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Sample records for carlton power reactor

  1. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco Combined Heat and Power Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosfjord, Thomas J [UTC Power

    2007-11-01

    Under collaboration between DOE and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. This packaged CHP system integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller, directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 RT of chilled water at a 59F ambient temperature.

  2. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  3. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshihiko; Arita, Setsuo; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fukazawa, Yukihisa; Ishii, Kazuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor power control device capable of enhancing an operation efficiency while keeping high reliability and safety in a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a means for inputting a set value of a generator power and a set value of a reactor power, (2) a means for controlling the reactor power to either smaller one of the reactor power corresponding to the set value of the generator power and the set value of the reactor power. With such procedures, even if the nuclear power plant is set so as to operate it to make the reactor power 100%, when the generator power reaches the upper limit, the reactor power is controlled with a preference given to the upper limit value of the generator power. Accordingly, safety and reliability are not deteriorated. The operation efficiency of the plant can be improved. (I.S.)

  4. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Seki, Eiji; Yoshida, Toshifumi; Ito, Toshiaki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  5. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogen, Ayumi; Ozawa, Michihiro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly improve the working efficiency of a nuclear reactor by reflecting the control rod history effect on thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation. Constitution: An incore power distribution calculation section reads the incore neutron fluxes detected by neutron detectors disposed in the reactor to calculate the incore power distribution. A burnup degree distribution calculation section calculates the burnup degree distribution in the reactor based on the thus calculated incore power distribution. A control rod history date store device supplied with the burnup degree distribution renews the stored control rod history data based on the present control rod pattern and the burnup degree distribution. Then, thermal variants of the nuclear reactor are calculated based on the thus renewed control rod history data. Since the control rod history effect is reflected on the thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation, the working efficiency of the nuclear reactor can be improved significantly. (Seki, T.)

  6. Reactor power distribution monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoizumi, Atsushi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To grasp the margin for the limit value of the power distribution peaking factor inside the reactor under operation by using the reactor power distribution monitor. Constitution: The monitor is composed of the 'constant' file, (to store in-reactor power distributions obtained from analysis), TIP and thermocouple, lateral output distribution calibrating apparatus, axial output distribution synthesizer and peaking factor synthesizer. The lateral output distribution calibrating apparatus is used to make calibration by comparing the power distribution obtained from the thermocouples to the power distribution obtained from the TIP, and then to provide the power distribution lateral peaking factors. The axial output distribution synthesizer provides the power distribution axial peaking factors in accordance with the signals from the out-pile neutron flux detector. These axial and lateral power peaking factors are synthesized with high precision in the three-dimensional format and can be monitored at any time. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Reactor power control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomisawa, Teruaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To restore reactor-power condition in a minimum time after a termination of turbine bypass by reducing the throttling of the reactor power at the time of load-failure as low as possible. Constitution: The transient change of the internal pressure of condenser is continuously monitored. When a turbine is bypassed, a speed-control-command signal for a coolant recirculating pump is generated according as the internal pressure of the condenser. When the signal relating to the internal pressure of the condenser indicates insufficient power, a reactor-control-rod-drive signal is generated. (J.P.N.)

  8. Power reactors operational diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.; Pecinka, L.

    1976-01-01

    The definition of reactor operational diagnostics is presented and the fundamental trends of research are determined. The possible sources of power reactor malfunctions, the methods of defect detection, the data evaluation and the analysis of the results are discussed in detail. In view of scarcity of a theoretical basis and of insufficient in-core instrumentation, operational diagnostics cannot be as yet incorporated in a computer-aided reactor control system. (author)

  9. Low Power Reactor Comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homeyer, W. G. [General Atomics Site, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1969-02-21

    Studies were made of a number of low power (< 300 kWe) thermionic reactors containing flashlight or unit cell thermionic fuel elements. The objective of these studies was to determine the feasibility of producing a net power of 50 to 100 kWe with a power plant weighing 3000 to 4000 lb (1360 to 1820 kg).

  10. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Akira.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent misoperation in a control system for the adjustment of core coolant flow rate, and the increase in the neutron flux density caused from the misoperation in BWR type reactors. Constitution: In a reactor power control system adapted to control the reactor power by the adjustment of core flow rate, average neutron flux signals of a reactor core, entire core flow rate signals and operation state signals for coolant recycling system are inputted to a microcomputer. The outputs from the computer are sent to a recycling MG set speed controller to control the reactor core flow rate. The computer calculates the change ratio with time in the average neutron flux signals, correlation between the average neutron flux signals and the entire core flow rate signals, change ratio with time in the operation state signals for the coolant recycling system and the like and judges the abnormality in the coolant recycling system based on the calculated results. (Ikeda, J.)

  11. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichige, Masayuki; Ishige, Takanori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for measuring a power such as of a nuclear fission reactor or a thermonuclear reactor by utilizing a light emitting phenomenon by radiation rays of gases. Namely, a measuring vessel sealed with a gas scintillator is inserted to the inside of a reactor. The measuring vessel is optically connected to a photoelectric convertor. The photoelectric convertor is electrically connected with a signal processing device. With such a constitution, gases sealed in the measuring vessel are ionized by radiation rays released in proportion to the power of the reactor to cause scintillation emission. The light is converted into electric signals by the photoelectric convertor. Reactor power can be monitored by the signal processing device having the electric signals as an input. According to the present invention, since the gas scintillation detector is used, the device is simplified and time responsiveness can be improved. As a result, the function of the reactor power measuring device can be improved. (I.S.)

  12. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaruoka, Hiromitsu.

    1994-01-01

    A high pressure water injection recycling system comprising injection pipelines of a high pressure water injection system and a flow rate control means in communication with a pool of a pressure control chamber is disposed to a feedwater system of a BWR type reactor. In addition, the flow rate control means is controlled by a power control device comprising a scram impossible transient event judging section, a required injection flow rate calculation section for high pressure water injection system and a control signal calculation section. Feed water flow rate to be supplied to the reactor is controlled upon occurrence of a scram impossible transient event of the reactor. The scram impossible transient event is judged based on reactor output signals and scram operation demand signals and injection flow rate is calculated based on a predetermined reactor water level, and condensate storage tank water or pressure control chamber pool water is injected to the reactor. With such procedures, water level can be ensured and power can be suppressed. Further, condensate storage tank water of low enthalpy is introduced to the pressure suppression chamber pool to directly control elevation of water temperature and ensure integrity of the pressure vessel and the reactor container. (N.H.)

  13. Power reactor design trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade and Pulse Star represent new trends in ICF power reactor design that have emerged in the last few years. The most recent embodiments of these two concepts, and that of the HYLIFE design with which they will compare them, are shown. All three reactors depend upon protecting structural elements from neutrons, x rays and debris by injecting massive amounts of shielding material inside the reaction chamber. However, Cascade and Pulse Star introduce new ideas to improve the economics, safety, and environmental impact of ICF reactors. They also pose different development issues and thus represent technological alternatives to HYLIFE

  14. Reactor power distribution monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the performance and secure the safety of a nuclear reactor by rapidly computing and display the power density in the nuclear reactor by using a plurality of processors. Constitution: Plant data for a nuclear reactor containing the measured values from a local power monitor LPRM are sent and recorded in a magnetic disc. They are also sent to a core performance computer in which burn-up degree distribution and the like are computed, and the results are sent and recorded in the magnetic disc. A central processors loads programs to each of the processors and applies data recorded in the magnetic disc to each of the processors. Each of the processors computes the corresponding power distribution in four fuel assemblies surrounding the LPRM string by the above information. The central processor compiles the computation results and displays them on a display. In this way, power distribution in the fuel assemblies can rapidly be computed to thereby secure the improvement of the performance and safety of the reactor. (Seki, T.)

  15. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Hiroyuki.

    1991-01-01

    The device of the present invention prevents unnecessary automatic reactor shutdown, without increasing operator's burden by automatic insertion of selected control rods in case if a recycling pump in a BWR reaction should stop. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a means for detecting that at least one recycling pump stops, (2) a means for judging region for inserting the selected control rods based on the reactor power and the recycling flowrate of driving water, and (3) a means for calculating a logic product of output signals sent from both of the means described above and outputting a selected control rod insertion signal. With such a constitution, if at least one recycling pump stops, the means (1) detects it. Further, the means (2) judges the regions for inserting the selected control rods. Then, the means (3) outputs a signal for inserting the selected control rods. As a result, since a group of control rods selected previously are inserted into the reactor rapidly, the reactor power is suppressed, to avoid the automatic reactor shutdown. (I.N.)

  16. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Shigehiro.

    1990-01-01

    Among a plurality of power monitoring programs in a reactor power monitoring device, rapid response is required for a scram judging program for the power judging processing of scram signals. Therefore, the scram judging program is stored independently from other power monitoring programs, applied with a priority order, and executed in parallel with other programs, to output scram signals when the detected data exceeds a predetermined value. As a result, the capacity required for the scram judging program is reduced and the processing can be conducted in a short period of time. In addition, since high priority is applied to the scram judging program which is divided into a small capacity, it is executed at higher frequency than other programs when they are executed in parallel. That is, since the entire processings for the power monitoring program are repeated in a short cycle, the response speed of the scram signals required for high responsivity can be increased. (N.H.)

  17. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, Robert

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude [fr

  18. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Mitsutaka

    1997-01-01

    Hardware of an analog nuclear instrumentation system is reformed, a function generator is added to a setting calculation circuit of the nuclear instrumentation system, and each of setting lines of the nuclear instrumentation system is set in parallel with an upper limit curve in an operation region defined by a second order or third order equation. Upon transient change of abnormal power elevation during operation, scram signals are generated by power change in the same state as 100% rated operation due to elevation of reactor thermal power. Since the operation limit value relative to transient change due to power elevation can be made substantially equal with the same as that upon rated operation, the operation limit value for partial power operation state can be kept substantially the same level as that upon rated operation. When transition change caused by abnormal control rod withdrawal occurs during operation, a control rod withdrawal inhibition signal can ensure the power elevation width equal with that upon rated power operation, and since the withdrawal inhibition signal is generated in substantially the same withdrawing state, the operation limit value relative to a partial power operation state can be kept at the same level as that during rated operation. (N.H.)

  19. Power reactors in member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This is the first issue of a periodical computer-based listing of civilian nuclear power reactors in the Member States of the IAEA, presenting the situation as of 1 April 1975. It is intended as a replacement for the Agency's previous annual publication of ''Power and Research Reactors in Member States''. In the new format, the listing contains more information about power reactors in operation, under construction, planned and shut down. As far as possible all the basic design data relating to reactors in operation have been included. In future these data will be included also for other power reactors, so that the publication will serve to give a clear picture of the technical progress achieved. Test and research reactors and critical facilities are no longer listed. Of interest to nuclear power planners, nuclear system designers, nuclear plant operators and interested professional engineers and scientists

  20. Nuclear reactor power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    The redundant signals from the sensor assemblies measuring the process parameters of a nuclear reactor power supply are transmitted each in its turn to a protection system which operates to actuate the protection apparatus for signals indicating off-process conditions. Each sensor assembly includes a number of like sensors measuring the same parameters. The protection system has a number of separate protection units, each unit receiving the process signals from the like sensors of each assembly in its turn. The sets of process signals derived from the sensor parameter assemblies are each in its turn transmitted from the protection system to the control system which impresses control signals on the reactor or its components to counteract the tendency for conditions to drift off-normal status requiring operation of the protection system. A parameter signal selector is interposed between the protection system and the control system. This selector prevents a parameter signal of a set of signals, which differs from the other parameter signals of the set by more than twice the allowable variation of the sensors which produce the set, from passing to the control system. The connection between the protection units and the selector is four separate fiber optic channels so that electrical interaction between the protection units and the selector or control system is precluded. The selectors include a pair of signal selection units, one unit sending selected process signals to primary control channels and the other sending selected process signals to back-up control channels. Test signals are periodically impressed on a selected pair of a selected unit and control channels. When test signals are so impressed the selected control channel is disabled from transmitting control signals to the reactor and/or its associated components

  1. Tendencies in operating power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinckmann, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given about new tendencies in operating power reactors. In order to meet the high demands for control and monitoring of power reactors modern procedures are applicated such as the incore-neutron flux detection by means of electron emission detectors and multi-component activation probes, the noise diagnostics as well as high-efficient automation systems

  2. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  3. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  4. Power reactors in Member States. 1978 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The computer-based reactor listing gives information on reactor core characteristics and plant systems for all power reactors in operation under construction and planned. The following two tables are included to give a general picture of the overall situation: Reactor types and net electrical power; Reactor units and net electrical power by country and cumulated by year

  5. Fractals in Power Reactor Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Martinez, O.

    1994-01-01

    In this work the non- lineal dynamic problem of power reactor is analyzed using classic concepts of fractal analysis as: attractors, Hausdorff-Besikovics dimension, phase space, etc. A new non-linear problem is also analyzed: the discrimination of chaotic signals from random neutron noise signals and processing for diagnosis purposes. The advantages of a fractal analysis approach in the power reactor noise are commented in details

  6. Power reactor information system (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Since the very beginning of commercial operation of nuclear power plants, the nuclear power industry worldwide has accumulated more than 5000 reactor years of experience. The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants since 1970 which were computerized in 1980. The Agency has undertaken to make Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) available on-line to its Member States. The aim of this publication is to provide the users of PRIS from their terminals with description of data base and communication systems and to show the methods of accessing the data

  7. Reactor power distribution monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate the power distribution at high accuracy by detecting failures of LPRM and, if they should occur giving a reliable substituent value instead of the counted value. Constitution: Means for detecting the failure of LRRMs and inserting TIP to that position and means for calculating the power distribution in the reactor core based on output signals from TIP are disposed. Power distribution is calculated as usual if no failure is detected. However, if the failure is detected, counted power distribution is calculated by using counted values from TIP instead thereof. In this way, even if several of LRRMs happen to be failed, power distribution can be determined at such a high accuracy as in the normal operation. Further, it is also possible to exactly evaluate the fuel integrity and recognize the reactor core state, to thereby exactly monitor the reactor core. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg, R.

