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Sample records for carnitine o-palmitoyltransferase

  1. Carnitine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnitine (L-g-trimethylamino-ß-hydroxybutyrate) functions metabolically as a covalent molecular chaperone of acyl compounds esterified to its hydroxyl moiety (1,2). The quintessentialmetabolic function of L-carnitine is to shuttle long-chain FAs (LCFAs)2 across the inner mitochondrial membrane to t...

  2. Molecular characterization of inherited carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Taroni, F; Verderio, E; Fiorucci, S; P. Cavadini; Finocchiaro, G; Uziel, G.; LAMANTEA, E.; Gellera, C.; DiDonato, S

    1992-01-01

    Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTase II; palmitoyl-CoA:L-carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.21) is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder of energy metabolism. We studied the molecular basis of CPTase II deficiency in an early-onset patient presenting with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and cardiomyopathy. cDNA and genomic DNA analysis demonstrated that the patient was homozygous for a mutant CPTase II allele (termed ICV), which carried three missense mut...

  3. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Finocchiaro, G; Taroni, F; Rocchi, M; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I; Tarelli, G T; DiDonato, S

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPTase; palmitoyl-CoA:L-carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.21), an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA enco...

  4. Malonyl-CoA binding site and the overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity reside on the opposite sides of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, M. S.; Pande, S V

    1987-01-01

    The overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (palmitoyl-CoA:L-carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.21) activity of intact mitochondria from rat heart and liver was found to be resistant to the action of proteases such as Nagarse (subtilisin, EC 3.4.21.14). Nagarse under the same conditions, however, greatly decreased the malonyl-CoA inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity, the high-affinity binding of malonyl-CoA to mitochondria, and the ability of malonyl-CoA to shift to the ...

  5. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  6. Molecular characterization of inherited carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, F; Verderio, E; Fiorucci, S; Cavadini, P; Finocchiaro, G; Uziel, G; Lamantea, E; Gellera, C; DiDonato, S

    1992-01-01

    Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTase II; palmitoyl-CoA:L-carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.21) is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder of energy metabolism. We studied the molecular basis of CPTase II deficiency in an early-onset patient presenting with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and cardiomyopathy. cDNA and genomic DNA analysis demonstrated that the patient was homozygous for a mutant CPTase II allele (termed ICV), which carried three missense mutations: a G-1203----A transition, predicting a Val-368----Ile substitution (V368I); a C-1992----T transition, predicting an Arg-631----Cys substitution (R631C); and an A-2040----G transition, predicting a Met-647----Val substitution (M647V). Genomic DNA analysis of family members showed that the mutations cosegregated with the disease in the family. However, screening of 59 healthy controls demonstrated that both the V368I and M647V mutations are sequence polymorphisms with allele frequencies of 0.5 and 0.25, respectively. By contrast, the R631C substitution was not detected in 22 normal individuals or in 12 of 14 CPTase II-deficient patients with the adult muscular form. Notably, 2 adult CPTase II-deficient patients were heterozygous for the ICV allele, thus suggesting compound heterozygosity for this and a different mutant allele. The consequences of the three mutations on enzyme activity were investigated by expressing normal and mutated CPTase II cDNAs in COS cells. The R631C substitution drastically depressed the catalytic activity of CPTase II, thus confirming that this is the crucial mutation. Interestingly, the V368I and M647V substitutions, which did not affect enzyme activity alone, exacerbated the effects of the R631C substitution. Biochemical characterization of mutant CPTase II in patient's cells showed that the mutations are associated with (i) severe reduction of Vmax (approximately 90%), (ii) normal apparent Km values, and (iii) decreased protein stability

  7. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  8. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, L.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1–5 μM, normal 20–55 μM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of 1 year, after interruption of carnitine supplementation for a 4-week period the carnitine profile was assessed and the free carnitine level had dropped to 10.4 μmol/l (normal: 20–55 μM) and total car...

  9. DISORDERS OF CARNITINE TRANSPORT AND THE CARNITINE CYCLE

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Nicola; di San Filippo, Cristina Amat; Pasquali, Marzia

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine plays an essential role in the transfer of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This transfer requires enzymes and transporters that accumulate carnitine within the cell (OCTN2 carnitine transporter), conjugate it with long chain fatty acids (carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, CPT1), transfer the acylcarnitine across the inner plasma membrane (carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase, CACT), and conjugate the fatty acid back to Coenzyme A for subsequent beta ox...

  10. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, G; Taroni, F; Rocchi, M; Martin, A L; Colombo, I; Tarelli, G T; DiDonato, S

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPTase; palmitoyl-CoA:L-carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.21), an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH2-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH2-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Images PMID:1988962

  11. Role of carnitine in disease

    OpenAIRE

    Flanagan Judith L; Simmons Peter A; Vehige Joseph; Willcox Mark DP; Garrett Qian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Carnitine is a conditionally essential nutrient that plays a vital role in energy production and fatty acid metabolism. Vegetarians possess a greater bioavailability than meat eaters. Distinct deficiencies arise either from genetic mutation of carnitine transporters or in association with other disorders such as liver or kidney disease. Carnitine deficiency occurs in aberrations of carnitine regulation in disorders such as diabetes, sepsis, cardiomyopathy, malnutrition, cirrhosis, en...

  12. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong; Chen, Shubao

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affec...

  13. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids provides an important source of energy for the heart as well as for skeletal muscle during prolonged aerobic work and for hepatic ketogenesis during long-term fasting. The carnitine shuttle is responsible for transferring long-chain fatty acids across the barrier of the inner mitochondrial membrane to gain access to the enzymes of beta-oxidation. The shuttle consists of three enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 2) and a small, soluble molecule, carnitine, to transport fatty acids as their long-chain fatty acylcarnitine esters. Carnitine is provided in the diet (animal protein) and also synthesized at low rates from trimethyl-lysine residues generated during protein catabolism. Carnitine turnover rates (300-500 micromol/day) are benefit in genetic or acquired disorders of energy production to improve fatty acid oxidation, to remove accumulated toxic fatty acyl-CoA metabolites, or to restore the balance between free and acyl-CoA. Two disorders have been described in children where the supply of carnitine becomes limiting for fatty acid oxidation: (1) A recessive defect of the muscle/kidney sodium-dependent, plasma membrane carnitine symporter, which presents in infancy with cardiomyopathy or hypoketotic hypoglycemia; treatment with oral carnitine is required for survival. (2) Chronic administration of pivalate-conjugated antibiotics in which excretion of pivaloyl-carnitine can lead to carnitine depletion; tissue levels may become low enough to limit fatty acid oxidation, although no cases of illness due to carnitine deficiency have been described. There is speculation that carnitine supplements might be beneficial in other settings (such as genetic acyl-CoA oxidation defects--"secondary carnitine deficiency", chronic ischemia, hyperalimentation, nutritional carnitine deficiency), but efficacy has not been documented. The formation of abnormal

  14. Role of carnitine in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flanagan Judith L

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carnitine is a conditionally essential nutrient that plays a vital role in energy production and fatty acid metabolism. Vegetarians possess a greater bioavailability than meat eaters. Distinct deficiencies arise either from genetic mutation of carnitine transporters or in association with other disorders such as liver or kidney disease. Carnitine deficiency occurs in aberrations of carnitine regulation in disorders such as diabetes, sepsis, cardiomyopathy, malnutrition, cirrhosis, endocrine disorders and with aging. Nutritional supplementation of L-carnitine, the biologically active form of carnitine, is ameliorative for uremic patients, and can improve nerve conduction, neuropathic pain and immune function in diabetes patients while it is life-saving for patients suffering primary carnitine deficiency. Clinical application of carnitine holds much promise in a range of neural disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, hepatic encephalopathy and other painful neuropathies. Topical application in dry eye offers osmoprotection and modulates immune and inflammatory responses. Carnitine has been recognized as a nutritional supplement in cardiovascular disease and there is increasing evidence that carnitine supplementation may be beneficial in treating obesity, improving glucose intolerance and total energy expenditure.

  15. Relative Carnitine Deficiency in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipek, Pauline A.; Juranek, Jenifer; Nguyen, Minh T.; Cummings, Christa; Gargus, J. Jay

    2004-01-01

    A random retrospective chart review was conducted to document serum carnitine levels on 100 children with autism. Concurrently drawn serum pyruvate, lactate, ammonia, and alanine levels were also available in many of these children. Values of free and total carnitine ([rho] less than 0.001), and pyruvate ([rho]=0.006) were significantly reduced…

  16. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-02

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event.

  17. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event

  18. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  19. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine was administered intravenously to six normal subjects, one patient with primary muscle carnitine deficiency (MCD), and four patients with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD). Specific radioactivity was followed in plasma for 28 d. A three-compartment model (extracellular fluid, muscle, and ''other tissues'') was adopted. Rate constants, fluxes, pool sizes, and turnover times were calculated. Results of these calculations indicated reduced transport of carnitine into muscle in both forms of primary carnitine deficiency. However, in SCD, the reduced rate of carnitine transport was attributed to reduced plasma carnitine concentration. In MCD, the results are consistent with an intrinsic defect in the transport process. Abnormal fluctuations of the plasma carnitine, but of a different form, occurred in MCD and SCD. The significance of these are unclear, but in SCD they suggest abnormal regulation of the muscle/plasma carnitine concentration gradient. In 8 of 11 subjects, carnitine excretion was less than dietary carnitine intake. Carnitine excretion rates calculated by kinetic compartmental analysis were higher than corresponding rates measured directly, indicating degradation of carnitine. However, we found no radioactive metabolites of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine in urine. These observations suggest that dietary carnitine was metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract

  20. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CPT I deficiency carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency is a condition ...

  1. The plasma carnitine concentration regulates renal OCTN2 expression and carnitine transport in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Schürch, R; Todesco, L.; Novakova, K.; Mevissen, M.; Stieger, B; Krähenbühl, S

    2010-01-01

    Previous findings in rats and in human vegetarians suggest that the plasma carnitine concentration and/or carnitine ingestion may influence the renal reabsorption of carnitine. We tested this hypothesis in rats with secondary carnitine deficiency following treatment with N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP) for 2 weeks and rats treated with excess L-carnitine for 2 weeks. Compared to untreated control rats, treatment with THP was associated with an approximately 70% decrease in plasma car...

  2. Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 form a complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Console, Lara; Giangregorio, Nicola; Indiveri, Cesare; Tonazzi, Annamaria

    2014-09-01

    Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 are members of the carnitine system, which are responsible of the regulation of the mitochondrial CoA/acyl-CoA ratio and of supplying substrates for the ß-oxidation to mitochondria. This study, using cross-Linking reagent, Blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation followed by detection with immunoblotting, shows conclusive evidence about the interaction between carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase supporting the channeling of acylcarnitines and carnitine at level of the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:24898781

  3. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Emily Cornforth; di San Filippo, Cristina Amat; Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi C.; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency is caused by defective OCTN2 carnitine transporters encoded by the SLC22A5 gene. Lack of carnitine impairs fatty acid oxidation resulting in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hepatic encephalopathy, skeletal and cardiac myopathy. Recently, asymptomatic mothers with primary carnitine deficiency were identified by low carnitine levels in their infant by newborn screening. Here we evaluate mutations in the SLC22A5 gene and carnitine transport in fibroblasts from symptomatic ...

  4. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Rebouche, C J; Engel, A G

    1984-01-01

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine wa...

  5. The Effect of Carnitine Supplementation on Hyperammonemia and Carnitine Deficiency Treated with Valproic Acid in a Psychiatric Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Masaru; Nagamine, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of levocarnitine (active isoform of carnitine, L-Carnitine) supplementation on serum ammonia and carnitine levels simultaneously, and their clinical outcomes in valproic acid-treated psychiatric subjects.

  6. Mutations in the organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 in primary carnitine deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuhuan; Ye, Jing; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Longo, Nicola

    1999-01-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation caused by defective carnitine transport. This disease presents early in life with hypoketotic hypoglycemia or later in life with skeletal myopathy or cardiomyopathy. The gene for this condition maps to 5q31.2–32 and OCTN2, an organic cation/carnitine transporter, also maps to the same chromosomal region. Here we test the causative role of OCTN2 in primary carnitine deficiency by searching for mutations in ...

  7. Synthesis of carboxy-labelled 1-carnitine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodfellow, D.B.; Hoppel, C.L.; Turkaly, J.S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (USA). School of Medicine)

    1982-03-01

    A method for the production of carboxy-labelled l-carnitine is described. The first step is the chemical synthesis of 4-N-trimethylammoniobutanoate (butyrobetaine) from the precursors 4-aminobutanoate and iodomethane. The second step involves the hydroxylation of butyrobetaine to form l-carnitine using butyrobetaine hydroxylase partially purified from bovine calf liver. The method also can be used to synthesize Me-labelled and uniformly-chain-labelled l-carnitine.

  8. Novel aspects of carnitine function and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Violante, Sara Liliana Nunes, 1983-

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Farmácia (Bioquímica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Farmácia, 2013 Normal functioning of fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism depends on carnitine. Although this compound has been extensively studied over the years, some aspects of carnitine metabolism and function remain unclear. This thesis aimed to: 1) elucidate the reverse action of the carnitine shuttle in the mitochondrial detoxification of intermediates accumulating in mitochondrial fatty acid β-o...

  9. Synthesis of carboxy-labelled 1-carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the production of carboxy-labelled l-carnitine is described. The first step is the chemical synthesis of 4-N-trimethylammoniobutanoate (butyrobetaine) from the precursors 4-aminobutanoate and iodomethane. The second step involves the hydroxylation of butyrobetaine to form l-carnitine using butyrobetaine hydroxylase partially purified from bovine calf liver. The method also can be used to synthesize Me-labelled and uniformly-chain-labelled l-carnitine. (author)

  10. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  11. Carnitine Level Changes with the Ketogenic Diet

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the ketogenic diet (KD) on carnitine levels were determined in 38 consecutive patients with epilepsy treated at Rush-Presbyterian-St Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, IL Carnitine levels were determined at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24 months of diet treatment.

  12. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 370C in the presence of 14C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with 14C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine

  13. Genetics Home Reference: primary carnitine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are at risk for heart failure, liver problems, coma, and sudden death. Problems related to primary carnitine ... management of various health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related ...

  14. Primary Carnitine deficiency in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Køber, Lars; Lund, Allan M; Nielsen, Olav W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carnitine deficiency can cause cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia. The prevalence in the Faroe Islands is the highest reported in the world (1:300). A nationwide screening program identified 76 Faroese adult patients (15-80 years) with Primary Carnitine Deficiency (PCD). We describe...... prior and current health status and symptoms in these patients, especially focusing on cardiac characteristics. METHODS: Upon identification, patients were immediately admitted for physical examination, ECG, blood tests and initiation of L-carnitine supplementation. Medical records were reviewed and...... patients were interviewed. Echocardiography and blood tests were performed in 35 patients before and after L-carnitine supplementation. RESULTS: All patients were either asymptomatic or had minor symptoms when diagnosed. Echocardiography including LVEF, global longitudinal strain and dimensions were normal...

  15. L-carnitine therapy in isovaleric acidemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, C R; Millington, D S; Maltby, D A; Kahler, S G; Bohan, T P

    1984-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia, resulting from isovaleryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, is associated with marked reduction of free carnitine in both plasma and urine. Fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, hydrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry have unequivocally identified the existence of isovalerylcarnitine, a new metabolite specific for this disorder. Administration of equimolar amounts of glycine or L-carnitine separately with leucine demonstrated that isovaleryl-coenzyme A ...

  16. Altered carnitine transport in pressure-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously observed reduced carnitine levels in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for reduced myocardial carnitine content, carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Hearts were excised from sham-operated and aortic-constricted rats 3 weeks following surgery and perfused at 60 mm Hg aortic pressure with buffer containing various concentrations of L-14C-carnitine. Carnitine uptake by control and hypertrophied hearts was linear throughout 30 minutes of perfusion with 40 μM carnitine. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by 25% in hypertrophied hearts at each time point examined. The reduction in uptake by hypertrophied hearts was also evident when hearts were perfused with 100 or 200 μM carnitine. When 0.05 mM mersalyl acid was included in the buffer to inhibit the carrier-mediated component of transport, no difference in carnitine uptake was observed indicating that the transport of carnitine by diffusion was unaltered in the hypertrophied myocardium. Carrier-mediated carnitine uptake (total uptake - uptake by diffusion) was significantly reduced by approximately 40% in hypertrophied hearts at all concentrations examined. Thus, the reduction in carnitine content in the pressure-overload hypertrophied rat heart appears to be due to a reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake by the heart

  17. Mechanisms for altered carnitine content in hypertrophied rat hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnitine levels are reduced in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction (banding) and evaluated in hypertrophied hearts of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In an attempt to determine the mechanisms for these alterations, L-[14C]carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by ∼20% in hypertrophied hearts of banded rats at all perfusate carnitine concentrations employed. The reduction in total uptake was due to a 40% reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake with no difference in uptake by diffusion. In contrast, carnitine uptake was not altered in isolated hypertrophied hearts of SHR. However, serum carnitine levels were elevated in SHR, which could result in increased myocardial carnitine uptake in vivo. The data suggest that altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of aortic-banded rats is due to an alteration in the carrier-mediated carnitine transport system in the myocardium. However, altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of SHR is not due to a change in the carnitine transport system per se but may rather be due to a change in serum carnitine levels

  18. Cisplatin-induced downregulation of OCTN2 affects carnitine wasting

    OpenAIRE

    Lancaster, Cynthia; Hu, Chaoxin; Franke, Ryan; Filipski, Kelly; Orwick, S.J.; Chen, Zhaoyuan; Zuo, Zhili; Loos, Walter; Sparreboom, Alex

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Carnitine is an essential cofactor for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation that is actively reabsorbed by the luminal transporter Octn2 (Slc22a5). Because the nephrotoxic agent cisplatin causes urinary loss of carnitine in humans, we hypothesized that cisplatin may affect Octn2 function. Experimental Design: Excretion of carnitine and acetylcarnitine was measured in urine collected from mice with or without cisplatin administration. The transport of carnitine was assessed ...

  19. Identification of genes required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa carnitine catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wargo, Matthew J.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine is a quaternary amine compound prevalent in animal tissues, and a potential carbon, nitrogen and energy source for pathogens during infection. Characterization of activities in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell lysates has previously shown that carnitine is converted to 3-dehydrocarnitine (3-dhc) which is in turn metabolized to glycine betaine (GB), an intermediate metabolite in the catabolism of carnitine to glycine. However, the identities of the enzymes required for carnitine catabolis...

  20. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium

  1. Dicarboxylicaciduria and secondary carnitine deficiency in glycogenosis type IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D; Poorthuis, B.J.; van Gelderen, H. H.; van de Kamp, J J

    1987-01-01

    A 3 year old boy developed an unusually mild form of glycogen storage disease type IV. Metabolic investigations showed severe abnormalities of fatty acid and carnitine metabolism. A muscle carnitine deficiency was found. Treatment with L-carnitine orally led to a notable improvement in muscle strength.

  2. Effect of (L-Carnitine) on acetyl-L-carnitine production by heart mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieber, L.L.; Lilly, K.; Lysiak, W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors recently reported a large efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine from rat heart mitochondria during state 3 respiration with pyruvate as substrate both in the presence and absence of malate. In this series of experiments, the effect of the concentration of L-carnitine on the efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine and on the production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from 2-/sup 14/C-pyruvate was determined. Maximum acetylcarnitine production (approximately 25 n moles/min/mg protein) was obtained at 3-5 mM L-carnitine in the absence of added malate. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production decreased as the concentration of L-carnitine increased; it plateaued at 3-5 mM L-carnitine. These data indicate carnitine can stimulate flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase and can reduce flux of acetyl CoA through the Krebs cycle by acting as an acceptor of the acetyl moieties of acetyl CoA generated by pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  3. Effect of [L-Carnitine] on acetyl-L-carnitine production by heart mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors recently reported a large efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine from rat heart mitochondria during state 3 respiration with pyruvate as substrate both in the presence and absence of malate. In this series of experiments, the effect of the concentration of L-carnitine on the efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine and on the production of 14CO2 from 2-14C-pyruvate was determined. Maximum acetylcarnitine production (approximately 25 n moles/min/mg protein) was obtained at 3-5 mM L-carnitine in the absence of added malate. 14CO2 production decreased as the concentration of L-carnitine increased; it plateaued at 3-5 mM L-carnitine. These data indicate carnitine can stimulate flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase and can reduce flux of acetyl CoA through the Krebs cycle by acting as an acceptor of the acetyl moieties of acetyl CoA generated by pyruvate dehydrogenase

  4. Effects of oral L-carnitine and DL-carnitine supplementation on alloxan-diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Barbosa Bazotte; Gisele Lopes-Bertolini

    2012-01-01

    The effect of oral L-carnitine (LC) or DL-carnitine (DLC) supplementation during one or four weeks (200 or 400 mg.kg-1.day-1) in diabetic rats was investigated. After the supplementation period, the blood was collected for the evaluation of total (TC) and free L-carnitine (FC), glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triacylglycerol. Tissues were collected for the determination of TC and FC concentrations. The c...

  5. Does carnitine have a role in fat absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leichter, J.; Ottem, A.; Hahn, P.

    1987-08-24

    The effect of D-carnitine and tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA), an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase, on intestinal absorption of palmitic acid was determined. The proximal intestinal segment was ligated in adult male rats and filled with 0.5 ..mu..Ci of /sup 14/C-palmitic acid alone or with either D-carnitine or TDGA. Thirty minutes alter the radioactivity was determined in the intestinal lumen, intestinal wall and plasma. The absorption of palmitic acid was decreased in the presence of D-carnitine (10 mg/ml) as evidenced by significantly lower levels of radioactivity in the gut wall and the plasma and by significantly greater residual radioactivity in the lumenal contents. L-carnitine had no effect on plasma radioactivity but if D- and L-carnitine were given together the effect of D-carnitine was still in evidence. TDGA also inhibited intestinal absorption of palmitic acid. 8 references, 2 tables.

  6. Does carnitine have a role in fat absorption?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of D-carnitine and tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA), an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase, on intestinal absorption of palmitic acid was determined. The proximal intestinal segment was ligated in adult male rats and filled with 0.5 μCi of 14C-palmitic acid alone or with either D-carnitine or TDGA. Thirty minutes alter the radioactivity was determined in the intestinal lumen, intestinal wall and plasma. The absorption of palmitic acid was decreased in the presence of D-carnitine (10 mg/ml) as evidenced by significantly lower levels of radioactivity in the gut wall and the plasma and by significantly greater residual radioactivity in the lumenal contents. L-carnitine had no effect on plasma radioactivity but if D- and L-carnitine were given together the effect of D-carnitine was still in evidence. TDGA also inhibited intestinal absorption of palmitic acid. 8 references, 2 tables

  7. Carnitine Levels in Skeletal Muscle, Blood, and Urine in Patients with Primary Carnitine Deficiency During Intermission of l-Carnitine Supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, J.; Thomsen, J. A.; Olesen, J. H.; Lund, T. M.; Mohr, M.; Clementsen, J.; NIELSEN, O. W.; Lund, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is a disorder of fatty acid oxidation with a high prevalence in the Faroe Islands. Only patients homozygous for the c.95A>G (p.N32S) mutation have displayed severe symptoms in the Faroese patient cohort. In this study, we investigated carnitine levels in skeletal muscle, plasma, and urine as well as renal elimination kinetics before and after intermission with l-carnitine in patients homozygous for c.95A>G.

  8. Intracellular in vitro probe acylcarnitine assay for identifying deficiencies of carnitine transporter and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Jamiyan; Kobayashi, Hironori; Hasegawa, Yuki; Yamada, Kenji; Takahashi, Tomoo; Takayanagi, Masaki; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) disorders are caused by defects in one of the FAO enzymes that regulates cellular uptake of fatty acids and free carnitine. An in vitro probe acylcarnitine (IVP) assay using cultured cells and tandem mass spectrometry is a tool to diagnose enzyme defects linked to most FAO disorders. Extracellular acylcarnitine (AC) profiling detects carnitine palmitoyltransferase-2, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, and other FAO deficiencies. However, the diagnosis of primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) or carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1) deficiency using the conventional IVP assay has been hampered by the presence of a large amount of free carnitine (C0), a key molecule deregulated by these deficiencies. In the present study, we developed a novel IVP assay for the diagnosis of PCD and CPT1 deficiency by analyzing intracellular ACs. When exogenous C0 was reduced, intracellular C0 and total AC in these deficiencies showed specific profiles clearly distinguishable from other FAO disorders and control cells. Also, the ratio of intracellular to extracellular C0 levels showed a significant difference in cells with these deficiencies compared with control. Hence, intracellular AC profiling using the IVP assay under reduced C0 conditions is a useful method for diagnosing PCD or CPT1 deficiency. PMID:23143007

  9. Supplementation with carnitine for weight loss: a biochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henry Osorio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Carnitine is a molecule involved in transporting activated fatty acids among different cellular compartments, which is mostlikely present in all animal species, and in numerous microorganisms and plants. Recently the trend in the field of weightcontrol is to include carnitine in the diet as an agent responsible for weight loss. In the present review, some findings arediscussed from a biochemical point of view to illustrate if the use of carnitine for weight loss can be considered fiction orreality.

  10. Regulation of normal human polyrnorphonuclear leucocytes by carnitine

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Fattorossi; Roberto Biselli; Anna Casciaro; Sonia Tzantzoglou; Claudio De Simone

    1993-01-01

    The effect of carnitine, a drug that plays an essential role in mitochondria metabolism, on some of the most important human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) activation steps including modulation of adhesion molecule density, reactive oxygen species production, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production was investigated. The capability of carnitine in protecting PMN from deter ioration on storage was also studied. Data shows that carnitine exerts considerable effects on all PMN function...

  11. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to quantitate the dynamic parameters of carnitine metabolism in the dog. Six mongrel dogs were given intravenous injections of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine and the specific radioactivity of carnitine was followed in plasma and urine for 19-28 days. The data were analyzed by kinetic compartmental analysis. A three-compartment, open-system model [(a) extracellular fluid, (b) cardiac and skeletal muscle, (c) other tissues, particularly liver and kidney] was adopted and kinetic parameters (carnitine flux, pool sizes, kinetic constants) were derived. In four of six dogs the size of the muscle carnitine pool obtained by kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 5%) with estimates based on measurement of carnitine concentrations in different muscles. In three of six dogs carnitine excretion rates derived from kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 9%) with experimentally measured values, but in three dogs the rates by kinetic compartmental analysis were significantly higher than the corresponding rates measured directly. Appropriate chromatographic analyses revealed no radioactive metabolites in muscle or urine of any of the dogs. Turnover times for carnitine were (mean +/- SEM): 0.44 +/- 0.05 h for extracellular fluid, 232 +/- 22 h for muscle, and 7.9 +/- 1.1 h for other tissues. The estimated flux of carnitine in muscle was 210 pmol/min/g of tissue. Whole-body turnover time for carnitine was 62.9 +/- 5.6 days (mean +/- SEM). Estimated carnitine biosynthesis ranged from 2.9 to 28 mumol/kg body wt/day. Results of this study indicate that kinetic compartmental analysis may be applicable to study of human carnitine metabolism

  12. Inhibition of OCTN2-Mediated Transport of Carnitine by Etoposide

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chaoxin; Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Zuo, Zhili; Hu, Shuiying; Chen, Zhaoyuan; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Baker, Sharyn D.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2012-01-01

    OCTN2 is a bifunctional transporter that reabsorbs filtered carnitine in a sodium dependent manner and secretes organic cations into urine as a proton antiport mechanism. We hypothesized that inhibition of OCTN2 by anticancer drugs can influence carnitine resorption. OCTN2-mediated transport inhibition by anticancer drugs was assessed using cells transfected with human OCTN2 (hOCTN2) or mouse Octn2 (mOctn2). Excretion of carnitine and acetylcarnitine was measured in urine collected from mice ...

  13. Structural model of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I based on the carnitine acetyltransferase crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Montserrat; López-VViñas, Eduardo; Valencia, Alfonso; Serra, Dolors; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Asins, Guillermina

    2004-01-01

    CPT I (carnitine palmitoyltransferase I) catalyses the conversion of palmitoyl-CoA into palmitoylcarnitine in the presence of L-carnitine, facilitating the entry of fatty acids into mitochondria. We propose a 3-D (three-dimensional) structural model for L-CPT I (liver CPT I), based on the similarity of this enzyme to the recently crystallized mouse carnitine acetyltransferase. The model includes 607 of the 773 amino acids of L-CPT I, and the positions of carnitine, CoA and the palmitoyl group were assigned by superposition and docking analysis. Functional analysis of this 3-D model included the mutagenesis of several amino acids in order to identify putative catalytic residues. Mutants D477A, D567A and E590D showed reduced L-CPT I activity. In addition, individual mutation of amino acids forming the conserved Ser685-Thr686-Ser687 motif abolished enzyme activity in mutants T686A and S687A and altered K(m) and the catalytic efficiency for carnitine in mutant S685A. We conclude that the catalytic residues are His473 and Asp477, while Ser687 probably stabilizes the transition state. Several conserved lysines, i.e. Lys455, Lys505, Lys560 and Lys561, were also mutated. Only mutants K455A and K560A showed decreases in activity of 50%. The model rationalizes the finding of nine natural mutations in patients with hereditary L-CPT I deficiencies. PMID:14711372

  14. Effects of oral L-carnitine and DL-carnitine supplementation on alloxan-diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Barbosa Bazotte

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of oral L-carnitine (LC or DL-carnitine (DLC supplementation during one or four weeks (200 or 400 mg.kg-1.day-1 in diabetic rats was investigated. After the supplementation period, the blood was collected for the evaluation of total (TC and free L-carnitine (FC, glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and triacylglycerol. Tissues were collected for the determination of TC and FC concentrations. The carnitine supplementation did not change levels of glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C in the blood. Diabetic rats showed hypertriacylglycerolemia and decreased blood and tissue levels of FC and TC. Normalization of the blood triacylglycerol and increased blood and tissue levels of FC and TC were observed with the LC or DLC supplementation. However, the hyperglycemia remained unchanged. Thus, the reduction of blood triacylglycerol obtained with carnitine supplementation in the diabetic rats did not depend on an amelioration in the glycemia and was mediated partly at least by an increment of serum and tissue concentrations of FC and TC.

  15. Low availability of carnitine precursors as a possible reason for the diminished plasma carnitine concentrations in pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Seliger Gregor; Hanisch Nicole; Ringseis Robert; Eder Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background It has been shown that plasma carnitine concentrations decrease markedly during gestation. A recent study performed with a low number of subjects suggested that this effect could be due to a low iron status which leads to an impairment of carnitine synthesis. The present study aimed to confirm this finding in a greater number of subjects. It was moreover intended to find out whether low carnitine concentrations during pregnancy could be due to a reduced availability of pre...

  16. Genes involved in carnitine synthesis and carnitine uptake are up-regulated in the liver of sows during lactation

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Susann; Ringseis, Robert; Most, Erika; Hillen, Sonja; Becker, Sabrina; Erhardt, Georg; Reiner, Gerald; Eder, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Convincing evidence exist that carnitine synthesis and uptake of carnitine into cells is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA), a transcription factor which is physiologically activated during fasting or energy deprivation. Sows are typically in a negative energy balance during peak lactation. We investigated the hypothesis that genes involved in carnitine synthesis and uptake in the liver of sows are up-regulated during peak lactation. FINDINGS:Tra...

  17. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-[3H]carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined

  18. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Muscle contraction augmented carnitine uptake into rat hindlimb muscles. ► An increase in carnitine uptake was due to an intrinsic clearance, not blood flow. ► Histochemical analysis showed sarcolemmal OCTN2 was emphasized after contraction. ► OCTN2 protein in sarcolemmal fraction was increased in contracting muscles. -- Abstract: Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CLuptake) of L-[3H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CLuptake of [14C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CLuptake of L-[3H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4–1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p uptake of [14C]IAP was much higher than that of L-[3H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p < 0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly via the contraction-induced translocation of its specific transporter OCTN2 to the plasma membrane.

  19. Carnitine Levels in Skeletal Muscle, Blood, and Urine in Patients with Primary Carnitine Deficiency During Intermission of L-Carnitine Supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J; Thomsen, J A; Olesen, J H; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Mohr, M; Clementsen, J; Nielsen, O W; Lund, A M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is a disorder of fatty acid oxidation with a high prevalence in the Faroe Islands. Only patients homozygous for the c.95A>G (p.N32S) mutation have displayed severe symptoms in the Faroese patient cohort. In this study, we investigated carnitine levels...... in skeletal muscle, plasma, and urine as well as renal elimination kinetics before and after intermission with L-carnitine in patients homozygous for c.95A>G. Methods: Five male patients homozygous for c.95A>G were included. Regular L-carnitine supplementation was stopped and the patients were...... observed during five days. Blood and urine were collected throughout the study. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained at 0, 48, and 96 h. Results: Mean skeletal muscle free carnitine before discontinuation of L-carnitine was low, 158 nmol/g (SD 47.4) or 5.4% of normal. Mean free carnitine in plasma (fC0...

  20. Systemic carnitine deficiency exacerbated by a strict vegetarian diet.

    OpenAIRE

    Etzioni, A.; Levy, J; Nitzan, M; Erde, P; Benderly, A

    1984-01-01

    A 12-year old boy suffered episodes of vomiting, lethargy, and hypoglycaemia from the age of 1 year. Adhering to a vegetarian diet caused an increase in frequency and severity of the attacks. It was found that he was suffering from systemic carnitine deficiency that responded promptly to treatment with L-carnitine.

  1. Muscle carnitine deficiency presenting as familial fatal cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, A. A.; M. Jaffe; Shapira, Y.; Ne'eman, Z; Gutman, A; S. Korman

    1987-01-01

    Three siblings presented with fatal cardiomyopathy confirmed by electron microscopy, and normal serum but low muscle carnitine concentrations. A fourth had similar signs but remained asymptomatic. He was treated with carnitine orally which increased the concentration in muscle, though it remained below normal. Electron microscopic features were unchanged.

  2. Active sites residues of beef liver carnitine octanoyltransferase (COT) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nic a'Bháird, N; Yankovskaya, V; Ramsay, R R

    1998-01-01

    The carnitine acyltransferases which catalyse the reversible transfer of fatty acyl groups between carnitine and coenzyme A have been proposed to contain a catalytic histidine. Here, the chemical reactivity of active site groups has been used to demonstrate differences between the active sites of beef liver carnitine octanoyltransferase (COT) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-II (CPT-II). Treatment of CPT-II with the histidine-selective reagent, diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC), resulted in simple linear pseudo-first-order kinetics. The reversal of the inhibition by hydroxylamine and the pKa (7.1) of the modified residue indicated that the residue was a histidine. The order of the inactivation kinetics showed that 1mol of histidine was modified per mol of CPT-II.When COT was treated with DEPC the kinetics of inhibition were biphasic with an initial rapid loss of activity followed by a slower loss of activity. The residue reacting in the faster phase of inhibition was not a histidine but possibly a serine. The modification of this residue did not lead to complete loss of activity suggesting that a direct role in catalysis is unlikely. It was deduced that the residue modified by DEPC in the slower phase was a lysine and indeed fluorodinitrobenzene (FDNB) inactivated COT with linear pseudo-first-order kinetics. The COT peptide containing the FDNB-labelled lysine was isolated and sequenced. Alignment of this sequence placed it 10 amino acids downstream of the putative active-site histidine. PMID:9480926

  3. Carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children with solid malignancies receiving doxorubicin therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Anant Khositseth; Suwadee Jirasakpisarn; Samart Pakakasama; Lulin Choubtuym; Duangrurdee Wattanasirichaigoon

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Previous studies demonstrated l-carnitine decreasing doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Our objectives were to study carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children treated with doxorubicin and the effect of short-term l-carnitine supplements. Materials and Methods: Serial carnitine levels and cardiac functions were obtained in children with newly diagnosed solid malignancies before doxorubicin, after cumulative doses of ≥150 mg/m 2 and ≥300 mg/m 2 , respectively. Oral l-carnitine 10...

  4. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Gahl, W A; Bernardini, I; Dalakas, M; Rizzo, W B; Harper, G S; Hoeg, J M; Hurko, O; Bernar, J

    1988-01-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration ...

  5. Carnitine Profile and Effect of Suppletion in Children with Renal Fanconi Syndrome due to Cystinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Besouw, M.; Cornelissen, E; Cassiman, D.; Kluijtmans, L.; van den Heuvel, L; Levtchenko, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder marked by intralysosomal cystine accumulation. Patients present with generalized proximal tubular dysfunction called renal Fanconi syndrome. Urinary carnitine loss results in plasma and muscle carnitine deficiency, but no clinical signs of carnitine deficiency have been described. Also, the optimal dose of carnitine supplementation is undefined. This study aimed to determine whether currently recommended carnitine doses result in adequ...

  6. Carnitine levels in 26,462 individuals from the nationwide screening program for primary carnitine deficiency in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Nielsen, Olav W; Janzen, Nils; Duno, Morten; Gislason, Hannes; Køber, Lars; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Lund, Allan M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation and has been associated to episodes of sudden death in the Faroe Islands. Data are presented from the nationwide population based Faroese screening program to find people with low carnitine...... levels indicating PCD. METHODS: Whole blood samples from dried blood spots were analysed by tandem mass spectrometry with and without butylation. Genetic analyses were performed in all people with non-butylated free carnitine (fC0) below 7 μmol/L. RESULTS: 55 % (n = 26,462) of the entire population was...... screened and 89 PCD patients were identified, yielding an overall prevalence of 1:297 of PCD in the Faroe Islands. Carnitine levels were positively correlated to age in both males and females (p < 0.003) although levels decreased in females when reaching fertile age. The gender difference in mean carnitine...

  7. Molecular characterization of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C

    OpenAIRE

    Gratacòs Batlle, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) catalyzes the conversion of long chain fatty acyl-CoAs into acylcarnitines, the first step in the transport of long chain fatty acids from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix, where they undergo β-oxidation. This reaction is not only central to the control of fatty acid oxidation, but it also determines the availability of long chain acyl-CoA for other processes. There are three different CPT1 isozymes: CPT1A (expressed in liver, pancreas, kidney,...

  8. Does L-carnitine improve endothelial function in hemodialysis patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sabri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients. These patients are also very prone to L-carnitine deficiency due to kidney disease. In this clinical trial, we investigated the effect of oral L-carnitine on endothelial function of these patients. Materials ans Methods : We studied 31 adult chronic hemodialysis patients in our center and divided them into two groups. The first group (n = 20 received 1500 mg/dialysis interval (every other day oral L-carnitine. The control group (n = 11 received placebo for one month. Ultrasonographic measurements of flow mediated dilation and carotid intima-media thickness were performed before and after one month of L-carnitine and placebo therapy. Results: This study showed that after one month of L-carnitine or placebo therapy there was no significant improvement in flow mediated dilation (p = 0.80 and p = 0.59, respectively or decrease in carotid intima-media thickness (p = 0.12 and p = 0.50, respectively. Conclusions: Our study revealed that one month of oral L-carnitine therapy did not improve endothelial function in hemodialysis patients. Long-term studies with large sample size using intravenous form and higher doses of the drug are required to clarify the questionable role of L-carnitine in hemodialysis patients.

  9. Stereoselective synthesis of L-[4-13C]carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stereoselective synthesis of L-[4-13C]carnitine was achieved in 5 steps. The label was introduced from K13CN into an easily separated diastereomeric pair of 3-deoxy-D-[1-13C]aldohexoses. Reductive amination of the labeled aldohexose yielded the corresponding D-1-(dimethylamino)[1-13C]alditol which was oxidized in two steps and alkylated with iodomethane to yield L-[4-13C]carnitine. The stereochemical integrity at C-2 of the 3-deoxy-D-[1-13C]glucose precursor was maintained throughout the synthesis of L-[4-13C]carnitine. (author)

  10. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system. PMID:27100509

  11. Characterisation of carnitine palmitoyltransferases in patients with a carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency: implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, J.; S. Jackson; Taroni, F; Swift, P; Turnbull, D M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) deficiency is one of the most common defects of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Two different enzymes (CPT-I and CPT-II) are involved. Due to problems in measuring enzyme activity, relatively little is known about the substrate specificity of each of the human enzymes. This is of considerable importance in the treatment of patients. The objectives were to establish a reliable method for the measurement of CPT activity in whole cells, to use...

  12. Synthesis of carbon-11 labelled (R)-carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A route to 11C-labelled (R)-carnitine, based on the methylation of the dimethyl derivative is described. Furthermore, a five-step synthesis for the enantiomerically pure precursor is outlined. (author)

  13. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy. PMID:27159507

  14. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuichi, Yasuro [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio [Faculty of Pharmacy, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Takakura, Hisashi [Faculty of Human Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Hanai, Yoshiteru [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Hashimoto, Takeshi [Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu (Japan); Masuda, Kazumi, E-mail: masuda@ed.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Human Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscle contraction augmented carnitine uptake into rat hindlimb muscles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in carnitine uptake was due to an intrinsic clearance, not blood flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histochemical analysis showed sarcolemmal OCTN2 was emphasized after contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OCTN2 protein in sarcolemmal fraction was increased in contracting muscles. -- Abstract: Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL{sub uptake}) of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL{sub uptake} of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p < 0.05). The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]IAP was much higher than that of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p < 0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly

  15. Synthesis of radioactively methyl-labelled (1)-carnitine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingalls, S.T.; Hoppel, C.L.; Turkaly, J.S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (USA). School of Medicine)

    1982-04-01

    Commercial (l)-carnitine chloride was N-demethylated by the action of sodium benzenemercaptide in warm N,N-dimethylformamide. The product 4-(N,N-dimethylammonio)-3-hydroxybutanoic acid chloride salt was isolated in good yield by ion exchange chromatography. Methylation of the product by /sup 14/C-iodomethane in dry methanol produced biologically active 4-N-Me-/sup 14/C-(l)-carnitine chloride of high specific activity in excellent yield.

  16. Molecular basis of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    IJlst, H.; Mandel, J L; Oostheim, W.; Ruiter, J.P.N.; Gutman, A.; Wanders, R. J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation is important for energy production, which is stressed by the different defects found in this pathway. Most of the enzyme deficiencies causing these defects are well characterized at both the protein and genomic levels. One exception is carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency, of which until now no mutations have been reported although the defect is enzymatically well characterized. CPT I is the key enzyme in the carnitine-dependent transport...

  17. Topical and transdermal delivery of L-carnitine

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Lizelle Trifena; Gerber, Minja; Grobler, Anne Frederica; Du Preez, Jan Lourens; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2011-01-01

    Background: The two types of skin aging (intrinsic and extrinsic) share important molecular features, while having distinct differences on the macromolecular level: both lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species, enhanced matrix metalloproteinase expression and decreased procollagen synthesis. L-Carnitine L-tartrate has been reported to have anti-aging effects. Aim and Methods: The delivery as well as the transport of L-carnitine to the target sites, i.e. stratum corneum an...

  18. Synthesis of radioactively methyl-labelled (1)-carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial (l)-carnitine chloride was N-demethylated by the action of sodium benzenemercaptide in warm N,N-dimethylformamide. The product 4-(N,N-dimethylammonio)-3-hydroxybutanoic acid chloride salt was isolated in good yield by ion exchange chromatography. Methylation of the product by 14C -iodomethane in dry methanol produced biologically active 4-N-Me-14C -(l)-carnitine chloride of high specific activity in excellent yield. (author)

  19. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahl, W.A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W.B.; Harper, G.S.; Hoeg, J.M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

    1988-02-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-(/sup 3/H)carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined.

  20. L- and DL-carnitine induce tetanic fade in rat neuromuscular preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lopes

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Carnitine, a structurally choline-like metabolite, has been used to increase athletic performance, although its effects on neuromuscular transmission have not been investigated. It is present in skeletal muscle and its plasma levels are about 30 to 90 µM. Using rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparations indirectly and directly stimulated with high rate pulses, D-carnitine (30 and 60 µM, L-carnitine (60 µM and DL-carnitine (60 µM were shown to induce tetanic fade (D-carnitine = 19.7 ± 3.1%, N = 6; L-carnitine = 16.6 ± 2.4%, N = 6; DL-carnitine = 14.9 ± 2.1%, N = 6 without any reduction of maximal tetanic tension. D-carnitine induced tetanic fade in neuromuscular preparations previously paralyzed with d-tubocurarine and directly stimulated. The effect was greater than that obtained by indirect muscle stimulation. Furthermore, previous addition of atropine (20 to 80 µM to the bath did not reduce carnitine isomer-induced tetanic fade. In contrast to D-carnitine, the tetanic fade induced by L- and DL-carnitine was antagonized by choline (60 µM. The combined effect of carnitine isomers and hemicholinium-3 (0.01 nM was similar to the effect of hemicholinium-3 alone. The data suggest that L- and DL-carnitine-induced tetanic fade seems to depend on their transport into the motor nerve terminal.

  1. The effect of homozygous deletion of the BBOX1 and Fibin genes on carnitine level and acyl carnitine profile.

    OpenAIRE

    Rashidi-Nezhad A; Talebi S; Saebnouri H.; Akrami S.M.; Reymond A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carnitine is a key molecule in energy metabolism that helps transport activated fatty acids into the mitochondria. Its homeostasis is achieved through oral intake, renal reabsorption and de novo biosynthesis. Unlike dietary intake and renal reabsorption, the importance of de novo biosynthesis pathway in carnitine homeostasis remains unclear, due to lack of animal models and description of a single patient defective in this pathway. CASE PRESENTATION: We identified by array compara...

  2. The effect of homozygous deletion of the BBOX1 and Fibin genes on carnitine level and acyl carnitine profile

    OpenAIRE

    Rashidi-Nezhad, Ali; Talebi, Saeed; Saebnouri, Homeira; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Reymond, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnitine is a key molecule in energy metabolism that helps transport activated fatty acids into the mitochondria. Its homeostasis is achieved through oral intake, renal reabsorption and de novo biosynthesis. Unlike dietary intake and renal reabsorption, the importance of de novo biosynthesis pathway in carnitine homeostasis remains unclear, due to lack of animal models and description of a single patient defective in this pathway. Case presentation We identified by array comparati...

  3. Plasma carnitine concentrations after chronic alcohol intoxication 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Kępka

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carnitine transports fatty acids from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix, where the fatty acids are oxidized. Chronic alcohol consumption reduces the concentration of carnitine and interferes with oxidative processes occurring in the cell.Aim: The assessment of carnitine concentrations in plasma of chronically intoxicated alcohol dependent persons in a 49-day abstinence period.Material/Methods: The study included 31 patients (5 women and 27 men aged from 26 to 60 years (44.6± 8.9 and 32 healthy subjects (15 women and 17 men aged 22-60 years (39.8± 9.4. The patients’ alcohol dependence ranged from 2 to 30 years (13.6± 7.5. Examined subjects consumed 75-700 g of ethanol/day (226.9± 151.5. Plasma concentrations of free and total carnitine were measured three times: at the first (T0, 30th (T30 and 49th (T49 day of hospital detoxification. Free (FC and total (TC carnitine were determined by the spectrophotometric method. Plasma acylcarnitine (AC concentration was calculated from the difference between TC and FC; then the AC/FC ratio was calculated. To determine statistically significant differences for related variables, Student’s t-test was used.Results: At T0, alcoholics had significantly lower concentration of FC and TC (p < 0.05 in plasma, as compared to the control group. In comparison to controls, at T30, plasma TC and FC (p < 0.01 as well as AC (p < 0.001 were reduced. The lowest concentration of TC, FC and AC (p < 0.001was found at T49. The ratio of AC/FC at T0 had a tendency to be higher in alcoholics than in the control group (p = 0.05, whereas at T49 it was significantly lower in alcoholics as compared to the control subjects (p < 0.05.Conclusions: Chronic alcohol intoxication causes a plasma deficiency of carnitine. Forty-nine days of abstinence showed a significant decrease in the concentration of TC, FC and AC. Further research is necessary to clarify whether a low level of plasma carnitine

  4. Crystal Structure of an L-Carnitine Complex with Pyrogallol[4]arene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, I.; Takeuchi, D.; Kitamura, Y.; Okamoto, R.; Aoki, K.

    2012-03-01

    L-Carnitine is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids from cytosol into mitochondria for generating metabolic energy. The survey of crystal structures of carnitine-containing proteins in the Protein Data Bank reveals that carnitine can take several conformations with the quarternary trimethylammonium terminal being always bound to aromatic residues through cation-π interactions in acyltransferases or carnitine-binding proteins. In order to demonstrate the importance of cation-π interaction as a carnitine recognition mechanism in the artificial receptor-ligand system that mimics the carnitine-binding sites, we have determined the crystal structure of a complex formed between L-carnitine and pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT) as a carnitine receptor, 2PCT·2(L-carnitine)·4EtOH. There form two crystallographically independent monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, which further form an obliquely arranged capsule-like dimeric [PCT·L-carnitine]2 structure through a pair of O-H (PCT)···O (L-carnitine) hydrogen bonds. This is the first report of PCT complex with chiral molecules. In each of the two monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, the L-carnitine molecule takes the elongated form with an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group and the carboxylate oxygen, and the cationic trimethylammonium moiety is incorporated into the cavity of the bowl-shaped PCT molecule through cation-π interactions. These features are similar to those at the D-carnitine-binding site in the crystal structure of the glycine betaine/carnitine/choline-binding protein complex.

  5. Carnitine deficiency associated with long-term pivampicillin treatment: the effect of a replacement therapy regime.

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, S J; Stokes, T C; Patel, S.; Cooper, M B; Betteridge, D. J.; Payne, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A 51 year old female developed a skeletal muscle myopathy after 3 months of pivampicillin therapy. Pivampicillin can cause carnitine deficiency due to the pivalic acid side group. Plasma carnitine content and the patients symptoms failed to improve significantly on discontinuing the drug. Oral carnitine replacement therapy was administered for 6 weeks but the patient's plasma carnitine levels responded only slowly to this treatment. It is suggested that pivampicillin inhibits uptake of carnit...

  6. Familial carnitine deficiency: further evidence for autosomal recessive transmission with variable expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Shahar, E.; Brand, N; Shapira, Y.; Barash, V; Gutman, A

    1988-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency occurring in families has been rarely reported and the genetic transmission has not yet been clearly elucidated. Five members of one family showing marked heterogeneity of carnitine deficiency states are presented. In three patients, there was no correlation between measurable carnitine levels in serum and muscle and the clinical findings. The parents, who are remote relatives from an isolated village in Kurdistan (Iraq), had low muscle carnitine levels; however, they wer...

  7. Transport of L-carnitine in human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Shunjiang; Flanagan, Judith L.; Simmons, Peter A; Vehige, Joseph; Willcox, Mark D.; Garrett, Qian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previously we demonstrated expression and localization of carnitine/organic cation transporters, OCTN1 and OCTN2, in human corneal and conjunctival epithelia. The present study aimed to examine the characteristics of L-carnitine transporters in cultured human limbal corneal (HCLE) and conjunctival epithelial (HCjE) cells. Methods Time-course, Na+-dependence, kinetics, energy- and pH- dependence of L-carnitine transport were investigated by monitoring L-[3H]carnitine uptake into HCLE a...

  8. Alterations in the carnitine metabolism in epileptic children treated with valproic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, S; Choi, J; Hyun, T.; Rha, Y.; Bae, C.

    1997-01-01

    Serum concentrations of total carnitine, free carnitine and acylcarnitine were measured in forty-one epileptic patients treated with valproic acid (VPA). Among them, 14 patients were on VPA monotherapy and 27 were on VPA polytherapy. Forty-one age and sex matched healthy normal controls were also evaluated for carnitine metabolism. The mean total and free carnitine were significantly lower in both the VPA monotherapy and polytherapy groups compared with the controls. However, there were no si...

  9. Critical update for the clinical use of L-carnitine analogs in cardiometabolic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Justo ML; Rodríguez-Rodríguez R; Mingorance C; Alvarez de Sotomayor M; Herrera MD

    2011-01-01

    Carmen Mingorance, Rosalía Rodríguez-Rodríguez, María Luisa Justo, María Álvarez de Sotomayor, María Dolores HerreraDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Seville, Seville, SpainAbstract: Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) and propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) are two naturally occurring carnitine derivates formed by carnitine acetyltransferase. The beneficial cardiovascular effects of ALC and PLC have been ex...

  10. Crystal Structure of an L-Carnitine Complex with Pyrogallol[4]arene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-Carnitine is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids from cytosol into mitochondria for generating metabolic energy. The survey of crystal structures of carnitine-containing proteins in the Protein Data Bank reveals that carnitine can take several conformations with the quarternary trimethylammonium terminal being always bound to aromatic residues through cation-π interactions in acyltransferases or carnitine-binding proteins. In order to demonstrate the importance of cation-π interaction as a carnitine recognition mechanism in the artificial receptor-ligand system that mimics the carnitine-binding sites, we have determined the crystal structure of a complex formed between L-carnitine and pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT) as a carnitine receptor, 2PCT·2(L-carnitine)·4EtOH. There form two crystallographically independent monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, which further form an obliquely arranged capsule-like dimeric [PCT·L-carnitine]2 structure through a pair of O-H (PCT)···O (L-carnitine) hydrogen bonds. This is the first report of PCT complex with chiral molecules. In each of the two monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, the L-carnitine molecule takes the elongated form with an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group and the carboxylate oxygen, and the cationic trimethylammonium moiety is incorporated into the cavity of the bowl-shaped PCT molecule through cation-π interactions. These features are similar to those at the D-carnitine-binding site in the crystal structure of the glycine betaine/carnitine/choline-binding protein complex.

  11. OCTN3 is a mammalian peroxisomal membrane carnitine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the β-oxidation of fatty acids. The role of the carnitine system is to maintain homeostasis in the acyl-CoA pools of the cell, keeping the acyl-CoA/CoA pool constant even under conditions of very high acyl-CoA turnover, thereby providing cells with a critical source of free CoA. Carnitine derivatives can be moved across intracellular barriers providing a shuttle mechanism between mitochondria, peroxisomes, and microsomes. We now demonstrate expression and colocalization of mOctn3, the intermediate-affinity carnitine transporter (K m 20 μM), and catalase in murine liver peroxisomes by TEM using immunogold labelled anti-mOctn3 and anti-catalase antibodies. We further demonstrate expression of hOCTN3 in control human cultured skin fibroblasts both by Western blotting and immunostaining analysis using our specific anti-mOctn3 antibody. In contrast with two peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, we show reduced expression of hOCTN3 in human PEX 1 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes is impaired but the biosynthesis of peroxisomal membrane proteins is normal, versus a complete absence of hOCTN3 in human PEX 19 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which both the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes as well as peroxisomal membranes are deficient. This supports the localization of hOCTN3 to the peroxisomal membrane. Given the impermeability of the peroxisomal membrane and the key role of carnitine in the transport of different chain-shortened products out of peroxisomes, there appears to be a critical need for the intermediate-affinity carnitine/organic cation transporter, OCTN3, on peroxisomal membranes now shown to be expressed in both human and murine peroxisomes. This Octn3 localization is in keeping with the essential role of carnitine in peroxisomal lipid metabolism

  12. The mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier: function, structure and physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Cesare; Iacobazzi, Vito; Tonazzi, Annamaria; Giangregorio, Nicola; Infantino, Vittoria; Convertini, Paolo; Console, Lara; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2011-08-01

    The carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier (CAC) is a transport protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane that belongs to the mitochondrial carrier protein family. In its cytosolic conformation the carrier consists of a bundle of six transmembrane α-helices, which delimit a water filled cavity opened towards the cytosol and closed towards the matrix by a network of interacting charged residues. Most of the functional data on this transporter come from studies performed with the protein purified from rat liver mitochondria or recombinant proteins from different sources incorporated into phospholipid vesicles (liposomes). The carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier transports carnitine and acylcarnitines with acyl chains of various lengths from 2 to 18 carbon atoms. The mammalian transporter exhibits higher affinity for acylcarnitines with longer carbon chains. The functional data indicate that CAC plays the important function of catalyzing transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondria in exchange for intramitochondrial free carnitine. This results in net transport of fatty acyl units into the mitochondrial matrix where they are oxidized by the β-oxidation enzymes. The essential role of the transporter in cell metabolism is demonstrated by the fact that alterations of the human gene SLC25A20 coding for CAC are associated with a severe disease known as carnitine carrier deficiency. This autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by life-threatening episodes of coma induced by fasting, cardiomyopathy, liver dysfunction, muscle weakness, respiratory distress and seizures. Until now 35 different mutations of CAC gene have been identified in carnitine carrier deficient patients. Some missense mutations concern residues of the signature motif present in all mitochondrial carriers. Diagnosis of carnitine carrier deficiency requires biochemical and genetic tests; treatment is essentially limited to important dietetic measures. Recently, a pharmacological approach based on the

  13. L‑carnitine ameliorates the liver inflammatory response by regulating carnitine palmitoyltransferase I‑dependent PPARγ signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fang; Zhang, Zongqi; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Jianping; Yu, Li; Liu, Su

    2016-02-01

    The liver is crucial for systemic inflammation in cancer cachexia. Previous studies have shown that L‑carnitine, as the key regulator of lipid metabolism, exerts an anti‑inflammatory effect in several diseases, and ameliorates the symptoms of cachexia by regulating the expression and activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) in the liver. However, the effect of L‑carnitine on the liver inflammatory response in cancer cachexia remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the CPT I‑dependent peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)γ signaling pathway in the ameliorative effect of L‑carnitine on the liver inflammatory response. This was investigated in a colon‑26 tumor‑bearing mouse model with cancer cachexia. Liver sections were immunohistochemically analyzed, and mRNA and protein levels of representative molecules of the CPT-associated PPARγ signaling pathway were assessed using PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The results showed that oral administration of L‑carnitine in these mice improved hepatocyte necrosis, liver cell cord derangement and hydropic or fatty degeneration of the liver cells in the liver tissues, decreased serum levels of malondialdehyde, increased serum levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and elevated the expression levels of PPARα and PPARγ at the mRNA and protein levels. These changes induced by L‑carnitine were reversed by treatment with etomoxir, an inhibitor of CPT I. The inhibitory effect of L‑carnitine on the increased expression level of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells was markedly weakened by GW9662, a selective inhibitor of PPAR‑γ. GW9662 also eliminated the inhibitory effect of L‑carnitine on the expression of cyclooxygenase‑2 (Cox‑2) in the liver, and on the serum expression levels of pro‑inflammatory prostaglandin E2, C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor‑α and

  14. Metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in human adults: Identification and quantification of urinary and fecal metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebouche, C.J.; Chenard, C.A. (Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City (USA))

    1991-04-01

    Results of kinetic and pharmacokinetic studies have suggested that dietary carnitine is not totally absorbed and is in part degraded in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. To determine the metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in humans, we administered orally a tracer dose of methyl-{sup 3}H L-carnitine with a meal to subjects who had been adapted to a low-carnitine diet or a high-carnitine diet. Urinary and fecal excretion of radiolabeled carnitine and metabolites was monitored for 5 to 11 d following administration of the test dose. Total radioactive metabolites excreted ranged from 13 to 34% (low carnitine diet) and 27 to 46% (high carnitine diet) of the ingested tracer. Major metabolites found were ({sup 3}H)trimethylamine N-oxide (8 to 39% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in urine) and ({sup 3}H)gamma-butyrobetaine (0.09 to 8% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in feces). Urinary excretion of total carnitine was 42 to 95% (high carnitine diet) and 190 to 364% (low carnitine diet) of intake. These results indicate that oral carnitine is 54 to 87% bioavailable from normal Western diets; the percentage of intake absorbed is related to the quantity ingested.

