid-rich foods in the wild?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Leila K; Thorogood, Rose; Karadas, Filiz; Raubenheimer, David; Kilner, Rebecca M; Ewen, John G

    2014-09-01

    Dietary access to carotenoids is expected to determine the strength of carotenoid-based signal expression and potentially to maintain signal honesty. Species that display carotenoid-based yellow, orange, or red plumage are therefore expected to forage selectively for carotenoid-rich foods when they are depositing these pigments during molt, but whether they actually do so is unknown. We set out to address this in the hihi (Notiomystis cincta), a New Zealand passerine where males, but not females, display yellow carotenoid-based plumage. We measured circulating carotenoid concentrations in male and female hihi during breeding and molt, determined the nutritional content of common foods in the hihi diet, and conducted feeding observations of male and female hihi during molt. We found that although male and female hihi do not differ significantly in plasma carotenoid concentration, male hihi have a greater proportion of carotenoid-rich foods in their diet than do females. This is a consequence of a greater fruit and lower invertebrate intake than females and an avoidance of low-carotenoid content fruit. By combining behavioral observations with quantification of circulating carotenoids, we present evidence that colorful birds forage to maximize carotenoid intake, a conclusion we would not have drawn had we examined plasma carotenoids alone.

  7. A relationship between carotenoid accumulation and the distribution of species of the fungus Neurospora in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Eva M; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Navarro-Sampedro, Laura; Olmedo, María; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruger-Herreros, Carmen; Tagua, Víctor G; Corrochano, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Neurospora is present in many parts of the world, in particular in tropical and subtropical areas, where it is found growing on recently burned vegetation. We have sampled the Neurospora population across Spain. The sampling sites were located in the region of Galicia (northwestern corner of the Iberian peninsula), the province of Cáceres, the city of Seville, and the two major islands of the Canary Islands archipelago (Tenerife and Gran Canaria, west coast of Africa). The sites covered a latitude interval between 27.88° and 42.74°. We have identified wild-type strains of N. discreta, N. tetrasperma, N. crassa, and N. sitophila and the frequency of each species varied from site to site. It has been shown that after exposure to light Neurospora accumulates the orange carotenoid neurosporaxanthin, presumably for protection from UV radiation. We have found that each Neurospora species accumulates a different amount of carotenoids after exposure to light, but these differences did not correlate with the expression of the carotenogenic genes al-1 or al-2. The accumulation of carotenoids in Neurospora shows a correlation with latitude, as Neurospora strains isolated from lower latitudes accumulate more carotenoids than strains isolated from higher latitudes. Since regions of low latitude receive high UV irradiation we propose that the increased carotenoid accumulation may protect Neurospora from high UV exposure. In support of this hypothesis, we have found that N. crassa, the species that accumulates more carotenoids, is more resistant to UV radiation than N. discreta or N. tetrasperma. The photoprotection provided by carotenoids and the capability to accumulate different amounts of carotenoids may be responsible, at least in part, for the distribution of Neurospora species that we have observed across a range of latitudes.

  8. Correlation between qualitative balance indices, dynamic posturography and structural brain imaging in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and its subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Afsar Pasha

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: While balance and radiological abnormalities were more severe in PSP-R, the qualitative and quantitative measurements of severity of balance in PSP-P rather than PSP-R was a better reflection of the pathology of the midbrain.

  9. Method of producing purified carotenoid compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggink, Laura (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of producing a carotenoid in solid form includes culturing a strain of Chlorophyta algae cells in a minimal inorganic medium and separating the algae comprising a solid form of carotenoid. In one embodiment f the invention, the strain of Chlorophyta algae cells includes a strain f Chlamydomonas algae cells.

  10. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors in many horticultural crops attribute to overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegeta...

  11. The Role of Carotenoids in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theognosia Vergou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The human skin, as the boundary organ between the human body and the environment, is under the constant influence of free radicals (FR, both from the outside in and from the inside out. Carotenoids are known to be powerful antioxidant substances playing an essential role in the reactions of neutralization of FR (mainly reactive oxygen species ROS. Carotenoid molecules present in the tissue are capable of neutralizing several attacks of FR, especially ROS, and are then destroyed. Human skin contains carotenoids, such as α-, γ-, β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and their isomers, which serve the living cells as a protection against oxidation. Recent studies have reported the possibility to investigate carotenoids in human skin quickly and non-invasively by spectroscopic means. Results obtained from in-vivo studies on human skin have shown that carotenoids are vital components of the antioxidative protective system of the human skin and could serve as marker substances for the overall antioxidative status. Reflecting the nutritional and stress situation of volunteers, carotenoids must be administered by means of antioxidant-rich products, e.g., in the form of fruit and vegetables. Carotenoids are degraded by stress factors of any type, inter alia, sun radiation, contact with environmental hazards, illness, etc. The kinetics of the accumulation and degradation of carotenoids in the skin have been investigated.

  12. Carotenoids as signaling molecules in cardiovascular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Barzegari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation play important roles in the etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Thus, natural antioxidant carotenoids existing in fruits and vegetables could have a significant role in the prevention of CVD. Nevertheless,clinical data are conflicting about the positive effect of some antioxidant carotenoids in reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Many biological actions of carotenoids have been attributed to their antioxidant effect; however, the precise mechanism by which carotenoids produce their beneficial effects is still under discussion. They might modulate molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation, acting at Akt, tyrosine kinases, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP kinase and growth factor signaling cascades. Screening for a promising cardiovascular protective carotenoids therefore might be performed in vitro and in vivo with caution in cross-interaction with other molecules involved in signaling pathways especially those affecting microRNAs, performing a role in molecular modulation of cardiovascular cells.

  13. Carotenoid Metabolism: Biosynthesis, Regulation,and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Lu; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are Indispensable to plants and play a critical role in human nutrition and health. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of carotenoid metabolism in plants. The biosynthetic pathway has been extensively studied.Nearly all the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated and characterized from various organisms. In recent years, there is an increasing body of work on the signaling pathways and plastid development, which might provide global control of carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. Herein, we will highlight recent progress on the biosynthesis,regulation, and metabolic engineering of carotenoids in plants, as well as the future research towards elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and metabolic network that control carotenoid metabolism.

  14. PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CAROTENOIDS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumita S. Kadia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is an essential vitamin which is required in the vision process, epithelial maintenance, mucous secretion and reproduction obtained from carotenoids. Carotenoids have been considered to provide benefits in age-related diseases, against some forms of cancer (in especial lung cancer, strokes, macular degeneration, and cataracts. Till date, more than 600 carotenoids are known and 50 of them are consumed in meals to be transformed into the essential nutrient vitamin A. After their absorption, these carotenoids are metabolized by an oxidative rupture to retinal, retinoic acid and small quantities of breakdown products and are transported by plasma lipoproteins. Carotenes are mainly associated with low-density lipoproteins, while xanthophylls show a uniform distribution between the low- and high-density lipoproteins. The present review provides an insight into the recent status of pharmacological aspects of carotenoids.

  15. The intake of carotenoids in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Jakobsen, Jette; Andersen, N. L.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the intake of carotenoids in the Danish population Danish fruits and vegetables were screened with an HPLC method consisting of extraction with ethanol:tetrahydrofuran, separation by reversed phase HPLC with the mobile phase acetonitril:methanol:dichlormethan, triethylamin, BHT...... in the foods the mean intake and intake distribution of the carotenoids were calculated. Carrots and tomatoes have both high contents of carotenoids (8,450 mu g/100 g alpha- + beta-carotene and 4,790 mu g/100 g lycopene, respectively) and high intakes (19 and 15 g/day, respectively) and were responsible for 47......% and 32%, respectively, of the mean intake of carotenoids of 4.8 mg/day A median value of 4.1 mg/day was found indicating skewed intake distributions. The difference between men and women was 0.4 mg/day (p carotenoids, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene, contributed...

  16. Parameters of dynamic balance in the frontal and sagittal plane and their correlations with poor postures in children aged 10–12 from the Masłów district in Świętokrzyskie province

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Even postural asymmetry may provoke static and balance disorders. Aim of the research: To define the level of dynamic balance among children aged 10–12 and find the correlations between poor postures. Material and methods: This study was conducted among 176 children from Masłów district in Świętokrzyskie province. The Libra platform was used to examine the dynamic balance. Results: Dynamic balance parameters from the sagittal and frontal plane show statistica...

  17. Carotenoid Accumulation by Carrot Storage Roots in Relation to Nitrogen Fertilization Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek GAJEWSKI

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of carotenoid compounds in carrot (Daucus carota L. roots of five cultivars, in relation to different nitrogen fertilization levels was investigated. The experiment was carried out at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences. Carrot cultivars ‘Karotan’ F1, ‘Trafford’ F1, ‘Krakow’ F1, ‘Komarno’ F1 and ‘HY 7842’ were used in the study. Nitrogen fertilization was applied as urea form, in doses ranging from 0 to 120 kg N ha–1, and on two terms: pre-sowing and in the middle of the growing season. The carrot seeds were sown at the beginning of May and the roots were harvested in mid-October at maturity. Total carotenoids and β-carotene contents in the carrot roots were determined after the harvest by means of the standard spectrophotometric method. CIE L*a*b* colour parameters of the roots and the juice, as well as dry matter in the roots were determined. Results of the experiment showed that carotenoid accumulation in the roots was significantly affected by carrot genotype. ‘HY7842’ carrot showed the highest accumulation of total carotenoids and β-carotene. Nitrogen in the rates applied, did not significantly influence carotenoid content in the roots. Moderate correlation between carotenoid content and colour a* parameter (redness intensity of the roots and the juice was found.

  18. Substrate promiscuity of RdCCD1, a carotenoid cleavage oxygenase from Rosa damascena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fong-Chin; Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Schrader, Jens; Sandmann, Gerhard; Schmidt, Holger; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-03-01

    Several of the key flavor compounds in rose essential oil are C(13)-norisoprenoids, such as beta-damascenone, beta-damascone, and beta-ionone which are derived from carotenoid degradation. To search for genes putatively responsible for the cleavage of carotenoids, cloning of carotenoid cleavage (di-)oxygenase (CCD) genes from Rosa damascena was carried out by a degenerate primer approach and yielded a full-length cDNA (RdCCD1). The RdCCD1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and recombinant protein was assayed for its cleavage activity with a multitude of carotenoid substrates. The RdCCD1 protein was able to cleave a variety of carotenoids at the 9-10 and 9'-10' positions to produce a C(14) dialdehyde and two C(13) products, which vary depending on the carotenoid substrates. RdCCD1 could also cleave lycopene at the 5-6 and 5'-6' positions to produce 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one. Expression of RdCCD1 was studied by real-time PCR in different tissues of rose. The RdCCD1 transcript was present predominantly in rose flower, where high levels of volatile C(13)-norisoprenoids are produced. Thus, the accumulation of C(13)-norisoprenoids in rose flower is correlated to the expression of RdCCD1.

  19. Phytochrome-mediated Carotenoids Biosynthesis in Ripening Tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R L; Jen, J J

    1975-09-01

    Red light induced and far red light inhibited carotenoid biosynthesis in ripening tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) when compared to controls kept in the dark. Red illumination following far red illumination reversed the inhibitory action of far red light on carotenoid biosynthesis, suggesting a phytochrome-mediated process. Quantitation of individual carotenoids favored the hypothesis of two separate carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in tomatoes.

  20. Charge correlations using the balance function in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchi, Livio; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Francesco; Blanco, F; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanuel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Han, Byounghee; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Harton, Austin; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hippolyte, Boris; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Pier Giorgio; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kaidalov, Alexei; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Kamal Hussain; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kompaniets, Mikhail; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, AB; Kurepin, A; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Ma, Ke; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mizuno, Sanshiro; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Pastircak, Blahoslav; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schuster, Tim; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; 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Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Ter-Minasyan, Astkhik; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Toscano, Luca; Trubnikov, Victor; Truesdale, David Christopher; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Yury; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Vladimir; Wagner, Boris; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilk, Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Shiming; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhou, Daicui; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-01

    In high–energy heavy–ion collisions, the correlations between the emitted particles can be used as a probe to gain insight into the charge creation mechanisms. In this article, we report the first results of such studies using the electric charge balance function in the relative pseudorapidity (∆η) and azimuthal angle (∆φ) in Pb–Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The width of the balance function decreases with growing centrality (i.e. for more central collisions) in both projections. This centrality dependence is not reproduced by HIJING, while AMPT, a model which incorporates strings and parton rescattering, exhibits qualitative agreement with the measured correlations in ∆φ but fails to describe the correlations in ∆η. A thermal blast wave model incorporating local charge conservation and tuned to describe the pT spectra and v2 measurements reported by ALICE, is used to fit the centrality dependence of the width of the balance function...

  1. Characterisation of fatty acid, carotenoid, tocopherol/tocotrienol compositions and antioxidant activities in seeds of three Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao; Li, Xihong; Chen, Peter X; Zhang, Bing; Hernandez, Marta; Zhang, Hua; Marcone, Massimo F; Liu, Ronghua; Tsao, Rong

    2015-05-01

    Composition of fatty acids, tocopherols, tocotrienols, and carotenoids, and their contribution to antioxidant activities were investigated in seeds of three coloured quinoa cultivars (white, red and black). The major components and individual compounds were significantly different, and their concentrations were higher in darker seeds (p quinoa had the highest vitamin E followed by red and white quinoas. Carotenoids, mainly trans-lutein (84.7-85.6%) and zeaxanthin were confirmed for the first time in quinoa seeds, and the concentration was also the highest in black seeds. The antioxidant activities of lipophilic extracts were positively correlated with polyunsaturated fatty acids, total carotenoids and total tocopherols.

  2. Native carotenoids composition of some tropical fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Enrique; Giuffrida, Daniele; Menchaca, Dania; Dugo, Paola; Torre, Germana; Meléndez-Martinez, Antonio J; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-10-15

    Many tropical fruits can be considered a reservoir of bioactive substances with a special interest due to their possible health-promoting properties. The interest in carotenoids from a nutritional standpoint has recently greatly increased, because of their important health benefits. Here we report the native carotenoids composition in six tropical fruits from Panama, which is considered a region of great biodiversity. The native carotenoid composition was directly investigated by an HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS methodology, for the first time. In Corozo 32 different carotenoids were detected, including a high content of β-carotene and lycopene. Sastra showed the highest content of zeaxanthin among the fruit investigated. In Sapote 22 different carotenoids were detected, including β-carotene and 10 different zeaxanthin-di-esters. Frutita showed a very high content of the apo-carotenoid β-citraurin, and of a number of its esters. In Maracuyà chino 14 carotenoids were detected, including a high amounts of mono-esterified lauric acid with β-cryptoxanthin and with cryptocapsin. Mamey rojo was characterised by ketocarotenoids with κ rings, both hydroxylated and not hydroxylated.

  3. Genetic variations involved in interindividual variability in carotenoid status.

    OpenAIRE

    Borel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    International audience; As shown in most clinical studies dedicated to carotenoids, there is a huge interindividual variability in absorption, and blood and tissue responses, of dietary carotenoids. The recent discovery that several proteins are involved in carotenoid metabolism in humans has prompted a possible explanation for this phenomenon: genetic variants in genes encoding for these proteins may affect their expression or activity, and in turn carotenoid metabolism and carotenoid status...

  4. Extraction and chromatography of carotenoids from pumpkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung Sook; Burri, Betty Jane C; Quan, Zhejiu; Neidlinger, Terry R

    2005-05-06

    Vitamin A deficiency is a health problem in Southeast Asia that can be corrected by feeding orange fruits and vegetables such as mango. Pumpkin is a traditional Korean food that is easy to store and is already believed to have health benefits. We extracted carotenoids from pumpkin by liquid-liquid extraction and by supercritical fluid extraction. We measured carotenoids by reversed-phase chromatography with diode array detection. The major carotenoid in pumpkin (> 80%) is beta-carotene, with lesser amounts of lutein, lycopene, alpha-carotene and cis-beta-carotene. Pumpkin is a rich source of beta-carotene and might be useful for preventing Vitamin A deficiency.

  5. Dietary carotenoids are associated with cardiovascular disease risk biomarkers mediated by serum carotenoid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chung, Sang-Jin; McCullough, Marjorie L; Song, Won O; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Koo, Sung I; Chun, Ock K

    2014-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia and elevated circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations are cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Previous studies indicated that higher serum carotenoid concentrations were inversely associated with some of these biomarkers. However, whether dietary carotenoid intake is inversely associated with these CVD risk biomarkers is not well known. We assessed the associations between individual dietary carotenoid intake and CVD risk biomarkers and tested whether the serum carotenoid concentrations explain (mediate) or influence the strength of (moderate) the associations, if any association exists. Dietary data collected from 2 24-h dietary recalls and serum measurements in adult men (n = 1312) and women (n = 1544) from the NHANES 2003-2006 were used. Regression models designed for survey analysis were used to examine the associations between individual dietary carotenoids and log-transformed blood cholesterol, CRP, and tHcy. The corresponding individual serum carotenoid concentration was considered as mediator (and moderator if applicable). After adjustment for covariates, significant inverse associations with LDL cholesterol were observed for dietary β-carotene (P carotenoids (P carotenoid concentrations, indicating the complete mediation effects of serum carotenoids. Serum β-carotene significantly moderated the associations between dietary β-carotene and CRP (P-interaction 0.43 μmol/L. In this population-based cross-sectional study, serum carotenoids were mediators of dietary carotenoids and CVD risk biomarker associations. Serum β-carotene was also a moderator of the dietary β-carotene and CRP association. These findings may help in the design of future intervention studies on dietary carotenoids in the prevention of CVD.

  6. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  7. Carotenoid bioaccessibility in pulp and fresh juice from carotenoid-rich sweet oranges and mandarins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, María Jesús; Cilla, Antonio; Barberá, Reyes; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Citrus fruits are a good source of carotenoids for the human diet; however, comparative studies of carotenoids in different citrus food matrices are scarce. In this work the concentration and bioaccessibility of carotenoids in sweet oranges and mandarins with marked differences in carotenoid composition were evaluated in pulp and compared to those in fresh juice. The pulp and juice of the red-fleshed Cara Cara sweet orange variety was highly rich in carotenes (mainly lycopene and phytoene) compared to standard Navel orange, while β-cryptoxanthin and phytoene predominated in mandarins. Total carotenoid content in the pulp of the ordinary Navel orange and in the red-fleshed Cara Cara orange, as well as in the Clementine mandarin were higher than in the corresponding juices, although individual carotenoids were differentially affected by juice preparation. Bioaccessibility of the bioactive carotenoids (the ones described to be absorbed by humans) was greater in both pulp and juice of the carotenoid-rich Cara Cara orange compared to the Navel orange while increasing levels of β-cryptoxanthin were detected in the bioaccessible fractions of pulp and juice of mandarins postharvest stored at 12 °C compared to freshly-harvested fruits. Overall, results indicated that higher soluble bioactive carotenoids from citrus fruits and, consequently, potential nutritional and health benefits are obtained by the consumption of pulp with respect to fresh juice.

  8. An in vitro digestion method adapted for carotenoids and carotenoid esters: moving forward towards standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniele Bobrowski; Mariutti, Lilian Regina Barros; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti

    2016-12-07

    In vitro digestion methods are a useful approach to predict the bioaccessibility of food components and overcome some limitations or disadvantages associated with in vivo methodologies. Recently, the INFOGEST network published a static method of in vitro digestion with a proposal for assay standardization. The INFOGEST method is not specific for any food component; therefore, we aimed to adapt this method to assess the in vitro bioaccessibility of carotenoids and carotenoid esters in a model fruit (Byrsonima crassifolia). Two additional steps were coupled to the in vitro digestion procedure, centrifugation at 20 000g for the separation of the aqueous phase containing mixed micelles and exhaustive carotenoid extraction with an organic solvent. The effect of electrolytes, enzymes and bile acids on carotenoid micellarization and stability was also tested. The results were compared with those found with a simpler method that has already been used for carotenoid bioaccessibility analysis. These values were in the expected range for free carotenoids (5-29%), monoesters (9-26%) and diesters (4-28%). In general, the in vitro bioaccessibility of carotenoids assessed by the adapted INFOGEST method was significantly higher (p carotenoid form (free, monoester or diester), isomerization (Z/E) and the in vitro digestion protocol. To the best of our knowledge, it was the first time that a systematic identification of carotenoid esters by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS after in vitro digestion using the INFOGEST protocol was carried out.

  9. Carotenoid maintenance handicap and the physiology of carotenoid-based signalisation of health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Despite a reasonable scientific interest in sexual selection, the general principles of health signalisation via ornamental traits remain still unresolved in many aspects. This is also true for the mechanism preserving honesty of carotenoid-based signals. Although it is widely accepted that this type of ornamentation reflects an allocation trade-off between the physiological utilisation of carotenoids (mainly in antioxidative processes) and their deposition in ornaments, some recent evidence suggests more complex interactions. Here, we further develop the models currently proposed to explain the honesty of carotenoid-based signalisation of heath status by adding the handicap principle concept regulated by testosterone. We propose that under certain circumstances carotenoids may be dangerous for the organism because they easily transform into toxic cleavage products. When reserves of other protective antioxidants are insufficient, physiological trade-offs may exist between maintenance of carotenoids for ornament expression and their removal from the body. Furthermore, we suggest that testosterone which enhances ornamentation by increasing carotenoid bioavailability may also promote oxidative stress and hence lower antioxidant reserves. The presence of high levels of carotenoids required for high-quality ornament expression may therefore represent a handicap and only individuals in prime health could afford to produce elaborate colourful ornaments. Although further testing is needed, this ‘carotenoid maintenance handicap’ hypothesis may offer a new insight into the physiological aspects of the relationship between carotenoid function, immunity and ornamentation.

  10. Genetics of carotenoids for provitamin A biofortification in tropical-adapted maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhassan D. Halilu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yellow maize contains high levels of β-carotene (βC, making it an important crop for combating vitamin A deficiency through biofortification. In this study, nine maize inbred lines were selected at random from 31 provitamin A (PVA maize inbred lines and crossed in a partial diallel mating design to develop 36 crosses. The crosses were evaluated in the field in two locations (Samaru and Kerawa and their seed carotenoid content were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The modes of gene action, heritability, and correlations between agronomic traits and carotenoid content were estimated. Additive genetic variances (σ2a were lower than non-additive genetic variances (σ2d for all the carotenoids, plant height (PH, and grain yield (GY, suggesting a preponderance of non-additive gene action. Broad-sense heritability (H2 was high (H2 > 60% for zeaxanthin, days to anthesis, and PH, moderate (30% < H2 < 60% for lutein and GY, and low (H2 < 30% for alpha carotene, beta cryptoxanthin, βC, and PVA. Genetic advance as a percentage of mean, considered with H2, also suggests a preponderance of non-additive gene action for PVA carotenoids. Hybrid variety development is thus an appropriate approach to improving grain yield and PVA. GY showed no significant genotypic correlations with carotenoid content, suggesting that these traits can be improved concurrently. Thus, there is ample scope for improvement of PVA and GY in the sample of tropical-adapted maize.

  11. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  12. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between t...

  13. Evaluation of dietary patterns among Norwegian postmenopausal women using plasma carotenoids as biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markussen, Marianne S; Veierød, Marit B; Sakhi, Amrit K; Ellingjord-Dale, Merete; Blomhoff, Rune; Ursin, Giske; Andersen, Lene F

    2015-02-28

    A number of studies have examined dietary patterns in various populations. However, to study to what extent such patterns capture meaningful differences in consumption of foods is of interest. In the present study, we identified important dietary patterns in Norwegian postmenopausal women (age 50-69 years, n 361), and evaluated these patterns by examining their associations with plasma carotenoids. Diet was assessed by a 253-item FFQ. These 253 food items were categorised into forty-six food groups, and dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. We used the partial correlation coefficient (r(adj)) and multiple linear regression analysis to examine the associations between the dietary patterns and the plasma carotenoids α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin. Overall, four dietary patterns were identified: the 'Western'; 'Vegetarian'; 'Continental'; 'High-protein'. The 'Western' dietary pattern scores were significantly inversely correlated with plasma lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and total carotenoids (-0·25 ≤ r(adj) ≤ -0·13). The 'Vegetarian' dietary pattern scores were significantly positively correlated with all the plasma carotenoids (0·15 ≤ r(adj) ≤ 0·24). The 'Continental' dietary pattern scores were significantly inversely correlated with plasma lutein and α-carotene (r(adj) = -0·13). No significant association between the 'High-protein' dietary pattern scores and the plasma carotenoids was found. In conclusion, the healthy dietary pattern, the 'Vegetarian' pattern, is associated with a more favourable profile of the plasma carotenoids than our unhealthy dietary patterns, the 'Western' and 'Continental' patterns.

  14. IMPORTANCE OF CAROTENOIDS FOR HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih ÖTLEŞ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are brightly yellow to red pigments occuring in plants and are introduced into humans through dietary intake of vegetables and fruits. They do not dissolve in water, they can give maximum absorption in UV region at 400-450 nm., and they are stable in alkali. Some carotenoids have provitamin A activity and they are important because of the synthesis of Vitamin A needed to be taken into the body. In addition to this function, carotenoids play very important roles in preventing diseases caused by Vitamin A deficiency, coronary heart diseases, and cancer. They are effective in preventing or at least slowering cancer as a result of their antioxidative properties. Studies are shown that cancer risk (especially the lung cancer decreases with the intake of carotenoids. As a conclusion vegetables and fruits-rich diet is always important and valuable for healty populations.

  15. Carotenoid accumulation and carotenogenic gene expression during fruit development in novel interspecific inbred squash lines and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakkanong, Korakot; Yang, Jing Hua; Zhang, Ming Fang

    2012-06-13

    Carotenoid levels and composition during squash fruit development were compared in Cucurbita moschata , Cucurbita maxima , and two lines of their interspecific inbred lines, namely, Maxchata1 and Maxchata2. Eight genes associated with carotenoid biosynthesis were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The two squash species and their interspecific inbred lines exhibited different qualitative and quantitative carotenoid profiles and regulatory mechanisms. C. moschata had the lowest total carotenoid content and mainly accumulated α-carotene and β-carotene, as expected in a fruit with pale-orange flesh. Low carotenoid content in this species was probably due to the comparatively low expression of all genes investigated, especially PSY1 gene, compared to the other squashes. The predominant carotenoids in C. maxima were violaxanthin and lutein, which produced a corresponding yellow flesh color in mature fruit. The relationship between the expression of the CHYB and ZEP genes may result in almost equal concentrations of violaxanthin and lutein in C. maxima at fruit ripening. In contrast, their interspecific inbred lines principally accumulated lutein and β-carotene, leading to orange flesh color. The PSY1 gene exhibited higher expression levels at earlier stages of fruit development in the Maxchata lines, potentially triggering the increased carotenoid accumulation seen in these fruits. Likewise, the higher transcription level of CHYB gene observed in the two interspecific inbred lines might be correlated with high lutein in these hybrids. However, this study could not explain the observed β-carotene accumulation on the basis of gene expression.

  16. Latin American food sources of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Amaya, D B

    1999-09-01

    Latin America has a wide variety of carotenogenic foods, notable for the diversity and high levels of carotenoids. A part of this natural wealth has been analyzed. Carrot, red palm oil and some cultivars of squash and pumpkin are sources of both beta-carotene and alpha-carotene. beta-carotene is the principal carotenoid of the palm fruits burití, tucumã and bocaiuva, other fruits such as loquat, marolo and West Indian cherry, and sweet potato. Buriti also has high amounts of alpha-carotene and gamma-carotene. beta-Cryptoxanthin is the major carotenoid in caja, nectarine, orange-fleshed papaya, orange, peach, tangerine and the tree tomato. Lycopene predominates in tomato, red-fleshed papaya, guava, pitanga and watermelon. Pitanga also has substantial amounts of beta-cryptoxanthin, gamma-carotene and rubixanthin. Zeaxanthin, principal carotenoid of corn, is also predominant only in piquí. delta-Carotene is the main carotenoid of the peach palm and zeta-carotene of passion fruit. Lutein and beta-carotene, in high concentrations, are encountered in the numerous leafy vegetables of the region, as well as in other green vegetables and in some varieties of squash and pumpkin. Violaxanthin is the principal carotenoid of mango and mamey and is also found in appreciable amounts in green vegetables. Quantitative, in some cases also qualitative, differences exist among cultivars of the same food. Generally, carotenoids are in greater concentrations in the peel than in the pulp, increase considerably during ripening and are in higher levels in foods produced in hot places. Other Latin America indigenous carotenogenic foods must be investigated before they are supplanted by introduced crops, which are often poorer sources of carotenoids.

  17. Marine Carotenoids and Cardiovascular Risk Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Speranza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine carotenoids are important bioactive compounds with physiological activities related to prevention of degenerative diseases.found principally in plants, with potential antioxidant biological properties deriving from their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. They are substances with very special and remarkable properties that no other groups of substances possess and that form the basis of their many, varied functions and actions in all kinds of living organisms. The potential beneficial effects of marine carotenoids have been studied particularly in astaxanthin and fucoxanthin as they are the major marine carotenoids. Both these two carotenoids show strong antioxidant activity attributed to quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. The potential role of these carotenoids as dietary anti-oxidants has been suggested to be one of the main mechanisms for their preventive effects against cancer and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this short review is to examine the published studies concerning the use of the two marine carotenoids, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Comparison of three spectrophotometric methods for analysis of egg yolk carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, K M S; Schweigert, F J

    2015-04-01

    Carotenoids accumulated in the egg yolk are of importance for two reasons. Firstly they are important pigments influencing customer acceptance and secondly they are essential components with positive health effects either as antioxidants or as precursor of vitamin A. Different analytical methods are available to quantitatively identify carotenoids from egg yolk such as spectrophotometric methods described by AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists) and HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography). Both methods have in common that they are time consuming, need a laboratory environment and well trained technical operators. Recently, a rapid lab-independent spectrophotometric method (iCheck, BioAnalyt GmbH, Germany) has been introduced that claims to be less time consuming and easy to operate. The aim of the current study was therefore to compare the novel method with the two standard methods. Yolks of 80 eggs were analysed as aliquots by the three methods in parallel. While both spectrometric methods are only able measure total carotenoids as total ß-carotene, HPLC enables the determination of individual carotenoids such lutein, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, ß-carotene and β-apocarotenoic ester. In general, total carotenoids levels as obtained by AOAC were in average 27% higher than those obtained by HPLC. Carotenoid values obtained by the reference methods AOAC and HPLC are highly correlated with the iCheck method with r(2) of 0.99 and 0.94 for iCheck vs. AOAC and iCheck vs. HPLC, respectively (both p<0.001). Bland Altman analysis showed that the novel iCheck method is comparable to the reference methods. In conclusion, the novel rapid and portable iCheck method is a valid and effective tool to determine total carotenoid of egg yolk under laboratory-independent conditions with little trained personal.

  19. The role of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase and phytoene synthase gene family in citrus carotenoid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gang; Wang, Chunyan; Song, Song; Fu, Xiumin; Azam, Muhammad; Grierson, Don; Xu, Changjie

    2013-10-01

    Three 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthases (DXS) and three phytoene synthases (PSY) were identified in citrus, from Affymetrix GeneChip Citrus Genome Array, GenBank and public orange genome databases. Tissue-specific expression analysis of these genes was carried out on fruit peel and flesh, flower and leaf of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) in order to determine their roles in carotenoid accumulation in different tissues. Expression of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 was highest in all test tissues, while that of CitDXS2 and CitPSY2 was lower, and that of CitDXS3 and CitPSY3 undetectable. The transcript profiles of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 paralleled carotenoid accumulation in flesh of Satsuma mandarin and orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) during fruit development, and CitPSY1 expression was also associated with carotenoid accumulation in peel, while the CitDXS1 transcript level was only weakly correlated with carotenoid accumulation in peel. Similar results were obtained following correlation analysis between expression of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 and carotenoid accumulation in peel and flesh of 16 citrus cultivars. These findings identify CitPSY1 and CitDXS1 as the main gene members controlling carotenoid biosynthesis in citrus fruit. Furthermore, chromoplasts were extracted from flesh tissue of these citrus, and chromoplasts of different shape (spindle or globular), different size, and color depth were observed in different cultivars, indicating chromoplast abundance, number per gram tissue, size and color depth were closely correlated with carotenoid content in most cultivars. The relationship between carotenoid biosynthesis and chromoplast development was discussed.

  20. Silencing of beta-carotene hydroxylase increases total carotenoid and beta-carotene levels in potato tubers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzichini Daniele

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-carotene is the main dietary precursor of vitamin A. Potato tubers contain low levels of carotenoids, composed mainly of the xanthophylls lutein (in the beta-epsilon branch and violaxanthin (in the beta-beta branch. None of these carotenoids have provitamin A activity. We have previously shown that tuber-specific silencing of the first step in the epsilon-beta branch, LCY-e, redirects metabolic flux towards beta-beta carotenoids, increases total carotenoids up to 2.5-fold and beta-carotene up to 14-fold. Results In this work, we silenced the non-heme beta-carotene hydroxylases CHY1 and CHY2 in the tuber. Real Time RT-PCR measurements confirmed the tuber-specific silencing of both genes . CHY silenced tubers showed more dramatic changes in carotenoid content than LCY-e silenced tubers, with beta-carotene increasing up to 38-fold and total carotenoids up to 4.5-fold. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in the immediate product of beta-carotene hydroxylation, zeaxanthin, but not of the downstream xanthophylls, viola- and neoxanthin. Changes in endogenous gene expression were extensive and partially overlapping with those of LCY-e silenced tubers: CrtISO, LCY-b and ZEP were induced in both cases, indicating that they may respond to the balance between individual carotenoid species. Conclusion Together with epsilon-cyclization of lycopene, beta-carotene hydroxylation is another regulatory step in potato tuber carotenogenesis. The data are consistent with a prevalent role of CHY2, which is highly expressed in tubers, in the control of this step. Combination of different engineering strategies holds good promise for the manipulation of tuber carotenoid content.

  1. Need and Seek for Dietary Micronutrients: Endogenous Regulation, External Signalling and Food Sources of Carotenoids in New World Vultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Guillermo; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso; Lambertucci, Sergio A.; Bautista, Luis M.; Wiemeyer, Guillermo; Sanchez-Zapata, José A.; Garrido-Fernández, Juan; Hiraldo, Fernando; Donázar, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Among birds, vultures show low concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to the combination of their large size, general dull colouration and a diet based on carrion. We recorded the concentration of each carotenoid type present in plasma of the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) according to age and sex, that determine colour signalling and dominance hierarchies in the carcasses. We compared the carotenoid profile in wild condors with that of captive condors fed with a controlled diet of flesh to test the hypothesis that wild individuals could acquire extra carotenoids from vegetal matter contained in carcass viscera and fresh vegetation. Wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus) were also sampled to evaluate the potential influence of colouration in the integument on absorption and accumulation patterns of plasma carotenoids. A remarkably higher concentration of lutein than β-carotene was found in wild condors, while the contrary pattern was recorded in American black vultures and captive condors. We found a consistent decrease in all plasma carotenoids with age, and a lower concentration of most xanthophylls in male compared to female wild condors. Positive correlations of all carotenoids indicated general common absorption and accumulation strategies or a single dietary source containing all pigments found in plasma. The comparatively low total concentration of carotenoids, and especially of lutein rather than β-carotene, found in captive condors fed with a diet restricted to flesh supports the hypothesis that Andean condors can efficiently acquire carotenoids from vegetal matter in the wild. Andean condors seem to be physiologically more competent in the uptake or accumulation of xanthophylls than American black vultures, which agrees with the use of colour-signalling strategies in sexual and competitive contexts in the Andean condor. This study suggests that vultures may use dietary vegetal supplements that provide pigments and micronutrients that are

  2. Need and seek for dietary micronutrients: endogenous regulation, external signalling and food sources of carotenoids in new world vultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Blanco

    Full Text Available Among birds, vultures show low concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to the combination of their large size, general dull colouration and a diet based on carrion. We recorded the concentration of each carotenoid type present in plasma of the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus according to age and sex, that determine colour signalling and dominance hierarchies in the carcasses. We compared the carotenoid profile in wild condors with that of captive condors fed with a controlled diet of flesh to test the hypothesis that wild individuals could acquire extra carotenoids from vegetal matter contained in carcass viscera and fresh vegetation. Wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus were also sampled to evaluate the potential influence of colouration in the integument on absorption and accumulation patterns of plasma carotenoids. A remarkably higher concentration of lutein than β-carotene was found in wild condors, while the contrary pattern was recorded in American black vultures and captive condors. We found a consistent decrease in all plasma carotenoids with age, and a lower concentration of most xanthophylls in male compared to female wild condors. Positive correlations of all carotenoids indicated general common absorption and accumulation strategies or a single dietary source containing all pigments found in plasma. The comparatively low total concentration of carotenoids, and especially of lutein rather than β-carotene, found in captive condors fed with a diet restricted to flesh supports the hypothesis that Andean condors can efficiently acquire carotenoids from vegetal matter in the wild. Andean condors seem to be physiologically more competent in the uptake or accumulation of xanthophylls than American black vultures, which agrees with the use of colour-signalling strategies in sexual and competitive contexts in the Andean condor. This study suggests that vultures may use dietary vegetal supplements that provide pigments and

  3. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in colorati

  4. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between the carotenoid profile and the expression of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes is discussed. Finally, recent results of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of carotenoid contents and expression levels of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes in citrus fruit are shown.

  5. Regulation of leaf photosynthetic rate correlating with leaf carbohydrate status and activation state of Rubisco under a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Minobu

    2008-09-01

    There is evidence suggesting that in plants changes in the photosynthetic source/sink balance are an important factor that regulates leaf photosynthetic rate through affects on the leaf carbohydrate status. However, to resolve the regulatory mechanism of leaf photosynthetic rate associated with photosynthetic source/sink balance, information, particularly on mutual relationships of experimental data that are linked with a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances, seems to be still limited. Thus, a variety of manipulations altering the plant source/sink ratio were carried out with soybean plants, and the mutual relationships of various characteristics such as leaf photosynthetic rate, carbohydrate content and the source/sink ratio were analyzed in manipulated and non-manipulated control plants. The manipulations were removal of one-half or all pods, removal of one-third or two-third leaves, and shading of one-third or one-half leaves with soybean plants grown for 8 weeks under 10 h light (24 degrees C) and 14 h darkness (17 degrees C). It was shown that there were significant negative correlations between source/sink ratio (dry weight ratio of attached leaves to other all organs) and leaf photosynthetic rate; source/sink ratio and activation ratio (percentage of initial activity to total activity) of Rubisco in leaf extract; leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and photosynthetic rate; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and activation ratio of Rubisco; amount of protein-bound ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) in leaf extract and leaf photosynthetic rate; and the amount of protein-bound RuBP and activation ratio of Rubisco. In addition, there were significant positive correlations between source/sink ratio and leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content; source/sink ratio and the amount of protein-bound RuBP; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and amount of protein-bound RuBP and the activation ratio of Rubisco and leaf photosynthetic rate

  6. 番茄果实成熟过程中不同部位类胡萝卜素和糖含量变化及其相关性%Changes in Contents of Carotenoids and Sugar in Peparate Tissues and their Correlation during Ripening of Tomato Fruit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洋; 翁倩; 周宝利

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the changes of concentrations of carotenoids and carbohydrates in different positions of tomato fruit during fruit development stage and the correlation of them. The content of lycopene accumulated along with the ripening stage and reached the highest level in peripheral pericarp of mature fruit. The contents of beta-carotene and xanthophylls decreased first, then increased and the peripheral pericarp of mature fruit achieved the highest value. All the three sugars content reached the maximum level in the peripheral pericarp of mature fruit. The contents of lycopene and beta-carotene had significant significant positive correlation with the accumulations of fructose and glucose in each part of fruit, showed significant significant negative correlation with the accumulation of sucrose in pericarp, radical arms and locular gel in fruit. The content of xanthophylls had no correlation with the value of sugar in fruit.%研究了番茄果实不同部位类胡萝卜素和糖含量的动态变化,并对其相关性进行了分析.结果表明:果实成熟时,果皮中番茄红素含量最高;β-胡萝卜素和叶黄素在胶质胎座中含量最高;3种糖在果皮中含量最高.番茄红素、β-胡萝卜素与果实各部位果糖、葡萄糖呈显著或极显著正相关关系,与果皮、隔壁、胶质胎座中蔗糖含量呈显著或极显著的负相关关系.叶黄素含量与果实各部位中糖相关性很低.

  7. Carotenoid-enriched transgenic corn delivers bioavailable carotenoids to poultry and protects them against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogareda, Carmina; Moreno, Jose A; Angulo, Eduardo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Portero, Manuel; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are health-promoting organic molecules that act as antioxidants and essential nutrients. We show that chickens raised on a diet enriched with an engineered corn variety containing very high levels of four key carotenoids (β-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and lutein) are healthy and accumulate more bioavailable carotenoids in peripheral tissues, muscle, skin and fat, and more retinol in the liver, than birds fed on standard corn diets (including commercial corn supplemented with colour additives). Birds were challenged with the protozoan parasite Eimeria tenella and those on the high-carotenoid diet grew normally, suffered only mild disease symptoms (diarrhoea, footpad dermatitis and digital ulcers) and had lower faecal oocyst counts than birds on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid-rich corn maintains poultry health and increases the nutritional value of poultry products without the use of feed additives.

  8. Carotenoid production and gene expression in an astaxanthin-overproducing Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous mutant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelblanco-Matiz, Lina M; Barbachano-Torres, Alejandra; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C; Cerda García-Rojas, Carlos M; Flores-Ortiz, César M; Barahona-Crisóstomo, Salvador K; Baeza-Cancino, Marcelo E; Alcaíno-Gorman, Jennifer; Cifuentes-Guzmán, Víctor H

    2015-12-01

    The primary carotenoid synthesized by Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is astaxanthin, which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture. Cell growth kinetics and carotenoid production were correlated with the mRNA levels of the idi, crtE, crtYB, crtI, crtS and crtR genes, and the changes in gene sequence between the wild-type and a carotenoid overproducer XR4 mutant strain were identified. At the late stationary phase, the total carotenoid content in XR4 was fivefold higher than that of the wild-type strain. Additionally, the mRNA levels of crtE and crtS increased during the XR4 growth and were three times higher than the wild-type strain in the late stationary phase. Moreover, the nucleotide sequences of crtYB, crtI and crtR exhibited differences between the strains. Both the higher crtE and crtS transcript levels and the crtYB, crtI and crtR mutations can, at least in part, act to up-regulate the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in the XR4 strain.

  9. Singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation in light-harvesting LH2 complexes of purple phototrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenina, I B; Makhneva, Z K; Moskalenko, A A; Gudkov, N D; Bolshakov, M A; Pavlova, E A; Proskuryakov, I I

    2014-03-01

    The current generally accepted structure of light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple phototrophic bacteria conflicts with the observation of singlet-triplet carotenoid excitation fission in these complexes. In LH2 complexes from the purple bacterium Allochromatium minutissimum, a drop in the efficiency of carotenoid triplet generation is demonstrated, which correlates with the extent of selective photooxidation of bacteriochlorophylls absorbing at ~850 nm. We conclude that singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation proceeds with participation of these excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophylls. In the framework of the proposed mechanism, the contradiction between LH2 structure and photophysical properties of carotenoids is eliminated. The possibility of singlet-triplet excitation fission involving a third mediator molecule was not considered earlier.