    1992-01-01

    The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants of the IAEA Member States since 1970. In order to facilitate an analysis of nuclear power plant performance as well as to produce relevant publications, all previously collected data supplied from the questionnaires were computerized in 1980 and the Power Reactor Information System was implemented. PRIS currently contains production records for the years up to and including 1990 and about 98% of the reactors-years operating experience in the world is contained in PRIS. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Sakata, Akira; Karatsu, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To control abrupt changes in neutron fluxes by feeding back a correction signal obtained from a deviation between neutron fluxes and heat fluxes for changing the reactor core flow rate to a recycling flow rate control system upon abrupt power change of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In addition to important systems, that is, a reactor pressure control system and a recycling control system in the power control device of a BWR type power plant, a control circuit for feeding back a deviation between neutron fluxes and heat fluxes to a recycling flow rate control system is disposed. In the suppression circuit, a deviation signal is prepared in an adder from neutron flux and heat flux signals obtained through a primary delay filter. The deviation signal is passed through a dead band and an advance/delay filter into a correction signal, which is adapted to be fed back to the recycling flow rate control system. As a result, the reactor power control can be conducted smoothly and it is possible to effectively suppress the abrupt change or over shoot of the neutron fluxes and abrupt power change. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement predication models and of pressure vessel integrity can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed, computerized data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for US commercial nuclear reactors. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has provided financial support, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has provided technical assistance in the quality assurance (QA) of the data to establish an industry-wide data base that will be maintained and updated on a long-term basis. Successful applications of the data base to several of NRC's evaluations have received favorable response and support for its continuation. The future direction of the data base has been designed to include the test reactor and other types of data of interest to the regulators and the researchers. 1 ref

  12. Low power unattended defense reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, W.L.; Meier, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A small, low power, passive, nuclear reactor electric power supply has been designed for unattended defense applications. Through innovative utilization of existing proven technologies and components, a highly reliable, walk-away safe design has been obtained. Operating at a thermal power level of 200 kWt, the reactor uses low enrichment uranium fuel in a graphite block core to generate heat that is transferred through heat pipes to a thermoelectric (TE) converter. Waste heat is removed from the TEs by circulation of ambient air. Because such a power supply offers the promise of minimal operation and maintenance (O and M) costs as well as no fuel logistics, it is particularly attractive for remote, unattended applications such as the North Warning System

  13. Tokamak experimental power reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The principal results of a scoping and project definition study for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor are presented. Objectives are discussed; a preliminary conceptual design is described; detailed parametric, survey and sensitivity studies are presented; and research and development requirements are outlined. (U.S.)

  14. Nuclear reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, Yukio; Ebata, Shigeo.

    1991-01-01

    Possibility for the occurrence of vibrations in a reactor power due to lowering of reactor core stability is annihilated by avoiding an operation near natural convection high power state of a BWR type reactor. That is, a deviation between a total pump speed signal sent from a total pump speed calculation device and a total pump speed demand signal sent from a recycling flow rate control system is calculated in a deviation calculation device, and it is inputted to a comparison device. When the deviation is greater than a predetermined value, the comparison device judges it as a trip of the recycling pump, and outputs an actuation signal to a selection control rod insertion device to insert a predetermined number of control rods. As a result, the output at the natural convection state is decreased to lower than that of a 80% power flow rate control curve. Further, when the deviation value is smaller than the predetermined value, an actuation signal is outputted to the recycling pump speed controller so that the pump speed is not decreased to lower than a lowest pump speed. As a result, the lower limit of the reactor core flow rate is limited to the flow rate corresponding to the lowest pump speed. (I.S.)

  15. Computerized reactor power regulation with logarithmic controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossanyi, A.; Vegh, E.

    1982-11-01

    A computerized reactor control system has been operating at a 5 MW WWR-SM research reactor in the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest, for some years. This paper describes the power controller used in the SPC operating mode of the system, which operates in a 5-decade wide power range with +-0.5% accuracy. The structure of the controller easily limits the minimal reactor period and produces a reactor transient with constant period if the power demand changes. (author)

  16. Power reactors in Member States. 1979 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the fifth issue of a periodic computer-based listing of nuclear power reactors, presenting the situation as of 1 May 1979. The basic design data for all reactors in operation, under construction, planned and shut down have been included. The following two tables are included to give a general picture of the overall situation: Table I: Reactor types and net electrical power. Table II: Reactor units and net electrical powered by country cummulated by year

  17. TU Electric reactor physics model verification: Power reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.; Killgore, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Power reactor benchmark calculations using the advanced code package CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 have been performed for six cycles of Prairie Island Unit 1. The reload fuel designs for the selected cycles included gadolinia as a burnable absorber, natural uranium axial blankets and increased water-to-fuel ratio. The calculated results for both startup reactor physics tests (boron endpoints, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients) and full power depletion results were compared to measured plant data. These comparisons show that the TU Electric reactor physics models accurately predict important measured parameters for power reactors

  18. Feasible reactor power cutback logic development for an integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Soon-Kyoo; Lee, Chung-Chan; Choi, Suhn; Kang, Han-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Major features of integral reactors that have been developed around the world recently are simplified operating systems and passive safety systems. Even though highly simplified control system and very reliable components are utilized in the integral reactor, the possibility of major component malfunction cannot be ruled out. So, feasible reactor power cutback logic is required to cope with the malfunction of components without inducing reactor trip. Simplified reactor power cutback logic has been developed on the basis of the real component data and operational parameters of plant in this study. Due to the relatively high rod worth of the integral reactor the control rod assembly drop method which had been adapted for large nuclear power plants was not desirable for reactor power cutback of the integral reactor. Instead another method, the control rod assembly control logic of reactor regulating system controls the control rod assembly movements, was chosen as an alternative. Sensitivity analyses and feasibility evaluations were performed for the selected method by varying the control rod assembly driving speed. In the results, sensitivity study showed that the performance goal of reactor power cutback system could be achieved with the limited range of control rod assembly driving speed. (orig.)

  19. Physical protection of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories has applied a systematic approach to designing physical protection systems for nuclear facilities to commercial light-water reactor power plants. A number of candidate physical protection systems were developed and evaluated. Focus is placed on the design of access control subsystems at each of three plant layers: the protected area perimeter, building surfaces, and vital areas. Access control refers to barriers, detectors, and entry control devices and procedures used to keep unauthorized personnel and contraband out of the plant, and to control authorized entry into vital areas within the plant

  20. Research reactors compared with power reactors as terrorist targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, G.; Zaitseva, L.; Steinhaeusler, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Concerns about nuclear terrorism have focused on nuclear power reactors more than research reactors. Yet fuel from many research reactors could be used to make nuclear weapons, and the same is not true of power reactors. Radioactive materials from both could be used by terrorists to make 'dirty bombs'. But the used fuel from research reactors is typically easier to transport and easier to use in making a dirty bomb without becoming overcome by its radiation. Moreover, research reactors tend to be less well protected than power reactors from thieves and terrorists by guards, barriers, locks and sensors. The well-intended 'Atoms for Peace Program' initiated by US president Eisenhower in 1953 provided research reactors with weapon-usable highly-enriched uranium to countries all around the world. At the end of the Gulf War, Iraqi scientists were making a nuclear weapon from highly-enriched uranium from a research reactor supplied pursuant to a Soviet research reactor program modeled after the American one. An American program to bring home the US-supplied weapon-usable uranium from around the world has made great progress but is only about half completed. A comparable Russian return program is just beginning. Research reactors with weapon-usable uranium remain in many countries around the world. (author)

  1. Hybrid Reactor Simulation of Boiling Water Reactor Power Oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhengyu; Edwards, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) of boiling water reactor (BWR) instabilities, including in-phase and out-of-phase (OOP) oscillations, has been implemented on The Pennsylvania State University TRIGA reactor. The TRIGA reactor's power response is used to simulate reactor neutron dynamics for in-phase oscillation or the fundamental mode of the reactor modal kinetics for OOP oscillations. The reactor power signal drives a real-time boiling channel simulation, and the calculated reactivity feedback is in turn fed into the TRIGA reactor via an experimental changeable reactivity device. The thermal-hydraulic dynamics, together with first harmonic mode power dynamics, is digitally simulated in the real-time environment. The real-time digital simulation of boiling channel thermal hydraulics is performed by solving constitutive equations for different regions in the channel and is realized by a high-performance personal computer. The nonlinearity of the thermal-hydraulic model ensures the capability to simulate the oscillation phenomena, limit cycle and OOP oscillation, in BWR nuclear power plants. By adjusting reactivity feedback gains for both modes, various oscillation combinations can be realized in the experiment. The dynamics of axially lumped power distribution over the core is displayed in three-dimensional graphs. The HRS reactor power response mimics the BWR core-wide power stability phenomena. In the OOP oscillation HRS, the combination of reactor response and the simulated first harmonic power using shaping functions mimics BWR regional power oscillations. With this HRS testbed, a monitoring and/or control system designed for BWR power oscillations can be experimentally tested and verified

  2. Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He 3 reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored

  3. Power reactor embrittlement data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement prediction models and of vessel integrity under load can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed, computerized embrittlement data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance reports and other published reports of commercial nuclear reactors. The uses of the data base require that as many different data as available are collected from as many sources as possible with complete references and that subsets of relevant data can be easily retrieved and processed. The objectives of this NRC-sponsored program are the following: to compile and to verify the quality of the PR-EDB; to provide user-friendly software to access and process the data; to explore or confirm embrittlement prediction models; and to interact with standards organizations to provide the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards that can be used in regulatory guides, standard review plans, and codes. 9 figs

  4. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  5. Performance indicators for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, C.; White, M.

    1995-11-01

    A review of Canadian and worldwide performance indicator definitions and data was performed to identify a set of indicators that could be used for comparison of performance among nuclear power plants. The results of this review are to be used as input to an AECB team developing a consistent set of performance indicators for measuring Canadian power reactor safety performance. To support the identification of performance indicators, a set of criteria was developed to assess the effectiveness of each indicator for meaningful comparison of performance information. The project identified a recommended set of performance indicators that could be used by AECB staff to compare the performance of Canadian nuclear power plants among themselves, and with international performance. The basis for selection of the recommended set and exclusion of others is provided. This report provides definitions and calculation methods for each recommended performance indicator. In addition, a spreadsheet has been developed for comparison and trending for the recommended set of indicators. Example trend graphs are included to demonstrate the use of the spreadsheet. (author). 50 refs., 11 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Reactor power reduction system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An improved control method for maintaining the operation of a nuclear reactor system in response to an event which requires an immediate but less than complete power reduction called an accelerated power reduction, by rapidly inserting into said reactor core a portion of said regulating rods selected from said predetermined regulation sequence. (author)

  7. Impacts on power reactor health physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The impacts on power reactor health physics programs form implementing the revised 10 CFR Part 20 will be extensive and costly. Every policy, program, procedure and training lesson plan involving health physics will require changes and the subsequent retraining of personnel. At each power reactor facility, hundreds of procedures and thousands of people will be affected by these changes. Every area of a power reactor health physics program will be affected. These areas include; ALARA, Respiratory Protection, Exposure Control, Job Coverage, Dosimetry, Radwaste, Effluent Accountability, Emergency Planning and Radiation Worker Training. This paper presents how power reactor facilities will go about making these changes and gives possible examples of some of these changes and their impact on each area of power reactor health physics program

  8. Muon catalytic fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarnagin, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    Three main ideas are proposed using negative muoun catalyis in a fusion power reactor. Firstly, let low energy muons attack the lower end of a (dense plasma's distribution curve. This simultaneously helps clear the plasma of slow particles (by fusing them) and raises the plasma's average temperature. Concurrently, the upper end of the distribution curve is attacked as usual (here, with plasma beams from built-in reaccelerators). Secondly, let deuterium or tritium be substituted for hydrogen in the chemical formation of boron-hydrides or other macromelecular fuel. Thence fusion of clusters of (DTμ-) by thermal muons may ignite whole macromelecules. Energy release could be great. For instance, the large icosahedron (B/sub 12/H/sub 12/)/sup -2/, with D-T substitutions for H--at least in places--may release on the order of 300 MeV energy. A single muon (costing about 5 GeV)catalyzing the fusion of 100 of these macromolecules could, in principle, release about 30 GeV energy. Thirdly, it may be possible to reaccelerate muons back up to relativistic energies before they decay (to electrons, neutrions, antineutrinos). If so, then by relativity theory, their decay clocks should be reset, that is, their lifetime re-established. This should be significantly cheaper in energy than producing new pions which decay to muons. This step alone may be sufficient to yield net power from muon catalysts

  9. Fast reactors: potential for power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: basic facts about conventional and fast reactors; uranium economy; plutonium and fast reactors; cooling systems; sodium coolant; safety engineering; handling and recycling plutonium; safeguards; development of fast reactors in Britain and abroad; future progress. (U.K.)