  15. Metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in human adults: Identification and quantification of urinary and fecal metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of kinetic and pharmacokinetic studies have suggested that dietary carnitine is not totally absorbed and is in part degraded in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. To determine the metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in humans, we administered orally a tracer dose of methyl-3H L-carnitine with a meal to subjects who had been adapted to a low-carnitine diet or a high-carnitine diet. Urinary and fecal excretion of radiolabeled carnitine and metabolites was monitored for 5 to 11 d following administration of the test dose. Total radioactive metabolites excreted ranged from 13 to 34% (low carnitine diet) and 27 to 46% (high carnitine diet) of the ingested tracer. Major metabolites found were [3H]trimethylamine N-oxide (8 to 39% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in urine) and [3H]gamma-butyrobetaine (0.09 to 8% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in feces). Urinary excretion of total carnitine was 42 to 95% (high carnitine diet) and 190 to 364% (low carnitine diet) of intake. These results indicate that oral carnitine is 54 to 87% bioavailable from normal Western diets; the percentage of intake absorbed is related to the quantity ingested

  16. epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of carnitine biosynthesis in mammals depend on the availability of substrates and the activity of enzymes subserving the pathway. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine is rate-limiting for synthesis of carnitine in the growing rat and to evaluate diet as a source of this precursor for carnitine biosynthesis. Rats apparently absorbed greater than 90% of a tracer dose of [methyl-3H]epsilon-N-trimethyllysine, and approximately 30% of that was incorporated into tissues as [3H]carnitine. Rats given oral supplements of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine (0.5-20 mg/d), but no dietary carnitine, excreted more carnitine than control animals receiving no dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine or carnitine. Rates of carnitine excretion increased in a dose-dependent manner. Tissue and serum levels of carnitine also increased with dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. There was no evidence that the capacity for carnitine biosynthesis was saturated even at the highest level of oral epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. Common dietary proteins (casein, soy protein and wheat gluten) were found to be poor sources of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine for carnitine biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine limits the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat

  17. Carnitine Deficiency as the Possible Etiology of Idiopathic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    OpenAIRE

    Trivellato, Mario; De Palo, Elio; Gatti, Rosalba; Parenti, Anna; Piazza, Mario

    1984-01-01

    Idiopathic mitral valve prolapse (IMVP) is a very common cardiac abnormality that may be linked to carnitine deficit (inadequate nutritional intake or absorption). One patient with IMVP and related symptoms that were resistant to drug therapy was fully studied. Free plasma carnitine and 24-hour free urine carnitine were measured twice, 10 days apart, after an overnight fast.

  18. Primary carnitine deficiency and pivalic acid exposure causing encephalopathy and fatal cardiac events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Nielsen, Olav W; Lund, Allan M; Køber, Lars; Djurhuus, Høgni

    2013-01-01

    Several episodes of sudden death among young Faroese individuals have been associated with primary carnitine deficiency (PCD). Patients suffering from PCD have low carnitine levels and can present with metabolic and/or cardiac complications. Pivalic acid exposure decreases carnitine levels. The...

  19. Characterisation of carnitine palmitoyltransferases in patients with a carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency: implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, J; Jackson, S; Taroni, F; Swift, P; Turnbull, D M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) deficiency is one of the most common defects of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Two different enzymes (CPT-I and CPT-II) are involved. Due to problems in measuring enzyme activity, relatively little is known about the substrate specificity of each of the human enzymes. This is of considerable importance in the treatment of patients. The objectives were to establish a reliable method for the measurement of CPT activity in whole cells, to use this to characterise the substrate specificity of each enzyme, and finally, to determine if medium chain triglycerides would be of benefit in the treatment of deficient patients. METHODS: A simple permeabilisation technique was used which allows the measurement of CPT activity in a small amount of cultured skin fibroblasts or peripheral blood cells. Using this technique three patients were identified with CPT deficiency. In two of these patients, one with CPT-I deficiency and one with CPT-II deficiency, a complete substrate specificity profile of the mitochondrial carnitine acyltransferases was established for all saturated even chain acyl-CoA esters. RESULTS: For both enzymes the highest CPT activity was with C12-CoA. About 70% of total cellular carnitine octanoyltransferase activity was due to mitochondrial CPT. As CPT is involved in the transport of medium chain fatty acids the metabolic response of a patient with CPT-II deficiency to dietary medium chain triglycerides was assessed. Despite the normal production of ketone bodies there was a significant medium chain dicarboxylic aciduria in the patient, indicating a limited capacity of the CPT independent mitochondrial uptake of medium chain fatty acids. CONCLUSIONS: CPT deficiency can easily be diagnosed in permeabilised cultured skin fibroblasts. Both CPT-I and CPT-II are more active with medium chain length substrates than previously assumed. Care should therefore be taken in the treatment of these patients with medium

  20. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  1. L- and DL-carnitine induce tetanic fade in rat neuromuscular preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes G.; Bazotte R.B.; Curi R.; Alves-Do-Prado W.

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine, a structurally choline-like metabolite, has been used to increase athletic performance, although its effects on neuromuscular transmission have not been investigated. It is present in skeletal muscle and its plasma levels are about 30 to 90 µM. Using rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparations indirectly and directly stimulated with high rate pulses, D-carnitine (30 and 60 µM), L-carnitine (60 µM) and DL-carnitine (60 µM) were shown to induce tetanic fade (D-carnitine = 19.7 ± 3.1%, N...

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid carnitine levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, J C; de Bustos, F; Molina, J A; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Benito-León, J; Martín, M A; Campos, Y; Ortí-Pareja, M; Cabrera-Valdivia, F; Arenas, J

    1998-03-01

    We assessed free carnitine (FC) and acylcarnitine esters (AC) in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from 24 patients with diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 28 healthy matched-controls. We found no significant correlation between FC and AC levels in CSF. FC and AC levels in CSF did not differ significantly between AD patients and controls, but plasma FC levels were significantly lower in AD patients. CSF and plasma FC and AC levels did not correlate with age, age at onset of AD, duration of AD, and scores of the Minimental State Examination of Folstein. Although these results suggest that CSF carnitine levels are apparently unrelated with the risk for AD, the trend of the FC/AC ratio to be higher in AD patients might suggest the possibility of a lower carnitine acetyltransferase activity in AD, as previously reported in some brain areas. PMID:9562266

  3. Pharmacological doses of niacin stimulate the expression of genes involved in carnitine uptake and biosynthesis and improve the carnitine status of obese Zucker rats

    OpenAIRE

    Couturier, Aline; Ringseis, Robert; Most, Erika; Eder, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha and PPARdelta causes an elevation of tissue carnitine concentrations through induction of genes involved in carnitine uptake [novel organic cation transporter 2, (OCTN2)], and carnitine biosynthesis [gamma-butyrobetaine dioxygenase (BBD), 4-N-trimethyl-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (TMABA-DH)]. Recent studies showed that administration of the plasma lipid-lowering drug niacin causes activation of PPARalpha and...

  4. Crystal structure of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Yu-Shan; Jogl, Gerwald; Esser, Victoria; Tong, Liang

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Å resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is...

  5. Interaction of palmitoyl carnitine with calcium antagonists in myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Patmore, L; Duncan, G. P.; Spedding, M.

    1989-01-01

    1. Beating of aggregates of embryonic chick myocytes, in primary culture, was quantified by use of a motion-detector and video-recorder technique. Interactions of palmitoyl carnitine, a putative endogenous ligand at Ca2+ channels, with calcium antagonists were investigated. 2. Bay K 8644 (1-100 nM) and palmitoyl carnitine (0.2-30 microM) increased edge movement of the aggregates; beats fused so that there was an increase in baseline 'tone'. The concentrations required to produce a 50% increas...

  6. Results of treatment of infertility in men by complex acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Mikhaylichenko; A. I. Novikov; V. N. Fesenko; S. V. Fesenko; E. D. Kazimzade; L. M. Rodygin

    2014-01-01

    100 patients with various forms of patozoospermii were randomly divided equally into 2 groups. First group of patients administered complex of acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine (SpermAktin ®) and alpha-tocopherol acetate for 3 months, in the second group of patients was carried out single-agent alpha-tocopherol acetate duration of 3 months. Ejaculate volume, viscosity and pH of seminal plasma, the concentration, motility and morphology were evaluated after 1.5 and 3 months of starting treatm...

  7. Biochemical and molecular heterogeneity in carnitine palmitoyltransferase ii deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Carmen; Helena Fonseca, Hugo Rocha, Ana Marcão, Laura Vilarinho, Luísa Diogo, Sílvia Sequeira, Cristina Costa, Elisa Leão, Isabel Conceição, Ana Gaspar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Carnitine palmitoytransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a recessively inherited disorder of lipid metabolism. CPT II deficiency has several clinical presentations: the adult form is characterized by episodes of rhabdomyolysis, usually triggered by extensive exercice, cold, fever or prolonged fasting and the infantile-type CPT II hepatocardiomuscular form presents as severe attacks of hypoketotic, hypoglycemia, occasionally associated with cardiac damage. Molecular ana...

  8. Crystal structure of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Shan; Jogl, Gerwald; Esser, Victoria; Tong, Liang

    2010-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Å resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria. PMID:16781677

  9. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  10. Effect of L-carnitine on the hepatic transcript profile in piglets as animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluge Holger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carnitine has attracted scientific interest due to several health-related effects, like protection against neurodegeneration, mitochondrial decay, and oxidative stress as well as improvement of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The mechanisms underlying most of the health-related effects of carnitine are largely unknown. Methods To gain insight into mechanisms through which carnitine exerts its beneficial metabolic effects, we fed piglets either a control or a carnitine supplemented diet, and analysed the transcriptome in the liver. Results Transcript profiling revealed 563 genes to be differentially expressed in liver by carnitine supplementation. Clustering analysis of the identified genes revealed that most of the top-ranked annotation term clusters were dealing with metabolic processes. Representative genes of these clusters which were significantly up-regulated by carnitine were involved in cellular fatty acid uptake, fatty acid activation, fatty acid β-oxidation, glucose uptake, and glycolysis. In contrast, genes involved in gluconeogenesis were down-regulated by carnitine. Moreover, clustering analysis identified genes involved in the insulin signaling cascade to be significantly associated with carnitine supplementation. Furthermore, clustering analysis revealed that biological processes dealing with posttranscriptional RNA processing were significantly associated with carnitine supplementation. Conclusion The data suggest that carnitine supplementation has beneficial effects on lipid and glucose homeostasis by inducing genes involved in fatty acid catabolism and glycolysis and repressing genes involved in gluconeogenesis.

  11. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase are involved in the mitochondrial synthesis and export of acylcarnitines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Sara; Ijlst, Lodewijk; Te Brinke, Heleen; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Ventura, Fátima V; Houten, Sander M

    2013-05-01

    Acylcarnitines are commonly used in the diagnosis of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation disorders (mFAODs). It is generally assumed that this plasma acylcarnitine profile reflects the mitochondrial accumulation of acyl-CoAs. The identity of the enzymes and the mitochondrial and plasmalemmal transporters involved in the synthesis and export of these metabolites have remained undefined. We used lentiviral shRNA to knock down the expression of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) in control and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2)-, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT)-, and plasmalemmal carnitine transporter (OCTN2)-deficient human fibroblasts. These cell lines, including mock-transduced controls, were loaded with decanoic acid and carnitine, followed by the measurement of the acylcarnitine profile in the extracellular medium. In control fibroblasts, MCAD knockdown markedly increased the production of octanoylcarnitine (3-fold, P<0.01). OCTN2-deficient cell lines also showed extracellular accumulation of octanoylcarnitine (2.8-fold, P<0.01), suggesting that the cellular export of acylcarnitines does not depend on OCTN2. In contrast, in CPT2- and CACT-deficient cells, the accumulation of octanoylcarnitine in the medium did not significantly increase in the MCAD knockdown. Similar results were obtained using pharmacological inhibition of CPT2 in fibroblasts from MCAD-deficient individuals. This shows that CPT2 and CACT are crucial for mitochondrial acylcarnitine formation and export to the extracellular fluids in mFAOD. PMID:23322164

  12. The effect of carnitine on some biochemical variables in athletes using nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnitine (3-hydroxy-4-N-trimethylaminobutiric acid) ingestion has a positive effect on work performance and duration as well as delaying muscle fatigue in athletes. Carnitine leas to decrease triglycerides concentration by increasing its rate of oxidation, which decrease atherogenic risk in athletes. On the other hand after exercise, there was an increase in triglyceride level in blood due to increased fat utilization. Also, there was an elevation in lactate concentration after exercise and carnitine ingestion, which is, attributes to aerobic glycolysis. Carnitine. Carnitine ingestion lead also to a slight slight decrease in insulin secretion due to the increasing in glucose uptake by skeletal muscle associated with increasing glucose transport (Glut), however, protein density on the sarcolenma independent of insulin. The data obtained revealed that, was an elevation in cortisol level after exercise and it increased dramatically after carnitine ingestion

  13. Radiolabeled 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid and 9- or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation was to synthesize and purify radiolabeled 9- or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine for potential use as a perfusion and metabolic imaging agent for the heart. Oleic acid was iodinated via a free radical addition reaction of Hl across the double bond to give 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid which in turn was esterified with carnitine. The identity of 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid and 9-or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (i.r.), ultraviolet (u.v.), and mass spectroscopy. The purity of the fatty acid and carnitine ester was established by thin layer chromatography. 9- or 10-Monoiodo[125I]stearic acid and 9- or 10-monoiodo[125I]stearyl carnitine were synthesized via the isotopic exchange of 125I for cold iodine bonded to 9- or 10-monoiodostearic acid and 9- or 10-monoiodostearyl carnitine. (author)

  14. Is L-Carnitine Supplementation Beneficial in 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA Carboxylase Deficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jákup Andreas; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Olesen, Jess Have; Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background: 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (3-MCCd) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the catabolism of leucine. In the present study, we investigated the current and prior medical condition of patients with 3-MCCd in the Faroe Islands and their carnitine levels in blood, urine and...... muscle tissue with and without L-carnitine supplementation to evaluate the current treatment strategy of not recommending L-carnitine supplementation to Faroese 3-MCCd patients. Methods: Blood and urine samples and muscle biopsies were collected from patients at inclusion and at 3 months. Eight patients...... received L-carnitine supplementation when recruited; five did not. Included patients who received supplementation were asked to stop L-carnitine, the others were asked to initiate L-carnitine supplementation during the study. Symptoms were determined by review of hospital medical records and questionnaires...

  15. L-carnitine plasma levels in dogs and cats. A diagnostic parameter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between levels of carnitine in plasma and lesions of organs should be demonstrated. 52 dogs and 58 cats examined in veterinary clinics for several reasons and routinely screened for blood chemistry also were analysed for free plasma carnitine by a radiocarbon method. Increased carnitine levels were observed in both species in case of heart, liver and kidney disorders. Additionally the influence of food intake on carnitine levels in dogs was studied. Postprandial changes were insignificant. Because of lack of information about carnitine levels in cats and changes with age plasma carnitine was determined in cats and kittens. The range of normal values was 8.2 to 24.2 μmol/l without any significance of age

  16. Systematic Evaluation of Key L-Carnitine Homeostasis Mechanisms during Postnatal Development in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Binbing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conditionally essential nutrient, L-carnitine, plays a critical role in a number of physiological processes vital to normal neonatal growth and development. We conducted a systematic evaluation of the developmental changes in key L-carnitine homeostasis mechanisms in the postnatal rat to better understand the interrelationship between these pathways and their correlation to ontogenic changes in L-carnitine levels during postnatal development. Methods mRNA expression of heart, kidney and intestinal L-carnitine transporters, liver γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase (Bbh and trimethyllysine hydroxylase (Tmlh, and heart carnitine palmitoyltransferase (Cpt were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. L-Carnitine levels were determined by HPLC-UV. Cpt and Bbh activity were measured by a spectrophotometric method and HPLC, respectively. Results Serum and heart L-carnitine levels increased with postnatal development. Increases in serum L-carnitine correlated significantly with postnatal increases in renal organic cation/carnitine transporter 2 (Octn2 expression, and was further matched by postnatal increases in intestinal Octn1 expression and hepatic γ-Bbh activity. Postnatal increases in heart L-carnitine levels were significantly correlated to postnatal increases in heart Octn2 expression. Although cardiac high energy phosphate substrate levels remained constant through postnatal development, creatine showed developmental increases with advancing neonatal age. mRNA levels of Cpt1b and Cpt2 significantly increased at postnatal day 20, which was not accompanied by a similar increase in activity. Conclusions Several L-carnitine homeostasis pathways underwent significant ontogenesis during postnatal development in the rat. This information will facilitate future studies on factors affecting the developmental maturation of L-carnitine homeostasis mechanisms and how such factors might affect growth and development.

  17. Neonatal carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency: failure of treatment despite prolonged survival

    OpenAIRE

    Hissink-Muller, Petra; Lopriore, Enrico; Boelen, Carolien; Klumper, Frans; Duran, Marinus; Walther, Frans

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) deficiencies are disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO). In fatty acid oxidation, long-chain fatty acids need the carnitine cycle to be transported from the cytosol to the mitochondria. In CPT II deficiency, long-chain acylcarnitines cannot be metabolised to carnitine and acyl-CoA, leading to accumulation of toxic long-chain acylcarnitines. Three clinical presentations of CPT II deficiency have been identified: the adult form, the infantile ...

  18. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical densi...

  19. Transient carnitine transport defect with cholestatic jaundice: report of one case in a premature baby

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun-Seok Cho; Young Kwang Choo; Hong Jin Lee; hyeon-Soo Lee

    2012-01-01

    Carnitine (?#11112;ydroxy-?#15220;rimethylaminobutyric acid) is involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix and the removal of potentially toxic acylcarnitine esters. Transient carnitine transport defect is a rare condition in newborns reported in 1/90,000 live births. In this paper, we describe a case of transient carnitine transport defect found in a premature baby who had prolonged cholestatic jaundice and poor weight gain, and who responded dramat...

  20. Carnitine Insufficiency Caused by Aging and Overnutrition Compromises Mitochondrial Performance and Metabolic Control*

    OpenAIRE

    Noland, Robert C.; Koves, Timothy R.; Seiler, Sarah E; Lum, Helen; Lust, Robert M.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Stevens, Robert D; Hegardt, Fausto G.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to its essential role in permitting mitochondrial import and oxidation of long chain fatty acids, carnitine also functions as an acyl group acceptor that facilitates mitochondrial export of excess carbons in the form of acylcarnitines. Recent evidence suggests carnitine requirements increase under conditions of sustained metabolic stress. Accordingly, we hypothesized that carnitine insufficiency might contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and obesity-related impairments in gluco...

  1. Systematic Evaluation of Key L-Carnitine Homeostasis Mechanisms during Postnatal Development in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Binbing; Aziz Caroline; Alcorn Jane

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The conditionally essential nutrient, L-carnitine, plays a critical role in a number of physiological processes vital to normal neonatal growth and development. We conducted a systematic evaluation of the developmental changes in key L-carnitine homeostasis mechanisms in the postnatal rat to better understand the interrelationship between these pathways and their correlation to ontogenic changes in L-carnitine levels during postnatal development. Methods mRNA expression of...

  2. Identification of Mutations and Evaluation of Cardiomyopathy in Turkish Patients with Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kilic, M.; Özgül, R. K.; Coşkun, T.; Yücel, D.; Karaca, M.; Sivri, H. S.; Tokatli, A.; Şahin, M.; Karagöz, T.; Dursun, A.

    2011-01-01

    Primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective cellular carnitine transport. Patients usually present with predominant metabolic or cardiac manifestations. SCD is caused by mutations in the organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 (SLC22A5) gene. Mutation analysis of SLC22A5 gene was carried out in eight Turkish patients from six families. Six patients presented with signs and symptoms of heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and low plasma carni...

  3. Cardio-protective effects of carnitine in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Malone Michael A; Cuthbertson David D; Malone John I; Schocken Douglas D

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Streptozotocin-induced diabetes (STZ-D) in rats has been associated with carnitine deficiency, bradycardia and left ventricular enlargement. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine whether oral carnitine supplementation would normalize carnitine levels and cardiac function in STZ-D rats. Methods Wistar rats (48) were made hyperglycemic by STZ at 26 weeks of age. Same age normal Wistar rats (24) were used for comparison. Echocardiograms were performed at baseline 2, ...

  4. L-Carnitine Improves the Asthma Control in Children with Moderate Persistent Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Dalia D. El Lebedy; Nevien Helaly; Adel Salah Bediwy; Mona Isa; Mohammed Al-Biltagi

    2012-01-01

    The objective. was to investigate L-Carnitine level and the effects of its supplementation in children with moderate persistent Asthma. Methods. Free and total serum carnitine levels were measured in 50 children having moderate persistent asthma and 50 healthy control children. The patients group was randomly divided into two subgroups. Subgroup A was supplemented with L-carnitine for 6 months while subgroup B was used as a placebo controls. Both subgroups were assessed by pulmonary function ...

  5. Primary Systemic Carnitine Deficiency Presenting as Recurrent Reye-Like Syndrome and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2002-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal but treatable metabolic disorder.I present a 6-year-old girl with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD) provedby very low plasma carnitine level. Her major clinical features included neonatal metabolicacidosis, epilepsy, recurrent infections, acute encephalopathy, and dilated cardiomyopathywith heart failure before 4 years of age. Other features such as hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia,or hyperammonemia were noted around 5 years of...

  6. Dietary L-carnitine and energy and lipid metabolism in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) juveniles

    OpenAIRE

    Ozorio, R.

    2001-01-01

    As the lipid content of the diet increases so does the requirement for certain components involved in lipid metabolism. Carnitine is a normal constituent of animal tissues and plasma, which is required for the transport of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) to the site of oxidation. To avoid accumulation of lipids, supplementation of dietary carnitine may be used to stimulate fatty acid oxidation and to regulate lipolysis. Previous studies have demonstrated that responses to carnitine administrat...

  7. Serum carnitine concentration is decreased in patients with Lyme borreliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Kępka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lyme borreliosis (LB is a serious infectious disease. Carnitine plays a crucial role in metabolism and inflammatory responses. Carnitine may be important in improving neuronal dysfunction and loss of neurons. Aim: To evaluate serum carnitine concentration in adult patients with various clinical types of LB. Material/Methods: Groups: 1 patients with erythema migrans (EM, n=16, 2 neuroborreliosis (NB, n=10, 3 post-Lyme disease (PLD, n=22 and healthy controls (HC, n=32. Total (TC and free (FC carnitine were determined with the spectrophotometric method. Results: TC levels (44.9±10.4, 28.0±8.4, 35.9±15.6 μmol/L in the EM, NB and PLD patients were lower than in HC (54.0±11.4 μmol/L, p < 0.001. FC levels (32.7±7.7, 23.6±6.8, 26.3±11.2 μmol/L in the EM, NB and PLD patients were lower than in HC (40.5±7.6 μmol/L, p < 0.001. AC levels (12.2±5.2, 4.4±2.6, 9.6±7.4 μmol/L in the EM, NB and PLD patients were lower in the NB and PLD patients than in HC (13.5±8.40 μmol/L, p <0.001. AC/FC ratio was 0.31±0.14, 0.18±0.09, 0.39±0.33 in the EM, NB and PLD patients. Conclusions: LB patients exhibit a significant decrease of their serum carnitine concentrations. The largest changes were in the NB and PLD patients. To prevent late complications of the disease a possibility of early supplementation with carnitine should be considered. Further studies are required to explain the pathophysiological significance of our findings.

  8. Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency, clinical, biochemical and genetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Gozalbo, M E; Bakker, J A; Waterham, H R; Wanders, R J A

    2004-01-01

    The carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is one of the components of the carnitine cycle. The carnitine cycle is necessary to shuttle long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the intramitochondrial space where mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids takes place. The oxidation of fatty acids yields acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) units, which may either be degraded to CO(2) and H(2)O in the citric acid cycle to produce ATP or converted into ketone bodies which occurs in liver and kidneys. Metabolic consequences of a defective CACT are hypoketotic hypoglycaemia under fasting conditions, hyperammonemia, elevated creatine kinase and transaminases, dicarboxylic aciduria, very low free carnitine and an abnormal acylcarnitine profile with marked elevation of the long-chain acylcarnitines. Clinical signs and symptoms in CACT deficient patients, are a combination of energy depletion and endogenous toxicity. The predominantly affected organs are brain, heart and skeletal muscle, and liver, leading to neurological abnormalities, cardiomyopathy and arrythmias, skeletal muscle damage and liver dysfunction. Most patients become symptomatic in the neonatal period with a rapidly progressive deterioration and a high mortality rate. However, presentations at a later age with a milder phenotype have also been reported. The therapeutic approach is the same as in other long-chain fatty acid disorders and includes intravenous glucose (+/- insulin) administration to maximally inhibit lipolysis and subsequent fatty acid oxidation during the acute deterioration, along with other measures such as ammonia detoxification, depending on the clinical features. Long-term strategy consists of avoidance of fasting with frequent meals and a special diet with restriction of long-chain fatty acids. Due to the extremely low free carnitine concentrations, carnitine supplementation is often needed. Acylcarnitine profiling in plasma is the assay of choice for the diagnosis at a metabolite level

  9. Gbu Glycine Betaine Porter and Carnitine Uptake in Osmotically Stressed Listeria monocytogenes Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mendum, Mary Lou; Smith, Linda Tombras

    2002-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes grows actively under high-salt conditions by accumulating compatible solutes such as glycine betaine and carnitine from the medium. We report here that the dominant transport system for glycine betaine uptake, the Gbu porter, may act as a secondary uptake system for carnitine, with a Km of 4 mM for carnitine uptake and measurable uptake at carnitine concentrations as low as 10 μM. This porter has a Km for glycine betaine uptake of about 6 μM. The...

  10. Preparation of radioactive acetyl-l-carnitine by an enzymatic exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emaus, R.; Bieber, L.L.

    1982-01-15

    A rapid method for the preparation of (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine is described. The method involves exchange of (1-/sup 14/C)acetic acid into a pool of unlabeled acetyl-L-carnitine using the enzymes acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. After isotopic equilibrium is attained, radioactive acetylcarnitine is separated from the other reaction components by chromatography on Dowex 1 (C1/sup -/) anion exchange resin. One of the procedures used to verify the product (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine can be used to synthesize (3S)-(5-/sup 14/C)citric acid.

  11. Transient carnitine transport defect with cholestatic jaundice: report of one case in a premature baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Seok Cho

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carnitine (?#11112;ydroxy-?#15220;rimethylaminobutyric acid is involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix and the removal of potentially toxic acylcarnitine esters. Transient carnitine transport defect is a rare condition in newborns reported in 1/90,000 live births. In this paper, we describe a case of transient carnitine transport defect found in a premature baby who had prolonged cholestatic jaundice and poor weight gain, and who responded dramatically to oral carnitine supplementation.

  12. Preparation of radioactive acetyl-l-carnitine by an enzymatic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid method for the preparation of [1-14C]acetyl-L-carnitine is described. The method involves exchange of [1-14C]acetic acid into a pool of unlabeled acetyl-L-carnitine using the enzymes acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. After isotopic equilibrium is attained, radioactive acetylcarnitine is separated from the other reaction components by chromatography on Dowex 1 (C1-) anion exchange resin. One of the procedures used to verify the product [1-14C]acetyl-L-carnitine can be used to synthesize (3S)-[5-14C]citric acid

  13. Plasma and muscle free carnitine deficiency due to renal Fanconi syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardini, I; Rizzo, W B; Dalakas, M; Bernar, J; Gahl, W A

    1985-01-01

    Plasma and urine free and acyl carnitine were measured in 19 children with nephropathic cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome. Each patient exhibited a deficiency of plasma free carnitine (mean 11.7 +/- 4.0 [SD] nmol/ml) compared with normal control values (42.0 +/- 9.0 nmol/ml) (P less than 0.001). Mean plasma acyl carnitine in the cystinotic subjects was normal. Four subjects with Fanconi syndrome but not cystinosis displayed the same abnormal pattern of plasma carnitine levels; controls wi...

  14. Carnitine Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Provoke Cardiotoxicity in an Ifosfamide-Induced Fanconi Syndrome Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Sayed-Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day and PLC (250 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4th, 5th and 6th groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day. IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  15. Carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress provoke cardiotoxicity in an ifosfamide-induced Fanconi Syndrome rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Darweesh, Amal Q; Fatani, Amal J

    2010-01-01

    In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO) therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day) combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day) and PLC (250 mg/kg/day), respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4(th), 5(th) and 6(th) groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day). IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  16. Progression of diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatic carcinogenesis in carnitine-depleted rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salim S Al-Rejaie; Abdulaziz M Aleisa; Abdulaziz A Al-Yahya; Saleh A Bakheet; Abdulmalik Alsheikh; Amal G Fatani; Othman A Al-Shabanah; Mohamed M Sayed-Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether carnitine deficiency is a risk factor during the development of diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced hepatic carcinogenesis.METHODS: A total of 60 male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups with 10 animals in each group. Rats in group 1 (control group) received a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of normal saline.Animals in group 2 (carnitine-supplemented group) were given L-carnitine (200 mg/kg per day) in drinking water for 8 wk. Animals in group 3 (carnitine-depleted group) were given D-carnitine (200 mg/kg per day) and mildronate (200 mg/kg per day) in drinking water for 8 wk. Rats in group 4 (DENA group) were injected with a single dose of DENA (200 mg/kg, i.p.) and 2 wk later received a single dose of carbon tetrachloride (2 mL/kg) by gavage as 1:1 dilution in corn oil. Animals in group 5 (DENA-carnitine depleted group) received the same treatment as group 3 and group 4. Rats in group 6 (DENA-carnitine supplemented group) received the same treatment as group 2 and group 4.RESULTS: Administration of DENA resulted in a significant increase in alanine transaminase (ALT),gamma-glutamyl t ransferase (G-GT) , alkal ine phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) and a significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx),catalase (CAT) and total carnitine content in liver tissues. In the carnitine-depleted rat model, DENA induced a dramatic increase in serum ALT, G-GT, ALP and total bilirubin, as well as a progressive reduction in total carnitine content in liver tissues. Interestingly,L-carnitine supplementation resulted in a complete reversal of the increase in liver enzymes, TBARS and NOx, and a decrease in total carnitine, GSH, GSHPx,and CAT induced by DENA, compared with the control values. Histopathological examination of liver tissues confirmed the biochemical data, where L-carnitine prevented DENA-induced hepatic

  17. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplementation reverses the age-related decline in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity in interfibrillar mitochondria without changing the L-carnitine content in the rat heart

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Luis A.; Heath, Shi-Hua D.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2012-01-01

    The aging heart displays a loss of bioenergetic reserve capacity partially mediated through lower fatty acid utilization. We investigated whether the age-related impairment of cardiac fatty acid catabolism occurs, at least partially, through diminished levels of L-carnitine, which would adversely affect carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acyl-CoA uptake into mitochondria for β-oxidation. Old (24–28 mos) Fischer 344 rats were fed ± acetyl-L-carnitine (A...

  18. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Sushma; Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzyme...

  19. Cholestatic Jaundice Associated with Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase IA Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, A A M; Olpin, S E; Bennett, M. J.; Santani, A; Stahlschmidt, J; McClean, P

    2012-01-01

    Liver dysfunction usually accompanies metabolic decompensation in fatty acid oxidation disorders, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) Ia deficiency. Typically, the liver is enlarged with raised plasma transaminase activities and steatosis on histological examination. In contrast, cholestatic jaundice is rare, having only been reported in long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency. We report a 3-year-old boy with CPT Ia deficiency who developed hepatomegaly and ch...

  20. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnefont, J P; Taroni, F; P. Cavadini; Cepanec, C.; Brivet, M.; Saudubray, J M; Leroux, J P; Demaugre, F.

    1996-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form...

  1. The fixA and fixB Genes Are Necessary for Anaerobic Carnitine Reduction in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Walt, Angelique; Kahn, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the use of carnitine as a terminal electron acceptor depends on a functional caiTABCDE operon. It had been suggested that the adjacent but divergent fixABCX operon is also required for carnitine metabolism, perhaps to provide electrons for carnitine reduction. We have constructed E. coli fixA and fixB mutants and find that they are unable to reduce carnitine to γ-butyrobetaine under anaerobic conditions.

  2. PPAR-γ Regulates Carnitine Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Function in a Lamb Model of Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shruti; Sun, Xutong; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Oishi, Peter E.; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Raff, Gary; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Carnitine homeostasis is disrupted in lambs with endothelial dysfunction secondary to increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt). Our recent studies have also indicated that the disruption in carnitine homeostasis correlates with a decrease in PPAR-γ expression in Shunt lambs. Thus, this study was carried out to determine if there is a causal link between loss of PPAR-γ signaling and carnitine dysfunction, and whether the PPAR-γ agonist, rosiglitazone preserves carnitine homeostasis in ...

  3. The Effect of L-Carnitine on Oxidative Stress Responses of Experimental Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    BOYACIOGLU, Murat; TURGUT, Hulya; AKGULLU, Cagdas; Eryilmaz, Ufuk; KUM, Cavit; ONBASILI, Osman Alper

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was conducted to investigate the prophylactic effects of carnitine against contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) and its relation to oxidant/antioxidant status in kidney, liver, heart, spleen and lung tissues in a CIN rat model. Twenty-eight adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups, the control, contrast media (CM), carnitine and contrast media+carnitine (CM+carnitine) groups. Animals were placed in individual metabolism cages, and on the 2nd day, rats were deprived ...

  4. Free carnitine and acylcarnitines in obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and effects of pioglitazone treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Bohov, Pavol; Bjørndal, Bodil;

    2012-01-01

    To determine fasting and insulin-stimulated levels of carnitine precursors, total and free carnitine, and acylcarnitines, and evaluate the impact of pioglitazone treatment in obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).......To determine fasting and insulin-stimulated levels of carnitine precursors, total and free carnitine, and acylcarnitines, and evaluate the impact of pioglitazone treatment in obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)....

  5. Results of treatment of infertility in men by complex acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Mikhaylichenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 100 patients with various forms of patozoospermii were randomly divided equally into 2 groups. First group of patients administered complex of acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine (SpermAktin ® and alpha-tocopherol acetate for 3 months, in the second group of patients was carried out single-agent alpha-tocopherol acetate duration of 3 months. Ejaculate volume, viscosity and pH of seminal plasma, the concentration, motility and morphology were evaluated after 1.5 and 3 months of starting treatment. In the first group of infertile men showed a significant improvement in the quality and quantity of semen compared with the second patient group.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. 862.1055 Section 862.1055 Food and... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  7. Potential Inhibitory Effects of l-Carnitine Supplementation on Tissue Advanced Glycation End Products in Patients with Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Sakai, Kazuko; Kaida, Yusuke; Adachi, Takeki; Ando, Ryotaro; Okuda, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to cardiovascular disease in patients with hemodialysis (HD). We have recently found that carnitine levels are inversely associated with skin AGE levels in HD patients. We examined whether l-carnitine supplementation reduced skin AGE levels in HD patients with carnitine deficiency.

  8. Infantile form of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatomuscular symptoms and sudden death. Physiopathological approach to carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiencies.

    OpenAIRE

    Demaugre, F.; Bonnefont, J P; Colonna, M; Cepanec, C.; Leroux, J P; Saudubray, J M

    1991-01-01

    Reported cases of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are characterized only by a muscular symptomatology in young adults although the defect is expressed in extra-muscular tissues as well as in skeletal muscle. We describe here a CPT II deficiency associating hypoketotic hypoglycemia, high plasma creatine kinase level, heart beat disorders, and sudden death in a 3-mo-old boy. CPT II defect (-90%) diagnosed in fibroblasts is qualitatively similar to that (-75%) of two "class...

  9. L-carnitine increases body lean in adult dogs and cats

    OpenAIRE

    Jewell, D; Hahn, K.

    2010-01-01

    L-carnitine has been shown to be a repartitioning agent (i.e.,setting metabolism toward more protein and less fat accretion) in animals used for food production. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects on body composition repartitioning (i.e.,increasing lean body mass) of added dietary L-carnitine in adult dogs and cats.

  10. Aminocarnitine and acylaminocarnitines: Carnitine acyltransferase inhibitors affecting long-chain fatty acid and glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    DL-Aminocarnitine (DL-3-amino-4-trimethylaminobutyrate) and the acylaminocarnitines acetyl-, decanoyl- and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine have been synthesized and tested as inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase and carnitine acetyltransferase in vitro and in vivo. Acetyl-DL-aaminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine acetyltransferase reported to date, and is competitive with respect to acetyl-L-carnitine. Mice given acetyl-DL-aminocarnitine metabolize (U-{sup 14}C)acetyl-L-carnitine at about 60% of the rate of control mice. Palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase reported to date. Decanoyl-DL-aminocarnitine and DL-aminocarnitine are also very potent inhibitors; all compounds inhibit the catabolism of ({sup 14}C)palmitate to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in intact mice by at least 50%. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase controls the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for {beta}-oxidation. The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by aminocarnitine or acylaminocarnitines in vivo prevents or reverses ketogenesis in fasted mice, and causes the reversible accumulation of triglycerides in liver, kidney and plasma. Administration of DL-aminocarnitine to streptozotocindiabetic mice lowers plasma glucose levels and improves the glucose tolerance test.

  11. Carnitine levels in skeletal muscle of malnourished patients before and after total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstedt, S; Larsson, J; Cederblad, G

    1986-11-01

    Carnitine is necessary for the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane. Carnitine is derived from the diet and from endogenous synthesis from lysine and methionine. About 98% of the body's carnitine pool is located in skeletal muscle tissue. Skeletal muscle carnitine levels were determined in two groups of malnourished patients, eight patients with anorexia nervosa with a weight loss of 32.4% +/- 1.8 (mean +/- SEM) and six surgical patients with major gastrointestinal disorders and a weight loss of 15.2% +/- 2.7. Their hepatic and kidney functions were normal. On admission, the muscle carnitine levels were 16.9 +/- 4.0 mumol/g dry weight (mean +/- SD) for the surgical patients and 20.8 +/- 5.0 mumol/g dry weight for the anorexia nervosa patients, which corresponded to carnitine levels seen in healthy subjects. No statistical significance was found between the two groups. Total parenteral nutrition was given to the surgical patients for 2 weeks and to the anorexia nervosa patients for 3-5 weeks. No statistical difference in muscle carnitine levels was found in either group after nutritional support. These malnourished patients had no decreased muscle carnitine levels on admission and maintained them during several weeks of total parenteral nutrition. PMID:16831776

  12. Aminocarnitine and acylaminocarnitines: Carnitine acyltransferase inhibitors affecting long-chain fatty acid and glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DL-Aminocarnitine (DL-3-amino-4-trimethylaminobutyrate) and the acylaminocarnitines acetyl-, decanoyl- and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine have been synthesized and tested as inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase and carnitine acetyltransferase in vitro and in vivo. Acetyl-DL-aaminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine acetyltransferase reported to date, and is competitive with respect to acetyl-L-carnitine. Mice given acetyl-DL-aminocarnitine metabolize [U-14C]acetyl-L-carnitine at about 60% of the rate of control mice. Palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine is the most potent reversible inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase reported to date. Decanoyl-DL-aminocarnitine and DL-aminocarnitine are also very potent inhibitors; all compounds inhibit the catabolism of [14C]palmitate to 14CO2 in intact mice by at least 50%. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase controls the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by aminocarnitine or acylaminocarnitines in vivo prevents or reverses ketogenesis in fasted mice, and causes the reversible accumulation of triglycerides in liver, kidney and plasma. Administration of DL-aminocarnitine to streptozotocindiabetic mice lowers plasma glucose levels and improves the glucose tolerance test

  13. The Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Administration on Persons with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    2006-01-01

    Since previous investigations reported improvements in cognition of patients with dementia after acetyl-L-carnitine therapy and since there is an increased risk for persons with Down syndrome to develop Alzheimer disease, this study was designed to investigate the effect of acetyl-L-carnitine administration on neurological, intellectual, and…

  14. L-Carnitine Supplementation Improves the Behavioral Symptoms in Autistic Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Sarah Farid; El-hamamsy, Manal H.; Zaki, Osama K.; Badary, Osama A.

    2013-01-01

    L-Carnitine was proposed as a potential treatment for patients diagnosed with autism to ameliorate the behavioral symptoms associated with the disease. Thirty children diagnosed with autism were randomly assigned to receive (100 mg/kg bodyweight/day) of liquid L-carnitine (n = 16) or placebo (n = 14) for 6 months. Measurements included changes in…

  15. ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUG THERAPY AND SERUM CARNITINE LEVELS IN CHILDREN PRIOR TO AND FOLLOWING TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. SHEIKH

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:The physiologic function of carnitine, oxidation of fatty acid and lipidmetabolism, is severely affected in carnitine deficiency, secondaryforms of which lead to renal tubular disorders and chronic renalfailure. Reduction in serum carnitine has been frequently reportedin patients and experimental animals treated with antiepileptic drugs,one of which, valproic acid has consistently been found to cause thedeficiency; the antiepileptic drugs, valproic acid, has consistentlybeen found to cause the deficiency. Previous results, however, regardingthe effects of other antiepileptic drugs have been less consistent.Considering the controversial results available in lterarure, the aim ofthis study was to determine the effect of Valproic acid, Carbamazepineand Phenobarbital on serum carnitine levels in epileptic children.Methods:In the present study, serum carnitine levels were randomly monitoredbefore and six months after therapy in 39 epileptic patients receivingthe antiepileptic drugs mentioned. Patient blood samples were takenbefore and six months after treatment and L-carnitine level wasdetermined using the UV enzymatic test (Rouche Kit spectronicGenesis 2, 340 nm.Results:Results showed a significant fall in the L-carnitine levels of epilepticchildren taking these drugs (P< 0.01.Conclusion:Considering the reducing effect of antiepileptic drugs on serumcarnitine levels, it is recommended that a carnitine supplement beadministered in pediatric epileptic patients to prevent the deficiencyand related consequences caused by such therapies.

  16. Cardio-protective effects of carnitine in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptozotocin-induced diabetes (STZ-D in rats has been associated with carnitine deficiency, bradycardia and left ventricular enlargement. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine whether oral carnitine supplementation would normalize carnitine levels and cardiac function in STZ-D rats. Methods Wistar rats (48 were made hyperglycemic by STZ at 26 weeks of age. Same age normal Wistar rats (24 were used for comparison. Echocardiograms were performed at baseline 2, 6, 10, and 18 weeks after STZ administration in all animals. HbA1c, serum carnitine and free fatty acids (FFA were measured at the same times. Since STZ-D rats become carnitine deficient, 15 STZ-D rats received supplemental oral carnitine for 16 weeks. Results The heart rates for the STZ-D rats (290 ± 19 bpm were less than control rats (324 ± 20 bpm (p Conclusion Thus, supplemental oral carnitine in STZ-D rats normalized serum carnitine, heart rate regulation and left ventricular size. These findings suggest a metabolic mechanism for the cardiac dysfunction noted in this diabetic animal model.

  17. The results of nationwide survey efficiency of the complex acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine fumarate in the treatment of infertile marriages due to the presence of male factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vinogradov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the influence of a complex of acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine fumarate in combination therapy qualitative and quantitative indicators of sperm in men with various forms pathospermia. The study has shown that such improved performance as morphology, motility and concentration. It turned out that the treatment of complex drugs carnitine series allows you to have a spouse patients natural pregnancyin 29.57 % of cases, which does not exclude the use of drugs containing acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine fumarate in preparing men to assisted reproductive technologies programs.

  18. Serum Levels of Acyl-Carnitines along the Continuum from Normal to Alzheimer's Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapere, Nadia; La Marca, Giancarlo; Angiolillo, Antonella; Vitale, Michela; Corbi, Graziamaria; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Intrieri, Mariano; Russo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the serum levels of free L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine and 34 acyl-L-carnitine in healthy subjects and in patients with or at risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Twenty-nine patients with probable Alzheimer’s disease, 18 with mild cognitive impairment of the amnestic type, 24 with subjective memory complaint and 46 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study, and the levels of carnitine and acyl-carnitines were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. The concentrations of acetyl-L-carnitine progressively decreased passing from healthy subjects group (mean±SD, 5.6±1.3 μmol/L) to subjective memory complaint (4.3±0.9 μmol/L), mild cognitive impairment (4.0±0.53 μmol/L), up to Alzheimer’s disease (3.5±0.6 μmol/L) group (p<0.001). The differences were significant for the comparisons: healthy subjects vs. subjective memory complaint, mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease group; and subjective memory complaint vs. Alzheimer’s disease group. Other acyl-carnitines, such as malonyl-, 3-hydroxyisovaleryl-, hexenoyl-, decanoyl-, dodecanoyl-, dodecenoyl-, myristoyl-, tetradecenoyl-, hexadecenoyl-, stearoyl-, oleyl- and linoleyl-L-carnitine, showed a similar decreasing trend, passing from healthy subjects to patients at risk of or with Alzheimer’s disease. These results suggest that serum acetyl-L-carnitine and other acyl-L-carnitine levels decrease along the continuum from healthy subjects to subjective memory complaint and mild cognitive impairment subjects, up to patients with Alzheimer’s disease, and that the metabolism of some acyl-carnitines is finely connected among them. These findings also suggest that the serum levels of acetyl-L-carnitine and other acyl-L-carnitines could help to identify the patients before the phenotype conversion to Alzheimer’s disease and the patients who would benefit from the treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine. However, further validation on a larger number of samples in a longitudinal

  19. Serum Levels of Acyl-Carnitines along the Continuum from Normal to Alzheimer's Dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristofano

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the serum levels of free L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine and 34 acyl-L-carnitine in healthy subjects and in patients with or at risk of Alzheimer's disease. Twenty-nine patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, 18 with mild cognitive impairment of the amnestic type, 24 with subjective memory complaint and 46 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study, and the levels of carnitine and acyl-carnitines were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. The concentrations of acetyl-L-carnitine progressively decreased passing from healthy subjects group (mean±SD, 5.6±1.3 μmol/L to subjective memory complaint (4.3±0.9 μmol/L, mild cognitive impairment (4.0±0.53 μmol/L, up to Alzheimer's disease (3.5±0.6 μmol/L group (p<0.001. The differences were significant for the comparisons: healthy subjects vs. subjective memory complaint, mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease group; and subjective memory complaint vs. Alzheimer's disease group. Other acyl-carnitines, such as malonyl-, 3-hydroxyisovaleryl-, hexenoyl-, decanoyl-, dodecanoyl-, dodecenoyl-, myristoyl-, tetradecenoyl-, hexadecenoyl-, stearoyl-, oleyl- and linoleyl-L-carnitine, showed a similar decreasing trend, passing from healthy subjects to patients at risk of or with Alzheimer's disease. These results suggest that serum acetyl-L-carnitine and other acyl-L-carnitine levels decrease along the continuum from healthy subjects to subjective memory complaint and mild cognitive impairment subjects, up to patients with Alzheimer's disease, and that the metabolism of some acyl-carnitines is finely connected among them. These findings also suggest that the serum levels of acetyl-L-carnitine and other acyl-L-carnitines could help to identify the patients before the phenotype conversion to Alzheimer's disease and the patients who would benefit from the treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine. However, further validation on a larger number of samples in a longitudinal

  20. Activity of D-carnitine and its derivatives on Trypanosoma infections in rats and mice

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    Manganaro M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Little progress has been made in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis over the past decades. L-carnitine has a major role in glycolysis-based energy supply of blood trypanosomes for it stimulates constant ATP production. To investigate whether administration of the isomer D-carnitine could exert a competitive inhibition on the metabolic pathway of the L-form, possibily resulting in parasite replication inhibition, several formulations of this compound were tested on Trypanosoma lewisi and T. brucei rhodesiense in rodent models. High oral dosages of D-carnitine inner salt and proprionyl-D-carnitine were not toxic to animals and induced about 50 % parasite growth inhibition in reversible, i.e. competitive, fashion. A putative mechanism could be an interference in pyruvate kinase activity and hence ATP production. Considering both, lack of toxicity and inhibitory activity, D-carnitine may have a role in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis, in association with available trypanocidal drugs.

  1. Distribution, Molecular Structure and Functional Analysis of Carnitine Transporter (SLC22A5) in Canine Lens Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    OCHIAI, Hideharu; Kanemaki, Nobuyuki; SATO, Reiichiro; Onda, Ken

    2014-01-01

    While carnitine has been reported to have an anti-oxidative role on the ocular surface, there has been no report on the existence of a carnitine transporter (SLC22A5) in the lens. Therefore, we investigated the carnitine transport activity of canine lens epithelial cells (LEC) and determined the molecular structure of canine SLC22A5. The carnitine transport activity was 7.16 ± 0.48 pmol/mg protein/30 min. Butyrobetaine, the analogue of carnitine, reduced 30% of the activity at 50 µM. A coding...

  2. Fluorescent derivatization combined with aqueous solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of butyrobetaine, l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Chia-Ju; Feng, Chia-Hsien

    2016-09-16

    A novel aqueous solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (AS-DLLME) method was combined with narrow-bore liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection for the determination of hydrophilic compounds. A remover (non-polar solvent) and extractant (aqueous solution) were introduced into the derivatization system (acetonitrile) to obtain a water-in-oil emulsion state that increased the mass transfer of analytes. As a proof of concept, three quaternary ammonium substances, including butyrobetaine, l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine, were also used as analytes and determined in pharmaceuticals, personal care products, food and human plasma. The analytes were derivatized with 4-bromomethylbiphenyl for fluorescence detection and improved retention in the column. The linear response was 10-2000nM for l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine with a good determination coefficient (r(2)>0.998) in the standard solution. The detection limit for l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine was 4.5 fmol. The method was also successfully applied to a 1μL sample of human plasma. In the linearity calculations for determining butyrobetaine, l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine in human plasma, the determination coefficients ranged from 0.996 to 0.999. Linear regression exhibited good reproducibility and a relative standard deviation better than 7.50% for the slope and 9.06% for the intercept. To characterize highly hydrophilic compounds in various samples, the proposed method provides good sensitivity for a small sample volume with a low consumption of toxic solvents. PMID:27562416

  3. 左旋肉毒碱的代谢与营养效应%Metabolic and nutritional effects of L-carnitine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GinfrancoGurarnieri

    2001-01-01

    Carnitine is a water solule quaternary ammonium compound,which isa natural constituent of higher organisms,in particular of cells of animal origin.In humans,carnitine is synthesized in liver,brain and kidney starting from protein-bound lysine and methionine.Skeletal and heart muscle cannot synthesize carnitine.Therefore,these tissues are entirely dependent on carnitine uptake from the blood.In tissues and in physiological fluids carnitine is present in a free and an esterified form.The proportion of esterified carnitine may vary considerably with nutritional conditions,exercise and disease states.Tissue carnitine content depends on many factors: dietary carnitine,lysine,methionine and co-factor intake,carnitine synthesis (in uremia carnitine synthesis in the kidney is obviously reduced or absent),carnitine transport inside and outside tissues,and carnitine excretion.The transport of long-chain fatty acid esters to sites of beta-oxidation in the mitochondrial matrix requires L-carnitine.Besides,carnitine acts as a sink and allows a shift of the acyl pressure from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm.It has been suggested that carnitine is also important for the transport of the acyl groups (metabolic energy)from one cell to another cell and into the appropriate cellular compartment.Tissue carnitine content is much higher htan tissue CoA content and so acylcarnitines may also serve as storage for metabolic energy.By modulating the tissue content of acyl-CoA compounds which inhibit many enzyme activities (e.g.pyruvate dehydrogenase activity),carnitine may regulate many metabolic pathways.Carnitine system is located in the crossroads of intermediate metabolism and carnitine deficiency and supplementation may affect lipid,glucose and protein metabolism (and eventually nutrition) not only in primary,but also in secondary carnitine deficiency.Some positive effects of carnitine supplementation have been reported in experimental studies,in newborns,in patients treated with

  4. Carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children with solid malignancies receiving doxorubicin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Khositseth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Previous studies demonstrated l-carnitine decreasing doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Our objectives were to study carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children treated with doxorubicin and the effect of short-term l-carnitine supplements. Materials and Methods: Serial carnitine levels and cardiac functions were obtained in children with newly diagnosed solid malignancies before doxorubicin, after cumulative doses of ≥150 mg/m 2 and ≥300 mg/m 2 , respectively. Oral l-carnitine 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days were given to the children treated with doxorubicin at cumulative doses of ≥150 mg/m 2 and ≥300 mg/m 2 . Carnitine levels and cardiac functions were also obtained in those children before and after short-term oral l-carnitine at each cumulative dose of doxorubicin. Results: Five children (3 females, median age of 9.1 years (range 1.5-13 years with newly diagnosed solid malignancies were enrolled in the study. Free carnitine (FC tended to decrease while acyl-carnitine (AC increased making AC/FC ratio increased after cumulative dose of ≥150 and ≥300 mg/m 2 but the statistics was not significant. Left ventricular (LV systolic function was not significantly changed. Interestingly, LV global function (LV myocardial performance index was significantly increased after 150 mg/m 2 (median 0.39, 0.27-0.51 and 300 mg/m 2 (median 0.46, 0.27-0.50 when compared to baseline (median 0.28, 0.14-0.48 (P=0.05. Carnitine levels and cardiac functions were not significantly changed after oral l-carnitine supplement at cumulative dose of ≥150 mg/m 2 (n=6 and ≥300 mg/m 2 (n=9. Conclusions: Carnitine levels tended to decrease after doxorubicin treatment. LV global dysfunction was documented early after doxorubicin. However, short-term l-carnitine supplement did not improve cardiac function.

  5. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sushma; Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-10-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  6. Fenofibrate Therapy in Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase Type 2 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hamilton-Craig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bezafibrate therapy has been shown to improve beta-oxidation of fatty acids and to reduce episodes of rhabdomyolysis in patients with carnitine palmitoyltransferase type-2 (CPT2 deficiency. We report the efficacy of fenofibrate in a patient with CPT2 deficiency, in whom beta-oxidation was improved but an episode of rhabdomyolysis nevertheless occurred. This suggests additional methods to avoid rhabdomyolysis in patients with CPT2 deficiency should accompany fibrate therapy, including avoidance of muscular overexertion, dehydration, and heat exposure.

  7. Carnitine and/or Acetylcarnitine Deficiency as a Cause of Higher Levels of Ammonia

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    Cecilia Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine deficiencies are postulated in the literature as possible causes of higher ammonia levels. The aim of this study was to investigate if the use of valproic acid, the age of the patients, or certain central nervous system pathologies can cause carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine deficiency leading to increased ammonia levels. Three groups of patients were studied: (A epileptic under phenytoin monotherapy (n=31; (B with bipolar disorder under valproic acid treatment (n=28; (C elderly (n=41. Plasma valproic acid and blood carnitine and acyl carnitine profiles were determined using a validated HPLC and LC-MS/MS method, respectively. Blood ammonia concentration was determined using an enzymatic automated assay. Higher ammonia levels were encountered in patients under valproic acid treatment and in the elderly. This may be due to the lower carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine found in these patients. Patients with controlled seizures had normal carnitine and acetylcarnitine levels. Further studies are necessary in order to conclude if the uncontrolled bipolar disorder could be the cause of higher carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine levels.