  10. 平衡反馈训练仪与Berg平衡量表在评定脑卒中偏瘫患者平衡功能中的相关性%The study of correlation between Pro-Kin balance assessment equipment and Berg balance scale in assessing balance function of hemiplegic patients with stoke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨婷; 钱兴皋; 张会慧; 周俊; 高政; 许亮; 李雪萍

    2012-01-01

    目的:探索平衡反馈训练仪与Berg平衡量表在评定脑卒中偏瘫患者平衡功能的相关性.方法:脑卒中偏瘫患者30例,分别进行Pro-Kin平衡仪站立位睁、闭眼静态平衡测试和Berg平衡评估,比较睁、闭眼时平衡仪检测指标重心摆动轨迹长和摆动面积的差异,并分别与Berg平衡量表评分进行Pearson相关性分析.结果:睁眼时重心摆动轨迹长及摆动面积与闭眼时比较,差异均有显著性(P<0.05).睁眼时重心摆动轨迹长、摆动面积与BBS总分、第6、9项呈中度负相关(r=-0.408-0.663,P<0.05);重心摆动轨迹长与第8、11-14项,摆动面积与第1、5、7呈中度负相关(r=-0.409--0.590,P<0.05).闭眼时摆动面积与第7、8项呈中度负相关(r=-0.492,-0.501,P<0.05);重心摆动轨迹长与Berg总分及子项都不相关.结论:Pro-Kin平衡仪的站立位静态平衡测试时睁眼重心摆动的重心摆动轨迹长及摆动面积可反映脑卒中偏瘫患者的静态平衡能力.%Objective:To explore the correlation between balance assessment equipment and Berg balance scale(BBS) in assessing balance function of hemiplegic patients. Method: Thirty stroke hemiplegic patients were assessed the balance function by using BBS and Pro-Kin balance assessment equipment which were used to test the standing balance in eye-opened and eye-closed condition. Paired-samples t test was used to compare the difference in sway length and area of body gravity between eye-opened and eye-closed condition. Then Pearson correlation coefficient was used to study the correlation between these two assessments. Result: Sway length and area were correlated negatively moderately with the total score of BBS, the 6th and 9th items (r=-0.408--0.663). Additionally, sway length and area were correlated negatively moderately with the 8th, 11th to 14th and the 1st, 5th, 7th items, respectively (r=-0.409--0.590,P<0.05). Sway area were correlated negatively moderately with the 7th and 8

  11. Correlation of physical aptitude; functional capacity, corporal balance and quality of life (QoL) among elderly women submitted to a post-menopausal physical activities program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Santos, César Augusto; Dantas, Estélio Enrique Martin; Moreira, Maria Helena Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of physical activity from the "Menopause in Form" program on physical aptitude, functional capacity, corporal balance and QoL among elderly women. In addition, correlations among these variables were examined. The present work was a longitudinal study that was quasi-experimental and correlational. A total of 323 elderly women (age: 69.0±5.53 years) participated in this study. Subjects were non-institutionalized, post-menopausal individuals residing at the Elderly Care Center in Belém Municipality (Pará, Brazil) and practiced one activity (i.e., dancing or walking) over a 10-month period. The assessment protocols used were the following: the Fullerton functional fitness test battery (physical aptitude); the activities of daily living (ADL) indices (functional capacity); the Tinetti-scale (corporal balance); and the WHOQOL-OLD questionnaire (QoL). The adopted significance level was p<0.05. Results from the Wilcoxon test demonstrated significant differences for the post-test assessment of functional capacity (Δ%=5.63%; p=0.0001) and general QoL (Δ%=9.19%; p=0.001). These results suggest that the physical activities employed during the "Menopause in Form" program resulted in significant improvements in the functional capacity and QoL of post-menopausal elderly women.

  12. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein, and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD.

  13. Iridophores and not carotenoids account for chromatic variation of carotenoid-based coloration in common lizards (Lacerta vivipara).

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Jose, Luis M; Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Sinervo, Barry; Fitze, Patrick S

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Carotenoids typically need reflective background components to shine. Such components, iridophores, leucophores, and keratin- and collagen-derived structures, are generally assumed to show no or little environmental variability. Here, we investigate the origin of environmentally induced variation in the carotenoid-based ventral coloration of male common lizards (Lacerta vivipara) by investigating the effects of dietary carotenoids and corticosterone on both carotenoid- and background-related reflectance. We observed a general negative chromatic change that was prevented by β-carotene supplementation. However, chromatic changes did not result from changes in carotenoid-related reflectance or skin carotenoid content but from changes in background-related reflectance that may have been mediated by vitamin A1. An in vitro experiment showed that the encountered chromatic changes most likely resulted from changes in iridophore reflectance. Our findings demonstrate that chromatic variation in carotenoid-based ornaments may not exclusively reflect differences in integumentary carotenoid content and, hence, in qualities linked to carotenoid deposition (e.g., foraging ability, immune response, or antioxidant capacity). Moreover, skin carotenoid content and carotenoid-related reflectance were related to male color polymorphism, suggesting that carotenoid-based coloration of male common lizards is a multicomponent signal, with iridophores reflecting environmental conditions and carotenoids reflecting genetically based color morphs.

  14. Subchromoplast sequestration of carotenoids affects regulatory mechanisms in tomato lines expressing different carotenoid gene combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Marilise; Mora, Leticia; Enfissi, Eugenia M A; Bramley, Peter M; Fraser, Paul D

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway in recent years has successfully enhanced the carotenoid contents of crop plants. It is now clear that only increasing biosynthesis is restrictive, as mechanisms to sequestrate these increased levels in the cell or organelle should be exploited. In this study, biosynthetic pathway genes were overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines and the effects on carotenoid formation and sequestration revealed. The bacterial Crt carotenogenic genes, independently or in combination, and their zygosity affect the production of carotenoids. Transcription of the pathway genes was perturbed, whereby the tissue specificity of transcripts was altered. Changes in the steady state levels of metabolites in unrelated sectors of metabolism were found. Of particular interest was a concurrent increase of the plastid-localized lipid monogalactodiacylglycerol with carotenoids along with membranous subcellular structures. The carotenoids, proteins, and lipids in the subchromoplast fractions of the transgenic tomato fruit with increased carotenoid content suggest that cellular structures can adapt to facilitate the sequestration of the newly formed products. Moreover, phytoene, the precursor of the pathway, was identified in the plastoglobule, whereas the biosynthetic enzymes were in the membranes. The implications of these findings with respect to novel pathway regulation mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Carotenoid diagenesis in a marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, C. D.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The major carotenoids at three levels (3, 40, and 175 m below the sediment-water interface) in a core from a marine sediment (Cariaco Trench, off Venezuela) have been examined. Mass and electronic spectral data have provided evidence for the onset of a progressive reduction of carotenoids in the geological column. The time scale of the process appears to depend on the particular carotenoid. Reduction of up to two double bonds is observed for the diol, zeaxanthin, in the oldest sediment (about 340,000 years old) but no reduction is observed in the younger samples (about 5000 and 56,000 years old). The diketone, canthaxanthin, shows evidence of reduction of up to two double bonds in the 56,000-yr sample and up to five double bonds in the oldest sample. No reduction of beta-carotene was observed in any of the samples.

  16. Dehydrolutein: a metabolically derived carotenoid never observed in raptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David COSTANTINI; Vittorio BERTACCHE; Barbara PASTURA; Anthony TURK

    2009-01-01

    @@ Carotenoids are fat-soluble pigments synthesised by photosynthetic organisms (Brush, 1990). Conversely, animals are incapable of synthesizing carotenoids de novo, and they must obtain them through their diet. However, some animal species are able to make some alterations to the basic chemical structure, converting ingested carotenoids into more oxidized and differently coloured forms (Schiedt, 1998).

  17. Dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, I.; Cadier, E.; Beulens, J. W J; van der A, D. L.; Spijkerman, A. M W; van der Schouw, Y. T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Carotenoids may reduce diabetes risk, due to their antioxidant properties. However, the association between dietary carotenoids intake and type 2 diabetes risk is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether higher dietary carotenoid intakes assoc

  18. Carotenoid levels in human lymphocytes, measured by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanauskaite, R B; SegersNolten, IGMJ; DeGrauw, K J; Sijtsema, N M; VanderMaas, L; Greve, J; Otto, C; Figdor, C G

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoid levels in lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy people have been investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. We observed that carotenoids are concentrated in so-called ''Gall bodies''. The level of carotenoids in living human lymphocytes was found to be age-dependent and to d

  19. Relationships of body mass index with serum carotenoids, tocopherols and retinol at steady-state and in response to a carotenoid-rich vegetable diet intervention in Filipino schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D; Maramag, Cherry C; Tengco, Lorena W; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Solon, Florentino S

    2008-04-01

    In marginally nourished children, information is scarce regarding the circulating concentrations of carotenoids and tocopherols, and physiological factors influencing their circulating levels. We determined the serum concentrations of carotenoids, tocopherols and retinol at steady state and in response to a 9-week vegetable diet intervention in 9-12-year-old girls (n=54) and boys (n=65) in rural Philippines. We determined cross-sectional relationships of BMI (body mass index) with serum micronutrient levels, and whether BMI is a determinant of serum carotenoid responses to the ingestion of carotenoid-rich vegetables. We measured dietary nutrient intakes and assessed inflammation by measurement of serum C-reactive protein levels. The children had low serum concentrations of carotenoids, tocopherols and retinol as compared with published values for similar-aged children in the U.S.A. The low serum retinol levels can be ascribed to inadequate diets and were not the result of confounding due to inflammation. Significant inverse correlations of BMI and serum all-trans-beta-carotene, 13-cis-beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin and alpha-tocopherol (but not beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene and retinol) were observed among girls at baseline. The dietary intervention markedly enhanced the serum concentrations of all carotenoids. Changes in serum all-trans-beta-carotene and alpha-carotene (but not changes in lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin) in response to the dietary intervention were inversely associated with BMI in girls and boys. Thus, in Filipino school-aged children, BMI is inversely related to the steady-state serum concentrations of certain carotenoids and vitamin E, but not vitamin A, and is a determinant of serum beta- and alpha-carotene responses, but not xanthophyll responses, to the ingestion of carotenoid-rich vegetable meals.

  20. Postural balance, its sensory-motor correlates and self-reported functional ability in 75-year-old men and women: A cross-national comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Marianne; Pertti, Era; Avlund, Kirsten

    1999-01-01

    Social medicine, postural balance, functional ability, activities of daily living, physical activity, ageing......Social medicine, postural balance, functional ability, activities of daily living, physical activity, ageing...

  1. Effect of sulfur and nitrogen fertilization on the content of nutritionally relevant carotenoids in spinach ( Spinacia oleracea ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Constance; Arrigoni, Eva; Neuweiler, Reto; Baumgartner, Daniel; Nyström, Laura; Hurrell, Richard F

    2012-06-13

    Spinach is an important dietary source of lutein and β-carotene. Their synthesis is closely linked to chlorophyll synthesis and dependent upon an adequate supply of sulfur and nitrogen. Soils may become sulfur-deficient during winter because microorganisms convert atmospheric SO2 less efficiently to sulfate. The influence of sulfur and nitrogen fertilization on the carotenoid and chlorophyll contents of spinach grown in summer or winter was investigated. Carotenoid and chlorophyll levels were positively correlated. Lutein and β-carotene were 25% higher in summer than in winter. Winter levels were increased by 35-40% by sulfur fertilization in one location but not in the other, with the impact depending upon soil type, growing location, and atmospheric conditions. Carotenoids were little or not affected by nitrogen addition in winter or sulfur addition in summer. It is concluded that sulfur fertilization of spinach in winter may modestly increase carotenoids but high carotenoid levels are best assured with carotenoid-rich cultivars grown in summer.

  2. Enhanced accumulation of carotenoids in sweetpotato plants overexpressing IbOr-Ins gene in purple-fleshed sweetpotato cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Chul; Kim, Sun Ha; Park, Seyeon; Lee, Hyeong-Un; Lee, Joon Seol; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Yun-Hee; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] is an important root crop that produces low molecular weight antioxidants such as carotenoids and anthocyanin. The sweetpotato orange (IbOr) protein is involved in the accumulation of carotenoids. To increase the levels of carotenoids in the storage roots of sweetpotato, we generated transgenic sweetpotato plants overexpressing IbOr-Ins under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in an anthocyanin-rich purple-fleshed cultivar (referred to as IbOr plants). IbOr plants exhibited increased carotenoid levels (up to 7-fold) in their storage roots compared to wild type (WT) plants, as revealed by HPLC analysis. The carotenoid contents of IbOr plants were positively correlated with IbOr transcript levels. The levels of zeaxanthin were ∼ 12 times elevated in IbOr plants, whereas β-carotene increased ∼ 1.75 times higher than those of WT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that most carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes were up-regulated in the IbOr plants, including PDS, ZDS, LCY-β, CHY-β, ZEP and Pftf, whereas LCY-ɛ was down-regulated. Interestingly, CCD1, CCD4 and NCED, which are related to the degradation of carotenoids, were also up-regulated in the IbOr plants. Anthocyanin contents and transcription levels of associated biosynthetic genes seemed to be altered in the IbOr plants. The yields of storage roots and aerial parts of IbOr plants and WT plants were not significantly different under field cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that overexpression of IbOr-Ins can increase the carotenoid contents of sweetpotato storage roots.

  3. Photo-excitation of carotenoids causes cytotoxicity via singlet oxygen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Hiroshi, E-mail: yoshii@nirs.go.jp [Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yoshii, Yukie, E-mail: yukiey@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Asai, Tatsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Furukawa, Takako [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Takaichi, Shinichi [Department of Biology, Nippon Medical School, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 211-0063 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some photo-excited carotenoids have photosensitizing ability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They are able to produce ROS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photo-excited fucoxanthin can produce singlet oxygen through energy transfer. -- Abstract: Carotenoids, natural pigments widely distributed in algae and plants, have a conjugated double bond system. Their excitation energies are correlated with conjugation length. We hypothesized that carotenoids whose energy states are above the singlet excited state of oxygen (singlet oxygen) would possess photosensitizing properties. Here, we demonstrated that human skin melanoma (A375) cells are damaged through the photo-excitation of several carotenoids (neoxanthin, fucoxanthin and siphonaxanthin). In contrast, photo-excitation of carotenoids that possess energy states below that of singlet oxygen, such as {beta}-carotene, lutein, loroxanthin and violaxanthin, did not enhance cell death. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by photo-excited fucoxanthin or neoxanthin was confirmed using a reporter assay for ROS production with HeLa Hyper cells, which express a fluorescent indicator protein for intracellular ROS. Fucoxanthin and neoxanthin also showed high cellular penetration and retention. Electron spin resonance spectra using 2,2,6,6-tetramethil-4-piperidone as a singlet oxygen trapping agent demonstrated that singlet oxygen was produced via energy transfer from photo-excited fucoxanthin to oxygen molecules. These results suggest that carotenoids such as fucoxanthin, which are capable of singlet oxygen production through photo-excitation and show good penetration and retention in target cells, are useful as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy for skin disease.

  4. Carotenoid composition and in vitro pharmacological activity of rose hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Radó-Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Kawase, Masami; Satoh, Kazue; Tanaka, Toru; Tani, Satoru; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Gyémánt, Nóra; Molnár, József

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare carotenoid extracts of Rose hips (Rosa canina L.) with regard to their phytochemical profiles and their in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), cytotoxic, multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal and radical scavenging activity. Carotenoid composition was investigated in the different fractionation of rose hips, using extraction methods. Six main carotenoids - epimers of neochrome, lutein, zeaxanthin, rubixanthin, lycopene, β,β-carotene - were identified from Rose hips by their chromatographic behavior and UV-visible spectra, which is in accordance with other studies on carotenoids in this plant material. The active principles in the carotenoid extract might differ, depending upon the extraction procedures.

  5. Carotenoid biosynthesis in extremophilic Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2010-11-01

    Bacteria from the phylum Deinococcus-Thermus are known for their resistance to extreme stresses including radiation, oxidation, desiccation and high temperature. Cultured Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria are usually red or yellow pigmented because of their ability to synthesize carotenoids. Unique carotenoids found in these bacteria include deinoxanthin from Deinococcus radiodurans and thermozeaxanthins from Thermus thermophilus. Investigations of carotenogenesis will help to understand cellular stress resistance of Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria. Here, we discuss the recent progress toward identifying carotenoids, carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and pathways in some species of Deinococcus-Thermus extremophiles. In addition, we also discuss the roles of carotenoids in these extreme bacteria.

  6. The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, Julianna; Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezso

    2010-10-21

    We propose a simple model to explain the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of simple electrolytes without using any adjustable parameters. The primitive model of electrolytes is used to describe the interaction between ions computed by the adaptive grand canonical Monte Carlo method. For the dielectric constant of the electrolyte, we use experimental concentration dependent values. This is included through a solvation term in our treatment to describe the interaction between ions and water that changes as the dielectric constant changes with concentration. This term is computed by a Born-treatment fitted to experimental hydration energies. Our results for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaBr, NaI, MgCl(2), CaCl(2), SrCl(2), and BaCl(2) demonstrate that the principal reason of the nonmonotonic behavior of the activity coefficient is a balance between the solvation and ion-ion correlation terms. This conclusion differs from previous studies that assumed that it is the balance of hard sphere repulsion and electrostatic attraction that produces the nonmonotonic behavior. Our results indicate that the earlier assumption that solvation can be taken into account by a larger, "solvated" ionic radius should be reconsidered. To explain second order effects (such as dependence on ionic size), we conclude that explicit water models are needed.

  7. New target carotenoids for CCD4 enzymes are revealed with the characterization of a novel stress-induced carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene from Crocus sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Rambla, José Luis; Fernández-de-Carmen, Asun; Trapero-Mozos, Almudena; Ahrazem, Oussama; Orzáez, Diego; Granell, Antonio; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2014-11-01

    Apocarotenoid compounds play diverse communication functions in plants, some of them being as hormones, pigments and volatiles. Apocarotenoids are the result of enzymatic cleavage of carotenoids catalyzed by carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD). The CCD4 family is the largest family of plant CCDs, only present in flowering plants, suggesting a functional diversification associated to the adaptation for specific physiological capacities unique to them. In saffron, two CCD4 genes have been previously isolated from the stigma tissue and related with the generation of specific volatiles involved in the attraction of pollinators. The aim of this study was to identify additional CCD4 members associated with the generation of other carotenoid-derived volatiles during the development of the stigma. The expression of CsCCD4c appears to be restricted to the stigma tissue in saffron and other Crocus species and was correlated with the generation of megastigma-4,6,8-triene. Further, CsCCD4c was up-regulated by wounding, heat, and osmotic stress, suggesting an involvement of its apocarotenoid products in the adaptation of saffron to environmental stresses. The enzymatic activity of CsCCD4c was determined in vivo in Escherichia coli and subsequently in Nicotiana benthamiana by analyzing carotenoids by HPLC-DAD and the volatile products by GC/MS. β-Carotene was shown to be the preferred substrate, being cleaved at the 9,10 (9',10') bonds and generating β-ionone, although β-cyclocitral resulting from a 7,8 (7',8') cleavage activity was also detected at lower levels. Lutein, neoxanthin and violaxanthin levels in Nicotiana leaves were markedly reduced when CsCCD4c is over expressed, suggesting that CsCCD4c recognizes these carotenoids as substrates.

  8. Patterns of serum carotenoid accumulation and skin colour variation in kestrel nestlings in relation to breeding conditions and different terms of carotenoid supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, Stefania; Costantini, David; Fanfani, Alberto; Tagliavini, James; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids are pigments synthesised by autotrophic organisms. For nestlings of raptorial species, which obtain carotenoids from the consumption of other heterotrophic species, the access to these pigments can be crucial. Carotenoids, indeed, have fundamental health maintenance functions, especially

  9. The carotenoid-continuum: carotenoid-based plumage ranges from conspicuous to cryptic and back again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Mark L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are frequently used by birds to colour their plumage with green, yellow, orange or red hues, and carotenoid-based colours are considered honest signals of quality, although they may have other functions, such as crypsis. It is usually assumed that red through yellow colours have a signalling function while green is cryptic. Here we challenge this notion using the yellow and green colouration of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus, great tits (Parus major and greenfinches (Carduelis chloris as a model. Results The relationship between colouration (chroma, computed using visual sensitivities of conspecifics and detectability (contrast against natural backgrounds as perceived by conspecifics and avian predators followed a similar curvilinear pattern for yellow and green plumage with minimum detectability at intermediate levels of carotenoid deposition. Thus, for yellow and green plumage, colours at or close to the point of minimum detectability may aid in crypsis. This may be the case for blue and great tit green and yellow plumage, and greenfinch green plumage, all of which had comparably low levels of detectability, while greenfinch yellow plumage was more chromatic and detectable. As yellow and green blue tit colouration are strongly affected by carotenoid availability during moult, variation in pigment availability between habitats may affect the degree of background-matching or the costliness of producing cryptic plumage. Conclusions Increasing carotenoid-deposition in the integument does not always lead to more conspicuous colours. In some cases, such as in blue or great tits, carotenoid deposition may be selected through enhanced background-matching, which in turn suggests that producing cryptic plumage may entail costs. We stress however, that our data do not rule out a signalling function of carotenoid-based plumage in tits. Rather, it shows that alternative functions are plausible and that assuming a signalling

  10. Carotenoids from Haloarchaea and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Rodrigo-Baños

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The production of pigments by halophilic archaea has been analysed during the last half a century. The main reasons that sustains this research are: (i many haloarchaeal species possess high carotenoids production availability; (ii downstream processes related to carotenoid isolation from haloarchaea is relatively quick, easy and cheap; (iii carotenoids production by haloarchaea can be improved by genetic modification or even by modifying several cultivation aspects such as nutrition, growth pH, temperature, etc.; (iv carotenoids are needed to support plant and animal life and human well-being; and (v carotenoids are compounds highly demanded by pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food markets. Several studies about carotenoid production by haloarchaea have been reported so far, most of them focused on pigments isolation or carotenoids production under different culture conditions. However, the understanding of carotenoid metabolism, regulation, and roles of carotenoid derivatives in this group of extreme microorganisms remains mostly unrevealed. The uses of those haloarchaeal pigments have also been poorly explored. This work summarises what has been described so far about carotenoids production by haloarchaea and their potential uses in biotechnology and biomedicine. In particular, new scientific evidence of improved carotenoid production by one of the better known haloarchaeon (Haloferax mediterranei is also discussed.

  11. Long-lived coherence in carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. A.; Cannon, E.; Van Dao, L.; Hannaford, P.; Quiney, H. M.; Nugent, K. A.

    2010-08-01

    We use two-colour vibronic coherence spectroscopy to observe long-lived vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state of carotenoid molecules, with decoherence times in excess of 1 ps. Lycopene and spheroidene were studied isolated in solution, and within the LH2 light-harvesting complex extracted from purple bacteria. The vibrational coherence time is shown to increase significantly for the carotenoid in the complex, providing further support to previous assertions that long-lived electronic coherences in light-harvesting complexes are facilitated by in-phase motion of the chromophores and surrounding proteins. Using this technique, we are also able to follow the evolution of excited state coherences and find that for carotenoids in the light-harvesting complex the langS2|S0rang superposition remains coherent for more than 70 fs. In addition to the implications of this long electronic decoherence time, the extended coherence allows us to observe the evolution of the excited state wavepacket. These experiments reveal an enhancement of the vibronic coupling to the first vibrational level of the C-C stretching mode and/or methyl-rocking mode in the ground electronic state 70 fs after the initial excitation. These observations open the door to future experiments and modelling that may be able to resolve the relaxation dynamics of carotenoids in solution and in natural light-harvesting systems.

  12. Influence of Phenylalanine on Carotenoid Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L.; Ni, X.; Luo, X.

    2015-01-01

    The carotenoids lutein and β-carotene form, in 1:1 ethanol-water mixtures H-aggregates, of different strengths. The effects of phenylalanine on these aggregates were recorded by UV-Vis absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and Raman spectra. The H-aggregate of lutein was characterized by a large 78 nm blue shift in the absorption spectra, confirming the strong coupling between hydroxyl groups of adjacent molecules. The 15 nm blue shift in the β-carotene mixture also indicates that it was assembled by weak coupling between polyenes. After adding phenylalanine, the reducing absorption strength of the aggregates of lutein and reappearance of vibrational substructure indicate that the hydroxyl and amino groups of phenylalanine may coordinate to lutein and disaggregate the H-aggregates. However, phenylalanine had no effect on aggregates of β-carotene. The Raman spectra show three bands of carotenoids whose intensities decreased with increasing phenylalanine concentration. The frequency of ν1 corresponding to the length of the conjugated region was more sensitive to the solution of lutein. This coordination of phenylalanine to lutein could increase the length of the conjugated region. In addition, phenylalanine significantly affected the excited electronic states of carotenoids, which were crucial in the energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophyll a in vivo.

  13. Long-lived coherence in carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J A; Cannon, E; Van Dao, L; Hannaford, P [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Quiney, H M; Nugent, K A, E-mail: jdavis@swin.edu.a [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    We use two-colour vibronic coherence spectroscopy to observe long-lived vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state of carotenoid molecules, with decoherence times in excess of 1 ps. Lycopene and spheroidene were studied isolated in solution, and within the LH2 light-harvesting complex extracted from purple bacteria. The vibrational coherence time is shown to increase significantly for the carotenoid in the complex, providing further support to previous assertions that long-lived electronic coherences in light-harvesting complexes are facilitated by in-phase motion of the chromophores and surrounding proteins. Using this technique, we are also able to follow the evolution of excited state coherences and find that for carotenoids in the light-harvesting complex the (S{sub 2}|S{sub 0}) superposition remains coherent for more than 70 fs. In addition to the implications of this long electronic decoherence time, the extended coherence allows us to observe the evolution of the excited state wavepacket. These experiments reveal an enhancement of the vibronic coupling to the first vibrational level of the C-C stretching mode and/or methyl-rocking mode in the ground electronic state 70 fs after the initial excitation. These observations open the door to future experiments and modelling that may be able to resolve the relaxation dynamics of carotenoids in solution and in natural light-harvesting systems.

  14. Continuous production of carotenoids from Dunaliella salina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinegris, D.M.M.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    During the in situ extraction of ß-carotene from Dunaliella salina, the causal relationship between carotenoid extraction and cell death indicated that cell growth and cell death should be at equilibrium for a continuous in situ extraction process. In a flat-panel photobioreactor that was operated a

  15. A carotenoid health index based on plasma carotenoids and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Michael S

    2011-12-01

    While there have been many studies on health outcomes that have included measurements of plasma carotenoids, this data has not been reviewed and assembled into a useful form. In this review sixty-two studies of plasma carotenoids and health outcomes, mostly prospective cohort studies or population-based case-control studies, are analyzed together to establish a carotenoid health index. Five cutoff points are established across the percentiles of carotenoid concentrations in populations, from the tenth to ninetieth percentile. The cutoff points (mean ± standard error of the mean) are 1.11 ± 0.08, 1.47 ± 0.08, 1.89 ± 0.08, 2.52 ± 0.13, and 3.07 ± 0.20 µM. For all cause mortality there seems to be a low threshold effect with protection above every cutoff point but the lowest. But for metabolic syndrome and cancer outcomes there tends to be significant positive health outcomes only above the higher cutoff points, perhaps as a triage effect. Based on this data a carotenoid health index is proposed with risk categories as follows: very high risk: 4 µM. Over 95 percent of the USA population falls into the moderate or high risk category of the carotenoid health index.

  16. Ultrafast spectroscopy tracks carotenoid configurations in the orange and red carotenoid proteins from cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šlouf, Václav; Kuznetsova, Valentyna; Fuciman, Marcel; de Carbon, Céline Bourcier; Wilson, Adjélé; Kirilovsky, Diana; Polívka, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    A quenching mechanism mediated by the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) is one of the ways cyanobacteria protect themselves against photooxidative stress. Here, we present a femtosecond spectroscopic study comparing OCP and RCP (red carotenoid protein) samples binding different carotenoids. We confirmed significant changes in carotenoid configuration upon OCP activation reported by Leverenz et al. (Science 348:1463-1466. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa7234 , 2015) by comparing the transient spectra of OCP and RCP. The most important marker of these changes was the magnitude of the transient signal associated with the carotenoid intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state. While OCP with canthaxanthin exhibited a weak ICT signal, it increased significantly for canthaxanthin bound to RCP. On the contrary, a strong ICT signal was recorded in OCP binding echinenone excited at the red edge of the absorption spectrum. Because the carbonyl oxygen responsible for the appearance of the ICT signal is located at the end rings of both carotenoids, the magnitude of the ICT signal can be used to estimate the torsion angles of the end rings. Application of two different excitation wavelengths to study OCP demonstrated that the OCP sample contains two spectroscopically distinct populations, none of which is corresponding to the photoactivated product of OCP.

  17. Carotenoids in unexpected places: gall midges, lateral gene transfer, and carotenoid biosynthesis in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Cassidy; Heath, Jeremy; Stireman, John O; Abbot, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are conjugated isoprenoid molecules with many important physiological functions in organisms, including roles in photosynthesis, oxidative stress reduction, vision, diapause, photoperiodism, and immunity. Until recently, it was believed that only plants, microorganisms, and fungi were capable of synthesizing carotenoids and that animals acquired them from their diet, but recent studies have demonstrated that two arthropods (pea aphid and spider mite) possess a pair of genes homologous to those required for the first step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Absent in all other known animal genomes, these genes appear to have been acquired by aphids and spider mites in one or several lateral gene transfer events from a fungal donor. We report the third case of fungal carotenoid biosynthesis gene homologs in an arthropod: flies from the family Cecidomyiidae, commonly known as gall midges. Using phylogenetic analyses we show that it is unlikely that lycopene cyclase/phytoene synthase and phytoene desaturase homologs were transferred singly to an ancient arthropod ancestor; instead we propose that genes were transferred independently from related fungal donors after divergence of the major arthropod lineages. We also examine variation in intron placement and copy number of the carotenoid genes that may underlie function in the midges. This trans-kingdom transfer of carotenoid genes may represent a key innovation, underlying the evolution of phytophagy and plant-galling in gall midges and facilitating their extensive diversification across plant lineages.

  18. Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of carotenoid status for human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Susan T; Cartmel, Brenda; Scarmo, Stephanie; Jahns, Lisa; Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-11-15

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status has been suggested as a promising biomarker for human studies. This manuscript describes research done relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, and adiposity. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary [e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid fruit and vegetable (F/V)-enriched diet], demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective biomarker of F/V intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater F/V intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of F/V intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes.

  19. Physalis alkekengi carotenoidic extract inhibitor of soybean lipoxygenase-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedea, Veronica Sanda; Pintea, Adela; Bunea, Andrea; Braicu, Cornelia; Stanila, Andreea; Socaciu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the carotenoidic saponified extract of Physalis alkekengi sepals (PA) towards the lipoxygenase (LOX) oxidation of linoleic acid. Lipoxygenase activity in the presence of carotenoids, standard and from extract, was followed by its kinetic behaviour determining the changes in absorption at 234 nm. The standard carotenoids used were β-carotene (β-car), lutein (Lut), and zeaxanthin (Zea). The calculated enzymatic specific activity (ESA) after 600 s of reaction proves that PA carotenoidic extract has inhibitory effect on LOX oxidation of linoleic acid. A longer polyenic chain of carotenoid structure gives a higher ESA during the first reaction seconds. This situation is not available after 600 s of reaction and may be due to a destruction of this structure by cooxidation of carotenoids, besides the classical LOX reaction. The PA carotenoidic extract inhibiting the LOX-1 reaction can be considered a source of lipoxygenase inhibitors.

  20. Intraspecific Variation in Carotenoids of Brassica oleracea var. sabellica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageney, Vera; Baldermann, Susanne; Albach, Dirk C

    2016-04-27

    Carotenoids are best known as a source of natural antioxidants. Physiologically, carotenoids are part of the photoprotection in plants as they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important source of carotenoids in European food is Brassica oleracea. Focusing on the most abundant carotenoids, we estimated the contents of ß-carotene, (9Z)-neoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein as well as those of chlorophylls a and b to assess their variability in Brassica oleracea var. sabellica. Our analyses included more than 30 cultivars categorized in five distinct sets grouped according to morphological characteristics or geographical origin. Our results demonstrated specific carotenoid patterns characteristic for American, Italian, and red-colored kale cultivars. Moreover, we demonstrated a tendency of high zeaxanthin proportions under traditional harvest conditions, which accord to low-temperature regimes. We also compared the carotenoid patterns of self-generated hybrid lines. Corresponding findings indicated that crossbreeding has a high potential for carotenoid content optimization in kale.

  1. Accumulation and bioavailability of dietary carotenoids in vegetable crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsell, Dean A; Kopsell, David E

    2006-10-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments found in many vegetable crops that are reported to have the health benefits of cancer and eye disease reduction when consumed in the diet. Research shows that environmental and genetic factors can significantly influence carotenoid concentrations in vegetable crops, and that changing cultural management strategies could be advantageous, resulting in increased vegetable carotenoid concentrations. Improvements in vegetable carotenoid levels have been achieved using traditional breeding methods and molecular transformations to stimulate biosynthetic pathways. Postharvest and processing activities can alter carotenoid chemistry, and ultimately affect bioavailability. Bioavailability data emphasize the importance of carotenoid enhancement in vegetable crops and the need to characterize potential changes in carotenoid composition during cultivation, storage and processing before consumer purchase.

  2. A review on factors influencing bioaccessibility and bioefficacy of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshani, A M B

    2017-05-24

    Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most prevalent deficiency disorders in the world. As shown by many studies plant food based approaches have a real potential on prevention of vitamin A deficiency in a sustainable way. Carotenoids are important as precursors of vitamin A as well as for prevention of cancers, coronary heart diseases, age-related macular degeneration, cataract etc. Bioaccessibility and bioefficacy of carotenoids are known to be influenced by numerous factors including dietary factors such as fat, fiber, dosage of carotenoid, location of carotenoid in the plant tissue, heat treatment, particle size of food, carotenoid species, interactions among carotenoids, isomeric form and molecular linkage and subject characteristics. Therefore even when carotenoids are found in high quantities in plant foods their utilization may be unsatisfactory because some factors are known to interfere as negative effectors.

  3. Parameters of dynamic balance in the frontal and sagittal plane and their correlations with poor postures in children aged 10–12 from the Masłów district in Świętokrzyskie province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Szczepanowska-Wołowiec

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Even postural asymmetry may provoke static and balance disorders. Aim of the research: To define the level of dynamic balance among children aged 10–12 and find the correlations between poor postures. Material and methods: This study was conducted among 176 children from Masłów district in Świętokrzyskie province. The Libra platform was used to examine the dynamic balance. Results: Dynamic balance parameters from the sagittal and frontal plane show statistically significant differences between the control group and study groups. Conclusions: The analysis of dynamic balance parameters from the sagittal and frontal plane confirms that the lowest values occur in the control group, higher in children with foot defect, and the highest in children with scoliotic posture.

  4. What are carotenoids signaling? Immunostimulatory effects of dietary vitamin E, but not of carotenoids, in Iberian green lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopena, Renata; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    In spite that carotenoid-based sexual ornaments are one of the most popular research topics in sexual selection of animals, the antioxidant and immunostimulatory role of carotenoids, presumably signaled by these colorful ornaments, is still controversial. It has been suggested that the function of carotenoids might not be as an antioxidant per se, but that colorful carotenoids may indirectly reflect the levels of nonpigmentary antioxidants, such as melatonin or vitamin E. We experimentally fed male Iberian green lizards ( Lacerta schreiberi) additional carotenoids or vitamin E alone, or a combination of carotenoids and vitamin E dissolved in soybean oil, whereas a control group only received soybean oil. We examined the effects of the dietary supplementations on phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin-swelling immune response and body condition. Lizards that were supplemented with vitamin E alone or a combination of vitamin E and carotenoids had greater immune responses than control lizards, but animals supplemented with carotenoids alone had lower immune responses than lizards supplemented with vitamin E and did not differ from control lizards. These results support the hypothesis that carotenoids in green lizards are not effective as immunostimulants, but that they may be visually signaling the immunostimulatory effects of non-pigmentary vitamin E. In contrast, lizards supplemented with carotenoids alone have higher body condition gains than lizards in the other experimental groups, suggesting that carotenoids may be still important to improve condition.

  5. Biochemical Validation of the Older Australian’s Food Frequency Questionnaire Using Carotenoids and Vitamin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun S. Lai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Validation of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ is important, as inaccurate and imprecise information may affect the association between dietary exposure and health outcomes. Objective: This study assessed the validity of the Older Australian’s FFQ against plasma carotenoids and Vitamin E. Methods: A random subsample (n = 150 of 2420 participants in the Hunter Community Study, aged 55–85 years, were included. Correlations between crude and energy-adjusted FFQ estimates of carotenoids, Vitamin E, and fruit and vegetables with corresponding biomarkers were determined. Percentages of participants correctly classified in the same quartile, and in the same ± 1 quartile, by the two methods were calculated. Results: Significant correlations (P < 0.05 were observed for α-carotene (r = 0.26–0.28, β-carotene (r = 0.21–0.25, and β-cryptoxanthin (r = 0.21–0.23. Intakes of fruits and vegetables also showed similar correlations with these plasma carotenoids. Lycopene was only significantly correlated with fruit and vegetable intakes (r = 0.19–0.23. Weak correlations were observed for lutein + zeaxanthin (r = 0.12–0.16. For Vitamin E, significant correlation was observed for energy-adjusted FFQ estimate and biomarker (r = 0.20. More than 68% of individuals were correctly classified within the same or adjacent quartile, except for lutein + zeaxanthin. Conclusion: With the exception of lutein + zeaxanthin, the Older Australian’s FFQ provides reasonable rankings for individuals according to their carotenoids, Vitamin E, fruit and vegetable intakes.

  6. Mate choice for a male carotenoid-based ornament is linked to female dietary carotenoid intake and accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomey Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coevolution of male traits and female mate preferences has led to the elaboration and diversification of sexually selected traits; however the mechanisms that mediate trait-preference coevolution are largely unknown. Carotenoid acquisition and accumulation are key determinants of the expression of male sexually selected carotenoid-based coloration and a primary mechanism maintaining the honest information content of these signals. Carotenoids also influence female health and reproduction in ways that may alter the costs and benefits of mate choice behaviours and thus provide a potential biochemical link between the expression of male traits and female preferences. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the dietary carotenoid levels of captive female house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus and assessed their mate choice behavior in response to color-manipulated male finches. Results Females preferred to associate with red males, but carotenoid supplementation did not influence the direction or strength of this preference. Females receiving a low-carotenoid diet were less responsive to males in general, and discrimination among the colorful males was positively linked to female plasma carotenoid levels at the beginning of the study when the diet of all birds was carotenoid-limited. Conclusions Although female preference for red males was not influenced by carotenoid intake, changes in mating responsiveness and discrimination linked to female carotenoid status may alter how this preference is translated into choice. The reddest males, with the most carotenoid rich plumage, tend to pair early in the breeding season. If carotenoid-related variations in female choice behaviour shift the timing of pairing, then they have the potential to promote assortative mating by carotenoid status and drive the evolution of carotenoid-based male plumage coloration.

  7. Metal exposure influences the melanin and carotenoid-based colorations in great tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudeau, M; Mateos-Gonzalez, F; Cotín, J; Pagani-Nuñez, E; Torné-Noguera, A; Senar, J C

    2015-11-01

    Metals are naturally found in the environment but are also emitted through anthropogenic activities, raising some concerns about the potential deleterious effects of these elements on wildlife. The potential effects of metals on bird coloration have been the focus of several recent studies since animal colored-signals often reflect the physiology of their bearers and are thus used by animals to assess the quality of another individual as a mate or competitor. These studies have shown that the melanin pigmentation seems to be positively associated and the carotenoid-based coloration negatively associated with metal exposure in wild birds. Although these studies have been very useful to show the associations between metal exposure and coloration, only few of them have actually quantified the levels of metal exposure at the individual level; always focusing on one or two of them. Here, we measured the concentrations of eight metals in great tits' feathers and then assessed how these levels of metals were associated with the carotenoid and melanin-based colorations. We found that the melanin pigmentation was positively associated with the copper concentration and negatively correlated with the chromium concentration in feathers. In addition, we have shown that the carotenoid-based coloration was negatively associated with the feather's mercury concentration. This study is the first one to identify some metals that might affect positively and negatively the deposition of melanin and carotenoid into the plumage of wild birds.

  8. Variation in carotenoid-protein interaction in bird feathers produces novel plumage coloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; LaFountain, Amy M; Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A; Robert, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Light absorption by carotenoids is known to vary substantially with the shape or conformation of the pigment molecule induced by the molecular environment, but the role of interactions between carotenoid pigments and the proteins to which they are bound, and the resulting impact on organismal coloration, remain unclear. Here, we present a spectroscopic investigation of feathers from the brilliant red scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber, Threskiornithidae), the orange-red summer tanager (Piranga rubra, Cardinalidae) and the violet-purple feathers of the white-browed purpletuft (Iodopleura isabellae, Tityridae). Despite their striking differences in colour, all three of these feathers contain canthaxanthin (β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione) as their primary pigment. Reflectance and resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy were used to investigate the induced molecular structural changes and carotenoid-protein interactions responsible for the different coloration in these plumage samples. The results demonstrate a significant variation between species in the peak frequency of the strong ethylenic vibration (ν(1)) peak in the rR spectra, the most significant of which is found in I. isabellae feathers and is correlated with a red-shift in canthaxanthin absorption that results in violet reflectance. Neither polarizability of the protein environment nor planarization of the molecule upon binding can entirely account for the full extent of the colour shift. Therefore, we suggest that head-to-tail molecular alignment (i.e. J-aggregation) of the protein-bound carotenoid molecules is an additional factor.

  9. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms.

  10. The Postnatal Accumulation of Junctional E-cadherin Is Inversely Correlated with the Capacity for Supporting Cells to Convert Directly into Sensory Hair Cells in Mammalian Balance Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R.; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species’ capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases >6-fold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration. PMID:21849546

  11. The postnatal accumulation of junctional E-cadherin is inversely correlated with the capacity for supporting cells to convert directly into sensory hair cells in mammalian balance organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M; Corwin, Jeffrey T

    2011-08-17

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species' capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases more than sixfold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h, they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions, the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration.

  12. Application of dynamic balance instrument and Berg balance scale in assessing balance function of hemiplegic patients and analysis of its' correlation%动态平衡仪与Berg量表用于评定偏瘫患者平衡功能的相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王惠娟; 张盛全; 刘夏; 彭楠; 梁衍泉; 范建中

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨Pro-Kin Line动态平衡仪及Berg量表(BBS)在偏瘫患者平衡功能障碍评定中的应用价值及相关性.方法:选取脑卒中患者50例为实验组,健康志愿者41例纳入对照组.由治疗师用BBS及Pro-Kin Line动态平衡仪对受试者平衡功能进行评定,分析BBS和动态平衡仪所得结果的相关性.结果:两组受试者的平均轨迹误差(ATE)及各项稳定指数具有显著性意义(P<0.05).偏瘫组BBS得分与ATE、各项稳定指数均呈负相关(-0.226--0.617,P<0.05);同时ATE与各项稳定指数均呈正相关(0.392-0.813,P<0.05),其中ATE与圆周稳定指数呈高度正相关(r=0.813,P<0.01).结论:Berg量表和动态平衡仪测试均可反映偏瘫患者平衡功能且具有相关性,其中动态平衡仪较Berg量表更全面、详细、客观地反映患者的平衡功能.%Objective: To explore the application of balance assessments with Pro-Kin dynamic equipment and Berg balance scale (BBS) in assessing balance function of hemiplegic patients and to analyse it's correlation. Method: Fifty hemiplegic stroke patients (the patient group) and forty-one healthy volunteers (the control group) were recruited. Balance function of each subject was measured using BBS and Pro-Kin dynamic equipment. Result: The average trace error (ATE) and the sets of stability index (SI) showed significant differences between the patient group and the control group (P<0.05) .The data obtained through Pro-Kin dynamic equipment assessment showed that ATE and SI were strongly negative correlated with BBS result (-0.301--0.604, P<0.05). Besides, there was a strong positive correlation between ATE and SI(0.392-0.813,P<0.05). Conclusion: The dynamic balance equipment and BBS can both effectively reflect the balance function of the hemiplegic patients. But the result of dynamic balance equipment is more objective and detail.

  13. Carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase is involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bing; Sun, Zongtao; Xu, Zhenjian; Shen, Shaochuan; Wang, Hu; Hua, Yuejin

    2008-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 synthesizes deinoxanthin, a unique carotenoid product, which contributes to cell resistance following various stresses. The biosynthetic pathway of deinoxanthin is unclear, although several enzymes are presumed to be involved. The gene (dr2250) predicted by gene homologue analysis to encode carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase (CrtD) was deleted to investigate its function. A mutant deficient in the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) was also constructed to verify the catalytic function of the gene product in the native host. Carotenoid analysis of the resultant mutants verified that DR2250 encodes carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase, which catalyses the C-3',4'-desaturation of the monocyclic precursor of deinoxanthin but not acyclic carotenoids. Mutation of the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) resulted in accumulation of lycopene, confirming that it encodes the lycopene cyclase in the native host. The lack of CrtD decreased the antioxidant capacity of the mutant deficient in dr2250 compared with the wild-type, indicating that the C-3',4'-desaturation step contributes to the antioxidant capacity of deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans.