  10. Higher power density TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    2008-01-01

    The uranium zirconium hydride (U-ZrH) fuel is the fundamental feature of the TRIGA family of reactors that accounts for its widely recognized safety, good performance, economy of operation, and its acceptance worldwide. Of the 65 TRIGA reactors or TRIGA fueled reactors, several are located in hospitals or hospital complexes and in buildings that house university classrooms. These examples are a tribute to the high degree of safety of the operating TRIGA reactor. In the early days, the majority of the TRIGA reactors had power levels in the range from 10 to 250 kW, many with pulsing capability. An additional number had power levels up to 1 MW. By the late 1970's, seven TRIGA reactors with power levels up to 2 MW had been installed. A reduction in the rate of worldwide construction of new research reactors set in during the mid 1970's but construction of occasional research reactors has continued until the present. Performance of higher power TRIGA reactors are presented as well as the operation of higher power density reactor cores. The extremely safe TRIGA fuel, including the more recent TRIGA LEU fuel, offers a wide range of possible reactor configurations. A long core life is assured through the use of a burnable poison in the TRIGA LEU fuel. In those instances where large neutron fluxes are desired but relatively low power levels are also desired, the 19-rod hexagonal array of small diameter fuel rods offers exciting possibilities. The small diameter fuel rods have provided extremely long and trouble-free operation in the Romanian 14 MW TRIGA reactor

  11. Power source device for reactor recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimano, Kunio; Nakamura, Yoichi; Ozaki, Osamu.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention prevents occurrence of an accident of a reactor forecast upon spontaneous power stoppage, loss of power source or trip of the reactor. Namely, a AC/DC converter and a DC/AC connector having an AC voltage frequency controller are connected in series between an AC (bus) in the plant and reactor recycling pumps. A DC voltage controller, a superconductive energy storing device and an excitation power source are connected to the input of the DC/AC converter. The control device receives signals of the spontaneous power stoppage, loss of power source or trip of the reactor to maintain the output voltage of the superconductive energy storing device to a predetermined value. Further, the ratio of AC power voltage and the frequency of AC voltage to be supplied to the reactor recycling pumps is constantly varied to control the flow rate of the pump to a predetermined value. With such procedures, a power source device for the reactor recycling pumps compact in size, easy for maintenance and having high reliability can be realized by adopting a static-type superconductive energy storing device as an auxiliary power source for the reactor recycling pumps. (I.S.)

  12. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, R.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Weng, C.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lindsay, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  13. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, R.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Weng, C.K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Lindsay, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-06-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  14. Nuclear power reactors: reactor safety and military and civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hvinden, T.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of fission products and plutonium in reactors is briefly described, followed by a short general discussion of reactor safety. The interaction of reactor safety and radioactive release considerations with military and civil defence is thereafter discussed. Reactors and other nuclear plants are factors which must be taken into account in the defence of the district around the site, and as potential targets of both conventional and guerilla attacks and sabotage, requiring special defence. The radiological hazards arising from serious damage to a power reactor by conventional weapons are briefly discussed, and the benefits of underground siting evaluated. Finally the author discusses the significance of the IAEA safeguards work as a preventive factor. (JIW)

  15. Small and medium power reactors 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This TECDOC follows the publication of TECDOC-347 Small and Medium Power Reactors Project Initiation Study - Phase I published in 1985 and TECDOC-376 Small and Medium Power Reactors 1985 published in 1986. It is mainly intended for decision makers in Developing Member States interested in embarking on a nuclear power programme. It consists of two parts: 1) Guidelines for the Introduction of Small and Medium Power Reactors in Developing Countries. These Guidelines were established during the Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna from 11 to 15 May 1987. Their purpose is to review key aspects relating to the introduction of Small and Medium Power Reactors in developing countries; 2) Up-dated Information on SMPR Concepts Contributed by Supplier Industries. According to the recommendations of the Second Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, this part contains the up-dated information formerly published in Annex I of the above mentioned TECDOC-347. Figs

  16. Maximum power rating of a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, W.N. dos; Cintra, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Optimal fuel concentration distribution, which maximizes the power rating of a reactor assembly is determined for the inequality constraints on the upper limit of a power density and the upper limit of the allowable fuel concentration. The reactor is described by two groups diffusion model in slab geometry. Making use of Pontryagin's Maximum principle, the optimal sequence of control zones is found a priori. It is shown that the reactor consists of a central constant power density zone followed by a zone with uniform fuel concentration. (author) [pt

  17. Power supplyer for reactor coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Hiroshi; Okinaka, Yo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a variable voltage/variable frequency static power source (static power source) used as a power source for a coolants recycling pump motor of a nuclear power plant. That is, during lower power operation such as start up or shutdown in which stoppage of the power source gives less effect to a reactor core, power is supplied from a power system, a main power generator connected thereto or a high voltage bus in the plant or a common high voltage bus to the static power source. However, during rated power operation, power is supplied from the output of an axially power generator connected with a main power generator having an extremely great inertia moment to the static power device. With such a constitution, the static power device is not stopped by the lowering of the voltage due to a thunderbolt falling accident or the like to a power-distribution line suddenly occurred in the power system. Accordingly, reactor core flowrate is free from rapid decrease caused by the reduction of rotation speed of the recycling pump. Accordingly, disadvantgages upon operation control in the reactor core is not caused. (I.S.)

  18. Multiple microprocessor based nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.S.; Ethridge, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor power monitor is a portable multiple-microprocessor controlled data acquisition device being built for the International Atomic Energy Association. Its function is to measure and record the hourly integrated operating thermal power level of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of detecting unannounced plutonium production. The monitor consists of a 3 He proportional neutron detector, a write-only cassette tape drive and control electronics based on two INTEL 8748 microprocessors. The reactor power monitor operates from house power supplied by the plant operator, but has eight hours of battery backup to cover power interruptions. Both the hourly power levels and any line power interruptions are recorded on tape and in memory. Intermediate dumps from the memory to a data terminal or strip chart recorder can be performed without interrupting data collection

  19. Power distribution forecasting device for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukii, Makoto

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To save expensive calculations on the forecasting of reactor power distribution. Constitution: Core status (CSD) such as entire coolant flow rate, pressures in the reactor, temperatures at the outlet and inlet and positions for control rods are inputted into a power distribution calculation device to calculate the power distribution based on physical models intermittently. Further, present power distribution is calculated based on in-core neutron flux measured values and CSD in a process control computer. Further, the ratio of the calculation results of the latter to those of the former is calculated, stored and inputted into a correction device to correct the forecast power distribution obtained by the power distribution calculation device. This enables to forecast the power distribution with excellent responsivity in the reactor site. (Furukawa, Y.)

  20. Power distribution monitor in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable accurate monitoring for the reactor power distribution within a short time in a case where abnormality occurs in in-core neutron monitors or in a case where the reactor core state changes after the calibration for the neutron monitors. Constitution: The power distribution monitor comprises a power distribution calculator adapted to be inputted counted values from a reactor core present state data instruments and calculate the neutron flux distribution in the reactor core and the power distribution based on previously incorporated physical models, an RCF calculator adapted to be inputted with the counted values from the in-core neutron monitors and the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution calculated in the power distribution calculator and compensate the counted errors included in the counted values form the in-core neutron monitors and the calculation errors included in the power distribution calculated in the power distribution calculator to thereby calculate the power distribution within the reactor core, and an input/output device for the input of the data required for said power distribution calculator and the display for the calculation result calculated in the RCF calculator. (Ikeda, J.)

  1. A nuclear power reactor concept for Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of developing an independent national nuclear technology and effective manner of transferring such a technology, as well as developing a modern reactor, a new nuclear power reactor concept is proposed which is considered as a suitable and viable project for Brazil to support its development and finally construct its prototype as an indigeneous venture. (Author) [pt

  2. Reactor power control method and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Atsushi; Ishii, Yoshihiko; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kiyoharu, Norihiko; Aizawa, Yuko.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and a device suitable to rise the temperature and increase the pressure of the reactor to an aimed pressure in accordance with an aimed value for a reactor water temperature changing rate in the course of rising temperature and increasing pressure of the reactor upon start up of a BWR type power plant. Namely, neutron fluxes in the reactor and the temperature of reactor water are detected respectively. The maximum value among the detected values for the neutron fluxes is detected. The reactor water temperature changing rate is calculated based on the detected values of the reactor water temperature, from which the maximum value of the reactor water temperature changing rate is detected. An aimed value for the neutron flux is calculated in accordance with both detected maximum values and the aimed value of the reactor water temperature changing rate. The position of control rods is adjusted in accordance with the aimed value for the calculated neutron flux. Then, an aimed value for the neutron flux for realizing the aimed value for the reactor water temperature changing rate can be obtained accurately with no influence of the sensitivity of the detected values of the neutron fluxes and the time delay of the reactor water temperature changing rate. (I.S.)

  3. Regional overpower protection in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, C.M.; Fournier, R.D.; Laratta, F.A.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Regional Overpower Protection (ROP) trip in a CANDU power reactor protects the core against fuel overpowers, whether the result of local peaking within the core or due to an uncontrolled power transient. This paper outlines the design-basis safety requirements, the equipment used to provide the trip, the analytical approach and procedures for design optimization. To design the ROP trip means to select the optimum locations, trip setpoints and channelization of a set of self-powered in-core flux detectors for the trip. On-power fuelling, a relatively large reactor core, and the number and variety of in-core reactivity control devices in the CANDU reactor result in a large number of possible flux and power distributions which must be protected against overpowers. The design optimization problem is defined by the safety requirements and economic constraints, and is solved by Boolean reduction techniques. A final step is optimization of the reference channel power distribution

  4. Compact reactor/ORC power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500 0 C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370 0 C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analyses have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high. 10 refs

  5. Method of monitoring reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kazuyori; Kiguchi, Takashi; Yamada, Naoyuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate reactor power distribution in a BWR type reactor in a short time thereby enable high speed monitoring as to whether the present power distribution lies within a certain range. Method: Calculation data for thermal power such as feedwater flow rate, temperature and recycling flow rate are inputted into an existent core performance calculation device to calculate the current thermal power distribution for the entire core. Further, the power distribution for the entire core is calculated based on the indication values from local power detectors in a computer. Coefficients are calculated using thermal power variation width and core flow rate variation width outputted from the core performance calculation device. The coefficients are multiplied with the newest power distribution data for the entire core stored in a memory device, and the multiplied values are compared in a comparator with a previously experienced distribution inputted from the core performance calculation device. (Furukawa, Y.)

  6. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  7. Bottom reflector for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.; Kissel, K.F.; Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    In pebble bed reactors erosion and damage due fuel elements movement on the surface of the bottom reflector should be minimized. This can be achieved by chamfering and/or rounding the cover edges of the graphite blocks and the edges between the drilled holes and the surface of the graphite block. (orig.) [de

  8. Thorium utilization in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno; Marcos.

    1978-10-01

    In this work the recent (prior to Aug, 1976) literature on thorium utilization is reviewed briefly and the available information is updated. After reviewing the nuclear properties relevant to the thorium fuel cycle we describe briefly the reactor systems that have been proposed using thorium as a fertile material. (author) [es

  9. Nuclear reactors for space electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1978-06-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Lifetimes of 7 to 10 yr at full power, at converter operating temperatures of 1275 to 1675 0 K, are being studied. The systems are being designed such that no single-failure modes exist that will cause a complete loss of power. In fact, to meet the long lifetimes, highly redundant design features are being emphasized. Questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. ''Fail-safe'' means to prevent exposure of the population to radioactive material, meeting the environmental guidelines established by the U.S. Government have been and continue to be a necessary requirement for any space reactor program. The major safety feature to prevent prelaunch and launch radioactive material hazards is not operating the reactor before achieving the prescribed orbit. Design features in the reactor ensure that accidental criticality cannot occur. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit, where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. Orbits below 400 to 500 nautical miles are the ones where a safety issue is involved in case of satellite malfunction. The potential missions, the question of why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations will be discussed

  10. Advances in ICF power reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen ICF power reactor design studies published since 1980 are reviewed to illuminate the design trends they represent. There is a clear, continuing trend toward making ICF reactors inherently safer and environmentally benign. Since this trend accentuates inherent advantages of ICF reactors, we expect it to be further emphasized in the future. An emphasis on economic competitiveness appears to be a somewhat newer trend. Lower cost of electricity, smaller initial size (and capital cost), and more affordable development paths are three of the issues being addressed with new studies

  11. Different types of power reactors and provenness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture guides the potential buyer in the selection of a reactor type. Recommended criteria regarding provenness, licensability, and contractual arrangements are defined and discussed. Tabular data summarizing operating experience and commercial availability of units are presented and discussed. The status of small and medium power reactors which are of interest to many developing countries is presented. It is stressed that each prospective buyer will have to establish his own criteria based on specific conditions which will be applied to reactor selection. In all cases it will be found that selection, either pre-selection of bidders or final selection of supplier, will be a fairly complex evaluation. (orig.) [de

  12. Power Nuclear Reactors: technology and innovation for development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2009-01-01

    The conference is about some historicals task of the fission technology as well as many types of Nuclear Reactors. Enrichment of fuel, wastes, research reactors and power reactors, a brief advertisment about Uruguay electric siystem and power generation, energetic worldwide, proliferation, safety reactors, incidents, accidents, Three-Mile Island accident, Chernobil accident, damages, risks, classification and description of Power reactors steam generation, nuclear reactor cooling systems, future view

  13. Power control device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable smooth power changes in power conditioning systems by calculating forecast values for the neutron flux distribution and power distribution and by controlling the driving speed of control rods so as to correspond the forecast values with aimed values. Constitution: Control rod position is detected by a position detector and sent to a control computer as the position information. At the same time, the neutron flux distribution information is obtained by the neutron monitors, the power distribution information is obtained by a reactor power computer and they are outputted to the control computer. The control computer calculates the forecast values for the neutron flux distribution and the reactor power distribution from the information, and compares them with the aimed values from a setter and then outputs control signals so as to correspond the forecast values with the aimed values. The control rods can be inserted in appropriate velocity by the control signals. (Horiuchi, T.)

  14. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L. [MDS Nordion, Kanata, Ontario (Canada); Slack, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  15. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L.; Slack, J.

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  16. SP-100 space reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirpich, A.; Kruger, G.; Matteo, D.; Stephen, J.