  8. Critical update for the clinical use of L-carnitine analogs in cardiometabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justo ML

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Mingorance, Rosalía Rodríguez-Rodríguez, María Luisa Justo, María Álvarez de Sotomayor, María Dolores HerreraDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Seville, Seville, SpainAbstract: Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC and propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC are two naturally occurring carnitine derivates formed by carnitine acetyltransferase. The beneficial cardiovascular effects of ALC and PLC have been extensively evaluated in animals and humans during the last 20 years. For instance, many clinical trials have suggested ALC and PLC as potential strategies in the management of peripheral arterial disease, heart and cerebral ischemia, and congestive heart failure. As a result, several experts have already aimed to revise the clinical evidence supporting the therapeutic use of ALC and PLC. On the basis of their conclusions, our aim was a critical review of the effectiveness of ALC and PLC in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Therefore we also describe recent studies that have addressed the emerging use of ALC and PLC amelioration of the insulin resistant state and its related morbidities.Keywords: propionyl-L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine, L-carnitine, cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance 

  9. Synthesis of [methyl-14C]crotonobetaine from DL-[methyl-14C]carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The causes of carnitine deficiency syndromes are not completely understood, but decomposition of L-carnitine in vivo is likely to be involved. Carnitine is metabolized to γ-butyrobetaine, and crotonobetaine is probably an intermediate in this pathway. To validate experimentally the precursor-product relationship between the three physiologically occuring γ-betaines - L-carnitine, crotonobetaine, γ-butyrobetaine - labelling with stable or radioactive isotopes became necessary. Methyl-labelled carnitine isomers (L(-)-, D(+)- or DL-) or γ-butyrobetaine can be easily synthesized by methylation of 4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid isomers or 4-aminobutyric acid, respectively. Because of problems with the 4-aminocrotonic acid, we synthesized labelled crotonbetaine from labelled carnitine. Thus, DL-[methyl-14C]carnitine was dehydrated by reaction with concentrated sulfuric acid. After removal of the latter the products were separated and purified by ion exchange chromatography on DOWEX 50 WX8 (200 - 400 mesh) and gradient elution with hydrochloric acid. In addition to the labelled main product [methyl-14C]crotonobetaine (yield about 50 %), [methyl-14C]glycine betaine and [methyl-14C]acetonyl-trimethylammonium (ATMA) were formed. The end products were identified by combined thin layer chromatography/autoradiography and quantified by liquid scintillation counting. (Author)

  10. Update on critical evidence for use of carnitine analogs in clinical practice in CNS disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traina G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Giovanna TrainaDepartment of Economics and Food Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia, ItalyAbstract: L-carnitine (LC is part of the carnitine shuttle system at the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM and transports long chain fatty acids over the MIM route. Acetyl-L -carnitine (ALC, the acetyl ester of LC, plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism. To ALC are ascribed neurotrophic actions, antioxidant and antiapoptotic activity, positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and stabilization of intracellular membranes. Acylcarnitine and LC supplementation have shown beneficial effects in the treatment of aging, chronic degenerative pathologies and the slowing of the progression of mental deterioration in neurodegenerative diseases, and painful neuropathies. ALC is reported to affect brain energy and phospholipid metabolism and to interact with cell membranes, proteins, and enzymes. It also shows a neuromodulatory effect on synaptic morphology and neurotransmitter synaptic transmission, including that of acetylcholine and dopamine. All these data suggest that ALC can affect several targets in the central nervous system. The roles and effects of LC and ALC have led researchers to investigate carnitine's involvement in a variety of neuropathological states and treatments, including autism, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Down's syndrome, Huntington's disease, cerebellar ataxia, age-associated mental decline, hepatic encephalopathy, and ammonia neurotoxicity. This review summarizes evidence that carnitine analogs play many roles in serious neurological pathologies.Keywords: L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine, brain, neural disorders

  11. Reconstruction of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway from Neurospora crassa in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Jaco; Burger, Anita; Swiegers, Jan H; Bauer, Florian F

    2015-08-01

    Industrial synthesis of L-carnitine is currently performed by whole-cell biotransformation of industrial waste products, mostly D-carnitine and cronobetaine, through specific bacterial species. No comparable system has been established using eukaryotic microorganisms, even though there is a significant and growing international demand for either the pure compound or carnitine-enriched consumables. In eukaryotes, including the fungus Neurospora crassa, L-carnitine is biosynthesized through a four-step metabolic conversion of trimethyllysine to L-carnitine. In contrast, the industrial yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks the enzymes of the eukaryotic biosynthesis pathway and is unable to synthesize carnitine. This study describes the cloning of all four of the N. crassa carnitine biosynthesis genes and the reconstruction of the entire pathway in S. cerevisiae. The engineered yeast strains were able to catalyze the synthesis of L-carnitine, which was quantified using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HILIC-ESI-MS) analyses, from trimethyllysine. Furthermore, the yeast threonine aldolase Gly1p was shown to effectively catalyze the second step of the pathway, fulfilling the role of a serine hydroxymethyltransferase. The analyses also identified yeast enzymes that interact with the introduced pathway, including Can1p, which was identified as the yeast transporter for trimethyllysine, and the two yeast serine hydroxymethyltransferases, Shm1p and Shm2p. Together, this study opens the possibility of using an engineered, carnitine-producing yeast in various industrial applications while providing insight into possible future strategies aimed at tailoring the production capacity of such strains. PMID:25851717

  12. Does left ventricular function improve with L-carnitine after acute myocardial infarction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer R

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A double blind randomized placebo controlled clinical trial was carried out to assess the efficacy and safety of L-carnitine in patients suffering from acute anterior wall myocardial infarction with respect to left ventricular function. Sixty patients (34 men, 26 women, mean age 56+11 yr. with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction were randomized to placebo and L-carnitine. All the patients were given intravenous L-carnitine / placebo in the dose of 6gm/day for the first seven days followed by oral L-carnitine / placebo 3 gm/day in three divided doses for a period of three months. Echocardiography was performed for regional wall motion abnormality, left ventricular end systolic volume (ESV, end diastolic volume (EDV and ejection fraction (EF on admission, after seven days and after three months of the infarction. Forty-four patients completed the study. There were three deaths, two in the placebo and one in the L-carnitine group (p>0.05. Thirteen patients were lost to follow up. Echo parameters in both groups were comparable (p>0.05. The duration of chest pain prior to initiation of the I.V. L-carnitine was 7.5 + 5.2 hrs in the L-carnitine group and 7 + 4 hrs in the placebo group (p>0.05. There was no statistical difference in the EF, ESV and EDV on admission, at discharge and after three months in the L-carnitine and the placebo groups (p>0.05. No significant adverse effects were noted. L-carnitine, though a safe drug, does not affect the left ventricular function in patients with myocardial infarction.

  13. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplementation reverses the age-related decline in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity in interfibrillar mitochondria without changing the L-carnitine content in the rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Luis A; Heath, Shi-Hua D; Hagen, Tory M

    2012-01-01

    The aging heart displays a loss of bioenergetic reserve capacity partially mediated through lower fatty acid utilization. We investigated whether the age-related impairment of cardiac fatty acid catabolism occurs, at least partially, through diminished levels of L-carnitine, which would adversely affect carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acyl-CoA uptake into mitochondria for β-oxidation. Old (24-28 mos) Fischer 344 rats were fed±acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR; 1.5% [w/v]) for up to four weeks prior to sacrifice and isolation of cardiac interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria. IFM displayed a 28% (p<0.05) age-related loss of CPT1 activity, which correlated with a decline (41%, p<0.05) in palmitoyl-CoA-driven state 3 respiration. Interestingly, SSM had preserved enzyme function and efficiently utilized palmitate. Analysis of IFM CPT1 kinetics showed both diminished V(max) and K(m) (60% and 49% respectively, p<0.05) when palmitoyl-CoA was the substrate. However, no age-related changes in enzyme kinetics were evident with respect to L-carnitine. ALCAR supplementation restored CPT1 activity in heart IFM, but not apparently through remediation of L-carnitine levels. Rather, ALCAR influenced enzyme activity over time, potentially by modulating conditions in the aging heart that ultimately affect palmitoyl-CoA binding and CPT1 kinetics. PMID:22322067

  14. Synthesis of O-[11C]acetyl CoA, O-[11C]acetyl-L-carnitine, and L-[11C]carnitine labelled in specific positions, applied in PET studies on rhesus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The syntheses of L-carnitine, O-acetyl CoA, and O-acetyl-L-carnitine labelled with 11C at the 1- or 2-position of the acetyl group or the N-methyl position of carnitine, using the enzymes acetyl CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase, are described. With a total synthesis time of 45 min, O-[1-11C]acetyl CoA and O-[2-11C]acetyl CoA was obtained in 60-70% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, and O-[1-11C]acetyl-L-carnitine and O-[2-11C]acetyl-L-carnitine in 70-80% yield, based on [1-11C]acetate or [2-11C]acetate, respectively. By an N-methylation reaction with [11C]methyl iodide, L-[methyl-11C]carnitine was obtained within 30 min, and O-acetyl-L-[methyl-11C]carnitine within 40 min, giving a decay-corrected radiochemical yield of 60% and 40-50%, respectively, based on [11C]methyl iodide. Initial data of the kinetics of the different 11C-labelled L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitines in renal cortex of anaesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta) are presented

  15. Synthesis of O-[{sup 11}C]acetyl CoA, O-[{sup 11}C]acetyl-L-carnitine, and L-[{sup 11}C]carnitine labelled in specific positions, applied in PET studies on rhesus monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Gunilla B.; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Valind, Sven; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Laangstroem, Bengt

    1997-07-01

    The syntheses of L-carnitine, O-acetyl CoA, and O-acetyl-L-carnitine labelled with {sup 11}C at the 1- or 2-position of the acetyl group or the N-methyl position of carnitine, using the enzymes acetyl CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase, are described. With a total synthesis time of 45 min, O-[1-{sup 11}C]acetyl CoA and O-[2-{sup 11}C]acetyl CoA was obtained in 60-70% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, and O-[1-{sup 11}C]acetyl-L-carnitine and O-[2-{sup 11}C]acetyl-L-carnitine in 70-80% yield, based on [1-{sup 11}C]acetate or [2-{sup 11}C]acetate, respectively. By an N-methylation reaction with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide, L-[methyl-{sup 11}C]carnitine was obtained within 30 min, and O-acetyl-L-[methyl-{sup 11}C]carnitine within 40 min, giving a decay-corrected radiochemical yield of 60% and 40-50%, respectively, based on [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. Initial data of the kinetics of the different {sup 11}C-labelled L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitines in renal cortex of anaesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta) are presented.

  16. Decrease of serum carnitine levels in patients with or without gastrointestinal cancer cachexia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariano Malaguarnera; Corrado Risino; Maria Pia Gargante; Giovanni Oreste; Gloria Barone; Anna Veronica Tomasello; Mario Costanzo; Matteo Angelo Cannizzaro

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the levels of serum carnitine in patients with cancer in digestive organs and to compare them with other cancers in order to provide new insights into the mechanisms of cachexia.METHODS: Fifthy-five cachectic patients with or without gastrointestinal cancer were enrolled in the present study. They underwent routine laboratory investigations,including examination of the levels of various forms of carnitine present in serum (i.e., long-chain acylcarnitine,short-chain acylcarnitine, free carnitine, and total carnitine). These values were compared with those found in 60 cancer patients in good nutritional status as well as with those of 30 healthy control subjects.RESULTS: When the cachectic patients with gastrointestinal cancer were compared with the cachectic patients without gastrointestinal cancer, the difference was -6.8 μmol/L in free carnitine (P<0.005), 0.04 μmol/L in long chain acylcarnitine (P<0.05), 8.7 μmol/L in total carnitine (P<0.001). In the cachectic patients with or without gastrointestinal cancer, the difference was 12.2μmol/L in free carnitine (P<0.001), 4.60 μmol/L in short chain acylcarnitine (P<0.001), and 0.60 μmol/L in long-chain acylcarnitine (P<0.005) and 17.4 μmol/L in total carnitine (P<0.001). In the cachectic patients with gastrointestinal cancer and the healthy control subjects, the difference was 15.5 μmol/L in free carnitine (P<0.001), 5.2 μmol/L in short-chain acylcarnitine (P< 0.001), 1.0 μmol/L in long chain acylcarnitine (P <0.001), and 21.8μmol/L in total carnitine (P<0.001).CONCLUSION: Low serum levels of carnitine in terminal neoplastic patients are decreased greatly due to the decreased dietary intake and impaired endogenous synthesis of this substance. These low serum carnitine levels also contribute to the progression of cachexia in cancer patients.

  17. Effect of L-carnitine Supplementation on Nutritional Status and Physical Performance Under Calorie Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Swati; Singh, Som Nath

    2014-01-01

    L-carnitine is popular as a potential ergogenic aid because of its role in the conversion of fat into energy. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of short term supplementation of L-carnitine on metabolic markers and physical efficiency tests under short term calorie restriction. Male albino rats were divided into four groups (n = 12 in each)—control, calorie restricted (CR for 5 days, 25 % of basal food intake), L-carnitine supplemented (CAR, given orally for 5 days at ...

  18. L-carnitine: a partner between immune response and lipid metabolism ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Famularo

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrated that in vivo administered L-carnitine strongly ameliorated the immune response in both healthy individuals receiving Intralipid and ageing subjects with cardiovascular diseases, as shown by the enhancement of mixed lymphocyte reaction. Notably, in the latter group L-carnitine treatment also resulted in a significant reduction of serum levels of both cholesterol and triglycerides. Therefore, the hypothesis is that L-carnitine supplementation could ameliorate both the dysregulated immune response and the abnormal lipid metabolism in several conditions.

  19. Molecular basis of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJlst, L; Mandel, H; Oostheim, W; Ruiter, J P; Gutman, A; Wanders, R J

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation is important for energy production, which is stressed by the different defects found in this pathway. Most of the enzyme deficiencies causing these defects are well characterized at both the protein and genomic levels. One exception is carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency, of which until now no mutations have been reported although the defect is enzymatically well characterized. CPT I is the key enzyme in the carnitine-dependent transport across the mitochondrial inner membrane and its deficiency results in a decreased rate of fatty acid beta-oxidation. Here we report the first delineation of the molecular basis of hepatic CPT I deficiency in a new case. cDNA analysis revealed that this patient was homozygous for a missense mutation (D454G). The effect of the identified mutation was investigated by heterologous expression in yeast. The expressed mutant CPT IA displayed only 2% of the activity of the expressed wild-type CPT IA, indicating that the D454G mutation is the disease-causing mutation. Furthermore, in patient's fibroblasts the CPT IA protein was markedly reduced on immunoblot, suggesting that the mutation renders the protein unstable. PMID:9691089

  20. Carnitine Acetyltransferase Mitigates Metabolic Inertia and Muscle Fatigue during Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Sarah E; Koves, Timothy R; Gooding, Jessica R; Wong, Kari E; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Wittmann, April H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Davies, Michael N; Lindeboom, Lucas; Schrauwen, Patrick; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Muoio, Deborah M

    2015-07-01

    Acylcarnitine metabolites have gained attention as biomarkers of nutrient stress, but their physiological relevance and metabolic purpose remain poorly understood. Short-chain carnitine conjugates, including acetylcarnitine, derive from their corresponding acyl-CoA precursors via the action of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), a bidirectional mitochondrial matrix enzyme. We show here that contractile activity reverses acetylcarnitine flux in muscle, from net production and efflux at rest to net uptake and consumption during exercise. Disruption of this switch in mice with muscle-specific CrAT deficiency resulted in acetyl-CoA deficit, perturbed energy charge, and diminished exercise tolerance, whereas acetylcarnitine supplementation produced opposite outcomes in a CrAT-dependent manner. Likewise, in exercise-trained compared to untrained humans, post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rates were positively associated with CrAT activity and coincided with dramatic shifts in muscle acetylcarnitine dynamics. These findings show acetylcarnitine serves as a critical acetyl buffer for working muscles and provide insight into potential therapeutic strategies for combatting exercise intolerance. PMID:26154055

  1. Influences of Short -term Aerobic Exercise and Supplementation of Carnitine With or Without Choline on Body Weight, Serum Leptin and Carnitine as Well as Lipid Status In Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neamat E. Hishem*, Bushra H. El-Zawahry*, Seham M.S. El Nakeeb**

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carnitine is essential for fatty acids translocation, muscles function and exercise performance. Choline is a lipotropic agent that prevents deposition of fat in the liver. The studies concerning the effects of carnitine and choline supplementation with exercise on carnitine status and serum leptin are rare. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of carnitine and its combination with choline, with or without exercise on body and total fat pad (TFP weights, serum carnitine, leptin, -hydroxy butyric acid (-HBA, triacylglycerols (TAG and Free Fatty acids (FFA. Also, total lipids (TL and TAG content of TFP and urinary carnitine were investigated. Material and Methods: 48 male rats were equally divided to the following groups: control (C, carnitine (5 g/Kg diet supplemented, carnitine plus choline (5 and 11.5 g /Kg diet respectively supplemented. Half of each group was subjected to short term aerobic exercise on manual treadmill, in which the speed and duration were gradually increased via the course of the experiment, to be 10 m/min for 20 min/day, 5 days/week in the last 2 weeks. Body weights were recorded weekly. After 6 weeks, The 24 hours urine was collected then the fasted rats were sacrificed and blood and the total fat pad (TFP were collected for analysis. Results: Carnitine supplementation, tended to decrease body weight, TFP, TAG content and serum FFA, and significantly decreased the TL content, serum leptin, TAG (P<0.0005. Carnitine feeding resulted in a significant elevation of serum carnitine, -HBA and urinary carnitine (P<0.0005, compared to sedentary control rats. These values became more pronounced on choline addition to the diet except for serum and urinary carnitine that reversed (i.e. decreased by choline addition. Exercise intervention resulted in a significant decrease in body weight, TFP, TL content and serum leptin, TAG and FFA. These values were more pronounced in both supplements with exercise

  2. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats:functional and electron microscopy assessments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ümmü Zeynep Avsar; Umit Avsar; Ali Aydin; Muhammed Yayla; Berna Ozturkkaragoz; Harun Un; Murat Saritemur; Tolga Mercantepe

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuro-protective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved signiifcantly. These ifndings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

  3. The results of nationwide survey efficiency of the complex acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine fumarate in the treatment of infertile marriages due to the presence of male factor

    OpenAIRE

    I. V. Vinogradov; M. Yu. Gablya; M. A. Rodionov; L. M. Vinogradova

    2014-01-01

    The article studies the influence of a complex of acetyl-L-carnitine and L-carnitine fumarate in combination therapy qualitative and quantitative indicators of sperm in men with various forms pathospermia. The study has shown that such improved performance as morphology, motility and concentration. It turned out that the treatment of complex drugs carnitine series allows you to have a spouse patients natural pregnancyin 29.57 % of cases, which does not exclude the use of drugs containing acet...

  4. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Koeth, Robert A.; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S.; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline/phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Herein we demonstrate that intestinal microbiota metabolism of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis. Omnivorous subjects are shown to produce significantly more TMAO than vegans/vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a micr...

  5. Carnitine regulates myocardial metabolism by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α (PPARα) in alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Ling; Zhou, Li-jun; Li, Wei-Min; Zhang, Feng-Min; Yuan, Lin; Li, Shuang; Song, Jian; Sang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Chronic alcohol intake exerts myocardial damage en route to the development of alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM), although the precise pathogenesis of ACM is unknown. Carnitine is known to participate in the regulation of metabolism in a number of heart diseases. This study was designed to examine the interplay between myocardial metabolism and carnitine in the development of ACM. Material/Methods Experimental animals were divided into 3 groups: (i) group A: alcohol-fed. (ii) ...

  6. Carnitine and acylcarnitine metabolism during exercise in humans. Dependence on skeletal muscle metabolic state.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiatt, W R; Regensteiner, J G; Wolfel, E. E.; Ruff, L.; Brass, E P

    1989-01-01

    Carnitine metabolism has been previously shown to change with exercise in normal subjects, and in patients with ischemic muscle diseases. To characterize carnitine metabolism further during exercise, six normal male subjects performed constant-load exercise on a bicycle ergometer on two separate occasions. Low-intensity exercise was performed for 60 min at a work load equal to 50% of the lactate threshold, and high-intensity exercise was performed for 30 min at a work load between the lactate...

  7. L-Carnitine Preserves Endothelial Function in a Lamb Model of Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shruti; Aramburo, Angela; Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Kumar, Sanjiv; Oishi, Peter E.; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Raff, Gary; Xoinis, Kon; Kalkan, Gohkan; Fratz, Sohrab; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In our model of congenital heart disease (CHD) with increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt), we have recently shown a disruption in carnitine homeostasis, associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased eNOS/Hsp90 interactions that contribute to eNOS uncoupling, increased superoxide levels, and decreased bioavailable NO. Thus, we undertook this study to test the hypothesis that L-carnitine therapy would maintain mitochondrial function, and NO signaling. Methods Thirteen feta...

  8. Carnitine and/or Acetylcarnitine Deficiency as a Cause of Higher Levels of Ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Maldonado; Natalia Guevara; Cecilia Queijo; Raquel González; Pietro Fagiolino; Marta Vázquez

    2016-01-01

    Blood carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine deficiencies are postulated in the literature as possible causes of higher ammonia levels. The aim of this study was to investigate if the use of valproic acid, the age of the patients, or certain central nervous system pathologies can cause carnitine and/or acetylcarnitine deficiency leading to increased ammonia levels. Three groups of patients were studied: (A) epileptic under phenytoin monotherapy (n = 31); (B) with bipolar disorder under valproic aci...

  9. Carnitine Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Provoke Cardiotoxicity in an Ifosfamide-Induced Fanconi Syndrome Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Darweesh, Amal Q.; Fatani, Amal J

    2010-01-01

    In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO) therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with ...

  10. Transient reduction of human left ventricular mass in carnitine depletion induced by antibiotics containing pivalic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsson, K.; Mellander, M.; Eriksson, B. O.; Holme, E; Jodal, U.; Jönsson, A.; Lindstedt, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the effect of induced carnitine depletion on myocardial structure and function. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN--7 healthy adult volunteers given 1200 mg pivmecillinam per day for 7-8 weeks were studied by echocardiography before and after 7-8 weeks of treatment and a 15 months follow up after the treatment period. SETTING--Teaching hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Carnitine concentration in serum, urine, and muscle and echocardiographic measurements. RESULTS--After 7-8 weeks of treat...

  11. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C: From cognition to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals, Núria; Zammit, Victor; Herrero, Laura; Fadó, Rut; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Rosalía; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) C was the last member of the CPT1 family of genes to be discovered. CPT1A and CPT1B were identified as the gate-keeper enzymes for the entry of long-chain fatty acids (as carnitine esters) into mitochondria and their further oxidation, and they show differences in their kinetics and tissue expression. Although CPT1C exhibits high sequence similarity to CPT1A and CPT1B, it is specifically expressed in neurons (a cell-type that does not use fatty acids as fuel to any major extent), it is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells, and it has minimal CPT1 catalytic activity with l-carnitine and acyl-CoA esters. The lack of an easily measurable biological activity has hampered attempts to elucidate the cellular and physiological role of CPT1C but has not diminished the interest of the biomedical research community in this CPT1 isoform. The observations that CPT1C binds malonyl-CoA and long-chain acyl-CoA suggest that it is a sensor of lipid metabolism in neurons, where it appears to impact ceramide and triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism. CPT1C global knock-out mice show a wide range of brain disorders, including impaired cognition and spatial learning, motor deficits, and a deregulation in food intake and energy homeostasis. The first disease-causing CPT1C mutation was recently described in humans, with Cpt1c being identified as the gene causing hereditary spastic paraplegia. The putative role of CPT1C in the regulation of complex-lipid metabolism is supported by the observation that it is highly expressed in certain virulent tumor cells, conferring them resistance to glucose- and oxygen-deprivation. Therefore, CPT1C may be a promising target in the treatment of cancer. Here we review the molecular, biochemical, and structural properties of CPT1C and discuss its potential roles in brain function, and cancer. PMID:26708865

  12. Effect of L-carnitine on postischemic inhibition of protein synthesis in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Jozef; Hernández Viadel, Mariluz; Danielisová, Viera; Némethová, Miroslava; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of carnitine administration on protein synthesis recovery after transient cerebral ischemia. Rats received L-carnitine in two doses of 16 mmol/kg i.p. 15 min before ischemia and just on the onset of reperfusion. Transient forebrain ischemia was induced by 4-vessel occlusion for 15 min, followed by 30 min or 7 days of reperfusion. Protein synthesis rate, reinitiation ability and neurodegeneration in the frontal cortex and hippocampus were measured by the incorporation of radioactively labelled leucine into polypeptide chains in postmitochondrial supernatants and by Fluoro-Jade B staining. A protective effect was observed, on protein synthesis as well as the number of surviving neurons, in the L-carnitine-treated groups. Our results indicate that L-carnitine can exert a protective effect in the development of reperfusion-induced injury. L-carnitine significantly reduced the ischemia/reperfusion-induced inhibition of translation and neurodegeneration in the neocortex as well as in the highly sensitive hippocampus and dorsolateral striatum. We expect that the ability of L-carnitine to keep translational machinery on facilitates efficacy of postischemic remodulation of gene expression. PMID:20037189

  13. Failure of carnitine in improving hepatic nitrogen content in alcoholic and non-alcoholic malnourished rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana P. Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To investigate the effect of carnitine supplementation on alcoholic malnourished rats' hepatic nitrogen content. METHODS: Malnourished rats, on 50% protein-calorie restriction with free access to water (malnutrition group and malnourished rats under the same conditions with free access to a 20% alcohol/water solution (alcohol group were studied. After the undernourishment period (4 weeks with or without alcohol, both groups were randomly divided into two subgroups, one of them nutritionally recovered for 28 days with free access to a normal diet and water (recovery groups and the other re-fed with free access to diet and water plus carnitine (0.1 g/g body weight/day by gavage (carnitine groups. No alcohol intake was allowed during the recovery period. RESULTS: The results showed: i no difference between the alcohol/no alcohol groups, with or without carnitine, regarding body weight gain, diet consumption, urinary nitrogen excretion, plasma free fatty acids, lysine, methionine, and glycine. ii Liver nitrogen content was highest in the carnitine recovery non-alcoholic group (from 1.7 to 3.3 g/100 g, P.05 was highest in the alcoholic animals. CONCLUSION: Carnitine supplementation did not induce better nutritional recovery.

  14. Molecular Mechanism of Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporter by Omeprazole Revealed by Proteoliposome Assay, Mutagenesis and Bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Annamaria Tonazzi; Ivano Eberini; Cesare Indiveri

    2013-01-01

    The effect of omeprazole on the mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter has been studied in proteoliposomes. Externally added omeprazole inhibited the carnitine/carnitine antiport catalysed by the transporter. The inhibition was partially reversed by DTE indicating that it was caused by the covalent reaction of omeprazole with Cys residue(s). Inhibition of the C-less mutant transporter indicated also the occurrence of an alternative non-covalent mechanism. The IC50 of the inhibition...

  15. Levo-Carnitine Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Contractile Functions of Fast Muscles in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Aleem, Shoaib; Mazhar Hussain, Muhammad; Farooq, Yasir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Metabolic derangements in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are likely to affect skeletal muscle contractile functions adversely. Levo-carnitine improves muscle contractile functions in healthy humans and rats and corrects metabolic derangements in T2DM. Therefore, it is likely to improve muscle contractile functions in T2DM as well. This study was designed to determine the effect of levo-carnitine on serum levo-carnitine levels, oxidative stress and contractile parameters of fast m...

  16. Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency with severe hypoglycemia and auriculo ventricular block. Translocase assay in permeabilized fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Pande, S V; Brivet, M; Slama, A.; Demaugre, F; Aufrant, C; Saudubray, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of the enzymes of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and related carnitine dependent steps have been shown to be one of the causes of the fasting-induced hypoketotic hypoglycemia. We describe here carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency in a neonate who died eight days after birth. The proband showed severe fasting-induced hypoketotic hypoglycemia, high plasma creatine kinase, heartbeat disorder, hypothermia, and hyperammonemia. The plasma-free carnitine on day three was onl...

  17. Skeletal muscle carnitine loading increases energy expenditure, modulates fuel metabolism gene networks and prevents body fat accumulation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Francis B; Wall, Benjamin T.; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Shannon, Chris E; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Macdonald, Ian A.; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Twelve weeks of daily L-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding in humans increases skeletal muscle total carnitine content, and prevents body mass accrual associated with carbohydrate feeding alone. Here we determined the influence of L-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding on energy metabolism, body fat mass andmuscle expression of fuel metabolism genes. Twelve males exercised at 50% maximal oxygen consumption for 30 min once before and once after 12 weeks of twice daily feeding of 80 g carbohyd...

  18. Oxygen Glucose Deprivation in Rat Hippocampal Slice Cultures Results in Alterations in Carnitine Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas F. Rau; Qing Lu; Shruti Sharma; Xutong Sun; Gregory Leary; Beckman, Matthew L.; Yali Hou; Wainwright, Mark S; Michael Kavanaugh; Poulsen, David J.; Black, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neurop...

  19. Cholestatic Jaundice Associated with Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase IA Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A A M; Olpin, S E; Bennett, M J; Santani, A; Stahlschmidt, J; McClean, P

    2013-01-01

    Liver dysfunction usually accompanies metabolic decompensation in fatty acid oxidation disorders, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) Ia deficiency. Typically, the liver is enlarged with raised plasma transaminase activities and steatosis on histological examination. In contrast, cholestatic jaundice is rare, having only been reported in long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency. We report a 3-year-old boy with CPT Ia deficiency who developed hepatomegaly and cholestatic jaundice following a viral illness. No cause for the jaundice could be found, apart from the fatty acid oxidation disorder. Liver histology showed diffuse, predominately macrovesicular steatosis, hepatocellular and canalicular cholestasis but no bile duct paucity or evidence of large duct obstruction. The liver dysfunction resolved in 4-7 weeks. PMID:23430491

  20. Clinically symptomatic heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pushpa Raj; Deschauer, Marcus; Zierz, Stephan

    2012-12-01

    Two symptomatic patients with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are reported. Patient 1, a 21-year-old female professional tennis player, suffered from exercise-induced attacks of muscle pain, burning sensations and proximal weakness. Patient 2, a 30-year-old male amateur marathon runner developed muscle cramps and rhabdomyolysis upon extensive exercise and insolation-induced fever. In both patients, the common p.S113L mutation was found in heterozygote state. No second mutation could be found upon sequencing of all the exons of CPT2 gene including exon-intron boundaries. Biochemically, residual CPT activity in muscle homogenate upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton-X-100 was intermediate between controls and patients with mutations on both alleles. Although CPT II deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder, the reported patients indicate that heterozygotes might also have typical attacks of myalgia, pareses or rhabdomyolysis. PMID:23184072

  1. Betaine and Carnitine Derivatives as Herbicidal Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernak, Juliusz; Niemczak, Michał; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Fochtman, Przemysław; Marcinkowska, Katarzyna; Praczyk, Tadeusz

    2016-08-16

    This study focused on the synthesis and subsequent characterization of herbicidal ionic liquids based on betaine and carnitine, two derivatives of amino acids, which were used as cations. Four commonly used herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP and Dicamba) were used as anions in simple (single anion) and oligomeric (two anions) salts. The obtained salts were subjected to analyzes regarding physicochemical properties (density, viscosity, refractive index, thermal decomposition profiles and solubility) as well as evaluation of their herbicidal activity under greenhouse and field conditions, toxicity towards rats and biodegradability. The obtained results suggest that the synthesized herbicidal ionic liquids displayed low toxicity (classified as category 4 compounds) and showed similar or improved efficacy against weed compared to reference herbicides. The highest increase was observed during field trials for salts containing 2,4-D as the anion, which also exhibited the highest biodegradability (>75 %). PMID:27374836

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of cyclic analogs of L-carnitine as potential agents in the treatment of myocardial ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woster, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to synthesize a number of cyclic, rigid analogs of L-carnitine, having a variety of predetermined positional and stereochemical orientations, to be used as probes into the spatial and conformational requirements of the enzyme known as carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase. The ability of these analogs to serve as substrates for this enzyme was to be determined by assessing the degree to which they initiate efflux of {sup 14}C-L-carnitine from isolated heart mitochondria. Toward this end, synthesis of several such analogs was attempted, resulting in the isolation and characterization of 9 cyclic analogs of carnitine, 5 of which are previously unreported. Bioevaluation of these synthetic carnitine analogs was conducted in a previously described assay system. Rat heart mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation and prepared for the study by incubation with {sup 14}C-L-carnitine. Efflux of radiolabeled carnitine was then monitored in the presence of the compound being evaluated. This represents the first instance in which non-naturally occurring analogs of L-carnitine have been shown to undergo transport via this mitochondrial translocase, suggesting the possibility that cyclic carnitine analogs may find utility as agents in the treatment of myocardial ischemia.

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of cyclic analogs of L-carnitine as potential agents in the treatment of myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to synthesize a number of cyclic, rigid analogs of L-carnitine, having a variety of predetermined positional and stereochemical orientations, to be used as probes into the spatial and conformational requirements of the enzyme known as carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase. The ability of these analogs to serve as substrates for this enzyme was to be determined by assessing the degree to which they initiate efflux of 14C-L-carnitine from isolated heart mitochondria. Toward this end, synthesis of several such analogs was attempted, resulting in the isolation and characterization of 9 cyclic analogs of carnitine, 5 of which are previously unreported. Bioevaluation of these synthetic carnitine analogs was conducted in a previously described assay system. Rat heart mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation and prepared for the study by incubation with 14C-L-carnitine. Efflux of radiolabeled carnitine was then monitored in the presence of the compound being evaluated. This represents the first instance in which non-naturally occurring analogs of L-carnitine have been shown to undergo transport via this mitochondrial translocase, suggesting the possibility that cyclic carnitine analogs may find utility as agents in the treatment of myocardial ischemia

  4. Oxygen glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slice cultures results in alterations in carnitine homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Rau

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neuroprotective. Thus, this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which HI alters carnitine metabolism and to begin to elucidate the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine (LCAR supplementation. Utilizing neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures we found that oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD decreased the levels of free carnitines (FC and increased the acylcarnitine (AC: FC ratio. These changes in carnitine homeostasis correlated with decreases in the protein levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT 1 and 2. LCAR supplementation prevented the decrease in CPT1 and CPT2, enhanced both FC and the AC∶FC ratio and increased slice culture metabolic viability, the mitochondrial membrane potential prior to OGD and prevented the subsequent loss of neurons during later stages of reperfusion through a reduction in apoptotic cell death. Finally, we found that LCAR supplementation preserved the structural integrity and synaptic transmission within the hippocampus after OGD. Thus, we conclude that LCAR supplementation preserves the key enzymes responsible for maintaining carnitine homeostasis and preserves both cell viability and synaptic transmission after OGD.

  5. Effects of exercise on l-carnitine and lipid metabolism in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) fed different dietary l-carnitine and lipid levels

    OpenAIRE

    Ozorio, R.O.A.; Ginneken, van, A.C.G.; Bessa, R J B; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Huisman, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) were fed four isonitrogenous diets (34 % crude protein), each containing one of two lipid (100 or 180 g/kg) and two l-carnitine (15 or 1000 mg/kg) levels. After 81 d of feeding, thirty-two fish (body weight 32 g) from each dietary group were randomly selected, sixteen fish were induced to a 3-h swim (speed of 1.5 body length (BL)/s), while the other sixteen fish were kept under resting condition. Fish fed 1000 mg l-carnitine accumulated 3.5 and 5 times mor...

  6. Quantitative Measurement of Urinary Excretion of 3-Hydroxyisovaleryl Carnitine by LC–MS/MS as an Indicator of Biotin Status in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Thomas D.; Stratton, Shawna L; Bogusiewicz, Anna; Owen, Suzanne N.; Mock, Donald M; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormally increased urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleryl carnitine (3HIA-carnitine) results from impairment in leucine catabolism caused by reduced activity of the biotin-dependent enzyme 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase. Accordingly, urinary 3HIA-carnitine might reflect biotin status. Here, we describe an LC–MS/MS method for accurately quantitating the urinary concentration of 3HIA-carnitine at concentrations that are typical for excretion rates that are normal or only modestly increase...

  7. Effects of L-carnitine against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in grass carp ovary cells (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuju; Ju, Xue; Chen, Yuke; Dong, Xiaoqing; Luo, Sha; Liu, Hongjian; Zhang, Dongming

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed in vitro to investigate the effects of L-carnitine against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in a grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) ovary cell line (GCO). GCO cells were pre-treated with different concentrations of L-carnitine, followed by incubation with 2.5 mM H2O2 for 1 h to induce oxidative damage. The results indicated that adding L-carnitine at concentrations of 0.01-1 mM into the medium for 12 h significantly increased cell viability. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine at concentrations of 0.1-5 mM for 12 h significantly inhibited 2.5 mM H2O2-induced cell viability loss. The significant decreases in the level of reactive oxygen species and cell apoptosis were observed in 0.5 mM L-carnitine group compared to the H2O2 group. Malondialdehyde values of all of the L-carnitine groups were significantly lower than those of the H2O2 group, while total glutathione levels of all of the L-carnitine groups were significantly higher than of the H2O2 group. The activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as total superoxide dismutase (0.1 and 0.5 mM L-carnitine), catalase (0.5 mM L-carnitine) and γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (0.5 and 1 mM L-carnitine), was significantly increased. In addition, pre-treatment of L-carnitine in GCO cells exposed to 2.5 mM H2O2 significantly increased the mRNA expression of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase (0.5 mM L-carnitine), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (0.1-1 mM) and glutathione peroxidase (0.1 mM L-carnitine). In conclusion, L-carnitine promotes GCO cell growth and improves antioxidant function, it plays a protective role against oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in GCO cells, and the appropriate supplemental amount of L-carnitine is 0.1-1 mM. PMID:26701137

  8. Novel localization of OCTN1, an organic cation/carnitine transporter, to mammalian mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the β-oxidation of fatty acids. We report novel localization of the organic cation/carnitine transporter, OCTN1, to mitochondria. We made GFP- and RFP-human OCTN1 cDNA constructs and showed expression of hOCTN1 in several transfected mammalian cell lines. Immunostaining of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected cells with different intracellular markers and confocal fluorescent microscopy demonstrated mitochondrial expression of OCTN1. There was striking co-localization of an RFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein and a mitochondrial-GFP marker construct in transfected MEF-3T3 and no co-localization of GFP-hOCTN1 in transfected human skin fibroblasts with other intracellular markers. L-[3H]Carnitine uptake in freshly isolated mitochondria of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected HepG2 demonstrated a K m of 422 μM and Western blot with an anti-GFP antibody identified the expected GFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein (90 kDa). We showed endogenous expression of native OCTN1 in HepG2 mitochondria with anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody. Further, we definitively confirmed intact L-[3H]carnitine uptake (K m 1324 μM), solely attributable to OCTN1, in isolated mitochondria of mutant human skin fibroblasts having <1% of carnitine acylcarnitine translocase activity (alternate mitochondrial carnitine transporter). This mitochondrial localization was confirmed by TEM of murine heart incubated with highly specific rabbit anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody and immunogold labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody. This suggests an important yet different role for OCTN1 from other OCTN family members in intracellular carnitine homeostasis

  9. Urinary excretion of L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine, propionyl-L-carnitine and their antioxidant activities after single dose administration of L-carnitine in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The urine excretion of L-carnitine (LC, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC and propionyl-Lcarnitine (PLC and their relations with the antioxidant activities are presently unknown. Liquid L-carnitine (2.0 g was administered orally as a single dose in 12 healthy subjects. Urine concentrations of LC, ALC and PLC were detected by HPLC. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC, malondialdehyde (MDA and nitrogen monoxidum (NO activities were measured by spectrophotometric methods. The 0~2 h, 2~4 h, 4~8 h, 8~12 h, 12~24 h excretion of LC was 53.13±31.36 µmol, 166.93±76.87 µmol, 219.92±76.30 µmol, 100.48±23.89 µmol, 72.07±25.77 µmol, respectively. The excretion of ALC was 29.70±14.43 µmol, 80.59±32.70 µmol, 109.85±49.21 µmol, 58.65±18.55 µmol, and 80.43±35.44 µmol, respectively. The urine concentration of PLC was 6.63±4.50 µmol, 15.33±12.59 µmol, 15.46±6.26 µmol, 13.41±11.66 µmol and 9.67±7.92 µmol, respectively. The accumulated excretion rate of LC was 6.1% within 24h after its administration. There was also an increase in urine concentrations of SOD and T-AOC, and a decrease in NO and MDA. A positive correlation was found between urine concentrations of LC and SOD (r = 0.8277 or T-AOC (r = 0.9547, and a negative correlation was found between urine LC excretions and NO (r = -0.8575 or MDA (r = 0.7085. In conclusion, a single oral LC administration let to a gradual increase in urine L-carnitine excretion which was associated with an increase in urine antioxidant enzymes and the total antioxidant capacities. These data may be useful in designing therapeutic regimens of LC or its analogues in the future.A excreção urinária de L-carnitina (LC, acetil-L-carnitina (ALC e propionil-L-carnitine (PLC e as suas relações com as atividades antioxidantes são presentemente desconhecidos. Líquido de L-carnitina (2,0 g foi administrada por via oral como uma dose única em 12 indivíduos saudáveis. As concentra

  10. Neuroprotective effects of L-carnitine against oxygenglucose deprivation in rat primary cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jin Kim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available &lt;b&gt;Purpose:&lt;/b&gt; Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is an important cause of neonatal mortality, as this brain injury disrupts normal mitochondrial respiratory activity. Carnitine plays an essential role in mitochondrial fatty acid transport and modulates excess acyl coenzyme A levels. In this study, we investigated whether treatment of primary cultures of rat cortical neurons with L-carnitine was able to prevent neurotoxicity resulting from oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. &lt;b&gt;Methods:&lt;/b&gt; Cortical neurons were prepared from Sprague-Dawley rat embryos. L-Carnitine was applied to cultures just prior to OGD and subsequent reoxygenation. The numbers of cells that stained with acridine orange (AO and propidium iodide (PI were counted, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels were measured. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and the terminal uridine deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay were performed to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine (1 μM, 10 μM, and 100 μM on OGD-induced neurotoxicity. &lt;B&gt;Results:&lt;/b&gt; Treatment of primary cultures of rat cortical neurons with L-carnitine significantly reduced cell necrosis and prevented apoptosis after OGD. L-Carnitine application significantly reduced the number of cells that died, as assessed by the PI/AO ratio, and also reduced ROS release in the OGD groups treated with 10 μM and 100 μM of L-carnitine compared with the untreated OGD group (P&lt;0.05. The application of L-carnitine at 100 μM significantly decreased cytotoxicity, LDH release, and inhibited apoptosis compared to the untreated OGD group (P&lt;0.05. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/b&gt; L-Carnitine has neuroprotective benefits against OGD in rat primary cortical neurons in vitro.

  11. The Effect of Orally Administered L-carnitine on Testis Tissue Sperm Parameters and Daily Sperm Production in Adult Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Zare

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate body and testis weight, testis tissue,counts, motility, viability, morphology, and chromatin quality of epididymal sperm, aswell as the testicular spermatid number (TSN per gram of testis, and daily sperm production(DSP in L-carnitine treated mice.Materials and Methods: In the present study, adult male NMRI mice (mean age of 4weeks were administered L-carnitine by gavage for two weeks. The experimental groupsreceived 1mg L-carnitine/100 μl deionized water and 10 mg L-carnitine/100 μl deionizedwater, respectively. The control group did not receive L-carnitine. All samples were assessedaccording to World Health Organization (WHO criteria. Sperm morphology wasassessed with papanicula staining. Sperm chromatin quality was assessed using anilinebluestaining.The left testes were fixed in Bouins solution for histological examination and the end sliceswere stained with hematoxilin and eosin (H&E. The right testis was homogenized, andTSN and DSP were calculated with an improved neubauer haemocytometer and respectiveformula.Results: Administration of L-carnitine induced significant reduction in body weight (p<0.05and an increase in tchromatine quality (p<0.05. Amongst the other parameters no significantdifferences were observed in all groups.Conclusion: These results show that oral administration of L-carnitine to mice with normalspermatogenesis does not have any significant effect on the reproductive systems.Thus, L-carnitine seems to be ineffective in normospermic animals.

  12. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeth, Robert A; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S; Buffa, Jennifer A; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T; Britt, Earl B; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D; DiDonato, Joseph A; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J Mark; Krauss, Ronald M; Tang, W H Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2013-05-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline and phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). We demonstrate here that metabolism by intestinal microbiota of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice. Omnivorous human subjects produced more TMAO than did vegans or vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. The presence of specific bacterial taxa in human feces was associated with both plasma TMAO concentration and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predicted increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA and TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but this did not occur if intestinal microbiota was concurrently suppressed. In mice with an intact intestinal microbiota, dietary supplementation with TMAO or either carnitine or choline reduced in vivo reverse cholesterol transport. Intestinal microbiota may thus contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and CVD risk. PMID:23563705

  13. Positive influence of L-carnitine on the different muscle fibres types of racing pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M H; Tsai, F H; Chou, S J; Wang, J H; Lo, D Y; Zheng, Z Z; Chan, K W; Lai, J M

    2014-08-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), Ca(2+) ATPase, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), are involved in energy metabolism. These enzymes can be used as indicators of the energy capacity of aerobic cells. The study investigated the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on M. pectoralis superficialis, M. pectoralis profundus, M. extensor carpi radialis muscle and M. flexor carpi ulnaris. Twenty-eight racing pigeons hatched at the same time were divided randomly into three groups. Eight pigeons, which were used as the control group, were sacrificed at 92-day old. The remaining twenty pigeons continued training until they reached 157-day old, with half the pigeons getting 25 mg/head/day of L-carnitine, while the other half given the same amount of water. The pigeons were assessed by histochemical methods and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). To assess influence of L-carnitine on muscle fibre composition and the performance of three genes' mRNA, this study applied SDH localization, SDH, Ca(2+) ATPase and LDH mRNA expression to examine the results after oral administration of L-carnitine in vivo in racing pigeons. The results showed that L-carnitine significantly elevated the amount of white muscle fibre type IIa (p pigeon/day will result in an improvement of muscles related to flying. PMID:24164218

  14. Crystal Structures of Murine Carnitine Acetyltransferase in Ternary Complexes with Its Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine acyltransferases catalyze the reversible exchange of acyl groups between coenzyme A (CoA) and carnitine. They have important roles in many cellular processes, especially the oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the mitochondria for energy production, and are attractive targets for drug discovery against diabetes and obesity. To help define in molecular detail the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, we report here the high resolution crystal structure of wild-type murine carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) in a ternary complex with its substrates acetyl-CoA and carnitine, and the structure of the S554A/M564G double mutant in a ternary complex with the substrates CoA and hexanoylcarnitine. Detailed analyses suggest that these structures may be good mimics for the Michaelis complexes for the forward and reverse reactions of the enzyme, representing the first time that such complexes of CrAT have been studied in molecular detail. The structural information provides significant new insights into the catalytic mechanism of CrAT and possibly carnitine acyltransferases in general.

  15. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential. PMID:23138103

  16. Carnitine protects the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans from glucose-induced reduction of survival depending on the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni, E-mail: Dorothe.J.Deusing@ernaehrung.uni-giessen.de; Beyrer, Melanie, E-mail: m.beyrer@web.de; Fitzenberger, Elena, E-mail: Elena.Fitzenberger@ernaehrung.uni-giessen.de; Wenzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.wenzel@ernaehrung.uni-giessen.de

    2015-05-08

    Besides its function in transport of fatty acids into mitochondria in order to provide substrates for β-oxidation, carnitine has been shown to affect also glucose metabolism and to inhibit several mechanisms associated with diabetic complications. In the present study we used the mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans fed on a high glucose concentration in liquid media as a diabetes model and tested the effects of carnitine supplementation on their survival under heat-stress. Carnitine at 100 μM completely prevented the survival reduction that was caused by the application of 10 mM glucose. RNA-interference for sir-2.1, a candidate genes mediating the effects of carnitine revealed no contribution of the sirtuin for the rescue of survival. Under daf-12 RNAi rescue of survival by carnitine was abolished. RNA-interference for γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase 2, encoding the key enzyme for carnitine biosynthesis did neither increase glucose toxicity nor prevent the rescue of survival by carnitine, suggesting that the effects of carnitine supplementation on carnitine levels were significant. Finally, it was demonstrated that neither the amount of lysosomes nor the proteasomal activity were increased by carnitine, excluding that protein degradation pathways, such as autophagy or proteasomal degradation, are involved in the protective carnitine effects. In conclusion, carnitine supplementation prevents the reduction of survival caused by glucose in C. elegans in dependence on a nuclear hormone receptor which displays high homologies to the vertebrate peroxisomal proliferator activated receptors. - Highlights: • Carnitine protects from glucose-induced reduction of stress-resistance. • Carnitine acts via the PPAR homolog DAF-12 on glucose toxicity. • Carnitine protects from glucose toxicity independent of protein degradation.

  17. Carnitine protects the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans from glucose-induced reduction of survival depending on the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides its function in transport of fatty acids into mitochondria in order to provide substrates for β-oxidation, carnitine has been shown to affect also glucose metabolism and to inhibit several mechanisms associated with diabetic complications. In the present study we used the mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans fed on a high glucose concentration in liquid media as a diabetes model and tested the effects of carnitine supplementation on their survival under heat-stress. Carnitine at 100 μM completely prevented the survival reduction that was caused by the application of 10 mM glucose. RNA-interference for sir-2.1, a candidate genes mediating the effects of carnitine revealed no contribution of the sirtuin for the rescue of survival. Under daf-12 RNAi rescue of survival by carnitine was abolished. RNA-interference for γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase 2, encoding the key enzyme for carnitine biosynthesis did neither increase glucose toxicity nor prevent the rescue of survival by carnitine, suggesting that the effects of carnitine supplementation on carnitine levels were significant. Finally, it was demonstrated that neither the amount of lysosomes nor the proteasomal activity were increased by carnitine, excluding that protein degradation pathways, such as autophagy or proteasomal degradation, are involved in the protective carnitine effects. In conclusion, carnitine supplementation prevents the reduction of survival caused by glucose in C. elegans in dependence on a nuclear hormone receptor which displays high homologies to the vertebrate peroxisomal proliferator activated receptors. - Highlights: • Carnitine protects from glucose-induced reduction of stress-resistance. • Carnitine acts via the PPAR homolog DAF-12 on glucose toxicity. • Carnitine protects from glucose toxicity independent of protein degradation

  18. Effects of Dietary L-carnitine Supplementation on Growth, Muscle Fatty acid Composition and Economic Profit of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    Dikel, S.; Ünalan, B.; Eroldoğan, O.T.; Hunt, A. Özlüer

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effect of dietary L-carnitine on growth, proximate and muscle fatty acid compositions of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were investigated. The fish were fed with diets containing 300 mg kg-1 L-carnitine (LC300), other group was fed with diets containing 600 mg kg-1 L-carnitine (LC600) and control group was not supplementary L-carnitine for 63 days. The weight gain of LC600 fed with L-carnitine supplemented was found to be 7.73% higher than in control group. Feed co...

  19. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 supplementation on performance and ascites mortality of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ailian; Guo, Yuming; Yuan, Jianmin

    2004-12-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on growth performance and ascites mortality of broilers. A 3 x 3 factorial arrangement was employed with three levels (0, 75 and 150 mg/kg) of L-carnitine and three levels of CoQ10 (0, 20 and 40 mg/kg) supplementation during the experiment. Five hundred and forty one-day-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into nine groups with six replicates each. All birds were fed with the basal diets from day 1 to 7 and changed to the experimental diets from day 8. During day 15 to 21 all the birds were exposed to low ambient temperature (15-18 degrees C) to induce ascites. The results showed that under this condition, growth performance of broilers were not significantly affected by CoQ10 or L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation during week 0-3 and 0-6, but body weight gain (BWG) of broilers was significantly reduced by 150 mg/ kg L-carnitine during week 0-6. Packed cell volume (PCV) of broilers was significantly decreased by L-carnitine and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P ascites heart index (AHI) and ascites mortality of broilers were significantly decreased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation. Though no significant changes were observed in total antioxidative capability (T-AOC), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) was increased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P ascites mortality of broilers; the reason may be partially associated with their antioxidative effects. PMID:15732580

  20. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Sarah E; Martin, Ola J; Noland, Robert C; Slentz, Dorothy H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Ilkayeva, Olga R; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B; Koves, Timothy R; Muoio, Deborah M

    2014-04-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  1. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefont, J. P.; Taroni, F.; Cavadini, P.; Cepanec, C.; Brivet, M.; Saudubray, J. M.; Leroux, J. P.; Demaugre, F.

    1996-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the SER-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, with out consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8651281

  2. [Myopathy in the course of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durka-Kęsy, Marta; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Fidziańska, Anna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Pastuszak, Zanna

    2012-01-01

    Congenital deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II is a disease with an autosomal recessive inheritance of phenotypic variability which depends on age at the onset of symptoms. Three entities associated with deficiency of CPT II are known: the perinatal, the infantile and the adult form. The perinatal disease is the most severe form and is invariably fatal. On the other hand, the adult CPT II clinical phenotype is benign and requires additional external triggers such as high-intensity exercise to provoke myopathic symptoms. We report a case of adult CPT II deficiency presenting with the subtle symptoms of myopathy. A 32-year-old man was admitted to the hospital complaining of muscle pain after exercise. Athletic appearance drew attention, because the patient denied practicing sport. Neurological examination revealed marked tiredness during the single-leg hop test without other abnormalities. Electromyography (EMG) and serum biochemistry were not typical for myopathy. Routine histopathological examination did not reveal any abnormalities of structure of muscle fibers. Diagnosis was established after ultrastructural and biochemical analysis which revealed changes typical for CPT II deficiency. PMID:23319229

  3. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnefont, J.P.; Cepanec, C.; Leroux, J.P. [Unite INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical act phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the Ser-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, without consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Neonatal carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency: failure of treatment despite prolonged survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissink-Muller, Petra; Lopriore, Enrico; Boelen, Carolien; Klumper, Frans; Duran, Marinus; Walther, Frans

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) deficiencies are disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO). In fatty acid oxidation, long-chain fatty acids need the carnitine cycle to be transported from the cytosol to the mitochondria. In CPT II deficiency, long-chain acylcarnitines cannot be metabolised to carnitine and acyl-CoA, leading to accumulation of toxic long-chain acylcarnitines. Three clinical presentations of CPT II deficiency have been identified: the adult form, the infantile form and the neonatal form. The neonatal form of CPT II is the most severe and all reported patients died within a few days to 6 weeks after birth. The first case of a patient with neonatal CPT II deficiency surviving beyond the neonatal period is described. Unfortunately, the infant died at the age of 6 months due to untreatable cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21709843

  5. Kinetics of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) in Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) change with its development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cai-Xia; Luo, Zhi; Hu, Wei; Tan, Xiao-Ying; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Chen, Qi-Liang; Zhu, Qing-Ling

    2014-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the ontogeny and kinetic of CPT I in several tissues of the Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus. To this end, liver, muscle and intestine tissues were examined at five various developmental stages of Chinese sucker: newly-hatched larvae, 68-day-old, 4-month-old, 1- and 2-year-old Chinese sucker, respectively. The total carnitine (TC) content in the liver increased from birth to 1-year-old Chinese sucker and then declined in the 2-year-old Chinese sucker. From the 68-day-old to the 1-year-old Chinese sucker, both free and total concentrations in muscle increased. Both acyl carnitine (AC) and TC concentrations in intestine were very variable at different stages. The ratio of AC to free carnitine (FC) in liver progressively increased from hatching to 4 months, and declined at the age of 1 year, and then increased by 2 years. In muscle, the highest and lowest ratios of AC/FC were observed at 68-days-old and 4 month-old Chinese sucker. The highest proportion of AC/FC in intestine was also observed at 68-day-old Chinese sucker. All the Chinese sucker larvae at hatching had a high value of the Michaelis constant (K(m)) for carnitine. Maximal velocity (V(max)) in intestine increased with age. V(max) in liver and muscle increased with age except a decrease at 4 months in liver and at 2 years in muscle. The FC concentration in the examined tissues at all developmental stages were less than the respective K(m), indicating that Chinese suckers require supplemental carnitine in their food to ensure that CPT I activity is not constrained by carnitine availability. PMID:24264360

  6. Plasma free and total carnitine measured in children by tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Osorio

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Free and total carnitine quantification is important as a complementary test for the diagnosis of unusual metabolic diseases, including fatty acid degradation disorders. The present study reports a new method for the quantification of free and total carnitine in dried plasma specimens by isotope dilution electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with sample derivatization. Carnitine is determined by looking for the precursor of ions of m/z = 103 of N-butylester derivative, and the method is validated by comparison with radioenzymatic assay. We obtained an inter- and intra-day assay coefficient of variation of 4.3 and 2.3, respectively. Free and total carnitine was analyzed in 309 dried plasma spot samples from children ranging in age from newborn to 14 years using the new method, which was found to be suitable for calculating reference age-related values for free and total carnitine (less than one month: 19.3 ± 2.4 and 23.5 ± 2.9; one to twelve months: 28.8 ± 10.2 and 35.9 ± 11.4; one to seven years: 30.7 ± 10.3 and 38.1 ± 11.9; seven to 14 years: 33.7 ± 11.6, and 43.1 ± 13.8 µM, respectively. No difference was found between males and females. A significant difference was observed between neonates and the other age groups. We compare our data with reference values in the literature, most of them obtained by radioenzymatic assay. However, this method is laborious and time consuming. The electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method presented here is a reliable, rapid and automated procedure for carnitine quantitation.

  7. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft Matthias; Kraft Kathleen; Gärtner Simone; Mayerle Julia; Simon Peter; Weber Eckhard; Schütte Kerstin; Stieler Jens; Koula-Jenik Heide; Holzhauer Peter; Gröber Uwe; Engel Georg; Müller Cornelia; Feng You-Shan; Aghdassi Ali

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM)...

  8. Proximate Composition, and l-Carnitine and Betaine Contents in Meat from Korean Indigenous Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Samooel; Bae, Young Sik; Yong, Hae In; Lee, Hyun Jung; Seo, Dong Won; Park, Hee Bok; Lee, Jun Heon; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the proximate composition and l-carnitine and betaine content of meats from 5 lines of Korean indigenous chicken (KIC) for developing highly nutritious meat breeds with health benefits from the bioactive compounds such as l-carnitine and betaine in meat. In addition, the relevance of gender (male and female) and meat type (breast and thigh meat) was examined. A total of 595 F1 progeny (black [B], grey-brown [G], red-brown [R], white [W], and yellow-brown [Y]) from 70 f...