  14. Modification of carotenoid levels by abscission agents and expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in 'valencia' sweet orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferez, Fernando; Pozo, Luis V; Rouseff, Russell R; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2013-03-27

    The effect of 5-chloro-3-methyl-4-nitro-1H-pyrazole (CMNP) and ethephon on peel color, flavedo carotenoid gene expression, and carotenoid accumulation was investigated in mature 'Valencia' orange ( Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) fruit flavedo at three maturation stages. Abscission agent application altered peel color. CMNP was more effective than ethephon in promoting green-to-red (a) and blue-to-yellow (b) color at the middle and late maturation stages and total carotenoid changes at all maturation stages. Altered flow of carotenoid precursors during maturation due to abscission agents was suggested by changes in phytoene desaturase (Pds) and ζ-carotene desaturase (Zds) gene expression. However, each abscission agent affected downstream expression differentially. Ethephon application increased β-carotene hydroxilase (β-Chx) transcript accumulation 12-fold as maturation advanced from the early to middle and late stages. CMNP markedly increased β- and ε-lycopene cyclase (Lcy) transcript accumulation 45- and 15-fold, respectively, at midmaturation. Patterns of carotenoid accumulation in flavedo were supported in part by gene expression changes. CMNP caused greater accumulation of total flavedo carotenoids at all maturation stages when compared with ethephon or controls. In general, CMNP treatment increased total red carotenoids more than ethephon or the control but decreased total yellow carotenoids at each maturation stage. In control fruit flavedo, total red carotenoids increased and yellow carotenoids decreased as maturation progressed. Trends in total red carotenoids during maturation were consistent with measured a values. Changes in carotenoid accumulation and expression patterns in flavedo suggest that regulation of carotenoid accumulation is under transcriptional, translational, and post-translational control.

  15. Carotenoid stability during production and storage of tomato juice made from tomatoes with diverse pigment profiles measured by infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Diaz, Daniel E; Santos, Alejandra; Francis, David M; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2010-08-11

    Chemical changes in carotenoids and lipids were studied during production and storage of canned tomato juice using ATR infrared spectroscopy and HPLC. Samples from 10 groups of tomatoes with different carotenoid profiles were analyzed fresh, after hot-break and screening, after canning, and at five different time points during 1 year of storage. An apparent increase of carotenoids was observed after hot-break due to improved extraction efficiency. This increase was accompanied by some degree of lipid oxidation and carotenoid isomerization. Canning produced the most intense changes in the lipid profile with breakdown of triglycerides ( approximately 1743 cm(-1)), formation of fatty acids ( approximately 1712 cm(-1)), and degradation and isomerization of trans-carotenoids ( approximately 960 and approximately 3006 cm(-1)). Isomerization was corroborated by the relative increase of HPLC areas corresponding to carotenoid cis isomers. Canning reduced trans-lycopene, trans-delta-carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and trans-lutein by 30, 34, 43, and 67%, respectively. HPLC data indicate that canning causes a drastic reduction of tetra-cis-lycopene and promotes its isomerization to other geometric forms, including all-trans-lycopene. Infrared spectra of tomato juice lipid fractions correlated well with the number of days in storage (SECV 0.99), demonstrating continuous degradation of lipids. Results demonstrated that individual carotenoids and their isomeric forms behave differently during production and storage of canned tomato juice. Information collected by infrared spectroscopy complemented well that of HPLC, providing marker bands to further the understanding of chemical changes taking place during processing and storage of tomato juice.

  16. Vitamin A and bone health: the balancing act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2013-01-01

    The role of vitamin A status as it relates to bone health is historical yet controversial. Population-based studies have linked high dietary intake of preformed vitamin A, which is obtained from animal-source foods, fortified foods, and some supplements, to greater risk of osteoporosis and hip fracture. In contrast, carotenoids, some of which are vitamin A precursors from plants, are associated with improved bone health. Carotenoids may be a biomarker that reflects a generally healthy lifestyle, which includes fruit and vegetable consumption. Current dietary recommendations to increase fruit and vegetable intake in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans will result in greater intakes of provitamin A carotenoids if consumers comply. This could lead to artificially high intakes of vitamin A in dietary analyses. However, multiple factors affect the bioconversion of provitamin A carotenoids to the active form of vitamin A. The human body will strive to maintain vitamin A balance by down-regulating provitamin A carotenoid bioconversion. If high preformed vitamin A intake is associated with poor bone health and provitamin A carotenoids are protective, future studies are needed to clarify the associations between total body stores of vitamin A, dietary intake of the pre- and pro-forms, and bone health throughout the life cycle.

  17. Carotenoid:β-cyclodextrin stability is independent of pigment structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Elisabet; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2017-04-15

    Carotenoids refer to a wide class of lipophilic pigments synthesized by plants, exert photoprotective and antioxidant properties that are lost upon carotenoid degradation. Their inclusion into hydrophilic host-molecules could improve their stability. Cyclodextrins, provide a hydrophobic cavity in the core of their structure while the outer configuration is suitable with aqueous environments. Carotenoids can accommodate into the hydrophobic core of cyclodextrins and therefore, they are protected from exogenous stress. Literature reported that carotenoid structure could modulate stability of the complexes, however no conclusions can be drawn as the studies performed so far were not completely analogous. We describe the synthesis of several carotenoids/β-CDs inclusion complexes and provide experimental evidences that β-CDs inclusion renders these compounds more stability towards the oxidizing agents (2,2'-azobis, 2-methylpropionamidine dihydrochloride and hydrogen peroxide). Esterified carotenoids were also used in this work to screen the influence of this particular structural configuration of xanthophylls against oxidation.

  18. Biotechnological production of value-added carotenoids from microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichuk, Kristine; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður; Fu, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    We recently evaluated the relationship between abiotic environmental stresses and lutein biosynthesis in the green microalga Dunaliella salina and suggested a rational design of stress-driven adaptive evolution experiments for carotenoids production in microalgae. Here, we summarize our recent findings regarding the biotechnological production of carotenoids from microalgae and outline emerging technology in this field. Carotenoid metabolic pathways are characterized in several representative algal species as they pave the way for biotechnology development. The adaptive evolution strategy is highlighted in connection with enhanced growth rate and carotenoid metabolism. In addition, available genetic modification tools are described, with emphasis on model species. A brief discussion on the role of lights as limiting factors in carotenoid production in microalgae is also included. Overall, our analysis suggests that light-driven metabolism and the photosynthetic efficiency of microalgae in photobioreactors are the main bottlenecks in enhancing biotechnological potential of carotenoid production from microalgae. PMID:24691165

  19. Balance Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are having balance problems, see your doctor. Balance disorders can be signs of other health problems, such ... cases, treating the illness that is causing the disorder will help with the balance problem. Exercises, a change in diet, and some ...

  20. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments of prochloron (prochlorophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H. W.; Lewin, R. A.; Cheng, L.

    1983-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a gradient-elution technique was utilized to separate and quantify chlorophylls a and b as well as major carotenoid pigments present in freeze-dried preprations of prochloron-didemnid associations and in Prochloron cells separated from host colonies. Results confirm earlier spectrophotometric evidence for both chlorophylls a and b in this prokaryote. Chlorophyll a:b ratios range from 4.14 to 19.71; generally good agreement was found between ratios determined in isolated cell preprations and in symbiotic colonies (in hospite). These values are 1.5 to 5-fold higher than ratios determined in a variety of eukaryotic green plants. The carotenoids in Prochloron are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those found in various freshwater and marine blue-green algae (cyanopbytes) from high-light environments. However, Prochloron differs from cyanophytes by the absence of myxoxanthophyll and related glycosidic carotenoids. It pigment characteristics are considered sufficiently different from those of cyanophytes to justify its assignment to a separate algal division.

  1. Carotenoid Antenna Binding and Function in Retinal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    REPORT Carotenoid antenna binding and function in retinal proteins 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Xanthorhodopsin, a proton pump from the...eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, is a unique dual chromophore system that contains, in addition to retinal, the carotenoid salinixanthin as a light... carotenoid ring near the retinal ring. Substitution of the small glycine with bulky tryptophan in this site eliminates binding. The second factor is the 4

  2. Dietary carotenoids in normal and pathological tissues of corpus uteri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Wołczyński

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids and retinyl esters are the source of vitamin A in the human body and its natural derivatives takes part in the regulation of cell replication and differentiation in the human endometrium, may induce the leiomyoma growth and has a role in differentiation of endometrial adenocarcinoma. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the presence of carotenoids in tissues from the normal uterus and from various tumors of the uterine corpus, as well as to compare the total content, major carotenoids and % of carotenoids belonging to the provitamin A group between the tissues examined. Using three independent methods of chromatography (CC, TLC, HPLC we analysed 140 human samples. We identified 13 carotenoids belonging to the eg. provitamin A group and epoxy carotenoids. In all the samples beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, neoxanthin, violaxanthin and mutatoxanthin were isolated. In normal tissues, the mean carotenoid content was the highest in the follicular phase endometrium (9.9 microg/g, while the highest percentage of carotenoids belonging to provitamin A group was found in the luteal phase (18.2%. In the pathological group, the highest mean values were demonstrated for epithelial lesions (8.0 microg/g, and within this group - in endometrioid adenocarcinoma (10.8 microg/g. In both groups, violaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein epoxide and mutatoxanthin were the predominant carotenoids. We have demonstrated that all uterine tissues show a concentration of beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, being the source of vitamin A. The highest total values of carotenoids obtained in the group of endometrioid adenocarcinoma seem to confirm certain enzymatic defects in carotenoid metabolism in the course of the neoplastic process or some metabolic modifications. The finding of astaxanthin - the major antioxidant among carotenoids - in 63% of tissues examined is also significant.

  3. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki; Parisa Sadighara; Ramin Nabizadeh Nodehi; Mahmood Alimohammadi; Naiema Vakili Saatloo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal) treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged. ...

  4. Changes of the Main Carotenoid Pigment Contents During the Drying Processes of the Different Harvest Stage Fruits of Lycium barbarum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Wen-ping; NI Zhi-jing; LI He; CHEN Min

    2008-01-01

    The test analyzed the regularity of biosynthesis and degradation of the main functional components,such as zeaxanthin,β-carotene,and esterified carotenoids in the fruit of Lycium barbarum L.in order to provide theoretical basis for improvement of processing condition,appearance quality,and preservation of carotenoids.RP-HPLC was adapted to assay the changes of the main carotenoids of the different harvested stage fruit during the drying processing.Quantification was realized using external standard with gradient elution.The results showed that zeaxanthin and β-carotene contents in fruits increased dramatically,2-22 times that of fresh fruits at the beginning of the drying period.In the middle of drying period,degradation occurred to a some extent,and the fall fruit degraded to a large extent.At the end of drying period, zeaxanthin and β-carotene contents increased to a little extent until a balanced state is obtained.Zeaxanthin dipalmitate content had a total degradation to more than 40%at the beginning of the drying period,and increased a little at the middle period,then reached a balanced state finally.The total carotenoid content analysis showed that the summer fruit had higher carotenoid content than the fall fruit.The experiments demonstrated zeaxanthin and β-carotene contents in fruits increased and zeaxanthin dipalmitate decreased during the drying process,which had an effect on the production appearance.

  5. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    KAUST Repository

    Rodrigo, María J.

    2013-09-04

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly ?-citraurin (3-hydroxy-?-apo-8?-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of ?-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in ?-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7?,8? double bond in zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin, confrming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7?,8? double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. The Author 2013.

  6. Ultrastructural deposition forms and bioaccessibility of carotenoids and carotenoid esters from goji berries (Lycium barbarum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Judith; Schädle, Christopher N; Sprenger, Jasmin; Heller, Annerose; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2017-03-01

    Goji berries (Lycium barbarum L.) have been known to contain strikingly high levels of zeaxanthin, while the physical deposition form and bioaccessibility of the latter was yet unknown. In the present study, we associated ripening-induced modifications in the profile of carotenoids with fundamental changes of the deposition state of carotenoids in goji berries. Unripe fruit contained common chloroplast-specific carotenoids being protein-bound within chloroplastidal thylakoids. The subsequent ripening-induced transformation of chloroplasts to tubular chromoplasts was accompanied by an accumulation of up to 36mg/100g FW zeaxanthin dipalmitate and further minor xanthophyll esters, prevailing in a presumably liquid-crystalline state within the nano-scaled chromoplast tubules. The in vitro digestion unraveled the enhanced liberation and bioaccessibility of zeaxanthin from these tubular aggregates in goji berries as compared to protein-complexed lutein from spinach. Goji berries therefore might represent a more potent source of macular pigments than green leafy vegetables like spinach.

  7. Effects of experimental brood size manipulation and gender on carotenoid levels of Eurasian Kestrels Falco tinnunculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laaksonen, T.; Negro, J.J.; Lyytinen, S.; Valkama, J.; Ots, I.; Korpimäki, E.

    2008-01-01

    Animals use carotenoid-pigments for coloration, as antioxidants and as enhancers of the immune system. Carotenoid-dependent colours can thus signal individual quality and carotenoids have also been suggested to mediate life-history trade-offs.

  8. Specific appetite for carotenoids in a colorful bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Senar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since carotenoids have physiological functions necessary for maintaining health, individuals should be selected to actively seek and develop a specific appetite for these compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Great tits Parus major in a diet choice experiment, both in captivity and the field, preferred carotenoid-enriched diets to control diets. The food items did not differ in any other aspects measured besides carotenoid content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Specific appetite for carotenoids is here demonstrated for the first time, placing these compounds on a par with essential nutrients as sodium or calcium.

  9. Carboidratos e carotenoides totais em duas variedades de mangarito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sato Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição de carboidratos e carotenoides em rizomas mãe e filhos das variedades de mangarito (Xanthosoma riedelianum pequeno e gigante. Amostras dos rizomas coletadas ao longo do ciclo cultural e após 90 dias de armazenamento foram avaliadas quanto aos teores de carboidratos e carotenoides totais. Os rizomas apresentaram aumento no teor de carboidratos, e o rizoma-mãe da variedade pequeno apresentou acréscimos lineares no teor de carotenoides, ao longo do cultivo. O armazenamento reduz os teores de carboidratos e de carotenoides totais em todos os rizomas.

  10. Cyclisation and aromatisation of carotenoids during sediment diagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koster, J.; Baas, M.; Koopmans, M.; Kaam-Peters, H.M.E. van; Geenevasen, J.A.J.; Kruk, C.

    1995-01-01

    A novel diaryl isoprenoid with an additional aromatic ring, formed from the diaromatic carotenoid isorenieratene by cyclisation and aromatisation during sediment diagenesis, is identified in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks.

  11. Change Law of Hyperspectral Data in Related with Chlorophyll and Carotenoid in Rice at Different Developmental Stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Zhi-rui; TANG Yan-lin; ZHANG Rong-xian; HUANG Jing-feng; WANG Ren-chao

    2004-01-01

    The hyperspectral reflectances of the canopy, the first and the third unfolding leaves from the top and the panicles of two rice varieties (Xiushui 110 and Xieyou 9308) were measured by a ASD FieldSpec Pro FRTM in field and indoor environments under three nitrogen levels at different developmental stages. The concentrations of chlorophyll and carotenoid in leaves and panicle corresponding to the spectra were determined by biochemical method. The spectral differences were significant for rice under different nitrogen levels, and the concentrations of chlorophyll and carotenoid in leaves increased along with increasing applied nitrogen. There were more pronounced differences for the pigment concentrations in rice leaves with different nitrogen levels. The spectral reflectance of canopy was gradually getting smaller in the visible region and bigger in the near infrared region as the growth edge in the spectra of canopy, leaves and panicle after heading. The concentrations of chlorophyll and carotenoid in leaves presented S-shape change. The concentrations of chlorophyll and carotenoid in canopies, leaves and panicles were highly significantly correlated to the hyperspectral vegetation indices (Vis) R990/R553, R1200/R553, R750/R553, R553/R670, R800/R553, PSSRa,PSNDa and the red edge position λ red, indicating that these Vis could be used to estimate the concentrations of chlorophyll and carotenoid in canopies, leaves and panicles of rice.

  12. Production of the Marine Carotenoid Astaxanthin by Metabolically Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Nadja A; Heider, Sabine A E; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-06-30

    Astaxanthin, a red C40 carotenoid, is one of the most abundant marine carotenoids. It is currently used as a food and feed additive in a hundred-ton scale and is furthermore an attractive component for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications with antioxidant activities. Corynebacterium glutamicum, which naturally synthesizes the yellow C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin, is an industrially relevant microorganism used in the million-ton amino acid production. In this work, engineering of a genome-reduced C. glutamicum with optimized precursor supply for astaxanthin production is described. This involved expression of heterologous genes encoding for lycopene cyclase CrtY, β-carotene ketolase CrtW, and hydroxylase CrtZ. For balanced expression of crtW and crtZ their translation initiation rates were varied in a systematic approach using different ribosome binding sites, spacing, and translational start codons. Furthermore, β-carotene ketolases and hydroxylases from different marine bacteria were tested with regard to efficient astaxanthin production in C. glutamicum. In shaking flasks, the C. glutamicum strains developed here overproduced astaxanthin with volumetric productivities up to 0.4 mg·L(-1)·h(-1) which are competitive with current algae-based production. Since C. glutamicum can grow to high cell densities of up to 100 g cell dry weight (CDW)·L(-1), the recombinant strains developed here are a starting point for astaxanthin production by C. glutamicum.

  13. Production of the Marine Carotenoid Astaxanthin by Metabolically Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja A. Henke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a red C40 carotenoid, is one of the most abundant marine carotenoids. It is currently used as a food and feed additive in a hundred-ton scale and is furthermore an attractive component for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications with antioxidant activities. Corynebacterium glutamicum, which naturally synthesizes the yellow C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin, is an industrially relevant microorganism used in the million-ton amino acid production. In this work, engineering of a genome-reduced C. glutamicum with optimized precursor supply for astaxanthin production is described. This involved expression of heterologous genes encoding for lycopene cyclase CrtY, β-carotene ketolase CrtW, and hydroxylase CrtZ. For balanced expression of crtW and crtZ their translation initiation rates were varied in a systematic approach using different ribosome binding sites, spacing, and translational start codons. Furthermore, β-carotene ketolases and hydroxylases from different marine bacteria were tested with regard to efficient astaxanthin production in C. glutamicum. In shaking flasks, the C. glutamicum strains developed here overproduced astaxanthin with volumetric productivities up to 0.4 mg·L−1·h−1 which are competitive with current algae-based production. Since C. glutamicum can grow to high cell densities of up to 100 g cell dry weight (CDW·L−1, the recombinant strains developed here are a starting point for astaxanthin production by C. glutamicum.

  14. Evaluation of Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children: comparing reported fruit, juice and vegetable intakes with plasma carotenoid concentration and school lunch observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Bysted, Anette; Trolle, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    by comparing intake with plasma carotenoid concentration, and by comparing the reported FJV intake to actually eaten FJV, as observed by a photographic method. A total of eighty-one children, assisted by parents, reported their diet for seven consecutive days. For the same five schooldays as they reported...... their diet, the children's school lunch was photographed and weighed before and after eating. In the week after the diet reporting, fasting blood samples were taken. Self-reported intake of FJV and estimated intake of carotenoids were compared with plasma carotenoid concentration. Accuracy of self......-reported food and FJV consumption at school lunch was measured in terms of matches, intrusion, omission and faults, when compared with images and weights of lunch intake. Self-reported intake of FJV was significantly correlated with the total carotenoid concentration (0·58) (P

  15. X-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy study on the effect of carotenoid biosynthesis to the structure of Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikonen, T P; Li, H; Psencík, J

    2007-01-01

    Chlorosomes, the main antenna complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria, were isolated from null mutants of Chlorobium tepidum, each of which lacked one enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids. The effects of the altered carotenoid composition on the structure of the chlorosomes were...... studied by means of x-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy. The chlorosomes from each mutant strain exhibited a lamellar arrangement of the bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, which are the major constituents of the chlorosome interior. However, the carotenoid content and composition had a pronounced...... effect on chlorosome biogenesis and structure. The results indicate that carotenoids with a sufficiently long conjugated system are important for the biogenesis of the chlorosome baseplate. Defects in the baseplate structure affected the shape of the chlorosomes and were correlated with differences...

  16. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. Results We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were ort...

  17. Effects of zonal flows on correlation between energy balance and energy conservation associated with nonlinear nonviscous atmospheric dynamics in a thin rotating spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear Euler equations are used to model two-dimensional atmosphere dynamics in a thin rotating spherical shell. The energy balance is deduced on the basis of two classes of functorially independent invariant solutions associated with the model. It it shown that the energy balance is exactly the conservation law for one class of the solutions whereas the second class of invariant solutions provides and asymptotic convergence of the energy balance to the conservation law.

  18. On the regulation of photosynthesis by excitonic interactions between carotenoids and chlorophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Stefan; Quentmeier, Claudia C; Liao, Pen-Nan; Hafi, Nour; Barros, Tiago; Wilk, Laura; Bittner, Florian; Walla, Peter J

    2009-07-28

    Selective 2-photon excitation (TPE) of carotenoid dark states, Car S(1), shows that in the major light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII), the extent of electronic interactions between carotenoid dark states (Car S(1)) and chlorophyll (Chl) states, phi(Coupling)(Car S(1)-Chl), correlates linearly with chlorophyll fluorescence quenching under different experimental conditions. Simultaneously, a linear correlation between both Chl fluorescence quenching and phi(Coupling)(Car S(1)-Chl) with the intensity of red-shifted bands in the Chl Q(y) and carotenoid absorption was also observed. These results suggest quenching excitonic Car S(1)-Chl states as origin for the observed effects. Furthermore, real time measurements of the light-dependent down- and up-regulation of the photosynthetic activity and phi(Coupling)(Car S(1)-Chl) in wild-type and mutant (npq1, npq2, npq4, lut2 and WT+PsbS) Arabidopsis thaliana plants reveal that also in vivo the quenching parameter NPQ correlates always linearly with the extent of electronic Car S(1)-Chl interactions in any adaptation status. Our in vivo measurements with Arabidopsis variants show that during high light illumination, phi(Coupling)(Car S(1)-Chl) depends on the presence of PsbS and zeaxanthin (Zea) in an almost identical way as NPQ. In summary, these results provide clear evidence for a very close link between electronic Car S(1)-Chl interactions and the regulation of photosynthesis. These findings support a photophysical mechanism in which short-living, low excitonic carotenoid-chlorophyll states serve as traps and dissipation valves for excess excitation energy.

  19. Expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes and changes in carotenoids during ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namitha, Kanakapura Krishnamurthy; Archana, Surya Narayana; Negi, Pradeep Singh

    2011-04-01

    To study the expression pattern of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes, changes in their expression at different stages of maturity in tomato fruit (cv. Arka Ahuti) were investigated. The genes regulating carotenoid production were quantified by a dot blot method using a DIG (dioxigenin) labelling and detection kit. The results revealed that there was an increase in the levels of upstream genes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway such as 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), 4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (Lyt B), phytoene synthase (PSY), phytoene desaturase (PDS) and ζ-carotene desaturase (ZDS) by 2-4 fold at the breaker stage as compared to leaf. The lycopene and β-carotene content was analyzed by HPLC at different stages of maturity. The lycopene (15.33 ± 0.24 mg per 100 g) and β-carotene (10.37 ± 0.46 mg per 100 g) content were found to be highest at 5 days post-breaker and 10 days post-breaker stage, respectively. The lycopene accumulation pattern also coincided with the color values at different stages of maturity. These studies may provide insight into devising gene-based strategies for enhancing carotenoid accumulation in tomato fruits.

  20. Application of tristimulus colorimetry to estimate the carotenoids content in ultrafrozen orange juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-Martínez, Antonio J; Vicario, Isabel M; Heredia, Francisco J

    2003-12-03

    Tristimulus Colorimetry was applied to characterize the color of Valencia late orange juices. Color measurements were made against white background and black background. The profile of the main carotenoids related to the color of the juices was determined by HPLC. Significant correlations (p < 0.05) between b*, Cab* and h(ab) and the content of beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin and beta-carotene were found. The correlations between the color parameters L*, a*, b*, Cab* and h(ab) and the carotenoids content were also explored by partial least squares. The results obtained have shown that it is possible to obtain equations, by means of multiple regression models, which allow the determination of the individual carotenoid levels from the CIELAB color parameters, with R2 values always over 0.9. In this sense, equations have been proposed to calculate the retinol equivalents (1 RE = 1 microgram retinol = 12 micrograms beta-carotene = 24 micrograms alpha-carotene = 24 micrograms beta-cryptoxanthin) of the orange juice analyzed as a function of the color parameters calculated from measurement made against white and black backgrounds. The average RE per liter of juice obtained by HPLC was 51.07 +/- 18.89, whereas employing these equations, average RE values obtained were 51.16 +/- 1.36 and 51.21 +/- 1.70 for white background and black background, respectively.

  1. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  2. Photochemical properties of carotenoids: what can we get from the VB model?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Yi; (高嶷); LIU; Chungen; (刘春根); JIANG; Yuansheng; (江元生)

    2003-01-01

    The empirical valence bond model, solved by the DMRG technique, is applied to the systematical study of the photochemical processes of carotenoids. The polyenes with five up to one hundred of C=C bonds are investigated. The probability of the state arrangement for the conjugated bond, Pij, is evaluated. It is a parameter to correlate the bond lengths, and could also be applied to rationalizing the quantum yields of the photo-isomerization and the reaction constantof the quenching of singlet-oxygen happened to the external C=C bond of the carotenoids. The maximum reaction constant in long chain limit is determined as about 2.92×1010 L·mol-1·s-1.

  3. Direct Quantification of Carotenoids in Low Fat Baby Foods Via Laser Photoacoustics and Colorimetric Index *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóka, O.; Ajtony, Zs.; Bicanic, D.; Valinger, D.; Végvári, Gy.

    2014-12-01

    Carotenoids are important antioxidants found in various foods including those for nutrition of infants. In this investigation, the total carotenoid content (TCC) of nine different commercially available baby foods was quantified using colorimetric index * obtained via reflectance colorimetry (RC) and by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) at 473 nm. The latter requires a minimum of sample preparation and only a one time calibration step which enables practically direct quantification of TCC. Results were verified versus UV-Vis spectrophotometry (SP) as the reference technique. It was shown that RC and LPAS (at 473 nm) provide satisfactory results for *, = 0.9925 and = 0.9972, respectively. Other color indices do not show a correlation with TCC. When determining the TCC in baby foods containing tomatoes, it is necessary to select a different analytical wavelength to compensate for the effect of lycopene's presence in the test samples.

  4. Metabolism of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during ripening of raspberry fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, M.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Simic, A.; Uitdewilligen, J.; Arkel, van J.; Vos, de C.H.; Jonker, H.H.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Sibbesen, O.; Qvist, I.; Mikkelsen, J.D.; Hall, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are important lipophilic antioxidants in fruits. Apocarotenoids such as ¿-ionone and ß-ionone, which are breakdown products of carotenoids, are important for the flavor characteristics of raspberry fruit, and have also been suggested to have beneficial effects on human health. Raspberry

  5. Factors influencing the chemical stability of carotenoids in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Caitlin S; McClements, D Julian; Weiss, Jochen; Decker, Eric A

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have produced evidence to suggest that consuming carotenoids may provide a variety of health benefits including a reduced incidence of a number of cancers, reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, and improved eye health. Evolving evidence on the health benefits of several carotenoids has sparked interest in incorporating more carotenoids into functional food products. Unfortunately, the same structural attributes of carotenoids that are thought to impart health benefits also make these compounds highly susceptible to oxidation. Given the susceptibility of carotenoids to degradation, particularly once they have been extracted from biological tissues, it is important to understand the major mechanisms of oxidation in order to design delivery systems that protect these compounds when they are used as functional food ingredients. This article reviews current understanding of the oxidation mechanisms by which carotenoids are degraded, including pathways induced by heat, light, oxygen, acid, transition metal, or interactions with radical species. In addition, several carotenoid delivery systems are evaluated for their potential to decrease carotenoid degradation in functional food products.

  6. Regulatory control of carotenoid accumulation in winter squash during storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postharvest storage of fruits and vegetables is often required and frequently results in nutritional quality change. In this study, we investigated carotenoid storage plastids, carotenoid content, and its regulation during 3-month storage of winter squash butternut fruits. We showed that storage imp...

  7. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  8. Optimization of carotenoids extraction from Penaeus semisulcatus shrimp wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gholamreza jahed Khaniki; Parisa Sadighara; Ramin Nabizadeh Nodehi; Mahmood Alimohammadi; Naiema Vakili Saatloo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find effective method for carotenoids extraction from shrimp waste which is one of the important sources of natural carotenoids and produced in large quantities in Iran. Methods: Two methods of carotenoids extraction, enzymatic and alkaline (NaOH 1 normal) treatment, were assayed. About 5 g of gritted shrimp wastes were used at each stage. For alkaline treatment, sodium hydroxide were added to shrimp waste. After 48 h, the mixture was filtered and centrifuged.Results:Alcalase extraction produced (234.00±2.00) mg/L carotenoid and NaOH extraction produced (170.00±1.53) mg/L carotenoid. Based on the samples analyzed, alcalase enzyme showed more efficiency than NaOH extraction to achieve carotenoids from shrimp waste.Conclusions:It can be concluded that using alcalase enzyme for carotenoids extraction can produce higher carotenoids concentration than NaOH extraction method. So alcalase enzyme method can be used for achieving this kind of antioxidant.

  9. Importancia nutricional de los pigmentos carotenoides

    OpenAIRE

    Meléndez Martínez, Antonio Jesús; Vicario Romero, Isabel; Heredia Mira, Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Los pigmentos carotenoides son compuestos responsables de la coloración de gran número de alimentos vegetales y animales, como zanahorias, zumo de naranja, tomates, salmón y yema del huevo. Desde hace muchos años, se sabe que algunos de estos compuestos, como a y b-caroteno, así como la b-criptoxantina, son provitaminas A. No obstante, estudios recientes han puesto de manifiesto las propiedades antioxidantes de estos pigmentos, así como su eficacia en la prevención de ciertas enfermedades del...

  10. Carotenoids and Their Isomers: Color Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Jiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages.

  11. Carotenoid incorporation into microsomes: yields, stability and membrane dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Jessel, Robert; Diehl, Horst A.

    2000-12-01

    The carotenoids β-carotene (BC), lycopene (LYC), lutein (LUT), zeaxanthin (ZEA), canthaxanthin (CTX) and astaxanthin (ASTA) have been incorporated into pig liver microsomes. Effective incorporation concentrations in the range of about 1-6 nmol/mg microsomal protein were obtained. A stability test at room temperature revealed that after 3 h BC and LYC had decayed totally whereas, gradually, CTX (46%), LUT (21%), ASTA (17%) and ZEA (5%) decayed. Biophysical parameters of the microsomal membrane were changed hardly by the incorporation of carotenoids. A small rigidification may occur. Membrane anisotropy seems to offer only a small tolerance for incorporation of carotenoids and seems to limit the achievable incorporation concentrations of the carotenoids into microsomes. Microsomes instead of liposomes should be preferred as a membrane model to study mutual effects of carotenoids and membrane dynamics.

  12. Carotenoids and their isomers: color pigments in fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Hock-Eng; Prasad, K Nagendra; Kong, Kin-Weng; Jiang, Yueming; Ismail, Amin

    2011-02-18

    Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as 'functional food ingredients'. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages.

  13. Enhanced biological activity of carotenoids stabilized by phenyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ji Suk; Jeon, Sunhwa; Byun, Youn Jung; Koo, Sangho; Choi, Shin Sik

    2015-06-15

    Carotenoids are lipid soluble food ingredients with multifunction including antioxidant and anticancer activities. However, carotenoids are destructively oxidized upon reaction with radicals resulting in toxic effects on biological systems. Two synthetic carotenoids (BAS and BTS) containing the aromatic phenyl groups with a para-substituent (OMe and Me, respectively) at C-13 and C-13' position were prepared in order to overcome a structural instability of carotenoid. Both BAS and BTS exerted stronger radical scavenging activity than β-carotene in DPPH and ABTS assays. In particular, BTS significantly reduced in vivo ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels and improved body growth and reproduction of Caenorhabditiselegans. BTS has a great potential for the advanced and modified carotenoid material with stability leading to enhanced bioavailability.

  14. Biosynthesis of Carotenoids in Plants: Enzymes and Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Saavedra, Carolina; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most important biocolor isoprenoids responsible for yellow, orange and red colors found in nature. In plants, they are synthesized in plastids of photosynthetic and sink organs and are essential molecules for photosynthesis, photo-oxidative damage protection and phytohormone synthesis. Carotenoids also play important roles in human health and nutrition acting as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Biochemical and biophysical approaches in different plants models have provided significant advances in understanding the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in plants as well as the key points of regulation in their biosynthesis. To date, different plant models have been used to characterize the key genes and their regulation, which has increased the knowledge of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in plants. In this chapter a description of each step in the carotenoid synthesis pathway is presented and discussed.

  15. Carotenoids in Marine Invertebrates Living along the Kuroshio Current Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Sakagami

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids of the corals Acropora japonica, A. secale, and A. hyacinthus, the tridacnid clam Tridacna squamosa, the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, and the small sea snail Drupella fragum were investigated. The corals and the tridacnid clam are filter feeders and are associated with symbiotic zooxanthellae. Peridinin and pyrrhoxanthin, which originated from symbiotic zooxanthellae, were found to be major carotenoids in corals and the tridacnid clam. The crown-of-thorns starfish and the sea snail D. fragum are carnivorous and mainly feed on corals. Peridinin-3-acyl esters were major carotenoids in the sea snail D. fragum. On the other hand, ketocarotenoids such as 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin and astaxanthin were major carotenoids in the crown-of-thorns starfish. Carotenoids found in these marine animals closely reflected not only their metabolism but also their food chains.

  16. Metabolism of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during ripening of raspberry fruit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekwilder, J; van der Meer, IM; Simicb, A

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are important lipophilic antioxidants in fruits. Apocarotenoids such as α-ionone and β-ionone, which are breakdown products of carotenoids, are important for the flavor characteristics of raspberry fruit, and have also been suggested to have beneficial effects on human health. Raspberry...... is one of the few fruits where fruit ripening is accompanied by the massive production of apocarotenoids. In this paper, changes in levels of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening are described. In addition, the isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a carotenoid...... cleavage dioxygenase (CCD), which putatively mediates the degradation of carotenoids to apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening, is reported. Such information helps us to better understand how these compounds are produced in plants and may also enable us to develop novel strategies for improved...

  17. Assessment of carotenoids in pumpkins after different home cooking conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Maria Jaeger de Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids have antioxidant activity, but few are converted by the body into retinol, the active form of vitamin A. Among the 600 carotenoids with pro-vitamin A activity, the most common are α- and β-carotene. These carotenoids are susceptible to degradation (e.g., isomerization and oxidation during cooking. The aim of this study was to assess the total carotenoid, α- and β-carotene, and 9 and 13-Z- β-carotene isomer contents in C. moschata after different cooking processes. The raw pumpkin samples contained 236.10, 172.20, 39.95, 3.64 and 0.8610 µg.g- 1 of total carotenoids, β-carotene, α-carotene, 13-cis-β-carotene, and 9-Z-β-carotene, respectively. The samples cooked in boiling water contained 258.50, 184.80, 43.97, 6.80, and 0.77 µg.g- 1 of total carotenoids, β-carotene, α-carotene, 13-Z-β-carotene, and 9-Z-β-carotene, respectively. The steamed samples contained 280.77, 202.00, 47.09, 8.23, and 1.247 µg.g- 1 of total carotenoids, β-carotene, α-carotene,13-Z-β-carotene, and 9-Z-β-carotene, respectively. The samples cooked with added sugar contained 259.90, 168.80, 45.68, 8.31, and 2.03 µg.g- 1 of total carotenoid, β-carotene, α-carotene, 13-Z- β-carotene, and 9-Z- β-carotene, respectively. These results are promising considering that E- β-carotene has 100% pro-vitamin A activity. The total carotenoid and carotenoid isomers increased after the cooking methods, most likely as a result of a higher availability induced by the cooking processes.

  18. Single v. multiple measures of skin carotenoids by resonance Raman spectroscopy as a biomarker of usual carotenoid status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarmo, Stephanie; Cartmel, Brenda; Lin, Haiqun; Leffell, David J.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.; Mayne, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method of assessing carotenoid status in the skin, which has been suggested as an objective indicator of fruit/vegetable intake. The present study assessed agreement and identified predictors of single v. multiple RRS measures of skin carotenoid status. A total of seventy-four participants had their skin carotenoid status measured in the palm of the hand by RRS at six time points over 6 months. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic, lifestyle and dietary data. Mean age of the participants was 36.6 years, 62.2% were female, 83.8% Caucasian and 85.1% were non-smoking at baseline. There was a good agreement between a single measure of skin carotenoids by RRS and multiple measures (weighted κ = 0.80; 95% CI 0.72, 0.88). The same variables were significantly associated with carotenoid status based on single or multiple measures, including a positive association with intake of total carotenoids (Pseason of measurement (P≤0.05). The exception was recent sun exposure, which emerged as a significant predictor of lower carotenoid status only when using multiple RRS measures (P≤0.01). A single RRS measure was reasonably accurate at classifying usual skin carotenoid status. Researchers using RRS may want to take into account other factors that are associated with the biomarker, including season of measurement and recent sun exposure. PMID:23351238

  19. Testosterone treatment can increase circulating carotenoids but does not affect yellow carotenoid-based plumage colour in blue tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A.; Roberts, M.L.; Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Delhey, K.

    2012-01-01

    A number of mechanisms are responsible for producing the variation in natural colours, and these need not act in isolation. A recent hypothesis states that carotenoid-based coloration, in addition to carotenoid availability, is also enhanced by elevated levels of circulating testosterone (T). This h

  20. Comparison of different cutaneous carotenoid sensors and influence of age, skin type, and kinetic changes subsequent to intake of a vegetable extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Martina C.; Schanzer, Sabine; Lohan, Silke B.; Shchatsinin, Ihar; Darvin, Maxim E.; Vollert, Henning; Magnussen, Björn; Köcher, Wolfang; Helfmann, Jürgen; Lademann, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, cutaneous carotenoid measurements have become increasingly popular, as carotenoids were found to be a biomarker of nutrition rich in fruits and vegetables, permitting monitoring of the influence of various stress factors. For such measurements, in addition to the specific and selective resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), newly developed low expensive small and mobile sensors that are based on spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy (SRRS) are used for cutaneous carotenoid measurements. Human volunteers of different age exhibiting skin types I to III were investigated using RRS and two SRRS-based sensors to determine the influence of these parameters on the measuring results. In two studies on volunteers of either the same age or skin type, however, the respective other parameter being varied and no significant influences of age or skin type could be detected. Furthermore, the kinetic changes resulting from the intake and discontinued intake of a vegetable extract rich in carotenoids showed a good correlation among the three sensors and with the detected blood carotenoids. This illustrates that the SRRS-based sensors and RRS device provide reliable cutaneous carotenoid values independent of age and skin types I to III of the volunteers.

  1. Differential effects of early- and late-life access to carotenoids on adult immune function and ornamentation in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Butler

    Full Text Available Environmental conditions early in life can affect an organism's phenotype at adulthood, which may be tuned to perform optimally in conditions that mimic those experienced during development (Environmental Matching hypothesis, or may be generally superior when conditions during development were of higher quality (Silver Spoon hypothesis. Here, we tested these hypotheses by examining how diet during development interacted with diet during adulthood to affect adult sexually selected ornamentation and immune function in male mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos. Mallards have yellow, carotenoid-pigmented beaks that are used in mate choice, and the degree of beak coloration has been linked to adult immune function. Using a 2 × 2 factorial experimental design, we reared mallards on diets containing either low or high levels of carotenoids (nutrients that cannot be synthesized de novo throughout the period of growth, and then provided adults with one of these two diets while simultaneously quantifying beak coloration and response to a variety of immune challenges. We found that both developmental and adult carotenoid supplementation increased circulating carotenoid levels during dietary treatment, but that birds that received low-carotenoid diets during development maintained relatively higher circulating carotenoid levels during an adult immune challenge. Individuals that received low levels of carotenoids during development had larger phytohemagglutinin (PHA-induced cutaneous immune responses at adulthood; however, dietary treatment during development and adulthood did not affect antibody response to a novel antigen, nitric oxide production, natural antibody levels, hemolytic capacity of the plasma, or beak coloration. However, beak coloration prior to immune challenges positively predicted PHA response, and strong PHA responses were correlated with losses in carotenoid-pigmented coloration. In sum, we did not find consistent support for either the

  2. Carotenoid composition of hydroponic leafy vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mieko; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2003-04-23

    Because hydroponic production of vegetables is becoming more common, the carotenoid composition of hydroponic leafy vegetables commercialized in Campinas, Brazil, was determined. All samples were collected and analyzed in winter. Lactucaxanthin was quantified for the first time and was found to have concentrations similar to that of neoxanthin in the four types of lettuce analyzed. Lutein predominated in cress, chicory, and roquette (75.4 +/- 10.2, 57.0 +/- 10.3, and 52.2 +/- 12.6 microg/g, respectively). In the lactucaxanthin-containing lettuces, beta-carotene and lutein were the principal carotenoids (ranging from 9.9 +/- 1.5 to 24.6 +/- 3.1 microg/g and from 10.2 +/- 1.0 to 22.9 +/- 2.6 microg/g, respectively). Comparison of hydroponic and field-produced curly lettuce, taken from neighboring farms, showed that the hydroponic lettuce had significantly lower lutein, beta-carotene, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin contents than the conventionally produced lettuce. Because the hydroponic farm had a polyethylene covering, less exposure to sunlight and lower temperatures may have decreased carotenogenesis.

  3. Analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic gene expression during marigold petal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehs, C P; Tian, L; Osteryoung, K W; Dellapenna, D

    2001-02-01

    Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) flower petals synthesize and accumulate carotenoids at levels greater than 20 times that in leaves and provide an excellent model system to investigate the molecular biology and biochemistry of carotenoid biosynthesis in plants. In addition, marigold cultivars exist with flower colors ranging from white to dark orange due to >100-fold differences in carotenoid levels, and presumably similar changes in carbon flux through the pathway. To examine the expression of carotenoid genes in marigold petals, we have cloned the majority of the genes in this pathway and used these to assess their steady-state mRNA levels in four marigold cultivars with extreme differences in carotenoid content. We have also cloned genes encoding early steps in the biosynthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), the precursor of all isoprenoids, including carotenoids, as well as two genes required for plastid division. Differences among the marigold varieties in the expression of these genes suggest that differences in mRNA transcription or stability underlie the vast differences in carotenoid synthesis and accumulation in the different marigold varieties.

  4. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  5. Antioxidant activity of some Moroccan marine microalgae: Pufa profiles, carotenoids and phenolic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maadane, Amal; Merghoub, Nawal; Ainane, Tarik; El Arroussi, Hicham; Benhima, Redouane; Amzazi, Saaid; Bakri, Youssef; Wahby, Imane

    2015-12-10

    In order to promote Moroccan natural resources, this study aims to evaluate the potential of microalgae isolated from Moroccan coastlines, as new source of natural antioxidants. Different extracts (ethanolic, ethanol/water and aqueous) obtained from 9 microalgae strains were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activity using DPPH free radical-scavenging assay. The highest antioxidant potentials were obtained in Dunalliela sp., Tetraselmis sp. and Nannochloropsis gaditana extracts. The obtained results indicate that ethanol extract of all microalgae strains exhibit higher antioxidant activity, when compared to water and ethanol/water extracts. Therefore, total phenolic and carotenoid content measurement were performed in active ethanol extracts. The PUFA profiles of ethanol extracts were also determined by GC/MS analysis. The studied microalgae strains displayed high PUFA content ranging from 12.9 to 76.9 %, total carotenoids content varied from 1.9 and 10.8mg/g of extract and total polyphenol content varied from 8.1 to 32.0mg Gallic acid Equivalent/g of extract weight. The correlation between the antioxidant capacities and the phenolic content and the carotenoids content were found to be insignificant, indicating that these compounds might not be major contributor to the antioxidant activity of these microalgae. The microalgae extracts exerting the high antioxidant activity are potential new source of natural antioxidants.

  6. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria: Structural and Evolutionary Scenarios Based on Comparative Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwei Liang , Fangqing Zhao , Wei Wei , Zhangxiao Wen , Song Qin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are widely distributed pigments in nature and their biosynthetic pathway has been extensively studied in various organisms. The recent access to the overwhelming amount genomic data of cyanobacteria has given birth to a novel approach called comparative genomics. The putative enzymes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria were determined by similarity-based tools. The reconstruction of biosynthetic pathway was based on the related enzymes. It is interesting to find that nearly all the cyanobacteria share quite similar pathway to synthesize β-carotene except for Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421. The enzymes, crtE-B-P-Qb-L, involved in the upstream pathway are more conserved than the subsequent ones (crtW-R. In addition, many carotenoid synthesis enzymes exhibit diversity in structure and function. Such examples in the families of ζ –carotene desaturase, lycopene cylases and carotene ketolases were described in this article. When we mapped these crt genes to the cyanobacterial genomes, the crt genes showed great structural variation among species. All of them are dispersed on the whole chromosome in contrast to the linear adjacent distribution of the crt gene cluster in other eubacteria. Moreover, in unicellular cyanobacteria, each step of the carotenogenic pathway is usually catalyzed by one gene product, whereas multiple ketolase genes are found in filamentous cyanobacteria. Such increased numbers of crt genes and their correlation to the ecological adaptation were carefully discussed.