    1990-01-01

    A generic flight system (GFS) design for a 100-kWe space reactor power (SP-100) system is presented. The design has evolved around issues such as the selection of a lithium liquid-metal-cooled reactor built of refractory metals and permitting operation in the range of 1300-1400 K; heat transport by lithium circulation using thermoelectrically driven liquid-metal pumps; thermoelectric power conversion; and waste heat rejection at approximately 800 K through lithium circulation to potassium heat pipe radiators. Various thermal-hydraulic analytical procedures have been utilized in the design of the reactor, ducting, hot-side and cold-side heat exchangers, circulating pumps, and heat pipe radiators. The physical and performance characteristics of the GFS and its power margins are estimated as a function of mission time

  17. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Ranken, W.A.; Koenig, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  18. Liquid metal cooled reactor for space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzberg, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual design is for a liquid metal (LM) cooled nuclear reactor that would provide heat to a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion subsystem to provide electricity for electric propulsion thrusters and spacecraft power. The baseline power level is 100 kWe to the user. For long term power generation, UN pin fuel with Nb1Zr alloy cladding was selected. As part of the SP-100 Program this fuel demonstrated lifetime with greater than six atom percent burnup, at temperatures in the range of 1400-1500 K. The CBC subsystem was selected because of the performance and lifetime database from commercial and aircraft applications and from prior NASA and DOE space programs. The high efficiency of the CBC also allows the reactor to operate at relatively low power levels over its 15-year life, minimizing the long-term power density and temperature of the fuel. The scope of this paper is limited to only the nuclear components that provide heated helium-xenon gas to the CBC subsystem. The principal challenge for the LM reactor concept was to design the reactor core, shield and primary heat transport subsystems to meet mission requirements in a low mass configuration. The LM concept design approach was to assemble components from prior programs and, with minimum change, determine if the system met the objective of the study. All of the components are based on technologies having substantial data bases. Nuclear, thermalhydraulic, stress, and shielding analyses were performed using available computer codes. Neutronics issues included maintaining adequate operating and shutdown reactivities, even under accident conditions. Thermalhydraulic and stress analyses calculated fuel and material temperatures, coolant flows and temperatures, and thermal stresses in the fuel pins, components and structures. Using conservative design assumptions and practices, consistent with the detailed design work performed during the SP-100 Program, the mass of the reactor, shield, primary heat

  19. Reactor power system deployment and startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetch, J. R.; Nelin, C. J.; Britt, E. J.; Klein, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems.

  20. Strategic planning for hotel operations: The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, S J

    1993-01-01

    The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company won the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1992. One key to its success is its strategic planning process. In this second part of a two-part article, Stephen Shriver concludes his review of the Ritz-Carlton's approach to strategic planning. Shriver begins by outlining some key steps in plan development and goes on to describe how the Ritz-Carlton disseminates, implements, and evaluates the plan.

  1. Power control device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Tatsuo

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate for requirement of control rods and movable portions, as well as ensure the safety and reliability of the operation. Constitution: A plurality of control tubes are disposed within a reactor core instead of control rods. Tubes are connected from below the reactor core to the control tubes for supplying liquid poisons such as aqueous boric acid to the inside of the control tubes. Further, tubes are connected to the upper portion of the control tubes for guiding the liquid poisons from the reactor core to the outside. The tubes for supplying and discharging the liquid poisons are introduced externally through the flange disposed at the upper portion of a pressure vessel. At the outside of the pressure vessel, are disposed a liquid poison tank, a pressurizing source, a pressure control valve, a liquid level meter and the like. The control for the reactor power is conducted by controlling the level of the liquid poisons in the control tubes. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Method of controlling reactor powers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Yoshito.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To compensate power fluctuations with no distortions in the power distribution by varying the temperature of heavy water as moderators to thereby vary the density of boron therein. Method: A value set for the expected power is compared with a detected value for the power and the power deviation is inputted into a judging circuit. If the deviation exceeds a predetermined value, a power fluctuation amount signal from the judging circuit is inputted into a function generator, where the heavy water temperature fluctuation amount corresponding to the reactivity fluctuation amount is computed and outputted. The heavy water temperature fluctuation amount signal is compared with the detected heavy water temperature and a temperature deviation signal is inputted into a function generator, where the opening degree for a control valve is computed and an opening degree signal is supplied to a temperature control valve. The control valve, upon receiving the signal, regulates the amount of coolants to control the temperature of heavy water. (Sekiya, K.)

  3. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined

  4. The IAEA power reactor information system - PRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Qureshi, A.; Skjoeldebrand, R.; White, D.

    1983-01-01

    The IAEA Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is based on a collection of basic design data and operating experience data which the IAEA started in 1970. PRIS is used for annual publications on 'Power Reactors in Member States', 'Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States', which gives annual operating information for individual plants, and a 'Performance Analysis Report' summarizing each year's and earlier experience. Since 1973 information has been collected in a systematic manner on significant plant outages (= more than 10 full power hours). There is now information on more than 10,000 outages in the system which permits some conclusions to be drawn both in regard to individual plants and to categories of plants on the significance of different outage reasons and different types of equipment failures. PRIS has not been intended to be a component reliability information system as an international data collection must stop short of the level of detail which would be needed for that purpose. The objectives of PRIS have been to provide a factual background for assumptions on parameters which are essential for economic evaluations and for systems operation planning (load factor and availability). The outage information does, however, lend itself to conclusions about generic problems in different categories of plants and it can be used by an individual operator to find other plants where information about particular problems can be obtained. It would also now be possible to use PRIS for setting availability goals based on experience and not only on theoretical design considerations. The paper demonstrates the conclusions which can be drawn from 662 reactor years of operation of light and heavy water pressurized reactors and 390 reactor years of boiling water reactors and, in particular, the role that the main heat removal system and its components have played in the equipment failure category

  5. Assessment of the thorium fuel cycle in power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Homan, F.J.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the role of thorium fuel cycles in power reactors. Three thermal reactor systems were considered: Light Water Reactors (LWRs); High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs); and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) of the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor (CANDU) type; most of the effort was on these systems. A summary comparing thorium and uranium fuel cycles in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) was also compiled.

  6. Transients in reactors for power systems compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Haziah

    This thesis describes new models and investigations into switching transient phenomena related to the shunt reactors and the Mechanically Switched Capacitor with Damping Network (MSCDN) operations used for reactive power control in the transmission system. Shunt reactors and MSCDN are similar in that they have reactors. A shunt reactor is connected parallel to the compensated lines to absorb the leading current, whereas the MSCDN is a version of a capacitor bank designed as a C-type filter for use in the harmonic-rich environment. In this work, models have been developed and transient overvoltages due to shunt reactor deenergisation were estimated analytically using MathCad, a mathematical program. Computer simulations used the ATP/EMTP program to reproduce both single-phase and three-phase shunt reactor switching at 275 kV operational substations. The effect of the reactor switching on the circuit breaker grading capacitor was also examined by considering various switching conditions.. The main original achievement of this thesis is the clarification of failure mechanisms occurring in the air-core filter reactor due to MSCDN switching operations. The simulation of the MSCDN energisation was conducted using the ATP/EMTP program in the presence of surge arresters. The outcome of this simulation shows that extremely fast transients were established across the air-core filter reactor. This identified transient event has led to the development of a detailed air-core reactor model, which accounts for the inter-turn RLC parameters as well as the stray capacitances-to-ground. These parameters are incorporated into the transient simulation circuit, from which the current and voltage distribution across the winding were derived using electric field and equivalent circuit modelling. Analysis of the results has revealed that there are substantial dielectric stresses imposed on the winding insulation that can be attributed to a combination of three factors. (i) First, the

  7. Monitoring device for the reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi; Tsuiki, Makoto

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable accurate monitoring for the power distribution in a short time, as well as independent detection for in-core neutron flux detectors in abnormal operation due to failures or like other causes to thereby surely provide reliable substitute values. Constitution: Counted values are inputted from a reactor core present status data detector by a power distribution calculation device to calculate the in-core neutron flux density and the power distribution based on previously stored physical models. While on the other hand, counted value from the in-core neutron detectors and the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution calculated from the power distribution calculation device are inputted from a BCF calculation device to compensate the counting errors incorporated in the counted value from the in-core neutron flux detectors and the calculation errors incorporated in the power distribution calculated in the power distribution calculation device respectively and thereby calculate the power distribution in the reactor core. Further, necessary data are inputted to the power distribution calculation device by an input/output device and the results calculated in the BCF calculation device are displayed. (Aizawa, K.)

  8. Power balance in a Helias reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beidler, C.D.; Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Rau, F.; Wobig, H.; Karulin, N.

    1993-01-01

    Stellarator reactor studies have been undertaken since the beginning of stellarator research. The first studies of modular stellarator reactors mainly concentrated on technical issues neglecting the limitations set by confinement and stability. In contrast to these early studies, the Helias configuration offers the chance to develop a self-consistent reactor concept where the plasma losses, MHD stability limits and α-particle losses are not prohibitive to ignition. The dimensions of the Helias reactor are mainly determined by the technical limits of the coil system and the necessary space for blanket and shield. The main parameters are: Major radius 20 m, average plasma radius 1.6 m, magnetic field on axis 5 T, rotational transform on axis 0.84, transform on the boundary ∼ 1.0. The MHD-stability limit in a 5-period Helias configuration is expected to be β = 4-5 % and the neoclassical transport losses can be characterised by an effective helical ripple of 1-2%. This immediately poses the question of whether ignition is possible and, if so, if the fusion power is in the desired regime of P = 2.5 - 3.0 GW. Since a local power balance needs too many assumptions about transport coefficients and boundary conditions we follow the standard approach with fixed plasma profiles and empirical scaling laws for the confinement time. The plasma profiles are modelled analytically and the power balance is evaluated numerically. (author) 7 refs., 1 tab

  9. Method of estimating the reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuta, Toru; Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Doi, Kazuyori; Kiguchi, Takashi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the calculation accuracy for the power distribution thereby improve the reliability of power distribution monitor. Constitution: In detector containing strings disposed within a reactor core, movable type neutron flux monitors are provided in addition to position fixed type neutron monitors conventionally disposed so far. Upon periodical monitoring, a power distribution X1 is calculated from a physical reactor core model. Then, a higher power position X2 is detected by position detectors and value X2 is sent to a neutron flux monitor driving device to displace the movable type monitors to a higher power position in each of the strings. After displacement, the value X1 is amended by an amending device using measured values from the movable type and fixed type monitors and the amended value is sent to a reactor core monitor device. Upon failure of the fixed type monitors, the position is sent to the monitor driving device and the movable monitors are displaced to that position for measurement. (Sekiya, K.)

  10. Reactor power distribution pattern judging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Tadashi.

    1992-01-01

    The judging device of the present invention comprises a power distribution readout system for intaking a power value from a fuel segment, a neural network having an experience learning function for receiving a power distribution value as an input variant, mapping it into a desirable property and self-organizing the map, and a learning date base storing a plurality of learnt samples. The read power distribution is classified depending on the similarity thereof with any one of representative learnt power distribution, and the corresponding state of the reactor core is outputted as a result of the judgement. When an error is found in the classified judging operation, erroneous cases are additionally learnt by using the experience and learning function, thereby improving the accuracy of the reactor core characteristic estimation operation. Since the device is mainly based on the neural network having a self-learning function and a pattern classification and judging function, a judging device having a human's intuitive pattern recognition performance and a pattern experience and learning performance is obtainable, thereby enabling to judge the state of the reactor core accurately. (N.H.)

  11. Experimental development of power reactor intelligent control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Garcia, H.E.; Lee, K.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The US nuclear utility industry initiated an ambitious program to modernize the control systems at a minimum of ten existing nuclear power plants by the year 2000. That program addresses urgent needs to replace obsolete instrumentation and analog controls with highly reliable state-of-the-art computer-based digital systems. Large increases in functionality that could theoretically be achieved in a distributed digital control system are not an initial priority in the industry program but could be logically considered in later phases. This paper discusses the initial development of an experimental sequence for developing, testing, and verifying intelligent fault-accommodating control for commercial nuclear power plant application. The sequence includes an ultra-safe university research reactor (TRIGA) and a passively safe experimental power plant (Experimental Breeder Reactor 2)

  12. Self-powered detectors for power reactors: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, Self-Powered Detectors (SPDs) for applications in nuclear power reactors have been reviewed. Based on their responses to radiation, these detectors can be divided into delayed response Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND), prompt response SPND and Self-Powered Gamma Detector (SPGD). The operational principles of these detectors are presented and their distinctive characteristics are examined accordingly. The analytical models and Monte Carlo method to calculate the responses of these detectors to neutron flux and external gamma rays are reviewed. The paper has also considered some related signal processing techniques, such as detector calibrations and detector signal compensations. Furthermore, a couple of failure modes have also been analyzed. Finally, applications of SPD in nuclear power reactors are summarized. (author)

  13. In core system mapping reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoriyaz, H.; Moreira, J.M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the signals of SPND'S (Self Powered Neutron Detectors) distributed inside of a core, the spatial power distribution is obtained using the MAP program, developed in this work. The methodology applied in MAP program uses a least mean square technique to calculate expansion coefficients that depend on the SPND'S signals. The final power or neutron flux distribution is obtained by a combination of certains functions or expansion modes that are provided from diffusion calculation with the CITATION code. The MAP program is written in PASCAL language and will be used in IEA-R1 reactor for assisting its operation. (author) [pt

  14. Tandem mirror reactor power balance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorker, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    A tandem mirror reactor (TMR) power plant balance model has been developed and is now being used as a computer aid for performing parametric studies. End-cell power injection into the plasma and the physics thermal Q are used to determine the fusion power. About 80% of the fusion power is transferred by high-energy neutrons to the blanket modules and structures. The other 20% of the fusion power in the high-energy alpha particles is used to heat the deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma. Most of the plasma-ionized particles transfer their energy to the halo dumps and direct converters. The plant efficiency is calculated for three different system cycles: (1) the pressurized water/saturated steam cycle; (2) the superheated steam cycle; and (3) the more complex superheat/reheat cycle. There is a signficiant improvement in plant efficiency as the electrical power multiplication factor and steam cycle efficiency increases

  15. Indian strategy for future power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, V.V.; Balakrishnan, K.; Anand, A.K.; Kakodkar, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)

    1997-12-31

    The objective of utilization of the large thorium reserves has been an important part of the three stage programme laid down for the development of nuclear power in India right from the beginning. While emphasis has been placed on the development of fast reactors, attention has also been paid to the development of thermal reactors capable of effectively utilising thorium. Consideration has also been given to the incorporation of passive safety features in the design keeping in tune with the developments elsewhere in the world. The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) design is being developed keeping the above-mentioned objectives. This paper describes the various features incorporated in the AHWR design to meet the above-mentioned requirements. (author)

  16. Basic training of nuclear power reactor personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The basic training of nuclear power reactor personnel should be given very close attention since it constitutes the foundation of their knowledge of nuclear technology. Emphasis should be given on the thorough understanding of basic nuclear concepts in order to have reasonable assurance of successful assimilation by those personnel of more specialized and advanced concepts to which they will be later exposed. Basic training will also provide a means for screening to ensure that those will be sent for further spezialized training will perform well. Finally, it is during the basic training phase when nuclear reactor operators will start to acquire and develop attitudes regarding reactor operation and it is important that these be properly founded. (orig.)