  9. Cobalamin C Disease Missed by Newborn Screening in a Patient with Low Carnitine Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C; Serdaroglu, Esra; Muraresku, Colleen; Ficicioglu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin C (CblC) disease is the most common inherited disorder of intracellular cobalamin metabolism. It is a multisystemic disorder mainly affecting the eye and brain and characterized biochemically by methylmalonic aciduria, low methionine level, and homocystinuria. We report a patient found to have CblC disease who initially presented with low carnitine and normal propionylcarnitine (C3) levels on newborn screen. Newborn screening likely failed to detect CblC in this patient because of both his low carnitine level and the presence of a mild phenotype. PMID:25772322

  10. Study of the physiological function of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco Rodríguez, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1) enzymes catalyze the conversion of long-chain acyl-CoA to acyl-carnitines, thus facilitating the entry of long-chain fatty acids to the mitochondria, where they undergo β-oxidation. There are three isoforms: the liver isoform CPT1A (Esser, V. 1993), the muscle isoform CPT1B (Yamazaki, N. 1995) and the brain-specific isoform CPT1C (Price, N. 2002). CPT1A and CPT1B are localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and are rate-limiting enzymes in fatty-a...

  11. Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD) Reveals Subtle Conformational Aspects and Intermolecular Interactions in the Carnitine Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Castiglioni, Ettore; Villani, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Vibrational circular dichroism spectra (VCD) in the mid-IR region and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra for three carnitine derivatives in the form of hydrochloride salts were recorded in deuterated methanol solutions. Density Functional Theory calculations help one to understand the significance of the observed VCD bands. VCD and ECD spectra are informative about the absolute configuration of the molecule, but VCD data reveal also some conformational aspects in the N,N,N-trimethyl moiety and inform us about intermolecular interactions gained from the carbonyl stretching region for the acyl substituted carnitines. PMID:26447810

  12. Infantile form of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatomuscular symptoms and sudden death. Physiopathological approach to carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaugre, F; Bonnefont, J P; Colonna, M; Cepanec, C; Leroux, J P; Saudubray, J M

    1991-01-01

    Reported cases of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are characterized only by a muscular symptomatology in young adults although the defect is expressed in extra-muscular tissues as well as in skeletal muscle. We describe here a CPT II deficiency associating hypoketotic hypoglycemia, high plasma creatine kinase level, heart beat disorders, and sudden death in a 3-mo-old boy. CPT II defect (-90%) diagnosed in fibroblasts is qualitatively similar to that (-75%) of two "classical" CPT II-deficient patients previously studied: It resulted from a decreased amount of CPT II probably arising from its reduced biosynthesis. Consequences of CPT II deficiency studied in fibroblasts differed in both sets of patients. An impaired oxidation of long-chain fatty acids was found in the proband but not in patients with the "classical" form of the deficiency. The metabolic and clinical consequences of CPT II deficiency might depend, in part, on the magnitude of residual CPT II activity. With 25% residual activity CPT II would become rate limiting in skeletal muscle but not in liver, heart, and fibroblasts. As observed in the patient described herein, CPT II activity ought to be more reduced to induce an impaired oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in these tissues. Images PMID:1999498

  13. Systemic primary carnitine deficiency: an overview of clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magoulas Pilar L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic primary carnitine deficiency (CDSP is an autosomal recessive disorder of carnitine transportation. The clinical manifestations of CDSP can vary widely with respect to age of onset, organ involvement, and severity of symptoms, but are typically characterized by episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases, and hyperammonemia in infants; skeletal myopathy, elevated creatine kinase (CK, and cardiomyopathy in childhood; or cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, or fatigability in adulthood. The diagnosis can be suspected on newborn screening, but is established by demonstration of low plasma free carnitine concentration (SLC22A5 gene. The incidence of CDSP varies depending on ethnicity; however the frequency in the United States is estimated to be approximately 1 in 50,000 individuals based on newborn screening data. CDSP is caused by recessive mutations in the SLC22A5 gene. This gene encodes organic cation transporter type 2 (OCTN2 which transport carnitine across cell membranes. Over 100 mutations have been reported in this gene with the c.136C > T (p.P46S mutation being the most frequent mutation identified. CDSP should be differentiated from secondary causes of carnitine deficiency such as various organic acidemias and fatty acid oxidation defects. CDSP is an autosomal recessive condition; therefore the recurrence risk in each pregnancy is 25%. Carrier screening for at-risk individuals and family members should be obtained by performing targeted mutation analysis of the SLC22A5 gene since plasma carnitine analysis is not a sufficient methodology for determining carrier status. Antenatal diagnosis for pregnancies at increased risk of CDSP is possible by molecular genetic testing of extracted DNA from chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis if both mutations in SLC22A5 gene are known. Once the diagnosis of CDSP is established in an individual, an echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, CK concentration

  14. Contributions of phosphorylation to regulation of OCTN2 uptake of carnitine are minimal in BeWo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytting, Erik; Audus, Kenneth L

    2008-02-01

    Physiological functions of organic cation transporters (OCTs) in the placenta include transporting essential nutrients from the maternal to fetal circulations. OCTN2 transports carnitine with high affinity, and the transport of several drugs has also been shown to be mediated by this transporter. In this work, the role of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanisms in regulating OCTN2 was investigated by observing the effects of various activators and inhibitors of kinases and phosphatases on the uptake of carnitine in BeWo cells, a human choriocarcinoma trophoblast cell line frequently used as an in vitro model of the rate-limiting barrier for maternal-fetal exchange. Preincubation with genistein resulted in significant increases in both alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and carnitine uptake. Levamisole, an ALP inhibitor, caused a more substantial decrease in carnitine uptake than expected from its corresponding decrease in ALP activity. It was determined that levamisole competitively inhibits carnitine uptake, with a K(i) value of 1.01+/-0.05mM, and this effect has a greater role in decreasing carnitine uptake than any indirect effects of ALP inhibition upon OCTN2 function. Progesterone also competitively inhibited carnitine uptake (K(i)=48.6+/-5.0muM), but had no effect on ALP activity in BeWo cells. PMID:17977516

  15. Synthesis of [methyl-{sup 14}C]crotonobetaine from DL-[methyl-{sup 14}C]carnitine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loester, H.; Seim, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry

    1996-02-01

    The causes of carnitine deficiency syndromes are not completely understood, but decomposition of L-carnitine in vivo is likely to be involved. Carnitine is metabolized to {gamma}-butyrobetaine, and crotonobetaine is probably an intermediate in this pathway. To validate experimentally the precursor-product relationship between the three physiologically occuring {gamma}-betaines - L-carnitine, crotonobetaine, {gamma}-butyrobetaine - labelling with stable or radioactive isotopes became necessary. Methyl-labelled carnitine isomers (L(-)-, D(+)- or DL-) or {gamma}-butyrobetaine can be easily synthesized by methylation of 4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid isomers or 4-aminobutyric acid, respectively. Because of problems with the 4-aminocrotonic acid, we synthesized labelled crotonbetaine from labelled carnitine. Thus, DL-[methyl-{sup 14}C]carnitine was dehydrated by reaction with concentrated sulfuric acid. After removal of the latter the products were separated and purified by ion exchange chromatography on DOWEX 50 WX8 (200 - 400 mesh) and gradient elution with hydrochloric acid. In addition to the labelled main product [methyl-{sup 14}C]crotonobetaine (yield about 50 %), [methyl-{sup 14}C]glycine betaine and [methyl-{sup 14}C]acetonyl-trimethylammonium (ATMA) were formed. The end products were identified by combined thin layer chromatography/autoradiography and quantified by liquid scintillation counting. (Author).

  16. Recherche d'enzymes impliquées dans la voie de biosynthèse de la carnitine chez Arabidopsis thaliana et étude préliminaire de mutants à teneur réduite en carnitine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yingjuan,

    2014-01-01

    La carnitine, un acide aminé crucial pour le transfert intracellulaire des acides gras chez les animaux et les micro-organismes, est présente chez les plantes mais son mode d'implication dans le métabolisme lipidique et dans le développement reste à déterminer. Afin d'étudier le rôle biologique de la carnitine chez Arabidopsis nous avons initié une recherche bioinformatique d'enzymes susceptibles de participer à sa synthèse dans le but d'obtenir des mutants à teneur réduite en carnitine. Des ...

  17. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C deficiency causes motor impairment and hypoactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Patricia; Jacas, Jordi; Sahún, Ignasi; Muley, Helena; Ramírez, Sara; Puisac, Beatriz; Mezquita, Pau; Pié, Juan; Dierssen, Mara; Casals, Núria

    2013-11-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1c (CPT1C), a brain-specific protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons, is expressed in almost all brain regions, but its only known functions to date are involved in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis and in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning. To identify other physiological and behavioral functions of this protein, we performed a battery of neurological tests on Cpt1c-deficient mice. The animals showed intact autonomic and sensory systems, but some motor disturbances were observed. A more detailed study of motor function revealed impaired coordination and gait, severe muscle weakness, and reduced daily locomotor activity. Analysis of motor function in these mice at ages of 6-24 weeks showed that motor disorders were already present in young animals and that impairment increased progressively with age. Analysis of CPT1C expression in different motor brain areas during development revealed that CPT1C levels were low from birth to postnatal day 10 and then rapidly increased peaking at postnatal day 21, which suggests that CPT1C plays a relevant role in motor function during and after weaning. As CPT1C is known to regulate ceramide levels, we measured these biolipids in different motor areas in adult mice. Cerebellar, striatum, and motor cortex extracts from Cpt1c knockout mice showed reduced levels of ceramide and its derivative sphingosine when compared to wild-type animals. Our results indicate that altered ceramide metabolism in motor brain areas induced by Cpt1c deficiency causes progressive motor dysfunction from a young age. PMID:23973755

  18. Interaction of propionate and carnitine metabolism in isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propionate (P) and its metabolic products P-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA can disrupt normal hepatic metabolism. Carnitine (Cn) has been shown to partially restore cellular function in the presence of P. This effect of Cn may result from removal of propionyl groups as propionylcarnitine (P-Cn). The present study examined the kinetics of P-Cn formation in rat hepatocytes, and the consequence of P-Cn formation on P and Cn metabolism. 14C-P was converted to CO2, glucose and P-Cn in the hepatocyte system. Increasing concentrations of Cn up to 10.0 mM increased P-Cn formation from P without affecting CO2 or glucose formation. Thus, 10.0 mM Cn increased total P metabolism by 40%. Metabolism of P was associated with a decrease in Cn concentration and an increase in short chain acylcarnitines (SCCn). In the absence of added Cn, 60 min incubation with P decreased Cn from 6.8 to 2.5 μM with a corresponding increase in SCCn. This effect of P to deplete free Cn was not seen to the same degree with butyrate in place of P. Similar increases in the formation of SCCn in the presence of P at the expense of free Cn were seen when the incubation Cn concentration was increased to 50 μM or 150 μM. HPLC methodologies to study specific acylcarnitines demonstrated the accumulation of large amounts of P-Cn in the incubations containing P, accounting for the depletion of free Cn

  19. L-Carnitine Ameliorates Immunological-induced Hepatitis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunological mediated hepatitis can be initiated by bacterial product; Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The later is increased during severe infection, bacterial overgrowth or translocation. LPS stimulates Kupffer cells. Activation of the kupffer cells contributes to the onset of liver injuries by producing and releasing cytotoxic agents, inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. In the present study, L-carnitine, a natural antioxidant and immunoprotective agent, is used to protect against LPS-induced hepatitis. Liver content of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and the DNA adduct 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-HDG) are estimated. Serum activity of liver enzymes ALT, AST, and Gamma-GT, in addition to IL2 level are also estimated. Moreover, liver histopathological changes are determined. Results revealed that LPS (5mg/kg once i.p) significantly increased 8-HDG, MDA, NO and depleted GSH in the liver of the treated rats. It also increased serum IL2 and activity of all the estimated liver enzyme markers indicating massive hepatic cellular damage as also shown as a necrotic damage in liver histological sections. LCR administered (500mg/kg) 3h before LPS protected against LPS-induced lethality by 100%. LCR also prevented the increase in liver content of 8-HDG, MDA and NO. It reduced the depleted GSH and prevented the necrotic damage in the liver tissue as shown by normalization of ALT, AST and Gamma-Gt as well as IL2 and a remarkable improvement in liver histology. These data suggest that LCr could be used as an adjuvant therapy in severely infected and specific patients to counteract LPS-induced liver hepatitis. (author)

  20. Radioiodinated fatty acid carnitine ester: synthesis and biodistribution of 15-(p-iodo(/sup 131/I)-phenyl)pentadecanoyl-D,L-carnitine chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhut, M.; Liefhold, J.

    After the uptake into heart muscle cells long chain fatty acids enter predominantly into the triglyceride and phospholipid pool before they are degraded in the mitochondria by ..beta..-oxidation. Therefore the formation of fatty acid esters with glycerine obscures the functional ability of the heart namely to catabolize free fatty acids. The sum of the two reaction pathways are visualized by sequential heart scintigraphy with e.g. /sup 131/I labeled 15-(p-iodo-phenyl)-pentadecanoic acid (IPPA). Before the fatty acids can be degraded by ..beta..-oxidation they are bound to carnitine for mitochondrial membrane transport. Thus IPPA would not participate in lipid formation, if it is offered as 15-(p-iodo(/sup 131/I)-phenyl)-pentadecanoyl-D,L-carnitine chloride (IPPA-CE) to the heart muscle cells. Additionally carnitine esters of fatty acids are known to be better substrates for ..beta..-oxidation than free fatty acids. We were therefore interested in the biochemical fate of radioiodinated IPPA-CE in rats.

  1. Neuroprotective Effects of Pre-Treament with l-Carnitine and Acetyl-l-Carnitine on Ischemic Injury In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunjiang Xu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effect of stroke is hampered by the lack of neuroprotective drugs against ischemic insults beyond the acute phase. Carnitine plays important roles in mitochondrial metabolism and in modulating the ratio of coenzyme A (CoA/acyl-CoA. Here, we investigate the neuroprotective effects of l-carnitine (LC and Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC pre-treatment on ischemic insults under the same experimental conditions. We used a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model to evaluate the protective roles of LC and ALC in acute focal cerebral ischemia in vivo and to understand the possible mechanisms using model of PC12 cell cultures in vitro. Results showed that ALC, but not LC, decreased infarction size in SD rats after MCAO in vivo. However, both LC and ALC pretreatment reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD-induced cell injury and decreased OGD-induced cell apoptosis and death in vitro; at the same time, both of them increased the activities of super oxide dismutase (SOD and ATPase, and decreased the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA in vitro. Thus, our findings suggested that LC and ALC pre-treatment are highly effective in the prevention of neuronal cell against ischemic injury in vitro, however, only ALC has the protective effect on neuronal cell injury after ischemia in vivo.

  2. Radioiodinated fatty acid carnitine ester: synthesis and biodistribution of 15-(p-iodo[131I]-phenyl)pentadecanoyl-D,L-carnitine chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the uptake into heart muscle cells long chain fatty acids enter predominantly into the triglyceride and phospholipid pool before they are degraded in the mitochondria by β-oxidation. Therefore the formation of fatty acid esters with glycerine obscures the functional ability of the heart namely to catabolize free fatty acids. The sum of the two reaction pathways are visualized by sequential heart scintigraphy with e.g. 131I labeled 15-(p-iodo-phenyl)-pentadecanoic acid (IPPA). Before the fatty acids can be degraded by β-oxidation they are bound to carnitine for mitochondrial membrane transport. Thus IPPA would not participate in lipid formation, if it is offered as 15-(p-iodo[131I]-phenyl)-pentadecanoyl-D,L-carnitine chloride (IPPA-CE) to the heart muscle cells. Additionally carnitine esters of fatty acids are known to be better substrates for β-oxidation than free fatty acids. We were therefore interested in the biochemical fate of radioiodinated IPPA-CE in rats. (author)

  3. Protective Role of Carnitine against the Harmful Biological Effects of Paracetamol and Radiation Exposure in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-carnitine, a natural component of mammalian tissue, is a necessary factor in the utilization of long-chain fatty acids to produce energy. Furthermore it has been shown to protect cells from per oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of L-carnitine on hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity induced by paracetamol, γ-radiation, and paracetamol + γ-radiation. Male albino rats were divided into 8 groups. 1-Control group: rats not subject to any treatment, 2-Carnitine group: rats received L-carnitine (0.5 ml/Kg body weight) via intraperitoneal injection during 21 days, 3-Paracetamol group: rats received paracetamol (50 mg/kg body) via intraperi-toneal injection during 21 days, 4- Carnitine + Paracetamol group: rats received L-carnitine in parallel to paracetamol treatment, 5- Radiation groups: rats were whole body gamma irradiated with 7 Gy, 6- Carnitine + Radiation group: rats received L-carnitine for 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation with 7Gy, 7- Paracetamol + Radiation group: rats received paracetamol during 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation, 8- Carnitine + Paracetamol + Radiation group: rats received L-carnitine parallel to paracetamol during 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation.The results demonstrated that rats receiving paracetamol, as well as whole body gamma irradiated rats and rats receiving paracetamol and irradiated showed a significant increase of alanine amino transferase (ALT), aspartate amino transferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, and a significant decrease of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity indicating liver injury. A significant increase of urea, creatinine and uric acid levels was recorded also indicating kidney damage. Alteration in liver and kidney functions was accompanied by a significant increase in the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) associated with a significant decrease in glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide

  4. Effects of ethanol feeding on the activity and regulation of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzman, M.; Geelen, M.J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of ethanol administration on activity and regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) were studied in hepatocytes isolated from rats fed a liquid, high-fat diet containing 36% of total calories as ethanol or an isocaloric amount of sucrose. Cells were isolated at several time

  5. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Afifi, A; Clark, S; Manning, N J; Bonham, J R; Dalton, A; Leonard, J V; Land, J M; Andresen, B S; Morris, A A; Muntoni, F; Turnbull, D; Pourfarzam, M; Rahman, S; Pollitt, R J

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency has three basic phenotypes, late-onset muscular (mild), infantile/juvenile hepatic (intermediate) and severe neonatal. We have measured fatty acid oxidation and CPT II activity and performed mutation studies in 24 symptomatic patients...

  6. Effects of ICRF-187 and L-Carnitine on bleomycin-induced lung toxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible modulatory effects of ICRF-187 and L-carnitine against bleomycin-induced pulmonary toxicity in male rats were investigated. Repeated administration of bleomycin (10 mg/kg, twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks) produced significant lung toxicity. The toxicity was manifested by significant increase in normal contents of lipid peroxide (LPO, 91.7%) reduced glutathione (GSH, 73.2%) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG, 135.4%) as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, 222.7%). Thirty minutes prior to bleomycin treatment, other groups of rats received either ICRF-187 (95 mg/kg) or L-carnitine (500 mg/kg) adopting the same schedule of treatment as in bleomycin-treated group. L-carnitine decreased bleomycin-induced elevations in SOD activity, GSH and GSSG contents, however, it failed to suppress the increase in LPO level. On the other hand, treatment with ICRF-187 returned back all the elevated biochemical parameters induced by bleomycin to nearly normal levels. In conclusion, the results of this study showed a potential capability of ICRF-187 to mitigate the bleomycin-induced lung injury. Moreover, despite the inability of L-carnitine to change the elevated LPO content, it was able however, to decrease the elevated endogenous antioxidant parameters. (author)

  7. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN - a randomized multicentre trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraft Matthias

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM kg. During treatment body-mass-index increased by 3,4 ± 1,4% under L-Carnitine and decreased (−1,5 ± 1,4% in controls (p  Conclusion While these data are preliminary and need confirmation they indicate that patients with pancreatic cancer may have a clinically relevant benefit from the inexpensive and well tolerated oral supplementation of L-Carnitine.

  8. Carnitine: function, metabolism and value in hepatic failure during chronic alcohol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Kępka

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is one of the most frequent dependences among people, leading to damage of the liver and death of the person. Chronic alcohol consumption decreases fatty acid oxidation by interfering with carnitine metabolism and citric acid cycle activity. Block in activity of the citric acid cycle caused by alcohol and its metabolites is partially compensated by increased ketone body production, which results in ketosis. Chronic administration of alcohol induces liver injury, inflammation, cirrhosis, focal necrosis and steatosis.L-carnitine (L-3-hydroxy-4-N, N, N-trimethylaminebutyric acid is an essential factor in fatty acid metabolism, which plays a major role in transport of activated long-chain fatty acids to sites of β-oxidation in mitochondria. Carnitine also stabilizes cell membranes by removing long-chain acyl-CoA and excess of the acyl group from the body. L-carnitine can be a useful and safe drug in the liver pathology induced by chronic ethanol exposure.

  9. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism integrates nutrient and hormonal feedback to regulate energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-15

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires the hypothalamic integration of nutrient feedback cues, such as glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and metabolic hormones such as insulin, leptin and ghrelin. Although hypothalamic neurons are critical to maintain energy homeostasis research efforts have focused on feedback mechanisms in isolation, such as glucose alone, fatty acids alone or single hormones. However this seems rather too simplistic considering the range of nutrient and endocrine changes associated with different metabolic states, such as starvation (negative energy balance) or diet-induced obesity (positive energy balance). In order to understand how neurons integrate multiple nutrient or hormonal signals, we need to identify and examine potential intracellular convergence points or common molecular targets that have the ability to sense glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and hormones. In this review, we focus on the role of carnitine metabolism in neurons regulating energy homeostasis. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a novel means for neurons to facilitate and control both nutrient and hormonal feedback. In terms of nutrient regulation, carnitine metabolism regulates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing through the actions of CPT1 and has an underappreciated role in glucose sensing since carnitine metabolism also buffers mitochondrial matrix levels of acetyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and hence glucose metabolism. Studies also show that hypothalamic CPT1 activity also controls hormonal feedback. We hypothesis that hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a key molecular target that can concurrently integrate nutrient and hormonal information, which is critical to maintain energy homeostasis. We also suggest this is relevant to broader neuroendocrine research as it predicts that hormonal signaling in the brain varies depending on current nutrient status. Indeed, the metabolic action of ghrelin, leptin or insulin

  10. Serum levo-carnitine levels and skeletal muscle functions in type 2 diabetes mellitus in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study serum levo-carnitine (l-carnitine) levels and isometric contraction, force frequency relationship and fatigue of rodent skeletal muscles in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Physiology Department, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups; group I (control), fed on normal diet ad libitum and Group II (diabetic), fed on high fat diet and administered streptozocin to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). At 21st day, plasma glucose and TG/HDL ratio were measured to confirm the development of T2DM in group II. At 28th day, blood was drawn by intracardiac puncture to estimate serum levo-carnitine levels. Contractile functions of skeletal muscles were assessed by using iWorx AHK/214 physiological data acquisition unit. Simple muscle twitches, maximum isometric twitch tension (MITT), time-to-peak twitch tension (TPTT) and time-to-relax to 50% of the peak twitch tension (1/2RT) of extensor digitorum muscles were recorded. Muscles were stimulated at higher frequencies to determine maximum fused tetanic tension (MFTT), maximum fused tetanic tension after fatigue protocol (TTFP) and recovery from fatigue (RF). Results: Serum levo-carnitine level decreased significantly in the diabetic group. Both groups had similar MITT, TPTT and 1/2RT but decline in MFTT, TTFP and RF was significant in the diabetic rats. Conclusion: T2DM adversely affected serum levo-carnitine levels and the contractile functions of rodent skeletal muscle at high frequency stimulation. (author)

  11. Acetyl L-Carnitine Modulating Irradiation Induced Cardio-Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In The Present study male adult Wister albino rats were irradiated at 4 Gy whole body gamma irradiation and Acetyl L-carnitine (ALC) was evaluated as a potential radio-protector under conditions that would model the oxidative stress syndrome. ALC protect the heart and lung from the depletion of SOD, GSHPx activities and GSH content followed radiation exposure. Protection from the increase of malonaldehyde (MDA) in heart and lung tissues as well as serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), AST and LDH has been observed. These results imply that ALC can act as a radio-protector against many aspects of oxidative damage. ALC is an ester of the tri methylated amino acid L-carnitine, and is synthesized endogenously in the human brain, liver and kidney by the enzyme ALC transferase or obtained from dietary sources (Goa and Brogden, 1987). L carnitine and short chain derivatives are essential cofactors for mitochondrial transport and oxidation of long chain fatty acid and act also as scavengers of oxygen free radicals in mammalian tissue (Izgut-Uysal et al., 2001). The transport of ALC and PLC occurs more easily than L-carnitine through the lipid component of the intestinal barrier suggesting possible better oral bioavailability of the esters than L-carnitine (Marciniani et al., 1991). ALC has antioxidant activity towards oxidative stress via an inhibition of the increase in lipid hydro peroxidation (Yasui et al., 2002). ALC significantly enhances the regenerative capacity of neurons that survive peripheral nerve trauma (Marciniani et al., 1991) and has also shown neuro-protective effect in rats (Bigini et al., 2002)

  12. Effects of L-Carnitine Added to Erythropoietin in Anemic Chronic Renal Failure Patients on Hemodialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Taheri

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic renal disease (C.R.D is a pathophysiological process due to progressive and irreversible decrease in number and function of nephrons in the kidney. Anemia is one of the most important complications in CRD patients. Anemia is caused mainly due to diminished production of erythropoietin (EPO, which is treated by weekly injection of the EPO. L-carnitine added to EPO can increase the efficacy of EPO. Methods: Present study, from March 2003 until September 2004 (18 months, evaluates the effects of L-carnitine added to EPO in 30 patients at Shaheed Rahnemon hemodialysis center of Yazd. Each patient was administered one oral table (250 mg of L-carnitine, twice a day along with EPO for 90 days. EPO was in the form of injection 2000 iu/sc after dialysis.(three times per week. One questionnaire was completed for each patient, which included demographic characteristics, type of disease, duration of the hemodialysis, Hb and Hct levels, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels. Hb ,Hct and transferrin saturations were measured on days 1, 45 and 90. Results were analyzed by paired t test and analysis of variance. Results: Results of this study showed that the mean Hb levels and Hct were significantly raised up to 1.1 mg/dl (P.value<0.001 and 2.7% (P.Value<0.001, respectively. In addition, significant decrease of 5.75% in transferrin (P.Value< 0.001 and 121ng/ml in ferritin levels (P.Value< 0.001 was observed. Efficacy of EPO plus L-carnitine was affected only by duration of hemodialysis and not by age, sex or causes of CRD. Conclusion: L-carnitine added to EPO increases the efficacy of EPO after 3 months.

  13. Topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, F; Corstorphine, C G; Zammit, V A

    1997-01-01

    The topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) in the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria was studied using several approaches. 1. The accessibility of the active site and malonyl-CoA-binding site of the enzyme from the cytosolic aspect of the membrane was investigated using preparations of octanoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA immobilized on to agarose beads to render them impermeant through the outer membrane. Both immobilized ligands were fully able to interact effectively with CPT I. 2. The effects of proteinase K and trypsin on the activity and malonyl-CoA sensitivity of CPT I were studied using preparations of mitochondria that were either intact or had their outer membranes ruptured by hypo-osmotic swelling (OMRM). Proteinase K had a marked but similar effect on CPT I activity irrespective of whether only the cytosolic or both sides of the membrane were exposed to it. However, it affected sensitivity more rapidly in OMRM. By contrast, trypsin only reduced CPT I activity when incubated with OMRM. The sensitivity of the residual CPT I activity was unaffected by trypsin. 3. The proteolytic fragments generated by these treatments were studied by Western blotting using three anti-peptide antibodies raised against linear epitopes of CPT I. These showed that a proteinase K-sensitive site close to the N-terminus was accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane. No trypsin-sensitive sites were accessible in intact mitochondria. In OMRM, both proteinase K and trypsin acted from the inter-membrane space side of the membrane. 4. The ability of intact mitochondria and OMRM to bind to each of the three anti-peptide antibodies was used to study the accessibility of the respective epitopes on the cytosolic and inter-membrane space sides of the membrane. 5. The results of all these approaches indicate that CPT I adopts a bitopic topology within the mitochondrial outer membrane; it has two transmembrane domains, and both the N- and C-termini are exposed on the

  14. Radiolysis of D(+)-carnitine by /sup 60/Co-. gamma. -radiation and formation of L(+)-. beta. -methylcholine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loester, Heinz; Strack, Erich; Seim, Hermann

    1986-06-01

    The radiolysis of D(+)-carnitine by /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-radiation was examined to obtain optically active ..beta..-methylcholine. It was found that the radiolysis leads to a number of trimethylammonium bases but to no other betaines. (+)-..beta..-Methylcholine and acetonyltrimethylammonium could be identified by means of common analytical methods. The amounts of methylamines formed by irradiation were very small. Racemization of the D(+)-carnitine did not occur during irradiation, L(-)-carnitine was not found when an enzymatical determination method was used. The fact that (+)-..beta..-methylcholine was formed from D(+)-carnitine is pharmacologically important, because acetyl-L(+)-..beta..-methylcholine has a strong interaction with muscarinic receptors.

  15. Radiolysis of D(+)-carnitine by 60Co-γ-radiation and formation of L(+)-β-methylcholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis of D(+)-carnitine by 60Co-γ-radiation was examined to obtain optically active β-methylcholine. It was found that the radiolysis leads to a number of trimethylammonium bases but to no other betaines. (+)-β-Methylcholine and acetonyltrimethylammonium could be identified by means of common analytical methods. The amounts of methylamines formed by irradiation were very small. Racemization of the D(+)-carnitine did not occur during irradiation, L(-)-carnitine was not found when an enzymatical determination method was used. The fact that (+)-β-methylcholine was formed from D(+)-carnitine is pharmacologically important, because acetyl-L(+)-β-methylcholine has a strong interaction with muscarinic receptors. (author)

  16. Potential Effect of L-Carnitine on the Prevention of Myocardial Injury after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Dastan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: L-carnitine has been demonstrated to confer cardiac protection against ischemia reperfusion injury in animals. This study evaluates the effects of L-carnitine administration on cardiac biomarkers after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery.Methods: One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective CABG surgery, without a history of myocardial ischemia or previous L-carnitine treatment, were enrolled and randomly assigned to an L-carnitine group ([n = 67], 3000 mg/d, started 2 days preoperatively and continued for 2 days after surgery or a control group (n = 67. CK-MB (creatine kinase, muscle- brain subunits and troponin T (TnT levels were assessed in all the patients before surgery as baseline levels and at 8 and 24 hours postoperatively.Results: Our study included 134 patients (99 [73.8%] males at a mean ± SD age of 59.94 ± 8.61 years who were candidates for CABG and randomized them into control or L-carnitine groups. The baseline demographic characteristics, including age (60.01 ± 9.23 in the L-carnitine group vs. 59.88 ± 7.98 in the control group and sex (54 [80.6%] in the L-carnitine group vs. 45 [67.2%] in the control group did not show any significant differences (p value=0.93 and 0.08, respectively. Patients in the L-carnitine group had lower levels of CK-MB (mean ± SD, 25.06 ± 20.29 in the L-carnitine group vs. 24.26 ± 14.61 in the control group, but the difference was not significant (p value = 0.28. TnT levels also showed no significant differences between the two groups (399.50 ± 378.91 in the L-carnitine group vs. 391.48 ± 222.02 in the control group; p value = 0.34. Conclusion: In this population of intermediate- to high-risk patients undergoing CABG surgery, L-carnitine did not reduce CK-MB and TnT levels.

  17. Three Transporters Mediate Uptake of Glycine Betaine and Carnitine by Listeria monocytogenes in Response to Hyperosmotic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Angelidis, Apostolos S.; Smith, Gary M.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake and accumulation of the potent osmolytes glycine betaine and carnitine enable the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to proliferate in environments of elevated osmotic stress, often rendering salt-based food preservation inadequate. To date, three osmolyte transport systems are known to operate in L. monocytogenes: glycine betaine porter I (BetL), glycine betaine porter II (Gbu), and a carnitine transporter OpuC. We investigated the specificity of each transporter towards e...

  18. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661480

  19. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase leads to induction of 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in rat liver

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Hans; Hoogerbrugge van der Linden, N.; Hülsmann, William

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The relation between carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) activity and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity was investigated. Rats were treated with aminocarnitine or 1-carnitine overnight. In rats, in which CPT activity was inhibited by aminocarnitine, plasma and hepatic triacylglycerol contents were increased 5- to 6-fold. The plasma cholesterol concentration was unchanged, while the hepatic cholesterol content was lowered (−16%). Hepat...

  20. Effects of L-carnitine on serum triglyceride and cytokine levels in rat models of cachexia and septic shock.

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, B. K.; Fiskum, G; Gallo, L. L.

    1995-01-01

    Inappropriate hepatic lipogenesis, hypertriglyceridaemia, decreased fatty acid oxidation and muscle protein wasting are common in patients with sepsis, cancer or AIDS. Given carnitine's role in the oxidation of fatty acids (FAs), we anticipated that carnitine might promote FA oxidation, thus ameliorating metabolic disturbances in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma models of wasting in rats. In the LPS model, rats were injected with LPS (24 mg kg-1 i.p.), and trea...

  1. Mild synthesis of [N-methyl-11C]-isovaleroyl-(L)-carnitine. The usefulness of a tritium approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The title carnitine derivative was labelled both with [11C]methyl iodide and [3H]methyl iodide. The former was synthesized in order to improve the knowledge of the acyl carnitines fate in humans. The latter was synthesized, at approximately the same concentration level as that of the former, in order to optimize its radiosynthesis, taking advantage from the long half-life of the tritium

  2. Regulation of Genes Involved in Carnitine Homeostasis by PPARα across Different Species (Rat, Mouse, Pig, Cattle, Chicken, and Human)

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Ringseis; Gaiping Wen; Klaus Eder

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in rodents convincingly demonstrated that PPAR-alpha is a key regulator of genes involved in carnitine homeostasis, which serves as a reasonable explanation for the phenomenon that energy deprivation and fibrate treatment, both of which cause activation of hepatic PPAR-alpha, causes a strong increase of hepatic carnitine concentration in rats. The present paper aimed to comprehensively analyse available data from genetic and animal studies with mice, rats, pigs, cows, and layin...

  3. Mild synthesis of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]-isovaleroyl-(L)-carnitine. The usefulness of a tritium approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, G.; Carnevaletti, F.; Margonelli, A.; Corsi, G. [Istituto di Chimica Nucleare - C.N.R., C.P. 10, Rome (Italy); Ragni, P. [Istituto di Chimica Nucleare -- C.N.R., C.P. 10 -- 00016 Monterotondo Stazione, Roma, (Italy); Fazio, F.; Todde, S. [Istituto di Neuroscienze e Bioimmagini - C.N.R., H.S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Tinti, O. [Sigma-Tau, Industrie Farmaceutiche Riunite S.p.A., Pomezia, Rome (Italy)

    1999-02-01

    The title carnitine derivative was labelled both with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide and [{sup 3}H]methyl iodide. The former was synthesized in order to improve the knowledge of the acyl carnitines fate in humans. The latter was synthesized, at approximately the same concentration level as that of the former, in order to optimize its radiosynthesis, taking advantage from the long half-life of the tritium.

  4. L-carnitine enhances axonal plasticity and improves white-matter lesions after chronic hypoperfusion in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuji; Koike, Masato; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Hideki; Hira, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Ryota; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2015-03-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causes white-matter lesions (WMLs) with oxidative stress and cognitive impairment. However, the biologic mechanisms that regulate axonal plasticity under chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have not been fully investigated. Here, we investigated whether L-carnitine, an antioxidant agent, enhances axonal plasticity and oligodendrocyte expression, and explored the signaling pathways that mediate axonal plasticity in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model. Adult male Wistar rats subjected to ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries (LBCCA) were treated with or without L-carnitine. L-carnitine-treated rats exhibited significantly reduced escape latency in the Morris water maze task at 28 days after chronic hypoperfusion. Western blot analysis indicated that L-carnitine increased levels of phosphorylated high-molecular weight neurofilament (pNFH), concurrent with a reduction in phosphorylated phosphatase tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), and increased phosphorylated Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at 28 days after chronic hypoperfusion. L-carnitine reduced lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, and enhanced oligodendrocyte marker expression and myelin sheath thickness after chronic hypoperfusion. L-carnitine regulates the PTEN/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and enhances axonal plasticity while concurrently ameliorating oxidative stress and increasing oligodendrocyte myelination of axons, thereby improving WMLs and cognitive impairment in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model. PMID:25465043

  5. Propionyl-l-carnitine: Labelling in the N-methyl position with Carbon-11 and pharmacokinetic studies in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Raymond J.; Law, Marilyn P.; Pike, Victor W.; Osman, Safiye; Poole, Keith G

    1995-08-01

    The prospective therapeutic, propionyl-l-carnitine, was labelled in the N-methyl position with the positron-emitter, carbon-11 (t{sub (1(2))} = 20.4 min), with a view to studying its pharmacokinetics in humans using PET. Labelling was achieved by methylating nor-propionyl-l-carnitine hydrochloride with no-carrier-added [{sup 11}C]iodomethane (produced from cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide) in ethanol in the presence of 1,2,2,6,6,-pentamethylpiperidine. HPLC of the reaction mixture on a strong cation exchange column provided high purity [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]propionyl-l-carnitine in 62% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected from [{sup 11}C]iodomethane), ready for intravenous administration within 35 min from the end of radionuclide production. [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]Propionyl-l-carnitine, given intravenously to rats, cleared rapidly from plasma. A slow uptake of radioactivity into myocardium and striated muscle was observed. In plasma, unchanged tracer represented 84% of the radioactivity at 2.5 min and 2.5% of the radioactivity at 60 min. In heart, unchanged tracer represented 18% of radioactivity at 2.5 min and 2.4% at 15 min. The remainder of radioactivity detected in plasma and heart was identified as [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]l-carnitine and [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]acetyl-l-carnitine.

  6. Propionyl-l-carnitine: Labelling in the N-methyl position with Carbon-11 and pharmacokinetic studies in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospective therapeutic, propionyl-l-carnitine, was labelled in the N-methyl position with the positron-emitter, carbon-11 (t(1(2)) = 20.4 min), with a view to studying its pharmacokinetics in humans using PET. Labelling was achieved by methylating nor-propionyl-l-carnitine hydrochloride with no-carrier-added [11C]iodomethane (produced from cyclotron-produced [11C]carbon dioxide) in ethanol in the presence of 1,2,2,6,6,-pentamethylpiperidine. HPLC of the reaction mixture on a strong cation exchange column provided high purity [N-methyl-11C]propionyl-l-carnitine in 62% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected from [11C]iodomethane), ready for intravenous administration within 35 min from the end of radionuclide production. [N-methyl-11C]Propionyl-l-carnitine, given intravenously to rats, cleared rapidly from plasma. A slow uptake of radioactivity into myocardium and striated muscle was observed. In plasma, unchanged tracer represented 84% of the radioactivity at 2.5 min and 2.5% of the radioactivity at 60 min. In heart, unchanged tracer represented 18% of radioactivity at 2.5 min and 2.4% at 15 min. The remainder of radioactivity detected in plasma and heart was identified as [N-methyl-11C]l-carnitine and [N-methyl-11C]acetyl-l-carnitine

  7. Altered maternal thyroid function: Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on fetal and neonatal myocardial free fatty acid oxidation,in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ratan

    1998-01-01

    Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on myocardial free fatty acid oxidation,in vitro, in offsprings born of hypothyroid and hyperthyroid mothers was studied in rats. L-carnitine supplementation stimulated myocardial fatty acid oxidation during gestational period in offspring born of control and hyperthyroid mothers. In contrast L-carnitine supplementation induced stimulation in myocardial fatty acid oxidation was very less in fetuses born of hypothyroid mothers. However, in neonates born of...

  8. Dose-dependent effects of L-carnitine on blood sialic acid, mda and gsh concentrations in BALB/c mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yapar K.; Kart Asim; Karapehlivan M.; Citil M.

    2007-01-01

    L-carnitine is an essential quarternary amine having an important role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Although L-carnitine was shown to be protective against toxic effects of some chemicals the dose-effect relationship with respect to its antioxidant action and protection from lipid peroxidation is unknown. To evaluate the dose-response profile of L-carnitine on blood sialic acid, glutathione and malondialdehyde concentrations, 40 mice were randomly allocated to 4 groups. Experimental mic...

  9. Lotus leaf extract and L-carnitine influence different processes during the adipocyte life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stäb Franz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellular and molecular mechanisms of adipose tissue biology have been studied extensively over the last two decades. Adipose tissue growth involves both an increase in fat cell size and the formation of mature adipocytes from precursor cells. To investigate how natural substances influence these two processes, we examined the effects of lotus leaf extract (Nelumbo nucifera-extract solution obtained from Silab, France and L-carnitine on human preadipocytes and adipocytes. Methods For our in vitro studies, we used a lotus leaf extract solution alone or in combination with L-carnitine. Utilizing cultured human preadipocytes, we investigated lotus leaf extract solution-induced inhibition of triglyceride incorporation during adipogenesis and possible effects on cell viability. Studies on human adipocytes were performed aiming to elucidate the efficacy of lotus leaf extract solution to stimulate lipolytic activity. To further characterize lotus leaf extract solution-mediated effects, we determined the expression of the transcription factor adipocyte determination and differentiation factor 1 (ADD1/SREBP-1c on the RNA- and protein level utilizing qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Additionally, the effect of L-carnitine on beta-oxidation was analyzed using human preadipocytes and mature adipocytes. Finally, we investigated additive effects of a combination of lotus leaf extract solution and L-carnitine on triglyceride accumulation during preadipocyte/adipocyte differentiation. Results Our data showed that incubation of preadipocytes with lotus leaf extract solution significantly decreased triglyceride accumulation during adipogenesis without affecting cell viability. Compared to controls, adipocytes incubated with lotus leaf extract solution exhibited a significant increase in lipolysis-activity. Moreover, cell populations cultivated in the presence of lotus leaf extract solution showed a decrease in adipocyte

  10. Quantitative Measurement of Plasma 3-Hydroxyisovaleryl Carnitine by LC-MS/MS as a Novel Biomarker of Biotin Status in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Thomas D.; Stratton, Shawna L; Bogusiewicz, Anna; Pack, Lindsay; Moran, Jeffery; Mock, Donald M

    2010-01-01

    An increased plasma concentration of 3-hydroxyisovaleryl carnitine (3HIA-carnitine) results from impairment in the leucine catabolic pathway at the conversion of 3-methyl-crotonyl-CoA to 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA. The impairment is caused by reduced activity of the biotin-dependent enzyme 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase. Here, we describe an LC-MS/MS method for the quantitation of 3HIA-carnitine in plasma and present preliminary evidence validating plasma 3HIA-carnitine as a novel biomarker of ...

  11. Synthesis and biodistribution of 4-N,N,N-trimethylammonio-3-(4-(125I)-iodophenyl)butanoate, a radioiodinated analog of carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R-Carnitine is found in high concentrations in myocardial tissue and is vital for the myocardial metabolism of fatty acids, functioning as a shuttle for fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane as acylcarnitine esters. This paper describes the synthesis of a radioiodinated analog of carnitine as part of an effort to develop receptor probes useful in single photon emission computed tomography. Preliminary biodistribution studies showed the radioiodinated analog to be essentially stable to in vivo deiodination and have a distribution profile similar to that of R-carnitine. Co-administration or pre-dosing with R-carnitine effectively reduced the uptake of the labeled probe into myocardial tissue

  12. Fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I: emerging therapeutic targets in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Q; Zeng, F; Liu, X; Wang, Q J; Deng, F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit unique metabolic adaptations that are increasingly viewed as potential targets for novel and specific cancer therapies. Among these targets, the carnitine palmitoyltransferase system is responsible for delivering the long-chain fatty acid (FA) from cytoplasm into mitochondria for oxidation, where carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). With increasing understanding of the crucial role had by fatty acid oxidation in cancer, CPTI has received renewed attention as a pivotal mediator in cancer metabolic mechanism. CPTI activates FAO and fuels cancer growth via ATP and NADPH production, constituting an essential part of cancer metabolism adaptation. Moreover, CPTI also functionally intertwines with other key pathways and factors to regulate gene expression and apoptosis of cancer cell. Here, we summarize recent findings and update the current understanding of FAO and CPTI in cancer and provide theoretical basis for this enzyme as an emerging potential molecular target in cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27195673

  13. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on red blood cells deformability in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaos, S; George, A; Telemachos, T; Maria, S; Yannis, M; Konstantinos, M

    2000-01-01

    Anemia is a serious problem in hemodialysis patients, the main cause of which is erythropoietin deficiency. After the discovery of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) at the end of the last decade, the hematological profile of hemodialysis patients improved significantly but at considerable expense. The deformability of red blood cells (RBC) influences their microcirculation and tissue oxygen delivery along with their life span. We investigated the deformabilty of RBCs in 15 hemodialysis patients before and after three months on L-carnitine supplementation (30 mg/Kg body wt/dialysis session). We excluded from the study all patients who received blood transfusions three months before or during the study, patients who had hemorrhagic episodes, those with hyperparathyroidism or infections, and any who required surgical intervention during the study. The serum iron, folic acid and vitamin B-12 levels were kept normal during the duration of the study. The erythropoietin dose taken before the beginning of L-cartnitine supplementation was not changed. The deformability of RBCs before and after dialysis, prior to and following three months on L-carnitine was determined and compared to the deformability of RBCs from a control group. Hematocrit levels were measured before entry into the study and every month for three months. We found that the deformability of RBCs before the dialysis session was significantly greater than that found in the control group (t-test, p < 0.00001), and that there was a further increase after the end of the dialysis session. Three months following L-carnitine supplementation, we found a significant reduction of RBCs deformability (paired t-test, p < 0.004), and a significant increase in the hematocrit (ANOVA, p < 0.0001). We concluded that abnormalities in the deformability of RBCs improved after L-carnitine and that this was responsible for the increase in the hematocrit. This may allow a substantial reduction in rHuEpo dose. PMID:10718283

  14. Effects of propionyl-L-carnitine on ischemia-reperfusion injury in hamster cheek pouch microcirculation.

    OpenAIRE

    DomingaLapi; LinaSabatino; GiovannaAltobelli

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Propionyl-L-carnitine (pLc) exerts protective effects in different experimental models of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of intravenously and topically applied pLc on microvascular permeability increase induced by I/R in the hamster check pouch preparation. Methods The hamster check pouch microcirculation was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Microvascular permeability, leukocyte adhesion to venular walls, perfus...

  15. Changes of plasma fasting carnitine ester profile in patients with ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judit Bene; Mária Figler; Katalin Komlósi; Viktória Havasi; Gábor Talián; Beáta Gasztonyi; Krisztina Horváth; Gyula Mózsik; Béla Hunyady; Béla Melegh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the plasma carnitine ester profile in adult patients with ulcerative culitis (UC) and compared with healthy control subjects.METHOD: Using ESI triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry, the carnitine ester profile was measured in 44 patients with UC and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy controls.RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the fasting free carnitine level between the patients with UC and the healthy controls. The fasting propionyl(0.331 ±0.019 vs0.392 ± 0.017 μmol/L), butyryl(0.219 ± 0.014 vs 0.265± 0.012), and isovalerylcarnitine (0.111 ± 0.008 vs 0.134± 0.008) levels were decreased in the UC patients. By contrast, the level of octanoyl- (0.147 ± 0.009 vs 0.114 ± 0.008),decanoyl- (0.180 ± 0.012 vs 0.137 ± 0.008), myristoyl(0.048 ± 0.003 vs 0.039 ± 0.003), palmitoyl- (0.128 ± 0.006vs 0.109 ± 0.004), palmitoleyl- (0.042±0.003vs 0.031 ± 0.002) and oleylcarnitine (0.183 ± 0.007vs 0.163 ± 0.007; P < 0.05 in all comparisons) were increased in the patients with UC.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest selective involvement of the carnitine esters in UC patients, probably due to their altered metabolism.

  16. Metabolomics screening identifies reduced L-carnitine to be associated with progressive emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Thomas M; Bartel, Jörg; Ballweg, Korbinian; Günter, Stefanie; Prehn, Cornelia; Krumsiek, Jan; Meiners, Silke; Theis, Fabian J; Adamski, Jerzy; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic bronchitis, small airway remodelling and emphysema. Emphysema is the destruction of alveolar structures, leading to enlarged airspaces and reduced surface area impairing the ability for gaseous exchange. To further understand the pathological mechanisms underlying progressive emphysema, we used MS-based approaches to quantify the lung, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum metabolome during emphysema progression in the established murine porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model on days 28, 56 and 161, compared with PBS controls. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis revealed greater changes in the metabolome of lung followed by BALF rather than serum during emphysema progression. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that emphysema progression is associated with a reduction in lung-specific L-carnitine, a metabolite critical for transporting long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for their subsequent β-oxidation. In vitro, stimulation of the alveolar epithelial type II (ATII)-like LA4 cell line with L-carnitine diminished apoptosis induced by both PPE and H2O2. Moreover, PPE-treated mice demonstrated impaired lung function compared with PBS-treated controls (lung compliance; 0.067±0.008 ml/cmH20 compared with 0.035±0.005 ml/cmH20, P<0.0001), which improved following supplementation with L-carnitine (0.051±0.006, P<0.01) and was associated with a reduction in apoptosis. In summary, our results provide a new insight into the role of L-carnitine and, importantly, suggest therapeutic avenues for COPD. PMID:26564208

  17. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Zaugg, K; Yao, Y.; Reilly, P T; K. Kannan; Kiarash, R; Mason, J.; Huang, P.; Sawyer, S K; Fuerth, B.; Faubert, B; Kalliomäki, T; Elia, A J; Luo, X.; Nadeem, V; Bungard, D

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in met...

  18. Effects of ethanol feeding on the activity and regulation of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman, M.; Geelen, M.J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of ethanol administration on activity and regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) were studied in hepatocytes isolated from rats fed a liquid, high-fat diet containing 36% of total calories as ethanol or an isocaloric amount of sucrose. Cells were isolated at several time points in the course of a 5-week experimental period. Ethanol consumption markedly decreased CPT-I activity and increased enzyme sensitivity to inhibition by exogenously added malonyl-CoA. Changes ...

  19. Sarcoplasmic reticulum function and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition during progression of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rupp, Heinz; Vetter, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Failing cardiac hypertrophy is associated with an inadequate sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function. The hypothesis was examined that pressure overloaded hearts fail to increase SR Ca2+ uptake rate proportionally to the hypertrophy and that carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition by etomoxir ((±)-ethyl 2[6(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl] oxirane-2-carboxylate) can counteract this process.Severe left ventricular pressure overload was induced in rats by constricting the ascending aorta for 8, 10, 14 a...

  20. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2: New insights on the substrate specificity and implications for acylcarnitine profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Violante, Sara; IJlst, Lodewijk; Van Lenthe, Henk; Tavares De Almeida, Isabel; Wanders, Ronald J; Ventura, Fátima V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Over the last years acylcarnitines have emerged as important biomarkers for the diagnosis of mitochondrial fatty acid ?-oxidation (mFAO) and branched-chain amino acid oxidation disorders assuming they reflect the potentially toxic acyl-CoA species, accumulating intramitochondrially upstream of the enzyme block. However, the origin of these intermediates still remains poorly understood. A possibility exists that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), member of the carniti...

  1. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b Deficiency Protects Mice from Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Teayoun; HE, Lan; Johnson, Maria S.; Li, Yan; Zeng, Ling; Ding, Yishu; Long, Qinqiang; Moore, John F.; Sharer, Jon D.; Nagy, Tim R.; Young, Martin E.; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1 (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme governing long-chain fatty acid entry into mitochondria. CPT1 inhibitors have been developed and exhibited beneficial effects against type II diabetes in short-term preclinical animal studies. However, the long-term effects of treatment remain unclear and potential non-specific effects of these CPT1 inhibitors hamper in-depth understanding of the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Methods We investigated the...

  2. Abbreviated Half-Lives and Impaired Fuel Utilization in Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Variant Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Min; Min CAI; Yao, Dengfu; Xu, Xi; Yang, Rongrong; Li, Yuting; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Kido, Hiroshi; Yao, Dengbing

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is one of the most common causes of fatty acid oxidation metabolism disorders. However, the molecular mechanism between CPT2 gene polymorphisms and metabolic stress has not been fully clarified. We previously reported that a number of patients show a thermal instable phenotype of compound hetero/homozygous variants of CPT II. To understand the mechanism of the metabolic disorder resulting from CPT II deficiency, the present study investiga...

  3. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b Deficient Mice Develop Severe Insulin Resistance After Prolonged High Fat Diet Feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Teayoun; Moore, John F.; Sharer, Jon D.; Yang, Kevin; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme governing the entry of long-chain acyl-CoAs into mitochondria. Treatments with CPT1 inhibitors protect against insulin resistance in short-term preclinical animal studies. We recently reported that mice with muscle isoform CPT1b deficiency demonstrated improved insulin sensitivity when fed a High Fat-Diet (HFD) for up to 5 months. In this follow up study, we further investigated whether the insulin sensitizing effe...

  4. Inhibition of Palmityl Carnitine Oxidation in Rat Liver Mitochondria by Tert-Butyl Hydroperoxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinková, Z.; Rauchová, Hana; Křiváková, P.; Drahota, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2008), s. 133-136. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD303/03/H065; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/04/0500; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : liver mitochondria * palmityl carnitine oxidation * tert-butylhydroperoxide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  5. Cobalamin C Disease Missed by Newborn Screening in a Patient with Low Carnitine Level

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C.; Serdaroglu, Esra; Muraresku, Colleen; Ficicioglu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin C (CblC) disease is the most common inherited disorder of intracellular cobalamin metabolism. It is a multisystemic disorder mainly affecting the eye and brain and characterized biochemically by methylmalonic aciduria, low methionine level, and homocystinuria. We report a patient found to have CblC disease who initially presented with low carnitine and normal propionylcarnitine (C3) levels on newborn screen. Newborn screening likely failed to detect CblC in this patient because of b...

  6. Failure of carnitine in improving hepatic nitrogen content in alcoholic and non‐alcoholic malnourished rats

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Luciana P; Guilherme Vannucchi Portari; Gilberto João Padovan; Alceu Afonso Jordão; Vivian Suen; Julio Sergio Marchini

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the effect of carnitine supplementation on alcoholic malnourished rats' hepatic nitrogen content. METHODS: Malnourished rats, on 50% protein-calorie restriction with free access to water (malnutrition group) and malnourished rats under the same conditions with free access to a 20% alcohol/water solution (alcohol group) were studied. After the undernourishment period (4 weeks with or without alcohol), both groups were randomly divided into two subgroups, one of them nutrit...

  7. The effects of acute L-carnitine administration on ventilatory breakpoint and exercise performanceduring incremental exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Kaviani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 31 October, 2009 ; Accepted 10 March, 2010AbstractBackground and purpose: Many athletes adopt nutritional manipulations to improve their performance. Among the substances generally consumed is carnitine (L-trimethyl-3-hydroxy-ammoniobutanoate which has been used by athletes as an ergogenic aid, due to its role in the transport of long-chain fatty acids across mitochondrial membranes. Nutritional supplements containing carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals have been widely used in various sporting fields to provide a boost to the recommended daily allowance. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of acute L-carnitine administration on ventilatory breakpoint, an exercise performance during incremental exercise.Materials and methods: This study was double-blind, randomized and crossover in design. The subjects were 12 randomly selected active male physical education students, 21.75±0.64 years old, with a mean body mass index (BMI of 23.7±0.94kg/m2, divided into 2 groups. They received orally either 2g of L-carnitine dissolved in 200 ml of water, plus 6 drops of lemon juice or a placebo (6 ml lemon juice dissolved in 200 ml of water 90 minutes before they began to exercise on a treadmill. They performed a modified protocol of Conconi test to exhaustion. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measurements was used for data analysis.Results: The results showed that exercise performance improved in LC group (2980±155 meter compared with placebo group (2331±51 meter. Furthermore, no significant difference was found in ventilatory breakpoint between the two groups.Conclusion: This finding indicates that administration of L- Carnitine, 90 minutes prior to exercise may improve performance; despite the ventilatory breakpoint as one of the anaerobic system indices that had no effect. J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(73: 43-50 (Persian.

  8. Short Term Administration of L-Carnitine can be Detrimental to the Ischemic Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Moslem Najafi; Alireza Garjani

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that L-carnitine (LC) supplementation may exert a cardioprotective effect in cardiomyopathy, prevent arrhythmias in myocardial infarction and increase exercise tolerance in angina. Interestingly, we demonstrated that short term preischemic administration of LC can be detrimental to ischemic heart. In isolated rat hearts treated with LC for 10 min before ischemia, a marked and concentration dependent arrhythmogenic activity were produced during both ischemia and rep...

  9. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase Ia under inflammmatory conditions in rat mesangial and primary liver cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eschenröder, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Energy substrate utilisation rates are regulated during development and in response to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. Injury and inflammation result in marked changes in whole body lipid metabolism, including free fatty acid oxidation (Show et al., 1989). The regulation of fatty acid oxidation is most dependent on the enzyme carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I), which exists in two isoforms, hepatic CPT-Ialpha and muscle CPT-Iß isoform, and which catalyses the initial reac...

  10. Stabilization of the thermolabile variant S113L of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II

    OpenAIRE

    Motlagh, Leila; Golbik, Ralph; Sippl, Wolfgang; Zierz, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, the most common defect of lipid metabolism in muscle, is characterized by attacks of myoglobinuria without persistent muscle weakness. Methods: His6-N-hCPT2 (wild-type) and His6-N-hCPT2/S113L (variant) were produced recombinantly in prokaryotic host and characterized according to their functional and regulatory properties. Results: The wild-type and the variant S113L showed the same enzymatic activity and thermostability at...