  7. Oxidation of carotenoids by heat and tobacco smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, John S; Contreras, Janice E; Siems, Werner G; Van Kuijk, Frederik J G M

    2004-01-01

    The stability to autoxidation of the polar carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, was compared to that of the less polar carotenoids, beta-carotene and lycopene at physiologically or pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of 2 and 6 microM, after exposure to heat or cigarette smoke. Three methodological approaches were used: 1) Carotenoids dissolved in solvents with different polarities were incubated at 37 and 80 degrees C for different times. 2) Human plasma samples were subjected to the same temperature conditions. 3) Methanolic carotenoid solutions and plasma were also exposed to whole tobacco smoke from 1-5 unfiltered cigarettes. The concentrations of individual carotenoids in different solvents were determined spectrophotometrically. Carotenoids from plasma were extracted and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. Carotenoids were generally more stable at 37 than at 80 degrees C. In methanol and dichloromethane the thermal degradation of beta-carotene and lycopene was faster than that of lutein and zeaxanthin. However, in tetrahydrofuran beta-carotene and zeaxanthin degraded faster than lycopene and lutein. Plasma carotenoid levels at 37 degrees C did not change, but decreased at 80 degrees C. The decrease of beta-carotene and lycopene levels was higher than those for lutein and zeaxanthin. Also in the tobacco smoke experiments the highest autoxidation rates were found for beta-carotene and lycopene at 2 microM, but at 6 microM lutein and zeaxanthin depleted to the same extent as beta-carotene. These data support our previous studies suggesting that oxidative stress degrade beta-carotene and lycopene faster than lutein and zeaxanthin. The only exception was the thermal degradation of carotenoids solubilized in tetrahydrofuran, which favors faster breakdown of beta-carotene and zeaxanthin.

  8. Carotenoid Composition of the Fruit of Red Mamey (Pouteria sapota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Enrique; Turcsi, Erika; Szabó, Ildikó; Mosquera, Yesuri; Agócs, Attila; Nagy, Veronika; Gulyás-Fekete, Gergely; Deli, József

    2016-09-28

    The detailed carotenoid analysis of red mamey (Pouteria sapota) was achieved by HPLC-DAD-MS, chemical tests, and cochromatography with authentic samples. Altogether 47 components were detected and 34 identified from the total extract or after fractionation with column chromatography. The main carotenoids were cryptocapsin, sapotexanthin, and capsanthin 5,6-epoxide. Some further minor components containing the κ-end group with or without a hydroxy group and their 5,6-epoxy precursors were identified. Some comments are made about the biosynthesis of κ-carotenoids in red mamey.

  9. Cloning and Characterization of a Lycium chinense Carotenoid Isomerase Gene Enhancing Carotenoid Accumulation in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李招娣; 季静; 王罡

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoid isomerase(CRTISO)is a key enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of cis-lycopene to all-trans lycopene. In this study, we isolated and characterized the CRTISO gene from Lycium chinense (LcCRTISO) for the first time. The open reading frame of LcCRTISO was 1 815 bp encoding a protein of 604 amino acids with a molecular mass of 66.24 kDa. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the LcCRTISO had a high level of simi-larity to other CRTISO. Phylogenetic analysis displayed that LcCRTISO kept a closer relationship with the CRTISO of plants than with those of other species. Semi-quantitative PCR analysis indicated that LcCRTISO gene was expressed in all tissues tested with the highest expression in maturing fruits. The overexpression of LcCRTISO gene in transgenic tobacco resulted in an increase of total carotenoids in the leaves withβ-carotene and lutein being the predominants. The results obtained here clearly suggested that the LcCRTISO gene was a promising candidate for carotenoid production.

  10. Single v. multiple measures of skin carotenoids by resonance Raman spectroscopy as a biomarker of usual carotenoid status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarmo, Stephanie; Cartmel, Brenda; Lin, Haiqun; Leffell, David J; Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S; Mayne, Susan T

    2013-09-14

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method of assessing carotenoid status in the skin, which has been suggested as an objective indicator of fruit/vegetable intake. The present study assessed agreement and identified predictors of single v. multiple RRS measures of skin carotenoid status. A total of seventy-four participants had their skin carotenoid status measured in the palm of the hand by RRS at six time points over 6 months. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic, lifestyle and dietary data. Mean age of the participants was 36.6 years, 62.2% were female, 83.8% Caucasian and 85.1% were non-smoking at baseline. There was a good agreement between a single measure of skin carotenoids by RRS and multiple measures (weighted κ = 0.80; 95% CI 0.72, 0.88). The same variables were significantly associated with carotenoid status based on single or multiple measures, including a positive association with intake of total carotenoids (Pcarotenoid status only when using multiple RRS measures (P≤ 0.01). A single RRS measure was reasonably accurate at classifying usual skin carotenoid status. Researchers using RRS may want to take into account other factors that are associated with the biomarker, including season of measurement and recent sun exposure.

  11. Correlation between lower-extremity muscle strength and balance in post-menopause women%绝经妇女下肢肌力与平衡功能的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光华; 杨爱萍; 刘邦忠; 王平; 林岳军; 陆志辉; 陈建新

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between lower-extremity muscle strength and balance in elderly women. Method: Sixty community-dwelling elderly women aged between 56 and 79 participated in our research. The static standing balance of these subjects was performed using a PJ-I computerized stabilometer with their eyes open and closed. Knee flexors and extensors strength at 60°/s and 120°/s and 180°/s of the left leg was tested with a Cybex-330 isokinetic dynamometer.Result: In total, lower-extremity muscle strength did not correlate with the static standing balance in elderly women, but when divided into two groups by age, the parameter of balance such as Romberg rates was correlated to peak torque of knee extensors at 60°/s and 120°/s, and L/Earea was correlated to the torque ratio of agonist/antagonist muscles for the knee extension at 180°/s in the older group.Conclusion: Decreasing in the lower-extremity muscle strength is not necessarily lead to bad performance in balance, only when accompanies with other dysfunctions such as proprioception dose it affects standing balance.%目的:研究绝经后妇女膝关节肌力与静态平衡之间的相关性。方法:60例绝经后妇女,分别用PJ-I型电脑平衡功能检测仪测定静态平衡功能,Cybex-330等速肌力测试仪测试膝关节肌力,将所测定的平衡功能参数与肌力参数做相关性分析,按年龄分为65岁以下(含65岁)以及65岁以上年龄组,每组组内进行肌力与平衡功能相关性分析。结果:总体上静态平衡功能与下肢肌力之间无直线相关,按年龄分组后,65岁以上年龄组平衡功能与下肢肌力间存在相关性。结论:年龄相关的平衡功能减退涉及的因素繁杂,单纯膝关节肌力下降一般不至于引起显著的静态平衡功能低下。

  12. California Hass Avocado: Profiling of Carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-01-01

    The California Hass avocado (Persea Americana) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July and September 2008 from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego), and analyzed fortotal fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with total fat content (r=0.99, pavocado.. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes. PMID:19813713

  13. California Hass avocado: profiling of carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-11-11

    The California Hass avocado ( Persea americana ) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore, in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July, and September, 2008, from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside, and San Diego) and analyzed for total fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids, and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with the total fat content (r = 0.99, p Hass avocado. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area, and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes.

  14. Balancing Audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of balance in music production and examines the role of conceptual metaphors in reasoning about audio editing. Balance may be the most central concept in record production, however, the way we cognitively understand and respond meaningfully to a mix requiring balance...... is not thoroughly understood. In this paper I treat balance as a metaphor that we use to reason about several different actions in music production, such as adjusting levels, editing the frequency spectrum or the spatiality of the recording. This study is based on an exploration of a linguistic corpus of sound...

  15. Enzymic Pathways for Formation of Carotenoid Cleavage Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Peter; Zorn, Holger

    Degraded carotenoids (apocarotenoids, norisoprenoids) have been a subject of intensive research for several decades. From the perspective of human physiology and nutrition, the retinoids, acting as vitamins, signalling molecules, and visual pigments, attracted the greatest attention (Chapters 15 and 16). Plant scientists, however, detected a wealth of different apocarotenoids, presumably derived by the excentric cleavage of carotenoids in various species, the plant hormone abscisic acid (1, Scheme 6) being the best-investigated example. With the onset of fruit ripening, flower opening or senescence of green tissues, carotenoids are degraded oxidatively to smaller, volatile compounds. The natural biological functions of the reaction products are outlined in Chapter 15. As many of these apocarotenoids act as potent flavour compounds, food chemists and flavourists worldwide have investigated meticulously their structural and sensory properties. Many aspects of carotenoid metabolites and breakdown products as aroma compounds are presented in a comprehensive book [1].

  16. Fermented orange juice: source of higher carotenoid and flavanone contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero-López, Blanca; Cerrillo, Isabel; Herrero-Martín, Griselda; Hornero-Méndez, Damaso; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Medina, Sonia; Ferreres, Federico; Berná, Genoveva; Martín, Francisco; Fernández-Pachón, Maria-Soledad

    2013-09-18

    The intake of bioactive compounds and moderate alcohol decreases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. These effects could be joined in a beverage created by a controlled alcoholic fermentation of orange juice. The influence of controlled alcoholic fermentation on the bioactive compound profile of orange juice has not been previously evaluated, and this is the purpose of the present study. Total and individual flavanones and carotenoids significantly increased throughout the fermentation. The reason for this was an enhanced extraction of these compounds from the pulp. Besides, the potential bioavailability of flavanones increased due to a higher content of hesperetin-7-O-glucoside (2-fold higher at the end of the fermentation process). Ascorbic acid did not undergo a significant change, and only total phenolics decreased. Antioxidant capacity was also evaluated. TEAC and FRAP values remained constant throughout the process. However, ORAC and DPPH values significantly increased. Correlation analysis concluded that the increase in ORAC and DPPH values could be due to enhancement of flavanones.

  17. Path analysis suggests phytoene accumulation is the key step limiting the carotenoid pathway in white carrot roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Fernandes Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Two F2 carrot (Daucus carota L. populations (orange rooted Brasilia x very dark orange rooted High Carotene Mass - HCM cross and the dark orange rooted cultivated variety B493 x white rooted wild carrot Queen Anne's Lace - QAL cross with very unrelated genetic backgrounds were used to investigate intrinsic factors limiting carotenoid accumulation in carrots by applying phenotypic correlation and path analysis to study the relationships between major root carotenes, root color and several other morphological traits. Most of the correlations between traits were close and agreed in sign between the two populations. Root weight had a moderate to highly significant positive correlation with leaf length, root length and top and middle root diameter. Although phenotypic correlations failed to identify the order of the substrates and products in the carotenoid pathway the correct order of substrates and products (phytoene -> zeta-carotene -> lycopene was identified in the causal diagram of beta-carotene for the Brasilia x HCM population. Path analysis of beta-carotene synthesis in the B493 x QAL population suggested that selection for root carotenes had little effect on plant morphological traits. Causal model of beta-carotene and lycopene in the B493 x QAL population suggested that phytoene synthesis is the key step limiting the carotenoid pathway in white carrots. Path analysis, first presented by Sewall Wright to study quantitative traits, appears to be a powerful statistical approach for the identification of key compounds in complex pathways.

  18. Bioavailability of natural carotenoids in human skin compared to blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Martina C; Darvin, Maxim E; Vollert, Henning; Lademann, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Skin functions and structure are significantly influenced by nutrients. Antioxidants protect the supportive layer of the skin against any damaging irradiation effects and the action of free radicals. A lack of suitable methods means that the pharmacokinetic properties of systemically applied carotenoids transferred into the skin remain poorly understood. In this study, a natural kale extract or placebo oil were given orally to 22 healthy volunteers for 4 weeks. Carotenoid bioaccessibility was evaluated using non-invasive resonance Raman spectroscopy on the palm and forehead skin. For the analysis of the blood serum, the standard HPLC method was used. The blood and skin levels of the carotenoids increased significantly during the study but compared to the blood serum values, increases in skin were delayed and depended on the dermal area as well as on the carotenoid. Lycopene, measured as being low in the extract, increases more in the skin compared to the blood indicating that the natural mixture of the extract stabilizes the antioxidative network in the skin. After supplementation had ended, the carotenoids decreased much faster in the blood than in the skin. The delayed decrease in the skin may indicate a peripheral buffer function of the skin for carotenoids.

  19. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Balanced sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    In balanced sampling a linear relation between the soil property of interest and one or more covariates with known means is exploited in selecting the sampling locations. Recent developments make this sampling design attractive for statistical soil surveys. This paper introduces balanced sampling

  1. The dynamic of accumulation of carotenoides and chlorophylls during maize leaf development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda CRAPATUREANU

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A new high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method for the rapid separation of carotenoids and chlorophylls in leaves is reported. The method allows the separation of eight pigments in less than 13 minutes and employs a 25 cm C18 column with a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. Using this method photosynthetic pigment content and composition during, maize leaf development were determined. Correlations between the rate of chlorophyll a and B-carotene biosynthesis and chlorophyll b lutein biosynthesis were established as well as between violaxanthin accumulation and the need of photoprotection in young leaves.

  2. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis ORF Rv0654 encodes a carotenoid oxygenase mediating central and excentric cleavage of conventional and aromatic carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzinger, Daniel; Scheffer, Erdmann; Bär, Cornelia; Ernst, Hansgeorg; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is assumed to lack carotenoids, which are widespread pigments fulfilling important functions as radical scavengers and as a source of apocarotenoids. In mammals, the synthesis of apocarotenoids, including retinoic acid, is initiated by the β-carotene cleavage oxygenases I and II catalyzing either a central or an excentric cleavage of β-carotene, respectively. The M. tuberculosis ORF Rv0654 codes for a putative carotenoid oxygenase conserved in other mycobacteria. In the present study, we investigated the corresponding enzyme, here named M. tuberculosis carotenoid cleavage oxygenase (MtCCO). Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, we show that MtCCO converts several carotenoids and apocarotenoids in vitro. Moreover, the identification of the products suggests that, in contrast to other carotenoid oxygenases, MtCCO cleaves the central C15-C15' and an excentric double bond at the C13-C14 position, leading to retinal (C(20)), β-apo-14'-carotenal (C(22)) and β-apo-13-carotenone (C(18)) from β-carotene, as well as the corresponding hydroxylated products from zeaxanthin and lutein. Moreover, the enzyme cleaves also 3,3'-dihydroxy-isorenieratene representing aromatic carotenoids synthesized by other mycobacteria. Quantification of the products from different substrates indicates that the preference for each of the cleavage positions is determined by the hydroxylation and the nature of the ionone ring. The data obtained in the present study reveal MtCCO to be a novel carotenoid oxygenase and indicate that M. tuberculosis may utilize carotenoids from host cells and interfere with their retinoid metabolism.

  3. The Mechanism of Carotenoid Degradation in Flue-Cured Tobacco and Changes in the Related Enzyme Activities at the Leaf-Drying Stage During the Bulk Curing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhao-peng; LI Tong-shuai; ZHANG Yong-gang; CAO Hui-jing; GONG Chang-rong; ZHANG Wei-jian

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of carotenoid degradation and the changes in the activities of related enzymes in flue-cured tobacco at the leaf-drying stage during the bulk-curing process were studied in order to provide theoretical basis for optimization of curing technology.The effect of different rising speeds of temperature on the carotenoid degradation and the related enzymes activities at the color-fixing stage during the bulk curing process was studied by using the electric-heated fluecuring barn designed by Henan Agricultural University,China,based on curing technology with yellowing at low temperature and moderate humidity and leaf drying at moderate humidity.The results showed that the carotenoid degradation components(β-carotene,lutein,neoxanthin,and violaxthin)decreased gradually at the color-fixing stage during the bulk curing process.The carotenoid degradation components viz.,β-carotene,lutein,neoxanthin,and violaxthin at the slow heating curing(T1)were relatively higher than the rapid heating curing(T2)accounting for 10,2,32 and 32%respectively,but there were no differences among treatments(P>0.05).The effect of different conditions of curing on the activities of enzymes related to carotenoids degradation were significant.The lipoxygenase,phenylalanine ammonialyase,peroxidase,and polyphenol oxidase enzymes had a bidirectional effect on the quality of tobacco leaves and it was beneficial to form more premise matter of aroma based on the higher enzyme activities at the early leaf-drying stage.The slow heating could regulate the change in various enzymes' activities reasonably,making cell redox reaction to reach the dynamic balance and make the degradation of carotenoids adequately.Meanwhile,it could avoid the occurrence of browning reaction and provide foundation for improving the quality of tobacco and optimization of technology for bulk curing and further enhancing aroma.

  4. Diversity, physiology, and evolution of avian plumage carotenoids and the role of carotenoid-protein interactions in plumage color appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFountain, Amy M; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    The diversity of vibrant plumage colors in birds has evolved as a direct result of social and environmental pressures. To fully understand these underlying pressures it is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms for the creation of novel plumage colors which include the metabolic transformations of dietary carotenoids and spectral tuning of the molecules within the feather protein environment. Recent advances in this field have greatly expanded the number and breadth of avian species for which plumage pigmentation has been characterized, making it possible to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of carotenoid usage in plumage. Resonance Raman and classical Raman spectroscopic techniques have been employed with great effect in the study of carotenoids in situ. The application of these methods have two benefits: to identify carotenoids in feathers that are unavailable for destructive sampling; and to study the spectral tuning resulting from the interaction between the carotenoids and the proteins to which they are bound. This review presents a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the molecular factors controlling the coloration of avian carotenoid plumage obtained through the application of both bioanalytical and spectroscopic methodologies.

  5. Carotenoids, carotenoid esters, and anthocyanins of yellow-, orange-, and red-peeled cashew apples (Anacardium occidentale L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiggert, Ralf M; Vargas, Ester; Conrad, Jürgen; Hempel, Judith; Gras, Claudia C; Ziegler, Jochen U; Mayer, Angelika; Jiménez, Víctor; Esquivel, Patricia; Carle, Reinhold

    2016-06-01

    Pigment profiles of yellow-, orange-, and red-peeled cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) apples were investigated. Among 15 identified carotenoids and carotenoid esters, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin palmitate were the most abundant in peels and pulp of all samples. Total carotenoid concentrations in the pulp of yellow- and red-peeled cashew apples were low (0.69-0.73 mg/100g FW) compared to that of orange-peeled samples (2.2mg/100g FW). The color difference between the equally carotenoid-rich yellow and red colored samples indicated the presence of a further non-carotenoid pigment type in red peels. Among four detected anthocyanins, the major anthocyanin was unambiguously identified as 7-O-methylcyanidin 3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside by NMR spectroscopy. Red and yellow peel color was chiefly determined by the presence and absence of anthocyanins, respectively, while the orange appearance of the peel was mainly caused by increased carotenoid concentrations. Thus, orange-peeled fruits represent a rich source of provitamin A (ca. 124 μg retinol-activity-equivalents/100g pulp, FW).

  6. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Harmonophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Danielle Barbara

    Information regarding the structure and function of living tissues and cells is instrumental to the advancement of cell biology and biophysics. Nonlinear optical microscopy can provide such information, but only certain biological structures generate nonlinear optical signals. Therefore, structural specificity can be achieved by introducing labels for nonlinear optical microscopy. Few studies exist in the literature about labels that facilitate harmonic generation, coined "harmonophores". This thesis consists of the first major investigation of harmonophores for third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy. Carotenoids and chlorophylls were investigated as potential harmonophores. Their nonlinear optical properties were studied by the THG ratio technique. In addition, a tunable refractometer was built in order to determine their second hyperpolarizability (gamma). At 830 nm excitation wavelength, carotenoids and chlorophylls were found to have large negative gamma values however, at 1028 nm, the sign of gamma reversed for carotenoids and remained negative for chlorophylls. Consequently, at 1028 nm wavelength, THG signal is canceled with mixtures of carotenoids and chlorophylls. Furthermore, when such molecules are covalently bonded as dyads or interact within photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, it is found that additive effects with the gamma values still play a role, however, the overall gamma value is also influenced by the intra-pigment and inter-pigment interaction. The nonlinear optical properties of aggregates containing chlorophylls and carotenoids were the target of subsequent investigations. Carotenoid aggregates were imaged with polarization-dependent second harmonic generation and THG microscopy. Both techniques revealed crystallographic information pertaining to H and J aggregates and beta-carotene crystalline aggregates found in orange carrot. In order to demonstrate THG enhancement due to labeling, cultured cells were labeled with carotenoid

  7. Antioxidant capacity and antimutagenic activity of anthocyanin and carotenoid extracts from nixtamalized pigmented Creole maize races (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Díaz, Sandra; Ortiz-Valerio, Ma del Carmen; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Figueroa-Cárdenas, Juan de Dios; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía; Ramos-Gómez, Minerva; Campos-Vega, Rocio; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2012-12-01

    Nixtamalization process is the first step to obtain maize based products, like tortillas; however, in both the traditional and commercial processes, white grain is generally preferred. Creole maize races, mainly pigmented varieties, have increasingly attention since these are rich in anthocyanins and carotenoids. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the antioxidant and antimutagenic activity of rich anthocyanins and carotenoids extracts from creole maize races before (grain) and after (masa and tortilla) the nixtamalization process. Most anthocyanins and carotenoids were lost during nixtamalization. Before nixtamalization, blue and red genotypes contained either higher antioxidant capacity and anthocyanin contents (963 ± 10.0 and 212.36 ± 0.36 mg of cyanidin-3-glucoside eq/100 g, respectively) than the white and yellow genotypes. However, the highest carotenoid levels were displayed by red grains (1.01 ± 0.07 to 1.14 ± 0.08 μg of β-carotene eq/g extract). Anthocyanins losses were observed when the blue grains were processed into masa (83 %) and tortillas (64 %). Anthocyanins content correlated with antiradical activity (r = 0.57) and with 2-aminoanthracene -induced mutagenicity inhibition on TA98 and TA100 (r = -0.62 and r = -0.44, respectively). For white grains, nixtamalization also reduced carotenoids (53 to 56 %), but not antioxidant activity and 2-Aa-induced mutagenicity. Throughout the nixtamalization process steps, all the extracts showed antimutagenic activity against 2-aminoanthracene-induced mutagenicity (23 to 90 %), displaying higher potential to inhibit base changes mutations than frameshift mutations in the genome of the tasted microorganism (TA100 and TA98, respectively). The results suggest that even though there were pigment losses, creole maize pigments show antioxidant and antimutagenic activities after nixtamalization process.

  8. The Aromatic Carotenoids in the Organic Matter of the Devonian Domanic Formation (on example of Tatarstan territory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, Irina; Nosova, Fidania; Ostroukhov, Sergey; Pronin, Nikita

    2015-04-01

    This report contains the results of the studies of shale hydrocarbons (HC) from carbonate-siliceous rocks on the territory of Melekess depressoin and South-Tatar arch of Volga-Ural oil and gas province of the East European Platform. Studies were performed in the laboratory of Geochemistry of Combustible Minerals at the Institute of Geology and Petroleum Technology of the Kazan Federal University. The main object of this study is Domanicoid high-TOC rocks of Devonian time. They are mainly represented by dark gray, almost black bituminous limestones that are interbedded with calcareous siliceous shales and cherts. Complex studies include the following: - extraction of bitumen from the rock, - determination of organic carbon content, - determination of the group and elemental composition of the bitumen, - gas chromatographic studies of the alkanoic lube fractions of bitumoid and oil, - gas chromato-mass spectrometry of the naphthenic lube fractions of bitumoid and oil, - isotopic studies of bitumens and oils, - pyrolysis studies of the rock using the Rock -Eval method (before and after extraction), - study of trace-element composition of the rocks and petrologen, comparison in terms of adsorbed gas and studying of the composition of adsorbed gases. Simultaneously with the study of standard and generally accepted biomarkers, deep and detailed study of alkyl toluene, aromatic hydrocarbons (and aromatic carotenoids in particular) were conducted. The comparison and comparative correlation aromatic carotenoids with standard biomarkers (for example, with hopanes C30 and steranes C27:C28:C29). Attitude hopane/aromatic carotenoids is 0.05. This testifies to the dominance of the transformation of carotenoid compounds on bacterial activity in the water column. Bacterial activity in the studied samples is also high. Attitude steranes C29/aromatic carotenoids reaches 10-3. The study of aromatic carotenoids has allowed first in the region of Tatarstan to get a new information on

  9. Natural variation in expression of genes associated with carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several groups have reported on massive accumulation of total carotenoids in cassava storage root (CSR). Naturally occurring color variation associated with carotenoid accumulation was observed in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root of landraces from Amazon. Here carotenoid profiles from...

  10. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering for marine carotenoids: new opportunities and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chonglong; Kim, Jung-Hun; Kim, Seon-Won

    2014-09-17

    Carotenoids are a class of diverse pigments with important biological roles such as light capture and antioxidative activities. Many novel carotenoids have been isolated from marine organisms to date and have shown various utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. In this review, we summarize the pathways and enzymes of carotenoid synthesis and discuss various modifications of marine carotenoids. The advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for carotenoid production are also reviewed, in hopes that this review will promote the exploration of marine carotenoid for their utilizations.

  11. Carotenoids: Actual knowledge on food sources, intakes, stability and bioavailability and their protective role in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiani, Giuseppe; Castón, María Jesús Periago; Catasta, Giovina

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are one of the major food micronutrients in human diets and the overall objective of this review is to re-examine the role of carotenoids in human nutrition. We have emphasized the attention on the following carotenoids present in food and human tissues: -carotene, -cryptoxanthin......, -carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin; we have reported the major food sources and dietary intake of these compounds. We have tried to summarize positive and negative effects of food processing, storage, cooking on carotenoid content and carotenoid bioavailability. In particular, we have evidenced...... the possibility to improve carotenoids bioavailability in accordance with changes and variations of technology procedures....

  12. Carotenoids in bird testes: links to body carotenoid supplies, plumage coloration, body mass and testes mass in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Melissah; Tourville, Elizabeth A; McGraw, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoid pigments can be allocated to different parts of the body to serve specific functions. In contrast to other body tissues, studies of carotenoid resources in the testes of animals are relatively scarce. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to determine the types and concentrations of carotenoids in the testes of house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus). Additionally, we examined the relationships between testes carotenoid concentrations and carotenoid pools in other body tissues, as well as body mass, testes mass and plumage coloration. We detected low concentrations of several carotenoids - lutein (the predominant carotenoid), zeaxanthin, anhydrolutein, β-cryptoxanthin, β-carotene and an unknown carotene - in the testes of wild house finches. We also found that testes lutein levels were significantly and positively associated with circulating lutein levels, while the concentration of zeaxanthin in testes was positively associated with zeaxanthin levels in liver, though in this instance the relationship was much weaker and only marginally significant. Furthermore, lutein levels in testes were significantly negatively associated with testes mass. Finally, plumage coloration was not associated with either the concentration of carotenoids in the testes or relative testes mass. These results suggest that testes carotenoids are reflective of the pool of circulating carotenoids in house finches, and that plumage coloration is unlikely to signal either the carotenoid content of testes tissue or a male's capacity for sperm production.

  13. Separation of plasma carotenoids and quantitation of beta-carotene using HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatautis, V J; Pearson, K H

    1987-07-15

    A method was developed for the extraction and separation of human plasma carotenoids and quantitation of beta-carotene. Carotenoids were extracted from plasma with ethanol: hexane and separated by C18 reversed phase HPLC using spherical 3 micron packing. beta-Carotene was identified and quantitated using an external standard. The within-run precision of three different plasma pools ranged from 3.53-5.72% relative standard deviation (RSD). The between-run precision was 7.34% RSD. The method was linear to 500 micrograms/l with a statistical detection limit of 3.80 micrograms/l. Recovery of added beta-carotene was from 90.41-100.37%. This method was compared to a spectrophotometric 'total carotene' method. The mean plasma concentrations of 25 male and 25 female human volunteers for the 'total carotene' were 1,549 micrograms/l for all samples, 1,487 micrograms/l for males and 1,611 micrograms/l for females. The corresponding true beta-carotene concentrations obtained by HPLC analysis were 134.8, 115.9 and 153.7 micrograms/l, respectively. The true beta-carotene concentrations were on the average only 8.76% (8.07% for males and 9.46% for females) of the concentrations obtained by the spectrophotometric 'total carotene' method. Correlation between the methods had an r = 0.6107. The poor correlation is due to the difference in the measured components. Total carotene methods measure all solvent extractable moieties having absorbance in the 430-460 nm region, while the HPLC method quantitates true beta-carotene after chromatographic separation from other carotenoids. Reference intervals were established for plasma beta-carotene using REFVAL, an IFCC computer program for determining statistical reference intervals. The reference interval for all samples is 40 to 344 micrograms/l.

  14. Carotenoids of Microalgae Used in Food Industry and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateau, Hélène; Solymosi, Katalin; Marchand, Justine; Schoefs, Benoît

    2016-08-08

    Since the industrial revolution, the consumption of processed food increased dramatically. During processing, food material loses many of its natural properties. The simple restoration of the original properties of the processed food as well as fortification require food supplementation with compounds prepared chemically or of natural origin. The observations that natural food additives are safer and better accepted by consumers than synthetic ones have strongly increased the demand for natural compounds. Because some of them have only a low abundance or are even rare, their market price can be very high. This is the case for most carotenoids of natural origin to which this review is dedicated. The increasing demand for food additives of natural origin contributes to an accelerated depletion of traditional natural resources already threatened by intensive agriculture and pollution. To overcome these difficulties and satisfy the demand, alternative sources for natural carotenoids have to be found. In this context, photosynthetic microalgae present a very high potential because they contain carotenoids and are able to produce particular carotenoids under stress. Their potential also resides in the fact that only ten thousands of microalgal strains have been described while hundred thousands of species are predicted to exist. Carotenoids have been known for ages for their antioxidant and coloring properties, and a large body of evidence has been accumulated about their health potential. This review summarizes both the medicinal and food industry applications of microalgae with emphasis on the former. In addition, traditional and alternative, microalgal sources for industrial carotenoid extraction, the chemical and physical properties, the biosynthesis and the localization of carotenoids in algae are also briefly discussed.

  15. Effects of white, blue, and red light-emitting diodes on carotenoid biosynthetic gene expression levels and carotenoid accumulation in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeon Bok; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Sun-Ju; Lee, Sanghyun; Chung, Sun-Ok; Park, Sang Un

    2013-12-18

    In this study, the optimum wavelengths of light required for carotenoid biosynthesis were determined by investigating the expression levels of carotenoid biosynthetic genes and carotenoid accumulation in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) exposed to white, blue, and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Most carotenoid biosynthetic genes showed higher expression in sprouts irradiated with white light at 8 days after sowing than in those irradiated with blue and red lights. The dominant carotenoids in tartary buckwheat sprouts were lutein and β-carotene. The richest accumulation of total carotenoids was observed in sprouts grown under white light (1282.63 μg g(-1) dry weight), which was relatively higher than that in sprouts grown under blue and red lights (940.86 and 985.54 μg g(-1), respectively). This study might establish an effective strategy for maximizing the production of carotenoids and other important secondary metabolites in tartary buckwheat sprouts by using LED technology.

  16. Balancing Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... new type of balance therapy using computerized, virtual reality. UPMC associate professor Susan Whitney, Ph.D., developed ... virtual grocery store in the university's Medical Virtual Reality Center. Patients walk on a treadmill and safely ...

  17. Balance Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fall may affect an older adult's life. BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo) There are many types of balance disorders. One of the most common is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or BPPV. In BPPV, you experience a brief, ...

  18. Carotenoids as a Source of Antioxidants in the Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana Augusta Odorissi; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, widely distributed fat-soluble pigments, are responsible for the attractive colorations of several fruits and vegetables commonly present in our daily diet. They are particularly abundant in yellow-orange fruits (carrots, tomatoes, pumpkins, peppers, among others) and, although masked by chlorophylls, in dark green leafy vegetables. Several health benefits have been attributed to carotenoids or to foods rich in these pigments, by means of different mechanisms-of-action, including the role as provitamin A of almost 50 different carotenoids and the antioxidant activity that protects cells and tissues from damage of free radicals and singlet oxygen, providing enhancement of the immune function, protection from sunburn reactions and delaying the onset of certain types of cancer. Common food sources and the efficiency of the absorption of carotenoids, analytical approaches used for measurement of their antioxidant effect and an overview of some epidemiological studies that have been performed to assess the beneficial impact of carotenoids in human health are outlined in this chapter.

  19. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takeshi; Buckup, Tiago; Krause, Marie S; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Motzkus, Marcus

    2016-04-28

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2 to the optically dark state S1. Extending this picture, some additional dark states (3A(g)(-) and 1B(u)(-)) and their interaction with the S2 state have also been suggested to play a major role in the ultrafast deactivation of carotenoids and their properties. Here, we investigate the interaction between such dark and bright electronic excited states of open chain carotenoids, particularly its dependence on the number of conjugated double bonds (N). We focus on the ultrafast wave packet motion on the excited potential surface, which is modified by the interaction between bright and dark electronic states. Such a coupling between electronic states leads to a shift of the vibrational frequency during the excited-state evolution. In this regard, pump-degenerate four-wave mixing (pump-DFWM) is applied to a series of carotenoids with different numbers of conjugated double bonds N = 9, 10, 11 and 13 (neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene and spirilloxanthin, respectively). Moreover, we demonstrate in a closed-chain carotenoid (lutein) that the coupling strength and therefore the vibrational shift can be tailored by changing the energy degeneracy between the 1B(u)(+) and 1B(u)(-) states via solvent interaction.

  20. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from transgenic provitamin A biofortified sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkie, Tristan E; De Moura, Fabiana F; Zhao, Zuo-Yu; Albertsen, Marc C; Che, Ping; Glassman, Kimberly; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2013-06-19

    Biofortified sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) lines are being developed to target vitamin A deficiency in Sub-Saharan Africa, but the delivery of provitamin A carotenoids from such diverse germplasms has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to screen vectors and independent transgenic events for the bioaccessibility of provitamin A carotenoids using an in vitro digestion model. The germplasm background and transgenic sorghum contained 1.0-1.5 and 3.3-14.0 μg/g β-carotene equivalents on a dry weight basis (DW), respectively. Test porridges made from milled transgenic sorghum contained up to 250 μg of β-carotene equivalents per 100 g of porridge on a fresh weight basis (FW). Micellarization efficiency of all-trans-β-carotene was lower (p transgenic sorghum (1-5%) than from null/nontransgenic sorghum (6-11%) but not different between vector constructs. Carotenoid bioaccessibility was significantly improved (p Transgenic sorghum event Homo188-A contained the greatest bioaccessible β-carotene content, with a 4-8-fold increase from null/nontransgenic sorghum. While the bioavailability and bioconversion of provitamin A carotenoids from these grains must be confirmed in vivo, these data support the notion that biofortification of sorghum can enhance total and bioaccessible provitamin A carotenoid levels.

  1. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases.

  2. Expression of the carotenoid biosynthesis genes in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, P; Alcaíno, J; Barahona, S; Niklitschek, M; Carmona, M; Wozniak, A; Baeza, M; Jiménez, A; Cifuentes, V

    2007-01-01

    In the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous the genes idi, crtE, crtYB, crtl and ast are involved in the biosynthesis of astaxanthin from isopentenyl pyrophosphate. The carotenoid production and the kinetics of mRNA expression of structural genes controlling the carotenogenesis in a wild-type ATCC 24230 and in carotenoid overproducer deregulated atxS2 strains were studied. The biosynthesis of carotenoid was induced at the late exponential growth phase in both strains. However, the cellular carotenoid concentration was four times higher in atxS2 than in the wild-type strain in the exponential growth phase, suggesting that carotenogenesis was deregulated in atxS2 at the beginning of growth. In addition, the maximum expression of the carotenogenesis genes at the mRNA level was observed during the induction period of carotenoid biosynthesis in the wild-type strain. The mRNA level of the crtYB, crtl, ast genes and to a lesser extent the idi gene, decayed at the end of the exponential growth phase. The mRNA levels of the crtE gene remained high along the whole growth curve of the yeast. In the atxS2 strain the mRNA levels of crtE gene were about two times higher than the wild-type strain in the early phase of the growth cycle.

  3. Direct quantification of carotenoids in low fat babyfoods via laser photoacoustics and colorimetric index a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doka, O.; Ajtony, Z.; Bicanic, D.D.; Valinger, D.; Vegvari, G.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are important antioxidants found in various foods including those for nutrition of infants. In this investigation, the total carotenoid content (TCC) of nine different commercially available baby foods was quantified using colorimetric index a * obtained via reflectance colorimetry (RC)

  4. Stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste and their use as colorant in fish sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachindra, N M; Mahendrakar, N S

    2010-01-01

    The stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste using organic solvents and vegetable oils as affected by antioxidants and pigment carriers was evaluated during storage under different conditions. Solvent extracted carotenoid incorporated into alginate and starch as carriers was stored in metallised polyester and polypropylene pouches. Oil extracted carotenoids were stored in transparent and amber bottles. Also the use of recovered pigments as colorants in fish sausage was evaluated. Antioxidants, packaging material and storage period had a significant effect (p≤0.001) on the reduction of carotenoid content, while type of carrier had marginal effect (p≥0.05) on solvent extracted carotenoids during storage. Carotenoid content in pigmented oil was significantly affected by antioxidants (p≤0.001), packaging material (p≤0.05) and storage period (p≤0.001). Addition of carotenoid to the sausage enhanced the sensory colour, flavour and overall quality score of sausage and the added carotenoid was stable during processing.

  5. Genus specific unusual carotenoids in purple bacteria, Phaeospirillum and Roseospira: structures and biosyntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Maoka, Takashi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V; Shimada, Keizo

    2011-07-01

    Phototrophic bacteria necessarily contain carotenoids for photosynthesis, and a few phototrophic purple bacteria accumulate unusual carotenoids. The carotenoids in the genera Phaeospirillum and Roseospira were identified using spectroscopic methods. All species of the genus Phaeospirillum contained characteristic polar carotenoids in addition to lycopene and hydroxylycopene (rhodopin); hydroxylycopene glucoside, dihydroxylycopene, and its mono- and/or diglucosides. From the structures of these carotenoids, their accumulation was suggested to be due to absence of CrtD (acyclic carotenoid C-3,4 desaturase) and to possession of glucosyltransferase. Species of the genus Roseospira have been reported to have unusual absorption spectra in acetone extract, and they were found to accumulate 3,4-didehydrorhodopin as a major carotenoid. This may be due to low activity of CrtF (acyclic 1-hydroxycarotenoid methyltransferase). The study concludes in identifying genus specific unusual carotenoids, which is probably due to characteristic nature of some carotenogenesis enzymes.

  6. Development of carotenoid-enriched vegetables with increased nutritional quality and visual appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a class of red, orange and yellow pigments widely distributed in nature. Biotech approach has been proved to be effective in successfully engineering of carotenoid content in food crops with better health and visual appearance....

  7. Lipid Class, Carotenoid, and Toxin Dynamics of Karenia Brevis (Dinophyceae) During Diel Vertical Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karenia brevis’ (Hansen and Moestrup) internal lipid, carotenoid, and toxin concentrations are influenced by its ability to use ambient light and nutrients for growth and reproduction. This project investigated changes of K. brevis toxicity, lipid class and carotenoid concentrat...

  8. Comparison of carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression between Valencia and Rohde Red Valencia sweet oranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression levels during fruit maturation were compared between ordinary Valencia (VAL) and its more deeply colored mutant Rohde Red Valencia orange (RRV). The two cultivars exhibited different carotenoid profiles and regulatory mechanisms in flavedo and...

  9. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Bun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored...... thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid...... structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-atocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid...

  10. Female-specific colouration, carotenoids and reproductive investment in a dichromatic species, the upland goose Chloephaga picta leucoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladbach, Anja; Gladbach, David Joachim; Kempenaers, Bart; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2010-11-01

    Although studies on the evolution and function of female ornaments have become more numerous in the last years, the majority of these studies were carried out in cases where female ornaments were a smaller and duller version of the ornaments found in males. There are substantially fewer studies on species with female-specific ornaments. However, no study so far investigated the potential of female-specific colouration as a quality signal in birds with conventional sex roles. We studied female-specific ornamentation in a strongly sexually dichromatic species, the upland goose Chloephaga picta leucoptera, in two consecutive years. Male upland geese have white head and breast feathers and black legs, whereas females have reddish-brown head and breast feathers and conspicuous yellow-orange legs. We found that female-specific colouration in upland geese can reliably indicate different aspects of female phenotypic quality. Females with more orange coloured legs and more red-like head colours had higher clutch and egg volumes than females with a paler leg and head colouration, and a more reddish plumage colouration was related to a higher body condition. These relationships provide the theoretic possibility for males to assess female phenotypic quality on the basis of colouration. Furthermore, the females with a more orange-like tarsus colouration had higher plasma carotenoid levels. Both tarsus colouration and carotenoid concentrations of individual females were highly correlated across years, indicating that tarsus colour is a stable signal. Despite this correlation, small individual differences in plasma carotenoid concentrations between the two study years were related to differences in tarsus colouration. We thus show for the first time in a wild bird and under natural conditions that carotenoid-based integument colouration remains consistent between individuals in consecutive years and is also a dynamic trait reflecting individual changes in carotenoid levels. In

  11. Differential selection on carotenoid biosynthesis genes as a function of gene position in the metabolic pathway: a study on the carrot and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Clotault

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history.

  12. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sookyoung Jeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months (n = 2/group. All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions.

  13. New insight into the cleavage reaction of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase in natural and nonnatural carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jinsol; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-06-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at a specific double bond to generate apocarotenoids. In this study, we investigated the activity and substrate preferences of NSC3, a CCD of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, in vivo and in vitro using natural and nonnatural carotenoid structures. NSC3 cleaved β-apo-8'-carotenal at 3 positions, C-13 C-14, C-15 C-15', and C-13' C-14', revealing a unique cleavage pattern. NSC3 cleaves the natural structure of carotenoids 4,4'-diaponeurosporene, 4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4'-al, 4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4'-oic acid, 4,4'-diapotorulene, and 4,4'-diapotorulen-4'-al to generate novel cleavage products (apo-14'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-13'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-10'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-14'-diapotorulenal, and apo-10'-diapotorulenal, respectively). The study of carotenoids with natural or nonnatural structures produced by using synthetic modules could provide information valuable for understanding the cleavage reactions or substrate preferences of other CCDs in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sookyoung; Neuringer, Martha; Johnson, Emily E.; Kuchan, Matthew J.; Pereira, Suzette L.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Erdman, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months (n = 2/group). All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions. PMID:28075370

  15. Microscale extraction method for HPLC carotenoid analysis in vegetable matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Pacheco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate simple, efficient analytical methods that are also fast, clean, and economical, and are capable of producing reliable results for a large number of samples, a micro scale extraction method for analysis of carotenoids in vegetable matrices was developed. The efficiency of this adapted method was checked by comparing the results obtained from vegetable matrices, based on extraction equivalence, time required and reagents. Six matrices were used: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., carrot (Daucus carota L., sweet potato with orange pulp (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam., pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch., watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. flour. Quantification of the total carotenoids was made by spectrophotometry. Quantification and determination of carotenoid profiles were formulated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with photodiode array detection. Microscale extraction was faster, cheaper and cleaner than the commonly used one, and advantageous for analytical laboratories.

  16. Differential effects of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol on carotenoid deposition in an avian sexually selected signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, Stefania; Dijkstra, Cor; Tagliavini, James; Goerlich, Vivian C.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that carotenoid-based traits are under the control of testosterone (T) by up-regulation of carotenoid carriers (lipoproteins) and/or tissue-specific uptake of carotenoids. T can be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2), and variation in conversion

  17. Novel expression patterns of carotenoid pathway-related gene in citrus leaves and maturing fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are abundant in citrus fruits and vary among cultivars and species. In the present study, HPLC and real-time PCR were used to investigate the expression patterns of 23 carotenoid biosynthesis gene family members and their possible relation with carotenoid accumulation in flavedo, juice s...

  18. Absorption and distribution kinetics of the 13C-labeled tomato carotenoid phytoene in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoene is a tomato carotenoid which may contribute to the apparent health benefits of tomato consumption. While phytoene is a less prominent tomato carotenoid than lycopene, it is a major carotenoid in various human tissues. Phytoene distribution to plasma lipoproteins and tissues differs from lyc...