  17. Safety Analysis for Power Reactor Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisawy, E.A.; Sallam, H.

    2012-01-01

    The main function of a Reactor Protection System (RPS) is to safely shutdown the reactor and prevents the release of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to present a technique and its application for used in the analysis of safety system of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). A more advanced technique has been presented to accurately study such problems as the plant availability assessments and Technical Specifications evaluations that are becoming increasingly important. The paper provides the Markov model for the Reactor Protection System of the NPP and presents results of model evaluations for two testing policies in technical specifications. The quantification of the Markov model provides the probability values that the system will occupy each of the possible states as a function of time.

  18. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, H. H.; Schwenk, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is participating in a NASA-sponsored program to demonstrate the feasibility of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor. The work is aimed at acquiring experimental and theoretical information for the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test heat removal by optical radiation. The basic goal of this work is for space applications, however, other NASA-sponsored work suggests several attractive applications to help meet earth-bound energy needs. Such potential benefits are: small critical mass, on-site fuel processing, high fuel burnup, low fission fragment inventory in reactor core, high temperature for process heat, optical radiation for photochemistry and space power transmission, and high temperature for advanced propulsion systems.

  19. 77 FR 60039 - Non-Power Reactor License Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 [NRC-2011-0087] RIN 3150-AI96 Non-Power Reactor... the final regulatory basis for rulemaking to streamline non-power reactor license renewal. This final... address technical issues in existing non-power reactor regulations. The NRC has developed a final...

  20. 77 FR 38742 - Non-Power Reactor License Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ...-0087] RIN 3150-AI96 Non-Power Reactor License Renewal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... existing non-power reactor regulations. The NRC is seeking input from the public, licensees, certificate... rulemaking regarding non-power reactor licenses. The preliminary draft regulatory basis document describes...

  1. 75 FR 67616 - Yamhill-Carlton Viticultural Area (2008R-305P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... our labeling and marketing materials.'' Brian O'Donnell of Belle Pente Vineyard and Winery stated that... entries in the local telephone book for the Yamhill-Carlton School District and the Yamhill-Carlton High... Lincoln County School District Boys Basketball online schedule (accessed February 11, 2008) showed that...

  2. A series of lectures on operational physics of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanakrishnan, P.; Rastogi, B.P.

    1982-01-01

    This report discusses certain aspects of operational physics of power reactors. These form a lecture series at the Winter College on Nuclear Physics and Reactors, Jan. - March 1980, conducted at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy. The topics covered are (a) the reactor physics aspects of fuel burnup (b) theoretical methods applied for burnup prediction in power reactors (c) interpretation of neutron detector readings in terms of adjacent fuel assembly powers (d) refuelling schemes used in power reactors. The reactor types chosen for the discussion are BWR, PWR and PHWR. (author)

  3. Pressurized water reactor nuclear power training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiro, Toshimasa; Maezawa, Yoshikazu; Tokuda, Kazuho; Takashima, Osao; Kido, Katsu.

    1976-01-01

    In spite of the necessity of training nuclear power plant operators so as to carry out proper operation, it is almost impossible to utilize real plants for training. Under such condition, Nuclear Power Training Center, Ltd. has been established in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture. The introduced simulator simulates the No.1 unit of Zion Nuclear Power Plant, Illinois, U.S.A. The simulator is placed in a computer room and a control room, and consists of three digital computers, an analog electrohydraulic controller panel, an instructor console, a reactor panel, a safety protecting panel, an alarm panel and others. The features of this simulator are the functions of initial conditions, snap shot, back track, freeze, local operation, malfunction, operation record and others. The main object of training is the operators who are on duty in the central control rooms of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Training program includes the beginner course and retraining course. Anyone, who possesses the scholarly attainments equal to or higher than those of senior high school graduates and the experiences in a thermal power plant as the qualification, is allowed to receive the training. The training period is 22 weeks, but 10 days for the retraining course. In addition, the general training course for those concerned with nuclear power generation is prepared, and curricula for these courses are briefly described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Leaching of nuclear power reactor wastes forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Villalobos, J.P.; Miyamoto, H.

    1986-01-01

    The leaching tests for power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN/CNEN-SP are described. These waste forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. 3 years leaching results are reported, determining cesium and strontium diffusivity coefficients for boric acid waste form and ion-exchange resins. (Author) [pt

  5. Power reactor noise studies and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzhanov, V

    2002-03-01

    The present thesis deals with the neutron noise arising in power reactor systems. Generally, it can be divided into two major parts: first, neutron noise diagnostics, or more specifically, novel methods and algorithms to monitor nuclear industrial reactors; and second, contributions to neutron noise theory as applied to power reactor systems. Neutron noise diagnostics is presented by two topics. The first one is a theoretical study on the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) for the localisation of anomalies. The second topic concerns various methods to detect guide tube impacting in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The significance of these problems comes from the operational experience. The thesis describes a novel method to localise vibrating control rods in a PWR by using only one C/F detector. Another novel method, based on wavelet analysis, is put forward to detect impacting guide tubes in a BWR. Neutron noise theory is developed for both Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and traditional reactors. By design the accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and methods that have been developed for traditional reactors and also it poses a number of new problems. As for the latter, the thesis investigates the space-dependent neutron noise caused by a fluctuating source. It is shown that the frequency-dependent spatial behaviour exhibits some new properties that are different from those known in traditional critical systems. On the other hand, various reactor physics approximations (point kinetic, adiabatic etc.) have not been defined yet for the subcritical systems. In this respect the thesis presents a systematic formulation of the above mentioned approximations as well as investigations of their properties. Another important problem in neutron noise theory is the treatment of moving boundaries. In this case one

  6. Power reactor noise studies and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhanov, V.

    2002-03-01

    The present thesis deals with the neutron noise arising in power reactor systems. Generally, it can be divided into two major parts: first, neutron noise diagnostics, or more specifically, novel methods and algorithms to monitor nuclear industrial reactors; and second, contributions to neutron noise theory as applied to power reactor systems. Neutron noise diagnostics is presented by two topics. The first one is a theoretical study on the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) for the localisation of anomalies. The second topic concerns various methods to detect guide tube impacting in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The significance of these problems comes from the operational experience. The thesis describes a novel method to localise vibrating control rods in a PWR by using only one C/F detector. Another novel method, based on wavelet analysis, is put forward to detect impacting guide tubes in a BWR. Neutron noise theory is developed for both Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and traditional reactors. By design the accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and methods that have been developed for traditional reactors and also it poses a number of new problems. As for the latter, the thesis investigates the space-dependent neutron noise caused by a fluctuating source. It is shown that the frequency-dependent spatial behaviour exhibits some new properties that are different from those known in traditional critical systems. On the other hand, various reactor physics approximations (point kinetic, adiabatic etc.) have not been defined yet for the subcritical systems. In this respect the thesis presents a systematic formulation of the above mentioned approximations as well as investigations of their properties. Another important problem in neutron noise theory is the treatment of moving boundaries. In this case one

  7. Direct conversion nuclear reactor space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.O.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of space nuclear reactor power systems using either thermoelectric or thermionic energy converters. An in-core reactor design and two heat pipe cooled out-of-core reactor designs were considered. One of the out-of-core cases utilized, long heat pipes (LHP) directly coupled to the energy converter. The second utilized a larger number of smaller heat pipes (mini-pipe) radiatively coupled to the energy converter. In all cases the entire system, including power conditioning, was constrained to be launched in a single shuttle flight. Assuming presently available performance, both the LHP thermoelectric system and minipipe thermionic system, designed to produce 100 kWe for seven years, would have a specific mass near 22kg/kWe. The specific mass of the thermionic minipipe system designed for a one year mission is 165 kg/kWe due to less fuel swelling. Shuttle imposed growth limits are near 300 kWe and 1.2 MWe for the thermoelectric and thermionic systems, respectively. Converter performance improvements could double this potential, and over 10 MWe may be possible for very short missions

  8. Boiler systems for nuclear powered reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; George, B.V.

    1979-01-01

    A power generating plant which comprises a heat source, at least one main steam turbine and at least one main boiler heated by heat from the heat source and providing the steam to drive the turbine, comprises additionally at least one further steam turbine, smaller than the main turbine, and at least one further boiler, of lower capacity than the main boiler, and heated from the same heat source and providing steam for the further turbine. Particularly advantageous in nuclear power stations, where the heat source is a nuclear reactor, the invention enables peak loads, above the normal continuous rating of the main generators driven by the main turbines, to be met by the further turbine(s) and one or more further generators driven thereby. This enables the main turbines to be freed from the thermal stresses of rapid load changes, which stresses are more easily accommodated by the smaller and thus more tolerant further turbine(s). Thus auxiliary diesel-driven or other independent power plant may be made partly or wholly unnecessary. Further, low-load running which would be inefficient if achieved by means of the main turbine(s), can be more efficiently effected by shutting them down and using the smaller further turbine(s) instead. These latter may also be used to provide independent power for servicing the generating plant during normal operation or during emergency or other shutdown, and in this latter case may also serve as a heat sink for the shutdown reactor

  9. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 1990 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the tenth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1989 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's power reactor information system (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States

  10. Nuclear power reactors in the world. Apr 1991 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This is the eleventh edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1990, on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. This information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States. 5 figs, 19 tabs

  11. Advanced power reactors with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of nuclear safety is the protection of individuals, society and environment against radiological hazards from accidental releases of radioactive materials contained in nuclear reactors. Hereto, these materials are enclosed by several successive barriers and the barriers protected against mishaps and accidents by a multi-level system of safety precautions. The evolution of reactor technology continuously improves this concept and its implementation. At a world-wide scale, several advanced reactor concepts are currently being considered, some of them already at a design stage. Essential safety objectives include both further strengthening the prevention of accidents and improving the containment of fission products should an accident occur. The proposed solutions differ considerably with regard to technical principles, plant size and time scales considered for industrial application. Two typical approaches can be distinguished: The first approach basically aims at an evolution of power reactors currently in use, taking into account the findings from safety research and from operation of current plants. This approach makes maximum use of proven technology and operating experience but may nevertheless include new safety features. The corresponding designs are often termed 'large evolutionary'. The second approach consists in more fundamental changes compared to present designs, often with strong emphasis on specific passive features protecting the fuel and fuel cladding barriers. Owing to the nature and capability of those passive features such 'innovative designs' are mostly smaller in power output. The paper describes the basic objectives of such developments and illustrates important technical concepts focusing on next generation plants, i.e. designs to be available for industrial application until the end of this decade. 1 tab. (author)

  12. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, J.; Norton, J.L.; Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    therapy machines. Today the majority of the cancer therapy cobalt-60 sources used in the world are manufactured using material from the NRU reactor in Chalk River. The same technology that was used for producing cobalt-60 in a research reactor was then adapted and transferred for use in a CANDU power reactor. In the early 1970s, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors located east of Toronto. This was the first full scale production of millions of curies of cobalt-60 per year. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology in additional CANDUs. Over the years MDS Nordion has partnered with CANDU reactor owners to produce cobalt-60 at various sites. CANDU reactors that have, or are still producing cobalt-60, include Pickering A, Pickering B, Gentilly 2, Embalse in Argentina, and Bruce B. In conclusion, the technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada, has been safely, economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world. MDS Nordion is presently adding three more CANDU power reactors to its supply chain. These three additional cobalt producing CANDU's will help supplement the ability of the health care industry to provide safe, sterile, medical disposable products to people around the world. As new applications for cobalt-60 are identified, and the demand for bulk cobalt-60 increases, MDS Nordion and AECL

  13. Reactor power control device in BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Tsuneo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for controlling reactor power based on a start-up/shut down program in a BWR type reactor, as well as for detecting deviation, if occurs, of the power from the start-up/shut down program, to control a recycling flow rate control system or control rod drive mechanisms. Namely, a power instruction section successively executes the start-up/shut down program and controls the coolant recycling system and the control rod driving mechanisms to control the power. A current state monitoring and calculation section receives a process amount, calculates parameters showing the plant state, compares/monitors them with predetermined values, detecting the deviation, if occurs, of the plant state from the start-up/shut down program, and prevents output of a power increase control signal which leads to power increase. A forecasting and monitoring/calculation section forecasts and calculates the plant state when not yet executed steps of the start-up/shut down program are performed, stops the execution of the start-up/shut down program in the next step in a case of forecasting that the results of the calculation will deviate from the start-up/shut down program. (I.S.)