  11. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase in human erythrocyte membrane. Properties and malonyl-CoA sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, R R; Mancinelli, G; Arduini, A

    1991-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase located in the erythrocyte plasma membrane is sensitive to inhibition by malonyl-CoA and 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA plus carnitine. Although this inhibition and other properties suggest similarities to the intracellular enzymes in other tissues, no cross-reaction was observed with antisera to the peroxisomal or to the mitochondrial inner-membrane enzyme. The activity was solubilized by and was stable in Triton X-100, which destroys the enzymes found in microsomes and in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The substrate specificity is broader than for the intracellular enzymes, the activities with stearoyl-CoA (114%) and arachidonoyl-CoA (97%) being equal to that with palmitoyl-CoA, and the activities with linoleoyl-CoA (44%) and erucoyl-CoA (46%) about half that with palmitoyl-CoA. The function of this carnitine palmitoyltransferase is probably to buffer the acyl-CoA present in the erythrocyte for turnover of the fatty acyl groups of the membrane lipids. PMID:2039446

  12. Participation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase in the synthesis of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine in rat alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, A; Zibellini, G; Ferrari, L; Magnanimi, L; Dottori, S; Lohninger, A; Carminati, P

    2001-02-01

    We have investigated the role of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.21) in pulmonar type II pneumocyte, a lung cell responsible for the synthesis of surface active lipids. Adult type II pneumocytes were isolated from rat lung and purified by differential adherence. When these lung cells were incubated with radioactive palmitate, the percentage of radioactivity recovered into dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a major surface active lipid, was almost 60% with respect to total phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species. Cellular lysates from type II pneumocytes contained detectable amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) activity (1 nmol/min/mg). Most of the CPT activity found in these cells could be inhibited by incubating them for 60 min with 5 microM tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA), a specific and irreversible CPT inhibitor of the malonyl-CoA sensitive CPT isoform (CPT I). TDGA treatment of adult type II pneumocytes caused a significant reduction in the incorporation of radioactive palmitate into PC, though this effect did not seem to be specific for DPPC. TDGA affected the incorporation of radioactive palmitate at the sn2 rather than the sn1 position of the glycerol backbone of PC. The incorporation of radioactive palmitate into DPPC was also observed when these lung cells were incubated with palmitate-labeled palmitoyl-L-carnitine. Our data suggest that type II pneumocyte CPT may play an important role in remodelling PC fatty acid composition and hence DPPC synthesis. PMID:11330841

  13. Role of carnitine in ameliorating the lead and / or irradiation induced toxicity in male albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work: aimed to investigate the protective effect of carnitine (3-hydroxy-4-N-trimethyl amino butyric acid) on the contents of total protein, albumin, glucose and lipid peroxides as malonaldehyde (MDA) in serum, in addition to liver glycogen and lipid peroxides content 1, 2, 4 weeks after exposure of rats to a collective dose of 4 Gy whole body gamma irradiation and / or lead treatment. Adult male rats received lead (50 mg/kg body weight) and / or exposed to fractionated dose (4 Gy) of gamma irradiation delivered as 0.5 Gy twice weekly for four weeks. Results of the present study revealed that fractionated whole body gamma irradiation and / or lead administration induced cellular damage manifested by a significant decrease in serum total protein and albumin, and a significant increase in serum glucose and MDA content as well as significant increase in liver glycogen and MDA. Administration of carnitine (200 mg/kg b.wt.) before lead and / or gamma irradiation, has significantly ameliorated the observed changes, indicating the prophylactic action of carnitine on lead and / or irradiation toxicity

  14. Radioisotopic assays of CoASH and carnitine and their acetylated forms in human skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopic assays for the determination of acetyl-CoA, CoASH, and acetylcarnitine have been modified for application to the amount of human muscle tissue that can be obtained by needle biopsy. In the last step common to all three methods, acetyl-CoA is condensed with [14C]oxaloacetate by citrate synthase to give [14C]-citrate. For determination of CoASH, CoASH is reacted with acetylphosphate in a reaction catalyzed by phosphotransacetylase to yield acetyl-CoA. In the assay for acetylcarnitine, acetylcarnitine is reacted with CoASH in a reaction catalyzed by carnitine acetyltransferase to form acetyl-CoA. Inclusion of new simple steps in the acetylcarnitine assay and conditions affecting the reliability of all three methods are also described. Acetylcarnitine and free carnitine levels in human rectus abdominis muscle were 3.0 +/- 1.5 (SD) and 13.5 +/- 4.0 mumol/g dry wt, respectively. Values for acetyl-CoA and CoASH were about 500-fold lower, 6.7 +/- 1.8 and 21 +/- 8.9 nmol/g dry wt, respectively. A strong correlation between acetylcarnitine (y) and short-chain acylcarnitine (x), determined as the difference between total and free carnitine, was found in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle obtained during intense muscular effort, y = 1.0x + 0.5; r = 0.976

  15. The effects of L-carnitin in Budd-Chiari syndrome in a domestic cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Sağkan Öztürk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a thrombosis in the vena cava caudalis of a 15 year-old cat with ascites. Trauma and eventually feline enteric corona virus infection in the cat were not detected. In the intrahepatic region, a blockage of vena cava caudalis was brought to light by ultrasonographic imaging. An aspirate of abdominal fl uid revealed modified transudate. Liver enzyme levels were increased in the serum sample of the cat. The levels of total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant status (TAS were elevated in the peritoneal fluid. Liver protection diet with L-carnitine, diuretic therapy and antimicrobial drugs were administrated for treatment of the cat. During the continuous treatment, the amount of abdominal fluid decreased, but never completely absorbed. L-carnitine was administered to the cat during the time of treatment, and subsequently the levels of liver enzymes decreased. However, the cat died because of recurrent ascites and persistent thrombosis. In conclusion, ultrasonographic examination was very reliable, non-invasive and highly useful diagnostic method for BCS and L-carnitine has crucial effects on the quality of life, energy metabolism and liver enzyme levels. However, the blockage of the vena cava caudalis could not completely respond to medical treatment and thrombosis should be eliminated by surgical intervention.

  16. Where does N(ε-trimethyllysine for the carnitine biosynthesis in mammals come from?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Servillo

    Full Text Available N(ε-trimethyllysine (TML is a non-protein amino acid which takes part in the biosynthesis of carnitine. In mammals, the breakdown of endogenous proteins containing TML residues is recognized as starting point for the carnitine biosynthesis. Here, we document that one of the main sources of TML could be the vegetables which represent an important part of daily alimentation for most mammals. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method, which we previously developed for the analysis of N(G-methylarginines, was utilized to quantitate TML in numerous vegetables. We report that TML, believed to be rather rare in plants as free amino acid, is, instead, ubiquitous in them and at not negligible levels. The occurrence of TML has been also confirmed in some vegetables by a HPLC method with fluorescence detection. Our results establish that TML can be introduced as free amino acid in conspicuous amounts from vegetables. The current opinion is that mammals utilize the breakdown of their endogenous proteins containing TML residues as starting point for carnitine biosynthesis. However, our finding raises the question of whether a tortuous and energy expensive route as the one of TML formation from the breakdown of endogenous proteins is really preferred when the substance is so easily available in vegetable foods. On the basis of this result, it must be taken into account that in mammals TML might be mainly introduced by diet. However, when the alimentary intake becomes insufficient, as during starvation, it might be supplied by endogenous protein breakdown.

  17. l-carnitine protects human hepatocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Yanli; Luan, Haiyun; Chen, Xuehong; Han, Yantao; Wang, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, l-carnitine was shown to have cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human normal HL7702 hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the protective effect of l-carnitine was associated with the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NFE2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Our results showed that pretreatment with l-carnitine augmented Nrf2 nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in H2O2-treated HL7702 cells, although l-carnitine treatment alone had no effect on them. Analysis using Nrf2 siRNA demonstrated that Nrf2 activation was involved in l-carnitine-induced HO-1 expression. In addition, l-carnitine-mediated protection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA, indicating the important role of Nrf2 in l-carnitine-induced cytoprotection. Further experiments revealed that l-carnitine pretreatment enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt in H2O2-treated cells. Blocking Akt pathway with inhibitor partly abrogated the protective effect of l-carnitine. Moreover, our finding demonstrated that the induction of Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression by l-carnitine directly correlated with the Akt pathway because Akt inhibitor showed inhibitory effects on the Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that l-carnitine protects HL7702 cells against H2O2-induced cell damage through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:26889770

  18. L -Carnitine and Melatonin Reverse CCl4 Induced Liver Fibrosis In Rats (Histological and Histochemical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma, A. Morsy, Abdel Razik, H. Farrag and Sonya, L. El-Sharkawy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbontetrachloride (CCl4 is closely related chemically to chloroform and likewise in hepatic poisons. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of carbon tetrachloride on liver of male rats and the reversing effects of L-carnitine and melatonin on established liver fibrosis. A total of 72 adult male albino rats were used in this study. The animals were divided into six groups. Group (1 animals of the first group were kept as control andtreated with paraffin oil twice weekly for eight weeks. Group (2 rats of the second group were injected with CCl4 intraperitoneally at 0.15 ml per rats (diluted 1:1 in liquid paraffin twice weekly for eight weeks to produced liver fibrosis. Group (3 following establishment with CCl4 which induced liver fibrosis, the rats were treated with L-carnitine at a dose level of 50 mg/kg for four weeks. Group (4 rats with liver fibrosis were injected intraperitoneally with melatonin at dose level of 10 mg/kg for four weeks. The fifth and sixth groups were given L-carnitine and/or melatonin at dose levels of 50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg respectively for four weeks. Histological changes in the liver of rats treated with CCl4 including liver fibrosis, architecture distortion and appearance of many pseudolobule. The fibrous tissues run in septa between the nodules. The liver damage varied from one area to another and varied from moderate fibrosis to cirrhosis. Quantitative measurement of the severity of liver fibrosis (area damage was achieved by using computerized image analysis (Leica image showed that highly significant increase in area of fibrosis was recorded in the case of rats treated with CCl4 only. Quantitative DNA image analysis showed that 3% of aneuploid cells could be noticed in liver of rats treated with CCl4 only. Histochemical results of rats treated with CCl4 showed highly significant increase in grey level of mucopolysaccharides and protein levels. No histological and histochemical changes could be noticed in

  19. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1 and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL

  20. Effects of chito-oligosaccharides and L-carnitine supplementation in diets for Japanese quails on performance, carcass traits and some blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tufan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine effects of dietary supplementation with chitosanoligosaccharides (COS and L-carnitine, individually or dually, on growth performance, carcass traits and some blood serum parameters in quails. A total of 192, four days old, Japanese quail chicks were allotted four groups, each of which included four replicates (12 birds per replicate. The groups received the same basal diet supplemented with 0 (Control, 150mg/kg chitosanoligosaccharides (COS, 150mg/kg L-carnitine (Carnitine, and 150 mg/kg chitosanoligosaccharides+150 mg/kg L-carnitine (COS+Car. during the starter (1 to 21 days and a grower (22 to 42 days period. The feeding trial shoved that COS, L-carnitine and COS+L-carnitine had no significant effect on live weight, live weight gain, feed consumption and feed conversion. Supplementation with COS+L-carnitine induced higher leg ratio from than that of the Control. There were no differences on serum albumin, total protein, glucose and total cholesterol concentrations. It is concluded that due to the obtained higher leg ratio from COS+Car. group, after analysis of the profit and loss, if is economically profitable, chitosanoligosaccharides+L-carnitine could be added quail diets.

  1. Dose-dependent effects of L-carnitine on blood sialic acid, mda and gsh concentrations in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yapar K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available L-carnitine is an essential quarternary amine having an important role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Although L-carnitine was shown to be protective against toxic effects of some chemicals the dose-effect relationship with respect to its antioxidant action and protection from lipid peroxidation is unknown. To evaluate the dose-response profile of L-carnitine on blood sialic acid, glutathione and malondialdehyde concentrations, 40 mice were randomly allocated to 4 groups. Experimental mice were treated with intraperitoneal saline for 5 days (Group 1, L-carnitine at 100 mg/kg for 5 days (Group 2, L-carnitine at 250 mg/kg for 5 days (Group 3, L-carnitine at 500 mg/kg for 5 days (Group 4. Following the treatments, blood samples were collected, and blood glutathione, malondialdehyde and sialic acid concentrations were determined. L-carnitine provided an antioxidant action at doses of 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg with the strongest antioxidant action observed at 500 mg/kg dose. There was a significant increase in malondialdehyde and sialic acid concentrations at all doses of Lcarnitine with the highest effect seen at 500 mg/kg dose. In addition, Lcarnitine caused a dose-dependent elevation in glutathione level. These results suggest that L-carnitine applied at 500 mg/kg dose provides strong antioxidant action by increasing glutathione, malondialdehyde and sialic acid in BALB/c mice.

  2. Plasma carnitine ester profile in adult celiac disease patients maintained on long-term gluten free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judit Bene; Katalin Komlósi; Beáta Gasztonyi; Márk Juhász; Zsolt Tulassay; Béla Melegh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the fasting plasma carnitine ester in patients with celiac disease.METHODS: We determined the fasting plasma carnitine ester profile using ESI triple quadrupol mass spectrometry in 33 adult patients with biopsy-confirmed maturity onset celiac disease maintained on long term gluten free diet.RESULIS: The level of free camitine did not differ as the celiac disease patients were compared with the healthy controls, whereas the acetylcarnitine level was markedly reduced (4.703 ± 0.205 vs 10.227 ± 0.368 nmol/mL,P<0.01). The level of propionylcarnitine was 61.5%,butyrylcarnitine 56.9%, hexanoylcarnitine 75%,octanoylcarnitine 71.1%, octenoylcarnitine 52.1%,decanoylcarnitine 73.1%, cecenoylcarnitine 58.3%,lauroylcarnitine 61.5%, miristoylcarnitine 66.7%,miristoleylcarnitine 62.5% and oleylcarnitine 81.1%in the celiac disease patients compared to the control values, respectively (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: The marked decrease of circulating acetylcarnitine with 50-80 % decrease of 11 other carnitine esters shows that the carnitine ester metabolism can be influenced even in clinically asymptomatic and well being adult celiac disease patients, and gluten withdrawal alone does not necessarily normalize all elements of the disturbed carnitine homeostasis.

  3. Reduction of apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway by the administration of acetyl-L-carnitine to mouse fibroblasts in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown in literature that stress, such as deprivation of trophic factors and hypoxia, induces apoptosis in cultured cells and in tissues. In light of these results, we explored the possibility of protecting cells from programmed death by improving the metabolism of the mitochondrion. To this end, acetyl-L-carnitine was administered at various concentrations under conditions of serum deprivation. The choice of this drug was based on the accepted notion that acetyl-L-carnitine is able to stabilize mitochondrial membranes and to increase the supply of energy to the organelle. The results presented here indicate that the drug protects cells from apoptotic death: this is demonstrated by a lower positivity to the TUNEL reaction and by a strong reduction of the apoptotic DNA ladder in serum-deprived cells. The involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was assessed by cytochrome C release and immunoreactivity to caspase 3. Moreover, acetyl-L-carnitine stimulates cell proliferation

  4. Effect of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the effects of combined and individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: The randomised controlled trial was conducted at the Department of Physiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, between October 2010 and April 2011. It comprised 80 healthy Sprague Dawley rats who were divided into four groups (n = 20 each). Rats were fed high-fat diet for 2 weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus. Group I served as diabetic control; group II was given cholecalciferol; group III; levo carnitine; and group IV was administered cholecalciferol and levo carnitine together. After 6 days of supplementation, terminal intracardiac blood extraction was done and samples were analysed for fasting plasma glucose and plasma insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance. SPSS 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly decreased (p <0.001) in the combined supplementation group compared to the diabetic control and individual supplementation groups. Combined supplementation showed a significant increase in fasting plasma insulin levels when compared with diabetic control and levo carnitine groups (p <0.001), and the effect of combined supplementation on ameliorating insulin resistance was significantly better (p <0.001) as compared to the individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine. Conclusions: The combined supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine for 6 days markedly improved the glycaemic control, insulin secretion and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats on high-fat diet. A prolonged supplementation by both the compounds along with caloric restriction may yield a more promising outcome. (author)

  5. Long-term L-Carnitine Administration reduces Erythropoietin Resistance in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients with Thalassemia Minor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagio R. Di Iorio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Both thalassemia and carnitine deficiency represent independent causes of erythropoietin resistance, and thus anemia, in uremic patients. We evaluated the unknown long-term effects of L-carnitine administration in β-thalassemic on chronic hemodialysis.Methods: We studied twelve subjects (M = 8; F = 4 affected by β-thalassemia minor (β-thal; HbA2 level = 6.6 ± 0.6% and forty non-thalassemic subjects (M = 24; F = 16 as controls (C, on chronic hemodialysis treatment. Patients and controls were at target hemoglobin levels (11–12g/dl prior to the study and underwent to i.v. L-carnitine administration for a one year period-time.Results: Groups were comparable for age, gender, serum levels of hemoglobin (Hb, iron, ferritine, PTH and aluminum, transferrin saturation, and dialysis modalities. During the study both groups showed signifi cant Hb increase and erythropoietin (EPO decrease; as a difference, such changes emerged at the 3rd month in C but at the 8th month in β-thal. At start, during the dialysis session the erythrocyte MCV reduced in C but not in β-thal (65.3 ± 3.2 to 65.5 ± 3.2 fl ; NS; along carnitine administration period, however, MCV during dialysis decreased also in β-thal, starting since the 9th month of treatment.Conclusion: This study provides evidence of the lowering of EPO resistance in β-thalassemia patients on hemodialysis due to long-term carnitine administration. Thus, prolonged carnitine supplementation should be suggested to patients on dialysis affected by β-thalassemia with poorly responsive anemia, or requiring large doses of erythropoietin.

  6. Role of Protective Effect of L-Carnitine against Acute Acetaminophen Induced Hepatic Toxicity in Adult Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab M. Gebaly* and Gamal M. Aboul Hassan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic and antipyretic is known to cause hepatic injury in humans and experimental animals when administered in high doses. It was reported that toxic effects of acetaminophen are due to oxidative reactions that take place during its metabolism. L-carnitine is a cofactor in the transfer of long-chain fatty acid allowing to the beta-oxidation of fatty acid in the mitochondria. It is a known antioxidant with protective effects against lipid peroxidation. This study aimed to investigate the possible beneficial effect of L-carnitine as an antioxidant agent against acetaminophen induced hepatic toxicity in rats. Material and Methods: Four rat groups (N=7 in each group. Group I is the control, group II received 500 mg/kg/ body weight of L-carnitine for 7 days by oral route, group III received 640/kg/ bw of acetaminophen by oral route, group IV acute acetaminophen group pretreated with L-carnitine for 7 days by gastric tube gavage tube. The liver of all rats were removed for investigation using light and electro microscopic studies. Results: Acetaminophen caused massive centrilobular necrosis and massive degenerative changes. The electron-microscopic study showed few mitochondria, increased fat droplets and scanty smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER, rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER.These changes were reduced by L-carnitine pretreatment. Conclusion: those results suggest that acetaminophen results damage in the liver as an acute effect and L-carnitine ameliorated the adverse effects of acetaminophen via its antioxidant role

  7. Does L-carnitine increase serum TNF -α and IGF-1 during liver regeneration in the rat?

    OpenAIRE

    PEHLİVAN, Mevlüt

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We sought to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine administration on the levels of IGF-1, TNF-a, and lipid peroxidation during hepatic regeneration for up to 72 h in an experimental partial hepatic resection rat model. Materials and methods: Sixty rats were divided into 3 groups: control and low-dose (100 mg/kg) and high-dose (200 mg/kg) L-carnitine. Each group was divided into 2 sub groups (24 and 72 h after partial hepatectomy). Partial (70%) hepatectomy was performed after 7 days of int...

  8. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Caloglu; Vuslat Yurut Caloglu; Tulin Yalta; Omer Yalcin; Cem Uzal

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC) to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6), Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8), Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8), and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8). The rats in all groups were irradiated individually...

  9. L-Carnitine Protection Against Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity In Rats: Comparison with Amifostin Using Quantitative Renal Tc 99m DMSA Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Yakup Yürekli; Perihan Ünak; Çiğdem Yenisey; Türkan Ertay; Fazilet Zumrut Biber Müftüler; Emin İlker Medine

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the cytoprotective effect of L-carnitine against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and to compare its efficacy with that of amifostin by quantitative renal Tc 99m DMSA uptake. Material and Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups of six animals each. 1) Control (saline; 5 ml/kg intraperitoneally); 2) L-carnitine (CAR; 300 mg/kg intraperitoneally); 3) Amifostine (AMI; 200 mg /kg intraperitoneally); 4) Cisplatin (CIS;7 mg/k...

  10. Enzymatic synthesis of radioactive (-)-carnitine from γ-butyrobetaine prepared by the methylation of γ-aminobutyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive γ-butyrobetaine was prepared by quaternization of γ-aminobutyric acid with tritiated methyl iodide under conditions giving high yields with respect to both the above precursors. Part of the product was passed through a column of ion-retardation resin and gave radioactive γ-butyrobetaine of good purity. The remainder was converted to (-)-carnitine stoichiometrically by employing a 50-60% ammonium sulfate fraction of rat liver supernatant as the source of γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1,14,11,1) Successive column chromatographies on a cation exchanger and ion-retardation resins then gave radioactive (-)-carnitine of good purity in high yield

  11. Palmitoyl-DL-carnitine has calcium-dependent effects on cultured neurones from rat dorsal root ganglia.

    OpenAIRE

    S. R. Stapleton; Currie, K. P.; Scott, R. H.; Bell, B A

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of palmitoyl-DL-carnitine (0.01 to 1 mM) on whole cell voltage-activated calcium channel currents carried by calcium or barium and Ca(2+)-activated chloride currents were studied in cultured neurones from rat dorsal root ganglia. 2. Palmitoyl-DL-carnitine applied to the extracellular environment or intracellularly via the patch solution reduced Ca2+ currents activated over a wide voltage range from a holding potential of -90 mV. Inhibition of high voltage activated Ca2+ channel...

  12. Influence of L-Carnitine Supplementation on Serum Lipid Profile in Hemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohai Huang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that L-carnitine plays a pivotal role in lipid metabolism of hemodialysis (HD patients. However, there are still some reservations about its benefits. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on lipid profile in HD patients. Methods: Literature search was performed to identify the relevant randomized controlled trials that investigated the effects of L-carnitine on the lipid profile of subjects. Two independent authors used an Excel file to extract data and assess trials quality. The primary effect measure was the difference in means of the final lipid measurements between the intervention and control groups. The meta-analysis was performed with the fixed-effects model or random-effects model according to heterogeneity. Results: Twelve studies with a total of 391 patients met the inclusion criteria. The use of L-carnitine was not associated with a reduction in the total cholesterol (SMD, -0.11; 95% CI, -0.31 to 0.09, HDL-cholesterol (SMD, 0.01; 95% CI, -0.36 to 0.39, VLDL-cholesterol (SMD, 0.54; 95% CI, -0.06 to 1.14, and the serum triglycerides (SMD, -0.12; 95% CI, -0.36 to 0.12. However, L-carnitine can significantly decrease the LDL-cholesterol (SMD, -0.29; 95% CI, -0.53 to -0.06 in HD patients. In a subgroup meta-analysis, a significant LDL-cholesterol-lowering effect of L-carnitine supplementation was observed in intravenous application group, and patients with longer interventional duration and renal diseases. Conclusion: The limited evidence suggests that there was no effect of L-carnitine on serum total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and serum triglycerides. By contrast, this meta-analysis suggests a promising effect of L-carnitine on LDL-cholesterol. Further large-scale, well-designed randomized controlled trials are urgently needed

  13. Dietary Carnitine maintains energy reserves and delays fatigue of exercised African catfish (Clarias Gariepinus) fed high fat diets

    OpenAIRE

    Ozorio, R.; Ginneken, van, CJJM Kees; Thillart, van den, G.; M.W.A. Verstegen; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Lipids, together with proteins, are traditionally considered as primary fuels during aerobic swimming. The effects of dietary fat and carnitine supplements and exercise on the energy metabolism of juvenile fish were investigated. One hundred African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) were fed four isonitrogenous diets containing a fat level of 100 or 190 g kg-1 diet and one of the two levels of carnitine (15 and 1000 mg kg-1). Fish grew from 61 to 162 g in 10 wk. Thereafter, 6 fish per group swam v...

  14. Melatonin and L-carnitin improves endothelial disfunction and oxidative stress in Type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanoglu, Derya Selcen; Gurpinar, Tugba; Vural, Kamil; Ekerbicer, Nuran; Darıverenli, Ertan; Var, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    Vascular dysfunction is thought to play a major role in the development of diabetic cardiovascular disease. The roles of endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia will be considered. Melatonin as well as L-carnitine were shown to possess strong antioxidant properties. Diabetes induced with high fat diet (for 8 weeks) and multipl low doses intraperitoneal injection of STZ (twice, 30mg/kg/d i.p). The diabetic animals were randomly assigned to one of the experimental groups as follows: Control group (C), high fat diet (HFD), STZ-induced diabetic group (HFD+STZ) , HFD+STZ diabetic group received melatonin (10mg/kg/d i.p), HFD+STZ diabetic group received L-carnitine (0.6g/kg/d i.p), and HFD+STZ diabetic group received glibenclamide (5mg/kg/d, oral). The serum fasting blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, HDL- cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were tested. Acetylcholine induced endothelium-dependent relaxation and sodium nitroprusside induced endothelium-independent relaxation were measured in aortas for estimating endothelial function. Also, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO) levels activities were determined in rat liver. According to our results melatonin and L-carnitine treatment decreased fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and LDL levels. MDA levels significantly decreased with the melatonin treatment whereas SOD levels were not significantly changed between the groups. The results suggest that especially melatonin restores the vascular responses and endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:26803481

  15. Sequencing and functional expression of the malonyl-CoA-sensitive carnitine palmitoyltransferase from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, V N; Cameron, J M; Zammit, V A; Price, N T

    1999-01-01

    Using expressed sequence tag data, we obtained a cDNA for a carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I)-like molecule from Drosophila melanogaster. The cDNA encodes a 782-residue protein that shows 49% and 48% sequence identity with the rat liver and skeletal-muscle isoforms of CPT I respectively. The sequence has two predicted membrane-spanning regions, suggesting that it adopts the same topology as its mammalian counterparts. The sequence contains all the residues that have been shown to be characteristic of carnitine acetyltransferases. Expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris confirmed that the cDNA does encode a CPT enzyme. The activity was found to be associated with a mitochondria-enriched fraction. Kinetic analysis revealed a K(m) for carnitine of 406 microM and a K(m) for palmitoyl-CoA of 105 microM. The CPT activity was very sensitive to inhibition by malonyl-CoA, with an IC(50) of 0.74 microM when the activity was assayed with 35 microM palmitoyl-CoA and 1% (w/v) albumin at pH 7.0. A histidine residue at position 140 in rat liver CPT I has been indicated to be important for inhibition by malonyl-CoA. The equivalent residue (position 136) in Drosophila CPT I is arginine, implying that any basic residue might be compatible with such sensitivity. Evidence is presented that, unlike in mammals, Drosophila has only a single CPT I gene. Sequences suggesting the existence of a splice variant in the 5' untranslated region were found; this was consistent with the existence of two promoters for the CPT I gene. PMID:10417309

  16. Structural Characterization of the Regulatory Domain of Brain Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1

    OpenAIRE

    Samanta, Soma; Situ, Alan J.; Ulmer, Tobias S.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons contain a mammalian-specific isoform of the enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1C) that couples malonyl-CoA to ceramide levels thereby contributing to systemic energy homeostasis and feeding behavior. In contrast to CPT1A, which controls the rate-limiting step of long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation in all tissues, the biochemical context and regulatory mechanism of CPT1C are unknown. CPT1 enzymes are comprised of an N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain...

  17. The brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c regulates energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Kurama, Takeshi; Dai, Yun; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shun-ichiro; Cha, Seung Hun; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in the central nervous system is implicated in the control of food intake and energy expenditure. An intermediate in this pathway, malonyl-CoA, mediates these effects. Malonyl-CoA is an established inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme that controls entry of fatty acids into mitochondria and, thereby, fatty acid oxidation. CPT1c, a brain-specific enzyme with high sequence similarity to CPT1a (liver) and CPT1b (muscle)...

  18. Homozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (muscle isoform) deficiency is lethal in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Shaonin; You, Yun; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Chick, Wallace S H; Hamm, Doug A.; Sharer, J. Daniel; Wood, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA), the most abundant fatty acids in mammalian membranes and in energy metabolism. Human deficiency of the muscle isoform CPT-1b is poorly understood. In the current study, embryos with a homozygous knockout of Cpt-1b were lost before embryonic day 9.5 − 11.5. Also, while there were normal percentages of CPT-1b+/−pups born from both male and female CPT-1b+/− mic...

  19. Isothermal titration calorimetry with micelles: Thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 membrane protein ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Perspicace, Samantha; Rufer, Arne C.; Thoma, Ralf; Mueller, Francis; Hennig, Michael; Ceccarelli, Simona; Schulz-Gasch, Tanja; Seelig, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 (CPT-2) is a key enzyme in the mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism. The active site is comprised of a Y-shaped tunnel with distinct binding sites for the substrate acylcarnitine and the cofactor CoA. We investigated the thermodynamics of binding of four inhibitors directed against either the CoA or the acylcarnitine binding sites using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). CPT-2 is a monotopic membrane protein and was solubilized by β-octylglucoside (β-OG) ...

  20. Carnitine tailored Sensors on Surface Molecular Imprinting based on Graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Truta, Liliana A.A.N.A.; Nádia S. Ferreira; M. Goreti F. Sales

    2013-01-01

    III Jornadas de Electroquímica e Inovação (Electroquímica e Nanomateriais), na Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Vila Real, 16 a 17 de Setembro de 2013 A new biosensor based on surface molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) on graphene layers was successfully developed. It consists in a 3D polymeric network created on top of surface and around the target template, Carnitine (CRT), a potential biomarker of ovary cancer. The polymeric structure was obtained after radical polyme...

  1. Might carnitine status in animals indicate environmental/toxicological harm at the cellular level?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garst, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    It is well known that R-(L)-carnitine (Cn) is essential for the energy-producing, mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long chain fatty acids. Cn can ameliorate the diverse effects of drugs, a chemicals and pollutants. Moreover, the toxicities of carbon monoxide, several heavy metals, and even the antibiotic cephaloridine seem mediated, in part, by actions affecting the Cn system. Data which could suggest that the Cn system is an integrator/regulator of the cellular response by the organism to it`s environment is described.

  2. The effects of exogenous l-carnitine on lipid peroxidation and tissue damage in an experimental warm hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury model*

    OpenAIRE

    Canbaz, Hakan; Akca, Tamer; Tataroglu, Canten; Caglikulekci, Mehmet; Dirlik, Musa; Ayaz, Lokman; Ustunsoy, Ali Bora; Tasdelen, Bahar; Aydin, Suha

    2007-01-01

    Background:l-Carnitine is the essential endogenous factor for the transport of long-chain fatty acids from the cytoplasm to within the mitochondrion where the β-oxidation process takes place. l-Carnitine is a superoxide scavenger and an antioxidant that possesses an anti-ischemic action and a stabilizing effect on cell membranes. It may be of help in liver ischemia reperfusion injury. Results regarding the effects of l-carnitine on liver ischemia and reperfusion injury are few and conflicting.

  3. Effects of short- and long-term feeding of L-carnitine and congeners on the production of eicosanoids from rat peritoneal leucocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Garrelds, Ingrid; Elliott, G; Zijlstra, Freek; Bonta, I L

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of short- and long-term feeding with L-carnitine, L-acetyl carnitine and L-propionyl carnitine on the production of eicosanoids front in vitro stimulated carrageenan-induced rat peritoneal macrophages was investigated. Both young (4 weeks) and old (18 months) rats were used. A lower number of cells was isolated from the peritonea of treated than control young rats after 4 d feeding, but after 60 d no differences were observed. A similar reduction in cell number was foun...

  4. Over-expression and characterization of active recombinant rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II using baculovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T M; Mann, W R; Dragland, C J; Anderson, R C; Nemecek, G M; Bell, P A

    1995-01-01

    The cDNA encoding rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) was heterologously expressed using a recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. Unlike Escherichia coli, the baculovirus-infected insect cells expressed mostly soluble active recombinant CPT-II (rCPT-II). CPT activity from crude lysates of recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells was maximal between 50 and 72 h post-infection, with a peak specific activity of 100-200 times that found in the mock- or wild-type-infected control lysates. Milligram quantities (up to 1.8 mg/l of culture) of active rCPT-II were chromatographically purified from large-scale cultures of insect cells infected with the recombinant baculovirus. The rCPT-II was found to be: (1) similar in size to the native rat liver enzyme (approximately 70 kDa) as judged by SDS/PAGE; (2) immunoreactive with a polyclonal serum raised against rat liver CPT-II; and (3) not glycosylated. Kinetic analysis of soluble rCPT-II revealed Km values for carnitine and palmitoyl-CoA of 950 +/- 27 microM and 34 +/- 5.6 microM respectively. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7626037

  5. The brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c regulates energy homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Kurama, Takeshi; Dai, Yun; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shun-ichiro; Cha, Seung Hun; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in the central nervous system is implicated in the control of food intake and energy expenditure. An intermediate in this pathway, malonyl-CoA, mediates these effects. Malonyl-CoA is an established inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme that controls entry of fatty acids into mitochondria and, thereby, fatty acid oxidation. CPT1c, a brain-specific enzyme with high sequence similarity to CPT1a (liver) and CPT1b (muscle) was recently discovered. All three CPTs bind malonyl-CoA, and CPT1a and CPT1b catalyze acyl transfer from various fatty acyl-CoAs to carnitine, whereas CPT1c does not. These findings suggest that CPT1c has a unique function or activation mechanism. We produced a targeted mouse knockout (KO) of CPT1c to investigate its role in energy homeostasis. CPT1c KO mice have lower body weight and food intake, which is consistent with a role as an energy-sensing malonyl-CoA target. Paradoxically, CPT1c KO mice fed a high-fat diet are more susceptible to obesity, suggesting that CPT1c is protective against the effects of fat feeding. CPT1c KO mice also exhibit decreased rates of fatty acid oxidation, which may contribute to their increased susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings indicate that CPT1c is necessary for the regulation of energy homeostasis. PMID:16651524

  6. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S. (Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy)); Rocchi, M. (Istituto G. Gaslini, Genoa (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH{sub 2}-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH{sub 2}-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids.

  7. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A deficiency: a look at classic and arctic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykema, Deanna M

    2012-02-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) deficiency is a defect of fatty acid metabolism that presents as an autosomal recessive inheritance. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A is the rate-limiting enzyme that allows the body to process fats to provide energy during times of fasting and illness. Patients usually present between birth and 18 months of age following an illness with various symptoms including hypoketotic hypoglycemia, lethargy, and seizures. Diagnosis can be achieved through newborn metabolic screening. Long-term treatment is managed through dietary management. A milder form has been found to occur at a much higher incidence in the Inuit population. Since the recent discovery of CPT-1A deficiency, much is yet to be learned. Researchers are busy identifying and studying groups of people who are presenting with CPT-1A deficiency at significantly higher rates than the general population. This research will lead to a better understanding and future care of individuals diagnosed with CPT-1A deficiency. PMID:22301540

  8. Peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibitors of the mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorin, C; Necochea, C; Johow, V; Soto, U; Grau, A M; Bremer, J; Leighton, F

    1992-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation was studied in the presence of inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), in normal and in peroxisome-proliferated rat hepatocytes. The oxidation decreased in mitochondria, as expected, but in peroxisomes it increased. These two effects were seen, in variable proportions, with (+)-decanoylcarnitine, 2-tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA) and etomoxir. The decrease in mitochondrial oxidation (ketogenesis) affected saturated fatty acids with 12 or more carbon atoms, whereas the increase in peroxisomal oxidation (H2O2 production) affected saturated fatty acids with 8 or more carbon atoms. The peroxisomal increase was sensitive to chlorpromazine, a peroxisomal inhibitor. To study possible mechanisms, palmitoyl-, octanoyl- and acetyl-carnitine acyltransferase activities were measured, in homogenates and in subcellular fractions from control and TDGA-treated cells. The palmitoylcarnitine acyltransferase was inhibited, as expected, but the octanoyltransferase activity also decreased. The CoA derivative of TDGA was synthesized and tentatively identified as being responsible for inhibition of the octanoylcarnitine acyltransferase. These results show that inhibitors of the mitochondrial CPT I may also inhibit the peroxisomal octanoyl transferase; they also support the hypothesis that the octanoyltransferase has the capacity to control or regulate peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. PMID:1736904

  9. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH2-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH2-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids

  10. Propionyl-L-carnitine as a potential protective agent against radiation-induced cardiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, propiony-L-carnitine (PLC); a natural short-chain derivative of L-carnitine, has been tested as a potential protective agent against radiation-induced cardio-toxicity. Cardiotoxicity was assessed in the homo-genate of the heart by measuring the plasma levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), as well as malon-dialdehyde (MDA), glutathione content (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and nitric oxide (NO) production, whole body gamma-irradiation (2 and 6Gy ) of rats significantly increased CPK, LDH, AST,MDA, and NO and significantly decreased GSH,GSH-PX, SOD and ATP. Daily administration (one week) of PLC before whole body irradiation caused significant recovery for the serum enzyme CPK, LDH, AST and MDA, GSH, GSH-PX, SOD, ATP and NO levels in cardiac tissue. The protective effect PLC was attributed to it's antioxidant properties. Radiation therapy, likewise, is a valuable method of treatment for a variety of intrathoracic neoplasms. During radiotherapy of thoracic tumorus, the heart is often included in the primary treatment volume and chronic impairment of myocadial function occurs (cilliers and lochner, 1993; benderitter et al., 1995). Irradiation causes numerous changes in different metabolic reactions within the cardiac cells with major adverse undersirable effects that involve cardiotoxicity

  11. Effect of exogenous proline, betaine, and carnitine on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in a minimal medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, R R; Te Giffel, M C; Cox, L J; Rombouts, F M; Abee, T

    1994-04-01

    Three Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from food or food-processing environments were used to assess the response of this species to salinity in a chemically defined minimal medium. Growth in a minimal medium containing five essential amino acids and glucose as a carbon and energy source was comparable to growth in a rich medium (brain heart infusion broth). In the absence and presence of 3% NaCl the final cell numbers reached in minimal medium were 10(9) and 10(7) CFU/ml, respectively. Growth under the latter conditions could not be detected by spectrophotometry by measuring A660. Apparently, this technique was not suitable for these experiments since the detection level was > 10(7) CFU/ml. Exogenously added proline (10 mM), trimethylglycine (betaine) (1 mM), and beta-hydroxy-gamma-N-trimethyl aminobutyrate (carnitine) (1 mM) significantly stimulated growth under osmotic stress conditions in minimal medium at both 37 and 10 degrees C. Betaine and carnitine are present in foods derived from plants and animals, respectively. Therefore, these compounds can contribute significantly to growth of L. monocytogenes in various foods at high osmolarities. PMID:8017923

  12. Severe infantile carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency in 19-week fetal sibs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Karen; Fellig, Yakov; Meiner, Vardiella; Korman, Stanley H; Shaag, Avraham; Nadjari, Michel; Soffer, Dov; Ariel, Ilana

    2009-01-01

    Antenatal presentation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II deficiency due to mutations in the CPT2 gene has been rarely reported. We report an Ashkenazi Jewish family with 3 terminated pregnancies for multicystic kidneys and/or hydrocephalus. Fetal autopsy after termination of the couple's 4th pregnancy (sib 2) showed renal parenchyma replaced by cysts that appeared to increase in diameter toward the medulla. Fetopsy after termination of the 7th pregnancy (sib 3) revealed micrognathia; hypospadias; cystic renal dysplasia; hepatosteatosis; and lipid accumulation in the renal tubular epithelium, myocardium, and skeletal muscle. Microvascular proliferative changes and focal polymicrogyria were seen in the brain. A beta-oxidative enzyme deficiency was suspected. CPT2 gene analysis showed a homozygous complex haplotype for the F448L mutation associated with a c.del1238_1239AG (p.Q413fs) truncating mutation in exon 4. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II deficiency should be included in the differential diagnosis in fetuses of Ashkenazi origin with multicystic kidneys and unusual cerebral findings. PMID:19335026

  13. [Effects of panthenol and carnitine on aldehyde metabolic enzymes in rats with tetrachloromethane-induced liver injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satanovskaia, V I; Pron'ko, P S; Gaĭshmanova, A V; Miskevich, D A

    2009-01-01

    Tetrachloromethane (2 g/kg, intragastric) produced a decrease in the activity of NAD- and NADH- dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases with high Km for aldehydes in rat liver. Panthenol and L-carnitine administered separately normalized the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases, while a combination of the drugs did not produce any significant effect. PMID:19441727

  14. Stability of carboplatin, paclitaxel, and docetaxel with acetyl-l-carnitine during simulated Y-site administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Scarlett, Cameron; Hutson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The compatibility of acetyl-l-carnitine with three chemotherapy agents was studied during simulated Y-site administration. Acetyl-l-carnitine 30 mg/mL in 5% dextrose for injection (D5W) was combined with carboplatin 4 mg/mL, paclitaxel 2 mg/mL, and docetaxel 0.74 mg/mL in glass vials. Physical compatibility over the 4-hour storage at room temperature was assessed by visual examinations with unaided eye under fluorescent light and by measuring the percent transmittance at 600 nm. Chemical compatibility was measured by the percent of initial concentration remaining using stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic-ultraviolet and high-performance liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometry methods. No visible particulate matter, haze, or color change was observed, and the percent transmittance was >95% for all admixtures. After a 4-hour incubation, 93.2% of the paclitaxel and 96.5% of docetaxel remained in separate mixtures with acetyl-l-carnitine. Carboplatin 4 mg/mL, paclitaxel 1.2 mg/mL, and docetaxel 0.74 mg/mL are physically and chemically compatible with acetyl-l-carnitine 30 mg/mLin D5W during a simulated 4-hour Y-site administration. PMID:23050317

  15. Severe human herpesvirus 6-associated encephalopathy in three children: analysis of cytokine profiles and the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Hatanaka, Daisuke; Ogura, Yumi; Chida, Ayako; Nakamura, Yasuko; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2011-11-01

    Three children developed severe encephalopathy associated with human herpesvirus 6 infection. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed either basal ganglia involvement or diffusion abnormalities in the cerebral white matter. Coagulopathy with hypercytokinemia was observed in 2 patients. One demonstrated thermolabile variation in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2. These results suggest a heterogeneous pathogenic mechanism in encephalopathy associated with human herpesvirus 6 infection. PMID:21654547

  16. Ontogeny and kinetics of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in hepatopancreas and skeletal muscle of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Luo, Zhi; Mai, Kang-Sen; Liu, Cai-Xia; Zheng, Jia-Lang

    2015-12-01

    The ontogeny and kinetics of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) were investigated in hepatopancreas and muscle throughout four developmental stages (newly hatched larvae, 1-month-old juvenile, 3-month-old, and 6-month-old, respectively) of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. In hepatopancreas, the maximal velocity (Vmax) significantly increased from hatching to 1-month-old grass carp and then gradually declined at 6-month-old grass carp. In muscle, CPT I activity was the highest at 1-month-old grass carp, nearly twofold higher than that at hatching (P < 0.05). The Michaelis constant (Km) value was also the highest for 1-month-old in both tested tissues. Carnitine concentrations (FC, AC and TC) were the lowest for 3-month-old grass carp and remained relatively constant in both tissues from fish under the other developmental stages. The FC concentration in hepatopancreas and muscle at four developmental stages were less than the respective Km, indicating that grass carp required supplemental carnitine in their food to ensure that CPT I activity was not constrained by carnitine availability. PMID:26170093

  17. Inhibition of carnitine-acyl transferase I by oxfenicine studied in vivo with [{sup 11}C]-labeled fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angsten, Gertrud [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Children' s Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: gertrud.angsten@surgsci.uu.se; Valind, Sven [Uppsala University PET Centre, Uppsala University, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Takalo, Reijo [Uppsala University PET Centre, Uppsala University, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Neu, Henrik [Uppsala University PET Centre, Uppsala University, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Organic Chemistry, Uppsala University, S-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Meurling, Staffan [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Children' s Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Langstroem, Bengt [Uppsala University PET Centre, Uppsala University, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Organic Chemistry, Uppsala University, S-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Methods: Anesthetized pigs were studied with [{sup 11}C]-labeled fatty acids (FAs) with carbon chain length ranging from 8 to 16 carbon atoms, during control conditions and during inhibition of carnitine-palmitoyl transferase I (CPT I) with oxfenicine. The myocardial uptake of [{sup 11}C]-FAs from blood was measured together with the relative distribution of [{sup 11}C]-acyl-CoA between rapid mitochondrial oxidation and incorporation into slow turnover lipid pools in the heart. Results: During baseline conditions, the fractional oxidative utilization of palmitate was almost as high as that of carnitine-independent short-chain FAs, unless the carnitine shuttle was inhibited by high levels of lactate. Inhibition of CPT I almost completely blocked the oxidative pathway for palmitic acid and reduced the fractional oxidative utilization, while the rate of oxidative metabolism of acyl-CoA was unaffected. Conclusions: [{sup 11}C]-Labeled FAs allow rapid oxidation to be well separated from esterification into slow turnover lipid pools in the heart of anaesthetized pigs. The fractional oxidative utilization of [{sup 11}C]-palmitate serves well to characterize, in vivo, the carnitine-dependent transfer of long-chain FAs.

  18. Inhibition of carnitine-acyl transferase I by oxfenicine studied in vivo with [11C]-labeled fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods: Anesthetized pigs were studied with [11C]-labeled fatty acids (FAs) with carbon chain length ranging from 8 to 16 carbon atoms, during control conditions and during inhibition of carnitine-palmitoyl transferase I (CPT I) with oxfenicine. The myocardial uptake of [11C]-FAs from blood was measured together with the relative distribution of [11C]-acyl-CoA between rapid mitochondrial oxidation and incorporation into slow turnover lipid pools in the heart. Results: During baseline conditions, the fractional oxidative utilization of palmitate was almost as high as that of carnitine-independent short-chain FAs, unless the carnitine shuttle was inhibited by high levels of lactate. Inhibition of CPT I almost completely blocked the oxidative pathway for palmitic acid and reduced the fractional oxidative utilization, while the rate of oxidative metabolism of acyl-CoA was unaffected. Conclusions: [11C]-Labeled FAs allow rapid oxidation to be well separated from esterification into slow turnover lipid pools in the heart of anaesthetized pigs. The fractional oxidative utilization of [11C]-palmitate serves well to characterize, in vivo, the carnitine-dependent transfer of long-chain FAs

  19. Variations in IBD (ACAD8) in children with elevated C4-carnitine detected by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina B; Bischoff, Claus; Christensen, Ernst; Simonsen, Henrik; Lund, Allan M; Young, Sarah P; Koeberl, Dwight D; Millington, David S; Roe, Charles R; Roe, Diane S; Wanders, Ronald J A; Ruiter, Jos P N; Keppen, Laura D; Stein, Quinn; Knudsen, Inga; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage S

    2006-01-01

    or compound heterozygous for variations in the IBD gene have been reported. We present IBD deficiency in an additional four newborns with elevated C(4)-carnitine identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) screening in Denmark and the United States. Three showed urinary excretions of isobutyryl...

  20. Protective Effects of Ibuprofen and L-Carnitine Against Whole Body Gamma Irradiation-Induced Duodenal Mucosal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Akpolat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine have been demonstrated to provide radioprotective activity to the hamster against whole body sublethal irradiation. The purpose of this study is to test those antioxidant drugs, each of which has the capacity of inhibiting mucosal injury, as topical radioprotectants for the intestine. Material and Methods: The male hamsters were divided into the following four groups (n=6: group 1: control group, received saline, 1 ml/100 g by gavage, as placebo. Group 2: irradiated-control group, received whole body irradiation of 8 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. The animals in groups 3 and 4 were given a daily dose of 10 mg/kg of ibuprofen and 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine for 15 days respectively, before irradiation with a single dose of 8 Gy. Twenty-four hours after radiation exposure, the hamsters were sacrificed and samples were taken from the duodenum, and the histopatological determinations were carried out. Results: Morphologically, examination of the gamma irradiated duodenum revealed the presence of shortening and thickening of villi and flattening of enterocytes, massive subepithelial lifting. Pretreatment of ibuprofen and L-carnitine with irradiation reduced these histopathological changes. Conclusion: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine administrated by the oral route may be a good radioprotector against small intestinal damage in patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  1. Modulation of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis by meloxicam and/or L-carnitine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. A. Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Treatment with both meloxicam and L-carnitine is a more effective than each of them alone which is attributed to augmentation their antioxidant, anti inflammatory effects. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(6.000: 1247-1253

  2. Overexpression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in skeletal muscle in vivo increases fatty acid oxidation and reduces triacylglycerol esterification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruce, Clinton R.; Brolin, Camilla; Turner, Nigel; Cleasby, Mark E.; van der Leij, Feike R.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Kraegen, Edward W.

    2007-01-01

    A key regulatory point in the control of fatty acid ( FA) oxidation is thought to be transport of FAs across the mitochondrial membrane by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I). To investigate the role of CPT I in FA metabolism, we used in vivo electrotransfer (IVE) to locally overexpress CPT I i

  3. Effects of L-Carnitine Theraphy On Methabolic and Biochemical Changes Caused By Propofol Infusion in Rabbits Undergoing Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş Yılbaş

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increased lipid mass in the body secondary to long term and high doses of propofol infusion may cause carnitine deficiency. In this study; we aimed to investigate the effects of carnitine, given for treatment purposes and have not been analyzed before, during high doses of propofol infusion in rabbits. Materials and Methods: Following ethical committee approval; 2500-3500 grams weight, 3-4 months-old, healthy, male, white 20 New Zealand rabbits were included in the study. The rabbits were premedicated with xsilazine and atropine. After the preparation period including tracheostomy, monitorization, catheterization of the ear arteries and veins and urinary vesical; basal blood samples for biochemical and metabolic parameters included in the study were taken and rabbits were divided into 4 groups, 5 rabbits in each,randomly (Group P, Group PC, Group S, Group SC. For sedation 20 mg/kg/h propofol infusion was given to Group P, 20 mg/kg/h propofol and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine infusions were given simultaneously to Group PC, sevoflurane for sedation was given to Group S, sevoflurane and L-carnitine infusion were given simultaneously to Group SC. Their sedation levels were evaluated every 30 minutes and their vital signs were reported every 15 minutes. Every 2 hours arterial blood gases analysis and every 12 hours electrolytes and metabolic parameters were repeated. Euthanasia with high doses (60 mg/kg of ketamin is performed for rabbits that were alive at the end of 24 hours. Results: All groups were similar in weight, vital parameters, all parameters searched in arterial blood gases, life time, liver enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase, serum electrolytes, creatine kinase and renal function tests (p>0.05. However; amylase levels before death or euthanasia were lower in Group PC compared to other groups;myoglobin and CK-MB levels in Group P were higher compared to other groups; cholesterol levels at 12th hour, before death or euthanasia were higher

  4. Correlation of Serum Free Carnitine with Serum Ferritin and Vitamin C Levels in Type II Diabetic Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Pourabbas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is a major health problem worldwide. Type II diabetic patients are reported to have higher ferritin and lower vitamin C concentrations. Considering the role of ascorbic acid in carnitine biosynthesis and the limited information on free carnitine correlations with ferritin and vitamin C levels in diabetic patients without microvascular complications, this case-control study was conducted to determine ferritin and vitamin C levels in hyperlipidemic-diabetic men comparing to healthy controls; the correlation of free carnitine with ferritin and vitamin C levels were also studied in these patients.Methods: Thirty-five hyperlipidemic-diabetic and seventy healthy men, were included in the study by the convenience sampling method. Body Mass Index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, ferritin and vitamin C levels were assessed in both case and control groups; moreover, serum free carnitine was measured in both groups. Dietary assessments were performed using 24 hour recall and food frequency questionnaires.Results: Blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and HDL concentrations were significantly higher in the case group. Mean serum ferritin concentrations were higher in diabetics comparing to controls (93.22±0.27 vs. 44.66±4.23 µg/l; whereas, mean plasma vitamin C in these patients were lower than the healthy subjects (0.68±0.07 vs. 0.89±0.05. Positive correlations were observed between free carnitine and vitamin C levels.Conclusion: According to the results, it could be suggested that vitamin C supplementation in diabetic patients with hyperlipidemia might be useful. In addition, inclusion of serum ferritin assay in routine evaluation of diabetic patients could be beneficial.

  5. Exploration of lipid metabolism in relation with plasma membrane properties of Duchenne muscular dystrophy cells: influence of L-carnitine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Le Borgne

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD arises as a consequence of mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a membrane-spanning protein that connects the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. The most distinctive features of DMD are a progressive muscular dystrophy, a myofiber degeneration with fibrosis and metabolic alterations such as fatty infiltration, however, little is known on lipid metabolism changes arising in Duchenne patient cells. Our goal was to identify metabolic changes occurring in Duchenne patient cells especially in terms of L-carnitine homeostasis, fatty acid metabolism both at the mitochondrial and peroxisomal level and the consequences on the membrane structure and function. In this paper, we compared the structural and functional characteristics of DMD patient and control cells. Using radiolabeled L-carnitine, we found, in patient muscle cells, a marked decrease in the uptake and the intracellular level of L-carnitine. Associated with this change, a decrease in the mitochondrial metabolism can be seen from the analysis of mRNA encoding for mitochondrial proteins. Probably, associated with these changes in fatty acid metabolism, alterations in the lipid composition of the cells were identified: with an increase in poly unsaturated fatty acids and a decrease in medium chain fatty acids, mono unsaturated fatty acids and in cholesterol contents. Functionally, the membrane of cells lacking dystrophin appeared to be less fluid, as determined at 37°C by fluorescence anisotropy. These changes may, at least in part, be responsible for changes in the phospholipids and cholesterol profile in cell membranes and ultimately may reduce the fluidity of the membrane. A supplementation with L-carnitine partly restored the fatty acid profile by increasing saturated fatty acid content and decreasing the amounts of MUFA, PUFA, VLCFA. L-carnitine supplementation also restored muscle membrane fluidity. This suggests that regulating lipid metabolism

  6. Effects of Dietary L-carnitine Supplementation on Growth Performance, Organ Weight, Biochemical Parameters and Ascites Susceptibility in Broilers Reared Under Low-temperature Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Ning, D; Peng, Y Z; Guo, Y M

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on growth performance, organ weight, biochemical parameters of blood, heart and liver, and ascites susceptibility of broilers at different ages reared under a low-temperature environment. A total of 420 1-d-old male Ross 308 broilers were randomly assigned to two dietary treatments with fifteen replicates of fourteen broilers each. Treatment diets consisted of L-carnitine supplementation at levels of 0 and 100 mg/kg. At 11-d of age, low temperature stress was used to increase ascites susceptibility. Blood, heart and liver samples were collected at different ages for analysis of boichemical parameters. The results showed that, there was no significant difference in growth performance with L-carnitine supplementation, but the mortality due to ascites was significantly decreased. Dietary L-carnitine supplementation significantly reduced heart index (HI) and ascites heart index (AHI) on d 21, lung index (LUI) on d 35 and liver index (LI) on d 42. The broilers fed diets containing L-carnitine had significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB) concentration and hematocrit (HCT) on d 42. Dietary L-carnitine supplementation significantly reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) content of heart tissue on d 21 and 35, and significantly increased total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity of the heart on d 21 and 42. L-carnitine supplementation significantly reduced serum triglyceride (TG) content on d 28 and 35 and serum glucose (GLU) on d 35 and 42, and significantly increased serum total protein (TP) and globulin (GLO) content on d 42. L-carnitine supplementation significantly enhanced liver succinodehydrogenase (SDH), malic dehydrogenase (MDH) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity on d 28, and tended to reduce the lactic acid (LD) level of liver on d 35 (p = 0.06). L-carnitine supplementation significantly reduced serum uric acid (UA) content on d 28, 35 and 42

  7. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPAR gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) induce carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT-1A) via independent gene elements

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Shulan; Attia, Ramy R.; Connaughton, Sara; Niesen, Melissa I.; Ness, Gene C.; Elam, Marshall B.; Hori, Roderick T.; Cook, George A.; Park, Edwards A.

    2010-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids and pharmacologic ligands for the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activate expression of genes involved in fatty acid and glucose oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4). CPT-1A catalyzes the transfer of long chain fatty acids from acyl-CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial membranes and is an initiating step in the mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty...

  8. Novel Mutations in the CPT1A Gene Identified in the Patient Presenting Jaundice as the First Manifestation of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1A Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jong Sub; Yoo, Hyeoh Won; Lee, Kyung Jae; Ko, Jung Min; Moon, Jin Soo; Ko, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) is an enzyme functioning in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) of the liver. Patients with CPT1A deficiency have impaired mitochondrial FAO and display hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic encephalopathy as typical manifestations. In this report, we present a case of CPT1A deficiency presenting jaundice as the first manifestation. A 1.9 years old boy showed jaundice and elevated levels of free and total carnitine were observed. From direct seque...

  9. Inhibition of Gene Expression of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter and Antioxidant Enzymes in Oxazaphosphorines-Induced Acute Cardiomyopathic Rat Models

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Meshan Lafi Aldelemy; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that high therapeutic doses of oxazaphosphorines, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IFO), are associated with cardiomyopathy. This study investigated whether oxazaphosphorines alter the expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2) and antioxidant genes and if so, whether these alterations contribute to CP and IFO-induced cardiotoxicity. Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups namely, control, L carnitine, CP, IFO, CP p...