  19. Absorption of beta-carotene and other carotenoids in humans and animal models : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To review available information on absorption and further metabolism of different carotenoids in man and to discuss animal models and approaches in the study of carotenoid absorption and metabolism in man. Conclusions: Humans appear to absorb various carotenoids in a relatively non-specif

  20. [The effect of beta-ionine on biosynthesis of carotenes by Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlova, A N; Alekseeva, L N; Nefelova, M V

    1977-01-01

    Biosynthesis of carotenoids by a growing culture of Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides is totally inhibited by beta-ionone added at different concentrations, at various time of the cultural growth, and in various combinations with oil. The inhibition of carotenoid synthesis by beta-ionone is of a specific character since the biomass growth under the same conditions does not increase.

  1. Exploratory metabolomic analyses reveal compounds correlated with lutein concentration in frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex of human infant brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with...

  2. Estabilidad de los pigmentos carotenoides en los alimentos

    OpenAIRE

    Meléndez Martínez, Antonio Jesús; Vicario Romero, Isabel; Heredia Mira, Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Los pigmentos carotenoides son compuestos responsables de la coloración de gran número de alimentos vegetales y animales. Numerosos estudios publicados recientemente han demostrado el efecto beneficioso de estos compuestos en la salud humana, por lo que, desde un punto de vista nutricional, resulta de gran importancia conocer qué factores intervienen en la degradación de los carotenoides, ya que su pérdida, además de producir cambios de color en el alimento, conlleva una disminución de su val...

  3. Los carotenoides dietéticos en el organismo animal

    OpenAIRE

    Brenes-Soto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Los compuestos carotenoides se encuentran en plantas, algas y bacterias, principalmente, y son ingeridos por los animales en sus dietas. Estos compuestos lipofílicos se dividen en carotenos y xantofilas, dependiendo de su estructura y composición molecular.  Además de su función como precursores de la vitamina A y como antioxidantes, los carotenoides también se pueden depositar en varios tejidos y órganos como el ojo, hígado, músculo, piel, picos y plumas de aves, en los cuales también cumple...

  4. Estabilidad del Carotenoide Licopeno en Tomates en Conserva Lycopene Carotenoide Stability in Canned Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia L Ordóñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la estabilidad del carotenoide licopeno durante el proceso de elaboración de conservas de tomates peritas y evaluar la misma durante su almacenamiento como producto terminado. Se trabajó con muestras provenientes de elaboraciones industriales extraídas en distintos puntos del proceso: tomates frescos, en la boquilla de alimentación de la línea; tomate pelado, a la salida de la peladora termofísica y producto terminado a la salida del esterilizador-enfriador, de distintos lotes de elaboración y en tres ocasiones durante la temporada 2007. El producto terminado, envasado en hojalata, fue evaluado durante un año, cada tres meses. El licopeno fue extraído con una mezcla de hexano-acetona-etanol y determinado por espectrofotometría visible a 472nm. Los resultados se analizaron estadísticamente mostrando que la esterilización industrial produce liberación celular del licopeno.The objective of this work was to determine lycopene carotenoid stability during manufacturing process in canned peeled whole tomatoes and during its storage as final product. Samples were taken during industrial manufacturing at different process points: fresh tomatoes when they were feeding to process line, peeled tomatoes from thermophysical peeler and finished product after it passed the cooker-cooler. Samples were obtained from different manufacturing lots at three times during the 2007 harvesting season. Canned tomatoes were analyzed every three months, during one year. Lycopene was extracted with hexane-acetone-ethyl alcohol and measured by spectrophotometry at 472 nm. Statistical analysis of the results shows that industrial sterilization produces cell release of lycopene.

  5. The basis for colorless hemolymph and cocoons in the Y-gene recessive Bombyx mori mutants: a defect in the cellular uptake of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Kozo; Katagiri, Chihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiro; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Sato, Ryoichi; Maekawa, Hideaki; Takada, Naoko; Banno, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi; Wells, Michael A; Jouni, Zeina E

    2004-10-01

    Bombyx mori is an excellent model for the study of carotenoid-binding proteins (CBP). In previous papers, we identified and molecularly characterized a CBP from the Y-gene dominant mutants. In the present study, we attempted to correlate and establish lipid metabolism and distribution in these mutants. When [3H]-triolein was fed to the mutants, typical patterns of uptake of labeled fatty acids from midgut to hemolymph and subsequent delivery to fat body and silk glands were obtained in all mutants. Further analysis of lipid and carotenoid profiles revealed that the yellow coloration in the hemolymph associated with lipophorin is not attributed to a difference in lipophorin concentrations among the mutants, nor to its lipid composition, but rather to its carotenoid content. Lipophorin of the Y+I mutant exhibited the highest concentration of total carotenoids of 55.8 microg/mg lipophorin compared to 3.1 microg/mg in the +Y+I mutant, 1.2 microg/mg in the YI mutant and 0.5 microg/mg in the +YI mutant. Characteristic retention time in HPLC of the different classes of carotenoids of lipophorin identified the presence of lutein as the major chromophore (62-77%), followed by beta-carotenes (22-38%). Although lutein and beta-carotene content of mutants' lipophorin differed significantly, the ratio of lutein to beta-carotene of 3:1 was not different among mutants. Similarly, lipid compositions of mutant silk glands were not significantly different, but carotenoid contents were. The significantly high concentration of lutein in the Y+I mutant silk gland represented more than 160-fold increase compared to +Y+I mutant (plipid metabolism in the mutants is not defected and that the molecular basis for colorless hemolymph and cocoons is a defect in the cellular uptake of lutein associated with the Y-gene recessive mutants.

  6. The Correlations of Balance Function and Cognition Function in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease%阿尔茨海默病患者平衡功能与认知功能的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史建平; 潘佳; 赵彬; 汪广剑; 徐乐平

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the relationships between balance function and cognition function in patients with Alzheimer's disease(AD) .Methods:Eighty AD patients were recruited and measured by Berg balance scale(BBS)and Montreal cognitive assessment(MoCA)to evaluate balance function and cognition function respectively ,and divided into three groups according to the scores of BBS including balance disfunctiongroup(n=19) ,impaired balance group (n=27) ,normal balance group(n= 34) .Results:AD patients with balance disfunction had lower scores of MoCA than those with impaired balance(d=1 5.1 ,P<0 0.01)or normal balance patients(d=3 .47 ,P<0 .001) ,while the former lower than the later(d=1 9.8 ,P<0 0.1) .AD patients with balance disfunction also had lower scores of atten‐tion /calculation(d=0 6.3 ,P<0 0.5)or visuospatial /executive function(d=1 .00 ,P<0 0.01)compared with those normal balance AD patients ,and decreased subscale score of visuospatial/executive function(d=0 5.4 ,P<0 0.5)com‐pared with those impaired balance AD patients .with impaired balance had lower subscale scores of visuospatial/exec‐utive function(d=0 5.1 ,P<0 0.5)than those AD patients with normal balance .The scores of BBS was positively re‐lated with scores of MoCA(r=0 4.35 ,P<0 0.1) ,subscale score of attention /calculation(r=0 2.26 ,P<0 0.5) ,and visuospatial/executive function(r=0 3.55 ,P<0 0.1) .The subscale score of static balance of BBS had a positive corre‐lation with scores of MoCA(r=0 3.94 ,P<0 0.01) ,subscale score of attention /calculation(r=0 2.23 ,P<0 0.5) ,and visuospatial/executive function(r=0 3.14 ,P<0 0.1) .The subscale score of dynamic balance of BBS had positively correlated with scores of MoCA(r=0 4.27 ,P<0 0.01) ,subscale score of attention /calculation(r=0 2.55 ,P<0 0.5) , visuospatial/executive function(r=0 3.57 ,P<0 0.1) or orientation(r=0 2.40 ,P< 0 0.5) .Conclusion:The damaged balance function should associate with the impaired cognition ,especially attention

  7. Study of the expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes in wild-type and deregulated strains of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Ex.: Phaffia rhodozyma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Patricia; Alcaíno, Jennifer; Barahona, Salvador; Retamales, Patricio; Jiménez, Antonio; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2004-01-01

    The expression, at the mRNA level, of carotenoid biosynthetic genes from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was studied by RT-PCR. The experimental conditions for the RT-PCR assay were standardized to quantify the relative transcript levels of idi, crtE, crtYB and crtI genes. This work attempted to correlate astaxanthin production with the transcript levels of carotenogenic genes in a wild-type strain (UCD 67-385) and two overproducer deregulated strains (atxS1 and atxS2). At 3 day cultures, the wild-type strain contained higher transcript levels from the crtE and crtYB genes on minimal medium than on rich medium. Similarly, carotenoid production was higher on minimal medium than on rich medium. However, carotenoid production in the atxS1 and atxS2 strains was not correlated with the transcript level of carotenogenic genes under the same experimental conditions. This result suggests that there is not a linear relationship between carotenogenic transcript levels and carotenoid biosynthesis.

  8. Genetic background specific hypoxia resistance in rat is correlated with balanced activation of a cross-chromosomal genetic network centering on physiological homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eMao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism’s response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN, Dahl salt-sensitive (SS rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 consomic rat strains under normoxia and two-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9BN and SS-18BN represent the most hypoxia resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6BN and SS-YBN segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these consomic rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia-relevant core genetic network was reverse-engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward

  9. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9(BN) and SS-18(BN) represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6(BN) and SS-Y(BN) segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine.

  10. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  11. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M

    2016-06-23

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC═C + NC═O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids.

  12. Carotenoids of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca (Gemmatimonadetes): identification of a novel carotenoid, deoxyoscillol 2-rhamnoside, and proposed biosynthetic pathway of oscillol 2,2'-dirhamnoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Maoka, Takashi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Hanada, Satoshi

    2010-03-01

    Gemmatimonas aurantiaca strain T-27(T) is an orange-coloured, Gram-negative, facultatively aerobic, polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium belonging to a recently proposed phylum, Gemmatimonadetes. We purified its pigments and identified them as carotenoids and their glycoside derivatives using spectral data. The major carotenoid was (2S,2' S)-oscillol 2,2'-di-(alpha-l-rhamnoside), and the minor carotenoids were (2S)-deoxyoscillol 2-( alpha-l-rhamnoside) and didemethylspirilloxanthin. Deoxyoscillol 2-rhamnoside is a novel carotenoid. Oscillol 2,2'-diglycosides have hitherto only been reported in a limited number of cyanobacteria, and this is believed to be the first finding of such carotenoids in another bacterial phylum. Based on the identification of the carotenoids and the completion of the entire nucleotide sequence, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for the carotenoids and the corresponding genes and enzymes. We propose the involvement of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (CrtE), phytoene synthase (CrtB) and phytoene desaturase (CrtI) for lycopene synthesis; and of carotenoid 1,2-hydratase (CruF) and carotenoid 2-O-rhamnosyltransferase (CruG) for oscillol 2,2'-dirhamnoside synthesis. Further, isopentenyl pyrophosphate could be synthesized by a non-mevalonate pathway (DXP pathway).

  13. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on carotenoids production by native strain of Aurantiochytrium Ch25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiye Esmizade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microorganisms produce carotenoids as a part of their response to environmental stresses. Carotenoids have many applications in human health, such as antioxidant, anti-cancer, light protection activity and as a precursor for hormones. Materials and methods: In this study, the effect of different carbon and nitrogen sources was evaluated on carotenoids production by native Aurantiochytrium strain. The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources were studied on biomass and carotenoid production. Then, carotenoids were extracted and analyzed by TLC, spectrophotometry and HPLC methods. Results: Results showed that glycerol is the best carbon source for production of high carotenoids content. Selected medium contained: glycerol (1.5% v/v, peptone (1g/l, yeast extract (1g/l and 50% of sea water. Total carotenoids content was 134.8 µg/g CDW in this medium. TLC analysis showed that the extracted carotenoid is included: beta-carotene, astaxanthin monoester, astaxanthin diester and free astaxanthin. The results of HPLC analysis showed presence of astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, echinenone and β-carotene in the carotenoid extract. Discussion and conclusion: In this research, production of carotenoids was investigated in native strain of Aurantiochytrium and carotenoids profile was included astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, β-carotene and echinenone.

  14. Low skin carotenoid concentration measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy is associated with metabolic syndrome in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Edward W; Wei, Esther K; Bennett, Nancy; Zhang, Laura M

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). Antioxidants, including carotenoids, are decreased in MS. We hypothesized that a low skin carotenoid score (SCS), calculated using resonance Raman spectroscopy, would correlate with the presence of MS. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients referred for dietary assessment between 2010 and 2012. For each patient, a nutrition history, medical history, and SCS were recorded. χ(2) and Student t test were used to determine factors associated with MS. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with MS. One hundred fifty-five patients were included. The mean age was 54.1 ± 13.1 years, and the mean body mass index was 28.3 ± 6.1 kg/m(2). Metabolic syndrome was present in 43.9% of patients. The mean SCS was 28 084 ± 14 006 Raman counts (RC), including 23 058 ± 9812 RC for patients with MS and 32 011 ± 15 514 RC for patients without MS (P = .0001). In a multivariate analysis, SCS less than 25 000 RC (odds ratio, 3.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-10.7; P = .01) was independently associated with MS. A higher number of MS components was associated with a progressively lower SCS (P = .004). In a consecutive sample of patients referred for dietary assessment, a noninvasively measured SCS was lower among patients with MS.

  15. Mallow carotenoids determined by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow (corchorus olitorius) is a green vegetable, which is widely consumed either fresh or dry by Middle East population. This study was carried out to determine the contents of major carotenoids quantitatively in mallow, by using a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a Bis...

  16. Vitamins, carotenoids, dietary fiber, and the risk of gastric carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botterweck, A.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Numerous components of fruit and vegetables are considered to decrease the risk of gastric carcinoma. In the current prospective study, the authors examined the association between the intake of vitamins, carotenoids, and dietary fiber and vitamin supplement use and the incidence rate of

  17. Serum carotenoids and vitamins in relation to markers of endothelial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen-Broekmans, W. van; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.; Michiel, B.; Cornelis, K.; Hans, P.; Hendriks, F.J.; Tijburg, L.; Poppel, G. van; Kardinaal, A.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Endothelial cell dysfunction may be related to an increase in cellular oxidative stress. Carotenoids and vitamins could have an antioxidant-mediated tempering influence on endothelial function and inflammation, thereby reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. Methods: We measured serum caro

  18. Innovative Alternative Technologies to Extract Carotenoids from Microalgae and Seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojary, Mahesha M.; Barba, Francisco J.; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Donsì, Francesco; Pataro, Gianpiero; Dias, Daniel A.; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Marine microalgae and seaweeds (microalgae) represent a sustainable source of various bioactive natural carotenoids, including β-carotene, lutein, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, violaxanthin and fucoxanthin. Recently, the large-scale production of carotenoids from algal sources has gained significant interest with respect to commercial and industrial applications for health, nutrition, and cosmetic applications. Although conventional processing technologies, based on solvent extraction, offer a simple approach to isolating carotenoids, they suffer several, inherent limitations, including low efficiency (extraction yield), selectivity (purity), high solvent consumption, and long treatment times, which have led to advancements in the search for innovative extraction technologies. This comprehensive review summarizes the recent trends in the extraction of carotenoids from microalgae and seaweeds through the assistance of different innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric fields, liquid pressurization, supercritical fluids, subcritical fluids, microwaves, ultrasounds, and high-pressure homogenization. In particular, the review critically analyzes technologies, characteristics, advantages, and shortcomings of the different innovative processes, highlighting the differences in terms of yield, selectivity, and economic and environmental sustainability. PMID:27879659

  19. Innovative Alternative Technologies to Extract Carotenoids from Microalgae and Seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojary, Mahesha M; Barba, Francisco J; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Donsì, Francesco; Pataro, Gianpiero; Dias, Daniel A; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-11-22

    Marine microalgae and seaweeds (microalgae) represent a sustainable source of various bioactive natural carotenoids, including β-carotene, lutein, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, violaxanthin and fucoxanthin. Recently, the large-scale production of carotenoids from algal sources has gained significant interest with respect to commercial and industrial applications for health, nutrition, and cosmetic applications. Although conventional processing technologies, based on solvent extraction, offer a simple approach to isolating carotenoids, they suffer several, inherent limitations, including low efficiency (extraction yield), selectivity (purity), high solvent consumption, and long treatment times, which have led to advancements in the search for innovative extraction technologies. This comprehensive review summarizes the recent trends in the extraction of carotenoids from microalgae and seaweeds through the assistance of different innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric fields, liquid pressurization, supercritical fluids, subcritical fluids, microwaves, ultrasounds, and high-pressure homogenization. In particular, the review critically analyzes technologies, characteristics, advantages, and shortcomings of the different innovative processes, highlighting the differences in terms of yield, selectivity, and economic and environmental sustainability.

  20. Innovative Alternative Technologies to Extract Carotenoids from Microalgae and Seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesha M. Poojary

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine microalgae and seaweeds (microalgae represent a sustainable source of various bioactive natural carotenoids, including β-carotene, lutein, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, violaxanthin and fucoxanthin. Recently, the large-scale production of carotenoids from algal sources has gained significant interest with respect to commercial and industrial applications for health, nutrition, and cosmetic applications. Although conventional processing technologies, based on solvent extraction, offer a simple approach to isolating carotenoids, they suffer several, inherent limitations, including low efficiency (extraction yield, selectivity (purity, high solvent consumption, and long treatment times, which have led to advancements in the search for innovative extraction technologies. This comprehensive review summarizes the recent trends in the extraction of carotenoids from microalgae and seaweeds through the assistance of different innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric fields, liquid pressurization, supercritical fluids, subcritical fluids, microwaves, ultrasounds, and high-pressure homogenization. In particular, the review critically analyzes technologies, characteristics, advantages, and shortcomings of the different innovative processes, highlighting the differences in terms of yield, selectivity, and economic and environmental sustainability.

  1. Excited Electronic States, Photochemistry and Photophysics of Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Harry A.; Christensen, Ronald L.

    The most striking characteristic of carotenoids is their palette of colours. Absorption of light in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum by molecules such as β-carotene (3) and lycopene (31) not only readily accounts for their colours but also signals the ability of these long-chain polyenes to serve as antenna pigments in diverse photosynthetic systems [1-4].

  2. Strigolactones, a Novel Carotenoid-Derived Plant Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Babili, S.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived plant hormones and signaling molecules. When released into the soil, SLs indicate the presence of a host to symbiotic fungi and root parasitic plants. In planta, they regulate several developmental processes that adapt plant architecture to nutrient availa

  3. Pigments of Staphylococcus aureus, a series of triterpenoid carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J H; Wilmoth, G J

    1981-01-01

    The pigments of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated and purified, and their chemical structures were determined. All of the 17 compounds identified were triterpenoid carotenoids possessing a C30 chain instead of the C40 carotenoid structure found in most other organisms. The main pigment, staphyloxanthin, was shown to be alpha-D-glucopyranosyl 1-O-(4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4-oate) 6-O-(12-methyltetradecanoate), in which glucose is esterified with both a triterpenoid carotenoid carboxylic acid and a C15 fatty acid. It is accompanied by isomers containing other hexoses and homologs containing C17 fatty acids. The carotenes 4,4'-diapophytoene, 4,4'-diapophytofluene, 4-4'-diapophytofluene, 4-4'-diapo-zeta-carotene, 4,4'-diapo-7,8,11,12-tetrahydrolycopene, and 4,4'-diaponeurosporene and the xanthophylls 4,4'-diaponeurosporenal, 4,4'-diaponeurosporenoic acid, and glucosyl diaponeurosporenoate were also identified, together with some of their isomers or breakdown products. The symmetrical 4,4'-diapo- structure was adopted for these triterpenoid carotenoids, but an alternative unsymmetrical 8'-apo-structure could not be excluded. PMID:7275936

  4. Differential effects of environment on potato phenylpropanoid and carotenoid expression

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Plant secondary metabolites, including phenylpropanoids and carotenoids, are stress inducible, have important roles in potato physiology and influence the nutritional value of potatoes. The type and magnitude of environmental effects on tuber phytonutrients is unclear, especially under modern agricultural management that minimizes stress. Understanding factors that influence tuber secondary metabolism could facilitate production of more nutritious crops. Metabolite pools o...

  5. Rewiring carotenoid biosynthesis in plants using a viral vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, Eszter; Llorente, Briardo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Plants can be engineered to sustainably produce compounds of nutritional, industrial or pharmaceutical relevance. This is, however, a challenging task as extensive regulation of biosynthetic pathways often hampers major metabolic changes. Here we describe the use of a viral vector derived from Tobacco etch virus to express a whole heterologous metabolic pathway that produces the health-promoting carotenoid lycopene in tobacco tissues. The pathway consisted in three enzymes from the soil bacteria Pantoea ananatis. Lycopene is present at undetectable levels in chloroplasts of non-infected leaves. In tissues infected with the viral vector, however, lycopene comprised approximately 10% of the total carotenoid content. Our research further showed that plant viruses that express P. ananatis phytoene synthase (crtB), one of the three enzymes of the heterologous pathway, trigger an accumulation of endogenous carotenoids, which together with a reduction in chlorophylls eventually result in a bright yellow pigmentation of infected tissues in various host-virus combinations. So, besides illustrating the potential of viral vectors for engineering complex metabolic pathways, we also show a yellow carotenoid-based reporter that can be used to visually track infection dynamics of plant viruses either alone or in combination with other visual markers. PMID:28139696

  6. Profiling of carotenoids and antioxidant capacity of microalgae from subtropical coastal and brackish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Faruq; Fanning, Kent; Netzel, Michael; Turner, Warwick; Li, Yan; Schenk, Peer M

    2014-12-15

    Carotenoids are associated with various health benefits, such as prevention of age-related macular degeneration, cataract, certain cancers, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy and cardiovascular problems. As microalgae contain considerable amounts of carotenoids, there is a need to find species with high carotenoid content. Out of hundreds of Australian isolates, 12 microalgal species were screened for carotenoid profiles, carotenoid productivity, and in vitro antioxidant capacity (total phenolic content (TPC) and ORAC). The top four carotenoid producers at 4.68-6.88 mg/g dry weight (DW) were Dunaliella salina, Tetraselmis suecica, Isochrysis galbana, and Pavlova salina. TPC was low, with D. salina possessing the highest TPC (1.54 mg Gallic Acid Equivalents/g DW) and ORAC (577 μmol Trolox Equivalents/g DW). Results indicate that T. suecica, D. salina, P. salina and I. galbana could be further developed for commercial carotenoid production.

  7. Carotenoids of Sea Angels Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis from the Perspective of the Food Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea angels, Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis, are small, floating sea slugs belonging to Gastropoda, and their gonads are a bright orange-red color. Sea angels feed exclusively on a small herbivorous sea snail, Limacina helicina. Carotenoids in C. limacina, P. doliiformis, and L. helicina were investigated for comparative biochemical points of view. β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, and diatoxanthin were found to be major carotenoids in L. helicina. L. helicina accumulated dietary algal carotenoids without modification. On the other hand, keto-carotenoids, such as pectenolone, 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin, and adonixanthin were identified as major carotenoids in the sea angels C. limacina and P. doliiformis. Sea angels oxidatively metabolize dietary carotenoids and accumulate them in their gonads. Carotenoids in the gonads of sea angels might protect against oxidative stress and enhance reproduction.

  8. Novel targeted approach to better understand how natural structural barriers govern carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility in vegetable-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Paola; Lemmens, Lien; Ribas-Agustí, Albert; Sosa, Carola; Met, Kristof; de Dieu Umutoni, Jean; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2013-12-01

    An experimental approach, allowing us to understand the effect of natural structural barriers (cell walls, chromoplast substructures) on carotenoid bioaccessibility, was developed. Different fractions with different levels of carotenoid bio-encapsulation (carotenoid-enriched oil, chromoplasts, small cell clusters, and large cell clusters) were isolated from different types of carrots and tomatoes. An in vitro method was used to determine carotenoid bioaccessibility. In the present work, a significant decrease in carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility could be observed with an increasing level of bio-encapsulation. Differences in cell wall material and chromoplast substructure between matrices influenced carotenoid release and inclusion in micelles. For carrots, cell walls and chromoplast substructure were important barriers for carotenoid bioaccessibility while, in tomatoes, the chromoplast substructure represented the most important barrier governing bioaccessibility. The highest increase in carotenoid bioaccessibility, for all matrices, was obtained after transferring carotenoids into the oil phase, a system lacking cell walls and chromoplast substructures that could hamper carotenoid release.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, Lowell D [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Focsan, A Ligia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konovalova, Tatyana A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence, Jesse [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowman, Michael K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Molnar, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deli, Jozsef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond

  10. Balancing priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Troels; Johansen, Andreas Kaas; Lauridsen, Frederik Vahr Bjarnø

    2016-01-01

    a heterogeneous ensemble of care providers. In this paper, we present findings from a field study of coordinative work in distributed elder care in Denmark. The purpose of this study is to further our understanding of the coordinative challenges of distributed elder care, and to inform design of new care......, that are needed by the healthcare system, but also the work involved in balancing priorities....

  11. Spectrophotometric and chromatographic assessment of contributions of carotenoids and chlorophylls to the total antioxidant capacities of plant foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sözgen Başkan, Kevser; Tütem, Esma; Özer, Nihat; Apak, Reşat

    2013-11-27

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic compounds and also efficient antioxidants. This study aims to identify and quantify carotenoids and chlorophylls in some vegetables (carrot, tomato, spinach), to measure the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of these samples with two spectrophotometric methods, to correlate TAC data with carotenoid structure, and to compare the TAC results with HPLC findings. Separation of the individual antioxidant pigments was achieved on a C30 column using a developed gradient elution program involving methanol-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) with 0.1% (v/v) triethylamine (TEA) (A) and acetone (B) mobile phases. Total antioxidant capacities of the acetone extracts of studied samples, in trolox and β-carotene equivalents, were in the order: spinach > tomato > carrot by both CUPRAC and ABTS methods. CUPRAC responded favorably to both chlorophylls a and b. The TAC calculated with aid of combined HPLC-spectrophotometry was very close to the spectrophotometric value (93-108%) for real samples and synthetic mixtures.

  12. Graviresponsiveness and abscisic-acid content of roots of carotenoid-deficient mutants of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Smith, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The abscisic-acid (ABA) content of roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with an analysis sensitivity of 6 ng ABA g-1 fresh weight (FW). Roots of normal seedlings of the same lines were characterized by the following amounts of ABA (as ng ABA g-1 FW, +/- standard deviation): w-3, 279 +/- 43; vp-5, 237 +/- 26; vp-7, 338 +/- 61. We did not detect any ABA in roots of any of the mutants. Thus, the lack of carotenoids in these mutants correlated positively with the apparent absence of ABA. Primary roots of normal and mutant seedlings were positively gravitropic, with no significant differences in the curvatures of roots of normal as compared with mutant seedlings. These results indicate that ABA 1) is synthesized in maize roots via the carotenoid pathway, and 2) is not necessary for positive gravitropism by primary roots of Z. mays.

  13. Spectral heterogeneity and carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Hacking, Kirsty; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms produce a vast array of spectral forms of antenna pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar energy and also to adapt to growth under the variable environmental conditions of light intensity, temperature, and nutrient availability. This behavior is exemplified by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium that produces different types of LH2 light-harvesting complexes in response to variations in growth conditions. In the present work, three different spectral forms of LH2 from Alc. vinosum, B800-820, B800-840, and B800-850, were isolated, purified, and examined using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The pigment composition of the LH2 complexes was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and all were found to contain five carotenoids: lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin, spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, and rhodovibrin. Spectral reconstructions of the absorption and fluorescence excitation spectra based on the pigment composition revealed significantly more spectral heterogeneity in these systems compared to LH2 complexes isolated from other species of purple bacteria. The data also revealed the individual carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiencies which were correlated with the kinetic data from the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic experiments. This series of LH2 complexes allows a systematic exploration of the factors that determine the spectral properties of the bound pigments and control the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer.

  14. Stability and genotype by environment interaction of provitamin A carotenoid and dry matter content in cassava in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esuma, Williams; Kawuki, Robert Sezi; Herselman, Liezel; Labuschagne, Maryke Tine

    2016-01-01

    Efforts are underway to develop staple crops with improved levels of provitamin A carotenoids to help combat dietary vitamin A deficiency (VAD), which has afflicted the health of resource-poor people in the developing world. As a staple crop for more than 500 million people in sub-Saharan Africa, cassava enriched with provitamin A carotenoids could have a widespread nutritional impact. To this effect, 13 provitamin A clones were evaluated in a randomized complete block design in six environments to assess genotype by environment interaction (GEI) effects for total carotenoid (TCC) and dry matter content (DMC) in roots. Additive main effect and multiplicative interaction analysis showed significant variation among genotypes for TCC, DMC, fresh root weight and harvest index. Environmental effects were non-significant for TCC, but GEI effects were significantly large for all traits measured. There were significant temporal increments for all traits measured within 12 months after planting. TCC correlated negatively with DMC, illustrating an important challenge to overcome when developing provitamin A cassava varieties without compromising DMC, which is a major farmer-preference trait. Nonetheless, best performing genotypes were identified for TCC, DMC and FRW, and these could constitute genetic resources for advancement or developing breeding populations through hybridization. PMID:27436954

  15. The back and forth of energy transfer between carotenoids and chlorophylls and its role in the regulation of light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleboom, Christoph-Peter; Walla, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Many aspects in the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting of plants are still quite poorly understood. For example, it is still a matter of debate which physical mechanism(s) results in the regulation and dissipation of excess energy in high light. Many researchers agree that electronic interactions between chlorophylls (Chl) and certain states of carotenoids are involved in these mechanisms. However, in particular, the role of the first excited state of carotenoids (Car S1) is not easily revealed, because of its optical forbidden character. The use of two-photon excitation is an elegant approach to address directly this state and to investigate the energy transfer in the direction Car S1 → Chl. Meanwhile, it has been applied to a large variety of systems starting from simple carotenoid-tetrapyrrole model compounds up to entire plants. Here, we present a systematic summary of the observations obtained by two-photon excitation about Car S1 → Chl energy transfer in systems with increasing complexity and the correlation to fluorescence quenching. We compare these observations directly with the energy transfer in the opposite direction, Chl → Car S1, for the same systems as obtained in pump-probe studies. We discuss what surprising aspects of this comparison led us to the suggestion that quenching excitonic Car-Chl interactions could contribute to the regulation of light harvesting, and how this suggestion can be connected to other models proposed.

  16. Evaluation of carotenoid contents in irradiated buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jaqueline M. da; Coelho, Maysa J.; Lima, Keila S.C.; Lima, Antonio L.S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: maysa@ime.eb.br; Godoy, Ronoel L.O.; Pacheco, Sidney [EMBRAPA Agroindustria de Alimentos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronoel@ctaa.embrapa.br; Ferreira, Rubemar S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste CRCN-CO/CNEN, Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil); E-mail: rferreira@cnen.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.), a typical Brazilian fruit, can be found at north, northeast and center-west regions in Brazil. It has a high nutritional value and is considered an excellent source of vitamin A precursors, called carotenoids, showing a majority of {beta}-carotene. It can be used in many regional dishes. In this study, Buriti in natura was treated with gamma irradiation, deriving from a cavity type research irradiator which has a Cs-137 radiation source, with the doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. The objective is to evaluate the irradiation effects on nutritional quality maintenance and conservation of Buriti, focusing in optimizer the processing conditions and increase consumption as a way to fight vitamin A deficiency. Clinical, biological and dietetic studies have indicated that the lack of vitamin A is the main cause of night blindness and xerophthalmia. The use of food irradiation is growing and represents an economic benefit to the agriculture through the reduction of post harvesting losses. The irradiated fruits and the control group were evaluated through the total carotenoids analysis, by spectrophotometry, and the carotenoids (a and b-carotene and luteine) determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). ANOVA was used to treat the results. The results show that buriti is an excellent source of total carotenoids, with a concentration of 44500 {mu}g/100 g in the pulp (70% of {beta}-carotene). The reduction of carotenoids contents due to the irradiation process does not compromise its nutritional quality that is still very above of recommendations, being the dose of 0.5 kGy more appropriate. (author)

  17. The antioxidant potential of carotenoid extract from Phaffia rhodozyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gramza-Michałowska

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carotenoids are components playing an important role in biological systems, starting with light protection, immunoenhancement, protection against carcinogens and finishing with antioxidant activity. Food additives market is based mainly on synthetic additives; however, higher consumer awareness has resulted in an increased use of natural substances. One of the potentially antioxidant compounds could be a lipid soluble carotenoid – astaxanthin (xanthophyll, found in the microbial world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential of carotenoid extract from Phaffia rhodozyma extract. Material and methods. Carotenoids extracted from Phaffia rhodozyma and the astaxanthin standard was selected for the investigations. Antioxidant potential was evaluated by radical scavenging activity (DPPH• and ABTS•+ radicals and in lipid oxidative stability measurements (Rancimat, Oxidograph and Schaal oven tests. Results. It was found that the examined extracts presented a significantly higher ability to scavenge the DPPH• radical in comparison to the ABTS•+ radical. Evaluations of linoleic acid emulsion oxidative stability showed a higher antioxidant effect of the Phaffia rhodozyma extract than that of astaxanthin during 19 h of incubation. That potential however, was not detected in linoleic acid emulsion incubated for 96 h, where both additives accelerated oxidation process. In bulk sunflower oil a protective effect of Phaffia rhodozyma extract was observed. In both Rancimat and Oxidograph tests antioxidant activity measured using the induction period was evaluated. However, results of the Schaal oven test indicated that a 144 h incubation of sunflower oil offered a significantly better protection of the lipid against oxidation when the Phaffia rhodozyma extract was added. Conclusions. On the basis of recorded results it was found that the Phaffia rhodozyma carotenoid extract showed moderate antioxidant properties

  18. Different Response of Carbonyl Carotenoids to Solvent Proticity Helps To Estimate Structure of the Unknown Carotenoid from Chromera velia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keşan, Gürkan; Durchan, Milan; Tichý, Josef; Minofar, Babak; Kuznetsova, Valentyna; Fuciman, Marcel; Šlouf, Václav; Parlak, Cemal; Polívka, Tomáš

    2015-10-01

    In order to estimate the possible structure of the unknown carbonyl carotenoid related to isofucoxanthin from Chromera velia denoted as isofucoxanthin-like carotenoid (Ifx-l), we employed steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to investigate spectroscopic properties of Ifx-l in various solvents. The results were compared with those measured for related carotenoids with known structure: fucoxanthin (Fx) and isofucoxanthin (Ifx). The experimental data were complemented by quantum chemistry calculations and molecular modeling. The data show that Ifx-l must have longer effective conjugation length than Ifx. Yet, the magnitude of polarity-dependent changes in Ifx-l is larger than for Ifx, suggesting significant differences in structure of these two carotenoids. The most interesting spectroscopic feature of Ifx-l is its response to solvent proticity. The transient absorption data show that (1) the magnitude of the ICT-like band of Ifx-l in acetonitrile is larger than in methanol and (2) the S1/ICT lifetime of Ifx-l in acetonitrile, 4 ps, is markedly shorter than in methanol (10 ps). This is opposite behavior than for Fx and Ifx whose S1/ICT lifetimes are always shorter in protic solvent methanol (20 and 13 ps) than in aprotic acetonitrile (30 and 17 ps). Comparison with other carbonyl carotenoids reported earlier showed that proticity response of Ifx-l is consistent with presence of a conjugated lactone ring. Combining the experimental data and quantum chemistry calculations, we estimated a possible structure of Ifx-l.

  19. Social Balance Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hokky Situngkir; Deni Khanafiah

    2004-01-01

    We construct a model based on social balance theory proposed by Fritz Heider to analyze the interpersonal network among social agents. The model of social balance theory provides us an interesting tool to see how a social group evolves to the possible balance state. We introduce the balance index that can be used to measure social balance in macro structure level (global balance index) or in micro structure (local balance index) to see how the local balance index influences the global balance...

  20. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    KAUST Repository

    Ilg, Andrea

    2014-06-25

    The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B), which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-. trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents. © 2014 The Authors.

  1. Chemical and morphological characterization of Costa Rican papaya (Carica papaya L.) hybrids and lines with particular focus on their genuine carotenoid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiggert, Ralf M; Steingass, Christof B; Esquivel, Patricia; Carle, Reinhold

    2012-03-14

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) F1 hybrids and inbred lines grown in Costa Rica were screened for morphological and nutritionally relevant fruit traits. The qualitative composition of carotenoids showed great similarity, being mostly composed of free and esterified β-cryptoxanthins accompanied by β-carotene, lycopene, and biosynthetic precursors. High levels of (all-E)-lycopene and its isomers were distinctive for red-fleshed hybrids, whereas yellow-fleshed fruits were virtually devoid of lycopenes. Because carotenoid levels among the investigated hybrids and lines differed significantly, this study supports the hypothesis of an exploitable genetic variability, and a potential heterotic effect regarding carotenoid expression may be instrumental in papaya-breeding programs. Due to significantly higher levels of provitamin A carotenoids and coinciding high levels of total lycopene, particularly red-fleshed hybrids might represent prospective sources of these compounds. Furthermore, the nutritional value of some genotypes was boosted by substantial amounts of ascorbic acid (up to 73 mg/100 g of fresh weight), which correlated to total soluble solids (R(2) = 0.86).

  2. Carotenoid compositions of coloured tomato cultivars and contribution to antioxidant activities and protection against H(2)O(2)-induced cell death in H9c2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; Deng, Zeyuan; Liu, Ronghua; Loewen, Steven; Tsao, Rong

    2013-01-15

    The carotenoid compositions, antioxidant activities and the potential cardio-protective role of 13 tomato cultivars with distinct colour were studied. Colour coordinates were evaluated by colorimeter and the carotenoid compositions were analysed by UPLC. Red tomatoes had the highest total carotenoid contents (TCC) and antioxidant activities, followed by purple, orange, pink and yellow ones. The TCC were 120.5-278.0 μg/gDW, and the antioxidant activities were 21.32-40.07 μmolTE/gDW (PCL), 64.42-89.98% (DPPH) and 10.47-13.76 μmolTE/g DW (ORAC), respectively. The lipophilic extracts were also found to prevent cell death in a cell-based model system using cardiac H9c2 cells and H(2)O(2), via attenuation of the caspase-3 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 activities. The extracts of different tomatoes showed strong but different antioxidant activities. Roles of total and individual carotenoids in the antioxidant activities were studied and lycopene showed the highest correlation. Results of this study can be used to guide the development of new tomato cultivars and functional foods, and benefit the consumers.

  3. The Relationship Between Carotenoids Intake and Serum Lipids in Adults%成人膳食中类胡萝卜素摄入量与血脂关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨艳晖; 常东; 潘洪志; 陈文华

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究成人膳食中类胡萝卜素的摄入状况与血脂的关系. 方法 采用问卷调查法,调查130名35~60岁人群连续3d的膳食情况,根据膳食摄人情况计算5种类胡萝卜素(包括α-胡萝卜素、β-胡萝卜素、β-隐黄质、番茄红素、叶黄素/玉米黄质)每此摄入量,将调查人群按类胡萝卜素摄入量四分位间距分组,观察类萝卜素的摄入量与血脂的关系. 结果 第1组人群血清甘油三酯水平明显低于第4组人群,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).相关分析结果表明,类胡萝卜素的摄入量与血清中甘油三酯含量呈显著负相关(P<0.05). 结论 结果提示成人膳食类胡萝卜素的摄入与甘油三酯水平具有相关性,摄入类胡萝卜素可能对血脂有一定程度的保护作用.%Objective To investigate the relationship between carotenoids intake and serum lipids in adults. Methods Dietary intake for a consecution of 3 days was investigated in 130 objects aged 35 to 60 years old by a questionnaire. Daily Intake of five carotenoids, including α-carotene, β- carotene, β- cryptoxanthin, lycopene and lutein/zeaxanthin, were calculated. The investigation objects were classified into four groups according to the quartiles of the carotenoids intake: Group 1 (P100 - P75), Group 2 (P75 - P50), Group 3 (P50 - P25), Group 4 (P25 - P0). The relationship between carotenoids intake and serum lipids was explored. Results The serum triglyceride level in Group 1 was significantly lower than that in Group 4 (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the carotenoids intake and serum triglyceride level. Conclusions Serum triglyceride level in adult is correlated with the dietary intake of carotenoids. Carotenoids intake might protect lipids increase to some extent.

  4. Determination of carotenoids in yellow maize, the effects of saponification and food preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzhingi, Tawanda; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Russell, Robert M; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Qin, Jian; Tang, Guangwen

    2008-05-01

    Maize is an important staple food consumed by millions of people in many countries. Yellow maize naturally contains carotenoids which not only provide provitamin A carotenoids but also xanthophylls, which are known to be important for eye health. This study was aimed at 1) evaluating the effect of saponification during extraction of yellow maize carotenoids, 2) determining the major carotenoids in 36 genotypes of yellow maize by high-performance liquid chromatography with a C30 column, and 3) determining the effect of cooking on the carotenoid content of yellow maize. The major carotenoids in yellow maize were identified as all-trans lutein, cis-isomers of lutein, all-trans zeaxanthin, alpha- and beta-cryptoxanthin, all-trans beta-carotene, 9-cis beta-carotene, and 13-cis beta-carotene. Our results indicated that carotenoid extraction without saponification showed a significantly higher yield than that obtained using saponification. Results of the current study indicate that yellow maize is a good source of provitamin A carotenoids and xanthophylls. Cooking by boiling yellow maize at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes increased the carotenoid concentration, while baking at 450 degrees F for 25 minutes decreased the carotenoid concentrations by almost 70% as compared to the uncooked yellow maize flour.

  5. Carotenoids extraction from Japanese persimmon (Hachiya-kaki) peels by supercritical CO(2) with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mayako; Watanabe, Hiromoto; Kikkawa, Junko; Ota, Masaki; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Inomata, Hiroshi; Sato, Nobuyuki

    2006-11-01

    The extraction of carotenoids from Japanese persimmon peels by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), of which the solvent was CO(2), was performed. In order to enhance the yield and selectivity of the extraction, some portion of ethanol (5 - 20 mol%) was added as an entrainer. The extraction temperature ranged from 313 to 353 K and the pressure was 30 MPa. The effect of temperature on the extraction yield of carotenoids was investigated at 10 mol% of the ethanol concentration in the extraction solvent, and a suitable temperature was found to be 333 K among the temperatures studied with respect to the carotenoid yield. With increasing the entrainer amount from 0 to 10 mol% at a constant temperature (333 K), the carotenoid yield in the extraction was improved, whereas the selectivity of the extracted carotenoids was drastically depressed. We also conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses for the carotenoid components in the extract by HPLC, and analyzed the extraction behavior of each individual carotenoid (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin). The selectivity of each carotenoid changed with the elapsed time and its time evolution was dependent on the carotenoid component, indicating that the location profile and the content can be important factors to understand the SFE behavior of each carotenoid in persimmon peels.

  6. Accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenogenic genes in peach fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shifeng; Liang, Minhua; Shi, Liyu; Shao, Jiarong; Song, Chunbo; Bian, Kun; Chen, Wei; Yang, Zhenfeng

    2017-01-01

    To understand better the regulatory mechanism of the carotenoid accumulation, the expression profile of relevant carotenoid genes and metabolites were compared between two peach cultivars with different colors during fruit development. Meanwhile, the change pattern of carotenoid content and expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in peaches after harvest in response to blue light were also investigated. As compared to the yellow fleshed-cultivar 'Jinli', lower carotenoid levels were observed in skin and pulp in white peach cultivar 'Hujing', which might be explained by differentially expression of PpCCD4 gene. With respect to 'Jinli', the carotenoid accumulation during fruit development in fruit skin was partially linked with the transcriptional regulation of PpFPPS, PpGGPS, PpLCYB and PpCHYB. However, in the pulp, the accumulation might be also associated with the increased transcriptions of PpPDS, along with the above four genes. Blue light treatment induced carotenoid accumulation in 'Jinli' peaches during storage. In addition, the treated-fruit displayed higher expression of all the eight genes analysed with a lesser extent on PpCCD4, which suggested that the much more increased carotenoid synthesis rate could result in the higher carotenoid content in blue light-treated fruit. The results presented herein contribute to further elucidating the regulatory mechanism of carotenoid accumulation in peach fruit.