  14. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  15. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance

  16. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance in the

  17. Study on Reactor Performance of Online Power Monitoring in PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Mohd Sabri Minhat

    2014-01-01

    The Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) at Malaysia Nuclear Agency is a TRIGA Mark II type reactor and pool type cooled by natural circulation of light water. This paper describe on reactor performance of online power monitoring based on various parameter of reactor such as log power, linear power, period, Fuel and coolant temperature and reactivity parameter with using neutronic and other instrumentation system of reactor. Methodology of online power estimation and monitoring is to evaluate and analysis of reactor power which is important of reactor safety and control. Neutronic instrumentation system will use to estimate power measurement, differential of log and linear power and period during reactor operation .This study also focus on noise fluctuation from fission chamber during reactor operation .This work will present result of online power monitoring from RTP which indicated the safety parameter identification and initiate safety action on crossing the threshold set point trip. Conclude that optimization of online power monitoring will improved the reactor control and safety parameter of reactor during operation. (author)

  18. Leaching of nuclear power reactor waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Villalobos, J.P.; Miyamoto, H.

    1987-01-01

    The leaching tests for immobilized power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN are described. These wastes forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. Three years leaching results are reported. The cesium diffuvity coefficients determined out of these results are about 1 x 10 -8 cm 2 /s for boric acid waste form and 9 x 10 -9 cm 2 /s for ion-exchange resin waste. Strontium diffusivity coefficients found are about 3 x 10 -11 cm 2 /s and 9 x 10 -11 cm 2 /s respectively. (Author) [pt

  19. Revision of the second basic plans of power reactor development in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Revision of the second basic plans concerning power reactor development in PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) is presented. (1) Fast breeder reactors: As for the experimental fast breeder reactor, after reaching the criticality, the power is raised to 50 MW thermal output within fiscal 1978. The prototype fast breeder reactor is intended for the electric output of 200 MW -- 300 MW, using mixed plutonium/uranium oxide fuel. Along the above lines, research and development will be carried out on reactor physics, sodium technology, machinery and parts, nuclear fuel, etc. (2) Advanced thermal reactor: The prototype advanced thermal reactor, with initial fuel primarily of slightly enriched uranium and heavy water moderation and boiling water cooling, of 165 MW electric output, is brought to its normal operation by the end of fiscal 1978. Along the above lines, research and development will be carried out on reactor physics, machinery and parts, nuclear fuel, etc. (Mori, K

  20. The control of emissions from nuclear power reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Neil, B.C.J.; Chatterjee, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU pressurised heavy water design. These are located in the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Most of the nuclear generating capacity is in the province of Ontario which has 16 commissioned reactors with a total capacity of 11,500 MWe. There are four reactors under construction with an additional capacity of 3400 MWe. Nuclear power currently accounts for approximately 50% of the electrical power generation of Ontario. Regulation of the reactors is a Federal Government responsibility administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) which licenses the reactors and sets occupational and public dose limits

  1. Calorimetrics on the JASON low power teaching and research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorman, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Teaching and research reactors are often of low power. This low power cannot be measured simply by calorimetrics of the coolant because the fraction of the nuclear power which is not transferred to the coolant is significant. However, the power still needs to be known accurately to support a safety case. This paper presents a simple and novel method whereby the JASON low power reactor was thermally calibrated and the power assessed directly. (author)

  2. ATMEA and medium power reactors. The ATMEA joint venture and the ATMEA1 medium power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathet, Eric; Castello, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This Power Point presentation presents the ATMEA company (a joint venture of Areva and Mitsubishi), the main features of its medium power reactor (ATMEA1) and its building arrangement, indicates the general safety objectives. It outlines the features of its robust design which aim at protecting, cooling down and containing. It indicates the regulatory and safety frameworks, comments the review of the safety options by the ASN and the results of this assessment

  3. Optimal control rod programs in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadilah, S.M.; Lewins, J.

    1975-01-01

    Control rod programming is investigated with respect to optimising the power peaking factor and hence the utilisation of a nuclear reactor. A simplified diffusion model, initially with a finite number of regions, in cylindrical geometry, is used to enable optimal trajectories to be completely synthesised. The average discharge burnup problem is posed both as an external and as an internal optimisation. The connection between optimum power shape and the maximisation of the average discharge burnup is explored in a wider context. It is shown that optimum trajectories combine an initial singular solution of the Haling type with a terminal bang-bang solution. An extension to a higher number of regions and, on passing to the limit, to a diffusion model, provides an alternative proof of Haling's principle without the restriction to monotonic reactivity decrease with burnup. Numerical results in the two-region model are given to show the general scope of optimisation available. (author)

  4. Neutron measurements at nuclear power reactors [55

    CERN Document Server

    Scherpelz, R I

    2002-01-01

    Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), have performed neutron measurements at a number of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Neutron radiation fields at light water reactor (LWR) power plants are typically characterized by low-energy distributions due to the presence of large amounts of scattering material such as water and concrete. These low-energy distributions make it difficult to accurately monitor personnel exposures, since most survey meters and dosimeters are calibrated to higher-energy fields such as those produced by bare or D sub 2 O-moderated sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf sources. Commercial plants typically use thermoluminescent dosimeters in an albedo configuration for personnel dosimetry and survey meters based on a thermal-neutron detector inside a cylindrical or spherical moderator for dose rate assessment, so their methods of routine monitoring are highly dependent on the energy of the neutron fields. Battelle has participate...

  5. Experience in using a research reactor for the training of power reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenaut, L.J.

    1972-01-01

    A research reactor facility such as the one at the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital would have much to offer in the way of training reactor operators. Although most of the candidates for the course had either received previous training in the Westinghouse Reactor Operator Training Program, had operated nuclear submarine reactors or had operated power reactors, they were not offered the opportunity to perform the extensive manipulations of a reactor that a small research facility will allow. In addition the AEC recommends 10 research reactor startups per student as a prerequisite for a cold operator?s license and these can easily be obtained during the training period

  6. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant

  7. How power is generated in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, V.

    1978-01-01

    Power generation by nuclear fission as a result of chain reaction caused by neutrons interacting with fissile material such as 235 U, 233 U and 239 Pu is explained. Electric power production by reactor is schematically illustrated. Materials used in thermal reactor and breeder reactor are compared. Fuel reprocessing and disposal of radioactive waste coming from reprocessing plant is briefly described. Nuclear activities in India are reviewed. Four heavy water plants and two power reactors are under construction and will be operative in the near future. Two power reactors are already in operation. Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad supplies fuel element to the reactors. Fuel reprocessing and waste management facility has been set up at Tarapur. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay and Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam near Madras are engaged in applied and basic research in nuclear science and engineering. (B.G.W.)

  8. UF6 breeder reactor power plants for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, J.H.; Clement, J.D.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor concept analyzed is a 233 UF 6 core surrounded by a molten salt (Li 7 F, BeF 2 , ThF 4 ) blanket. Nuclear survey calculations were carried out for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. A maximum breeding ratio of 1.22 was found. Thermodynamic cycle calculations were performed for a variety of Rankine cycles. Optimization of a Rankine cycle for a gas core breeder reactor employing an intermediate heat exchanger gave a maximum efficiency of 37 percent. A conceptual design is presented along with a system layout for a 1000 MW stationary power plant. The advantages of the GCBR are as follows: (1) high efficiency, (2) simplified on-line reprocessing, (3) inherent safety considerations, (4) high breeding ratio, (5) possibility of burning all or most of the long-lived nuclear waste actinides, and (6) possibility of extrapolating the technology to higher temperatures and MHD direct conversion

  9. Strategic planning for hotel operations: The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company (Part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, S J

    1993-01-01

    The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company won the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award in 1992. One key to its success is its strategic planning process. This two-part article reviews the Ritz-Carlton's approach to strategic planning. In particular, it describes (1) the role of senior leadership in the planning process and (2) the specific activities that are associated with plan development and implementation.

  10. Nuclear Power: Outlook for New U.S. Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Larry; Holt, Mark

    2007-01-01

    .... The renewed interest in nuclear power has resulted primarily from higher prices for natural gas, improved operation of existing reactors, and uncertainty about future restrictions on coal emissions...

  11. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve

  12. The concept of the innovative power reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima accident reveals the vulnerability of existing active nuclear power plant (NPP design against prolonged loss of external electricity events. The passive safety system is considered an attractive alternative to cope with this kind of disaster. Also, the passive safety system enhances both the safety and the economics of NPPs. The adoption of a passive safety system reduces the number of active components and can minimize the construction cost of NPPs. In this paper, reflecting on the experience during the development of the APR+ design in Korea, we propose the concept of an innovative Power Reactor (iPower, which is a kind of passive NPP, to enhance safety in a revolutionary manner. The ultimate goal of iPower is to confirm the feasibility of practically eliminating radioactive material release to the environment in all accident conditions. The representative safety grade passive system includes a passive emergency core cooling system, a passive containment cooling system, and a passive auxiliary feedwater system. Preliminary analysis results show that these concepts are feasible with respect to preventing and/or mitigating the consequences of design base accidents and severe accidents.

  13. Pellet bed reactor for multi-modal space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Williams, K.; Mast, P.; Mims, J.

    1987-01-01

    A review of forthcoming space power needs for both civil and military missions indicates that power requirements will be in the tens of megawatts. The electrical power requirements are envisioned to be twofold: long-duration lower power levels will be needed for station keeping, communications, and/or surveillance; short-duration higher power levels will be required for pulsed power devices. These power characteristics led to the proposal of a multi-modal space power reactor using a pellet bed design. Characteristics desired for such a multimegawatt reactor power source are standby, alert, and pulsed power modes; high-thermal output heat source (approximately 1000 MWt peak power); long lifetime station keeping power (10 to 30 years); high temperature output (1500 K to 1800 K); rapid-burst power transition; high reliability (above 95 percent); and stringent safety standards compliance. The proposed pellet bed reactor is designed to satisfy these characteristics

  14. Nuclear problems of power reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocic, A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to emphasize the conditions that would be of high importance in safety analyses concerned first of all with reactor core. It describes reactor kinetics processes in the core and build up of fission products, classification of reactor accidents related to the core, risk estimation and includes a list of importance reactor accidents

  15. The inherently-safe power reactor DYONISOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, M.; Lanfranchi, M.; Weissenfluh, Th. von; Ligou, J.; Rippin, D.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Taube, P.; Kohl, H.

    1985-12-01

    A philosophy of inherent safety is formulated and an inherently-safe thermal power reactor is presented. Solid fuel in the form of spheres a few centimeters in diameter is suspended under the hydrodynamic pressure of molten lead coolant in vertical channels within the graphite moderator. Loss of main pump pressure, or a loss-of-coolant accident, results in immediate removal of the fuel to rigid sieves below the core, with consequent subcriticality. Residual and decay heat are carried away by thermal conduction through the coolant or, in the case of a LOCA, by a combination of radiation and natural convection of cover gas or incoming air from fuel to reactor vessel and convection of air between vessel and steel containment wall. All decay heat removal systems are passive, though actively initiated external spray cooling of the containment can be used to reduce wall temperature. This, however, is only necessary in the case of a LOCA and after a period of 24 hours. (author)

  16. Reactor G1: high power experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laage, F. de; Teste du Baillet, A.; Veyssiere, A.; Wanner, G.

    1957-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  17. Liquid-poison type power controlling device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuo; Yamanari, Shozo; Sugisaki, Toshihiko; Goto, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety and the operability of a nuclear reactor by adjusting the density of liquid poison. Constitution: The thermal expansion follow-up failure between cladding and a pellet upon abrupt and local variations of the power is avoided by adjusting the density of liquid poison during ordinary operation in combination with a high density liquid poison tank and a filter and smoothly controlling the reactor power through a pipe installed in the reactor core. The high density liquid poison is abruptly charged in to the reactor core under relatively low pressure through the tube installed in the reactor core at the time of control rod insertion failure in an accident, thereby effectively shutting down the reactor and improving the safety and the operability of the reactor. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. Axial power monitoring uncertainty in the Savannah River Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losey, D.C.; Revolinski, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of this analysis quantified the uncertainty associated with monitoring the Axial Power Shape (APS) in the Savannah River Reactors. Thermocouples at each assembly flow exit map the radial power distribution and are the primary means of monitoring power in these reactors. The remaining uncertainty in power monitoring is associated with the relative axial power distribution. The APS is monitored by seven sensors that respond to power on each of nine vertical Axial Power Monitor (APM) rods. Computation of the APS uncertainty, for the reactor power limits analysis, started with a large database of APM rod measurements spanning several years of reactor operation. A computer algorithm was used to randomly select a sample of APSs which were input to a code. This code modeled the thermal-hydraulic performance of a single fuel assembly during a design basis Loss-of Coolant Accident. The assembly power limit at Onset of Significant Voiding was computed for each APS. The output was a distribution of expected assembly power limits that was adjusted to account for the biases caused by instrumentation error and by measuring 7 points rather than a continuous APS. Statistical analysis of the final assembly power limit distribution showed that reducing reactor power by approximately 3% was sufficient to account for APS variation. This data confirmed expectations that the assembly exit thermocouples provide all information needed for monitoring core power. The computational analysis results also quantified the contribution to power limits of the various uncertainties such as instrumentation error

  19. Nuclear reactor power control system based on flexibility model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gang; Zhao Fuyu; Li Chong; Tai Yun

    2011-01-01

    Design the nuclear reactor power control system in this paper to cater to a nonlinear nuclear reactor. First, calculate linear power models at five power levels of the reactor as five local models and design controllers of the local models as local controllers. Every local controller consists of an optimal controller contrived by the toolbox of Optimal Controller Designer (OCD) and a proportion-integration-differentiation (PID) controller devised via Genetic Algorithm (GA) to set parameters of the PID controller. According to the local models and controllers, apply the principle of flexibility model developed in the paper to obtain the flexibility model and the flexibility controller at every power level. Second, the flexibility model and the flexibility controller at a level structure the power control system of this level. The set of the whole power control systems corresponding to global power levels is to approximately carry out the power control of the reactor. Finally, the nuclear reactor power control system is simulated. The simulation result shows that the idea of flexibility model is feasible and the nuclear reactor power control system is effective. (author)

  20. Safety studies concerning nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Jean; Pelce, Jacques

    1980-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations poses different technical problems, whether concerning pressurized water reactors or fast reactors. But investigating methods are closely related and concern, on the one hand, the behavior of shields placed between fuel and outside and, on the other, analysis of accidents. The article is therefore in two parts based on the same plan. Concerning light water reactors, the programme of studies undertaken in France accounts for the research carried out in countries where collaboration agreements exist. Concerning fast reactors, France has the initiative of their studies owing to her technical advance, which explains the great importance of the programmes under way [fr

  1. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathaire, F. de; Vernier, Ph.; Pascouet, A.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors) [fr

  2. Modular Lead-Bismuth Fast Reactors in Nuclear Power

    OpenAIRE

    Georgy Toshinsky; Vladimir Petrochenko

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the unique experience of operating reactors with heavy liquid metal coolant–eutectic lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear submarines, the concept of modular small fast reactors SVBR-100 for civilian nuclear power has been developed and validated. The features of this innovative technology are as follows: a monoblock (integral) design of the reactor with fast neutron spectrum, which can operate using different types of fuel in various fuel cycles including MOX fuel in a self-providing...