  10. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 at different supplemental ages on growth performance and some immune response in ascites-susceptible broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ailian; Li, Baoming; Guo, Yuming

    2007-02-01

    Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) at different supplemental ages on performance and some immune response were investigated in ascites-susceptible broilers. A 3 x 2 x 2 factorial design was used consisting of L-carnitine supplementation (0, 75, and 100 mg/kg), CoQ10 supplementation (0 and 40 mg/kg) and different supplemental ages (from day 1 on and from day 10 on). A total of 480 one-day-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated to 12 groups, every group had five replicates, each with eight birds. The birds were fed a corn-soybean based diet for six weeks. From day 10-21, all the birds were exposed to a low ambient temperature (12-15 degrees C) to increase the susceptibility to ascites. No significant effects were observed on growth performance by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation, and different supplemental ages. Packed cell volume was significantly decreased by L-carnitine supplementation alone, and ascites heart index and ascites mortality were decreased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation alone, and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation together (p broilers was significantly improved by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation alone during 0-3 week. Serum IgG content was improved by L-carnitine supplementation alone (p ascites-susceptible broilers, which might benefit for the reduction of broilers' susceptibility to ascites. PMID:17361948

  11. Effect of Combined Treatment with Alpha Lipoic Acid and Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Vascular Function and Blood Pressure in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    McMackin, Craig J.; Widlansky, Michael E.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Huang, Alex L.; Weller, Susan; Holbrook, Monika; Gokce, Noyan; Hagen, Tory M.; Keaney, John F.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species that may contribute to vascular dysfunction. Alpha-lipoic acid and acetyl-L-carnitine reduce oxidative stress and improve mitochondrial function. In a double blind, crossover study, we examined the effects of combined alpha-lipoic acid /acetyl-L-carnitine treatment and placebo (eight weeks per treatment) on vasodilator function and blood pressure in 36 subjects with coronary artery disease. Active treatment increased brachial artery diameter by 2.3...

  12. Effects of L-carnitine and Pentoxifylline on the Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase C4 isozyme and Motility of Testicular Spermatozoa in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Aliabadi, Elham; Karimi, Fatemeh; Rasti, Mozhgan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracted sperm from the testis have poor motility. Moreover, their motility changes during their journey through epidydimis. Meanwhile, they face high concentration of L-carnitin. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase C4 (LDH-C4) gene disorders has been shown to cause impaired sperm motility, leading to infertility in male mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate sperm motility and LDH-C4 enzyme activity upon L-carnitine (LC) and Pentoxifylline (PTX) administrations in mice. Metho...

  13. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2: New insights on the substrate specificity and implications for acylcarnitine profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Sara; Ijlst, Lodewijk; van Lenthe, Henk; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Wanders, Ronald J; Ventura, Fátima V

    2010-09-01

    Over the last years acylcarnitines have emerged as important biomarkers for the diagnosis of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation (mFAO) and branched-chain amino acid oxidation disorders assuming they reflect the potentially toxic acyl-CoA species, accumulating intramitochondrially upstream of the enzyme block. However, the origin of these intermediates still remains poorly understood. A possibility exists that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), member of the carnitine shuttle, is involved in the intramitochondrial synthesis of acylcarnitines from accumulated acyl-CoA metabolites. To address this issue, the substrate specificity profile of CPT2 was herein investigated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae homogenates expressing human CPT2 were incubated with saturated and unsaturated C2-C26 acyl-CoAs and branched-chain amino acid oxidation intermediates. The produced acylcarnitines were quantified by ESI-MS/MS. We show that CPT2 is active with medium (C8-C12) and long-chain (C14-C18) acyl-CoA esters, whereas virtually no activity was found with short- and very long-chain acyl-CoAs or with branched-chain amino acid oxidation intermediates. Trans-2-enoyl-CoA intermediates were also found to be poor substrates for CPT2. Inhibition studies performed revealed that trans-2-C16:1-CoA may act as a competitive inhibitor of CPT2 (K(i) of 18.8 microM). The results obtained clearly demonstrate that CPT2 is able to reverse its physiological mechanism for medium and long-chain acyl-CoAs contributing to the abnormal acylcarnitines profiles characteristic of most mFAO disorders. The finding that trans-2-enoyl-CoAs are poorly handled by CPT2 may explain the absence of trans-2-enoyl-carnitines in the profiles of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficient patients, the only defect where they accumulate, and the discrepancy between the clinical features of this and other long-chain mFAO disorders such as very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. PMID:20538056

  14. Comparative acute effects of l-carnitine and dl-carnitine on hepatic catabolism of l-alanine and l-glutamine in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gisele LOPES; Vilma A F G GAZOLA; Sharize B GALENDE; Wilson ALVES-DO-PRADO; Rui CURI; Roberto B BAZOTTE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the acute effects of l-carnitine (LCT) and dl-camitine (DLC) on hepatic catabolism of l-alanine andl-glutamine in rats. METHODS: Livers from 24 h fasted and fed rats were perfused in situ. The substrates l-alanine (5 mmol/L) and l-glutamine (5 mmol/L) were employed. The gluconeogenic and ureogenic activity was measured as the difference between the rates of glucose and urea released during and before the infusion of l-glutamine or l-alanine. RESULTS: LCT (60 μmol/L) but not DLC (60 μmol/L and 120 μmol/L) increased the production of glucose and urea froml-glutamine. However, neither LCT (60 μmol/L and 120 μmol/L) nor DLC (60 μmol/L and 240 μmol/L) showed any significant effect on hepatic glucose and urea production froml-alanine.CONCLUSION: The results showed a different acute effect of LCT and DLC on the activation of hepatic gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis promoted byl-glutamine, reinforcing the idea that DLC could not replace LCT.

  15. The Effects of Different Levels of Dietary Protein and L-Carnitine on Blood Sugar and Lipids of the New GIFT Strain of Juvenile Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

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    Gang Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The new GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia strain of Nile tilapia is a popular cultivated fish in Asia, but intensive aquaculture using nutritionally imbalanced feed has led to disorder of lipid metabolisms. An 8-week feeding experiment was conducted in order to assess the effects of different levels of L-carnitine (0, 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg/kg and dietary protein (22, 25, and 28% on blood sugar and blood lipid contents of the new juvenile GIFT strain of Nile tilapia. Results showed that dietary protein and L-carnitine had significant influences on glucose (GLU, high-density lipoprotein–cholesterol (HDL-C, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and low-density lipoprotein–cholesterol (LDL-C in the blood serum. The contents of GLU and HDL-C increased with the increases in dietary protein and L-carnitine levels, while the contents of TC, LDL-C, and TG decreased with the increases in dietary protein and L-carnitine levels. The interactive effect of both dietary protein and L-carnitine was most significant on GLU (p = 0.0001, followed by TG (p = 0.001, TC (p = 0.005, HDL-C (p = 0.056, and LDL-C (p = 0.109. These results suggested that high levels of dietary protein and L-carnitine supplementation reduce blood lipids and the burden of the fish liver.

  16. The uptake of tritium-labelled carnitine by monolayer cultures of human fetal muscle and its potential as a label in cytotoxicity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a novel approach to the investigation of immune responses directed against muscle antigens in inflammatory muscle disease, the use of tritium-labelled carnitine as a selective marker for myotubes in monolayer cultures was investigated. Tritium-labelled carnitine was incubated either with monolayer cultures of human fetal muscle or with syngeneic monolayer cultures of human fetal fibroblasts. The rate of uptake and loss of tritium-labelled carnitine by muscle cultures was compared with that shown by fibroblast cultures; values for the ratio Ksub(m)/Vsub(max) were 3.1 for muscle cultures and 0.46 for fibroblast cultures. Freeze-dried radioautographs of muscle monolayers, previously incubated with tritium-labelled carnitine confirmed the specific intra-tubular localization of the label. Fetal muscle monolayers, previously incubated with tritium-labelled carnitine, were used as targets in long-term cytotoxicity experiments into lymphocyte-mediated myotoxicity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with inflammatory muscle disease were shown to be myotoxic, but lymphocytes from normal individuals or those with non-inflammatory muscle disease were not. Carnitine-based measures of myotoxicity closely followed the clinical activity of the disease in one patient and the test shows considerable potential as a means of assessing myotube killing by lymphocytes on a per-cell basis. (author)

  17. L-Carnitine Protection Against Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity In Rats: Comparison with Amifostin Using Quantitative Renal Tc 99m DMSA Uptake

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    Yakup Yürekli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the cytoprotective effect of L-carnitine against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and to compare its efficacy with that of amifostin by quantitative renal Tc 99m DMSA uptake. Material and Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups of six animals each. 1 Control (saline; 5 ml/kg intraperitoneally; 2 L-carnitine (CAR; 300 mg/kg intraperitoneally; 3 Amifostine (AMI; 200 mg /kg intraperitoneally; 4 Cisplatin (CIS;7 mg/kg intraperitoneally; 5 Cisplatin plus L-carnitine (CIS + CAR; 6 Cisplatin plus amifostine (CIS + AMI. L-carnitine and amifostine were injected 30 minutes before cisplatin in Group 5 and 6. Tc 99m DMSA, 7.4 MBq/0.2 ml, was injected through the tail vein 72 hours after the drug administration. Rats were killed and kidneys removed by dissection 2 hours after the injection of the radiopharmaceutical. The percentage of the injected dose per gram of kidney tissue (%ID/g was calculated. Renal function was monitored by measuring BUN and plasma levels of creatinine. Lipid peroxidation and glutathione content were determined by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA and reduced glutathione (GSH in kidney tissue homogenates. Results: Tc 99m DMSA uptake per gram tissue of the kidney as %ID/g was 29.54±4.72, 29.86 ± 7.47 and 26.37 ± 4.54 in the control, CAR and AMI groups respectively. %ID/g was the lowest of all the groups, 11.60±3.59 (p<0.01, in the cisplatin group. Carnitine or amifostine administration 30 minutes before cisplatin injection resulted a significant increase in %ID/g, 21.28±7.73 and 18.97±3.24 respectively, compared to those of cisplatin-treated rats (p<0.002. A marked increase in plasma BUN and creatinine indicating nephrotoxicity and acute renal failure was observed in the cisplatin-treated group. MDA and GSH levels were concordant with cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in the kidney tissue. Conclusion: The results showed that L-carnitine significantly

  18. Synergistic Effect of Probiotics, Butyrate and l-Carnitine in Treatment of IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Moeinian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic, environmental factors, dysregulation of immune system, intestinal microbes and oxidative stress are the most important factors that play the role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Current treatments do not always result in complete remission and usually accompanied with several adverse effects. Recent studies showed that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and oxidative stress play the pivotal role in the induction of inflammation. Butyrate, l-Carnitine, and probiotics have the potential to control inflammation by reduction of main inflammatory cytokines, including NF-κB and TNF-α. They also stimulate antioxidant enzymes and inhibit IκB kinase (IKK. Regarding the beneficial effects of these three compounds in inflammation via several mechanisms, we hypothesize that the mixture of these compounds would be synergistically effective in reduction of inflammation and alleviation of IBD. Further experimental investigations are needed, to evaluate the hypothesis.

  19. [Anesthetic management of a patient with carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency with a history of rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sayaka; Sugita, Michiko; Nakahara, Eriko; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2013-03-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) makes the fatty acids available through beta-oxidation. Deficiency of CPT causes difficulties of muscle cells to metabolize fatty acid. In affected patients, exercise, fast for a prolonged period, and stress, lead to exhaustion of the store of glucose in the body, and rhabdomyolysis may occur, since muscle can not utilize fatty acid as an alternative energy source. Therefore, anesthetic management of CPT deficiency needs infusion of glucose continuously, avoiding the use of the drugs that cause rhabdomyolysis and suppressing the surgical stress. A 67-year-old man, who had previous history of rhabdmyolysis during the postoperative period, and diagnosed CPT deficiency was scheduled for total gastrectomy. General anesthesia was induced with remifentanil, thiamylal and rocuronium after epidural catheter insertion. During surgery, general anesthesia was maintained with remifentanil, sevoflurane, and blood glucose was monitored frequently, with continuous glucose infusion. No complications occurred during anesthesia and perioperative course was uneventful. PMID:23544345

  20. A case of recurrent acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus with carnitine palmitoyltransferase II variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Eiko; Yamanaka, Gaku; Kawashima, Hisashi; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Ishida, Yu; Oana, Shingo; Miyajima, Tasuku; Shinohara, Mayu; Saitoh, Makiko; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    Acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE) is the most common type of acute encephalopathy in childhood in Japan, which develops with prolonged febrile convulsion, followed by mild unconsciousness. It is generally sporadic and nonrecurrent. In this report, a 1-year-old girl showed signs of AEFCSE triggered by respiratory syncytial virus infection. Two years later, she presented with AEFCSE triggered by influenza virus infection, resulting in severe neurologic sequelae. The patient had a thermolabile genotype of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) variations consisting of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in exons 4 [1055T > G/F352C and 1102G > A/V368I] and 5 [1939A > G/M647V]. The polymorphism has been identified as a genetic predisposition for acute encephalopathy. This report presents the first case of recurrent encephalopathy with CPT II variations that may partially associate with pathogenesis of recurrent AEFCSE. PMID:23450341

  1. Short Term Administration of L-Carnitine Can Be Detrimental to the Ischemic Heart

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    Moslem Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that L-carnitine (LC supplementation may exert a cardioprotective effect in cardiomyopathy, prevent arrhythmias in myocardial infarction and increase exercise tolerance in angina. Interestingly, we demonstrated that short term preischemic administration of LC can be detrimental to ischemic heart. In isolated rat hearts treated with LC for 10 min before ischemia, a marked and concentration dependent arrhythmogenic activity were produced during both ischemia and reperfusion as increases in the number of ventricular ectopic beats, ventricular tachycardia and incidence of ventricular fibrillation. We hypothesized that preischemic using of LC for an inadequate time may pose arrhythmogenic activity, due to incomplete metabolism of fatty acids which in turn lead to production of toxic long chain fatty acid metabolites and also because of interruption in glucose oxidation.

  2. The liver isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 is not targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Neil M; Pease, Richard J; Birdsey, Graeme; Shayeghi, Majid; Turner, Nigel A; David Saggerson, E

    2003-01-01

    Liver microsomal fractions contain a malonyl-CoA-inhibitable carnitine acyltransferase (CAT) activity. It has been proposed [Fraser, Corstorphine, Price and Zammit (1999) FEBS Lett. 446, 69-74] that this microsomal CAT activity is due to the liver form of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (L-CPT1) being targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as well as to mitochondria, possibly by an N-terminal signal sequence [Cohen, Guillerault, Girard and Prip-Buus (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 5403-5411]. COS-1 cells were transiently transfected to express a fusion protein in which enhanced green fluorescent protein was fused to the C-terminus of L-CPT1. Confocal microscopy showed that this fusion protein was localized to mitochondria, and possibly to peroxisomes, but not to the ER. cDNAs corresponding to truncated (amino acids 1-328) or full-length L-CPT1 were transcribed and translated in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes. However, there was no evidence of authentic insertion of CPT1 into the ER membrane. Rat liver microsomal fractions purified by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation contained an 88 kDa protein (p88) which was recognized by an anti-L-CPT1 antibody and by 2,4-dinitrophenol-etomoxiryl-CoA, a covalent inhibitor of L-CPT1. Abundance of p88 and malonyl-CoA-inhibitable CAT activity were increased approx. 3-fold by starvation for 24 h. Deoxycholate solubilized p88 and malonyl-CoA-inhibitable CAT activity from microsomes to approximately the same extent. The microsomal fraction contained porin, which, relative to total protein, was as abundant as in crude mitochondrial outer membranes fractions. It is concluded that L-CPT1 is not targeted to the ER membrane and that malonyl-CoA CAT in microsomal fractions is L-CPT1 that is derived from mitochondria, possibly from membrane contact sites. PMID:12401113

  3. The effects of proline, carnitine on the viability of sperm stored at 5oC (chilled semen

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    Polmer Situmorang

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to evaluate the addition of proline, carnitine in Tris-extender on the viability of bull sperm following storage at 5oC. Semen was collected by means of artificial vagina (AV, diluted in Tris-extender containing 5% V/V egg yolk (EY and 4% V/V glycerol to get a final concentration of 50 million sperms/ml. Diluted semen cooled to 5oC for 45 minute and stored at those temperature for 1, 3, 10, and 13 days. In the first activity the addition of 15, 30 and 60 mM carnitine in Tris-extender while in the second activity the inclusion of 15, 30, and 60 mM proline on the viability of sperm was investigated. Addition of carnitine to Tris-extender signifinatly increase (P<0.05 the viability of sperm after storage for more than 3 days. At 3 days of storage, the mean %M and %L were 27.3, 38.8, 33.5, 53.0, 31.8, 47.0, and 30.5, 46.8 for control 15, 30, and 60 mM carnitine respectively. The similar results was obtained for 7 days of storage where the mean %M and %L for control (12.5 and 27.3 was significantly lower (P<0.05 than those 15, 30, and 60 mM carnitine (15.0, 33.5, 18.8, 36.5, 17.5, 36.3. The superiority of carnitine was maintained for 10 days of storage, where the mean %L were 23.5, 28.8, 31.5, and 30.3 for control; 15; 30; and 60 mM respectively. There was no any significant within concentration of carnitine tested (15 to 60 mM.The condition of apical ridge was not significantly affected by carnitine. In the second activity, inclusion of proline to Trisextender statistically (P<0.05 improved the viability of sperm after storage for 7 and 13 days. After 7 days of storage the mean %M and %L were 31.4, 36.4, 38.8, 40.4, 36.6, 42.7, and 34.8, 43.3 for control; 15, 30, and 60 mM proline respectively. The significant effects of proline was remain for 13 days of storage where the mean %M and % L were 24.6, 32.9, 28.6, 37.5, 29.1, 39.8, and 30.1, 37.3 for control; 15, 30, and 60 mM proline respectively. There was no significant

  4. Protective Role of L- Carnitine and Zinc against γ-Radiation induced Cardiac and testicular Disorders in Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-Carnitine is a dipeptide amino acid necessary for fat metabolism, it provides energy by transporting long-chain fatty acids to mitochondria to act as a fuel and it is considered a powerful antioxidant. In addition, zinc is an essential mineral which helps to increase the secretion of male sex hormones and raises the sperm count, so its combination with L-carnitine is useful for the fertility process. The present study aims to evaluate the potency of L-carnitine and zinc as radio- protective and curative agent pre and after exposure to γ-radiation through biochemical, histological, morphological abnormalities of sperms and DNA damage in the sperms induced by γ-irradiation by comet assay. Animals received L-carnitine (LC) and zinc (Zn) orally at the dose 9.45 mg/100 gm body wt./day for successive 20 days and then exposed to whole body gamma radiation at the dose 4 Gy (1 Gy for 4 days, day after day) on the 7th day from treatment with antioxidant. Histological examinations of heart and testis tissues showed that administration of LC and Zn have attenuated radiation induced damage and improved tissues architecture. Moreover, the observed amelioration in the tissues was accompanied by a remarkable decrease of their lipid peroxide levels (malondialdehyde (MDA)), together with an increase in glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Hormonal determinations of serum testosterone (T), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) which carried out for fertility assessment showed that whole body γ-irradiation of rats induced significant decrease in serum testosterone while FSH and LH were significantly increased as compared with control group. On the other hand, irradiation caused significant elevation in the total number of abnormal head, and / or tail of sperms in comparison to the control rats. The comet assay showed that exposure to γ-radiation induced DNA damage of sperms (tail moment values).

  5. Effects of L-Carnitine and Cinnamon Extract Treatment on Lens Crystallins of Rats Fed High Fructose Diet

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    Mohamed H. Mahfouz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Rats fed high dietary fructose are documented to form an acquired model of insulin resistance; the present study aims to investigate possible changes in lens crystallins of rats fed high fructose diet and the effects of administration of each exogenous L-Carnitine (CA and Cinnamon Extract (CE on protein glycation, oxidative stress and redox homeostasis in this rat model. Approach: A total number of 60 male Wister rats of body weight 120-160 g were divided into 4 groups of 15 rats each. Group 1 received control diet, while groups 2, 3 and 4: rats received high fructose diet (60g/100 g diet. After 2 weeks from fructose feeding, animals of group 3 were treated with L-carnitine (300 mg g-1 body weight/day i.p., while animals of group 4 were treated with cinnamon extract (0.5 mL/rat/day orally. At the end of experimental period (30 days, serum levels of glucose and insulin were determined. Lenses of each animal were dissected; molecular weights of crystalline, oxidative stress markers, early glycation of lens proteins and carbonyl group were assayed. Results: A significant decline in antioxidants and increase in lipid peroxidation products, protein oxidation and protein glycation were observed in lens samples obtained from fructose-fed rats. Administration of each CA and CE to fructose-fed rats significantly attenuated oxidative damage and protein glycation and returned levels of antioxidants to near those in control group. Chromatographic analysis of lens crystalline of rats fed high fructose diet showed diffused peaks, indicating crystalline aggregation. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that dietary fructose disturbs lens integrity and administration of L-carnitine or cinnamon extract may safeguard the lens by minimizing the protein aggregation, preventing glycation and oxidative stress in animals fed high fructose diet. L-carnitine has more potent effects than CE in this animal model.

  6. Contributions of Phosphorylation to Regulation of OCTN2 Uptake of Carnitine are Minimal in BeWo Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rytting, Erik; Audus, Kenneth L.

    2007-01-01

    Physiological functions of organic cation transporters (OCTs) in the placenta include transporting essential nutrients from the maternal to fetal circulations. OCTN2 transports carnitine with high affinity, and the transport of several drugs has also been shown to be mediated by this transporter. In this work, the role of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanisms in regulating OCTN2 was investigated by observing the effects of various activators and inhibitors of kinases and phosphatas...

  7. Effect of Electromagnetic Field (Wi-Fi on the Pancreas: Role of Selenium and L-Carnitine

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    Ahmet Koyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Effects of electromagnetic fields (Wi-Fi on the pancreatic tissue of rats and the role of selenium and L-carnitine were investigated. Material and Method: Thirty male Wistar Albino rats were used in this study. The rats were divided randomly into 5 groups. Group I: EMR (n = 6: 28 days, 60 min / day was exposed to 2.45 GHz EMR. Group II: EMR + Selenium (n = 6: 28 days, 60 min / day was exposed to 2.45 GHz EMR and selenium 1.5 mg / kg / alternate day by intraperitoneal (i.p. Group III EMR + L-carnitine (n = 6: 28 days, 60 min / day were exposed to 2.45 GHz EMR and L-carnitine 100 mg / kg / day by i.p. Group IV: Sham control (n = 6: 28 days 60 min / day in the experimental setup without EMR and saline 0.5 ml / day of i.p. was administered. Group V: Cage control (n = 6: 28 days without any application were kept under the same environmental conditions. At the end of the experiment the rats’ blood samples were collected for amylase and lipase measurement and pancreas tissue was evaluated by histopathologically. Results: Amylase (p = 0.007 and lipase (p = 0.004 levels were found statistically significant between the groups. These parameters were increased related to EMR in Group I and amylase and lipase were significantly decreased in Group II and III. Histopathological evaluation; serous glands degeneration of the pancreas tissue (p = 0.009 and vascular congestion (p = 0.009 increased in the group I. These parameters were significantly decreased in group II and III. Discussions: EMR caused pancreatic tissue damage and selenium has been demonstrated protective effect more than L-carnitine.

  8. Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Su; Zhu, Guangjing; Gao, Xuefei; Wu, Donghai; Carrasco, Patricia; Casals, Núria; Hegardt, Fausto G; Moran, Timothy H.; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2011-01-01

    Brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1c) is implicated in CNS control of food intake. In this article, we explore the role of hypothalamic CPT-1c in leptin's anorexigenic actions. We first show that adenoviral overexpression of CPT-1c in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of rats increases food intake and concomitantly up-regulates orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Bsx (a transcription factor of NPY). Then, we demonstrate that this overexpression antagonizes the anorectic actions ...

  9. Selective Reversible Inhibition of Liver Carnitine Palmitoyl-Transferase 1 by Teglicar Reduces Gluconeogenesis and Improves Glucose Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Conti, Roberto; Mannucci, Edoardo; Pessotto, Pompeo; Tassoni, Emanuela; Carminati, Paolo; Giannessi, Fabio; Arduini, Arduino

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We have developed a new antihyperglycemic agent (teglicar) through the selective and reversible inhibition of the liver isoform of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1 (L-CPT1). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glucose production was investigated in isolated hepatocytes and during pancreatic clamps in healthy rats. Chronic treatments on C57BL/6J, db/db, high-fat fed mice, and rats were performed to understand glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. RESULTS In isolated hepatocytes, tegli...

  10. Long-Term Increased Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1A Expression in Ventromedial Hypotalamus Causes Hyperphagia and Alters the Hypothalamic Lipidomic Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Mera Nanín, Paula; Mir, Joan Francesc; Fabriàs Domingo, Gemma; Casas Brugulat, Josefina; Costa, Ana S.H.; Malandrino, Maria Ida; Fernández López, José Antonio; Remesar Betlloch, Xavier; Gao, Su; Chohnan, Shigeru; Rodríguez-Peña, Maria Sol; Petry, Harald; Asins Muñoz, Guillermina; García Hegardt, Fausto; Herrero Rodríguez, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) has emerged as a crucial pathway in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) 1A is the rate-limiting enzyme in mitochondrial fatty acid boxidation and it has been proposed as a crucial mediator of fasting and ghrelin orexigenic signalling. However, the relationship between changes in CPT1A activity and the intracellular downstream effectors in the VMH that contribute to appetite modulation is...

  11. Malonyl coenzyme A and the regulation of functional carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity and fat oxidation in human skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    RASMUSSEN, BLAKE B.; Holmbäck, Ulf C.; Volpi, Elena; Morio-Liondore, Beatrice; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Robert R. Wolfe

    2002-01-01

    Physiological hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia reduces fat oxidation in skeletal muscle. The mechanism responsible for this decrease in fat oxidation in human muscle is not known and may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that the transfer of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into the mitochondria via carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) is inhibited by increased malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) (a known potent inhibitor of CPT-1) in human muscle during h...

  12. Long-Term Increased Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1A Expression in Ventromedial Hypotalamus Causes Hyperphagia and Alters the Hypothalamic Lipidomic Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Mera, Paula; Mir, Joan Francesc; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Costa, Ana S.H.; Malandrino, Maria Ida; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier; Gao, Su; Chohnan, Shigeru; Rodríguez-Peña, Maria Sol; Petry, Harald; Asins, Guillermina; Hegardt, Fausto G; Herrero, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) has emerged as a crucial pathway in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) 1A is the rate-limiting enzyme in mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation and it has been proposed as a crucial mediator of fasting and ghrelin orexigenic signalling. However, the relationship between changes in CPT1A activity and the intracellular downstream effectors in the VMH that contribute to appetite modulation i...

  13. Automated chemoenzymatic synthesis of no-carrier-added [carbonyl-11C]propionyl L-carnitine for pharmacokinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is under development as a therapeutic for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure. Three methods were examined for labelling PLC in its propionyl group with positron-emitting carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.3 min), one chemical and two chemoenzymatic. The former was based on the preparation of [11C]propionyl chloride as labelling agent via 11C-carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with cyclotron-produced [11C]carbon dioxide and subsequent chlorination. Reaction of carrier-added [11C]propionyl chloride with L-carnitine in trifluoroacetic acid gave [11C]PLC in 12% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from cyclotron-produced [11C]carbon dioxide. However, the radiosynthesis was unsuccessful at the no-carrier added (NCA) level of specific radioactivity. [11C]Propionate, as a radioactive precursor for chemoenzymatic routes, was prepared via carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with [11C]carbon dioxide and hydrolysis. NCA [11C]PLC was prepared in 68 min in 14% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from [11C]propionate via sequential conversions catalysed by acetate kinase, phosphotransacetylase and carnitine acetyltransferase. A superior chemoenzymatic synthesis of NCA [11C]PLC was developed, based on the use of a novel supported Grignard reagent for the synthesis of [11C]propionate and conversions by S-acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. This gave an overall radiochemical yield of 30-48% (decay-corrected). This synthesis was automated for radiation safety and provides pure NCA [11C]PLC in high radioactivities ready for intravenous administration within 25 min from radionuclide production. The [11C]PLC is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies in human subjects with PET and the elucidation of the fate of the propionyl group of PLC in vivo. (Author)

  14. L-carnitine enhances axonal plasticity and improves white-matter lesions after chronic hypoperfusion in rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ueno, Yuji; Koike, Masato; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Hideki; Hira, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Ryota; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causes white-matter lesions (WMLs) with oxidative stress and cognitive impairment. However, the biologic mechanisms that regulate axonal plasticity under chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have not been fully investigated. Here, we investigated whether L-carnitine, an antioxidant agent, enhances axonal plasticity and oligodendrocyte expression, and explored the signaling pathways that mediate axonal plasticity in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model. Adult male Wistar ...

  15. Role of Protective Effect of L-Carnitine against Acute Acetaminophen Induced Hepatic Toxicity in Adult Albino Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zeinab M. Gebaly* and Gamal M. Aboul Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic and antipyretic is known to cause hepatic injury in humans and experimental animals when administered in high doses. It was reported that toxic effects of acetaminophen are due to oxidative reactions that take place during its metabolism. L-carnitine is a cofactor in the transfer of long-chain fatty acid allowing to the beta-oxidation of fatty acid in the mitochondria. It is a known antioxidant with protective effects against lipid peroxidati...

  16. L-Carnitine, but not coenzyme Q10, enhances the anti-osteoporotic effect of atorvastatin in ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Murad, Hussam A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Statins’ therapy in osteoporosis can aggravate muscle damage. This study was designed to assess which agent, L-carnitine or coenzyme Q10, could enhance the anti-osteoporotic effect of atorvastatin while antagonizing myopathy in ovariectomized rats. Methods: Forty-eight female Sprague Dawley rats were used; forty rats were ovariectomized while eight were sham-operated. Eight weeks post-ovariectomy, rats were divided into ovariectomized-untreated group and four ovariectomized-treated...

  17. Plasma concentration of 3-hydroxyisovaleryl carnitine is an early and sensitive indicator of marginal biotin deficiency in humans1234

    OpenAIRE

    Stratton, Shawna L.; Horvath, Thomas D.; Bogusiewicz, Anna; Matthews, Nell I.; Henrich, Cindy L; Spencer, Horace J.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Mock, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Blood-based indicators of biotin status in humans were shown to be useful tools in several clinical situations, including pregnancy. We previously validated the activity of the biotin-dependent enzyme propionyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (PCC) in lymphocytes as a sensitive and specific blood-based indicator of marginal degrees of biotin deficiency. However, the measurement of PCC activity in population studies presents substantial analytic challenges. 3-Hydroxyisovaleryl carnitine (3H...

  18. Dynamic monitoring of plasma amino acids and carnitine during chemotherapy of patients with alimentary canal malignancies and its clinical value

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    Xiaoyu Wang,1 Jiaqi Wang,2 Zhenghua Wang,1 Qingjun Wang,1 Hua Li1 1Second Ward of Oncology Department, 2Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: The aim of this study was to observe the plasma amino acid and carnitine characteristics in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies during chemotherapy and to identify markers for the early diagnosis and evaluation of a...

  19. Dynamic monitoring of plasma amino acids and carnitine during chemotherapy of patients with alimentary canal malignancies and its clinical value

    OpenAIRE

    Wang XY; Wang JQ; Wang ZH; Wang QJ; Li H.

    2015-01-01

    Xiaoyu Wang,1 Jiaqi Wang,2 Zhenghua Wang,1 Qingjun Wang,1 Hua Li1 1Second Ward of Oncology Department, 2Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: The aim of this study was to observe the plasma amino acid and carnitine characteristics in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies during chemotherapy and to identify markers for the early diagnosis and evaluation of adver...

  20. C26:0-Carnitine Is a New Biomarker for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy in Mice and Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Beek, Malu-Clair; Dijkstra, Inge M. E.; van Lenthe, Henk; Ofman, Rob; Goldhaber-Pasillas, Dalia; Schauer, Nicolas; Schackmann, Martin; Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Kulik, Wim; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by mutations in ABCD1 and characterized by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) accumulation. Virtually all males develop progressive myelopathy (AMN). A subset of patients, however, develops a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease (cerebral ALD). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for cerebral ALD provided the procedure is performed in an early stage of the disease. Unfortunately, this narrow therapeutic window is often missed. Therefore, an increasing number of newborn screening programs are including ALD. To identify new biomarkers for ALD, we developed an Abcd1 knockout mouse with enhanced VLCFA synthesis either ubiquitous or restricted to oligodendrocytes. Biochemical analysis revealed VLCFA accumulation in different lipid classes and acylcarnitines. Both C26:0-lysoPC and C26:0-carnitine were highly elevated in brain, spinal cord, but also in bloodspots. We extended the analysis to patients and confirmed that C26:0-carnitine is also elevated in bloodspots from ALD patients. We anticipate that validation of C26:0-carnitine for the diagnosis of ALD in newborn bloodspots may lead to a faster inclusion of ALD in newborn screening programs in countries that already screen for other inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:27124591

  1. Development of a sensitive method for a structural elucidation of acyl carnitines by means of GC-MS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the present work was to develop a sensitive and reliable method to characterize the urinary acyl carnitines, to further establish it as routine procedure in hospitals, especially in Pedriatic Departments. The determination of the excreted acyl carnitines allows drawing conclusions on errors or deviations in the cellular metabolism. Applying the volatile lactone derivatives of the acyl carnitines various methods of GC/MS technique are compared. With the examined lactones under concern EI mass spectra furnish just a first incomplete information. Frequently the molecular peaks are not sufficiently intense. Yet by means of the retention times, the signals m/z 84, 85 and 144 as ion traces, as well as the characteristic fragmentation helpful information is provided. Concerning the +CI/NH3 - mass spectra the protonated molecular ions (M + H)+ and the usually very intense (M + NH4)+ - ions unambiguously render structural assignments. In the case of the - CI/NH3 - mass spectra the (M-1) and (M-85) ions allow definitive assignments due to their lesser fragmentation tendency. Each of the analytical outcoming can be regarded as leading contribution in helpfully establishing the current method in every clinical hospital. (author)

  2. Effects of perfluorodecanoic(PFDA) and perfluorooctanoic (PFOA) acids on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) activity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PFDA has been hypothesized to cause a diversion of fatty acids from oxidation toward esterification in rat liver. Normal regulation of this partitioning is exerted by CPT, an enzyme inhibited by several peroxisome proliferators. Effects of the peroxisome proliferators PFDA and PFOA on hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and CPT activity were examined. PFDA or PFOA added to isolated rat liver mitochondria in concentrations of 0.2, 2, 20 and 200 μg per mg mitochondrial protein had no effect on CPT activity nor on mitochondrial oxidation of [1-14C] palmitoyl-CoA or [1-14C] palmitoyl-carnitine (quantitated by 14CO2 plus acid soluble 14C production). Three days after rats were treated with PFDA or PFOA (37.5 or 150 μmol/kg, ip) or vehicle, liver mitochondria were isolated. Mitochondrial oxidation of [1-14C] palmitoyl-CoA or [1-14C]palmitoyl-carnitine was unaffected by PFDA and PFOA. CPT activity and inhibition of CPT activity by malonyl-CoA was also unaffected by PFDA and PFOA. Therefore, PFDA and PFOA did not have a major inhibitory effect on hepatic mitochondrial oxidation of palmitoyl-CoA or palmitoyl-carnitine, nor did they interfere with hepatic CPT activity either in vitro or in vivo

  3. Role of L-carnitine in Ameliorating the Cadmium Chloride and/or Irradiation-Induced Testicular Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of oxidative stress in chronic administration of CdCl2 and/or irradiation toxicity and its prevention by pretreatment with L-carnitine was investigated. Adult male rats were administered with CdCl2 (3 mg/kg S.C. three times a week for three weeks) and /or irradiated at (2 Gy) dose level of gamma radiation. CdCl2 administration and/or irradiation induced cellular damage was indicated by significant decrease in lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme (LDH-X), glutathione level (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activity (GSH-PX) as well as significant increase in malonaldehyde (MDA) in testicular tissues. Administration of L-carnitine (200 mg/kg I.P.) 1 hr before CdCl2 and/or irradiation, ameliorated the decrease in LDH-X, GSH and GSH-PX and the increase in MDA induced by CdCl2 and/or irradiation indicating the prophylactic action of L-carnitine on CdCl2 and /or irradiation toxicity. Various studies have indicated that cadmium is a potent heavy metal carcinogen in experimental animals (Poirier et al., 1983 and Waalkes et al..,1988) and is possibly carcinogenic in human populations exposed either occupationally or environmentally (Bako et al., 1982). Target sites for cadmium carcinogenesis in rodents have been shown to include testes after parenteral exposure (Poirier et al., 1983 and Waalkes et al., 1988) and lung after chronic inhalation (Takenaka et al., 1983)

  4. Impact of L-carnitine on plasma lipoprotein(a) concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Maria-Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Toth, Peter P; Jones, Steven R; Muntner, Paul; Blaha, Michael J; Andrica, Florina; Martin, Seth S; Borza, Claudia; Lip, Gregory Y H; Ray, Kausik K; Rysz, Jacek; Hazen, Stanley L; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of L-carnitine on plasma Lp(a) concentrations through systematic review and meta-analysis of available RCTs. The literature search included selected databases up to 31(st) January 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I(2) statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The meta-analysis showed a significant reduction of Lp(a) levels following L-carnitine supplementation (WMD: -8.82 mg/dL, 95% CI: -10.09, -7.55, p < 0.001). When the studies were categorized according to the route of administration, a significant reduction in plasma Lp(a) concentration was observed with oral (WMD: -9.00 mg/dL, 95% CI: -10.29, -7.72, p < 0.001) but not intravenous L-carnitine (WMD: -2.91 mg/dL, 95% CI: -10.22, 4.41, p = 0.436). The results of the meta-regression analysis showed that the pooled estimate is independent of L-carnitine dose (slope: -0.30; 95% CI: -4.19, 3.59; p = 0.878) and duration of therapy (slope: 0.18; 95% CI: -0.22, 0.59; p = 0.374). In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests a significant Lp(a) lowering by oral L-carnitine supplementation. Taking into account the limited number of available Lp(a)-targeted drugs, L-carnitine might be an effective alternative to effectively reduce Lp(a). Prospective outcome trials will be required to fully elucidate the clinical value and safety of oral L-carnitine supplementation. PMID:26754058

  5. Effects of oral L-carnitine administration in narcolepsy patients: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over and placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Miyagawa

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and rapid eye movement (REM sleep abnormalities. A genome-wide association study (GWAS identified a novel narcolepsy-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, which is located adjacent to the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B gene encoding an enzyme involved in β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. The mRNA expression levels of CPT1B were associated with this SNP. In addition, we recently reported that acylcarnitine levels were abnormally low in narcolepsy patients. To assess the efficacy of oral L-carnitine for the treatment of narcolepsy, we performed a clinical trial administering L-carnitine (510 mg/day to patients with the disease. The study design was a randomized, double-blind, cross-over and placebo-controlled trial. Thirty narcolepsy patients were enrolled in our study. Two patients were withdrawn and 28 patients were included in the statistical analysis (15 males and 13 females, all with HLA-DQB1*06:02. L-carnitine treatment significantly improved the total time for dozing off during the daytime, calculated from the sleep logs, compared with that of placebo-treated periods. L-carnitine efficiently increased serum acylcarnitine levels, and reduced serum triglycerides concentration. Differences in the Japanese version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 vitality and mental health subscales did not reach statistical significance between L-carnitine and placebo. This study suggests that oral L-carnitine can be effective in reducing excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN UMIN000003760.

  6. Advance of research of detection methods forL-carnitine%左旋肉碱检测方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马兴; 高云; 崔颖; 张海滨; 高健会

    2015-01-01

    左旋肉碱是一种类维生素的氨基酸衍生物,广泛存在于生物体内,在脂肪酸代谢中起重要作用。近年来,左旋肉碱越来越广泛地应用于保健食品、减肥药、婴幼儿奶粉和运动员补充剂中,因此,对其进行准确定量检测面临更高的技术要求。目前,研究人员对左旋肉碱进行了有关生物化学、药代动力学及毒理学等方面的广泛研究,与此同时开发了大量用于检测食品、营养补充剂和配方药物中左旋肉碱的方法。本文简要介绍了左旋肉碱的性质、生理功能和应用,分类总结了已开发的左旋肉碱检测方法,展望了左旋肉碱检测方法的未来发展方向。%ABSTRACT:L-carnitine is a vitamin-like amino acid derivative, which is widely existed in organisms. L-carnitine plays an important role in fatty acids metabolism. In recent years,L-carnitine has been increasingly used in health foods, diet pills, infant formula and supplement for athletes. Therefore the accurate quantitative detection methods forL-carnitine are needed. So far,L-carnitine has been investigated in biochemical, pharmacokinetic and toxico-kinetic studies and thus many detection methods has been developed for the determination ofL-carnitine in foods, dietary supplements and pharmaceutical formulations. This article briefly introduced the properties, physiological functions and applications ofL-carnitine, classified and summarized the developed detection methods forL-carnitine, and discussed the future development ofL-carnitine detection methods.

  7. Protective effect of R. glutinosa oligosaccharides against high l-carnitine diet-induced endothelial dysfunction and hepatic injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Zhang, Ruijun; Guo, Jianjun; Shao, Hongjun; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-04-01

    Current research for the first time demonstrated that endothelial dysfunction and hepatic injury in mice were induced by ingestion of 3% l-carnitine water for consecutive 10 weeks. Interestingly, oral administration of dietary raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) at 400 and 800mg/kgbw significantly reduced the impact of l-carnitine on the serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoproteins, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate amino-transferase, NO, endothelin-1 and C-reactive protein. Furthermore, l-carnitine-induced elevation of hepatic lipid contents and malonaldehyde formation, and the inhibition of SOD and GSH-Px activities in mice were markedly ameliorated by oral administration of RFOs. Moreover, histopathology of H&E and Oil Red O staining of the liver also confirmed the protective effect of RFOs against hepatic steatosis and oxidative injury induced by high l-carnitine diet in mice. These findings for the first time suggest that RFOs may alleviate endothelial dysfunction and liver injury from ingestion of high l-carnitine diet. PMID:26769087

  8. Synthesis, purification, and time-dependent disposition studies of 9- or 10-mono-iodostearic acid and 9- and 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential use of radiolabeled 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine as a perfusion and metabolic imaging agent for the heart. Radiochemical purity was achieved and determined by the use of silica gel and/or anion exchange resin chromatography. Radiochemical yields of 45-63 and 4% were obtained for the fatty acid and carnitine ester, respectively. Male albino mice were sacrificed at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 50 minutes post-injection with either 125I 9- or 10-mono-iodostearic acid or 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl (-) carnitine. The lungs, liver heart, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, stomach, thyroid, blood, fat, and skeletal muscle tissue were excised and assayed for levels of radioactivity in a NaI crystal well counter. The very low target-to-nontarget ratios obtained with 125I 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine in mice strongly suggest that radioiodinated 9- or 10-mono-iodostearyl carnitine is not suitable for use as a myocardial imaging agent. However, radioiodinated 9- or 10-mono-iodostearic acid showed promise as a myocardial imaging agent and may warrant further investigation

  9. The disruption of L-carnitine metabolism by aluminum toxicity and oxidative stress promotes dyslipidemia in human astrocytic and hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemire, Joseph; Mailloux, Ryan; Darwich, Rami; Auger, Christopher; Appanna, Vasu D

    2011-06-24

    L-Carnitine is a critical metabolite indispensable for the metabolism of lipids as it facilitates fatty acid transport into the mitochondrion where β-oxidation occurs. Human astrocytes (CCF-STTG1 cells) and hepatocytes (HepG2 cells) exposed to aluminum (Al) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), were characterized with lower levels of L-carnitine, diminished β-oxidation, and increased lipid accumulation compared to the controls. γ-Butyrobetainealdehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) and butyrobetaine dioxygenase (BBDOX), two key enzymes mediating the biogenesis of L-carnitine, were sharply reduced during Al and H₂O₂ challenge. Exposure of the Al and H₂O₂-treated cells to α-ketoglutarate (KG), led to the recovery of L-carnitine production with the concomitant reduction in ROS levels. It appears that the channeling of KG to combat oxidative stress results in decreased L-carnitine synthesis, an event that contributes to the dyslipidemia observed during Al and H₂O₂ insults in these mammalian cells. Hence, KG may help alleviate pathological conditions induced by oxidative stress. PMID:21439360

  10. Effect of Different Levels of L-Carnitine on the Productive Performance, Egg Quality, Blood Parameters and Egg Yolk Cholesterol in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazemi-Fard M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of L-carnitine on productive performance, egg quality and blood parameters in laying hens. Forty-eight Hy-Line W-36 egg Layers were weighed at 90 weeks of age and randomly allocated into 16 cages (three hens per cage. Four dietary treatments were prepared by supplementing L-carnitine (0, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg of diet to corn-soybean meal diet and offered ad libitum to hens. After two weeks of acclimatization, the eggs were weighed daily and feed intake as well as egg quality traits were measured biweekly. At the end of the experiment, two hens from each cage were selected to determine blood parameters and two eggs from each replicate were collected for cholesterol analysis. Results showed that L-carnitine supplementation at 100 and 150 mg/kg significantly increased egg production and egg mass, but decreased yolk cholesterol content. Laying hens receiving diet containing 50 mg/kg L-carnitine had significantly higher Hough unit, but lower progesterone than the hens fed control diet (P < 0.05. The results of this study showed that supplementing hens' diet with L-carnitine had beneficial effects on productive performance and decreased yolk cholesterol concentration; so it can be used as an effective supplement in the diet of laying hens.

  11. Modulation of synergistic cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin and radiation therapy by propionyl l-carnitine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy have represented a major advance in the therapeutic management of cancer therapy. However, the combination of Doxorubicin (DOX) and irradiation (IRR) may be more cardiotoxic than either agent. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a naturally occurring derivative of L-carnitine that has been considered in the treatment of many forms of cardiomyopathies. In this study, the possible mechanism (S) whereby PLC couls protect against DOX and/or IRR-induced cardiomyopathy were carried out. Administration of DOX as a single dose (5 mg/Kg) or cumulative dose (15 and 25 mg/kg divided into 3 and 5 equal doses 5 mg/kg each, every other day) resulted in significant and dose dependent increase in serum cardiac enzymes (CPK, GOT and LDH) in rat, MDA level and nitric oxide in heart tissue and dose dependent decrease in the antioxidant enzymes (SOD) and GSHPx). Whole body irradiation (2 Gy) induced similar effect to DOX. Combination of DOX and IRR resulted in marked elevation in cardiac enzymes and MDA level and remarkable decrease in the antioxidant enzymes . PLC (250 mg/kg, for 9 days) before DOX and /or IRR induced significant increase in the activity of SOD and GSHPx and significantly decreased the level of MDA and nitric oxide in rat cardiac tissue and the activity of cardiac enzymes in rat serum. Also, DOX-induced dose dependent increase in AC/FC ratio above the normal value (0.4) in serum and heart tissue. Combination of DOX and IRR increased the ratio. Administration of PLC to DOX and/or IRR resulted in partial reversal of DOX induced increase in the AC/FC ratio except for the highest cumulative dose (25 mg/kg) in serum. Dox induced dose-dependent increase in DOX concentration in serum and heart tissue. Administration of PLC decreased DOX concentration in heart with an increase in DOX concentration in serum. IRR did not alter DOX concentration. Worth mentioning os that PLC had no effect on the antitumor activity of DOX and/ or IRR in solid

  12. Assessment of pharmacokinetic interaction between piracetam and l-carnitine in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Gustavo D; Zaffalon, Gabriela Traldi; Silveira, Antonio Sérgio; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Lopes, Anibal Gil; de Almeida Magalhães, José Cássio; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    A rapid, sensitive and specific method for quantifying piracetam in human plasma using Piracetam d-8 as the internal standard (IS) is described. The analyte and the IS were extracted from plasma by one-step precipitation of protein using an acetonitrile (100%). The extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The method had a chromatographic run time of 3.8 min and a linear calibration curve over the range 0.5-50 µg/mL (r > 0.99). This LC-MS-MS procedure was used to assess the bioavailability of two piracetam formulations: piracetam + l-carnitine (Piracar®; 270/330 mg tablet) and piracetam (Nootropil®; 800 mg tablet) in healthy volunteers of both sexes. The geometric means with corresponding 90% confidence interval (CI) for test/reference percentage ratios were 88.49% (90% CI = 81.19 - 96.46) for peak concentration/dose and 102.55% (90% CI = 100.62 - 104.51) for AUCinf /dose. The limit of quantitation of 0.5 µg/mL is well suited for pharmacokinetic studies in healthy volunteers. It was concluded that piracetam (Piracar®; 270/330 mg tablet) has a bioavailability equivalent to the piracetam (Nootropil®; 800 mg tablet) formulation with regard to both the rate and the extent of absorption. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26248695

  13. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity alleviates insulin resistance in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Wendy; Ussher, John R; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Raubenheimer, Monique; Lam, Victoria H M; Wagg, Cory S; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2013-03-01

    Impaired skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation has been suggested to contribute to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, increasing muscle fatty acid oxidation may cause a reciprocal decrease in glucose oxidation, which might impair insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. We therefore investigated what effect inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake has on whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in obese insulin-resistant mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (60% calories from fat) for 12 weeks to develop insulin resistance. Subsequent treatment of mice for 4 weeks with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibitor, oxfenicine (150 mg/kg i.p. daily), resulted in improved whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Exercise capacity was increased in oxfenicine-treated mice, which was accompanied by an increased respiratory exchange ratio. In the gastrocnemius muscle, oxfenicine increased pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, membrane GLUT4 content, and insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Intramyocellular levels of lipid intermediates, including ceramide, long-chain acyl CoA, and diacylglycerol, were also decreased. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice. This is associated with increased carbohydrate utilization and improved insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle, suggestive of an operating Randle Cycle in muscle. PMID:23139350

  14. An environment-dependent structural switch underlies the regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jampani N; Warren, Gemma Z L; Estolt-Povedano, Sara; Zammit, Victor A; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2011-12-01

    The enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), which is anchored in the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), controls the rate-limiting step in fatty acid β-oxidation in mammalian tissues. It is inhibited by malonyl-CoA, the first intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, and it responds to OMM curvature and lipid characteristics, which reflect long term nutrient/hormone availability. Here, we show that the N-terminal regulatory domain (N) of CPT1A can adopt two complex amphiphilic structural states, termed Nα and Nβ, that interchange in a switch-like manner in response to offered binding surface curvature. Structure-based site-directed mutageneses of native CPT1A suggest Nα to be inhibitory and Nβ to be noninhibitory, with the relative Nα/Nβ ratio setting the prevalent malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the enzyme. Based on the amphiphilic nature of N and molecular modeling, we propose malonyl-CoA sensitivity to be coupled to the properties of the OMM by Nα-OMM associations that alter the Nα/Nβ ratio. For enzymes residing at the membrane-water interface, this constitutes an integrative regulatory mechanism of exceptional sophistication. PMID:21990363

  15. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L; Hill, Richard P; Jones, Russell G; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O; Thompson, Craig B; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W

    2011-05-15

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  16. Expression of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II genes during development in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumelin, S; Esser, V; Charvy, D; Kolodziej, M; Zammit, V A; McGarry, D; Girard, J; Pegorier, J P

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme activity and the expression (protein and mRNA concentrations) of genes encoding for hepatic carnitine palmitoyl-transferases (CPT) I and II were studied during neonatal development, in response to nutritional state at weaning and during the fed-starved transition in adult rats. The activity, the protein concentration and the level of mRNA encoding CPT I are low in foetal-rat liver and increase 5-fold during the first day of extra-uterine life. The activity and gene expression of CPT I are high during the entire suckling period, in the liver of 30-day-old rats weaned at 20 days on to a high-fat diet and in the liver of 48 h-starved adult rats. The activity and CPT I gene expression are markedly decreased in the liver of rats weaned on to a high-carbohydrate diet. By contrast, the activity, the protein concentration and the level of mRNA encoding CPT II are already high in the liver of term foetuses and remain at this level throughout the suckling period, irrespective of the nutritional state of the animals either at weaning or in the adult. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8002965

  17. An Environment-dependent Structural Switch Underlies the Regulation of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1A*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jampani N.; Warren, Gemma Z. L.; Estolt-Povedano, Sara; Zammit, Victor A.; Ulmer, Tobias S.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), which is anchored in the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), controls the rate-limiting step in fatty acid β-oxidation in mammalian tissues. It is inhibited by malonyl-CoA, the first intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, and it responds to OMM curvature and lipid characteristics, which reflect long term nutrient/hormone availability. Here, we show that the N-terminal regulatory domain (N) of CPT1A can adopt two complex amphiphilic structural states, termed Nα and Nβ, that interchange in a switch-like manner in response to offered binding surface curvature. Structure-based site-directed mutageneses of native CPT1A suggest Nα to be inhibitory and Nβ to be noninhibitory, with the relative Nα/Nβ ratio setting the prevalent malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the enzyme. Based on the amphiphilic nature of N and molecular modeling, we propose malonyl-CoA sensitivity to be coupled to the properties of the OMM by Nα-OMM associations that alter the Nα/Nβ ratio. For enzymes residing at the membrane-water interface, this constitutes an integrative regulatory mechanism of exceptional sophistication. PMID:21990363

  18. Structural characterization of the regulatory domain of brain carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Soma; Situ, Alan J; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2014-04-01

    Neurons contain a mammalian-specific isoform of the enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1C) that couples malonyl-CoA to ceramide levels thereby contributing to systemic energy homeostasis and feeding behavior. In contrast to CPT1A, which controls the rate-limiting step of long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation in all tissues, the biochemical context and regulatory mechanism of CPT1C are unknown. CPT1 enzymes are comprised of an N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain (CD) that are separated by two transmembrane helices. In CPT1A, the regulatory domain, termed N, adopts an inhibitory and non-inhibitory state, Nα and Nβ, respectively, which differ in their association with the CD. To provide insight into the regulatory mechanism of CPT1C, we have determined the structure of its regulatory domain (residues Met1-Phe50) by NMR spectroscopy. In relation to CPT1A, the inhibitory Nα state was found to be structurally homologues whereas the non-inhibitory Nβ state was severely destabilized, suggesting a change in overall regulation. The destabilization of Nβ may contribute to the low catalytic activity of CPT1C relative to CPT1A and makes its association with the CD unlikely. In analogy to the stabilization of Nβ by the CPT1A CD, non-inhibitory interactions of N of CPT1C with another protein may exist. PMID:24037959

  19. Abbreviated half-lives and impaired fuel utilization in carnitine palmitoyltransferase II variant fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Cai, Min; Yao, Dengfu; Xu, Xi; Yang, Rongrong; Li, Yuting; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Kido, Hiroshi; Yao, Dengbing

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is one of the most common causes of fatty acid oxidation metabolism disorders. However, the molecular mechanism between CPT2 gene polymorphisms and metabolic stress has not been fully clarified. We previously reported that a number of patients show a thermal instable phenotype of compound hetero/homozygous variants of CPT II. To understand the mechanism of the metabolic disorder resulting from CPT II deficiency, the present study investigated CPT II variants in patient fibroblasts, [c.1102 G>A (p.V368I)] (heterozygous), [c.1102 G>A (p.V368I)] (homozygous), and [c.1055 T>G (p.F352C)] (heterozygous) + [c.1102 G>A (p.V368I)] (homozygous) compared with fibroblasts from healthy controls. CPT II variants exerted an effect of dominant negative on the homotetrameric proteins that showed thermal instability, reduced residual enzyme activities and a short half-life. Moreover, CPT II variant fibroblasts showed a significant decrease in fatty acid β-oxidation and adenosine triphosphate generation, combined with a reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in cellular apoptosis. Collectively, our data indicate that the CPT II deficiency induces an energy crisis of the fatty acid metabolic pathway. These findings may contribute to the elucidation of the genetic factors involved in metabolic disorder encephalopathy caused by the CPT II deficiency. PMID:25781464

  20. Normal protein content but abnormally inhibited enzyme activity in muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Diana; Zierz, Stephan

    2014-04-15

    The biochemical consequences of the disease causing mutations of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are still enigmatic. Therefore, CPT II was characterized in muscle biopsies of nine patients with genetically proven muscle CPT II deficiency. Total CPT activity (CPT I+CPT II) of patients was not significantly different from that of controls. Remaining activities upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton X-100 were significantly reduced in patients. Immunohistochemically CPT II protein was predominantly expressed in type-I-fibers with the same intensity in patients as in controls. Western blot showed the same CPT II staining intensity ratio in patients and controls. CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations estimated by ELISA were not significantly different in patients and in controls. Citrate synthase activity in patients was significantly increased. Total CPT activity significantly correlated with both CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations in patients and controls. This implies (i) that normal total CPT activity in patients with muscle CPT II deficiency is not due to compensatory increase of CPT I activity and that (ii) the mutant CPT II is enzymatically active. The data further support the notion that in muscle CPT II deficiency enzyme activity and protein content are not reduced, but rather abnormally inhibited when fatty acid metabolism is stressed. PMID:24602495

  1. Metabolomics reveals that carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 is a novel target for oxidative inactivation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoyama, Daiki; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative dysfunction in the metabolism has long been implicated in diverse biological disorders. Although a substantial number of metabolic enzymes are targeted for inactivation by oxidative stress, identifying those targets remains difficult due to a lack of comprehensive observations of the metabolism acting through the stress response. We herein developed a metabolomics strategy using integrative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and observing rapid metabolomic changes in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Among the many metabolite changes detected, the most characteristic metabolites uniquely indicated carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), the critical enzyme for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, to be a target for oxidative inactivation. We showed that the enzymatic activity of CPT1 significantly declined by H2 O2 in several human cells. Interestingly, the inactivation was shown to be a direct effect of H2 O2 in vitro, but substantially occurred when cells were cultured with some reagents that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, our results suggest the generality of CPT1 inhibition under various stress conditions associated with ROS generation, providing an insight into a mechanism for oxidative dysfunction in mitochondrial metabolism. Our metabolome data additionally suggest that certain methyltransferase(s) may be targets of oxidative stress as well. PMID:24118240

  2. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  3. L-Carnitine Modulates Gamma Rays-Induced Biochemical and Physiological Toxicities in Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to investigate the antioxidant and therapeutic efficiency of L-carnitine (LC) before and after gamma irradiation exposure. The study include estimation of haematological parameters such as white blood cells (WBC), thrombocytes (Plt), red blood cells (RBC), haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrite (Htc) levels as well as biochemical estimations. Non-enzymatic parameters in plasma such as malondialdehyde (MDA), as index of lipid peroxidation, glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO), and enzymatic antioxidant parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and catalase (CAT) were estimated. The results obtained from this study demonstrated that gamma irradiation causes decrease in WBC and thrombocytes and did not cause any alternation in RBC, Hb and Htc levels. In addition, radiation exposure significantly increased MDA level and decreased GSH, NO, SOD, GSHPx and CAT levels. LC administration either before or after gamma irradiation caused improvement in the tested parameters, so, it could be concluded that LC has beneficial potential role against gamma rays-induced biochemical and physiological alternation in rat model.