  7. Ancient origins and multiple appearances of carotenoid-pigmented feathers in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B; McGraw, Kevin J; Butler, Michael W; Carrano, Matthew T; Madden, Odile; James, Helen F

    2014-08-07

    The broad palette of feather colours displayed by birds serves diverse biological functions, including communication and camouflage. Fossil feathers provide evidence that some avian colours, like black and brown melanins, have existed for at least 160 million years (Myr), but no traces of bright carotenoid pigments in ancient feathers have been reported. Insight into the evolutionary history of plumage carotenoids may instead be gained from living species. We visually surveyed modern birds for carotenoid-consistent plumage colours (present in 2956 of 9993 species). We then used high-performance liquid chromatography and Raman spectroscopy to chemically assess the family-level distribution of plumage carotenoids, confirming their presence in 95 of 236 extant bird families (only 36 family-level occurrences had been confirmed previously). Using our data for all modern birds, we modelled the evolutionary history of carotenoid-consistent plumage colours on recent supertrees. Results support multiple independent origins of carotenoid plumage pigmentation in 13 orders, including six orders without previous reports of plumage carotenoids. Based on time calibrations from the supertree, the number of avian families displaying plumage carotenoids increased throughout the Cenozoic, and most plumage carotenoid originations occurred after the Miocene Epoch (23 Myr). The earliest origination of plumage carotenoids was reconstructed within Passeriformes, during the Palaeocene Epoch (66-56 Myr), and not at the base of crown-lineage birds.

  8. Effects of experimental brood size manipulation and gender on carotenoid levels of Eurasian kestrels Falco tinnunculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Laaksonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals use carotenoid-pigments for coloration, as antioxidants and as enhancers of the immune system. Carotenoid-dependent colours can thus signal individual quality and carotenoids have also been suggested to mediate life-history trade-offs. METHODOLOGY: To examine trade-offs in carotenoid allocation between parents and the young, or between skin coloration and plasma of the parents at different levels of brood demand, we manipulated brood sizes of Eurasian kestrels (Falco tinnunculus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Brood size manipulation had no overall effect on plasma carotenoid levels or skin hue of parents, but female parents had twice the plasma carotenoid levels of males. Males work physically harder than females and they might thus also use more carotenoids against oxidative stress than females. Alternatively, females could be gaining back the carotenoid stores they depleted during egg-laying by eating primarily carotenoid-rich food items during the early nestling stage. Fledglings in enlarged broods had higher plasma carotenoid concentrations than those in reduced broods. This difference was not explained by diet. In light of recent evidence from other species, we suggest it might instead be due to fledglings in enlarged broods having higher testosterone levels, which in turn increased plasma carotenoid levels. The partial cross-foster design of our experiment revealed evidence for origin effects (genetic or maternal on carotenoid levels of fledglings, but no origin-environment interaction. SIGNIFICANCE: These results from wild birds differ from studies in captivity, and thus offer new insights into carotenoid physiology in relation to division of parental care and demands of the brood.

  9. Effects of organic and conventional growth systems on the content of carotenoids in carrot roots, and on intake and plasma status of carotenoids in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Malene; Bysted, Anette; Madsen, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for organic food products has increased during the last decades due to their probable health effects, among others. A higher content of secondary metabolites such as carotenoids in organic food products has been claimed, though not documented, to contribute to increased...... health effects of organic foods. The aim was to study the impact of organic and conventional agricultural systems on the content of carotenoids in carrots and human diets. In addition, a human cross-over study was performed, measuring the plasma status of carotenoids in humans consuming diets made from...... crops from these agricultural systems. RESULTS: The content of carotenoids in carrot roots and human diets was not significantly affected by the agricultural production system or year, despite differences in fertilisation strategy and levels. The plasma status of carotenoids increased significantly...

  10. Transcriptome Profiling of Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Transcription Factors Associated with Ascorbic Acid, Carotenoid and Flavonoid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jie; Hu, Tixu; Yang, Congmei; Li, Hanxia; Yang, Mingze; Ijaz, Raina; Ye, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) serves as a research model for fruit development; however, while it is an important dietary source of antioxidant nutrients, the transcriptional regulation of genes that determine nutrient levels remains poorly understood. Here, the transcriptomes of fruit at seven developmental stages (7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 days after flowering) from two tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and HG6-61) were evaluated using the Illumina sequencing platform. A total of 26,397 genes, which were expressed in at least one developmental stage, were detected in the two cultivars, and the expression patterns of those genes could be divided into 20 groups using a K-mean cluster analysis. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that genes involved in RNA regulation, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism and cell wall metabolism were the most highly differentially expressed genes during fruit development and ripening. A co-expression analysis revealed several transcription factors whose expression patterns correlated with those of genes associated with ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis. This transcriptional correlation was confirmed by agroinfiltration mediated transient expression, which showed that most of the enzymatic genes in the ascorbic acid biosynthesis were regulated by the overexpression of each of the three transcription factors that were tested. The metabolic dynamics of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid were investigated during fruit development and ripening, and some selected transcription factors showed transcriptional correlation with the accumulation of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid. This transcriptome study provides insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and presents candidate transcription factors involved in secondary metabolism.

  11. Transcriptome Profiling of Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Transcription Factors Associated with Ascorbic Acid, Carotenoid and Flavonoid Biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ye

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum serves as a research model for fruit development; however, while it is an important dietary source of antioxidant nutrients, the transcriptional regulation of genes that determine nutrient levels remains poorly understood. Here, the transcriptomes of fruit at seven developmental stages (7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 days after flowering from two tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and HG6-61 were evaluated using the Illumina sequencing platform. A total of 26,397 genes, which were expressed in at least one developmental stage, were detected in the two cultivars, and the expression patterns of those genes could be divided into 20 groups using a K-mean cluster analysis. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that genes involved in RNA regulation, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism and cell wall metabolism were the most highly differentially expressed genes during fruit development and ripening. A co-expression analysis revealed several transcription factors whose expression patterns correlated with those of genes associated with ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis. This transcriptional correlation was confirmed by agroinfiltration mediated transient expression, which showed that most of the enzymatic genes in the ascorbic acid biosynthesis were regulated by the overexpression of each of the three transcription factors that were tested. The metabolic dynamics of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid were investigated during fruit development and ripening, and some selected transcription factors showed transcriptional correlation with the accumulation of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid. This transcriptome study provides insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and presents candidate transcription factors involved in secondary metabolism.

  12. Carotenoid profiling, in silico analysis and transcript profiling of miRNAs targeting carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes in different developmental tissues of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Archana; Yogindran, Sneha; Sharma, Deepak; Kaul, Sanjana; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat; Dhar, Manoj K

    2016-11-01

    Carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is one of the highly significant and very well elucidated secondary metabolic pathways in plants. microRNAs are the potential regulators, widely known for playing a pivotal role in the regulation of various biological as well as metabolic processes. miRNAs may assist in the metabolic engineering of the secondary metabolites for the production of elite genotypes with increased biomass and content of various metabolites. miRNA mediated regulation of carotenoid biosynthetic genes has not been elucidated so far. To illustrate the potential regulatory role of miRNAs in carotenoid biosynthesis, transcript profiling of the known miRNAs and their possible target carotenoid genes was undertaken at eight different developmental stages of tomato, using stem-loop PCR approach combined with quantitative RT-PCR. The inter-relationship amongst carotenoid content, biosynthetic genes and miRNAs was studied in depth. Comparative expression profiles of miRNA and target genes showed variable expression in different tissues studied. The expression level of miRNAs and their target carotenoid genes displayed similar pattern in the vegetative tissues as compared to the reproductive ones, viz. fruit (different stages), indicating the possibility of regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at various stages of fruit development. This was later confirmed by the HPLC analysis of the carotenoids. The present study has further enhanced the understanding of regulation of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in plants. The identified miRNAs can be employed to manipulate the biosynthesis of different carotenoids, through metabolic engineering for the production of lycopene rich tomatoes.

  13. Fast regeneration of carotenoids from radical cations by isoflavonoid dianions: importance of the carotenoid keto group for electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui-Min; Chen, Chang-Hui; Tian, Yu-Xi; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2010-01-14

    Electron transfer to radical cations of beta-carotene, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, and astaxanthin from each of the three acid/base forms of the diphenolic isoflavonoid daidzein and its C-glycoside puerarin, as studied by laser flash photolysis in homogeneous methanol/chloroform (1/9) solution, was found to depend on carotenoid structures and more significantly on the deprotonation degree of the isoflavonoids. None of the carotenoid radical cations reacted with the neutral forms of the isoflavonoids while the monoanionic and dianionic forms of the isoflavonoids regenerated the oxidized carotenoid. Electron transfer to the beta-carotene radical cation from the puerarin dianion followed second order kinetics with the rate constant at 25 degrees C k(2) = 5.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), zeaxanthin 8.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), canthaxanthin 6.5 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), and astaxanthin 11.1 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) approaching the diffusion limit and establishing a linear free energy relationship between rate constants and driving force. Comparable results found for the daidzein dianion indicate that the steric hindrance from the glucoside is not important suggesting the more reducing but less acidic 4'-OH/4'-O(-) as electron donors. On the basis of the rate constants obtained from kinetic analyses, the keto group of carotenoids is concluded to facilitate electron transfer. The driving force was estimated from oxidation potentials, as determined by cyclic-voltametry for puerarin and daidzein in aqueous solutions at varying pH conditions, which led to the standard reduction potentials E degrees = 1.13 and 1.10 V versus NHE corresponding to the uncharged puerarin and daidzein. For pH > pK(a2), the apparent potentials of both puerarin and daidzein became constants and were E degrees = 0.69 and 0.65 V, respectively. Electron transfer from isoflavonoids to the carotenoid radical cation, as formed during oxidative stress, is faster for astaxanthin than for the other carotenoids, which may relate

  14. Carotenoid extraction from plants using a novel, environmentally friendly solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Betty K; Chapman, Mary H

    2009-02-11

    Few environmentally friendly solvents are available to extract carotenoids for use in foods. The most effective known solvents are products of the petroleum industry and toxic for human consumption. Yet carotenoid extracts are desirable for use in dietary supplements and as additives to enhance the health benefits of processed foods. Ethyl lactate is an excellent solvent to extract both trans- and cis-lycopene isomers from dried tomato powder, the extraction efficiency of which is enhanced by the addition of the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and alpha-lipoic acid, both of which are known to benefit human health. It is also useful to extract lutein and beta-carotene from dried powders prepared from white corn and carrots. Because of its low flammability and its origin as a byproduct of the corn and soybean industries, it is more advantageous than ethyl acetate, which is a petroleum product.

  15. The very early events following photoexcitation of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Yoshizawa, Masayuki; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; De Silvestri, Sandro; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J

    2004-10-01

    The recent availability of laser pulses with 10-20 fs duration, tunable throughout the visible and near infrared wavelengths, has facilitated the investigation, with unprecedented temporal resolution, into the very early events of energy relaxation in carotenoids [Science 298 (2002) 2395; Synth. Metals 139 (2003) 893]. This has enabled us to clearly demonstrate the existence of an additional intermediate state, Sx, lying between the S2 (1(1)Bu+) and S1 (2(1)Ag-) states. In addition, by applying time-resolved stimulated Raman spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution, it has also been shown that vibrational relaxation in electronic excited states plays an important role in these interconversions. In this mini-review, we describe briefly the current understanding of Sx and the other intermediate excited states that can be formed by relaxation from S2, mainly focusing attention on the above two topics. Emphasis is also placed on some of the major remaining unsolved issues in carotenoid photochemistry.

  16. Colorful World of Microbes: Carotenoids and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwaha Kirti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cells accumulate pigments under certain culture conditions, which have very important industrial applications. Microorganisms can serve as sources of carotenoids, the most widespread group of naturally occurring pigments. More than 750 structurally different yellow, orange, and red colored molecules are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes with an estimated market of $ 919 million by 2015. Carotenoids protect cells against photooxidative damage and hence found important applications in environment, food and nutrition, disease control, and as potent antimicrobial agents. In addition to many research advances, this paper reviews concerns with recent evaluations, applications of microbial pigments, and recommendations for future researches with an understanding of evolution and biosynthetic pathways along with other relevant aspects.

  17. Resonance Raman measurements of carotenoids using light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D; Eyring, N J; Fralick, J F; Stevenson, D N; Ferguson, S B

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact commercial instrument for measuring carotenoids in skin tissue. The instrument uses two light emitting diodes (LEDs) for dual-wavelength excitation and four photomultiplier tubes for multichannel detection. Bandpass filters are used to select the excitation and detection wavelengths. The f/1.3 optical system has high optical throughput and single photon sensitivity, both of which are crucial in LED-based Raman measurements. We employ a signal processing technique that compensates for detector drift and error. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the LED Raman instrument compares favorably to laser-based Raman spectrometers. This compact, portable instrument is used for non-invasive measurement of carotenoid molecules in human skin with a repeatability better than 10%.

  18. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallabhaneni Ratnakar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA. Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced

  19. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2011-05-19

    Background: The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana.Results: A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR) but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA). Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs) and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced and uncoupled from that of

  20. Proteomic analysis identifies proteins related to carotenoid accumulation in Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueyue; Zhang, Lingling; Sun, Jin; Qiu, Jianwen; Hu, Xiaoli; Hu, Jingjie; Bao, Zhenmin

    2014-03-15

    Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants that affect many physiological functions. As an important source of natural carotenoids, marine mollusks contain various types of carotenoids and are receiving increasing research attention. To better understand the molecular mechanism underlying carotenoid accumulation in marine mollusks, a new variety of carotenoid-enriched Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis), named "Haida golden scallop", was used in this study. A proteomic approach was applied to explore the differences between the new variety and common individuals, resulting in seven differentially expressed proteins. Real-time PCR showed that four of the corresponding genes were also significantly up-regulated at the mRNA level in the new variety. Genes involved in various biological processes, such as lipid and glucose metabolism, protein-folding and degradation, were altered. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) may play a vital role in these changes. This study represents the first step towards future work on the genetic basis of carotenoid accumulation in marine mollusks.

  1. Concurrent production of carotenoids and lipid by a filamentous microalga Trentepohlia arborum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Lanlan; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-08-01

    During the study of Trentepohlia arborum it became clear that its cells are rich in lipids and carotenoids. Thus, lipid content, composition and fatty acids profiles in individual lipid classes, as well as pigment profiles, responding to different culture conditions, were further investigated. The results showed that the predominant carotenoids and lipid fraction in total lipid in this study was β-carotene and TAG, respectively. The lipid content increased significantly under high light while nitrogen-replete conditions induced the highest carotenoids content. However, only with a double stress of high light and nitrogen-deficiency it was possible to maximize the productivities of both carotenoids and lipids. Carotenoids (mainly β-carotene) accounted for ca. 5% of the microalgal lipid under the double stress. Data herein show the potential of T. arborum for the production of both lipids and carotenoids, and hence provide an appropriate way to produce different products from T. arborum.

  2. Carotenoids as protection against sarcopenia in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Sarcopenia, or loss of muscle mass and strength, plays a major role in the disablement process in older adults and increases the risk of impaired physical performance, falls, physical disability, frailty, and death. Oxidative stress is a major mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia; aging muscle shows increased oxidative damage to DNA, protein, and lipids. Carotenoids quench free radicals, reduce damage from reactive oxygen species, and appear to modulate redox-sensitive trans...

  3. Análise de trilha para carotenoides em milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara de Almeida Rios

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ainda que sejam considerados os aspectos de magnitude e significância, o estudo de correlações entre caracteres por si só não garante causa e efeito entre eles. Dessa forma, o objetivo deste trabalho foi desdobrar as correlações fenotípicas em seus efeitos diretos e indiretos, pela análise de trilha, considerando o perfil de carotenoides em genótipos de milho. Foram utilizados dados obtidos do ensaio nacional de cultivares de milho conduzido pela Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, no ano agrícola 2004/2005, com média de 10 genótipos em cinco ambientes. Avaliaram-se os teores de carotenoides totais (CT, α e β-carotenos, luteína, zeaxantina e β-criptoxantina. A xantofila zeaxantina apresenta o maior efeito direto sobre β-caroteno. As altas correlações entre β-caroteno e carotenoides totais e entre β-caroteno e β-criptoxantina são devidas ao efeito indireto, via zeaxantina. A seleção direta de genótipos com altos teores de β-caroteno apresenta-se como a alternativa de maior efetividade, mas se outras frações de carotenoides também forem consideradas, esquemas de seleção simultânea de caracteres, por meio da utilização de índices de seleção, mostram-se mais eficientes na obtenção de genótipos com altos teores de β-caroteno do que a resposta correlacionada.

  4. Carotenoid-cleavage activities of crude enzymes from Pandanous amryllifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningrum, Andriati; Schreiner, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Carotenoid degradation products, known as norisoprenoids, are aroma-impact compounds in several plants. Pandan wangi is a common name of the shrub Pandanus amaryllifolius. The genus name 'Pandanus' is derived from the Indonesian name of the tree, pandan. In Indonesia, the leaves from the plant are used for several purposes, e.g., as natural colorants and flavor, and as traditional treatments. The aim of this study was to determine the cleavage of β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal by carotenoid-cleavage enzymes isolated from pandan leaves, to investigate dependencies of the enzymatic activities on temperature and pH, to determine the enzymatic reaction products by using Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrophotometry (HS-SPME GC/MS), and to investigate the influence of heat treatment and addition of crude enzyme on formation of norisoprenoids. Crude enzymes from pandan leaves showed higher activity against β-carotene than β-apo-8'-carotenal. The optimum temperature of crude enzymes was 70°, while the optimum pH value was 6. We identified β-ionone as the major volatile reaction product from the incubations of two different carotenoid substrates, β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal. Several treatments, e.g., heat treatment and addition of crude enzymes in pandan leaves contributed to the norisoprenoid content. Our findings revealed that the crude enzymes from pandan leaves with carotenoid-cleavage activity might provide a potential application, especially for biocatalysis, in natural-flavor industry.

  5. The role of cis-carotenoids in abscisic acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A D; Babiano, M J; Horgan, R

    1990-08-01

    Evidence has been obtained which is consistent with 9'-cis-neoxanthin being a major precursor of abscisic acid (ABA) in higher plants. A mild, rapid procedure was developed for the extraction and analysis of carotenoids from a range of tissues. Once purified the carotenoids were identified from their light-absorbance properties, reactions with dilute acid, high-performance liquid chromatography Rts, mass spectra and the quasiequilibria resulting from iodine-catalysed or chlorophyllsensitised photoisomerisation. Two possible ABA precursors, 9'-cis-neoxanthin and 9-cis-violaxanthin, were identified in extracts of light-grown and etiolated leaves (of Lycopersicon esculentum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Cicer arietinum, Zea mays, Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, Plantago lanceolata and Digitalis purpurea), and roots of light-grown and etiolated plants (Lycopersicon, Phaseolus and Zea). The 9,9'-di-cisisomer of violaxanthin was synthesised but its presence was not detected in any extracts. Levels of 9'-cis-neoxanthin and all-trans-violaxanthin were between 20- to 100-fold greater than those of ABA in light-grown leaves. The levels of 9-cis-violaxanthin were similar to those of ABA but unaffected by water stress. Etiolated Phaseolus leaves contained reduced amounts of carotenoids (15-20% compared with light-grown leaves) but retained the ability to synthesise large amounts of ABA. The amounts of ABA synthesised, measured as increases in ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid, were closely matched by decreases in the levels of 9'-cis-neoxanthin and all-trans-violaxanthin. In etiolated seedlings grown on 50% D2O, deuterium incorporation into ABA was similar to that into the xanthophylls. Relative levels of carotenoids in roots and light-grown and etiolated leaves of the ABA-deficient mutants, notabilis, flacca and sitiens were the same as those found in wild-type tomato tissues.

  6. Physicochemical parameters that influence carotenoids bioaccessibility from a tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrou, Antoine; Georgé, Stéphane; Renard, Catherine M G C; Page, David

    2013-01-15

    In vitro digestion models have been developed to estimate carotenoid bioavailability but most do not consider that their diffusion from fruit matrix to the lipid phase of the bolus could be a limiting step. Therefore we designed a model in which tomato juice is mixed with oil or oil/water emulsions, and the carotenoids diffusing to oil are measured by spectrometry. Temperature, pH and tomato juice/peanut oil ratio were evaluated for their influence on carotenoid diffusion. When oil/tomato ratio was between 0.11 and 1, extraction of lycopene was limited by the saturation of the oil phase. With a large excess of oil, diffusion was also limited, as only 31 ± 1% of lycopene could be extracted from the juice. Diffusion did not vary significantly with pH but doubled when temperature rose from 10°C to 37°C. When the juice was mixed in an emulsion stabilised with bovine serum albumin or phospholipids the maximum extraction decreased to 14.5 ± 0.2% and 18.5 ± 1.5% respectively, indicating that in addition to the saturation of the oil phase at low oil/tomato ratio and in addition to intrinsic properties of the tomato juice in non-saturating conditions, lycopene diffusion was limited by the structure of the interface in emulsions.

  7. Biotechnological conversion of spent coffee grounds into polyhydroxyalkanoates and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obruca, Stanislav; Benesova, Pavla; Kucera, Dan; Petrik, Sinisa; Marova, Ivana

    2015-12-25

    Coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages and has been growing steadily in commercial importance. Nowadays, coffee is the second largest traded commodity in the world, after petroleum. Hence, coffee industry is responsible for the generation of large amounts of waste, especially spent coffee grounds (SCG). Various attempts to valorize this waste stream of coffee industry were made. This article summarizes our research and publications aiming at the conversion of SCG into valuable products - polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and carotenoids. At first, oil extracted from SCG (approx. 15 wt% oil in SCG) can be efficiently (YP/S=0.82 g/g) converted into PHA employing Cupriavidus necator H16. Further, the solid residues after oil extraction can be hydrolyzed (by the combination of chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis) yielding fermentable sugars, which can be further used as a substrate for the production of PHAs employing Bacillus megaterium (YP/S=0.04 g/g) or Burkholderia cepacia (YP/S=0.24 g/g). Alternatively, SCG hydrolysate can be used as a substrate for biotechnological production of carotenoids by carotenogenic yeast Sporobolomyces roseus. Solid residues after either oil extraction or hydrolysis can be used as fuel in industrial boilers to generate heat and energy. Therefore, entire biomass of SCG can be used for sustainable production of PHAs and/or carotenoids employing bio-refinery approach.

  8. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  9. The role of carotenoids on the risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Kenneth R

    2003-02-01

    Smoking prevention and cessation remain the primary methods of reducing the incidence of lung cancer. The limited success of efforts towards smoking cessation have led to increasing interest in the role of nutrition in lung cancer prevention. One class of nutrients that has attracted attention as potential chemopreventive agents is the carotenoids, especially beta-carotene, due to their antioxidant properties. In vitro, carotenoids exert antioxidant functions and inhibit carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation, inhibit plasma membrane lipid oxidation, and cause upregulated expression of connexin 43. These in vitro results suggest that carotenoids have intrinsic cancer chemopreventive action in humans. Many cohort and case-control study data have shown an inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer, although several more recent studies have cast doubt on these findings. Different effects of various dietary nutrients on lung cancer risk have been observed. Several prospective intervention trials were undertaken to examine the effect of supplementation on the risk of lung cancer. Some of these studies demonstrated an increased incidence and mortality from lung cancer in those receiving supplementation. Many hypotheses have emerged as to the reasons for these findings.

  10. [Detection of carotenoids in the vitreous body of the human eye during prenatal development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovleva, M A; Panova, I G; Fel'dman, T B; Zak, P P; Tatikolov, A S; Sukhikh, G T; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids were found for the first time in the vitreous body of human eye during the fetal period from week 15 until week 28. Their maximum content was timed to week 16-22. No carotenoids were found the vitreous body of 31-week fetuses, as well as adult humans, which corresponds to the published data. It was shown using HPLC that chromatographic characteristics of these carotenoids correspond to those of lutein and zeaxanthin, characteristic pigments of the retinal yellow macula.

  11. Investigations of carotenoids in fungi. III. Fructifications of some species from the genus Suillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazyli Czeczuga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Using column and thin-layer chromatography the occurrence of carotenoids and their content was determined in fructifications of 5 species from the genus Suillus. 21 carotenoids were found, among them 3 which had not hitherto been detected in fungi (auroxanthin, 3,4-dihydroxy-α-carotene and myxoxantophyll. Moreover quantitative and qualitative differences were found in the content of carotenoids in fructifications of Boletus luteus which may be of importance in their taxonomy.

  12. Supercritical CO(2) extraction of carotenoids from pitanga fruits (Eugenia uniflora L.)

    OpenAIRE

    FILHO, Genival L.; ROSSO, VeridianaV. De; M. Angela A. MEIRELES; ROSA, Paulo T. V.; OLIVEIRA, Alessandra L.; MERCADANTE, Adriana Z.; CABRAL,Fernando A.

    2008-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) extraction was employed to extract carotenoids from the freeze-dried pulp of pitanga fruits (Eugenia uniflora L.), an exotic fruit, rich in carotenoids and still little explored commercially. The SC-CO(2) extraction was carried out at two temperatures, 40 and 60 degrees C, and seven pressures, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 400 bar. The carotenoids were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography connected to photodiode array and mass spectro...

  13. Absorption of Vitamin A and Carotenoids by the Enterocyte: Focus on Transport Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Reboul

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in most developing countries, especially in children and pregnant women. It is thus a priority in health policy to improve preformed vitamin A and/or provitamin A carotenoid status in these individuals. A more accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intestinal vitamin A absorption is a key step in this direction. It was long thought that β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet), and thus all carotenoids, were abs...

  14. Carotenoids, Tocopherols and Antioxidant Activity of Lipophilic Extracts from Sea Buckthorn Berries (Hippophae rhamnoides, Apricot Pulp and Apricot Kernel (Prunus armeniaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Andreea Pop

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A healthy human diet requires the daily consumption of fruits and vegetables rich in bioactive compounds. Sea buckthorn berries (Hippophae rhamnoides L. and apricot fruits (Prunus armeniaca L. are cultivated and appreciated in Romania both as fresh fruits and as derived products. Characterized by a complex chemical composition, sea buckthorn is rich in unsaturated lipids, carotenoids and tocopherols. Except for β-carotene content, less is known about other lipophilic compounds in apricot fruits. The aim of this paper was to separate and quantify the individual carotenoids, tocopherols and tocotrienols in sea buckthorn, apricot pulp and kernels and also to determine the antioxidant activity of the lipophilic extracts using the TEAC  method.  Chemical characterization of lipophilic extract was performed by HPLC with PDA and fluorescence detection. The total carotenoid content was 17.19±1.4 mg/100g F.W. in sea buckthorn; 3.51±0.25 mg/100g F.W. in apricot fruits and 0.58±0.04 mg/100 g F.W. in apricot kernels. The major carotenoids in sea buckthorn were β-carotene, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin esters. Apricots fruits are rich in β-carotene and its geometric isomers while in kernels we could properly identified only lycopene. The α-tocopherol concentration was higher in sea buckthorn (46 mg/kg than in apricot fruits (1.09 mg/kg while apricot kernel contain large amounts of γ-tocopherol (111 mg/kg. Sea buckthorn fruits showed the highest antioxidant capacity, correlated with a high content of both tocopherols and carotenoids.

  15. Specific carotenoid pigments in the diet and a bit of oxidative stress in the recipe for producing red carotenoid-based signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther García-de Blas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorful ornaments have been the focus of sexual selection studies since the work of Darwin. Yellow to red coloration is often produced by carotenoid pigments. Different hypotheses have been formulated to explain the evolution of these traits as signals of individual quality. Many of these hypotheses involve the existence of a signal production cost. The carotenoids necessary for signaling can only be obtained from food. In this line, carotenoid-based signals could reveal an individual’s capacity to find sufficient dietary pigments. However, the ingested carotenoids are often yellow and became transformed by the organism to produce pigments of more intense color (red ketocarotenoids. Biotransformation should involve oxidation reactions, although the exact mechanism is poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that carotenoid biotransformation could be costly because a certain level of oxidative stress is required to correctly perform the conversion. The carotenoid-based signals could thus reveal the efficiency of the owner in successfully managing this challenge. In a bird with ketocarotenoid-based ornaments (the red-legged partridge; Alectoris rufa, the availability of different carotenoids in the diet (i.e. astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein and oxidative stress were manipulated. The carotenoid composition was analyzed and quantified in the ornaments, blood, liver and fat. A number of oxidative stress biomarkers were also measured in the same tissues. First, we found that color and pigment levels in the ornaments depended on food levels of those carotenoids used as substrates in biotransformation. Second, we found that birds exposed to mild levels of a free radical generator (diquat developed redder bills and deposited higher amounts of ketocarotenoids (astaxanthin in ornaments. Moreover, the same diquat-exposed birds also showed a weaker resistance to hemolysis when their erythrocytes were exposed to free radicals, with females also enduring

  16. Maize provitamin A carotenoids, current resources and future metabolic engineering challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanore T Wurtzel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A deficiency is a serious global health problem that can be alleviated by improved nutrition. Development of cereal crops with increased provitamin A carotenoids can provide a sustainable solution to eliminating vitamin A deficiency worldwide. Maize is a model for cereals and a major staple carbohydrate source. Here, we discuss maize carotenogenesis with regard to pathway regulation, available resources, and current knowledge for improving carotenoid content and levels of provitamin A carotenoids in edible maize endosperm. This knowledge will be applied to improve the nutritional composition of related Poaceae crops. We discuss opportunities and challenges for optimizing provitamin A carotenoid biofortification of cereal food crops.

  17. Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Carotenoids Extracted from Dried Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela Hernández-Ortega; Alicia Ortiz-Moreno; María Dolores Hernández-Navarro; Germán Chamorro-Cevallos; Lidia Dorantes-Alvarez; Hugo Necoechea-Mondragón

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406 ± 4  μ g/g, pasilla 2933 ± 1  μ g/g, and ancho 1437 ± 6  μ g/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts e...

  18. Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy reveals a carotenoid dark state in purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Mulvaney, Rachel M; Cogdell, Richard J; Scholes, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Although the energy transfer processes in natural light-harvesting systems have been intensively studied for the past 60 years, certain details of the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. We performed broadband two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy measurements on light-harvesting proteins from purple bacteria and isolated carotenoids in order to characterize in more detail the excited-state manifold of carotenoids, which channel energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules. The data revealed a well-resolved signal consistent with a previously postulated carotenoid dark state, the presence of which was confirmed by global kinetic analysis. The results point to this state's role in mediating energy flow from carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll.

  19. Distribution of retinal cone photoreceptor oil droplets, and identification of associated carotenoids in crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Lutfur; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Maeda, Isamu; Tanaka, Hideuki; Sugita, Shoei

    2010-06-01

    The topography of cone oil droplets and their carotenoids were investigated in the retina of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). Fresh retina was sampled for the study of retinal cone oil droplets, and extracted retinal carotenoids were saponified using methods adapted from a recent study, then identified with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To assess the effects of saponification conditions on carotenoid recovery from crow retina, we varied base concentration and total time of saponification across a wide range of conditions, and again used HPLC to compare carotenoid concentrations. Based on colors, at least four types of oil droplets were recognized, i.e., red, orange, green, and translucent, across the retina. With an average of 91,202 /mm(2), density gradually declines in an eccentric manner from optic disc. In retina, the density and size of droplets are inversely related. In the peripheral zone, oil droplets were significantly larger than those of the central area. The proportion of orange oil droplets (33%) was higher in the central area, whereas green was predominant in other areas. Three types of carotenoid (astaxanthin, galloxanthin and lutein), together with one unknown carotenoid, were recovered from the crow retina; astaxanthin was the dominant carotenoid among them. The recovery of carotenoids was affected by saponification conditions. Astaxanthin was well recovered in weak alkali (0.06 M KOH), in contrast, xanthophyllic carotenoids were best recovered in strong alkali (0.6 M KOH) after 12 h of saponification at freeze temperature.

  20. Carotenoid responses to environmental stimuli: integrating redox and carbon controls into a fruit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciullino, A L; Bidel, L P R; Urban, L

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids play an important role in plant adaptation to fluctuating environments as well as in the human diet by contributing to the prevention of chronic diseases. Insights have been gained recently into the way individual factors, genetic, environmental or developmental, control the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway at the molecular level. The identification of the rate-limiting steps of carotenogenesis has paved the way for programmes of breeding, and metabolic engineering, aimed at increasing the concentration of carotenoids in different crop species. However, the complexity that arises from the interactions between the different factors as well as from the coordination between organs remains poorly understood. This review focuses on recent advances in carotenoid responses to environmental stimuli and discusses how the interactions between the modulation factors and between organs affect carotenoid build-up. We develop the idea that reactive oxygen species/redox status and sugars/carbon status can be considered as integrated factors that account for most effects of the major environmental factors influencing carotenoid biosynthesis. The discussion highlights the concept of carotenoids or carotenoid-derivatives as stress signals that may be involved in feedback controls. We propose a conceptual model of the effects of environmental and developmental factors on carotenoid build-up in fruits.

  1. Composition and spectra of copper-carotenoid sediments from a pyrite mine stream in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Furio, Marta; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Jurado, Valme; Correcher, Virgilio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2015-01-01

    Mine drainages of La Poderosa (El Campillo, Huelva, Spain), located in the Rio Tinto Basin (Iberian Pyrite Belt) generate carotenoid complexes mixed with copper sulfates presenting good natural models for the production of carotenoids from microorganisms. The environmental conditions of Rio Tinto Basin include important environmental stresses to force the microorganisms to accumulate carotenoids. Here we show as carotenoid compounds in sediments can be analyzed directly in the solid state by Raman and Luminescence spectroscopy techniques to identify solid carotenoid, avoiding dissolution and pre-concentration treatments, since the hydrous copper-salted paragenesis do not mask the Raman emission of carotenoids. Raman spectra recorded from one of these specimens' exhibit major features at approximately 1006, 1154, and 1520 cm-1. The bands at 1520 cm-1 and 1154 cm-1 can be assigned to in-phase Cdbnd C (γ-1) and Csbnd C stretching (γ-2) vibrations of the polyene chain in carotenoids. The in-plane rocking deformations of CH3 groups linked to this chain coupled with Csbnd C bonds are observed in the 1006 cm-1 region. X-irradiation pretreatments enhance the cathodoluminescence spectra emission of carotenoids enough to distinguish organic compounds including hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Carotenoids in copper-sulfates could be used as biomarkers and useful proxies for understanding remote mineral formations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to mine drainage contamination including biological activity and photo-oxidation processes.

  2. An R2R3-MYB transcription factor regulates carotenoid pigmentation in Mimulus lewisii flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Janelle M; Stanley, Lauren E; LaFountain, Amy M; Frank, Harry A; Liu, Chang; Yuan, Yao-Wu

    2016-02-01

    Carotenoids are yellow, orange, and red pigments that contribute to the beautiful colors and nutritive value of many flowers and fruits. The structural genes in the highly conserved carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been well characterized in multiple plant systems, but little is known about the transcription factors that control the expression of these structural genes. By analyzing a chemically induced mutant of Mimulus lewisii through bulk segregant analysis and transgenic experiments, we have identified an R2R3-MYB, Reduced Carotenoid Pigmentation 1 (RCP1), as the first transcription factor that positively regulates carotenoid biosynthesis during flower development. Loss-of-function mutations in RCP1 lead to down-regulation of all carotenoid biosynthetic genes and reduced carotenoid content in M. lewisii flowers, a phenotype recapitulated by RNA interference in the wild-type background. Overexpression of this gene in the rcp1 mutant background restores carotenoid production and, unexpectedly, results in simultaneous decrease of anthocyanin production in some transgenic lines by down-regulating the expression of an activator of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Identification of transcriptional regulators of carotenoid biosynthesis provides the 'toolbox' genes for understanding the molecular basis of flower color diversification in nature and for potential enhancement of carotenoid production in crop plants via genetic engineering.

  3. Evaluation of antigenotoxic effects of carotenoids from green algae Chlorococcum humicola using human lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bhagavathy S; Sumathi P

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To identify the available phytochemicals and carotenoids in the selected green algae and evaluate the potential genotoxic/antigenotoxic effect using lymphocytes. Methods:Organic solvent extracts of Chlorococcum humicola (C. humicola) were used for the phytochemical analysis. The available carotenoids were assessed by HPLC, and LC-MS analysis. The genotoxicity was induced by the benzo(a)pyrene in the lymphocyte culture, the genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of algal carotenoids with and without genotoxic inducer were evaluated by chromosomal aberration (CA), sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus assay (MN). Results: The results of the analysis showed that the algae were rich in carotenoids and fatty acids. In the total carotenoids lutein,β-carotene and α-carotene were found to be present in higher concentration. The frequency of CA and SCE increased by benzo(a)pyrene were significantly decreased by the carotenoids (P<0.05 for CA, P<0.001 for SCE). The MN frequencies of the cells were significantly decreased by the treatment with carotenoids when compared with the positive controls (P<0.05). Conclusions:The findings of the present study demonstrate that, the green algae C. humicola is a rich source of bioactive compounds especially carotenoids which effectively fight against environmental genotoxic agents, the carotenoids itself is not a genotoxic substance and should be further considered for its beneficial effects.

  4. In vivo antioxidant activity of carotenoid powder from tomato byproduct and its use as a source of carotenoids for egg-laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Li, Chen; Pan, Siyi

    2013-04-25

    Ultrasound treatment was used to extract carotenoids from tomato waste. Gelatin and gum arabic were applied as coating materials for the encapsulation of carotenoids. The first-order reaction was used to determine the degradation of carotenoids in the microcapsules. The result of controlled release studies showed that microcapsules would protect most of the carotenoids from being released in the stomach. We investigated the modifications induced by an oral administration of carotenoid powder on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and ion status in liver of rat. The 28 day treatment increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and manganese superoxide dismutase and reduced malondialdehyde concentration in rat liver. The activity of catalase was not affected by treatment and greater iron concentration was found in liver from treatment groups. However, there was no dose-dependent change of antioxidant enzyme activity or malondialdehyde concentration with increasing carotenoid consumption. Furthermore, carotenoid powder was able to be used as forage material for egg-laying hens. The 28 day treatment did not affect the egg performance, but significantly increased yolk colour parameters and lycopene content.

  5. Carotenoids in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus: occurrence of 9'-cis-echinenone as the dominant carotenoid in gonad colour determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Rachael C; Kelly, Maeve S; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Young, Andrew J

    2007-12-01

    Regular sampling of wild Paracentrotus lividus was carried out over a 12-month period to examine seasonal effects on the pigment profile and content of the gonads, especially in comparison to gonad colour. The major pigments detected in the gut wall were breakdown products of fucoxanthin, namely fucoxanthinol and amarouciaxanthin A. Lower levels of other dietary carotenoids (lutein and beta-carotene) together with some carotenoids not found in the diet, namely isozeaxanthin and echinenone ( approximately 20% total carotenoid) were also detected in the gut wall. The presence of echinenone in the gut wall demonstrates that this organ acts as a major site of carotenoid metabolism. Echinenone is the dominant carotenoid in the gonads, accounting for approx. 50-60% of the total pigment. Both all-trans and 9'-cis forms of echinenone were detected in both the gut wall and in the gonad, with levels of the 9'-cis form typically 10-fold greater than the all-trans form in the gonad. The detection of large levels of 9'-cis-echinenone in wild sea urchins is unexpected due to the absence of 9- or 9'-cis forms of carotenoids in the natural, algal, diet. Whilst echinenone clearly contributes towards gonad pigmentation, levels of this carotenoid, cannot be directly linked to a qualitative assessment of gonad colour in terms of market acceptability. Indeed, unacceptable gonad colouration can be seen with both very low and high levels of echinenone and total carotenoid. The presence of 9'-cis-echinenone as the major carotenoid contributing to the pigmentation/colour of the gonad is an important observation in terms of developing artificial diets for urchin cultivation.

  6. Carotenoids production: microorganisms as source of natural dyes Produção de carotenoides: microrganismos como fonte de pigmentos naturais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Valduga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are natural dyes synthesized by plants, algae and microorganisms. Application in many sectors can be found, as food dyeing and supplementation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and animal feed. Recent investigations have shown their ability to reduce the risks for many degenerative diseases like cancer, heart diseases, cataract and macular degeneration. An advantage of microbial carotenoids is the fact that the cultivation in controlled conditions is not dependent of climate, season or soil composition. In this review the advances in bio-production of carotenoids are presented, discussing the main factors that influence the microbial production of these dyes in different systems.

  7. Composição de carotenoides em canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth Baehni Carotenoids composition of canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth Baehni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia da Silveira Agostini Costa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O canistel (P. campechiana é uma fruta nativa da América Central e México, ainda pouco conhecida no Brasil. Apresenta uma polpa amarelo-alaranjada, rica em carotenoides, que tem despertado interesse como potencial de vitamina A. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o teor de carotenoides e o valor provitamina A na polpa de canistel, assim como os teores de umidade e lipídeos na polpa e na semente. Os carotenoides foram separados por cromatografia em coluna aberta. O conteúdo de carotenoides totais foi de 226 ± 4 μg/g. Violaxantina e neoxantina foram os carotenóides predominantes, somando 196 ± 5 μg/g. seguidos por zetacaroteno, betacaroteno 5,6-epóxido, betacaroteno e fitoflueno. A semente foi a parte do fruto que apresentou maior teor de lipídeos totais, com 4,6 ± 0,2 %, e a polpa, 0,61 ± 0,03 %. Os resultados indicam que o canistel apresenta teores de carotenóides totais muito elevados e pode ser considerado uma boa fonte de provitamina A (59 ± 6 RAE/100g, se comparado com outras frutas normalmente consumidas. No entanto, os principais carotenoides encontrados em sua polpa são destituídos de atividade provitamina A.Canistel (Pouteria campechiana is a native fruit from Central America and Mexico. This fruit still not known in Brazil, presents an orange-yellow pulp rich in carotenoids, which has attracted interest as a potential source of vitamin A. The purpose of this study was to determine the carotenoids content and pro-vitamin A values in the pulp of canistel, as well as the percentage of moisture and lipids in the pulp and seeds. Carotenoids were separated by open column chromatography. The content of total carotenoids was 226 ± 4 μg/g. Violaxantin and neoxantin were the predominant carotenoids with 196 ± 5 μg/g followed by zeta-carotene, beta-carotene 5,6-epoxide, beta-carotene and phytofluene. The seeds presented higher levels of total lipids with 4.6 ± 0.2 %, while pulp had 0.61 ± 0.03 % of total lipid. These

  8. Age-Related Relationships between Innate Immunity and Plasma Carotenoids in an Obligate Avian Scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rull, Isabel; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso; Frías, Óscar; Blanco, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Variation in immunity is influenced by allocation trade-offs that are expected to change between age-classes as a result of the different environmental and physiological conditions that individuals encounter over their lifetime. One such trade-off occurs with carotenoids, which must be acquired with food and are involved in a variety of physiological functions. Nonetheless, relationships between immunity and carotenoids in species where these micronutrients are scarce due to diet are poorly studied. Among birds, vultures show the lowest concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a diet based on carrion. Here, we investigated variations in the relationships between innate immunity (hemagglutination by natural antibodies and hemolysis by complement proteins), pathogen infection and plasma carotenoids in nestling and adult griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) in the wild. Nestlings showed lower hemolysis, higher total carotenoid concentration and higher pathogen infection than adults. Hemolysis was negatively related to carotenoid concentration only in nestlings. A differential carotenoid allocation to immunity due to the incomplete development of the immune system of nestlings compared with adults is suggested linked to, or regardless of, potential differences in parasite infection, which requires experimental testing. We also found that individuals with more severe pathogen infections showed lower hemagglutination than those with a lower intensity infection irrespective of their age and carotenoid level. These results are consistent with the idea that intraspecific relationships between innate immunity and carotenoids may change across ontogeny, even in species lacking carotenoid-based coloration. Thus, even low concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a scavenger diet can be essential to the development and activation of the immune system in growing birds.

  9. Age-Related Relationships between Innate Immunity and Plasma Carotenoids in an Obligate Avian Scavenger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel López-Rull

    Full Text Available Variation in immunity is influenced by allocation trade-offs that are expected to change between age-classes as a result of the different environmental and physiological conditions that individuals encounter over their lifetime. One such trade-off occurs with carotenoids, which must be acquired with food and are involved in a variety of physiological functions. Nonetheless, relationships between immunity and carotenoids in species where these micronutrients are scarce due to diet are poorly studied. Among birds, vultures show the lowest concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a diet based on carrion. Here, we investigated variations in the relationships between innate immunity (hemagglutination by natural antibodies and hemolysis by complement proteins, pathogen infection and plasma carotenoids in nestling and adult griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus in the wild. Nestlings showed lower hemolysis, higher total carotenoid concentration and higher pathogen infection than adults. Hemolysis was negatively related to carotenoid concentration only in nestlings. A differential carotenoid allocation to immunity due to the incomplete development of the immune system of nestlings compared with adults is suggested linked to, or regardless of, potential differences in parasite infection, which requires experimental testing. We also found that individuals with more severe pathogen infections showed lower hemagglutination than those with a lower intensity infection irrespective of their age and carotenoid level. These results are consistent with the idea that intraspecific relationships between innate immunity and carotenoids may change across ontogeny, even in species lacking carotenoid-based coloration. Thus, even low concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a scavenger diet can be essential to the development and activation of the immune system in growing birds.