  3. The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs

  4. Design characteristics of research zero power fast reactor Lasta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.; Stefanovic, D.; Pesic, M.; Nikolic, D.; Antic, D.; Zavaljevski, N.; Popovic, D.

    1990-01-01

    LASTA is a flexible zero power reactor with uranium and plutonium fuel designed for research in the neutron physics and in the fast reactor physics. Safety considerations and experimental flexibility led to the choice of a fixed vertical assembly with two safety blocks as the main safety elements, so that safety devices would be operated by gravity. The neutron and reactor physics, the control and safety philosophy adopted in our design, are described in this paper. Developed computer programs are presented. (author)

  5. Status report on nuclear reactors for space electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Increased questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. The potential missions, why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations are discussed

  6. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 2005 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: - General information as of the end of 2004 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; - Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States and available at the Internet address http://www.iaea.org/programmes/a2

  7. Design for reactor core safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Guide covers the neutronic, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and irradiation considerations important to the safe design of a nuclear reactor core. The Guide applies to the types of thermal neutron reactor power plants that are now in common use and fuelled with oxide fuels: advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR), boiling water reactor (BWR), pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) (pressure tube and pressure vessel type) and pressurized water reactor (PWR). It deals with the individual components and systems that make up the core and associated equipment and with design provisions for the safe operation of the core and safe handling of the fuel and other core components. The Guide discusses the reactor vessel internals and the reactivity control and shutdown devices mounted on the vessel. Possible effects on requirements for the reactor coolant, the reactor coolant system and its pressure boundary (including the pressure vessel) are considered only as far as necessary to clarify the interface with the Safety Guide on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13) and other Guides. In relation to instrumentation and control systems the guidance is mainly limited to functional requirements

  8. Calculation device for fuel power history in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Masaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable calculations for power history and various variants of power change in the power history of fuels in a BWR type reactor or the like. Constitution: The outputs of the process computation for the nuclear reactor by a process computer are stored and the reactor core power distribution is judged from the calculated values for the reactor core power distribution based on the stored data. Data such as for thermal power, core flow rate, control rod position and power distribution are recorded where the changes in the power distribution exceed a predetermined amount, and data such as for thermal power and core flow rate are recorded where the changes are within the level of the predetermined amount, as effective data excluding unnecessary data. Accordingly, the recorded data are taken out as required and the fuel power history and the various variants in the fuel power are calculated and determined in a calculation device for fuel power history and variants for fuel power fluctuation. (Furukawa, Y.)

  9. Thermohydraulic analysis for power increase of IEAR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Bastos, Jose L.F.

    1996-01-01

    In this work has been presented the reactor core thermohydraulic model of IEAR-1, aiming its power operation increase from 2MW to 5MW. The design criteria adopted have been established in Safety Series 35. Three configurations of reactor core were analysed: fuel elements 20, 25 and 30

  10. Neutronic analysis of a high power density hybrid reactor using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in hexagonal geometry with ten rows of pitch length 1·25 cm in the radial direction. In the investigated blanket, selection of the potential structural materials for a high power density reactor is conducted on the basis of the following considerations. Among the candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, tungsten (W) has ...

  11. Preliminary Study of 20 MWth Experiment Power Reactor based on Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, Dwi; Permana, Sidik; Pramuditya, Syeilendra

    2017-07-01

    In this study, preliminary design calculations for experimental small power reactor (20 MWt) based on Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) are performed. PBR technology chosen due to its advantages in neutronic and safety aspects. Several important parameters, such as fissile enrichment, number of fuel passes, burnup and effective multiplication factor are taken into account in the calculation to find neutronic characteristics of the present reactor design.

  12. Reactor shutdown: nuclear power plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The article essentially looks at the performance of nine of Sweden's nuclear reactors. A table lists the percentage of time for the first three quarters of 1981 that the reactors were operating, and the number of hours out of service for planned or other reasons. In particular, one station - Ringhals 3 - was out of action because of a damaged tube in the associated steam generator. The same fault occurred with another reactor - Ringhals 4 - before this was brought into service. The reasons for the failure and its importance are briefly discussed. (G.P.)

  13. Decay Power Calculation for Safety Analysis of Innovative Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shwageraus, E.; Fridman, E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2008-07-01

    In this work, we verified the decay heat calculation capabilities of BGCore computer code system developed recently at Ben-Gurion University. Decay power was calculated for a typical UO{sub 2} fuel in Pressurized Water Reactor environment using BGCore code and using procedure prescribed by the ANS/ANSI-2005 standard. Very good agreement between the two methods was obtained. Once BGCore calculation capabilities were verified, we calculated decay power as a function of time after shutdown for various reactors with innovative fuels, for which no standard procedure is currently available. Notable differences were observed for decay power of the advanced reactors as compared with conventional UO{sub 2} LWR. The observed differences suggest that the design of new reactors safety systems must be based on corresponding decay power curves for each individual case in order to assure the desired performance of such systems. (authors)

  14. Nuclear Power: Outlook for New U.S. Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Larry; Holt, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Nearly three decades after the most recent order was placed for a new nuclear power plant in the United States, several utilities are now expressing interest in building a total of up to 30 new reactors...

  15. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Horn, F. L.

    Reactors based on direct cooled High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out along the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBRs) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed.

  16. Regulations of local choices for installation of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-09-01

    The present regulations specify the criteria under which the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear will approve the local proposed for the installation of power reactors, according to his attributions established in the Law 4118, dated of August 27, 1962

  17. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion in Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Presby, Andrew L

    2004-01-01

    .... This has potential benefits for space nuclear reactor power systems currently in development. The primary obstacle to space operation of thermophotovoltaic devices appears to be the low heat rejection temperatures which necessitate large radiator areas...

  18. Decay Power Calculation for Safety Analysis of Innovative Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwageraus, E.; Fridman, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we verified the decay heat calculation capabilities of BGCore computer code system developed recently at Ben-Gurion University. Decay power was calculated for a typical UO 2 fuel in Pressurized Water Reactor environment using BGCore code and using procedure prescribed by the ANS/ANSI-2005 standard. Very good agreement between the two methods was obtained. Once BGCore calculation capabilities were verified, we calculated decay power as a function of time after shutdown for various reactors with innovative fuels, for which no standard procedure is currently available. Notable differences were observed for decay power of the advanced reactors as compared with conventional UO 2 LWR. The observed differences suggest that the design of new reactors safety systems must be based on corresponding decay power curves for each individual case in order to assure the desired performance of such systems. (authors)

  19. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios

  20. Studies on transferring the safety features of the module reactor to a large power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuliang.

    1992-02-01

    The German industries and research institutions have developed the HTR module reactor, which is strongly characterized by inherent safety features. The power output is limited to about 200 MWth because of its core configuration. It has been investigated in this work, whether the safety features of the module reactor can be transferred to larger power reactors. For this purpose the conceptual design of a ring core pebble bed reactor has been made with a thermal power output of 3000 MW. By means of computer calculations, the principal physical, thermohydraulical and safety features of the ring reactor have been studied. It has been shown that the 3000-MWth ring reactor basically possesses the same safety characteristics as the small module reactor. At reactivity disturbances, the reactor is shut down passively by the strongly negative temperature coefficient. The decay heat removal is also realized based on the passive priniciple. In the case of a total loss of coolant, the maximum fuel element temperature remains below 1600deg C; and consequently the retention of fission products in the fuel elements is fully attained. The control of xenon oscillations takes place inherently due to the mutual coupling between the local power production and the fuel temperature. (orig.) [de

  1. On-load refuelling for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of handling irradiated fuel are, first that there is a residual heat produced even when the fission process in the fuel element is ended by shutdown or withdrawal of the fuel element from the reactor on-load. Secondly, that highly penetrating ionising radiations are emitted from irradiated fuel. In PWR and BWR reactors the need for on-load fuel handling has been avoided. However, in other types on-load handling became part of the design. The conditions needed for on-load handling and some of the problems with on-load handling of magnox fuel elements are mentioned. The situation for CANDU and other reactor types are considered briefly. The detailed design of machines for on-load fuel handling for the UK gas-cooled reactors and typical refuelling machines in current use are described in some detail. (UK)

  2. Self-operation type power control device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention operates by sensing the temperature change of a reactor core in all of LMFBR type reactors irrespective of the scale of the reactor core power. That is, a region where liquid poison is filled is disposed at the upper portion and a region where sealed gases are filled is disposed at the lower portion of a pipe having both ends thereof being closed. When the pipe is inserted into the reactor core, the inner diameter of the pipe is determined smaller than a predetermined value so that the boundary between the liquid poison and the sealed gases in the pipe is maintained relative to an assumed maximum acceleration. The sealed gas region is disposed at the reactor core region. If the liquid poison is expanded by the elevation of the reactor core exit temperature, it is moved to the lower gas region, to control the reactor power. Since high reliability can be maintained over a long period of time by this method, it is suitable to FBR reactors disposed in such environments that maintenance can not easily be conducted, such as desserts, isolated islands and undeveloped countries. Further, it is also suitable to ultra small sized nuclear reactors disposed at environments that the direction and the magnitude of gravity are different from those on the ground. (I.S.)

  3. 75 FR 9831 - Proposed Renaming of the Yamhill-Carlton District Viticultural Area (2008R-305P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ...://www.regulations.gov (via the online comment form for this notice as posted within Docket No. TTB-2010...-Carlton AVA [name] would be much preferable for use in our labeling and marketing materials.'' Brian O... Yamhill- Carlton District viticultural area included entries in the local telephone book for the Yamhill...

  4. Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicates but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat

  5. Expanding of reactor power calculation model of RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Meng; Yang Yanhua; Chen Yuqing; Zhang Hong; Liu Dingming

    2007-01-01

    For better analyzing of the nuclear power transient in rod-controlled reactor core by RELAP5 code, a nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic best-estimate system code, it is expected to get the nuclear power using not only the point neutron kinetics model but also one-dimension neutron kinetics model. Thus an existing one-dimension nuclear reactor physics code was modified, to couple its neutron kinetics model with the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic model. The detailed example test proves that the coupling is valid and correct. (authors)

  6. Technology and use of low power research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    The report contains a summary of discussions and 10 papers presented at the Consultants' Meeting on the Technology and Use of Low Power Research Reactors organized by the IAEA and held in Beijing (China) during 30 April - 3 May 1985. The following topics have been covered: reactor utilization in medicine and biology, in universities, for training, as a neutron source for radiography and some remarks on the safety of low power research reactors. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper presented at the meeting

  7. Station Blackout Analysis of HTGR-Type Experimental Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarip; Zuhdi, Aliq; Falah, Sabilul

    2018-01-01

    The National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia has decided to build an experimental power reactor of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) type located at Puspiptek Complex. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate a small modular nuclear power plant that can be operated safely. One of the reactor safety characteristics is the reliability of the reactor to the station blackout (SBO) event. The event was observed due to relatively high disturbance frequency of electricity network in Indonesia. The PCTRAN-HTR functional simulator code was used to observe fuel and coolant temperature, and coolant pressure during the SBO event. The reactor simulated at 10 MW for 7200 s then the SBO occurred for 1-3 minutes. The analysis result shows that the reactor power decreases automatically as the temperature increase during SBO accident without operator’s active action. The fuel temperature increased by 36.57 °C every minute during SBO and the power decreased by 0.069 MW every °C fuel temperature rise at the condition of anticipated transient without reactor scram. Whilst, the maximum coolant (helium) temperature and pressure are 1004 °C and 9.2 MPa respectively. The maximum fuel temperature is 1282 °C, this value still far below the fuel temperature limiting condition i.e. 1600 °C, its mean that the HTGR has a very good inherent safety system.