  4. Differentially Expressed Genes in Hirudo medicinalis Ganglia after Acetyl-L-Carnitine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federighi, Giuseppe; Macchi, Monica; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Scuri, Rossana; Brunelli, Marcello; Durante, Mauro; Traina, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance that, when administered at supra-physiological concentration, is neuroprotective. It is involved in membrane stabilization and in enhancement of mitochondrial functions. It is a molecule of considerable interest for its clinical application in various neural disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and painful neuropathies. ALC is known to improve the cognitive capability of aged animals chronically treated with the drug and, recently, it has been reported that it impairs forms of non-associative learning in the leech. In the present study the effects of ALC on gene expression have been analyzed in the leech Hirudo medicinalis. The suppression subtractive hybridisation methodology was used for the generation of subtracted cDNA libraries and the subsequent identification of differentially expressed transcripts in the leech nervous system after ALC treatment. The method detects differentially but also little expressed transcripts of genes whose sequence or identity is still unknown. We report that a single administration of ALC is able to modulate positively the expression of genes coding for functions that reveal a lasting effect of ALC on the invertebrate, and confirm the neuroprotective and neuromodulative role of the substance. In addition an important finding is the modulation of genes of vegetal origin. This might be considered an instance of ectosymbiotic mutualism. PMID:23308261

  5. New molecularly-imprinted polymer for carnitine and its application as ionophore in potentiometric selective membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Joséphine; Moreira, Felismina T C; Almeida, Sofia A A; Sales, M Goreti F

    2014-10-01

    Carnitine (CRT) is a biological metabolite found in urine that contributes in assessingseveral disease conditions, including cancer. Novel quick screening procedures for CRT are therefore fundamental. This work proposes a novel potentiometric device where molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were used as ionophores. The host-tailored sites were imprinted on a polymeric network assembled by radical polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM). Non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) were produced as control by removing the template from the reaction media. The selective membrane was prepared by dispersing MIP or NIP particles in plasticizer and poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and casting this mixture over a solid contact support made of graphite. The composition of the selective membrane was investigated with regard to kind/amount of sensory material (MIP or NIP), and the need for a lipophilic additive. Overall, MIP sensors with additive exhibited the best performance, with near-Nernstian response down to ~1×10(-4)mol L(-1), at pH5, and a detection limit of ~8×10(-5)mol L(-1). Suitable selectivity was found for all membranes, assessed by the matched potential method against some of the most common species in urine (urea, sodium, creatinine, sulfate, fructose and hemoglobin). CRT selective membranes including MIP materials were applied successfully to the potentiometric determination of CRT in urine samples. PMID:25175239

  6. 左旋肉碱的生理功能及应用进展%The Physiological Function and Application of L-carnitine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU You-ya; WANG Xue

    2001-01-01

    L-carnitine is an essential matter of the body as protein, fat and water do. It is also a natual matter exsists in animal body and human body. With the advance of research,L-carnitine has been accepted and used widely. On the basis of consulting lots of reference,the paper summarizes the physiological function and application of L-carnitine.%L-肉碱如同蛋白质、脂肪、水一样,是人体必需的营养物质.随着研究的深入,L-肉碱已被人们广泛接受,并得到普遍应用.在查阅大量文献基础上,综述了L-肉碱的生理功能及应用情况.

  7. Effect of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) on hepatic, heart and skeletal muscle mitochrondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and. beta. -oxidation of fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, L.J.; Brady, P.S.; Gandour, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) is an antileukemic agent and polyamine analog which inhibits S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase. However, MGBG also produces mitochondrial structural damage and inhibition of ..beta..-oxidation. The present experiments were designed to determine if MGBG acts via carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A (CPT-A) inhibition. Liver, heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria were isolated from rats following a 24 h fast. MGBG was competitive with 1-carnitine. The MGBG CPT-A Ki were (mM): liver, 5.0 +/- 0.6 (n = 15); heart, 3.2 +/- 1.2 (n = 3); skeletal muscle, 2.8 +/- 1.0 (n = 3). Lysis of hepatic mitochondria with Triton X-100 yielded a Ki of 4.0 +/- 2.0. Purified hepatic CPT was also sensitive to MGBG inhibition (Ki = 4.5 mM). Spermine and spermidine, which are structurally similar to MGBG, did not inhibit CPT or acid-soluble product formation from 1-(/sup 14/C)-palmitoyl-CoA. MGBG inhibited mitochondrial state 3 oxidation rates of palmitoyl-CoA and palmitoylcarnitine, as well as of glutamate. However, the fatty acid substrates were considerably more sensitive than glutamate to MGBG inhibition. MGBG also increased hepatic mitochondrial aggregation which was reversed by 1-carnitine. Fluorescence polarization, using diphenylhexatriene as a probe, indicated that MGBG increased membrane rigidity in a dose dependent manner. This effect was not reversed by 1-carnitine. The authors conclude that MGBG exhibits competitive competition with 1-carnitine for CPT. However, MGBG also exhibits a number of effects which may be mediated through membrane interaction and which are not necessarily reversed by carnitine.

  8. Effect of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) on hepatic, heart and skeletal muscle mitochrondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and β-oxidation of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) is an antileukemic agent and polyamine analog which inhibits S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase. However, MGBG also produces mitochondrial structural damage and inhibition of β-oxidation. The present experiments were designed to determine if MGBG acts via carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A (CPT-A) inhibition. Liver, heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria were isolated from rats following a 24 h fast. MGBG was competitive with 1-carnitine. The MGBG CPT-A Ki were (mM): liver, 5.0 +/- 0.6 (n = 15); heart, 3.2 +/- 1.2 (n = 3); skeletal muscle, 2.8 +/- 1.0 (n = 3). Lysis of hepatic mitochondria with Triton X-100 yielded a Ki of 4.0 +/- 2.0. Purified hepatic CPT was also sensitive to MGBG inhibition (Ki = 4.5 mM). Spermine and spermidine, which are structurally similar to MGBG, did not inhibit CPT or acid-soluble product formation from 1-[14C]-palmitoyl-CoA. MGBG inhibited mitochondrial state 3 oxidation rates of palmitoyl-CoA and palmitoylcarnitine, as well as of glutamate. However, the fatty acid substrates were considerably more sensitive than glutamate to MGBG inhibition. MGBG also increased hepatic mitochondrial aggregation which was reversed by 1-carnitine. Fluorescence polarization, using diphenylhexatriene as a probe, indicated that MGBG increased membrane rigidity in a dose dependent manner. This effect was not reversed by 1-carnitine. The authors conclude that MGBG exhibits competitive competition with 1-carnitine for CPT. However, MGBG also exhibits a number of effects which may be mediated through membrane interaction and which are not necessarily reversed by carnitine

  9. Normal Levels of Plasma Free Carnitine and Acylcarnitines in Follow-Up Samples from a Presymptomatic Case of Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1 (CPT1) Deficiency Detected Through Newborn Screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Luise; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Wibrand, Flemming; Christensen, Ernst; Søndergaard, Charlotte; Gahrn, Birthe; Hougaard, David Michael; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Gregersen, Niels; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2012-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) 1 A deficiency is a rare disorder of hepatic long-chain fatty acid oxidation. CPT1 deficiency is included in newborn screening programs in a number of countries to allow presymptomatic detection and early treatment of affected patients.We present a case of...... clinical symptoms at the age of 8 months. At that time, a diagnosis of CPT1A deficiency was confirmed by sequence analysis of the CPT1A gene revealing homozygosity for a novel c.167C>T variation in exon 3. Enzyme activity measurements showed a relatively mild enzyme defect with a decreased residual enzyme...

  10. Patients with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency have impaired oxidation of fat during exercise but no effect of L-carnitine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K L; Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Andersen, S P; Olesen, J H; Lund, A M; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear to what extent skeletal muscle is affected in patients with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD). l-Carnitine is commonly used as a supplement in patients with MCADD, although its beneficial effect has not been verified.......It is not clear to what extent skeletal muscle is affected in patients with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD). l-Carnitine is commonly used as a supplement in patients with MCADD, although its beneficial effect has not been verified....

  11. Effect of Different Levels of L-Carnitine on the Productive Performance, Egg Quality, Blood Parameters and Egg Yolk Cholesterol in Laying Hens

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi-Fard M; Yousefi S; Dirandeh E; Rezaei M

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of L-carnitine on productive performance, egg quality and blood parameters in laying hens. Forty-eight Hy-Line W-36 egg Layers were weighed at 90 weeks of age and randomly allocated into 16 cages (three hens per cage). Four dietary treatments were prepared by supplementing L-carnitine (0, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg of diet) to corn-soybean meal diet and offered ad libitum to hens. After two weeks of acclimatization, the e...

  12. Dynamic monitoring of plasma amino acids and carnitine during chemotherapy of patients with alimentary canal malignancies and its clinical value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang XY

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyu Wang,1 Jiaqi Wang,2 Zhenghua Wang,1 Qingjun Wang,1 Hua Li1 1Second Ward of Oncology Department, 2Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: The aim of this study was to observe the plasma amino acid and carnitine characteristics in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies during chemotherapy and to identify markers for the early diagnosis and evaluation of adverse reactions and prognosis of the digestive tract malignant tumor patients.Methods: Blood samples of 30 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal malignancies were collected at four time points: before chemotherapy, the first day after chemotherapy (+1 day, bone marrow depression period (+14 days, and hematopoietic recovery period (+21 days. The plasma amino acids and carnitine from those 30 patients were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. Simultaneously, the levels of 21 amino acids were detected in 30 healthy individuals, who were considered as control. Biochemical indexes were also detected at four time points, adverse reactions were recorded during the chemotherapy process, and patients were followed up for 1 year to observe time to progression (TTP and progression-free survival (PFS.Results: Compared to healthy people in the control group, patients with malignancies showed significantly increased levels of plasma amino acids such as Arg, Asp, Cit, Gly, Orn, Tyr, Val, and carnitine (such as C2. The levels of compounds such as C3, Asn, Leu, Lys, Pip, Pro, C0, C5:1 decreased significantly before chemotherapy. The levels of Cit, Cys, Lys, Pro, Tyr, Val, C0, and C2 decreased significantly on the second day of chemotherapy (+1 day, whereas the level of C3 increased significantly. During myelosuppression (+14 days, the levels of Asp, Cit, Met, and Orn were observed to still decrease significantly, whereas the

  13. Proteinase treatment of intact hepatic mitochondria has differential effects on inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by different inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashfi, K; Cook, G A

    1992-01-01

    Proteolysis of intact mitochondria by Nagarse (subtilisin BPN') and papain resulted in limited loss of activity of the outer-membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase, but much greater loss of sensitivity to inhibition by malonyl-CoA. In contrast with a previous report [Murthy & Pande (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 378-382], we found that trypsin had no effect on malonyl-CoA sensitivity. Even when 80% of activity was destroyed by trypsin, there was no difference in the malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the enzyme remaining. Trypsin caused release of the intermembrane-space enzyme adenylate kinase, indicating loss of integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane, whereas Nagarse and papain caused no release of that enzyme. Citrate synthase was not released by any of the three proteinases, indicating no damage to the mitochondrial inner membrane. When we examined the effects of proteolysis on the inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by a wide variety of inhibitors having different mechanisms of inhibition, we found differential proteolytic effects that were specific for those inhibitors (malonyl-CoA and hydroxyphenylglyoxylate) that have their inhibitory potencies diminished by changes in physiological state. Both of those inhibitors protected carnitine palmitoyltransferase from the effects of proteolysis, but did not inhibit the proteinases directly. Inhibition by two other inhibitors (DL-2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA and N-benzyladriamycin 14-valerate) was not altered by proteinase treatment, even when most of the enzyme activity had been destroyed. Inhibition by glyburide, which is minimally affected by physiological state, was affected only to a slight extent at the highest concentration of trypsin tested. Proteolysis by Nagarse appeared to produce loss of co-operativity in malonyl-CoA inhibition. The effects of proteolysis are discussed and compared with changes in Ki occurring with changing physiological states. PMID:1554374

  14. The Protective Effect of Proponyl-L-Carnitine Against Ultrastructural Alterations in Cardiac Muscle of Irradiated and / or diabetic Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heart dysfunction in chronic diabetes has been observed to be associated with depressed myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase activities. Oxidative stress a factor implicated in the heart injury may contribute towards some of these alterations. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of L-carnitine on gamma radiation and diabetes induced oxidative damage in the heart by investigating alterations in the ultrastructural level. Streptozotocin was intraperitoneally injected (i.p) to rats at a dose of 28 mg/Kg b.wt / day for 2 weeks pre-irradiation. In irradiated groups, animals were exposed to 6.5 Gy whole body gamma radiation. L-carnitine was intraperitoneally injected (i.p) to rats at a dose of 250 mg/Kg b.wt/day for 2 weeks pre-irradiation. Animals were sacrificed on the 7th day after irradiation. The results demonstrated that the whole body exposure of rats to ionizing radiation induce oxidative stress which showed alterations on the ultrastructural level included dis organization with mayofibrillolysis relatively intact z-band (Z), fibrosis, swollen mitochondria, apoptotic nuclei and thickened walls of capillaries. In diabetic rats cardio muscle focal loss of myofilaments, also swelling of mitochondria and rupture of sacroplasmic reticulum, apoptotic nuclei with dilation of capillaries were evident. Administration of L-carnitine pre-irradiation has improved the ultrastructural alterations of the heart tissue. It is proposed that the oxidative stress is associated with a deficit in the status of the antioxidant defense system which may play a critical role in subcellular remodeling, calcium-handling abnormalities and subsequent diabetic cardiomyopathy

  15. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Culture and Cooperation of L-carnitine in Reducing Stress Induced Cellular Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose was to show that L-carnitine (LC) is capable of reducing non-oxidative stress in the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) of the human eye. The RPE cells were cultured from donor eyes, obtained immediately after post-mortem. The interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and non-oxidative (sodium hydroxide and methyl methane sulphonate) stress-inducers was observed by recording the change in the absorption profiles of the interacting molecules after incubation in light for 5 hours and after treatment with LC. The isolated and cultured RPE cells from the human eyes were treated with sodium hydroxide or methyl methane sulphonate and/or LC for 5 hours under light, and the qualitative effect on cell morphology after treatment was analyzed by staining cells with Giemsa and visualization by light microscopy. The cell morphology was also qualitatively analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). L-carnitine and stress-inducers interact with BSA and bring about changes in the spectral profile of the interacted molecules. Light microscopy as well as SEM show that the changes in the cellular morphology, induced by 100 uM concentrations of non-oxidative stress-inducers, are considerably reduced in the presence of 100 uM LC. However, L-carnitine alone does not cause any qualitative damage to the cell morphology during incubation under similar conditions. The results give a preliminary indication that LC has ability to reduce the changes brought about by the non-oxidative stress-inducers in the RPF cells in culture. (author)

  16. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on growth performance, nutrient utilization, and nitrogen balance of broilers fed with animal fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Murali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on growth performance, nutrient utilization and nitrogen balance in broilers fed with animal fat. Materials and Methods: 80 day-old Cobb commercial broiler chicks were randomly assigned into two dietary treatment groups with four replicates of ten chicks each. The diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric. The birds in both the control (T1 and treatment group (T2 were fed with a diet having 5% animal fat, while the treatment group (T2 was supplemented with 900 mg of L-carnitine. The birds were fed with standard broiler starter ration up to 4 weeks of age and finisher ration up to 6 weeks of age. Results: The average body weight (g, cumulative feed intake (g and cumulative feed conversion ratio belonging to groups T1 and T2 at 6th week of age were 2091.25 and 2151.11, 3976.49 and 4171.68, 1.97 and 1.96 respectively. The percentage availability of the nutrients of two experimental rations T1 and T2 was 68.23 and 68.00 for dry matter, 58.72 and 55.98 for crude protein, 73.85 and 71.35 for ether extract, 34.19 and 33.86 for crude fiber, 79.18 and 79.59 for nitrogen free extract, 70.24 and 70.03 for energy efficiency and nitrogen balance (g/day were 2.35 and 2.39, respectively. Conclusion: This study suggests that the supplementation of 900 mg L-carnitine in diet with added animal fat had no effect on growth performance, nutrient utilization, and nitrogen balance of broilers.

  17. The effects of proline, carnitine on the viability of sperm stored at 5oC (chilled semen)

    OpenAIRE

    Polmer Situmorang; E Triwulanningsih; A Lubis; W Caroline; T Sugiarti

    2001-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to evaluate the addition of proline, carnitine in Tris-extender on the viability of bull sperm following storage at 5oC. Semen was collected by means of artificial vagina (AV), diluted in Tris-extender containing 5% V/V egg yolk (EY) and 4% V/V glycerol to get a final concentration of 50 million sperms/ml. Diluted semen cooled to 5oC for 45 minute and stored at those temperature for 1, 3, 10, and 13 days. In the first activity the addition of 15, 30 and 60 mM car...

  18. Mitochondrial Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) Is Part of an Outer Membrane Fatty Acid Transfer Complex*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immu...

  19. Effect of Feed Additive on Base of L-carnitine in Drinking Water on Internal and External Egg Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Cyril Hrnčár; Martin Gašparovič; Ján Weis; Henrieta Arpášová; Veronika Pistová; Martin Fik; Jozef Bujko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of present study was to investigate the effect of feed additive on base of L-carnitine (30%) on some parameters of egg quality. Totally 40 White Leghorn laying hens were divided in two groups: control group (n=20) received drinking water without any additives and experimental group (n=20) received feed additive in dose 1 ml per 1.2 l of drinking water for a period of 5 days in 2 week intervals from 26 to 56 week of age. Hens in both groups were feeding ad libitum with commercial...

  20. Effect of L-Carnitine on Skeletal Muscle Lipids and Oxidative Stress in Rats Fed High-Fructose Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Panchamoorthy Rajasekar; Carani Venkatraman Anuradha

    2007-01-01

    There is evidence that high-fructose diet induces insulin resistance, alterations in lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress in rat tissues. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine (CAR) on lipid accumulation and peroxidative damage in skeletal muscle of rats fed high-fructose diet. Fructose-fed animals (60 g/100 g diet) displayed decreased glucose/insulin (G/I) ratio and insulin sensitivity index (ISI0,120) indicating the development of insulin resistance. Rats sho...

  1. Effects of high-intensity intermittent training on carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats

    OpenAIRE

    L.C. Carnevali Jr; Eder, R.; F.S. Lira; Lima, W. P.; Gonçalves, D. C.; N.E. Zanchi; H. Nicastro; Lavoie, J.M.; M.C.L. Seelaender

    2012-01-01

    We examined the capacity of high-intensity intermittent training (HI-IT) to facilitate the delivery of lipids to enzymes responsible for oxidation, a task performed by the carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) system in the rat gastrocnemius muscle. Male adult Wistar rats (160-250 g) were randomly distributed into 3 groups: sedentary (Sed, N = 5), HI-IT (N = 10), and moderate-intensity continuous training (MI-CT, N = 10). The trained groups were exercised for 8 weeks with a 10% (HI-IT) and a ...

  2. PGC-1{beta} regulates mouse carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase through estrogen-related receptor {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gacias, Mar; Perez-Marti, Albert; Pujol-Vidal, Magdalena; Marrero, Pedro F. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB) (Spain); Haro, Diego, E-mail: dharo@ub.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB) (Spain); Relat, Joana [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB) (Spain)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene contains a functional consensus sequence for ERR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sequence binds ERR{alpha} both in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ERRE is required for the activation of Cact expression by the PGC-1/ERR axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results add Cact as a genuine gene target of these transcriptional regulators. -- Abstract: Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a mitochondrial-membrane carrier proteins that mediates the transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix for their oxidation by the mitochondrial fatty acid-oxidation pathway. CACT deficiency causes a variety of pathological conditions, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiac arrest, hepatomegaly, hepatic dysfunction and muscle weakness, and it can be fatal in newborns and infants. Here we report that expression of the Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. To gain insight into the control of Cact gene expression, we examine the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Cact gene. We show that the 5 Prime -flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and contains a consensus sequence for the estrogen-related receptor (ERR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. This sequence binds ERR{alpha}in vivo and in vitro and is required for the activation of Cact expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1/ERR axis. We also demonstrate that XTC790, the inverse agonist of ERR{alpha}, specifically blocks Cact activation by PGC-1{beta} in C2C12 cells.

  3. Effect of L-carnitine on fatty acid oxidation of the muscle in hemodialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siami, G.; Clinton, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-03-05

    Muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on long term hemodialysis (HD). Carnitine (C) is important for transport of fatty acids into mitochondria. The kidney is a major site of C biosynthesis which may be compromised in ESRD. C is lost during dialysis and is reduced in plasma and muscle. Although the cause of muscle weakness is multifactorial, the effect of supplemental C was tested on a group of ESRD patients on HD. C (1 gm I.V. 3 x/wk) or placebo was given to HD patients for 6 months. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after C supplementation and from control subjects. Muscle pathology was examined by histochemical light microscopy. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by homogenate of the biopsied muscle was measured using (/sup 14/C) palmitate. Plasma aluminum (AL) and parthyroid hormone (PTH) were also measured and patients were evaluated for the degree of muscle weakness. All Pts had abnormal muscle pathology and C supplementation did not improve it. FAO by 3 HD Pts who had received placebo was 639 +/- 285 (S.D.) dpm/mg protein while control subjects were 1487 +/- 267 and was statistically different (p < .003). FAO by 8 HD Pts receiving C was not different from placebo. Addition of C in vitro stimulated FAO 70 to 80%, but there was not difference between groups. The degree of FAO was inversely correlated with the severity of the muscle pathology, and was directly correlated with the concentration of C in muscle. Pts with high plasma AL had lower FAO, but there was no correlation between FAO and PTH.

  4. Effects of L-Carnitine and Pentoxifylline on Carbohydrate Distribution of Mouse Testicular Sperm Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aliabadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The glycoconjugate content of sperms indicates their physiological and fertility properties. Lectin reactivity is indicative of intact, capacitated, and acrosome-reacted sperms. In the epididymis, sperms experience maturation, glycoconjugate modification, and simultaneously, higher L-carnitine (LC concentrations. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effects of LC and Pentoxifylline (PF on the integrity, capacitation, and acrosomal reaction of sperms by studying their lectin reactivity.Methods: Mouse testicular sperm samples were divided into three parts. Each sample was added Ham’s F10 (control or media containing 1.76 mM LC or PF. At 30 and 90 minutes after incubation, sperm motility was assessed. Peanut agglutinin (PNA, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, and Concanavalin A (Con A were used to detect non-acrosome-reacted, non-capacitated, and acrosome-reacted sperms, respectively and the frequency was evaluated by flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA. Results: Sperm motility increased after 30 and 90 minutes of incubation in the LC- and PF-treated cultures (P=0.001. LC administration created a significant increase in the percentage of the non-acrosome-reacted sperms compared to the control sperms after 30 and 90 minutes (P=0.02 and P=0.03, respectively. The frequency of the non-capacitated sperms in the LC-treated group increased compared to the control sperms after 30 minutes significantly (P=0.01. Conclusion: Although the administration of LC and PF enhanced sperm motility, LC also impacted glycoconjugates on the sperm surface. Glycoconjugates are involved in the interaction between the sperm and the zona pellucida and subsequently fertilization, thereby probably influencing the male fertility state.

  5. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G. (Servizio di Endocrinologia, Milano, (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine ({sup 3}H)-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca{sup 2}{sup +}-containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37{degree}C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37{degree}C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4{degree}C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca{sup 2}{sup +}.

  6. Acetyl-L-carnitine improves behavior and dendritic morphology in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

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    Laura R Schaevitz

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder affecting 1 in 10,000 girls. Approximately 90% of cases are caused by spontaneous mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. Girls with RTT suffer from severe motor, respiratory, cognitive and social abnormalities attributed to early deficits in synaptic connectivity which manifest in the adult as a myriad of physiological and anatomical abnormalities including, but not limited to, dimished dendritic complexity. Supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC, an acetyl group donor, ameliorates motor and cognitive deficits in other disease models through a variety of mechanisms including altering patterns of histone acetylation resulting in changes in gene expression, and stimulating biosynthetic pathways such as acetylcholine. We hypothesized ALC treatment during critical periods in cortical development would promote normal synaptic maturation, and continuing treatment would improve behavioral deficits in the Mecp2(1lox mouse model of RTT. In this study, wildtype and Mecp2(1lox mutant mice received daily injections of ALC from birth until death (postnatal day 47. General health, motor, respiratory, and cognitive functions were assessed at several time points during symptom progression. ALC improved weight gain, grip strength, activity levels, prevented metabolic abnormalities and modestly improved cognitive function in Mecp2 null mice early in the course of treatment, but did not significantly improve motor or cognitive functions assessed later in life. ALC treatment from birth was associated with an almost complete rescue of hippocampal dendritic morphology abnormalities with no discernable side effects in the mutant mice. Therefore, ALC appears to be a promising therapeutic approach to treating early RTT symptoms and may be useful in combination with other therapies.

  7. Isothermal titration calorimetry with micelles: Thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perspicace, Samantha; Rufer, Arne C; Thoma, Ralf; Mueller, Francis; Hennig, Michael; Ceccarelli, Simona; Schulz-Gasch, Tanja; Seelig, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 (CPT-2) is a key enzyme in the mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism. The active site is comprised of a Y-shaped tunnel with distinct binding sites for the substrate acylcarnitine and the cofactor CoA. We investigated the thermodynamics of binding of four inhibitors directed against either the CoA or the acylcarnitine binding sites using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). CPT-2 is a monotopic membrane protein and was solubilized by β-octylglucoside (β-OG) above its critical micellar concentration (CMC) to perform inhibitor titrations in solutions containing detergent micelles. The CMC of β-OG in the presence of inhibitors was measured with ITC and small variations were observed. The inhibitors bound to rat CPT-2 (rCPT-2) with 1:1 stoichiometry and the dissociation constants were in the range of K D = 2-20 μM. New X-ray structures and docking models of rCPT-2 in complex with inhibitors enable an analysis of the thermodynamic data in the context of the interaction observed for the individual binding sites of the ligands. For all ligands the binding enthalpy was exothermic, and enthalpy as well as entropy contributed to the binding reaction, with the exception of ST1326 for which binding was solely enthalpy-driven. The substrate analog ST1326 binds to the acylcarnitine binding site and a heat capacity change close to zero suggests a balance of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. An excellent correlation of the thermodynamic (ITC) and structural (X-ray crystallography, models) data was observed suggesting that ITC measurements provide valuable information for optimizing inhibitor binding in drug discovery. PMID:23772395

  8. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c gain-of-function in the brain results in postnatal microencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamy, Amanda A; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1c (CPT1c) is a newly identified and poorly understood brain-specific CPT1 homologue. Here, we have generated a new animal model that allows the conditional expression of CPT1c in a tissue specific and/or temporal manner via Cre-lox mediated recombination. Brain-specific, exogenous expression of CPT1c was achieved by crossing transgenic CPT1c mice to Nestin-Cre mice. The resulting double transgenic mice (CPT1c-TgN) displayed severe growth retardation in the postnatal period with a stunted development at 2 weeks of age. CPT1c-TgN mice had a greater than 2.3-fold reduction in brain weight. Even with this degree of microencephaly, CPT1c-TgN mice were viable and fertile and exhibited normal post-weaning growth. When fed a high fat diet CPT1c-TgN mice were protected from weight gain and the difference in body weight between CPT1c-TgN and control mice was further exaggerated. Conversely, low fat, high carbohydrate feeding partially reversed the body weight defects in CPT1c-TgN mice. Analysis of total brain lipids of low fat fed mice revealed a depletion of total very long chain fatty acids in adult CPT1c-TgN mice which was not evident in high fat fed CPT1c-TgN mice. These data show that CPT1c can elicit profound effects on brain physiology and total fatty acid profiles, which can be modulated by the nutritional composition of the diet. PMID:21592121

  9. Ceramide levels regulated by carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C control dendritic spine maturation and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Patricia; Sahún, Ignasi; McDonald, Jerome; Ramírez, Sara; Jacas, Jordi; Gratacós, Esther; Sierra, Adriana Y; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Hegardt, Fausto G; Dierssen, Mara; Casals, Núria

    2012-06-15

    The brain-specific isoform carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) has been implicated in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nevertheless, its molecular function is not completely understood, and its role in other brain areas is unknown. We demonstrate that CPT1C is expressed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and is located in the endoplasmic reticulum throughout the neuron, even inside dendritic spines. We used molecular, cellular, and behavioral approaches to determine CPT1C function. First, we analyzed the implication of CPT1C in ceramide metabolism. CPT1C overexpression in primary hippocampal cultured neurons increased ceramide levels, whereas in CPT1C-deficient neurons, ceramide levels were diminished. Correspondingly, CPT1C knock-out (KO) mice showed reduced ceramide levels in the hippocampus. At the cellular level, CPT1C deficiency altered dendritic spine morphology by increasing immature filopodia and reducing mature mushroom and stubby spines. Total protrusion density and spine head area in mature spines were unaffected. Treatment of cultured neurons with exogenous ceramide reverted the KO phenotype, as did ectopic overexpression of CPT1C, indicating that CPT1C regulation of spine maturation is mediated by ceramide. To study the repercussions of the KO phenotype on cognition, we performed the hippocampus-dependent Morris water maze test on mice. Results show that CPT1C deficiency strongly impairs spatial learning. All of these results demonstrate that CPT1C regulates the levels of ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum of hippocampal neurons, and this is a relevant mechanism for the correct maturation of dendritic spines and for proper spatial learning. PMID:22539351

  10. Homozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (muscle isoform) deficiency is lethal in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shaonin; You, Yun; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Chick, Wallace S.H.; Hamm, Doug A.; Sharer, J. Daniel; Wood, Philip A.

    2008-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA), the most abundant fatty acids in mammalian membranes and in energy metabolism. Human deficiency of the muscle isoform CPT-1b is poorly understood. In the current study, embryos with a homozygous knockout of Cpt-1b were lost before embryonic day 9.5 − 11.5. Also, while there were normal percentages of CPT-1b+/−pups born from both male and female CPT-1b+/− mice crossed with wild-type mates, the number of CPT-1b+/− pups from CPT-1b+/− breeding pairs was under-represented (63% of the expected number). Northern blot analysis demonstrated ∼50% Cpt-1b mRNA expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT), heart and skeletal muscles in the CPT-1b+/− male mice. Consistent with tissue-specific expression of Cpt-1b mRNA in muscle but not liver, CPT-1+/− mice had ∼60% CPT-1 activity in skeletal muscle and no change in total liver CPT-1 activity. CPT-1b+/− mice had normal fasting blood glucose concentration. Consistent with expression of CPT-1b in BAT and muscle, ∼7% CPT-1b+/− mice (n=30) developed fatal hypothermia following a 3 hr cold challenge, while none of the CPT-1b+/+ mice (n=30) did. With a prolonged cold challenge (6 hr), significantly more CPT-1b+/− mice developed fatal hypothermia (52% CPT-1b+/− mice vs. 21% CPT-1b+/+ mice), with increased frequency in females of both genotypes (67% female vs. 38% male CPT-1b+/− mice, and 33% female vs. 8% male CPT-1b+/+ mice). Therefore, lethality of homozygous CPT-1b deficiency in the mice is consistent with paucity of human cases. PMID:18023382

  11. Ceramide Levels Regulated by Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1C Control Dendritic Spine Maturation and Cognition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Patricia; Sahún, Ignasi; McDonald, Jerome; Ramírez, Sara; Jacas, Jordi; Gratacós, Esther; Sierra, Adriana Y.; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Hegardt, Fausto G.; Dierssen, Mara; Casals, Núria

    2012-01-01

    The brain-specific isoform carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) has been implicated in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nevertheless, its molecular function is not completely understood, and its role in other brain areas is unknown. We demonstrate that CPT1C is expressed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and is located in the endoplasmic reticulum throughout the neuron, even inside dendritic spines. We used molecular, cellular, and behavioral approaches to determine CPT1C function. First, we analyzed the implication of CPT1C in ceramide metabolism. CPT1C overexpression in primary hippocampal cultured neurons increased ceramide levels, whereas in CPT1C-deficient neurons, ceramide levels were diminished. Correspondingly, CPT1C knock-out (KO) mice showed reduced ceramide levels in the hippocampus. At the cellular level, CPT1C deficiency altered dendritic spine morphology by increasing immature filopodia and reducing mature mushroom and stubby spines. Total protrusion density and spine head area in mature spines were unaffected. Treatment of cultured neurons with exogenous ceramide reverted the KO phenotype, as did ectopic overexpression of CPT1C, indicating that CPT1C regulation of spine maturation is mediated by ceramide. To study the repercussions of the KO phenotype on cognition, we performed the hippocampus-dependent Morris water maze test on mice. Results show that CPT1C deficiency strongly impairs spatial learning. All of these results demonstrate that CPT1C regulates the levels of ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum of hippocampal neurons, and this is a relevant mechanism for the correct maturation of dendritic spines and for proper spatial learning. PMID:22539351

  12. Important role of ventromedial hypothalamic carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a in the control of food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Su; Serra, Dolors; Keung, Wendy; Hegardt, Fausto G; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2013-08-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) liver isoform, or CPT-1a, is implicated in CNS control of food intake. However, the exact brain nucleus site(s) in mediating this action of CPT-1a has not been identified. In this report, we assess the role of CPT-1a in hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMN). We stereotaxically injected an adenoviral vector containing CPT-1a coding sequence into the VMN of rats to induce overexpression and activation of CPT-1a. The VMN-selective activation of CPT-1a induced an orexigenic effect, suggesting CPT-1a in the VMN is involved in the central control of feeding. Intracerebroventricular administration of etomoxir, a CPT-1 inhibitor, decreases food intake. Importantly, in the animals with VMN overexpression of a CPT-1a mutant that antagonizes the CPT-1 inhibition by etomoxir, the anorectic response to etomoxir was attenuated. This suggests that VMN is involved in mediating the anorectic effect of central inhibition of CPT-1a. In contrast, arcuate nucleus (Arc) overexpression of the mutant did not alter etomoxir-induced inhibition of food intake, suggesting that Arc CPT-1a does not play significant roles in this anorectic action. Furthermore, in the VMN, CPT-1a appears to act downstream of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA action of feeding. Finally, we show that in the VMN CPT-1 activity was altered in concert with fasting and refeeding states, supporting a physiological role of CPT-1a in mediating the control of feeding. All together, CPT-1a in the hypothalamic VMN appears to play an important role in central control of food intake. VMN-selective modulation of CPT-1a activity may therefore be a promising strategy in controlling food intake and maintaining normal body weight. PMID:23736540

  13. Neonatal carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency associated with Dandy-Walker syndrome and sudden death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyaoui, Raquel; Espinosa, María Gracia; Gómez, Celia; Dayaldasani, Anita; Rueda, Inmaculada; Roldán, Ana; Ugarte, Magdalena; Lastra, Gonzalo; Pérez, Vidal

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal onset of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive, often lethal disorder of the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. It is a rare multiorgan disease which includes hypoketotic hypoglycemia, severe hepatomuscular symptoms, cardiac abnormalities, seizures and lethargy, as well as dysmorphic features. Until now, only 22 affected families have been described in the literature. An increasing number of mutations are being identified in the CPT2 gene, with a distinct genotype-phenotype correlation in most cases. Herein we report a new case of neonatal CPT II deficiency associated with Dandy-Walker syndrome and sudden death at 13 days of life. CPT II deficiency was suggested by acylcarnitine analysis of dried-blood on filter paper in the expanded newborn screening. Genetic analysis of the CPT2 gene identified the presence of a previously described mutation in homozygosity (c.534_558del25bpinsT). All lethal neonatal CPT II deficiency patients previously described presented severe symptoms during the first week of life, although this was not the case in our patient, who remained stable and without apparent vital risk during the first 11 days of life. The introduction of tandem mass spectrometry to newborn screening has substantially improved our ability to detect metabolic diseases in the newborn period. This case illustrates the value of expanded newborn screening in a neonate with an unusual clinical presentation, combining hydrocephalus and sudden death, that might not commonly lead to the suspicion of an inborn error of metabolism. PMID:21641254

  14. Sarcoplasmic reticulum function and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition during progression of heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Heinz; Vetter, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Failing cardiac hypertrophy is associated with an inadequate sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function. The hypothesis was examined that pressure overloaded hearts fail to increase SR Ca2+ uptake rate proportionally to the hypertrophy and that carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition by etomoxir ((±)-ethyl 2[6(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl] oxirane-2-carboxylate) can counteract this process. Severe left ventricular pressure overload was induced in rats by constricting the ascending aorta for 8, 10, 14 and 28 weeks leading to cardiac hypertrophy (+62–+103% of sham-operated rats) and pulmonary congestion. Homogenate oxalate-facilitated SR Ca2+ uptake rate g wet wt−1 was reduced (P<0.05) by 29.9±1.8% irrespective of phospholamban phosphorylation (in the presence of catalytic subunit of protein kinase A) and inhibition of SR Ca2+ release channel by ruthenium red. SERCA2 protein level was reduced (P<0.05) by 30.4±0.8%. SR Ca2+ uptake rate was inversely correlated (P<0.05) with left ventricular weight but was not affected by the occurrence of pulmonary congestion. Because SR Ca2+ uptake rate of whole ventricles was not reduced, a hypertrophy proportional dilution of SR Ca2+ uptake has to be inferred which precedes pulmonary congestion. Treatment with etomoxir (15 mg kg body wt−1 day−1 for 10 weeks) did not affect left ventricular weight but decreased (P<0.05) the right ventricular hypertrophy related to pulmonary congestion. In parallel, SR Ca2+ uptake rate of left ventricle and myosin isozyme V1 were increased (P<0.05). Etomoxir represents a candidate approach for prevention of heart failure by inducing a hypertrophy proportional increase in SR Ca2+ uptake rate. PMID:11139455

  15. Isothermal titration calorimetry with micelles: Thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 membrane protein☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perspicace, Samantha; Rufer, Arne C.; Thoma, Ralf; Mueller, Francis; Hennig, Michael; Ceccarelli, Simona; Schulz-Gasch, Tanja; Seelig, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 (CPT-2) is a key enzyme in the mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism. The active site is comprised of a Y-shaped tunnel with distinct binding sites for the substrate acylcarnitine and the cofactor CoA. We investigated the thermodynamics of binding of four inhibitors directed against either the CoA or the acylcarnitine binding sites using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). CPT-2 is a monotopic membrane protein and was solubilized by β-octylglucoside (β-OG) above its critical micellar concentration (CMC) to perform inhibitor titrations in solutions containing detergent micelles. The CMC of β-OG in the presence of inhibitors was measured with ITC and small variations were observed. The inhibitors bound to rat CPT-2 (rCPT-2) with 1:1 stoichiometry and the dissociation constants were in the range of KD = 2–20 μM. New X-ray structures and docking models of rCPT-2 in complex with inhibitors enable an analysis of the thermodynamic data in the context of the interaction observed for the individual binding sites of the ligands. For all ligands the binding enthalpy was exothermic, and enthalpy as well as entropy contributed to the binding reaction, with the exception of ST1326 for which binding was solely enthalpy-driven. The substrate analog ST1326 binds to the acylcarnitine binding site and a heat capacity change close to zero suggests a balance of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. An excellent correlation of the thermodynamic (ITC) and structural (X-ray crystallography, models) data was observed suggesting that ITC measurements provide valuable information for optimizing inhibitor binding in drug discovery. PMID:23772395

  16. Distinct effects of ketamine and acetyl L-carnitine on the dopamine system in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bonnie L; Dumas, Melanie; Cuevas, Elvis; Gu, Qiang; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. We have previously shown that acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents ketamine toxicity in zebrafish embryos. In mammals, ketamine is known to modulate the dopaminergic system. NMDA receptor antagonists are considered as promising anti-depressants, but the exact mechanism of their function is unclear. Here, we measured the levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the zebrafish embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses (0.1-0.3 mM), did not produce significant changes in DA, DOPAC or HVA levels in 52 h post-fertilization embryos treated for 24 h. In these embryos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression remained unchanged. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels equivalent to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced DA level and TH mRNA indicating that DA synthesis was adversely affected. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR showed similar effects on DA level and TH mRNA, but increased DOPAC level compared to control. ALCAR reversed 2 mM ketamine-induced reduction in HVA levels. With ALCAR alone, the expression of genes encoding the DA metabolizing enzymes, MAO (monoamine oxidase) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), was not affected. However, ketamine altered MAO mRNA expression, except at the 0.1 mM dose. COMT transcripts were reduced in the 2 mM ketamine-treated group. These distinct effects of ketamine and ALCAR on the DA system may shed some light on the mechanism on how ketamine can work as an anti-depressant, especially at sub-anesthetic doses that do not affect DA metabolism and suppress MAO gene expression. PMID:26898327

  17. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine [3H]-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca2+ and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca2+-containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37 degree C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37 degree C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca2+ to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca2+ and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4 degree C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca2+

  18. Effect of L-carnitine on fatty acid oxidation of the muscle in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on long term hemodialysis (HD). Carnitine (C) is important for transport of fatty acids into mitochondria. The kidney is a major site of C biosynthesis which may be compromised in ESRD. C is lost during dialysis and is reduced in plasma and muscle. Although the cause of muscle weakness is multifactorial, the effect of supplemental C was tested on a group of ESRD patients on HD. C (1 gm I.V. 3 x/wk) or placebo was given to HD patients for 6 months. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after C supplementation and from control subjects. Muscle pathology was examined by histochemical light microscopy. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by homogenate of the biopsied muscle was measured using [14C] palmitate. Plasma aluminum (AL) and parthyroid hormone (PTH) were also measured and patients were evaluated for the degree of muscle weakness. All Pts had abnormal muscle pathology and C supplementation did not improve it. FAO by 3 HD Pts who had received placebo was 639 +/- 285 (S.D.) dpm/mg protein while control subjects were 1487 +/- 267 and was statistically different (p < .003). FAO by 8 HD Pts receiving C was not different from placebo. Addition of C in vitro stimulated FAO 70 to 80%, but there was not difference between groups. The degree of FAO was inversely correlated with the severity of the muscle pathology, and was directly correlated with the concentration of C in muscle. Pts with high plasma AL had lower FAO, but there was no correlation between FAO and PTH

  19. Effects of propionyl-L-carnitine on ischemia-reperfusion injury in hamster cheek pouch microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DomingaLapi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose Propionyl-L-carnitine (pLc exerts protective effects in different experimental models of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of intravenously and topically applied pLc on microvascular permeability increase induced by I/R in the hamster check pouch preparation. Methods The hamster check pouch microcirculation was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Microvascular permeability, leukocyte adhesion to venular walls, perfused capillary length and capillary red blood cell velocity (VRBC were evaluated by computer-assisted methods. E-selectin expression was assessed by in vitro analysis. Lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation were determined by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS and 2’-7’-dichlorofluorescein (DCF, respectively. Results In control animals, I/R caused a significant increase in permeability and in the leukocyte adhesion in venules. Capillary perfusion and VRBC decreased. TBARS levels and DCF fluorescence significantly increased compared with baseline. Intravenously infused pLc dose-dependently prevented leakage and leukocyte adhesion, preserved capillary perfusion and induced vasodilation at the end of reperfusion, while ROS concentration decreased. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase prior to pLc caused vasoconstriction and partially blunted the pLc-induced protective effects; inhibition of the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF abolished pLc effects. Topical application of pLc on check pouch membrane produced the same effects as observed with intravenous administration. pLc decreased the E-selectin expression. Conclusions pLc prevents microvascular changes induced by I/R injury. The reduction of permeability increase could be mainly due to EDHF release induce vasodilatation together with NO. The reduction of E-selectin expression prevents leukocyte adhesion and permeability increase.

  20. Determination of L-carnitine in food supplement formulations using ion-pair chromatography with indirect conductimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakou, Aikaterini; Megoulas, Nikolaos C; Koupparis, Michael A

    2005-04-01

    A novel method for the determination of L-carnitine in food supplement formulations was developed and validated, using ion-pair chromatography with indirect conductimetric detection. The chromatographic method was based on a non-polar (C18) column and an aqueous octanesulfonate (0.64 mM) eluent, acidified with trifluoroacetic acid (5.2 mM). The retention time was 5.4 min and the asymmetry factor 0.65. A linear calibration curve from 10 to 1000 microg/ml (r= 0.99998), with a detection limit of 2.7 microg/ml (25 microl injection volume), a repeatability %RSD of 0.8 (40 microg/ml, n = 5) and reproducibility %RSD of 2.6 were achieved. The proposed method was applied for the determination of carnitine in oral solutions and capsules. No interference from excipients was found and the only pretreatment step required was the appropriate dilution with the mobile phase. Recovery from spiked samples was ranged from 97.7 to 99.7% with a precision (%RSD, n = 3) of 0.01-2.1%. PMID:15830947

  1. Comparison of the catalytic activities of three isozymes of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 expressed in COS7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takenori; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ohkura, Kazuto; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Takiguchi, Yoshiharu; Shinohara, Yasuo

    2014-02-01

    The enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) catalyzes the transfer of an acyl group from acyl-CoA to carnitine to form acylcarnitine, and three isozymes of it, 1a, 1b, and 1c, have been identified. Interestingly, the 1c isozyme was reported to show no enzymatic activity, but it was not clearly demonstrated whether this inactivity was due to its dysfunction or due to its poor expression. In the present study, we (a) expressed individual CPT1 isozymes in COS7 cells, (b) evaluated quantitatively their expression levels by Western blotting using the three bacterially expressed CPT1 isozymes as standards, and (c) evaluated their catalytic activities. With these experiments, we successfully demonstrated that the absence of the enzymatic activity of the 1c isozyme was due to its dysfunction. In addition, experiments on the preparation of standard CPT1 isozymes revealed that the 1c isozyme did not show the standard relationship between migration in an SDS-PAGE gel and molecular size. We further tried to determine why the 1c isozyme was inert by preparing chimeric CPT1 between 1a and 1c, but no clear conclusion could be drawn because one of the chimeric CPT1s was not sufficiently expressed. PMID:24222496

  2. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in Morris Hepatoma 7777 mitochondria and its sensitivity to malonyl CoA inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier reports in the literature have indicated no detectable Carnitine Palymitoyl Transferase (CPT) activity in homogenates prepared from Morris Hepatoma 7777. In its study CPT activity in isolated mitochondria (mito) was measured by butanol extraction of the [3H]palmitoyl carnitine formed as outlined by Bremer et al. Contrary to the earlier work where no appreciable activity of CPT was observed the authors find significant levels of CPT (2.6 nMol/min/mg protein) in isolated mito from Morris Hepatoma 7777 (MH 7777). The level of CPT activity observed in MH 7777 mito was, however, 36% lower compared to the host liver CPT activity (4.1 nMol/min/mg protein). The enzyme in MH 7777 mito showed 83% inhibition in the presence of 10 μM malonyl CoA, in agreement with the degree of sensitivity observed with the host liver isolated mito. On freeze thawing host mito, total CPT activity increased and the sensitivity of the enzyme to malonyl CoA decreased. Frozen thawed MH 7777 mito showed a similar response to malonyl CoA but no change in the total CPT level was observed. The authors results establish for the first time the presence of a malonyl CoA sensitive CPT in MH 7777 mito, which may have slightly different properties from normal due to the membrane environment of the enzyme

  3. Characteristics of separation of carnitine and metal ions in cheese whey model solution by loose reverse osmosis membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Echizen, H.; Xing, X.; Yamamoto, S.; Unno, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-20

    Aiming at recovering carnitine from cheese whey by using loose reverse osmosis membranes, rejection characteristics of several components in the whey were examined by using model solutions. An electroneutral membrane was found to be most effective for the separation. The rejection of carnitine was above 0.95 independent of the pH of solutions, while monovalent metal ions showed low rejections of 0.1-0.3. On the other hand, the rejections of divalent metal ions deceased with increase of the pH, and reached a minimum of about 0.5. As a result, mono-and divalent metal ions could be removed simultaneously by adjusting the pH of the feed solutions. To clarify the effect of pH on the rejection the permeate of MgCl2 aqueous solution was examined. The rejections of MgCl2 were greatly affected by the pH and showed the same tendency as the mixed station. The effect of the pH on permeation of electrolyte was considered to be caused mainly by the adsorption of ions on the membrane. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-Induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N. Davies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation (AcK, a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT, an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK.

  5. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-Induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael N; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J Will; Dubois, Laura G; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Brosnan, M Julia; Rolph, Timothy P; Grimsrud, Paul A; Muoio, Deborah M

    2016-01-12

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  6. Effects of Dietary Protein Concentration and L-carnitine on Growth, Processing Yield, and Body Composition of Channel X Blue Catfish Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in earthen ponds to evaluate effects of dietary protein concentration and L-carnitine supplementation on production and processing traits of channel catfish × blue catfish hybrids. Hybrid fingerlings, mean initial weight = 66 g, were stocked into 20, 0.04-ha earthen ponds at a...

  7. Acetyl-L-Carnitine as an Adjunctive Therapy in the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: A Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Seyed-Hesameddin; Heidari, Shahram; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Tabrizi, Mina; Ghaleiha, Ali; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether a previous observed Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) treatment effect could be repeated in an ALC adjunctive therapy treatment trial of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. This was a six-week, randomized clinical trial undertaken in an outpatient child and adolescent…

  8. The Effect of Creatin and Carnitine Supplementation on 5 kmClassic and 10 km Free Styles Race Performance of Cross Country Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru ÇETİN

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This İnvestigation examined the effect of creatin and carnitine supplementation on 5 km classic and 10 km free styles race performance of competitive cross country skiers.Eighteen highly trained (12 male and 6 female cross country skiers aged 13-16 years seperated into 3 equal groups. All groups participated in the 5 km classic and 10 km free races styles in Erciyes at 2200m altitude ski center before the carnitine and creatine loading. After the race subjects were seperated into carnitine, creatine and control groups. Creatine supplementation was given with the dosege of 20gr divided 4 times per day and carnite wasgicen with the dossage of 2gr divided 3 times per day, for seven days.After the last race all results were analysed by repeated measure analysis of variance and SPSS statistical program.According to the study there were no significant effects of carnitin and creatin supplement on 5 km classic and 10 km free styles race performans as in groups. The increased performances which were reperted can be explained by 9 days aerobic, on competition course.

  9. The effect of acute L-Carnitine supplementation on the blood lactate, glucose, VO2max and power in trained men: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arazi H

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probably L-Carnitine can induce increasing of Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, decreasing of lactic acid production and performance improvements due to the reinforcement of long chain fatty acid oxidation and stabilize of Coenzyme A (CoASH to free Coenzyme A (COA. Based on this, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute L-Carnitine supplementation on blood lactate, glucose, VO2max and anaerobic power in trained men.Methods: Sixteen trained men (aged 19-23 volunteers from University of Guilan, facul-ty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences participated as subjects in this investiga-tion. Subjects divided to aerobic (A and anaerobic (An group randomly. In a double blind design, subjects participated in two separated tests by one week. Subjects ingested 3 grams of L-Carnitine supplementation or placebo (maltodextrin 90 minute before aerobic and anaerobic exercise. For aerobic activity used shuttle run 20 meter and for anaerobic activity used RAST test. Blood samples were collected 5 minute prior at rest and 4 minute post tests. Participants were asked in the morning to obtain fasting blood samples and perform tests. A t-test was used to detect differences between supplementa-tion and placebo groups in each exercise.Results: L-Carnitine group ((A 141.25±20.62 and (An 145.38±55.47 significantly had lower lactate concentration than placebo ((A 151.00±20.85 and (An 152.50±28.59 after tests (P≤0.05. L-Carnitine group ((A 136.00±19.74 and (An 115.50±13.64 had significa-ntly higher blood glucose compared to placebo ((A 121.62±15.65 and (An 110.12±12.63 too (P≤0.05. Also, VO2max, mean and maximum anaerobic power in L-Carnitine group were significantly more than ones in placebo (P<0.05.Conclusion: These findings indicate that acute oral supplementation of L-Carnitine can induce fatigue decreasing and improvement of aerobic and anaerobic performance.

  10. Role of l-carnitine in the prevention of seminiferous tubules damage induced by gamma radiation: a light and electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study, we hypothesized that l-carnitine can minimize germ-cell depletion and morphological features of late cell damage in the rat testis following gamma (γ)-irradiation. Wistar albino male rats were divided into three groups. Control group received physiological saline 0.2 ml intraperitoneally (i.p.), as placebo. Radiation group received scrotal γ-irradiation of 10 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. Radiation + l-carnitine group received scrotal γ-irradiation plus 200 mg/kg i.p. l-carnitine. l-carnitine starting 1 day before irradiation and 21 days (three times per week) after irradiation. Testis samples of the all groups were taken at day 21, 44 and 70 post-irradiation. All samples were processed at the light and electron microscopic levels. Morphologically, examination of γ-irradiated testis revealed presence of marked disorganization and depletion of germ cells, arrest of spermatogenesis, formation of multinucleated giant cells, and vacuolization in the germinal epithelium. The type and extent of these changes varied at different post-treatment intervals. The damage was evident at the 21st day and reached maximum level by the 44th day. By day 44 post-irradiation, the changes were most advanced, and were associated with atrophied seminiferous tubules without germ cells, the increase in the number and size of vacuolizations in germinal epithelium, and the absent multinucleated giant cells due to spermatids had completely disappeared. The increase in nucleus invaginations, the dilatation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cysternas and the increase in the number and size of lipid droplets in the Sertoli cells were determined at the electron microscopic level. In conclusion, l-carnitine supplementation during the radiotherapy would be effective in protecting against radiation-induced damages in rat testis, and thereby may improve the quality of patient's life after the therapy. (orig.)

  11. Role of l-carnitine in the prevention of seminiferous tubules damage induced by gamma radiation: a light and electron microscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Kanter, Mehmet [Trakya University, Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Uzal, Mustafa Cem [Trakya University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Edirne (Turkey)

    2009-08-15

    The present study, we hypothesized that l-carnitine can minimize germ-cell depletion and morphological features of late cell damage in the rat testis following gamma ({gamma})-irradiation. Wistar albino male rats were divided into three groups. Control group received physiological saline 0.2 ml intraperitoneally (i.p.), as placebo. Radiation group received scrotal {gamma}-irradiation of 10 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. Radiation + l-carnitine group received scrotal {gamma}-irradiation plus 200 mg/kg i.p. l-carnitine. l-carnitine starting 1 day before irradiation and 21 days (three times per week) after irradiation. Testis samples of the all groups were taken at day 21, 44 and 70 post-irradiation. All samples were processed at the light and electron microscopic levels. Morphologically, examination of {gamma}-irradiated testis revealed presence of marked disorganization and depletion of germ cells, arrest of spermatogenesis, formation of multinucleated giant cells, and vacuolization in the germinal epithelium. The type and extent of these changes varied at different post-treatment intervals. The damage was evident at the 21st day and reached maximum level by the 44th day. By day 44 post-irradiation, the changes were most advanced, and were associated with atrophied seminiferous tubules without germ cells, the increase in the number and size of vacuolizations in germinal epithelium, and the absent multinucleated giant cells due to spermatids had completely disappeared. The increase in nucleus invaginations, the dilatation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cysternas and the increase in the number and size of lipid droplets in the Sertoli cells were determined at the electron microscopic level. In conclusion, l-carnitine supplementation during the radiotherapy would be effective in protecting against radiation-induced damages in rat testis, and thereby may improve the quality of patient's life after the therapy. (orig.)

  12. Over-expression in Escherichia coli, purification and reconstitution in liposomes of the third member of the OCTN sub-family: The mouse carnitine transporter OCTN3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► mOCTN3 transport protein has been cloned in pET-21a(+) and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. ► The expressed mOCTN3 has been purified to homogeneity by Ni-chelating chromatography. ► The protein solubilised in Triton X-100 has been reconstituted in liposomes. ► Recombinant mOCTN3 catalyses transport of carnitine by a uniport mode. -- Abstract: pET-21a(+)-mOCTN3-6His was constructed and used for over-expression in Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)pLysS. After IPTG induction a protein with apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa was collected in the insoluble fraction of the cell lysate and purified by Ni2+-chelating chromatography with a yield of 2 mg/l of cell culture. The over-expressed protein was identified with mOCTN3 by anti-His antibody and reconstitution in liposomes. mOCTN3 required peculiar conditions for optimal expression and reconstitution in liposomes. The protein catalyzed a time dependent [3H]carnitine uptake which was stimulated by intraliposomal ATP and nearly independent of the pH. The Km for carnitine was 36 μM. [3H]carnitine transport was inhibited by carnitine analogues and some Cys and NH2 reagents. This paper represents the first outcome in over-expressing, in active form, the third member of the OCTN sub-family, mOCTN3, in E. coli.