  10. KAROTENOID DARI MAKROALGAE DAN MIKROALGAE: POTENSI KESEHATAN APLIKASI DAN BIOTEKNOLOGI [Carotenoids from Macroalgae and Microalgae: Health Potential, Application and Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenawaty Limantara3

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Algae, both micro and macroalgae, is one of the largest producers of carotenoids. The major composition of carotenoid on algae are β-carotene, astaxanthin, luthein, zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, and fucoxanthin which have important roles for human health. Carotenoids were produced by several microalgae species such as Dunaliella sallina, Haemotococcus pluvialis, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Spirulina platensis, Nannnochloropsis oculata, and also from some macroalgae species such as Kappaphycus alvarezii, Sargassum sp, and Caulerpa sp. Carotenoids from algae has been proven as a powerful antioxidant and may prevent some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular, and cancer. Carotenoid also has been applied as a natural dye and dietary supplements. Biotechnology has been developed to increase the production of carotenoids from micro- and macroalgae. The large-scale cultivation of microalgae, either in open or closed system are shown to increase carotenoid production. During cultivation, some stress conditions can be specifically manipulated to optimize carotenoid production from microalgae.

  11. Relationship between Carotenoids, Retinol, and Estradiol Levels in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Marcello; de Vita, Francesca; Lauretani, Fulvio; Bandinelli, Stefania; Semba, Richard D.; Bartali, Benedetta; Cherubini, Antonio; Cappola, Anne R.; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background. In vitro evidence suggests anti-estrogenic properties for retinol and carotenoids, supporting a chemo-preventive role of these phytochemicals in estrogen-dependent cancers. During aging there are significant reductions in retinol and carotenoid concentrations, whereas estradiol levels decline during menopause and progressively increase from the age of 65. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis of a potential relationship between circulating levels of retinol, carotenoids, and estradiol (E2) in a cohort of late post-menopausal women. Methods. We examined 512 women ≥ 65 years from the InCHIANTI study. Retinol, α-caroten, β-caroten, β-criptoxantin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene levels were assayed at enrollment (1998–2000) by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Estradiol and testosterone (T) levels were assessed by Radioimmunometry (RIA) and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio (T/E2), as a proxy of aromatase activity, was also calculated. General linear models adjusted for age (Model 1) and further adjusted for other confounders including Body Mass Index (BMI) BMI, smoking, intake of energy, lipids, and vitamin A; C-Reactive Protein, insulin, total cholesterol, liver function, and testosterone (Model 2) were used to investigate the relationship between retinol, carotenoids, and E2 levels. To address the independent relationship between carotenoids and E2 levels, factors significantly associated with E2 in Model 2 were also included in a fully adjusted Model 3. Results. After adjustment for age, α-carotene (β ± SE = −0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.02) and β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.0007) were significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels. α-Carotene was also significantly and positively associated with T/E2 ratio (β ± SE = 0.07 ± 0.03, p = 0.01). After adjustment for other confounders (Model 2), the inverse relationship between α-carotene (β ± SE = −1.59 ± 0.61, p = 0.01), β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.29 ± 0.08, p

  12. Relationship between Carotenoids, Retinol, and Estradiol Levels in Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maggio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In vitro evidence suggests anti-estrogenic properties for retinol and carotenoids, supporting a chemo-preventive role of these phytochemicals in estrogen-dependent cancers. During aging there are significant reductions in retinol and carotenoid concentrations, whereas estradiol levels decline during menopause and progressively increase from the age of 65. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis of a potential relationship between circulating levels of retinol, carotenoids, and estradiol (E2 in a cohort of late post-menopausal women. Methods. We examined 512 women ≥ 65 years from the InCHIANTI study. Retinol, α-caroten, β-caroten, β-criptoxantin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene levels were assayed at enrollment (1998–2000 by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Estradiol and testosterone (T levels were assessed by Radioimmunometry (RIA and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio (T/E2, as a proxy of aromatase activity, was also calculated. General linear models adjusted for age (Model 1 and further adjusted for other confounders including Body Mass Index (BMI BMI, smoking, intake of energy, lipids, and vitamin A; C-Reactive Protein, insulin, total cholesterol, liver function, and testosterone (Model 2 were used to investigate the relationship between retinol, carotenoids, and E2 levels. To address the independent relationship between carotenoids and E2 levels, factors significantly associated with E2 in Model 2 were also included in a fully adjusted Model 3. Results. After adjustment for age, α-carotene (β ± SE = −0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.02 and β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.0007 were significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels. α-Carotene was also significantly and positively associated with T/E2 ratio (β ± SE = 0.07 ± 0.03, p = 0.01. After adjustment for other confounders (Model 2, the inverse relationship between α-carotene (β ± SE = −1.59 ± 0.61, p = 0.01, β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.29

  13. Photooxidative stress stimulates illegitimate recombination and mutability in carotenoid-less mutants of Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchane, S; Picaud, M; Vernotte, C; Astier, C

    1997-08-01

    Carotenoids are essential to protection against photooxidative damage in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. In a previous study, we reported the disruption of crtD and crtC carotenoid genes in the purple bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus, resulting in mutants that synthesized carotenoid intermediates. Here, carotenoid-less mutants have been constructed by disruption of the crtB gene. To study the biological role of carotenoids in photoprotection, the wild-type and the three carotenoid mutants were grown under different conditions. When exposed to photooxidative stress, only the carotenoid-less strains (crtB-) gave rise with a high frequency to four classes of mutants. In the first class, carotenoid biosynthesis was partially restored. The second class corresponded to photosynthetic-deficient mutants. The third class corresponded to mutants in which the LHI antenna level was decreased. In the fourth class, synthesis of the photosynthetic apparatus was inhibited only in aerobiosis. Molecular analyses indicated that the oxidative stress induced mutations and illegitimate recombination. Illegitimate recombination events produced either functional or non-functional chimeric genes. The R. gelatinosus crtB- strain could be very useful for studies of the SOS response and of illegitimate recombination induced by oxidants in bacteria.

  14. Critical assessment of three high performance liquid chromatography analytical methods for food carotenoid quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, M.G.; Oliveira, L.; Camoes, M.F.G.F.C.; Nunes, B.; Versloot, P.; Hulshof, P.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Three sets of extraction/saponification/HPLC conditions for food carotenoid quantification were technically and economically compared. Samples were analysed for carotenoids a-carotene, ß-carotene, ß-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene, and zeaxanthin. All methods demonstrated good performance in the ana

  15. Carotenoid composition of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), determined by HPLC-PDA-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, A F; de Rosso, V V; Mercadante, A Z

    2009-06-01

    Carotenoids are pigments responsible for the yellow-reddish color of many foods and are related to important functions and physiological actions, preventing several chronic-degenerative diseases. The objective of this study was to confirm the carotenoid composition of jackfruit by high-performance liquid chromatography connected to photodiode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-PDA-MS/MS). The main carotenoids were all-trans-lutein (24-44%), all-trans-beta-carotene (24-30%), all-trans-neoxanthin (4-19%), 9-cis-neoxanthin (4-9%) and 9-cis-violaxanthin (4-10%). Either qualitative or quantitative differences, mainly related to the lutein proportion, were found among three batches of jackfruit. Since the fruits from batch A showed significantly lower contents for almost all carotenoids, it also had the lowest total carotenoid content (34.1 microg/100 g) and provitamin A value, whereas the total carotenoid ranged from 129.0 to 150.3 microg/100 g in the other batches. The provitamin A values from batches B and C were 3.3 and 4.3 microg RAE/100 g, respectively. The carotenoid composition of jackfruit was successfully determined, where 14 of the 18 identified carotenoids were reported for first time. Differences among batches may be due to genetic and/or agricultural factors.

  16. [Conformity of cancerous diagnosis of serum-fluorimetry under the influence of carotenoid fluorescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, J; Zhang, Y; Ren, X; Ma, H; Ren, W; Xu, X; Cao, B; Li, W

    2000-08-01

    We observed that carotenoid had sensitization for fluorescence of porphyrin as cancerous diagnostic technology was applied in clinic by serum-fluorimetry. The Forster theory was used in order to analyse sensitized fluorescence between carotenoid and porphyrin in this paper. Transfer characteristic between energy donor and energy acceptor was calculated and discussed its influence on cancerous diagnosis.

  17. Analysis of carotenoid composition in petals of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Sanae; Maoka, Takashi; Sumitomo, Katsuhiko; Ohmiya, Akemi

    2005-11-01

    Nineteen carotenoids were identified in extracts of petals of orange- and yellow-flowered cultivars of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.). Ten carotenoids were unique to orange-flowered cultivars. The UV-vis absorption maxima of these ten carotenoids were at longer wavelengths than that of flavoxanthin, the main carotenoid of calendula petals, and it is clear that these carotenoids are responsible for the orange color of the petals. Six carotenoids had a cis structure at C-5 (C-5'), and it is conceivable that these (5Z)-carotenoids are enzymatically isomerized at C-5 in a pathway that diverges from the main carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Among them, (5Z,9Z)-lycopene (1), (5Z,9Z,5'Z,9'Z)-lycopene (3), (5'Z)-gamma-carotene (4), and (5'Z,9'Z)-rubixanthin (5) has never before been identified. Additionally, (5Z,9Z,5'Z)-lycopene (2) has been reported only as a synthesized compound.

  18. Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-11-19

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

  19. Calorimetric studies of the effect of -carotenoids on the thermotropic phase behavior of phosphatidylcholine bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Widomska, Justyna; Kostecka-Gugała, Anna; Latowski, Dariusz; Gruszecki, Wiesław I.; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Carotenoid geometry is a factor that determines their solubility and orientation in the lipid memebrane as well as antioxidant capacities and bioavailability. The effects of the cis-isomers of carotenoids (zeaxanthin and ?-carotene) on the thermotropic properties of lipid membranes formed with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry. The results were compared with the ef...

  20. Dietary carotenoids and risk of colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männistö, S.; Yaun, S.S.; Hunter, D.J.; Spiegelman, D.; Adami, H.O.; Albanes, D.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Buring, J.E.; Cerhan, J.R.; Colditz, G.A.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Fuchs, C.S.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Harnack, L.; Leitzmann, M.; McCullough, M.L.; Miller, A.B.; Rohan, T.E.; Schatzkin, A.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Zhang, S.M.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids have been hypothesized to protect against epithelial cancers. The authors analyzed the associations between intakes of specific carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin, and lycopene) and risk of colorectal cancer using the primary data

  1. Carotenoid-rich bananas: a potential food source for alleviating vitamin A deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, Lois; Darnton-Hill, Ian; Coyne, Terry; Fitzgerald, Maureen H; Marks, Geoffrey C

    2003-12-01

    This review article points out that bananas are an important food for many people in the world. Thus, banana cultivars rich in provitamin A carotenoids may offer a potential food source for alleviating vitamin A deficiency, particularly in developing countries. Many factors are associated with the presently known food sources of vitamin A that limit their effectiveness in improving vitamin A status. Acceptable carotenoid-rich banana cultivars have been identified in Micronesia, and some carotenoid-rich bananas have been identified elsewhere. Bananas are an ideal food for young children and families for many regions of the world, because of their sweetness, texture, portion size, familiarity, availability, convenience, versatility, and cost. Foods containing high levels of carotenoids have been shown to protect against chronic disease, including certain cancers, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Because the coloration of the edible flesh of the banana appears to be a good indicator of likely carotenoid content, it may be possible to develop a simple method for selecting carotenoid-rich banana cultivars in the community. Research is needed on the identification of carotenoid-rich cultivars, targeting those areas of the world where bananas are a major staple food; investigating factors affecting production, consumption, and acceptability; and determining the impact that carotenoid-rich bananas may have on improving vitamin A status. Based on these results, interventions should be undertaken for initiating or increasing homestead and commercial production.

  2. Fruit over sunbed: carotenoid skin colouration is found more attractive than melanin colouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Carmen E; Perrett, David I

    2015-01-01

    Skin colouration appears to play a pivotal part in facial attractiveness. Skin yellowness contributes to an attractive appearance and is influenced both by dietary carotenoids and by melanin. While both increased carotenoid colouration and increased melanin colouration enhance apparent health in Caucasian faces by increasing skin yellowness, it remains unclear, firstly, whether both pigments contribute to attractiveness judgements, secondly, whether one pigment is clearly preferred over the other, and thirdly, whether these effects depend on the sex of the face. Here, in three studies, we examine these questions using controlled facial stimuli transformed to be either high or low in (a) carotenoid colouration, or (b) melanin colouration. We show, firstly, that both increased carotenoid colouration and increased melanin colouration are found attractive compared to lower levels of these pigments. Secondly, we show that carotenoid colouration is consistently preferred over melanin colouration when levels of colouration are matched. In addition, we find an effect of the sex of stimuli with stronger preferences for carotenoids over melanin in female compared to male faces, irrespective of the sex of the observer. These results are interpreted as reflecting preferences for sex-typical skin colouration: men have darker skin than women and high melanization in male faces may further enhance this masculine trait, thus carotenoid colouration is not less desirable, but melanin colouration is relatively more desirable in males compared to females. Taken together, our findings provide further support for a carotenoid-linked health-signalling system that is highly important in mate choice.

  3. Context-dependent effects of carotenoid supplementation on reproduction in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Briga, Michael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid-dependent sexual coloration is one of the best-studied sexual signals, but how the honesty of such signals is maintained remains uncertain. The main hypotheses focus on acquisition limits and physiological use of carotenoids in immune function and regulating oxidative stress. A hypothesis

  4. A single amino acid substitution in an ORANGE protein promotes carotenoid overaccumulation in arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are crucial for plant growth and human health. The finding of ORANGE (OR) protein as a pivotal regulator of carotenogenesis offers a unique opportunity to comprehensively understand the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid accumulation and develop crops with enhanced nutritional quality. ...

  5. Tomato fruit carotenoid biosynthesis is adjusted to actual ripening progression by a light-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Briardo; D'Andrea, Lucio; Ruiz-Sola, M Aguila; Botterweg, Esther; Pulido, Pablo; Andilla, Jordi; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds that are essential for plants to protect the photosynthetic apparatus against excess light. They also function as health-promoting natural pigments that provide colors to ripe fruit, promoting seed dispersal by animals. Work in Arabidopsis thaliana unveiled that transcription factors of the phytochrome-interacting factor (PIF) family regulate carotenoid gene expression in response to environmental signals (i.e. light and temperature), including those created when sunlight reflects from or passes though nearby vegetation or canopy (referred to as shade). Here we show that PIFs use a virtually identical mechanism to modulate carotenoid biosynthesis during fruit ripening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). However, instead of integrating environmental information, PIF-mediated signaling pathways appear to fulfill a completely new function in the fruit. As tomatoes ripen, they turn from green to red due to chlorophyll breakdown and carotenoid accumulation. When sunlight passes through the flesh of green fruit, a self-shading effect within the tissue maintains high levels of PIFs that directly repress the master gene of the fruit carotenoid pathway, preventing undue production of carotenoids. This effect is attenuated as chlorophyll degrades, causing degradation of PIF proteins and boosting carotenoid biosynthesis as ripening progresses. Thus, shade signaling components may have been co-opted in tomato fruit to provide information on the actual stage of ripening (based on the pigment profile of the fruit at each moment) and thus finely coordinate fruit color change. We show how this mechanism may be manipulated to obtain carotenoid-enriched fruits.

  6. Separation of the Carotenoid Bixin from Annatto Seeds Using Thin-Layer and Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James V.; Ramos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment the carotenoid bixin is isolated from annatto ("Bixa orellana") seeds using column chromatography. The experiment has several key advantages over previous pigment separation experiments. First, unlike other experiments significant quantities of the carotenoid (typically 20 to 25 mg) can be isolated from small quantities of plant…

  7. Regulatory control of high levels of carotenoid accumulation in potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.; McQuinn, R.; Fei, Z.; Wolters, A.M.A.; Eck, van J.; Brown, C.; Giovannoni, J.J.; Li, L.

    2011-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers contain a wide range of carotenoid contents. To decipher the key factors controlling carotenoid levels in tubers, four potato lines (Atlantic, Désirée, 91E22 and POR03) were examined by a combination of biochemical, molecular and genomics approaches. These lines

  8. Carotenoid profile and retention in yellow-, purple- and red-fleshed potatoes after thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotíková, Zora; Šulc, Miloslav; Lachman, Jaromír; Pivec, Vladimír; Orsák, Matyáš; Hamouz, Karel

    2016-04-15

    This research aimed to investigate the effect of thermal processing on carotenoid profile, quantity and stability in 22 colour-fleshed potato cultivars grown in the Czech Republic. The total of nine carotenoids was analysed by HPLC using a C30 column and PDA detection. The total carotenoid content for all cultivars ranged from 1.44 to 40.13 μg/g DM. Yellow cultivars showed a much higher average total carotenoid content (26.22 μg/g DM) when compared to red/purple-fleshed potatoes (5.69 μg/g DM). Yellow cultivars were dominated by antheraxanthin, whereas neoxanthin was the main carotenoid in red/purple cultivars. Thermal processing significantly impacted all potato cultivars. Boiling decreased the total carotenoids by 92% compared to baking (88%). Lutein was the most stable carotenoid against thermal processing (decreased by 24-43%) followed by β-carotene (decreased by 78-83%); other carotenoids were degraded nearly completely. Increased formation of (Z)-isomers by thermal processing has not been confirmed.

  9. Host-related factors explaining interindividual variability of carotenoid bioavailability and tissue concentrations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohn, Torsten; Desmarchelier, Charles; Dragsted, Lars O.; Nielsen, Charlotte S.; Stahl, Wilhelm; Rühl, Ralph; Keijer, Jaap; Borel, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Carotenoid dietary intake and their endogenous levels have been associated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases. There are indications that carotenoid bioavailability depends, in addition to the food matrix, on host factors. These include diseases (e.g. colitis), life-style habits (e

  10. More than meets the eye: from carotenoid biosynthesis to new insights into apocarotenoid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a class of isoprenoid compounds synthesized almost exclusively in plants and are involved in a myriad of roles including the provision of flower and fruit pigmentation for the attraction of pollinators and seed dispersing organisms. While carotenoids are essential throughout plant de...

  11. Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Sy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups. In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin. Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit FeII-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s, possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

  12. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both si

  13. Analysis of Carotenoid Production by Halorubrum sp. TBZ126; an Extremely Halophilic Archeon from Urmia Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziri, Davood; Hamidi, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Salar; Tarhriz, Vahideh; Maleki Zanjani, Bahram; Nazemyieh, Hossein; Hejazi, Mohammd Amin; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotenoids are of great interest in many scientific disciplines because of their wide distribution, diverse functions and interesting properties. The present report describes a new natural source for carotenoid production. Methods: Halorubrum sp., TBZ126, an extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from Urmia Lack following culture of water sample on marine agar medium and incubation at 30 °C. Then single colonies were cultivated in broth media. After that the cells were collected and carotenoids were extracted with acetone-methanol (7:3 v/v). The identification of carotenoids was performed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) in the presence of antimony pentachloride (SbCl5). The production profile was analyzed using liquid-chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) techniques. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolate were carried out and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: LC-MS analytical results revealed that produced carotenoids are bacterioruberin, lycopene and β-carotene. Bacterioruberin was found to be the predominant produced carotenoid. 16S rRNA analysis showed that TBZ126 has 100% similarity with Halorubrum chaoviator Halo-G*T (AM048786). Conclusion: Halorubrum sp. TBZ126, isolated from Urmia Lake has high capacity in the production of carotenoids. This extremely halophilic archaeon could be considered as a prokaryotic candidate for carotenoid production source for future studies. PMID:24409411

  14. Analysis of Carotenoid Production by Halorubrum sp. TBZ126; an Extremely Halophilic Archeon from Urmia Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Naziri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Carotenoids are of great interest in many scientific disciplines because of their wide distribution, diverse functions and interesting properties. The present report describes a new natural source for carotenoid production. Methods: Halorubrum sp., TBZ126, an extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from Urmia Lack following culture of water sample on marine agar medium and incubation at 30 °C. Then single colonies were cultivated in broth media. After that the cells were collected and carotenoids were extracted with acetone-methanol (7:3 v/v. The identification of carotenoids was performed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC in the presence of antimony pentachloride (SbCl5. The production profile was analyzed using liquid-chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS techniques. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolate were carried out and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: LC-MS analytical results revealed that produced carotenoids are bacterioruberin, lycopene and β-carotene. Bacterioruberin was found to be the predominant produced carotenoid. 16S rRNA analysis showed that TBZ126 has 100% similarity with Halorubrum chaoviator Halo-G*T (AM048786. Conclusion: Halorubrum sp. TBZ126, isolated from Urmia Lake has high capacity in the production of carotenoids. This extremely halophilic archaeon could be considered as a prokaryotic candidate for carotenoid production source for future studies.

  15. CAROTENOID RETENTION IN MINIMALLY PROCESSED BIOFORTIFIED GREEN CORN STORED UNDER RETAIL MARKETING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Alves Barbosa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Storing processed food products can cause alterations in their chemical compositions. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate carotenoid retention in the kernels of minimally processed normal and vitamin A precursor (proVA-biofortified green corn ears that were packaged in polystyrene trays covered with commercial film or in multilayered polynylon packaging material and were stored. Throughout the storage period, the carotenoids were extracted from the corn kernels using organic solvents and were quantified using HPLC. A completely factorial design including three factors (cultivar, packaging and storage period was applied for analysis. The green kernels of maize cultivars BRS1030 and BRS4104 exhibited similar carotenoid profiles, with zeaxanthin being the main carotenoid. Higher concentrations of the carotenoids lutein, β-cryptoxanthin, and β-carotene, the total carotenoids and the total vitamin A precursor carotenoids were detected in the green kernels of the biofortified BRS4104 maize. The packaging method did not affect carotenoid retention in the kernels of minimally processed green corn ears during the storage period.

  16. Dietary Carotenoids and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Seven Cohort Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männistö, S.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Albanes, D.; Anderson, K.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Cerhan, J.R.; Colditz, G.; Feskanich, D.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Miller, A.B.; Rohan, T.E.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Hunter, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intervention trials with supplemental β-carotene have observed either no effect or a harmful effect on lung cancer risk. Because food composition databases for specific carotenoids have only become available recently, epidemiological evidence relating usual dietary levels of these carotenoids with l

  17. Predictors of adipose tissue carotenoid and retinol levels in nine countries: The EURAMIC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Virtanen, S.M.; Veer, P. van 't; Kok, F.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Aro, A.

    1996-01-01

    The adipose tissue carotenoid (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene) and retinol levels and their predictors were determined in 686 male and 339 female middle-aged and elderly subjects from eight European countries and Israel during the years 1991 to 1992. Adipose tissue carotenoid levels in

  18. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoes, Jan C; Sandmann, Gerhard; Visser, Hans; Diaz, Maria; van Mossel, Minca; van Ooyen, Albert J J

    2003-07-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both single and double crossover events, resulting in non-carotenoid-producing transformants. In addition, the crtYB gene, linked to either its homologous or a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter, was overexpressed in the wild type and a beta-carotene-accumulating mutant of X. dendrorhous. In several transformants containing multiple copies of the crtYB gene, the total carotenoid content was higher than in the control strain. This increase was mainly due to an increase of the beta-carotene and echinone content, whereas the total content of astaxanthin was unaffected or even lower. Overexpression of the phytoene synthase-encoding gene (crtI) had a large impact on the ratio between mono- and bicyclic carotenoids. Furthermore, we showed that in metabolic engineered X. dendrorhous strains, the competition between the enzymes phytoene desaturase and lycopene cyclase for lycopene governs the metabolic flux either via beta-carotene to astaxanthin or via 3,4-didehydrolycopene to 3-hydroxy-3'-4'-didehydro-beta-psi-caroten-4-one (HDCO). The monocylic carotenoid torulene and HDCO, normally produced as minority carotenoids, were the main carotenoids produced in these strains.

  19. Isolation of a novel carotenoid, OH-chlorobactene glucoside hexadecanoate, and related rare carotenoids from Rhodococcus sp. CIP and their antioxidative activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Ayako; Kasahara, Asami; Mastuoka, Shoko; Gassel, Sören; Sandmann, Gerhard; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    In the course of screening for antioxidative carotenoids from bacteria, we isolated and identified a novel carotenoid, OH-chlorobactene glucoside hexadecanoate (4), and rare carotenoids, OH-chlorobactene glucoside (1), OH-γ-carotene glucoside (2) and OH-4-keto-γ-carotene glucoside hexadecanoate (3) from Rhodococcus sp. CIP. The singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) quenching model of these carotenoids showed potent antioxidative activities IC(50) 14.6 µM for OH-chlorobactene glucoside hexadecanoate (4), 6.5 µM for OH-chlorobactene glucoside (1), 9.9 µM for OH-γ-carotene glucoside (2) and 7.3 µM for OH-4-keto-γ-carotene glucoside hexadecanoate (3).

  20. Spectroscopic properties of the triple bond carotenoid alloxanthin

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Keşan, Gürkan; Trsková, Eliška; Sobotka, Roman; Kaňa, Radek; Fuciman, Marcel; Polívka, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Alloxanthin, which has two triple bonds within its backbone, was studied by steady-state and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopies. Alloxanthin demonstrates an S2 energy comparable to its non-triple bond homolog, zeaxanthin, while the S1 lifetime of 19 ps is markedly longer than that of zeaxanthin (9 ps). Along with corroborating quantum chemistry calculations, the results show that the long-lived S1 state of alloxanthin, which typically corresponds to the dynamic of a shorter carotenoid backbone, implies the triple bond isolates the conjugation of the backbone, increasing the S1 state energy and diminishing the S1-S2 energy gap.

  1. Dizziness and Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    AUDIOLOGY Dizziness and Balance Inform ation Seri es Our balance system helps us walk, run, and move without falling. ... if I have a problem with balance or dizziness? It is important to see your doctor if ...

  2. Identification of catalytically important residues of the carotenoid 1,2-hydratases from Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiseni, A.; Otten, L.G.; Arends, I.W.C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoid 1,2-hydratases (CrtC) catalyze the selective addition of water to an isolated carbon–carbon double bond. Although their involvement in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well understood, little is known about the mechanism by which these hydratases transform carotenoids such as lycope

  3. Arabidopsis OR proteins are the major post-transcriptional regulators of phytoene synthase in mediating carotenoid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are indispensable natural pigments to plants and humans. Phytoene synthase (PSY), the rate-limiting enzyme in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, and ORANGE (OR), a regulator of chromoplast differentiation and enhancer of carotenoid biosynthesis, represent two key proteins that control caro...

  4. Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Carotenoids Extracted from Dried Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Hernández-Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406±4 μg/g, pasilla 2933±1 μg/g, and ancho 1437±6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH+ cation (24.2%. They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief.

  5. Antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory effects of carotenoids extracted from dried pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortega, Marcela; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406 ± 4 μg/g, pasilla 2933 ± 1 μg/g, and ancho 1437 ± 6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH(+) cation (24.2%). They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief.

  6. The Quest for Golden Bananas: Investigating Carotenoid Regulation in a Fe'i Group Musa Cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buah, Stephen; Mlalazi, Bulukani; Khanna, Harjeet; Dale, James L; Mortimer, Cara L

    2016-04-27

    The regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in a high-carotenoid-accumulating Fe'i group Musa cultivar, "Asupina", has been examined and compared to that of a low-carotenoid-accumulating cultivar, "Cavendish", to understand the molecular basis underlying carotenogenesis during banana fruit development. Comparisons in the accumulation of carotenoid species, expression of isoprenoid genes, and product sequestration are reported. Key differences between the cultivars include greater carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (CCD4) expression in "Cavendish" and the conversion of amyloplasts to chromoplasts during fruit ripening in "Asupina". Chromoplast development coincided with a reduction in dry matter content and fruit firmness. Chromoplasts were not observed in "Cavendish" fruits. Such information should provide important insights for future developments in the biofortification and breeding of banana.

  7. Host-related factors explaining interindividual variability of carotenoid bioavailability and tissue concentrations in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Torsten; Desmarchelier, Charles; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2017-01-01

    Carotenoid dietary intake and their endogenous levels have been associated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases. There are indications that carotenoid bioavailability depends, in addition to the food matrix, on host factors. These include diseases (e.g. colitis), life-style habits (e.......g. smoking), gender and age, as well as genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms that govern carotenoid metabolism. These are expected to explain interindividual differences that contribute to carotenoid uptake, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and therefore possibly also...... their association with disease risk. For instance, digestion enzymes fostering micellization (PNLIP, CES), expression of uptake/efflux transporters (SRARB1, CD36, NPC1L1), cleavage enzymes (BCO1/2), intracellular transporters (FABP2), secretion into chylomicrons (APOB, MTTP), carotenoid metabolism in the blood...

  8. New and Rare Carotenoids Isolated from Marine Bacteria and Their Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Shindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria have not been examined as extensively as land bacteria. We screened carotenoids from orange or red pigments-producing marine bacteria belonging to rare or novel species. The new acyclic carotenoids with a C30 aglycone, diapolycopenedioc acid xylosylesters A–C and methyl 5-glucosyl-5,6-dihydro-apo-4,4′-lycopenoate, were isolated from the novel Gram-negative bacterium Rubritalea squalenifaciens, which belongs to phylum Verrucomicrobia, as well as the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Planococcus maritimus strain iso-3 belonging to the class Bacilli, phylum Firmicutes, respectively. The rare monocyclic C40 carotenoids, (3R-saproxanthin and (3R,2′S-myxol, were isolated from novel species of Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes. In this review, we report the structures and antioxidant activities of these carotenoids, and consider relationships between bacterial phyla and carotenoid structures.

  9. Genetic manipulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Maresca, Julia A; Yunker, Colleen E

    2004-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a strict anaerobe and an obligate photoautotroph. On the basis of sequence similarity with known enzymes or sequence motifs, nine open reading frames encoding putative enzymes of carotenoid biosynthesis were identified in the genome sequence of C....... tepidum, and all nine genes were inactivated. Analysis of the carotenoid composition in the resulting mutants allowed the genes encoding the following six enzymes to be identified: phytoene synthase (crtB/CT1386), phytoene desaturase (crtP/CT0807), zeta-carotene desaturase (crtQ/CT1414), gamma......-carotene desaturase (crtU/CT0323), carotenoid 1',2'-hydratase (crtC/CT0301), and carotenoid cis-trans isomerase (crtH/CT0649). Three mutants (CT0180, CT1357, and CT1416 mutants) did not exhibit a discernible phenotype. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in C. tepidum is similar to that in cyanobacteria and plants...

  10. Immune function is related to adult carotenoid and bile pigment levels, but not to dietary carotenoid access during development, in female mallard ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael W; McGraw, Kevin J

    2013-07-15

    Immune function can be modulated by multiple physiological factors, including nutrition and reproductive state. Because these factors can vary throughout an individual's lifetime as a result of environmental conditions (affecting nutrition) or life-history stage (e.g. entering the adult reproduction stage), we must carefully examine the degree to which developmental versus adult conditions shape performance of the immune system. We investigated how variation in dietary access to carotenoid pigments - a class of molecules with immunostimulatory properties that females deposit into egg yolks - during three different developmental time points affected adult immunological and reproductive traits in female mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). In males and females of other avian species, carotenoid access during development affects carotenoid assimilation ability, adult sexual ornamentation and immune function, while carotenoid access during adulthood can increase immune response and reproductive investment (e.g. egg-laying capacity, biliverdin deposition in eggshells). We failed to detect effects of developmental carotenoid supplementation on adult immune function [phytohemagglutinin-induced cutaneous immune response, antibody production in response to the novel antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), or oxidative burst, assessed by changes in circulating nitric oxide levels], carotenoid-pigmented beak coloration, ovarian development, circulating carotenoid levels or concentration of bile pigments in the gall bladder. However, we did uncover positive relationships between circulating carotenoid levels during adulthood and KLH-specific antibody production, and a negative relationship between biliverdin concentration in bile and KLH-specific antibody production. These results are consistent with the view that adult physiological parameters better predict current immune function than do developmental conditions, and highlight a possible, previously unstudied relationship

  11. Long range absolute distance measurement based on femtosecond laser balanced optical cross-correlation%基于飞秒激光平衡光学互相关的任意长绝对距离测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦鹏; 陈伟; 宋有建; 胡明列; 柴路; 王清月

    2012-01-01

    大尺度、高精度的绝对距离测量在卫星编队飞行、自由空间通信、大尺寸工件检测等前沿应用中具有举足轻重的作用.本文利用飞秒激光脉冲的飞行时间方法对一段52m的大气传输路径进行了绝对距离测量.通过平衡光学互相关技术探测目标反射脉冲与参考脉冲之间的时间误差,并利用得到的平衡互相关电压信号反馈控制谐振腔长,将脉冲间隔的整数倍精确锁定至往返距离,最后由飞秒激光的重复频率确定目标反射脉冲的飞行时间.这一测量方案有效地避免了直接光电探测造成的飞行时间分辨率的损失.实验中,采用工作在1.04μm波段的高重复频率掺Yb锁模光纤激光器作为飞秒激光源,在1S的平均时间下获得了12nm的测量精度.%High-precision distance measurement in a long range is critical for many advanced applications, such as satellite formation flying, free space optical communication and large scale machining. A 52 m absolute distance measurement in free space based on time of flight of femtosecond laser is demonstrated. The timing offset between target-reflected and the reference pulses is precisely characterized by balanced optical cross-correlation method. The balanced cross correlation signal is used for the feedback control of the cavity length and tightly locks the distance under test to multiple of pulse separation. As a result, the time of flight of the target-reflected pulse is determined by the repetition rate of the femtosecond laser, which effectively avoids the loss of timing resolution caused by direct access of pulse time-of-flight from photo-detection. In the experiment, a Yb -doped high repetition rate mode-locked fiber laser working at 1.04 μm is used as a femtosecond laser source, and a measurement precision of t2 nm is achieved in an average time of one second.

  12. Liposome as a delivery system for carotenoids: comparative antioxidant activity of carotenoids as measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power, DPPH assay and lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chen; Xue, Jin; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Shuqin

    2014-07-16

    This study was conducted to understand how carotenoids exerted antioxidant activity after encapsulation in a liposome delivery system, for food application. Three assays were selected to achieve a wide range of technical principles, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant powder (FRAP), and lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity (LPIC) during liposome preparation, auto-oxidation, or when induced by ferric iron/ascorbate. The antioxidant activity of carotenoids was measured either after they were mixed with preformed liposomes or after their incorporation into the liposomal system. Whatever the antioxidant model was, carotenoids displayed different antioxidant activities in suspension and in liposomes. The encapsulation could enhance the DPPH scavenging and FRAP activities of carotenoids. The strongest antioxidant activity was observed with lutein, followed by β-carotene, lycopene, and canthaxanthin. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation assay revealed a mutually protective relationship: the incorporation of either lutein or β-carotene not only exerts strong LPIC, but also protects them against pro-oxidation elements; however, the LPIC of lycopene and canthaxanthin on liposomes was weak or a pro-oxidation effect even appeared, concomitantly leading to the considerable depletion of these encapsulated carotenoids. The antioxidant activity of carotenoids after liposome encapsulation was not only related to their chemical reactivity, but also to their incorporation efficiencies into liposomal membrane and modulating effects on the membrane properties.

  13. Assembly of functional photosystem complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids from the spirilloxanthin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shuang C; Mothersole, David J; Dilbeck, Preston; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Pu; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Grayson, Katie J; Jackson, Philip J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Li, Ying; Holten, Dewey; Neil Hunter, C

    2015-02-01

    Carotenoids protect the photosynthetic apparatus against harmful radicals arising from the presence of both light and oxygen. They also act as accessory pigments for harvesting solar energy, and are required for stable assembly of many light-harvesting complexes. In the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides phytoene desaturase (CrtI) catalyses three sequential desaturations of the colourless carotenoid phytoene, extending the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, N, from three to nine and producing the yellow carotenoid neurosporene; subsequent modifications produce the yellow/red carotenoids spheroidene/spheroidenone (N=10/11). Genomic crtI replacements were used to swap the native three-step Rba. sphaeroides CrtI for the four-step Pantoea agglomerans enzyme, which re-routed carotenoid biosynthesis and culminated in the production of 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin under semi-aerobic conditions. The new carotenoid pathway was elucidated using a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Premature termination of this new pathway by inactivating crtC or crtD produced strains with lycopene or rhodopin as major carotenoids. All of the spirilloxanthin series carotenoids are accepted by the assembly pathways for LH2 and RC-LH1-PufX complexes. The efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer for 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin (15 conjugated CC bonds; N=15) in LH2 complexes is low, at 35%. High energy transfer efficiencies were obtained for neurosporene (N=9; 94%), spheroidene (N=10; 96%) and spheroidenone (N=11; 95%), whereas intermediate values were measured for lycopene (N=11; 64%), rhodopin (N=11; 62%) and spirilloxanthin (N=13; 39%). The variety and stability of these novel Rba. sphaeroides antenna complexes make them useful experimental models for investigating the energy transfer dynamics of carotenoids in bacterial photosynthesis.

  14. The Or Gene Enhances Carotenoid Accumulation and Stability During Post-Harvest Storage of Potato Tubers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Mark Failla; Theodore W.Thannhauser; Yong Yang; Qiang Xu; Katherine Owsiany; Ralf Welsch; Chureeporn Chitchumroonchokchai; Shan Lu; Joyce Van Eck; Xiu-Xin Deng

    2012-01-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality.To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability,we investigated transgenic potato tubers that expressed the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene.We found that the Or transgene not only promoted retention of β-carotene level,but also continuously stimulated its accumulation during 5 months of cold storage.In contrast,no increased levels of carotenoids were observed in the tubers of vector-only controls or a yellowflesh variety during the same period of storage.The increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be associated with the formation of lipoprotein-carotenoid sequestering structures,as well as with the enhanced abundance of phytoene synthase,a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway.Furthermore,the provitamin A carotenoids stored were shown to be stable during simulated digestion and accessible for uptake by human intestinal absorptive cells.Proteomic analysis identified three major functional groups of proteins (i.e.heat shock proteins,glutathione-S-transferases,and carbohydrate metabolic proteins) that are potentially important in the Or-regulated carotenoid accumulation.Our results show that regulation of carotenoid sequestration capacity is an important mechanism by which carotenoid stability is regulated.Our findings suggest that induction of a proper sink structure formation in staple crops may provide the crops with a unique ability to promote and/or stabilize provitamin A accumulation during plant growth and post-harvest storage.

  15. An SCD gene from the Mollusca and its upregulation in carotenoid-enriched scallops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Ning, Xianhui; Dou, Jinzhuang; Yu, Qian; Wang, Shuyue; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Shi; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-06-10

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of red, orange, and yellow pigments that act as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Animals can only obtain carotenoids through their diets. Amongst the carotenoids identified in nature, over one third are of marine origin, but current research on carotenoid absorption in marine species is limited. Bivalves possess an adductor muscle, which is normally white in scallops. However, a new variety of Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis), the 'Haida golden scallop', can be distinguished by its adductor muscle's orange colour, which is caused by carotenoid accumulation. Studying the genes related to carotenoid accumulation in this scallop could benefit our understanding of the mechanisms underlying carotenoid absorption in marine organisms, and it could further improve scallop breeding for carotenoid content. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of monounsaturated fatty acids, which enhance carotenoid absorption. Here, the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of the SCD gene from the Yesso scallop (PySCD) were obtained. The PySCD gene consisted of four exons and three introns, and it contained a 990-bp open reading frame encoding 329 amino acids. It was ubiquitously expressed in adult tissues, embryos and larvae of both white Yesso scallops and 'Haida golden' scallops. Although the expression pattern of PySCD in both types of scallops was similar, significantly more PySCD transcripts were detected in the 'Haida golden' scallops than in the white scallops. Elevated PySCD expression was found in tissues including the adductor muscle, digestive gland, and gonad, as well as in veliger larvae. This study represents the first characterisation of an SCD gene from the Mollusca. Our data imply that PySCD functions in multiple biological processes, and it might be involved in carotenoid accumulation.

  16. Carotenoid supplementation positively affects the expression of a non-visual sexual signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain J-M Van Hout

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of pigments which are widely used by animals for the expression of yellow-to-red colour signals, such as bill or plumage colour. Since they also have been shown to promote immunocompetence and to function as antioxidants, many studies have investigated a potential allocation trade-off with respect to carotenoid-based signals within the context of sexual selection. Although an effect of carotenoids on non-visual (e.g. acoustic signals involved in sexual selection has been hypothesized, this has to date not been investigated. First, we examined a potential effect of dietary carotenoid supplementation on overall song rate during the non-breeding season in captive male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris. After only 3-7 days, we found a significant (body-mass independent positive effect of carotenoid availability on overall song rate. Secondly, as a number of studies suggest that carotenoids could affect the modulation of sexual signals by plasma levels of the steroid hormone testosterone (T, we used the same birds to subsequently investigate whether carotenoid availability affects the increase in (nestbox-oriented song rate induced by experimentally elevated plasma T levels. Our results suggest that carotenoids may enhance the positive effect of elevated plasma T levels on nestbox-oriented song rate. Moreover, while non-supplemented starlings responded to T-implantation with an increase in both overall song rate and nestbox-oriented song, carotenoid-supplemented starlings instead shifted song production towards (reproductively relevant nestbox-oriented song, without increasing overall song rate. Given that song rate is an acoustic signal rather than a visual signal, our findings therefore indicate that the role of carotenoids in (sexual signalling need not be dependent on their function as pigments.

  17. Strigolactones, a novel carotenoid-derived plant hormone

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Babili, Salim

    2015-04-29

    Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived plant hormones and signaling molecules. When released into the soil, SLs indicate the presence of a host to symbiotic fungi and root parasitic plants. In planta, they regulate several developmental processes that adapt plant architecture to nutrient availability. Highly branched/tillered mutants in Arabidopsis, pea, and rice have enabled the identification of four SL biosynthetic enzymes: a cis/trans-carotene isomerase, two carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, and a cytochrome P450 (MAX1). In vitro and in vivo enzyme assays and analysis of mutants have shown that the pathway involves a combination of new reactions leading to carlactone, which is converted by a rice MAX1 homolog into an SL parent molecule with a tricyclic lactone moiety. In this review, we focus on SL biosynthesis, describe the hormonal and environmental factors that determine this process, and discuss SL transport and downstream signaling as well as the role of SLs in regulating plant development. ©2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  18. WORK / LIFE BALANCE REFLECTIONS ON EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvarani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyze the relationship between employee satisfaction andwork/life balance. The construct used for this research consists of career opportunity, recognition,work tasks, payments, benefits, superior subordinate relationship, employee satisfaction, andwork/life balance. The study was conducted on a total of 210 respondents working in IT organization.This study makes a contribution to join two distinct research streams, namely employee satisfaction,and work/life balance. Findings suggest that high correlation exists between work task and employeesatisfaction with a mediator variable namely work-life balance.

  19. Balance in Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The review by Black and Wiliam of national systems makes clear the complexity of assessment, and identifies important issues. One of these is "balance": balance between local and central responsibilities, balance between the weights given to various purposes of schooling, balance between weights for various functions of assessment, and balance…

  20. Is oxidative status influenced by dietary carotenoid and physical activity after moult in the great tit (Parus major)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Decencière, Beatriz; Perret, Samuel; Karadas, Filiz; Meylan, Sandrine; Biard, Clotilde

    2015-07-01

    In the context of sexual and natural selection, an allocation trade-off for carotenoid pigments may exist because of their obligate dietary origin and their role both in the antioxidant and immune systems and in the production of coloured signals in various taxa, particularly birds. When birds have expended large amounts of carotenoids to feather growth such as after autumn moult, bird health and oxidative status might be more constrained. We tested this hypothesis in a bird species with carotenoid-based plumage colour, by manipulating dietary carotenoids and physical activity, which can decrease antioxidant capacity and increase reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) concentration. Great tits were captured after moult and kept in aviaries, under three treatments: physical handicap and dietary supplementation with carotenoids, physical handicap and control diet, and no handicap and control diet. We measured plasma composition (antioxidant capacity, ROM concentration, and vitamin A, vitamin E and total carotenoid concentrations), immune system activation (blood sedimentation) and stress response (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio) and predicted that handicap treatment should influence these negatively and carotenoid supplementation positively. Coloration of yellow feathers was also measured. Carotenoid supplementation increased total plasma carotenoid concentration, decreased feather carotenoid chroma and marginally increased ROM concentration. Handicap increased blood sedimentation only in males but had no clear influence on oxidative stress, which contradicted previous studies. Further studies are needed to investigate how physical activity and carotenoid availability might interact and influence oxidative stress outside the moult period, and their combined potential influence on attractiveness and reproductive investment later during the breeding season.