  13. Microwave-assisted extraction and quantitative LC/ID-MS measurement of total choline and free carnitine in food standard reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Melissa M; Sander, Lane C

    2012-01-01

    The Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals of AOAC INTERNATIONAL has declared both choline and carnitine to be priority nutrients in infant formulas, and ongoing efforts exist to develop or improve Official Methods of Analysis for these nutrients. As a result, matrix-based certified reference materials are needed with assigned values for these compounds. In this work, traditional acid and enzymatic hydrolysis procedures were compared to microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis, and conditions optimized to provide complete sample hydrolysis and recovery of total choline from four food standard reference materials (SRMs): whole milk powder, whole egg powder, infant formula, and soy flour. The extracts were analyzed using LC on a mixed-mode column (simultaneous RP and ion exchange) with isotope dilution-MS detection to achieve simultaneous quantification of total choline and free carnitine. Total choline has been determined in these four food matrixes with excellent precision (0.65 to 2.60%) and accuracy, as confirmed by use of SRM 1849 Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula as a control material. Free carnitine has been determined in two of these food matrixes with excellent precision (0.69 to 2.19%) and accuracy, as confirmed by use of SRM 1849 Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula as a control material. Limitations in simultaneous determination of total choline and free carnitine resulted from extreme differences in concentration of the two components in egg powder and soy flour (at least three orders of magnitude). Samples required dilution to prevent poor LC peak shape, which caused decreased precision in the determination of low concentrations of free carnitine. Despite this limitation, the described method yields results comparable to current AOAC Official Method 999.14 Choline in Infant Formula, with a decrease of more than 2 h in sample preparation time. PMID:23175983

  14. Over-expression in Escherichia coli, purification and reconstitution in liposomes of the third member of the OCTN sub-family: The mouse carnitine transporter OCTN3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena [Department of Cell Biology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci 4c, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); Indiveri, Cesare, E-mail: indiveri@unical.it [Department of Cell Biology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci 4c, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mOCTN3 transport protein has been cloned in pET-21a(+) and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expressed mOCTN3 has been purified to homogeneity by Ni-chelating chromatography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protein solubilised in Triton X-100 has been reconstituted in liposomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recombinant mOCTN3 catalyses transport of carnitine by a uniport mode. -- Abstract: pET-21a(+)-mOCTN3-6His was constructed and used for over-expression in Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)pLysS. After IPTG induction a protein with apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa was collected in the insoluble fraction of the cell lysate and purified by Ni{sup 2+}-chelating chromatography with a yield of 2 mg/l of cell culture. The over-expressed protein was identified with mOCTN3 by anti-His antibody and reconstitution in liposomes. mOCTN3 required peculiar conditions for optimal expression and reconstitution in liposomes. The protein catalyzed a time dependent [{sup 3}H]carnitine uptake which was stimulated by intraliposomal ATP and nearly independent of the pH. The K{sub m} for carnitine was 36 {mu}M. [{sup 3}H]carnitine transport was inhibited by carnitine analogues and some Cys and NH{sub 2} reagents. This paper represents the first outcome in over-expressing, in active form, the third member of the OCTN sub-family, mOCTN3, in E. coli.

  15. A common haplotype of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b is associated with the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auinger, A; Rubin, D; Sabandal, M; Helwig, U; Rüther, A; Schreiber, S; Foelsch, U R; Döring, F; Schrezenmeir, J

    2013-03-14

    The carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) enzyme system facilitates the transport of long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria to provide substrates for β-oxidation. We performed an analysis including three coding SNP in the muscle isoform of the CPT1b gene (rs3213445, rs2269383 and rs470117) and one coding SNP in the CPT2 gene (rs1799821) to find associations with traits of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Male participants (n 755) from the Metabolic Intervention Cohort Kiel were genotyped and phenotyped for features of the MetS. Participants underwent a glucose tolerance test and a postprandial assessment of metabolic variables after a standardised mixed meal. Carriers of the rare CPT1b 66V (rs3213445) allele had significantly higher γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT) activities (P< 0·0001, P= 0·03 and P= 0·048, respectively) and a higher fatty liver index (FLI, P= 0·026). Fasting and postprandial TAG (P= 0·007 and P= 0·009, respectively) and fasting glucose (P= 0·012) were significantly higher in 66V-allele carriers. The insulin sensitivity index determined after a glucose load was lower in those subjects (P= 0·005). Total cholesterol (P= 0·051) and LDL-cholesterol (P= 0·062) tended to be higher in 66V-allele carriers when compared with I66I homozygotes. Homozygosity of the rare K531E allele presented with lower GGT and GOT activities (P= 0·011 and P= 0·027, respectively). E531E homozygotes tended to have lower GPT and FLI (P= 0·078 and P= 0·052, respectively). CPT2 V368I (rs1799821) genotypic groups did not differ in the investigated anthropometric and metabolic parameters. The present results confirm the association of CPT1b coding polymorphisms with the MetS, with a deleterious effect of the CPT1b I66V and a protective impact of the CPT1b K531E SNP, whereas haplotype analysis indicates a relevance of the E531K polymorphism only. PMID:22809552

  16. Identification of Cyclopropylacetyl-(R)-carnitine, a Unique Chemical Marker of the Fatally Toxic Mushroom Russula subnigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Masanori; Kato, Suguru; Saikawa, Yoko; Nakata, Masaya; Hashimoto, Kimiko

    2016-01-01

    A toxic mushroom, Russula subnigricans, causes fatal poisoning by mistaken ingestion. In spite of the potent bioactivity, the responsible toxin had not been identified for about 50 years since its first documentation. Recently, we isolated an unstable toxin and determined the structure. The slow elucidation was partly due to the instability of the toxin and also due to misidentification of R. subnigricans for similar mushrooms. To discriminate genuine Russula subnigricans from similar unidentified Russula species, we searched for a unique chemical marker contained in the mushroom. Cyclopropylacetyl-(R)-carnitine specific to R. subnigricans was identified as a novel compound whose (1)H-NMR signals appearing in the upfield region were easily recognizable among the complicated signals of the crude extract. PMID:27250795

  17. Creatine, L-Carnitine, and ω3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation from Healthy to Diseased Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe D’Antona

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myopathies are chronic degenerative pathologies that induce the deterioration of the structure and function of skeletal muscle. So far a definitive therapy has not yet been developed and the main aim of myopathy treatment is to slow the progression of the disease. Current nonpharmacological therapies include rehabilitation, ventilator assistance, and nutritional supplements, all of which aim to delay the onset of the disease and relieve its symptoms. Besides an adequate diet, nutritional supplements could play an important role in the treatment of myopathic patients. Here we review the most recent in vitro and in vivo studies investigating the role supplementation with creatine, L-carnitine, and ω3 PUFAs plays in myopathy treatment. Our results suggest that these dietary supplements could have beneficial effects; nevertheless continued studies are required before they could be recommended as a routine treatment in muscle diseases.

  18. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Caloglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6, Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8, Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8, and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8. The rats in all groups were irradiated individually with a single dose of 20 Gy to the total abdomen, except those in CONT. LC (300 mg/kg or amifostine (200 mg/kg was used 30 min before irradiation. Histopathological analysis of small intestine was carried out after euthanasia. Results: Pretreatment with amifostine reduced the radiation-induced acute degenerative damage (P = 0.009 compared to the RT group. Pretreatment with LC did not obtain any significant difference compared to the RT group. The vascular damage significantly reduced in both of the AMI+RT (P = 0.003 and LC+RT group (P = 0.029 compared to the RT group. The overall damage score was significantly lower in the AMI+RT group than the RT group (P = 0.009. There was not any significant difference between the LC+RT and RT group. Conclusions: Amifostine has a marked radioprotective effect against all histopathological changes on small intestinal tissue while LC has limited effects which are mainly on vascular structure.

  19. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A functions to repress FoxO transcription factors to allow cell cycle progression in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huanjie; Mohamed, Esraa M; Xu, Guoyan G; Waters, Michael; Jing, Kai; Ma, Yibao; Zhang, Yan; Spiegel, Sarah; Idowu, Michael O; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-26

    Cancer cells rely on hyperactive de novo lipid synthesis for maintaining malignancy. Recent studies suggest involvement in cancer of fatty acid oxidation, a process functionally opposite to lipogenesis. A mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to oncogenic processes is yet to be established. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) that catalyzes the transfer of long-chain acyl group of the acyl-CoA ester to carnitine, thereby shuttling fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrated that CPT1A was highly expressed in most ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian serous carcinomas. Overexpression of CPT1A correlated with a poor overall survival of ovarian cancer patients. Inactivation of CPT1A decreased cellular ATP levels and induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, suggesting that ovarian cancer cells depend on or are addicted to CPT1A-mediated FAO for cell cycle progression. CPT1A deficiency also suppressed anchorage-independent growth and formation of xenografts from ovarian cancer cell lines. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 (p21) was identified as most consistently and robustly induced cell cycle regulator upon inactivation of CPT1A. Furthermore, p21 was transcriptionally upregulated by the FoxO transcription factors, which were in turn phosphorylated and activated by AMP-activated protein kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinases JNK and p38. Our results established the oncogenic relevance of CPT1A and a mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to cell cycle regulation, suggesting that CPT1A could be a prognostic biomarker and rational target for therapeutic intervention of cancer. PMID:26716645

  20. Propionyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride for treatment of mild to moderate colonic inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Merra; Giovanni Gasbarrini; Lucrezia Laterza; Marco Pizzoferrato; Andrea Poscia; Franco Scaldaferri; Vincenzo Arena

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess clinical and endoscopic response to propionyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride (PLC) in colonic inflammatory bowel disease.METHODS:Patients suffering from mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) colitis,with disease activity index (DAI) between 3 and 10 and under stable therapy with oral aminosalicylates,mercaptopurine or azathioprine,for at least 8 wk prior to baseline assessments,were considered suitable for enrollment.Fourteen patients were enrolled to assume PLC 2 g/d (two active tablets twice daily) orally.Clinical-endoscopic and histological activity were assessed by DAI and histological index (HI),respectively,following a colonoscopy performed immediately before and after 4 wk treatment.Clinical response was defined as a lowering of at least 3 points in DAI and clinical remission as a DAI score ≤ 2.Histological response was defined as an improvement of HI of at least 1 point.We used median values for the analysis.Differences pre-and post-treatment were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test.RESULTS:All patients enrolled completed the study.One patient,despite medical advice,took deflazacort 5 d before follow-up colonoscopy examination.No side effects were reported by patients during the trial.After treatment,71% (SE 12%) of patients achieved clinical response,while 64% (SE 13%) obtained remission.Separating UC from CD patients,we observed a clinical response in 60% (SE 16%) and 100%,respectively.Furthermore 60% (SE 16%) of UC patients and 75% (SE 25%) of CD patients were in clinical remission after therapy.The median DAI was 7 [interquartile range (IQR):4-8] before treatment and decreased to 2 (IQR:1-3) (P < 0.01) after treatment.Only patients with UC showed a significant reduction of DAI,from a median 6.5 (IQR:4-9) before treatment to 2(IQR:1-3) after treatment (P < 0.01).Conversely,in CD patients,although displaying a clear reduction of DAI from 7 (IQR:5.5-7.5) before therapy to 1.5 (IQR:0

  1. Inhibition of gene expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and heart fatty acid binding protein in cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide-induced acute cardiotoxic rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Aldelemy, Meshan L; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Hafez, Mohamed M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al-Harbi, Naif O; Al-Sharary, Shakir D; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated whether cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IFO) therapy alters the expression of the key genes engaged in long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) oxidation outside rat heart mitochondria, and if so, whether these alterations should be viewed as a mechanism during CP- and IFO-induced cardiotoxicity. Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of the six treatment groups: Rats in group 1 (control) and group 2 (L-carnitine) were injected intraperitoneal (i.p.) with normal saline and L-carnitine (200 mg/kg/day), respectively, for 10 successive days. Animals in group 3 (CP group) were injected i.p. with normal saline for 5 days before and 5 days after a single dose of CP (200 mg/kg, i.p.). Rats in group 4 (IFO group) received normal saline for 5 successive days followed by IFO (50 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 5 successive days. Rats in group 5 (CP-carnitine supplemented) were given the same doses of L-carnitine as group 2 for 5 days before and 5 days after a single dose of CP as group 3. Rats in group 6 (IFO-carnitine supplemented) were given the same doses of L-carnitine as group 2 for 5 days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO as group 4. Immediately, after the last dose of the treatment protocol, blood samples were withdrawn and animals were killed for biochemical, histopathological and gene expression studies. Treatment with CP and IFO significantly decreased expression of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) genes in cardiac tissues. Moreover, CP but not IFO significantly increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase2 mRNA expression. Conversely, IFO but not CP significantly decreased mRNA expression of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase. Both CP and IFO significantly increased serum lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase isoenzyme MB and malonyl-CoA content and histopathological lesions in cardiac tissues. Interestingly, carnitine supplementation completely reversed all the biochemical, histopathological and

  2. Determination of carnitine and acylcarnitines in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernez, Laurence; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Wenk, Markus; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2003-01-17

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of native carnitine and eight acylcarnitines in urine. The procedure uses a solid-phase extraction on a cation-exchange column and the separation is performed without derivatization within 17 min on a reversed-phase C8 column in the presence of a volatile ion-pairing reagent. The detector was an ion trap mass spectrometer and quantification was carried out in the MS-MS mode. Validation was done for aqueous standards at ranges between 0.75 and 200 micromol/l, depending on the compound. Carnitine was quantified in urine and comparison with a radioenzymatic assay gave a satisfactory correlation (R2 = 0.981). The assay could be successfully applied to the diagnostic of pathological acylcarnitines profile of metabolic disorders in urines of patients suffering from different organic acidurias. PMID:12564691

  3. Comparison of the protective roles of L-carnitine and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage by histopathological and biochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Vuslat Yurut-Caloglu; Murat Caloglu; Sevgi Eskiocak; Ebru Tastekin; Alaattin Ozen; Nukhet Kurkcu; Fulya Oz-Puyan; Zafer Kocak; Cem Uzal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the radioprotective efficacies of L-carnitine (LC) and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage. Materials and Methods: Forty-five, 3-month-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to six groups. Control (CONT, n = 7); irradiation alone RT: radiation therapy (RT, n = 8); amifostine plus irradiation (AMI + RT, n = 8); LC plus irradiation (LC + RT, n = 8); LC and sham irradiation (LC, n = 7); and amifostine and sham irradia...

  4. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-Iα) gene expression by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1) isoforms

    OpenAIRE

    Sadana, Prabodh; Zhang, Yi; Song, Shulan; Cook, George A.; Elam, Marshall B.; Park, Edwards A.

    2006-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivators (PGC-1) have important roles in mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic control in a variety of tissues. There are multiple isoforms of PGC-1 including PGC-1α and PGC-1β. Both the PGC-1α and β isoforms promote mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, but only PGC-1α stimulates gluconeogenesis in the liver. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) is a key enzyme regulating mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. In these s...

  5. Genetic polymorphisms in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A gene are associated with variation in body composition and fasting lipid traits in Yup'ik Eskimos[S

    OpenAIRE

    LEMAS, Dominick J.; Wiener, Howard W.; O'brien, Diane M.; Hopkins, Scarlett; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Havel, Peter J; Allison, David B.; Fernandez, Jose R.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Boyer, Bert B.

    2012-01-01

    Variants of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), a key hepatic lipid oxidation enzyme, may influence how fatty acid oxidation contributes to obesity and metabolic outcomes. CPT1A is regulated by diet, suggesting interactions between gene variants and diet may influence outcomes. The objective of this study was to test the association of CPT1A variants with body composition and lipids, mediated by consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Obesity phenotypes and fasting lipids we...

  6. Overexpression of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1 in Skeletal Muscle Is Sufficient to Enhance Fatty Acid Oxidation and Improve High-Fat Diet–Induced Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Clinton R.; Hoy, Andrew J.; Turner, Nigel; Watt, Matthew J.; Allen, Tamara L.; Carpenter, Kevin; Cooney, Gregory J.; Febbraio, Mark A; Kraegen, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is associated with lipid accumulation, but whether insulin resistance is due to reduced or enhanced flux of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria is both controversial and unclear. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle–specific overexpression of the muscle isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the enzyme that controls the entry of long-chain fatty acyl CoA into mitochondria, would enhance rates of fatty acid oxidation and improv...

  7. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Supplementation During HCV Therapy With Pegylated Interferon-α 2b Plus Ribavirin: Effect on Work Performance; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Pennisi, Manuela; Gagliano, Caterina; Vacante, Marco; Malaguarnera, Michele; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Bertino, Gaetano; Caraci, Filippo; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Background: The health status of employees with chronic hepatitis C has major implications for organizations and labour market. Objectives: To assess the effects of Acetyl-L-Carnitine administration on work productivity, daily activity, and fatigue in subjects with chronic hepatitis C treated with Pegylated-Interferon-α2b and Ribavirin. Patients and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, placebo controlled, double blind clinical trial, 30 subjects (Group A) with chronic hepatitis, received...

  8. Effects of Dietary L-carnitine and Betaine on Serum Biochemical Indices of Large Yellow Croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea Cultured in Floating Net Cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-guo Sang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the biochemical changes of large yellow croaker as affected by dietary supplements. Large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea is a marine species that is widely cultured in China due to its high commercial value. However, the cage-cultured large yellow croakers were found to be less tasty compared with wild large yellow croakers due to high lipid in their body, which significantly impacts the commercial markets. Triglycerides, cholesterol and free fatty acids are main lipid ingredients in the animal body. The fish were fed with basal diet or basal diet supplemented with L-carnitine (0.08% of dry weight diet or betaine (0.8% of dry weight diet for 12 weeks in seawater floating net cages (3×2×1.5 m each holding 60 fishes. Three net cages were assigned to each dietary treatment, as replications. The seawater temperature ranged from 18 to 31°C and salinity from 25 to 28 g/kg. Fish were hand-fed one of the experimental diets to apparent satiety twice daily (05:00 and 17:30 throughout the 12 week experimental period. The results indicate that L-carnitine or betaine in diets significantly reduced Serum Triglyceride (STG and Serum Cholesterol (SCH levels while increased Serum Free Fatty Acids (SFFA content (p<0.05. The diets of L-carnitine or betaine supplements on serum biochemical indices of that fish species have positive effects. These results suggested that the supplementation with L-carnitine or betaine is one of the effective ways to improve the meat quality of large yellow croakers cultured in floating net cages.

  9. Automated chemoenzymatic synthesis of no-carrier-added [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]propionyl L-carnitine for pharmacokinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, R.J.; Pike, V.W.; Dowsett, K.; Turton, D.R.; Poole, K. [Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom). MRC Cyclotron Unit

    1997-07-30

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is under development as a therapeutic for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure. Three methods were examined for labelling PLC in its propionyl group with positron-emitting carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2} = 20.3 min), one chemical and two chemoenzymatic. The former was based on the preparation of [{sup 11}C]propionyl chloride as labelling agent via {sup 11}C-carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide and subsequent chlorination. Reaction of carrier-added [{sup 11}C]propionyl chloride with L-carnitine in trifluoroacetic acid gave [{sup 11}C]PLC in 12% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide. However, the radiosynthesis was unsuccessful at the no-carrier added (NCA) level of specific radioactivity. [{sup 11}C]Propionate, as a radioactive precursor for chemoenzymatic routes, was prepared via carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide and hydrolysis. NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC was prepared in 68 min in 14% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from [{sup 11}C]propionate via sequential conversions catalysed by acetate kinase, phosphotransacetylase and carnitine acetyltransferase. A superior chemoenzymatic synthesis of NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC was developed, based on the use of a novel supported Grignard reagent for the synthesis of [{sup 11}C]propionate and conversions by S-acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. This gave an overall radiochemical yield of 30-48% (decay-corrected). This synthesis was automated for radiation safety and provides pure NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC in high radioactivities ready for intravenous administration within 25 min from radionuclide production. The [{sup 11}C]PLC is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies in human subjects with PET and the elucidation of the fate of the propionyl group of PLC in vivo. (Author).

  10. SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL PART II: a prospective, single-armed trial of L-carnitine and valproic acid in ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Kissel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple lines of evidence have suggested that valproic acid (VPA might benefit patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. The SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL was a two part prospective trial to evaluate oral VPA and L-carnitine in SMA children. Part 1 targeted non-ambulatory children ages 2-8 in a 12 month cross over design. We report here Part 2, a twelve month prospective, open-label trial of VPA and L-carnitine in ambulatory SMA children. METHODS: This study involved 33 genetically proven type 3 SMA subjects ages 3-17 years. Subjects underwent two baseline assessments over 4-6 weeks and then were placed on VPA and L-carnitine for 12 months. Assessments were performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcomes included safety, adverse events and the change at 6 and 12 months in motor function assessed using the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Extend (MHFMS-Extend, timed motor tests and fine motor modules. Secondary outcomes included changes in ulnar compound muscle action potential amplitudes (CMAP, handheld dynamometry, pulmonary function, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scores. RESULTS: Twenty-eight subjects completed the study. VPA and carnitine were generally well tolerated. Although adverse events occurred in 85% of subjects, they were usually mild and transient. Weight gain of 20% above body weight occurred in 17% of subjects. There was no significant change in any primary outcome at six or 12 months. Some pulmonary function measures showed improvement at one year as expected with normal growth. CMAP significantly improved suggesting a modest biologic effect not clinically meaningful. CONCLUSIONS: This study, coupled with the CARNIVAL Part 1 study, indicate that VPA is not effective in improving strength or function in SMA children. The outcomes used in this study are feasible and reliable, and can be employed in future trials in SMA. TRIAL REGSITRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00227266.

  11. The neurotoxic effect of clindamycin - induced gut bacterial imbalance and orally administered propionic acid on DNA damage assessed by the comet assay: protective potency of carnosine and carnitine

    OpenAIRE

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Shaker, Ghada H; El-Gezeery, Amina R; Al-Ayadhi, Laila

    2013-01-01

    Background Comet assay is a quick method for assessing DNA damage in individual cells. It allows the detection of single and double DNA strand breaks, which represent the direct effect of some damaging agents. This study uses standard comet quantification models to compare the neurotoxic effect of orally administered propionic acid (PA) to that produced as a metabolite of bacterial overgrowth induced by clindamycin. Additionally, the protective effect of carnosine and carnitine as natural die...

  12. High degree of efficacy in the treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome with combined co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine and amitriptyline, a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boles Richard G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS, defined by recurrent stereotypical episodes of nausea and vomiting, is a relatively-common disabling and historically difficult-to-treat condition associated with migraine headache and mitochondrial dysfunction. Limited data suggests that the anti-migraine therapies amitriptyline and cyproheptadine, and the mitochondrial-targeted cofactors co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine, have efficacy in episode prophylaxis. Methods A retrospective chart review of 42 patients seen by one clinician that met established CVS diagnostic criteria revealed 30 cases with available outcome data. Participants were treated on a loose protocol consisting of fasting avoidance, co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine, with the addition of amitriptyline (or cyproheptadine in those Results Vomiting episodes resolved in 23 cases, and improved by > 75% and > 50% in three and one additional case respectively. Among the three treatment failures, two could not tolerate amitriptyline (as was also the case in the child with only > 50% efficacy and one had multiple congenital gastrointestinal anomalies. Excluding the latter case, substantial efficacy (> 75% response was 26/29 at the start of treatment, and 26/26 in those able to tolerate the regiment, including high dosages of amitriptyline. Conclusion Our data suggest that a protocol consisting of mitochondrial-targeted cofactors (co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine plus amitriptyline (or possibly cyproheptadine in preschoolers coupled with blood level monitoring is highly effective in the prevention of vomiting episodes.

  13. Flux control analysis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle: pyruvate and palmitoyl-carnitine as substrates give different control patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Anette J; Grunnet, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2007-01-01

    associated with the ADP-generating system, i.e., 0.58 +/- 0.05 with pyruvate, but significantly lower, 0.40 +/- 0.05, with palmitoyl-carnitine as substrate. The flux control coefficients of complex I, III and IV, the ATP synthase, the ATP/ADP carrier and the P(i) carrier were 0.070 +/- 0.03, 0.083 +/- 0.......04, 0.054 +/- 0.01, 0.11 +/- 0.03, 0.090 +/- 0.03 and 0.026 +/- 0.01, respectively, with pyruvate as substrate. With palmitoyl-carnitine all control coefficients were significantly different, except for the P(i) carrier (i.e., 0.024 +/- 0.001, 0.036 +/- 0.01, 0.052 +/- 0.02, 0.020 +/- 0.002, 0.034 +/- 0.......02 and 0.012 +/- 0.002, respectively), probably caused by the shift from NADH to FADH(2) oxidation. The sum of flux control coefficients was not significantly different from unity with pyruvate, while only 0.58 with palmitoyl-carnitine, indicating significant control contributions from the enzymes...

  14. Effect of Magnetic Field Exposure on Testicular function and Prophylactic Role of Coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protective effect of L-carnitine or Co enzyme Q 10 (Co Q 10) against high magnetic field (20 mt) induced testicular toxicity in mice was evaluated. Animals were injected with L-carnitine (200 mg/kg i.p.) or Co Q 10(200 mg/kg per o.s.) 1 hr before exposure to fractionated doses (1/2 h/day, 3 times per week for 2 weeks) or acute dose (3 hr) of magnetic field. Total sperm count motility, daily sperm production and testicular LDH-X activity as well as histopathological examination were investigated. Exposure of mice to fractionated doses of magnetic field caused a significant decrease in sperm count, motility, daily sperm production and LDH-X activity,which were more pronounced than those of acute dose. Moreover,marked testicular histopathological changes were observed after exposure to fractionated doses of magnetic field. Pretreatment of mice with L-carnitine or Co Q 10 1 hr before exposure to the magnetic field caused a significant recovery of testicular damage induced by high magnetic field (20 mT)

  15. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Immunomodulatory effects of L-carnitine and q10 in mouse spleen exposed to low-frequency high-intensity magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current study, we have investigated the bioeffects of repeated exposure to low-frequency (50 Hz) high-intensity (20 mT; 200 G) electromagnetic field (EMF) on some immune parameters in mice. The animals were exposed to EMF daily for 30 min three times per week for 2 weeks. We also studied the possible immunomodulatory effects of two anti-radical substances known to have non-specific immunostimulant effects namely, L-carnitine (200 mg/kg body weight i.p.) and Q10 (200 mg/kg body weight, p.o.). Both drugs were given 1 h prior to each EMF exposure. Immune endpoints included total body weight, spleen/body weight ratio, splenocytes viability, total and differential white blood cell (WBCs; lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils) counts, as well as the lymphocyte proliferation induced by the mitogens; phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin-A (Con-A) and lipoploysaccharide (LPS). Magnetic field decreased splenocyte viability, WBCs count, as well as mitogens-induced lymphocyte proliferation. L-carnitine, but not Q10 could ameliorate the adverse effects of EMF on the vast majority of the immune parameters tested, suggesting a possible immunoprotective role of L-carnitine under the current experimental conditions

  17. Placebo-controlled double-blind randomized trial on the use of L-carnitine, L-acetylcarnitine, or combined L-carnitine and L-acetylcarnitine in men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Balercia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of L-carnitine (LC or L-acetyl-carnitine (LAC or combined LC and LAC treatment in improving semen kinetic parameters and the total oxyradical scavenging capacity in semen. Design: Placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial.Setting: Andrology unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Polytechnic University of Marche, Italy.Patient(s: Sixty infertile men, ages 20 to 40 years, with the following baseline sperm selection criteria: concentration > 20 × 10 6 / mL, sperm forward motility < 50 %, and normal sperm morphology > 30 %; 59 patients completed the study.Intervention(s: Patients underwent a double-blind therapy of LC 3 g / d, LAC 3 g / d, a combination of LC 2 g / d + LAC 1 g / d, or placebo. The study design was 1 month of run in, 6 months of therapy or placebo, and 3 months of follow-up evaluation.Main Outcome Measure(s: Variations in semen parameters used for patient selection, and variations in total oxyradical scavenging capacity of the seminal fluid.Result(s: Sperm cell motility (total and forward, including kinetic features determined by computer-assisted sperm analysis increased in patients to whom LAC was administered both alone or in combination with LC; combined LC + LAC therapy led to a significant improvement of straight progressive velocity after 3 months. The total oxyradical scavenging capacity of the semen toward hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals also increased and was positively correlated with the improvement of kinetic features. Patients with lower baseline values of motility and total oxyradical scavenging capacity of the seminal fluid had a significantly higher probability of responding to the treatment.Conclusion(s: The administration of LC and LAC is effective in increasing sperm kinetic features in patients affected by idiopathic asthenozoospemia and improves the total oxyradical scavenging capacity of the seminal fluid in the same population (Fertil Steril ® 2005;84:662–71

  18. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Modifies the Effect of L-Carnitine,Curcumin, Garlic Powder and Green tea Extract on Doxorubicin-Induced Nephropathy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha R. Radwan*, Esmat A. Shaban*, Hesham A. Salem and Sanaa A. Kenawy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The possible protective potential of exposure to low dose of radiation in presence or absence of L-carnitine, curcumin, garlic powder or green tea extract was examined in the present study on doxorubicin (DOX-induced experimental nephropathy in rats. Preliminary study was carried out to select the suitable dose of DOX to induce nephrotoxicity. In the current experiment 5 mg/kg, i.p. was selected as a single dose to induce nephrotoxicity during 15 days. The possible modulating effect of L-carnitine, curcumin, garlic powder or green tea extract on kidney function was examined. Animals were subdivided into three sets. Three groups of the 1st set were exposed to radiation at a single dose level of 0.3 Gy then received DOX, 1, 3 or 7 days postirradiation respectively. The groups of 2nd set daily received L-carnitine (40 mg/kg, i.p., curcumin (50 mg/kg, i.p., garlic powder (100 mg/kg, p.o. and green tea extract (300 mg/kg, p.o. daily for two weeks before induction of nephropathy. Groups of the 3rd set received the same doses of drugs then were injected with DOX, 1, 3 or 7 days following irradiation respectively. Two groups of animals, one of them received saline and served as normal and the other received DOX and served as nephropathic group were included in 1st, 2nd as well as 3rd set. Fifteen days following DOX administration, serum was collected and the animals were then sacrificed. Serum creatinine, urea and uric acid were evaluated. Data revealed that, a single DOX dose (5 mg/kg induced marked acute nephrotoxicity manifested as significant increase in the activities of serum creatinine, urea as well as uric acid. Interestingly, pre-exposure to radiation at a dose level of 0.3 Gy, 1 or 3 days before DOX injection exhibited significant improvement in the above altered mentioned parameters. However, exposure to low dose radiation 7 days prior to DOX administration did not show a protective effect. Moreover, pretreatment with L-carnitine, curcumin

  19. Quantitative analysis of the dynamic signaling pathway involved in the cAMP mediated induction of l-carnitine biosynthesis in E. coli cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormiga, José; González-Alcón, Carlos; Sevilla, Angel; Cánovas, Manuel; Torres, Néstor V

    2010-04-01

    L-(-)-carnitine can be synthesized from waste bioprecursors in the form of crotonobetaine. Such biotransformation is carried out in E. coli by the enzymes encoded by operons regulated by the cAMP receptor proteins. Non-phosphorylated sugars, such as glycerol are used as energy and carbon source since glucose inhibits cAMP synthesis. Until now little attention has been paid to the regulatory signaling structure that operates during the transition from a glucose-consuming, non-l-carnitine producing steady state, to a glycerol-consuming l-carnitine producing steady state. In this work we aim to elucidate and quantify the underlying regulatory mechanisms operating in the abolition of the glucose inhibiting effect. For this purpose we make use of the systemic approach by integrating the available information and our own experimentally generated data to construct a mathematical model. The model is built using power-law representation and is used as a platform to make predictive simulations and to assess the consistency of the regulatory structure of the overall process. The model is subsequently checked for quality through stability and a special, dynamic sensitivity analysis. The results show that the model is able to deal with the observed system transient phase. The model is multi-hierarchical, comprising the metabolic, gene expression, signaling and bioreactor levels. It involves variables and parameters of a very different nature that develop in different time scales and orders of magnitude. Some of the most relevant conclusions obtained are: (i) the regulatory interactions among glucose, glycerol and cAMP metabolism are far stronger than those present in the l-carnitine transport, production and degradation processes; (ii) carnitine biosynthesis is very sensitive to the cAMP signaling system since it reacts at very low cAMP receptor concentrations, and (iii) ATP is a critical factor in the transient dynamics. All these model-derived observations have been

  20. Aplicações clínicas da suplementação de L-carnitina Clinical uses of L-carnitine supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne de Faria Coelho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A carnitina, uma amina quaternária (3-hidroxi-4-N-trimetilamino-butirato, é sintetizada no organismo (fígado, rins e cérebro a partir de dois aminoácidos essenciais: lisina e metionina, exigindo para sua síntese a presença de ferro, ácido ascórbico, niacina e vitamina B6. Tem função fundamental na geração de energia pela célula, pois age nas reações transferidoras de ácidos graxos livres do citosol para mitocôndrias, facilitando sua oxidação e geração de adenosina Trifosfato. A concentração orgânica de carnitina é resultado de processos metabólicos - como ingestão, biossíntese, transporte dentro e fora dos tecidos e excreção - que, quando alterados em função de diversas doenças, levam a um estado carencial de carnitina com prejuízos relacionados ao metabolismo de lipídeos. A suplementação de L-carnitina pode aumentar o fluxo sangüíneo aos músculos devido também ao seu efeito vasodilatador e antioxidante, reduzindo algumas complicações de doenças isquêmicas, como a doença arterial coronariana, e as conseqüências da neuropatia diabética. Por esse motivo, o objetivo do presente trabalho foi descrever possíveis benefícios da suplementação de carnitina nos indivíduos com necessidades especiais e susceptíveis a carências de carnitina, como os portadores de doenças renais, neuropatia diabética, síndrome da imunodefeciência adquirida e doenças cardiovasculares.Carnitine, a quaternary amine (3-hidroxy-4-n-trimethylaminobutyrate is synthesized in the body (liver, kidney and brain from lysine and methionine, two essential amino acids, in the presence of iron, ascorbate, niacin and vitamin B6. Carnitine plays a central role in the cellular energy metabolism because it transports long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol to the mitochondria for oxidation and adenosine 5'-triphosphate generation. The organic concentration of carnitine is a result of several metabolic pathways such as ingestion

  1. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Supplementation on Lipid Profile, Anemia, and Quality of Life in Chronic Renal Disease Patients under Hemodialysis: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Emami Naini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients on maintenance hemodialysis several factors reduce the body stored carnitine which could lead to dyslipidemia, anemia, and general health in these patients. We evaluated the effect of oral L-carnitine supplementation on lipid profiles, anemia, and quality of life (QOL in hemodialysis patients. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients on hemodialysis received either L-carnitine 1 g/d (n=24 or placebo (27 patients for 16 weeks. At the end of the study, there was a significant decrease in triglyceride (-31.1±38.7 mg/dL, P=0.001 and a significant increase in HDL (3.7±2.8 mg/dL, P0.05. Erythropoietin dose was significantly decreased in both the carnitine (-4750±5772 mg, P=0.001 and the placebo group (-2000±4296 mg, P<0.05. No improvement was observed in QOL scores of two groups. In ESRD patients under maintenance hemodialysis, oral L-carnitine supplementation may reduce triglyceride and cholesterol and increase HDL and hemoglobin and subsequently reduce needed erythropoietin dose without effect on QOL.

  2. NR4A nuclear receptors mediate carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A gene expression by the rexinoid HX600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizawa, Michiyasu [Division of Biochemistry, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi-kamicho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8610 (Japan); Kagechika, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Makishima, Makoto, E-mail: makishima.makoto@nihon-u.ac.jp [Division of Biochemistry, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi-kamicho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8610 (Japan)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The function of RXR heterodimers with NR4 receptors remains unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RXR ligand HX600 induces expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HX600-induced CPT1A expression is mediated by the NR4 receptors, Nur77 and NURR1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPT1A induction by HX600 is not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPT1A could be a target of the Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR heterodimers. -- Abstract: Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and can be activated by 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA). RXRs form homodimers and heterodimers with other nuclear receptors such as the retinoic acid receptor and NR4 subfamily nuclear receptors, Nur77 and NURR1. Potential physiological roles of the Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR heterodimers have not been elucidated. In this study, we identified a gene regulated by these heterodimers utilizing HX600, a selective RXR agonist for Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR. While 9CRA induced many genes, including RAR-target genes, HX600 effectively induced only carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) in human teratocarcinoma NT2/D1 cells, which express RXR{alpha}, Nur77 and NURR1. HX600 also increased CPT1A expression in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells. Although HX600 induced CPT1A less effectively than 9CRA, overexpression of Nur77 or NURR1 increased the HX600 response to levels similar to 9CRA in NT2/D1 and HEK293 cells. A dominant-negative form of Nur77 or NURR1 repressed the induction of CPT1A by HX600. A protein synthesis inhibitor did not alter HX600-dependent CPT1A induction. Thus, the rexinoid HX600 directly induces expression of CPT1A through a Nur77 or NURR1-mediated mechanism. CPT1A, a gene involved in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation, could be a target of RXR-NR4 receptor heterodimers.

  3. L-carnitine and pyruvate are prosurvival factors during the storage of stallion spermatozoa at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Zamira; Lambourne, Sarah R; Quadrelli, Julianne; Smith, Nathan D; Aitken, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    The spermatozoa of many stallions do not tolerate being cooled, restricting the commercial viability of these animals and necessitating the development of a chemically defined room temperature (RT) storage medium. This study examined the impact of two major modulators of oxidative phosphorylation, pyruvate (Pyr) and L-carnitine (L-C), on the storage of stallion spermatozoa at RT. Optimal concentrations of Pyr (10 mM) and L-C (50 mM) were first identified and these concentrations were then used to investigate the effects of these compounds on sperm functionality and oxidative stress at RT. Mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species, along with lipid peroxidation, were all significantly suppressed by the addition of L-C (48 h MitoSOX Red negative: 46.2% vs. 26.1%; 48 and 72 h dihydroethidium negative: 61.6% vs. 43.1% and 64.4% vs. 46.9%, respectively; 48 and 72 h 4-hydroxynonenal negative: 37.1% vs. 23.8% and 41.6% vs. 25.7%, respectively), while the Pyr + L-C combination resulted in significantly higher motility compared to the control at 72 h (total motility: 64.2% vs. 39.4%; progressive motility: 34.2% vs. 15.2%). In addition, supplementation with L-C significantly reduced oxidative DNA damage at 72 h (9.0% vs. 15.6%). To investigate the effects of L-C as an osmolyte, comparisons were made between media that were osmotically balanced with NaCl, choline chloride, or L-C. This analysis demonstrated that spermatozoa stored in the L-C balanced medium had significantly higher total motility (55.0% vs. 39.0%), rapid motility (44.0% vs. 25.7%), and ATP levels (70.9 vs. 12.8 ng/ml) following storage compared with the NaCl treatment, while choline chloride did not significantly improve these parameters compared to the control. Finally, mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate that a combination of Pyr and L-C produced significantly higher acetyl-L-carnitine production than any other treatment (6.7 pg/10(6) spermatozoa vs. control at 4.0 pg/10(6) spermatozoa

  4. NR4A nuclear receptors mediate carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A gene expression by the rexinoid HX600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The function of RXR heterodimers with NR4 receptors remains unknown. ► The RXR ligand HX600 induces expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A). ► HX600-induced CPT1A expression is mediated by the NR4 receptors, Nur77 and NURR1. ► CPT1A induction by HX600 is not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. ► CPT1A could be a target of the Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR heterodimers. -- Abstract: Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and can be activated by 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA). RXRs form homodimers and heterodimers with other nuclear receptors such as the retinoic acid receptor and NR4 subfamily nuclear receptors, Nur77 and NURR1. Potential physiological roles of the Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR heterodimers have not been elucidated. In this study, we identified a gene regulated by these heterodimers utilizing HX600, a selective RXR agonist for Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR. While 9CRA induced many genes, including RAR-target genes, HX600 effectively induced only carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) in human teratocarcinoma NT2/D1 cells, which express RXRα, Nur77 and NURR1. HX600 also increased CPT1A expression in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells. Although HX600 induced CPT1A less effectively than 9CRA, overexpression of Nur77 or NURR1 increased the HX600 response to levels similar to 9CRA in NT2/D1 and HEK293 cells. A dominant-negative form of Nur77 or NURR1 repressed the induction of CPT1A by HX600. A protein synthesis inhibitor did not alter HX600-dependent CPT1A induction. Thus, the rexinoid HX600 directly induces expression of CPT1A through a Nur77 or NURR1-mediated mechanism. CPT1A, a gene involved in fatty acid β-oxidation, could be a target of RXR-NR4 receptor heterodimers.

  5. Acetyl-l-carnitine restores synaptic transmission and enhances the inducibility of stable LTP after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Kitti; Frank, Rita; Szabó, József; Knapp, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2016-09-22

    Hypoxic circumstances result in functional and structural impairments of the brain. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on hippocampal slices is a technique widely used to investigate the consequences of ischemic stroke and the potential neuroprotective effects of different drugs. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance in the body, and it can therefore be administered safely even in relatively high doses. In previous experiments, ALC pretreatment proved to be effective against global hypoperfusion. In the present study, we investigated whether ALC can be protective in an OGD model. We are not aware of any earlier study in which the long-term potentiation (LTP) function on hippocampal slices was measured after OGD. Therefore, we set out to determine whether an effective ALC concentration has an effect on synaptic plasticity after OGD in the hippocampal CA1 subfield of rats. A further aim was to investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effect of this compound. The experiments revealed that ALC is neuroprotective against OGD in a dose-dependent manner, which is manifested not only in the regeneration of the impaired synaptic transmission after the OGD, but also in the inducibility and stability of the LTP. In the case of the most effective concentration of ALC (500μM), use of a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) revealed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a key role in the restoration of the synaptic transmission and plasticity reached by ALC treatment. PMID:27378558

  6. Prevention of di (2-ethylhexyl Phthalate-induced Testicular Disturbance in Mice by Co-administration of L-carnitine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Malekzadeh Shafaroudi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: di (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP is widely used in the plastic industry and caninduce reproductive toxicity. On the other hand, L-carnitine (LC plays a crucial role in spermmetabolism and maturation. This study evaluates the effect of LC on body and testis weight,testis tissue, count, motility, viability, morphology, and chromatin quality of epididymal sperm,testicular spermatid number (TSN per gram testis and daily sperm production (DSP in LCtreatedmice.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, adult male NMRI mice (mean age: 4weeks were given doses of DEHP and LC by gavaging for 2 weeks. All samples were assessedaccording to World Health Organization (WHO criteria. Sperm morphology was assessed usingPapanicolaou staining and sperm chromatin quality by aniline-blue staining.The left testes were fixed in Bouinś solution for histological examination and the end slices werestained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E. The right testes were homogenized, and then TSNand DSP were calculated with an improved Neubauer haemocytometer and respective frames.Paired t-test, ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were utilized for data analysis.Results: Co-administration of DEHP and LC not only prevented significant gains in testicularweight, but also maintained the sperm’s normal morphology and chromatin quality (p<0.05. Inaddition, LC recovered histological changes, TSN, DSP, and sperm count.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that oral administration of LC partially or generallyprotects spermatogenesis from DEHP-toxicity in mice.

  7. Mitochondrial Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) Is Part of an Outer Membrane Fatty Acid Transfer Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immunological method. Blue native electrophoresis followed by detection with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry identified large molecular mass complexes that contained not only CPT1a but also long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). Immunoprecipitation with antisera against the proteins revealed a strong interaction between the three proteins. Immobilized CPT1a-specific antibodies immunocaptured not only CPT1a but also ACSL and VDAC, further strengthening findings with blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation. This study shows strong protein-protein interaction between CPT1a, ACSL, and VDAC. We propose that this complex transfers activated fatty acids through the MOM. PMID:21622568

  8. Elevated expression of fatty acid synthase and nuclear localization of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C are common among human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamiya, Tomihiro; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Hamasaki, Hideomi; Honda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Iwaki, Toru

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific isoform of the CPT1 family, are upregulated in certain types of cancers, including gliomas. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) catalyzes the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, the rate-limiting step in fatty acid synthesis, and its phosphorylated form inhibits lipid synthesis. We examined the expression and subcellular localization of these fatty acid metabolism-related molecules in human gliomas. We performed immunostaining of two glioma cell lines (U373MG and U87MG) and 41 surgical specimens of diffuse gliomas with various histological grades (21 with the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1(IDH1) R132H mutation and 20 without the mutation). In the cultured glioma cells, CPT1C and phosphorylated ACC (p-ACC) were mainly localized to the nuclei, whereas FASN localized to the cytoplasm. In the surgical specimens, most glioma tissues showed nuclear staining for CPT1C and p-ACC, and cytoplasmic staining for FASN, regardless of the genetic status of IDH1 and the histological grade. Therefore, elevated cytoplasmic expression of FASN and nuclear localization of CPT1C are common among human diffuse gliomas, which may be regulated by the differential phosphorylation status of ACC in the cellular compartment. PMID:24984811

  9. The flux control coefficient of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I on palmitate beta-oxidation in rat hepatocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurway, T D; Sherratt, H A; Pogson, C I; Agius, L

    1997-01-01

    Two important factors that determine the flux of hepatic beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids are the availability of fatty acid and the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I). Using Metabolic Control Analysis, the flux control coefficient of CPT I in rat hepatocyte monolayers was determined by titration with 2-[6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (Etomoxir), which is converted to Etomoxir-CoA, an irreversible inhibitor of CPT I. We measured CPT I activity and flux through beta-oxidation at 0.2 mM and 1.0 mM palmitate to simulate substrate concentrations in fed and fasted states. Rates of beta-oxidation were 4.5-fold higher at 1. 0 mM palmitate compared with 0.2 mM palmitate. Flux control coefficients of CPT I, estimated by two independent methods, were similar: 0.67 and 0.79 for 0.2 mM palmitate, and 0.68 and 0.77 for 1 mM palmitate. It is concluded that the regulatory potential of CPT I is similar at low and high physiological concentrations of palmitate. PMID:9173869

  10. Methionine deficiency leads to hepatic fat accretion via impairment of fatty acid import by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikusato, M; Sudo, S; Toyomizu, M

    2015-04-01

    1. To clarify the underlying mechanism of hepatic fat accretion due to methionine (Met) deficiency in broiler chickens, the present study investigated the effect of Met deficiency on the hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) system, which imports fatty acids into mitochondria. 2. Fifteen-d-old male meat-type chickens were fed on either a control diet (containing 0.52 g/100 g Met) or a Met-deficient diet (containing 0.27 g Met/100 g). After a 10-d feeding period, the birds were killed by decapitation and their livers excised to determine hepatic CPT1 and CPT2 mRNA levels and for the related hepatic fatty acid-supported mitochondrial respiration to be measured. 3. Met deficiency decreased body weight gain and feed efficiency and increased hepatic lipid content compared to the control group. Whereas the hepatic CPT2 mRNA level in the Met-deficient group remained unchanged compared to that of the control group, the CPT1 mRNA level was decreased in the Met-deficient group and CPT1-dependent hepatic mitochondrial respiration was impaired. 4. Our results suggest that the hepatic lipid accretion that occurs in response to Met deficiency might be attributable to the impairment of CPT1-mediated fatty acid import into mitochondria. PMID:25561085

  11. Malonyl coenzyme A and the regulation of functional carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity and fat oxidation in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Blake B.; Holmbäck, Ulf C.; Volpi, Elena; Morio-Liondore, Beatrice; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    Physiological hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia reduces fat oxidation in skeletal muscle. The mechanism responsible for this decrease in fat oxidation in human muscle is not known and may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that the transfer of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into the mitochondria via carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) is inhibited by increased malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) (a known potent inhibitor of CPT-1) in human muscle during hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia. We studied six healthy subjects after an overnight fast and during an induced 5-hour period of hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia. Muscle fatty acid oxidation was calculated using stable isotope methodology combined with blood sampling from the femoral artery and vein of one leg. Muscle functional CPT-1 activity was assessed by concurrently infusing an LCFA tracer and a CPT-independent medium-chain fatty acid tracer. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis after the periods of fasting and hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia. Hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia decreased LCFA oxidation, but had no effect on LCFA uptake or medium-chain fatty acid oxidation across the leg. Malonyl-CoA concentration significantly increased from 0.13 ± 0.01 to 0.35 ± 0.07 nmol/g during hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia. We conclude that hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia increases malonyl-CoA, inhibits functional CPT-1 activity, and shunts LCFA away from oxidation and toward storage in human muscle. PMID:12464674

  12. Mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) is part of an outer membrane fatty acid transfer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L

    2011-07-22

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immunological method. Blue native electrophoresis followed by detection with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry identified large molecular mass complexes that contained not only CPT1a but also long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). Immunoprecipitation with antisera against the proteins revealed a strong interaction between the three proteins. Immobilized CPT1a-specific antibodies immunocaptured not only CPT1a but also ACSL and VDAC, further strengthening findings with blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation. This study shows strong protein-protein interaction between CPT1a, ACSL, and VDAC. We propose that this complex transfers activated fatty acids through the MOM. PMID:21622568

  13. Long-term increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A expression in ventromedial hypotalamus causes hyperphagia and alters the hypothalamic lipidomic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Paula; Mir, Joan Francesc; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Costa, Ana S H; Malandrino, Maria Ida; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier; Gao, Su; Chohnan, Shigeru; Rodríguez-Peña, Maria Sol; Petry, Harald; Asins, Guillermina; Hegardt, Fausto G; Herrero, Laura; Serra, Dolors

    2014-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) has emerged as a crucial pathway in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) 1A is the rate-limiting enzyme in mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation and it has been proposed as a crucial mediator of fasting and ghrelin orexigenic signalling. However, the relationship between changes in CPT1A activity and the intracellular downstream effectors in the VMH that contribute to appetite modulation is not fully understood. To this end, we examined the effect of long-term expression of a permanently activated CPT1A isoform by using an adeno-associated viral vector injected into the VMH of rats. Peripherally, this procedure provoked hyperghrelinemia and hyperphagia, which led to overweight, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. In the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), long-term CPT1AM expression in the VMH did not modify acyl-CoA or malonyl-CoA levels. However, it altered the MBH lipidomic profile since ceramides and sphingolipids increased and phospholipids decreased. Furthermore, we detected increased vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (VGAT) and reduced vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) expressions, both transporters involved in this orexigenic signal. Taken together, these observations indicate that CPT1A contributes to the regulation of feeding by modulating the expression of neurotransmitter transporters and lipid components that influence the orexigenic pathways in VMH. PMID:24819600

  14. A region in the first exon/intron of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase Ibeta is involved in enhancement of basal transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Li; Moore, Meredith L; McMillin, Jeanie B

    2002-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-Ibeta (CPT-Ibeta) catalyses the transfer of long-chain fatty acids to the enzymes of beta-oxidation of muscle and heart. Transcriptional control of this regulatory protein is relevant to disorders of fatty acid oxidation and the switch to glucose metabolism that occurs in cardiac pathology. The presence of a transcriptional enhancer sequence in the first untranslated exon and first intron of the CPT-Ibeta gene was identified using deletional and mutational analysis, and by ligation of an oleate responsive element (fatty acid response element) to a minimal promoter. The enhancer sequences are contained in the first 40 bases downstream of the transcription start site and increase CPT-Ibeta reporter gene expression independent of any 5' cis-acting elements. Deletion of the first 40 bases of the 3'-untranslated region does not affect the up-regulation of transcription by 10 microM phenylephrine. However, mutation and/or deletion of bases between +11 and +30 dramatically decreases reporter gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays reveal two DNA (+11 to +36)-protein complexes that appear cardiac specific. The exon/intron element enhances activation of the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter in a position- and orientation-dependent manner. Therefore we have identified a novel region in the first exon/intron of the CPT-Ibeta gene that acts as a non-classical transcriptional enhancer downstream of regulatory elements characterized previously in the 5'-flanking region of the minimal promoter. PMID:11879187

  15. Expression of novel isoforms of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1) generated by alternative splicing of the CPT-ibeta gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G S; Lu, Y C; Gulick, T

    1998-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) catalyses the rate-determining step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. The enzyme has two cognate structural genes that are preferentially expressed in liver (alpha) or fat and muscle (beta). We hypothesized the existence of additional isoforms in heart to account for unique kinetic characteristics of enzyme activity in this tissue. Hybridization and PCR screening of a human cardiac cDNA library revealed the expression of two novel CPT-I isoforms generated by alternative splicing of the CPT-Ibeta transcript, in addition to the beta and alpha cDNA species previously described. Ribonuclease protection and reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR assays confirmed the presence of mRNA species of each splicing variant in heart, skeletal muscle and liver, with differing relative concentrations in the tissues. The novel splicing variants omit exons or utilize a cryptic splice donor site within an exon. Deduced polypeptide sequences of the novel enzymes include omissions in the region of putative membrane-spanning and malonyl-CoA regulatory domains compared with the previously described CPT-Is, implying that the encoded enzymes will exhibit unique features with respect to outer mitochondrial membrane topology and response to physiological and pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:9693124

  16. Acute severe encephalopathy related to human herpesvirus-6 infection in a patient with carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 deficiency carrying thermolabile variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Ishikawa, Nobutsune; Tsumura, Miyuki; Fujii, Yuji; Okada, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Masao

    2013-05-01

    We describe a male infant with carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) deficiency who presented with acute encephalopathy related to human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) infection. He was hospitalized for pylexia and status epilepticus, diagnosed with acute encephalopathy, and treated with intensive supportive care including mechanical ventilation, support for hypothermia, and control of the intracranial pressure, that caused severe neurological sequelae. HHV-6 was detected in his cerebrospinal fluid, indicating HHV-6 related encephalopathy. In the acute phase, acylcarnitine analysis of blood suggested a defect of long chain fatty acid β-oxidation, and CPT2 deficiency was genetically confirmed. In addition, other gene alterations that have been previously reported as "thermolabile variants" were found. Some patients with the infantile form of CPT2 deficiency present with acute encephalopathy, but others do not develop encephalopathy. The correlation between phenotype and genotype has not been clarified. Our case may contribute to the elucidation of the genetic factor involved in acute encephalopathy in CPT2 deficiency. PMID:22854105

  17. Inhibition of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Keratinocytes Using a Composition Containing Carnitine, Thioctic Acid and Saw Palmetto Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridar Chittur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation of the hair follicle (HF is considered a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA. Previously, we clinically tested liposterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr and its glycoside, β-sitosterol, in subjects with AGA and showed a highly positive response to treatment. In this study, we sought to determine whether blockade of inflammation using a composition containing LSESr as well as two anti-inflammatory agents (carnitine and thioctic acid could alter the expression of molecular markers of inflammation in a well-established in vitro system. Using a well-validated assay representative of HF keratinocytes, specifically, stimulation of cultured human keratinocyte cells in vitro, we measured changes in gene expression of a spectrum of well-known inflammatory markers. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS provided an inflammatory stimulus. In particular, we found that the composition effectively suppressed LPS-activated gene expression of chemokines, including CCL17, CXCL6 and LTB(4 associated with pathways involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the test compound exhibits anti-inflammatory characteristics in a well-established in vitro assay representing HF keratinocyte gene expression. These findings suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors combined with blockade of inflammatory processes could represent a novel two-pronged approach in the treatment of AGA with improved efficacy over current modalities.

  18. Long-term increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A expression in ventromedial hypotalamus causes hyperphagia and alters the hypothalamic lipidomic profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Mera

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH has emerged as a crucial pathway in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT 1A is the rate-limiting enzyme in mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation and it has been proposed as a crucial mediator of fasting and ghrelin orexigenic signalling. However, the relationship between changes in CPT1A activity and the intracellular downstream effectors in the VMH that contribute to appetite modulation is not fully understood. To this end, we examined the effect of long-term expression of a permanently activated CPT1A isoform by using an adeno-associated viral vector injected into the VMH of rats. Peripherally, this procedure provoked hyperghrelinemia and hyperphagia, which led to overweight, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. In the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH, long-term CPT1AM expression in the VMH did not modify acyl-CoA or malonyl-CoA levels. However, it altered the MBH lipidomic profile since ceramides and sphingolipids increased and phospholipids decreased. Furthermore, we detected increased vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (VGAT and reduced vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2 expressions, both transporters involved in this orexigenic signal. Taken together, these observations indicate that CPT1A contributes to the regulation of feeding by modulating the expression of neurotransmitter transporters and lipid components that influence the orexigenic pathways in VMH.

  19. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudetti, Anna M; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  20. L-carnitine protects against nickel-induced neurotoxicity by maintaining mitochondrial function in Neuro-2a cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be a part of the mechanism underlying nickel-induced neurotoxicity. L-carnitine (LC), a quaternary ammonium compound biosynthesized from the amino acids lysine and methionine in all mammalian species, manifests its neuroprotective effects by improving mitochondrial energetics and function. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LC could efficiently protect against nickel-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we exposed a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro-2a) to different concentrations of nickel chloride (NiCl2) (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mM) for 24 h, or to 0.5 mM and 1 mM NiCl2 for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12, or 24 h). We found that nickel significantly increased the cell viability loss and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in Neuro-2a cells. In addition, nickel exposure significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reduced adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations and decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers and mtRNA transcript levels. However, all of the cytotoxicities and mitochondrial dysfunctions that were triggered by nickel were efficiently attenuated by pretreatment with LC. These protective effects of LC may be attributable to its role in maintaining mitochondrial function in nickel-treated cells. Our results suggest that LC may have great pharmacological potential in protecting against the adverse effects of nickel in the nervous system.