  1. The distribution of carotenoids in hens fed on biofortified maize is influenced by feed composition, absorption, resource allocation and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jose Antonio; Díaz-Gómez, Joana; Nogareda, Carmina; Angulo, Eduardo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Serrano, José C E; Twyman, Richard M; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2016-10-14

    Carotenoids are important dietary nutrients with health-promoting effects. The biofortification of staple foods with carotenoids provides an efficient delivery strategy but little is known about the fate and distribution of carotenoids supplied in this manner. The chicken provides a good model of human carotenoid metabolism so we supplemented the diets of laying hens using two biofortified maize varieties with distinct carotenoid profiles and compared the fate of the different carotenoids in terms of distribution in the feed, the hen's livers and the eggs. We found that after a period of depletion, pro-vitamin A (PVA) carotenoids were preferentially diverted to the liver and relatively depleted in the eggs, whereas other carotenoids were transported to the eggs even when the liver remained depleted. When retinol was included in the diet, it accumulated more in the eggs than the livers, whereas PVA carotenoids showed the opposite profile. Our data suggest that a transport nexus from the intestinal lumen to the eggs introduces bottlenecks that cause chemically-distinct classes of carotenoids to be partitioned in different ways. This nexus model will allow us to optimize animal feed and human diets to ensure that the health benefits of carotenoids are delivered in the most effective manner.

  2. Carotenoids, Phenolic Compounds and Tocopherols Contribute to the Antioxidative Properties of Some Microalgae Species Grown on Industrial Wastewater.

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    Safafar, Hamed; van Wagenen, Jonathan; Møller, Per; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2015-12-11

    This study aimed at investigating the potential of microalgae species grown on industrial waste water as a new source of natural antioxidants. Six microalgae from different classes, including Phaeodactylum sp. (Bacillariophyceae), Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae), Chlorella sp., Dunaniella sp., and Desmodesmus sp. (Chlorophyta), were screened for their antioxidant properties using different in vitro assays. Natural antioxidants, including pigments, phenolics, and tocopherols, were measured in methanolic extracts of microalgae biomass. Highest and lowest concentrations of pigments, phenolic compounds, and tocopherols were found in Desmodesmus sp. and Phaeodactylum tricornuotom microalgae species, respectively. The results of each assay were correlated to the content of natural antioxidants in microalgae biomass. Phenolic compounds were found as major contributors to the antioxidant activity in all antioxidant tests while carotenoids were found to contribute to the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, ferrous reduction power (FRAP), and ABTS-radical scavenging capacity activity. Desmodesmus sp. biomass represented a potentially rich source of natural antioxidants, such as carotenoids (lutein), tocopherols, and phenolic compounds when cultivated on industrial waste water as the main nutrient source.

  3. Carotenoids, Phenolic Compounds and Tocopherols Contribute to the Antioxidative Properties of Some Microalgae Species Grown on Industrial Wastewater

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    Hamed Safafar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the potential of microalgae species grown on industrial waste water as a new source of natural antioxidants. Six microalgae from different classes, including Phaeodactylum sp. (Bacillariophyceae, Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae, Chlorella sp., Dunaniella sp., and Desmodesmus sp. (Chlorophyta, were screened for their antioxidant properties using different in vitro assays. Natural antioxidants, including pigments, phenolics, and tocopherols, were measured in methanolic extracts of microalgae biomass. Highest and lowest concentrations of pigments, phenolic compounds, and tocopherols were found in Desmodesmus sp. and Phaeodactylum tricornuotom microalgae species, respectively. The results of each assay were correlated to the content of natural antioxidants in microalgae biomass. Phenolic compounds were found as major contributors to the antioxidant activity in all antioxidant tests while carotenoids were found to contribute to the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH radical scavenging activity, ferrous reduction power (FRAP, and ABTS-radical scavenging capacity activity. Desmodesmus sp. biomass represented a potentially rich source of natural antioxidants, such as carotenoids (lutein, tocopherols, and phenolic compounds when cultivated on industrial waste water as the main nutrient source.

  4. Carotenoids in Rhodoplanes species: variation of compositions and substrate specificity of predicted carotenogenesis enzymes.

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    Takaichi, Shinichi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V; Okamura, Keiko; Hiraishi, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Phototrophic bacteria necessarily contain carotenoids for photosynthesis, and accumulate unusual carotenoids in some cases. The carotenoids in all established species of Rhodoplanes (Rpl.), a representative of phototrophic genera, were identified using spectroscopic methods. The major carotenoid was spirilloxanthin in Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus, and rhodopin in "Rpl. cryptolactis". Rpl. elegans contained rhodopin, anhydrorhodovibrin, and spirilloxanthin. Rpl. pokkaliisoli contained not only rhodopin but also 1,1'-dihydroxylycopene and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin. These variations in carotenoid composition suggested that Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus had normal substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes of CrtC (acyclic carotene 1,2-hydratase), CrtD (acyclic carotenoid 3,4-desaturase), and CrtF (acyclic 1-hydroxycarotenoid methyltransferase). On the other hand, CrtC of Rpl. elegans, CrtD of "Rpl. cryptolactis", and CrtC, CrtD, and CrtF of Rpl. pokkaliisoli might have different characteristics from the usual activity of these normal enzymes in the normal spirilloxanthin pathway. These results suggest that the variation of carotenoids among the species of Rhodoplanes results from modified substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes involved.

  5. Carotenoids play a positive role in the degradation of heterocycles by Sphingobium yanoikuyae.

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    Xiaorui Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial oxidative degradation is a potential way of removing pollutants such as heterocycles from the environment. During this process, reactive oxygen species or other oxidants are inevitably produced, and may cause damage to DNA, proteins, and membranes, thereby decreasing the degradation rate. Carotenoids can serve as membrane-integrated antioxidants, protecting cells from oxidative stress. FINDINGS: Several genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway were cloned and characterized from a carbazole-degrading bacterium Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5. In addition, a yellow-pigmented carotenoid synthesized by strain XLDN2-5 was identified as zeaxanthin that was synthesized from β-carotene through β-cryptoxanthin. The amounts of zeaxanthin and hydrogen peroxide produced were significantly and simultaneously enhanced during the biodegradation of heterocycles (carbazole < carbazole + benzothiophene < carbazole + dibenzothiophene. These higher production levels were consistent with the transcriptional increase of the gene encoding phytoene desaturase, one of the key enzymes for carotenoid biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5 can enhance the synthesis of zeaxanthin, one of the carotenoids, which may modulate membrane fluidity and defense against intracellular oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the positive role of carotenoids in the biodegradation of heterocycles, while elucidating the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the Sphingobium genus.

  6. Quantum chemical insights in energy dissipation and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes.

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    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2007-06-21

    Light harvesting complexes (LHCs) have been identified in all photosynthetic organisms. To understand their function in light harvesting and energy dissipation, detailed knowledge about possible excitation energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes in these pigment proteins is of prime importance. This again requires the study of electronically excited states of the involved pigment molecules, in LHCs of chlorophylls and carotenoids. This paper represents a critical review of recent quantum chemical calculations on EET and ET processes between pigment pairs relevant for the major LHCs of green plants (LHC-II) and of purple bacteria (LH2). The theoretical methodology for a meaningful investigation of such processes is described in detail, and benefits and limitations of standard methods are discussed. The current status of excited state calculations on chlorophylls and carotenoids is outlined. It is focused on the possibility of EET and ET in the context of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in LHC-II and carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2. In the context of non-photochemical quenching of green plants, it is shown that replacement of the carotenoid violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in its binding pocket of LHC-II can not result in efficient quenching. In LH2, our computational results give strong evidence that the S(1) states of the carotenoids are involved in carotenoid cation formation. By comparison of theoretical findings with recent experimental data, a general mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is suggested.

  7. Effect of alcoholic fermentation on the carotenoid composition and provitamin A content of orange juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Isabel; Escudero-López, Blanca; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso; Martín, Francisco; Fernández-Pachón, María-Soledad

    2014-01-29

    Orange juice is considered a rich source of carotenoids, which are thought to have diverse biological functions. In recent years, a fermentation process has been carried out in fruits resulting in products that provide higher concentrations of bioactive compounds than their original substrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a controlled alcoholic fermentation process (15 days) on the carotenoid composition of orange juice. Twenty-two carotenoids were identified in samples. The carotenoid profile was not modified as result of the fermentation. Total carotenoid content and provitamin A value significantly increased from day 0 (5.37 mg/L and 75.32 RAEs/L, respectively) until day 15 (6.65 mg/L and 90.57 RAEs/L, respectively), probably due to a better extractability of the carotenoids from the food matrix as a result of processing. Therefore, the novel beverage produced could provide a rich source of carotenoids and exert healthy effects similar to those of orange juice.

  8. Pressurized Hot Ethanol Extraction of Carotenoids from Carrot By-Products

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    Charlotta Turner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are known for their antioxidant activity and health promoting effects. One of the richest sources of carotenoids are carrots. However, about 25% of the annual production is regarded as by-products due to strict market policies. The aim of this study was to extract carotenoids from those by-products. Conventional carotenoid extraction methods require the use of organic solvents, which are costly, environmentally hazardous, and require expensive disposal procedures. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE utilizes conventional solvents at elevated temperatures and pressure, and it requires less solvent and shorter extraction times. The extraction solvent of choice in this study was ethanol, which is a solvent generally recognized as safe (GRAS. The extraction procedure was optimized by varying the extraction time (2–10 min and the temperature (60–180 °C. β-Carotene was used as an indicator for carotenoids content in the carrots. The results showed that time and temperatures of extraction have significant effect on the yield of carotenoids. Increasing the flush volume during extraction did not improve the extractability of carotenoids, indicating that the extraction method was mainly desorption/diffusion controlled. Use of a dispersing agent that absorbs the moisture content was important for the efficiency of extraction. Analysing the content of β-carotene at the different length of extraction cycles showed that about 80% was recovered after around 20 min of extraction.

  9. Storage at low temperature differentially affects the colour and carotenoid composition of two cultivars of banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facundo, Heliofabia Virginia De Vasconcelos; Gurak, Poliana Deyse; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2015-03-01

    Different storage conditions can induce changes in the colour and carotenoid profiles and levels in some fruits. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of low temperature storage on the colour and carotenoid synthesis in two banana cultivars: Prata and Nanicão. For this purpose, the carotenoids from the banana pulp were determined by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS, and the colour of the banana skin was determined by a colorimeter method. Ten carotenoids were identified, of which the major carotenoids were all-trans-lutein, all-trans-α-carotene and all-trans-β-carotene in both cultivars. The effect of the low temperatures was subjected to linear regression analysis. In cv. Prata, all-trans-α-carotene and all-trans-β-carotene were significantly affected by low temperature (p0.05). The accumulation of carotenoids in this group may be because the metabolic pathways using these carotenoids were affected by storage at low temperatures. The colour of the fruits was not negatively affected by the low temperatures (p>0.05).

  10. Profiling of carotenoids in tomato juice by one- and two-dimensional NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiziani, Stefano; Schwartz, Steven J; Vodovotz, Yael

    2006-08-09

    Epidemiological data have shown a link between dietary intake of tomatoes and tomato products (rich in carotenoids) and a decreased risk of chronic diseases. The carotenoid profile in tomato products depends on tomato variety as well as the thermal conditions used in processing. The final carotenoid profile may affect the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of these biomolecules. Therefore, nondestructive, reliable methods are needed to characterize the structural and stereochemical variation of carotenoids. CDCl(3) rapid extraction was used to extract carotenoids from tomato juice as an alternative rapid procedure that minimizes solvents and time consumption prior to NMR analysis. The profile of these biomolecules was characterized by application of high-resolution multidimensional NMR techniques using a cryogenic probe. The combination of homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR techniques served to identify (all-E)-, (5Z)-, (9Z)-, and (13Z)-lycopene isomers and other carotenoids such as (all-E)-beta-carotene and (15Z)-phytoene dissolved in the extracted lipid mixture. The use of one-dimensional NMR enabled the rapid identification of lycopene isomers, thereby minimizing further isomerization of (all-E)-lycopene as compared to HPLC data. On the basis of the assignments accomplished, the carotenoid profile of typical tomato juice was successfully determined with minimal purification procedures.

  11. Influence of dietary carotenoids on radical scavenging capacity of the skin and skin lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, M C; Friedrich, A; Tscherch, K; Haag, S F; Darvin, M E; Vollert, H; Groth, N; Lademann, J; Rohn, S

    2013-06-01

    Nutrition rich in carotenoids is well known to prevent cell damage, premature skin aging, and skin cancer. Cutaneous carotenoids can be enriched in the skin by nutrition and topically applied antioxidants have shown an increase in radical protection after VIS/NIR irradiation. In this paper, it was investigated whether orally administered carotenoids increase the radical scavenging activity and the radical protection of the skin using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the skin lipid profile was investigated applying HPTLC on skin lipid extracts. Furthermore, in vivo Raman resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the cutaneous carotenoid concentration. A double blind placebo controlled clinical study was performed with 24 healthy volunteers, who have shown a slow but significant and effective increase in cutaneous carotenoids in the verum group. The enhancement in carotenoids increases the radical scavenging activity of the skin and provides a significant protection against stress induced radical formation. Furthermore, the skin lipids in the verum group increased compared to the placebo group but only significantly for ceramide [NS]. These results indicate that a supplementation with dietary products containing carotenoids in physiological concentrations can protect the skin against reactive oxygen species and could avoid premature skin aging and other radical associated skin diseases.

  12. EFFECT OF NITROGEN NUTRITION SOURCES ON CAROTENOIDS SYNTHESIS FOR SOME BASIDIOMYCETES STRAINS

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    A. K. Veligodska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of certain nitrogen compounds - components of glucose-peptone medium (GPM on the accumulation of carotenoids by some strains was investigated by surface cultivating basidiomycetes. The total carotenoid content was set in acetone extracts of mycological material spectrophotometrically and calculated using the Vetshteyn formula. As the nitrogen-containing components used GPM with 9 compounds, such as peptone, DL-valine, L-asparagine, DL-serine, DL-tyrosine, L-proline, L-alanine, urea, NaNO3. The effect on the accumulation of specific compounds both in the mycelium and in the culture fluid of carotenoids by culturing certain strains of Basidiomycetes was identified. Adding to standard glucose-peptone medium peptone at 5 g/l causes an increase of carotenoid accumulation by strain L. sulphureus Ls-08, and in a concentration of 4 g/l by strains of F. hepatica Fh-18 and F. fomentarius Ff-1201. In order to increase the accumulation of carotenoids in the mycelium  we suggested to make a standard glucose-peptone medium with proline or valine for cultivating of L. sulphureus Ls- 08 strain; alanine for F. fomentarius Ff-1201 strain; proline, asparagine and serine - for strain Fh-18 of F. hepatica. The results can be implemented in further optimization of the composition of the nutrient medium for culturing strains of Basidiomycetes wich producing carotenoids. Keywords: nitrogen-containing substances, Basidiomycetes, mycelium, culture filtrate, carotenoids

  13. Carotenoids from Foods of Plant, Animal and Marine Origin: An Efficient HPLC-DAD Separation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Irini F.; Sinanoglou, Vassilia J.; Kora, Lintita; Miniadis-Meimaroglou, Sofia; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids are important antioxidant compounds, present in many foods of plant, animal and marine origin. The aim of the present study was to describe the carotenoid composition of tomato waste, prawn muscle and cephalothorax and avian (duck and goose) egg yolks through the use of a modified gradient elution HPLC method with a C30 reversed-phase column for the efficient separation and analysis of carotenoids and their cis-isomers. Elution time was reduced from 60 to 45 min without affecting the separation efficiency. All-trans lycopene predominated in tomato waste, followed by all-trans-β-carotene, 13-cis-lutein and all-trans lutein, while minor amounts of 9-cis-lutein, 13-cis-β-carotene and 9-cis-β-carotene were also detected. Considering the above findings, tomato waste is confirmed to be an excellent source of recovering carotenoids, especially all-trans lycopene, for commercial use. Xanthophylls were the major carotenoids of avian egg yolks, all-trans lutein and all-trans zeaxanthin in duck and goose egg yolk, respectively. In the Penaeus kerathurus prawn, several carotenoids (zeaxanthin, all-trans-lutein, canthaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, optical and geometrical astaxanthin isomers) were identified in considerable amounts by the same method. A major advantage of this HPLC method was the efficient separation of carotenoids and their cis-isomers, originating from a wide range of matrices.

  14. Regular consumption of fresh orange juice increases human skin carotenoid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenti, Roberto; Perrone, Anna; Livrea, Maria Antonietta; Lo Bianco, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Dermal carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status in the body. This study aimed to determine whether regular consumption of orange juice could increase dermal carotenoids. Two types of orange juice, obtained from regularly (CI) and partially (PRD) irrigated trees, were tested to reveal any possible association between juice and dermal carotenoids. Soluble solids, titratable acidity, and total carotenoids were quantified in the juice; skin carotenoid score (SCS) was assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Carotenoid content was 7.3% higher in PRD than in CI juice, inducing no difference in SCS. In a first trial with daily juice intakes for 25 days, SCS increased linearly (10%) in the individual with higher initial SCS, and exponentially (15%) in the individual with lower initial SCS. In a second trial, SCS showed a 6.5% increase after 18 days of drinking juice every other day, but returned to initial values three days after last intake. Skin carotenoids can be increased by regular consumption of fresh orange juice, while their persistence may depend on the accumulation level, environmental conditions or living habits.

  15. Comparative carotenoid compositions during maturation and their antioxidative capacities of three citrus varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kyung-Mi; Moon, BoKyung

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated total carotenoid content, comparative carotenoid composition, vitamin C content, and total antioxidant capacity of three citrus varieties which are Yuza (Citrus junos Sieb ex Tabaka), Kjool (Citrus unshiu Marcow), and Dangyooja (Citrus grandis Osbeck). Seven carotenoids were identified, with β-cryptoxanthin, astaxanthin, and zeaxanthin being predominant in citrus varieties. Ripening increased the total carotenoid in three citrus varieties. Individual carotenoid of canthaxanthin, astaxanthin, and α-carotene in citrus varieties decreased with maturation, whereas the others increased with ripening. Yuza exhibited the highest total antioxidant capacity in 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays, with VCEAC values of 582.9 mg/100 g and 451.5 mg/100g, respectively. The relative VCEAC values were vitamin C (1.00)>lycopene (0.375), α-carotene (0.304), β-carotene (0.289), β-cryptoxanthin (0.242), and zeaxanthin (0.099). These results indicate that Yuza contains higher amounts of total carotenoids, individual carotenoids, and vitamin C than other Korean citrus varieties.

  16. Serum carotenoids reduce progression of early atherosclerosis in the carotid artery wall among Eastern Finnish men.

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    Jouni Karppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between concentrations of serum carotenoids, and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall was explored in 840 middle-aged men (aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries were performed at baseline and 7-year follow-up. Serum levels of carotenoids were analyzed at baseline. Changes in mean and maximum intima media thickness of carotid artery wall were related to baseline serum carotenoid levels in covariance analyses adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: In a covariance analysis with adjustment for age, ultrasound sonographer, maximum intima media thickness, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, physical activity, serum LDL cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease, antihypertensive medication and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 7-year change in maximum intima media thickness was inversely associated with lycopene (p = 0.005, α-carotene (p = 0.002 and β-carotene (p = 0.019, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that high serum concentrations of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis.

  17. Characterization of chromoplasts and carotenoids of red- and yellow-fleshed papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiggert, Ralf M; Steingass, Christof B; Heller, Annerose; Esquivel, Patricia; Carle, Reinhold

    2011-11-01

    Chromoplast morphology and ultrastructure of red- and yellow-fleshed papaya (Carica papaya L.) were investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. Carotenoid analyses by LC-MS revealed striking similarity of nutritionally relevant carotenoid profiles in both the red and yellow varieties. However, while yellow fruits contained only trace amounts of lycopene, the latter was found to be predominant in red papaya (51% of total carotenoids). Comparison of the pigment-loaded chromoplast ultrastructures disclosed tubular plastids to be abundant in yellow papaya, whereas larger crystalloid substructures characterized most frequent red papaya chromoplasts. Exclusively existent in red papaya, such crystalloid structures were associated with lycopene accumulation. Non-globular carotenoid deposition was derived from simple solubility calculations based on carotenoid and lipid contents of the differently colored fruit pulps. Since the physical state of carotenoid deposition may be decisive regarding their bioavailability, chromoplasts from lycopene-rich tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) were also assessed and compared to red papaya. Besides interesting analogies, various distinctions were ascertained resulting in the prediction of enhanced lycopene bioavailability from red papaya. In addition, the developmental pathway of red papaya chromoplasts was investigated during fruit ripening and carotenogenesis. In the early maturation stage of white-fleshed papaya, undifferentiated proplastids and globular plastids were predominant, corresponding to incipient carotenoid biosynthesis. Since intermediate plastids, e.g., amyloplasts or chloroplasts, were absent, chromoplasts are likely to emerge directly from proplastids.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative differences in carotenoid composition among Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita maxima, and Cucurbita pepo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Meleiro, Cristiane H; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2007-05-16

    Squashes and pumpkins are important dietary sources of carotenoids worldwide. The carotenoid composition has been determined, but reported data have been highly variable, both qualitatively and quantitatively. In the present work, the carotenoid composition of squashes and pumpkins currently marketed in Campinas, Brazil, were determined by HPLC-DAD, complemented by HPLC-MS for identification. Cucurbita moschata 'Menina Brasileira' and C. moschata 'Goianinha' had similar profiles, with beta-carotene and alpha-carotene as the major carotenoids. The hybrid 'Tetsukabuto' resembled the Cucurbita pepo 'Mogango', lutein and beta-carotene being the principal carotenoids. Cucurbita maxima 'Exposição' had a different profile, with the predominance of violaxanthin, followed by beta-carotene and lutein. Combining data from the current study with those in the literature, profiles for the Cucurbita species could be observed. The principal carotenoids in C. moschata were beta-carotene and alpha-carotene, whlereas lutein and beta-carotene dominate in C. maxima and C. pepo. It appears that hydroxylation is a control point in carotenoid biosynthesis.

  19. Absorption of Vitamin A and Carotenoids by the Enterocyte: Focus on Transport Proteins

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    Emmanuelle Reboul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in most developing countries, especially in children and pregnant women. It is thus a priority in health policy to improve preformed vitamin A and/or provitamin A carotenoid status in these individuals. A more accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intestinal vitamin A absorption is a key step in this direction. It was long thought that β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet, and thus all carotenoids, were absorbed by a passive diffusion process, and that preformed vitamin A (retinol absorption occurred via an unidentified energy-dependent transporter. The discovery of proteins able to facilitate carotenoid uptake and secretion by the enterocyte during the past decade has challenged established assumptions, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of retinol intestinal absorption is in progress. After an overview of vitamin A and carotenoid fate during gastro-duodenal digestion, our focus will be directed to the putative or identified proteins participating in the intestinal membrane and cellular transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte (i.e., Scavenger Receptors or Cellular Retinol Binding Proteins, among others. Further progress in the identification of the proteins involved in intestinal transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte is of major importance for optimizing their bioavailability.

  20. Absorption of vitamin A and carotenoids by the enterocyte: focus on transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2013-09-12

    Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in most developing countries, especially in children and pregnant women. It is thus a priority in health policy to improve preformed vitamin A and/or provitamin A carotenoid status in these individuals. A more accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intestinal vitamin A absorption is a key step in this direction. It was long thought that β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet), and thus all carotenoids, were absorbed by a passive diffusion process, and that preformed vitamin A (retinol) absorption occurred via an unidentified energy-dependent transporter. The discovery of proteins able to facilitate carotenoid uptake and secretion by the enterocyte during the past decade has challenged established assumptions, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of retinol intestinal absorption is in progress. After an overview of vitamin A and carotenoid fate during gastro-duodenal digestion, our focus will be directed to the putative or identified proteins participating in the intestinal membrane and cellular transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte (i.e., Scavenger Receptors or Cellular Retinol Binding Proteins, among others). Further progress in the identification of the proteins involved in intestinal transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte is of major importance for optimizing their bioavailability.

  1. Pink shrimp (P. brasiliensis and P. paulensis) residue: influence of extraction method on carotenoid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzomo, Natália; Maestri, Bianca; dos Santos, Renata Lazzaris; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2011-09-15

    The main residue from the shrimp processing is formed by head and carapace and represents from 40 to 50% (w/w) of the integral shrimp. The recovery of the carotenoid fraction from this residue stands for an alternative to increase its aggregated value. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use the pink shrimp waste as raw material to obtain carotenoid enriched extracts, evaluating different pre-treatments and extraction methods. The shrimp waste was supplied by a local public market (Florianópolis, SC, Brazil). The investigation of the different pre-treatments applied to the raw material shows that cooking associated with milling and drying produced the extract richest in carotenoid fraction. The extraction methods considered in this work were Soxhlet, maceration and ultrasound by means of different organic solvents and also a vegetable oil as solvent. The extracts were evaluated in terms of yield, carotenoid profile, total carotenoid content (TCC), UV-Visible scanning spectrophotometry and mid-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results indicate that shrimp waste can provide carotenoid enriched extracts, particularly astaxanthin, in concentrations up to 252 μg(astaxanthin)g(extract)(-1). The most adequate solvents were acetone and hexane: isopropanol (50:50, v/v) used in the maceration procedure. The UV-Vis results revealed the presence of carotenoids and flavonoids in the extracts while the FTIR spectroscopy indicated the existence of fatty acids, proteins, and phenolics.

  2. Metabolic engineering of potato tuber carotenoids through tuber-specific silencing of lycopene epsilon cyclase

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    Papacchioli Velia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potato is a major staple food, and modification of its provitamin content is a possible means for alleviating nutritional deficiencies. beta-carotene is the main dietary precursor of vitamin A. Potato tubers contain low levels of carotenoids, composed mainly of the xanthophylls lutein, antheraxanthin, violaxanthin, and of xanthophyll esters. None of these carotenoids have provitamin A activity. Results We silenced the first dedicated step in the beta-epsilon- branch of carotenoid biosynthesis, lycopene epsilon cyclase (LCY-e, by introducing, via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, an antisense fragment of this gene under the control of the patatin promoter. Real Time measurements confirmed the tuber-specific silencing of Lcy-e. Antisense tubers showed significant increases in beta-beta-carotenoid levels, with beta-carotene showing the maximum increase (up to 14-fold. Total carotenoids increased up to 2.5-fold. These changes were not accompanied by a decrease in lutein, suggesting that LCY-e is not rate-limiting for lutein accumulation. Tuber-specific changes in expression of several genes in the pathway were observed. Conclusion The data suggest that epsilon-cyclization of lycopene is a key regulatory step in potato tuber carotenogenesis. Upon tuber-specific silencing of the corresponding gene, beta-beta-carotenoid and total carotenoid levels are increased, and expression of several other genes in the pathway is modified.

  3. Differential carotenoid production and gene expression in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous grown in a nonfermentable carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Aniela; Lozano, Carla; Barahona, Salvador; Niklitschek, Mauricio; Marcoleta, Andrés; Alcaíno, Jennifer; Sepulveda, Dionisia; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-05-01

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a basidiomycetous yeast of considerable biotechnological interest because it synthesizes astaxanthin as its main carotenoid. The carotenoid production increases when it is grown using nonfermentable compounds as the sole carbon source. This work analyzes the expression of the carotenogenic genes and their relationship with the amount and types of carotenoids produced when X. dendrorhous is grown using a nonfermentable (succinate) or a fermentable carbon source (glucose). When X. dendrorhous is grown in succinate, carotenoid production is approximately three times higher than when it is grown in glucose. Moreover, carotenoid biosynthesis occurs at the start of the growth cycle when X. dendrorhous is grown in succinate, whereas when it is grown in glucose, carotenoids are produced at the end of the exponential phase. Additionally, we observed that some carotenogenic genes, such as alternative transcripts of crtYB and crtI, are differentially expressed when the yeast is grown in these carbon sources; other genes, such as crtS, exhibit a similar pattern of expression. Our data indicate that transcriptional regulation is not sufficient to explain the differences in carotenoid production between the two culture conditions, indicating that additional regulatory mechanisms may be operating in the carotenogenic pathway of X. dendrorhous.

  4. Statistical optimisation of cell growth and carotenoid production by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

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    Iriani R. Maldonade

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential statistical methods were used to maximise carotenoid production by a strain of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, isolated from the Brazilian ecosystem. Initially, a factorial 2(5-1 experimental design was used, and the variables were pH and the levels of glucose, yeast extract, MgSO4.7H2O and KH2PO4. The nitrogen source (yeast extract was the most important variable in enhancing carotenoid production; MgSO4.7H2O and KH2PO4 had a negative influence. The initial pH had no significant effect on carotenoid and cell productions. We further investigated the effects of glucose and yeast extract effects, using a second-order central composite design (CCD to optimise carotenoid production, which was adequately approximated with a full quadratic equation obtained from a two-factor-2-level design. The analysis of quadratic surfaces showed that after 5 days of cultivation at 25ºC, the maximum carotenoid concentration (745 µg l-1 was obtained with 15 g l-1 of yeast extract and 20 g l-1 of glucose. The maximum carotenoid production (152 µg g-1 was obtained with 5 g l-1 yeast extract and 10 g l-1 glucose. Carotenoid formation was more sensitive to changes in yeast extract concentration than to changes in glucose concentration. Maximum cell production was achieved with 15-17 g l-1 of yeast extract and 15-20 g l-1 of glucose.

  5. Statistical optimisation of cell growth and carotenoid production by rhodotorula mucilaginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonade, Iriani R; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B; Scamparini, Adilma R P

    2012-01-01

    Sequential statistical methods were used to maximise carotenoid production by a strain of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, isolated from the Brazilian ecosystem. Initially, a factorial 2(5-1) experimental design was used, and the variables were pH and the levels of glucose, yeast extract, MgSO4.7H2O and KH2PO4. The nitrogen source (yeast extract) was the most important variable in enhancing carotenoid production; MgSO4.7H2O and KH2PO4 had a negative influence. The initial pH had no significant effect on carotenoid and cell productions. We further investigated the effects of glucose and yeast extract effects, using a second-order central composite design (CCD) to optimise carotenoid production, which was adequately approximated with a full quadratic equation obtained from a two-factor-2-level design. The analysis of quadratic surfaces showed that after 5 days of cultivation at 25 °C, the maximum carotenoid concentration (745 µg l(-1)) was obtained with 15 g l(-1) of yeast extract and 20 g l(-1) of glucose. The maximum carotenoid production (152 µg g(-1)) was obtained with 5 g l(-1) yeast extract and 10 g l(-1) glucose. Carotenoid formation was more sensitive to changes in yeast extract concentration than to changes in glucose concentration. Maximum cell production was achieved with 15-17 g l(-1) of yeast extract and 15-20 g l(-1) of glucose.

  6. Assessing the Fatty Acid, Carotenoid, and Tocopherol Compositions of Amaranth and Quinoa Seeds Grown in Ontario and Their Overall Contribution to Nutritional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao; Li, Xihong; Chen, Peter X; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Ronghua; Hernandez, Marta; Draves, Jamie; Marcone, Massimo F; Tsao, Rong

    2016-02-10

    Various fatty acids, tocopherols, carotenoids, and their respective antioxidant contributions in 7 amaranth seed and 11 quinoa seed samples along with a new evaluation method are reported. The lipid yield was 6.98-7.22% in amaranth seeds and 6.03-6.74% in quinoa seeds, with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) being the predominant fatty acids, 71.58-72.44% in amaranth seeds and 81.44-84.49% in quinoa seeds, respectively. Carotenoids, mainly lutein and zeaxanthin, are confirmed for the first time in amaranth seeds, while β-carotene is reported first in quinoa seeds. The predominant tocopherols in amaranth seeds are δ- and α-tocopherol, whereas γ- and α-tocopherol are the primary tocopherols in quinoa seeds. UFAs, carotenoids, and tocopherols showed good correlation with antioxidant activity. All of the amaranth seeds demonstrated lower overall lipophilic quality than quinoa seeds, with the AS1 and QS10 cultivars providing the highest scores for amaranth and quinoa seeds, respectively. Results from this study will contribute to developing quinoa seeds and related functional foods with increased benefits.

  7. Lipids, tocopherols, and carotenoids in leaves of amaranth and quinoa cultivars and a new approach to overall evaluation of nutritional quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao; Li, Xihong; Chen, Peter X; Zhang, Bing; Hernandez, Marta; Zhang, Hua; Marcone, Massimo F; Liu, Ronghua; Tsao, Rong

    2014-12-31

    Composition of lipophilic phytochemicals including fatty acids, tocopherols, and carotenoids in leaves of 6 quinoa and 14 amaranth cultivars was analyzed. The oil yields in quinoa and amaranth leaves were only 2.72-4.18%, which contained mainly essential fatty acids and had a highly favorable ω-3/ω-6 ratio (2.28-3.89). Pro-vitamin A carotenoids, mainly α- and β-carotenes, and xanthophylls, predominantly lutein and violaxanthin, were found in all samples. The primary tocopherol isomers present in both quinoa and amaranth leaves were α- and β-tocopherols. Added to the discussion on the lipophilic nutrients was the normalization of ω-3/ω-6 ratio, α-tocopherol equivalents, and carotenoids, in an attempt to establish a novel system for evaluation of the overall quality attributes of lipophilic nutrients (NQ value). The NQ value, but not the individual components, was highly correlated with all the antioxidant activities, supporting the ranking order of the potential nutritional quality of quinoa and amaranth leaves based on this new method.

  8. Correlación entre unidades asta-concentración carotenoide en pimentones. Predicción de la estabilidad del color durante el almacenamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montero-de-Espinosa, Vicente

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Paprika obtained through the traditional process, from fruits dried in oak ovens, is stored at room temperature for 18 months. Samples are taken at 2-3 months time intervals and color quantity is evaluated, measuring it as ASTA units and carotenoid content. Values obtained from both measurements are compared, achieving a good correlation between ASTA units and total carotenoid content. As a result two equations are proposed, one linking both parameters and another which predicts the remaining ASTA unit as a function of storage time. ASTA values after 18 months of storing time are ca. 55 % of the initial values.El pimentón obtenido de forma tradicional, a partir de frutos secados en hornos de leña, se ha almacenado a temperatura ambiente durante 18 meses. Se han tomado muestras de los mismos a intervalos de 2-3 meses y se ha evaluado la cantidad de color extractable como unidades ASTA y, en paralelo, se ha controlado la concentración carotenoide. Se comparan los valores obtenidos por cada uno de los dos procedimientos, observándose que se da una buena correlación entre las unidades ASTA y la concentración total de carotenoides. Se postula una ecuación que relaciona ambos parámetros y otra ecuación que permite predecir el valor remanente de ASTA con el tiempo de conservación. La retención de color a los 18 meses se sitúa en torno al 55 % del valor inicial.

  9. Picosecond kinetics and Sn absorption spectra of retinoids and carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Bachilo, Sergei M.

    1991-05-01

    Light energy absorption, as well as the subsequent photochemical and photophysical processes of cis -+trans isomerisation (vision and bacteriorhodopsin photosynthesis) and energy transfer (photosynthesis in green plants and micro organisms) take place in a pigment-protein complex including polyene chromophors, retinoids and carotenoids. Picosecond and subpicosecond studies of the spectral and kinetic characteristics of these processes are carried out in both complex photoreceptor and photosynthetic ms'2 and model systems with the use of solutions of retinoids and carotenoids.36 The lifetimes of the lower singlet-exited states S (21A; ) ofsome carotenoids in toluene at room temperature have been measured by the method of picosecond photolysis and amount to 8.6+/- 0.5 for all-trans-fl -carotene1 and 5.2 0.6 PS for canthaxanthin.5 /3 -carotene fluorescence at room temperature is practically absent, its yield being less than iO (Ref. 7). /1 -carotene fluorescence at 77 and 4.2 K in isopentane discovered by us8 is characterized by yields of (4+/-2) .iO and (8+/-3) . i0- and lifetimes of(4+/-2) .iO' and (8+/-3) .iO' and is due to the transitions from the higher S(1' B) state. The picosecond transient S -S absorption of/I - carotene in different solvents at 293 K is characterized by spectra in the 550-600 nm range.8 For retinoids, there is one work (Ref. 4) which gives the S, +-Si absorption spectrum of the Schiff base (aldimine) of retinal with amaz 465 mn in n-hexane at 290 K. The duration of transient absorption was 21 5 ps, although the fluorescence kinetics measured in this work (Ref. 4) at 298 K were characterized by two-component decay with r1 = 22 and r2 = 265 ps. The transient picosecond absorption spectra for retinal are absent in the literature and the lifetimes of its singlet-excited state at room temperature, measured by absorption and fluorescence, amount to 20+/-10 Ps in n-hexane3 and 17 Ps in ethanol,'9 respectively.

  10. [Substrate specificity of carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase from Deinococcus radiodurans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongtao; Tian, Bing; Shen, Shaochuan; Hu, Yuejin

    2010-10-01

    To examine the substrate specificity of carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase (DR2250) from Deinococcus radiodurans, we amplified the dr2250 gene by using PCR methods. The PCR products were digested by Hind III-BamH I and ligated into the vector pUC19, yielding recombinant vector pUC-CRTD. We analyzed the carotenoids of E. coli transformants containing pACCRT-EBI(Eu) and (or) pRK-CRTC and (or) pUC-CRTD. Our results demonstrated that DR2250 had substrate specificity on the carotenoids with hydroxyl group at C1 (1').

  11. Carotenoid and polyphenol bioaccessibility and cellular uptake from plum and cabbage varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulmann, Anouk; André, Christelle M; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Hoffmann, Lucien; Bohn, Torsten

    2016-04-15

    Plum and cabbage are rich in carotenoids and polyphenols. However, their bioactivity depends on their release and intestinal uptake. Four varieties of Brassicaceae (Duchy, Scots Kale, Kale, Kalorama) and Prunus (Cherry Plum, Plum 620, Ersinger, Italian Plum) were studied; bioaccessibility following in vitro digestion, cellular uptake (Caco-2 vs. co-culture cell model: Caco-2:HT-29-MTX (90:10%) and colonic fermentation were determined for carotenoids/polyphenols; the influence of certain kitchen preparations was likewise studied. Carotenoids were non-significantly influenced by the latter, while for polyphenols, boiling and steaming significantly reduced total phenolics (pfuture.

  12. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  13. Investigations on carotenoids in lichens. XII. Some species from the Pyrenean Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazyli Czeczuga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of column and thin-layer chromatography, the authors investigated the presence of various carotenoids in thalli of 12 species of lichens from the Pyrenean Peninsula. The following carotenoids were found: lycophyll, lycoxanthin, β-carotene, α-, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lutein epoxide, zeaxanthin, antheraxanthin, canthaxanthin, phoenicoxanthin, adonixanthin, α-doradexanthin, astaxanthin, diatoxanthin, neoxanthin, violaxanthin, mutatochrome, mutatoxanthin and rhodoxanthin. The total content of carotenoids ranged from 2.299 (Cetraria cucullata to 39.402 mg•g-1 dry weight (Pseudoevernia furfuraceae.

  14. Noninvasive laser Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; McClane, Robert W.

    2001-05-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel non- invasive optical technology to measure carotenoid antioxidants in human skin of healthy volunteers. Using blue-green laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra are obtained which are superimposed on a large skin autofluorescence background. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 30 seconds, and the required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Our technique can be used for rapid screening of carotenoid antioxidant levels in large populations and may have applications for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  15. Anti-Obesity Activity of the Marine Carotenoid Fucoxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global tendency towards physical activity reduction and an augmented dietary intake of fats, sugars and calories is leading to a growing propagation of overweight, obesity and lifestyle-related diseases, such diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome. In particular, obesity, characterized as a state of low-level inflammation, is a powerful determinant both in the development of insulin resistance and in the progression to type 2 diabetes. A few molecular targets offer hope for anti-obesity therapeutics. One of the keys to success could be the induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 in abdominal white adipose tissue (WAT and the regulation of cytokine secretions from both abdominal adipose cells and macrophage cells infiltrated into adipose tissue. Anti-obesity effects of fucoxanthin, a characteristic carotenoid, exactly belonging to xanthophylls, have been reported. Nutrigenomic studies reveal that fucoxanthin induces UCP1 in abdominal WAT mitochondria, leading to the oxidation of fatty acids and heat production in WAT. Fucoxanthin improves insulin resistance and decreases blood glucose levels through the regulation of cytokine secretions from WAT. The key structure of anti-obesity effect is suggested to be the carotenoid end of the polyene chromophore, which contains an allenic bond and two hydroxyl groups. Fucoxanthin, which can be isolated from edible brown seaweeds, recently displayed its many physiological functions and biological properties. We reviewed recent studies and this article aims to explain essential background of fucoxanthin, focusing on its promising potential anti-obesity effects. In this respect, fucoxanthin can be developed into promising marine drugs and nutritional products, in order to become a helpful functional food.

  16. The effects of sun exposure on carotenoid accumulation and oxidative stress in the retina of the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew B Toomey; Kevin J McGraw

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diet-derived carotenoid pigments are concentrated in the retinas of birds and serve a variety of func-tions, including photoprotection. In domesticated bird species (e.g., chickens and quail), retinal carotenoid pigmenta-tion has been shown to respond to large manipulations in light exposure and provide protection against photodam-age. However, it is not known if or how wild birds respond to ecologically relevant variation in sun exposure. Methods: We manipulated the duration of natural sunlight exposure and dietary carotenoid levels in wild-caught captive House Finches (Haemorhous mexicanus), then measured carotenoid accumulation and oxidative stress in the retina. Results: We found no signiifcant effects of sun exposure on retinal levels of carotenoids or lipid peroxidation, in rep-licate experiments, in winter (Jan–Mar) and spring/summer (May–June). Dietary carotenoid supplementation in the spring/summer experiment led to signiifcantly higher retinal carotenoid levels, but did not affect lipid peroxidation. Carotenoid levels differed signiifcantly between the winter and spring/summer experiments, with higher retinal and lower plasma carotenoid levels in birds from the later experiment. Conclusion: Our results suggest that variation in the duration of exposure to direct sunlight have limited inlfuence on intraspeciifc variation in retinal carotenoid accumulation, but that accumulation may track other seasonal–envi-ronmental cues and physiological processes.

  17. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography versus high performance liquid chromatography: stationary phase selectivity for generic carotenoid screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijttebier, Sebastiaan; D'Hondt, Els; Noten, Bart; Hermans, Nina; Apers, Sandra; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2014-03-07

    Aim of study was to find the most suitable LC column for generic carotenoid screening. To represent the diversity of carotenoids in nature and to optimize chromatographic separation, a set of carotenoid standards was carefully chosen to account for the various classes of carotenoids. The HPLC C30 column has since long been the 'golden standard' in the chromatographic separation of carotenoids. Since approximately one decade, new UHPLC technology has led to much shorter analysis times, smaller peak widths and higher chromatographic resolution. However, there are currently no UHPLC columns on the market containing the specific stationary phase chemistry of the HPLC C30 column. Therefore during this study, we investigated the separation of carotenoids on a set of UHPLC columns and compared it to their separation on the HPLC C30 column. Comparison of carotenoids separations on the different stationary phases with objective column comparison parameters clearly indicated that the HPLC C30 column is an overall better performer in the separation of carotenoids. This is due to the lack of UHPLC column chemistries that are adapted for carotenoid analysis. However, analysis time on the HPLC C30 column takes about four times longer compared to UHPLC analysis. Therefore, with the range of columns that are commercially available nowadays, a choice has to be made between very high selectivity (HPLC C30 column) and analysis times that are adapted to modern laboratory requirements (UHPLC technology). Therefore, carotenoid separations would be even more performing if an appropriate UHPLC C30 column would be available.

  18. Serum carotenoids, alpha-tocopherol and mortality risk in a prospective study among Dutch elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waart, de F.; Schouten, E.G.; Stalenhoef, A.F.; Kok, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Background Although beta -carotene has shown inverse associations with chronic diseases involving free radical damage in observational epidemiological studies less attention has been paid to five other major carotenoids also showing antioxidant activity irt vitro. Methods We studied the associations

  19. Carotenoids from Marine Microalgae: A Valuable Natural Source for the Prevention of Chronic Diseases