  8. Method of controlling power distribution in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Shusaku; Kaneto, Kunikazu.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To attain the power distribution flattening with ease by obtaining a radial power distribution substantially in a constant configuration not depending on the burn-up cycle. Method: As the fuel burning proceeds, the radial power distribution is effected by the accumulation of fission products in the inner blancket fuel assemblies which varies the effect thereof as the neutron absorbing substances. Taking notice of the above fact, the power distribution is controlled in a heterogeneous FBR type reactor by varying the core residence period of the inner blancket assemblies in accordance with the charging density of the inner blancket assemblies in the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficiency and mass characteristics for four gas-cooled reactor power system configurations in the 2- to 20-MWe power range are modeled. The configurations use direct and indirect Brayton cycles with and without regeneration in the power conversion loop. The prismatic ceramic core of the reactor consists of several thousand pencil-shaped tubes made from a homogeneous mixture of moderator and fuel. The heat rejection system is found to be the major contributor to system mass, particularly at high power levels. A direct, regenerated Brayton cycle with helium working fluid permits high efficiency and low specific mass for a 10-MWe system

  10. Seasonal accumulation of major alkaloids in organs of pharmaceutical crop Narcissus Carlton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbe, A.; Gude, H.; Verpoorte, R.; Choi, C.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Narcissus pseudonarcissus (L.) cv. Carlton is being cultivated as a main source of galanthamine from the bulbs. After galanthamine, haemanthamine and narciclasine are the next most abundant alkaloids in this cultivar. Both these compounds are promising chemical scaffolds for potential anticancer

  11. Reference Reactor Module for the Affordable Fission Surface Power System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Amiri, Benjamin W.; Marcille, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The requirements of many surface power applications allow the consideration of systems with much less development risk than most other space reactor applications, because of modest power (10s of kWe) and no driving need for minimal mass (allowing temperatures 2 -fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. One of the important 'affordability' attributes is that the concept has been designed to minimize both the technical and programmatic safety risk

  12. Analysis of reactor power oscillation based on nonlinear dynamic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki

    1994-07-01

    Reactor power oscillations are discussed based on nonlinear dynamic theory with reference to stability problem of boiling water reactors (BWRs). The reactor noise from an actual plant is, firstly, analyzed by a method originally used for the analysis of chaotic phenomenon. The results show that this method gives better dynamic descriptor of oscillatory motion than those from previous methods, and that it is applicable to real-time monitoring system of the reactor core. Next, the low-dimensional phenomenological model of BWR power oscillation is analytically studied using bifurcation theory, a branch of nonlinear dynamic theory. From this analysis are derived explicit expressions for the steady state's linear stability and weak stability not given by numerical analyses, and the qualitative properties of the power oscillation can be better understood. (author)

  13. The system of the measurement of reactor power and the monitoring of core power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianfeng

    1999-01-01

    The author mainly describes the measurement of the reactor power and the monitoring of the core power distribution in DAYA BAY nuclear power plant, introduces the calibration for the measurement system. Ex-core nuclear instrumentation system (RPN) and LOCA surveillance system (LSS) are the most important system for the object. they perform the measurement of the reactor power and the monitoring of the core power distribution on-line and timely. They also play the important roles in the reactor control and the reactor protection. For the same purpose there are test instrumentation system (KME) and in-core instrumentation system (RIC). All of them work together ensuring the exact measurement and effective monitoring, ensuring the safety of the reactor power plant

  14. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    An important niche for nuclear energy is the need for power at remote locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. Nuclear energy has potential applications at strategic defense locations, theaters of battle, remote communities, and emergency locations. With proper safeguards, a 1 to 10-MWe (megawatt electric) mobile reactor system could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term power in any environment. Heat pipe-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactors have been identified as a candidate for these applications. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than “traditional” reactors. The goal of this project was to develop a scalable conceptual design for a compact reactor and to identify scaling issues for compact heat pipe cooled reactors in general. Toward this goal two detailed concepts were developed, the first concept with more conventional materials and a power of about 2 MWe and a the second concept with less conventional materials and a power level of about 5 MWe. A series of more qualitative advanced designs were developed (with less detail) that show power levels can be pushed to approximately 30 MWe.

  15. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  16. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Werner, James; Qualls, Louis; Radel, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO 2 -fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  17. Automatic power control for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Yung Joon

    1994-02-01

    During a normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the reactivity is controlled by control rods, boron, and the average temperature of the primary coolant. Especially in load follow operation, the reactivity change is induced by changes in power level and effects of xenon concentration. The control of the core power distribution is concerned, mainly, with the axial power distribution which depends on insertion and withdrawal of the control rods resulting in additional reactivity compensation. The utilization of part strength control element assemblies (PSCEAs) is quite appropriate for a control of the power distribution in the case of Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN Unit 3). However, control of the PSCEAs is not automatic, and changes in the boron concentration by dilution/boration are done manually. Thus, manual control of the PSCEAs and the boron concentration require the operator's experience and knowledge for a successful load follow operation. In this thesis, the new concepts have been proposed to adapt for an automatic power control in a PWR. One of the new concepts is the mode K control, another is a fuzzy power control. The system in mode K control implements a heavy-worth bank dedicated to axial shape control, independent of the existing regulating banks. The heavy bank provides a monotonic relationship between its motion and the axial power shape change, which allows automatic control of the axial power distribution. And the mode K enables precise regulation, by using double closed-loop control of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power difference. Automatic reactor power control permits the nuclear power plant to accommodate the load follow operations, including frequency control, to respond to the grid requirements. The mode K reactor control concepts were tested using simulation responses of a Korean standardized 1000-MWe PWR which is a reference plant for the YGN Unit 3. The simulation results illustrate that the mode K would be

  18. Safety of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products - Part 1: General requirements and tests

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    This International Standard deals with safety aspects of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products such as electrical, thermal and mechanical safety. This standard covers the following types of dry-type transformers, power supplies, including switch mode power supplies, and reactors, the windings of which may be encapsulated or non-encapsulated. It has the status of a group safety publication in accordance with IEC Guide 104.

  19. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  20. Laser fusion power reactor system (LFPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacik, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives detailed information for each of the following areas: (1) reference concept description, (2) nuclear design, (3) structural design, (4) thermal and fluid systems design, (5) materials design and analysis, (6) reactor support systems and balance of plant, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) environment and safety, (9) economics assessment, and (10) development requirements

  1. TerraPower, Bill Gates' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.

    2016-01-01

    TerraPower is a traveling wave reactor, it means that the reactor gradually converts non fissile material into the fuel it needs and the active part of the core progressively moves through the core leaving spent fuel behind. The last design of the TerraPower shows that it will use depleted uranium as fuel and that its core will need reloading every 10 years. Re-arrangement of the nuclear fuel will have to be made every 18 months to keep the core reactive. Metallic nuclear fuels will be used as they allow the highest breeding rates. It appears that apart from the very specific configuration of the core, the TerraPower is a reactor very similar to sodium-cooled fast reactors. Neutron transport inside traveling wave reactor core is complex and simulations show that the piling-up of fission product tends to kill the chain reaction and a continuous neutron addition may be necessary to keep the reactor going. A large part of the TerraPower feasibility studies concerns neutron transport inside its core. (A.C.)

  2. Inherent reactor power controller for a metal-fueled ALMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.T.; Wilson, T.L. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Inherent power control for metal-fueled ALMR designs involves using reactivity thermal feedback effects to control reactor power. This paper describes how, using classical control design techniques, a control system for normal load following maneuvers was deigned for a pool-type ALMR. This design provides active control of power removal in the balance of plant, direct control of selected primary and intermediate loop temperatures, and passive control of reactor power. The inherent stability of the strong, fast reactivity feedback effects bring heat production in the core into balance with the heat removal system temperatures, which are controlled to meet power demand. A simulation of the control system successfully responded to a 10% step change in power demand by changing power at an acceptable rate without causing large temperature fluctuations or exceeding thermal limits

  3. Power Trip Set-points of Reactor Protection System for New Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Yang, Soohyung

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the trip set-point related to the reactor power considering the reactivity induced accident (RIA) of new research reactor. The possible scenarios of reactivity induced accidents were simulated and the effects of trip set-point on the critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) were calculated. The proper trip set-points which meet the acceptance criterion and guarantee sufficient margins from normal operation were then determined. The three different trip set-points related to the reactor power are determined based on the RIA of new research reactor during FP condition, over 0.1%FP and under 0.1%FP. Under various reactivity insertion rates, the CHFR are calculated and checked whether they meet the acceptance criterion. For RIA at FP condition, the acceptance criterion can be satisfied even if high power set-point is only used for reactor trip. Since the design of the reactor is still progressing and need a safety margin for possible design changes, 18 MW is recommended as a high power set-point. For RIA at 0.1%FP, high power setpoint of 18 MW and high log rate of 10%pp/s works well and acceptance criterion is satisfied. For under 0.1% FP operations, the application of high log rate is necessary for satisfying the acceptance criterion. Considering possible decrease of CHFR margin due to design changes, the high log rate is suggested to be 8%pp/s. Suggested trip set-points have been identified based on preliminary design data for new research reactor; therefore, these trip set-points will be re-established by considering design progress of the reactor. The reactor protection system (RPS) of new research reactor is designed for safe shutdown of the reactor and preventing the release of radioactive material to environment. The trip set point of RPS is essential for reactor safety, therefore should be determined to mitigate the consequences from accidents. At the same time, the trip set-point should secure margins from normal operational condition to avoid

  4. Method of monitoring reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the power distribution of fuel assemblies at high accuracy in a short time by estimating the relative power distribution based on the amount of neutrons leaking out of the system and converting the same into the absolute power distribution. Method: The relative power distribution is estimated on the amount of neutrons leaking out of the system by the solution of tertiary diffusion equations concerning the counted values from the local power region monitors and the continuous conditions for the current of neutron flux at a position of the local power region. Then, the estimated relative power distribution is converted into the absolute power distribution by using the readings from the local power region monitors. (Horiuchi, T.)

  5. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Horn, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs

  6. Protective actions as a factor in power reactor siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, K.S.; Schweitzer, M.

    1984-06-01

    This report examines the relationship between a power reactor site and the ease of implementing protective actions (emergency measures a serious accident). Limiting populating density around a reactor lowers the number of people at risk but cannot assure that all protective actions are possible for those who reside near the reactor. While some protective measures can always be taken (i.e., expedient respiratory protection, sheltering) the ability to evacuate the area or find adequate shelter may depend on the characteristics of the area near the reactor site. Generic siting restrictions designed to identify and eliminate these site-specific constraints would be difficult to formulate. The authors suggest identifying possible impediments to protective actions at a proposed reactor site and addressing these problems in the emergency plans. 66 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  7. Training nuclear power plant personnel on SR-O reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, K.; Boucek, F.; Kveton, M.; Prokopec, Z.; Fleischhans, J.

    1983-01-01

    The SR-O reactor is an experimental pool-type reactor with a maximum output of 1 MW and maximum thermal neutron flux density of 5.3x10 13 m -2 s -1 . The reactor is described in detail and its specifications are given. The protection and control systems of the reactor permit both manual and automatic operation. The reactor is used for training courses for nuclear power plant operators and for post-graduate study courses for other specialists. Intensive courses for 4 to 6 persons take 15 to 20 days. The course is adjusted to the results of introductory theoretical tests. An optimal teaching method has been developed based on the flowchart algorithmic method, dividing activities into operations (manipulations with controls, issuing commands, making records, etc.) and decision making (information reception and processing). (M.D.)

  8. Protective actions as a factor in power reactor siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, K.S.; Schweitzer, M.

    1984-06-01

    This report examines the relationship between a power reactor site and the ease of implementing protective actions (emergency measures a serious accident). Limiting populating density around a reactor lowers the number of people at risk but cannot assure that all protective actions are possible for those who reside near the reactor. While some protective measures can always be taken (i.e., expedient respiratory protection, sheltering) the ability to evacuate the area or find adequate shelter may depend on the characteristics of the area near the reactor site. Generic siting restrictions designed to identify and eliminate these site-specific constraints would be difficult to formulate. The authors suggest identifying possible impediments to protective actions at a proposed reactor site and addressing these problems in the emergency plans. 66 references, 6 figures, 8 tables

  9. Nuclear safety. Concerns about the nuclear power reactors in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Jim; Aloise, Gene; Flaherty, Thomas J.; Fitzgerald, Duane; Zavala, Mario; Hayward, Mary Alice

    1992-09-01

    In 1976, the Soviet Union and Cuba concluded an agreement to construct two 440-megawatt nuclear power reactors near Cienfuegos on the south central coast of Cuba, about 180 miles south of Key West, Florida. The construction of these reactors, which began around 1983, was a high priority for Cuba because of its heavy dependence on imported oil. Cuba is estimated to need an electrical generation capacity of 3,000 megawatts by the end of the decade. When completed, the first reactor unit would provide a significant percentage (estimated at over 15 percent) of Cuba's need for electricity. It is uncertain when Cuba's nuclear power reactors will become operational. On September 5, 1992, Fidel Castro announced the suspension of construction at both of Cuba's reactors because Cuba could not meet the financial terms set by the Russian government to complete the reactors. Cuban officials had initially planned to start up the first of the two nuclear reactors by the end of 1993. However, before the September 5 announcement, it was estimated that this reactor would not be operational until late 1995 or early 1996. The civil construction (such as floors and walls) of the first reactor is currently estimated to be about 90 percent to 97 percent complete, but only about 37 percent of the reactor equipment (such as pipes, pumps, and motors) has been installed. The civil construction of the second reactor is about 20 percent to 30 percent complete. No information was available about the status of equipment for the second reactor. According to former Cuban nuclear power and electrical engineers and a technician, all of whom worked at the reactor site and have recently emigrated from Cuba, Cuba's nuclear power program suffers from poor construction practices and inadequate training for future reactor operators. One former official has alleged, for example, that the first reactor containment structure, which is designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material into

  10. The optimum shielding for a power reactor using local components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHajali, S.; Kharita, M. H.; Yousef, S.; Naoom, B.; Al-Nassar, M.

    2009-07-01

    Some local concrete mixtures have been picked out (selected) to be studied as shielding concrete for prospective nuclear power reactor in Syria. This research has interested in the attenuation of gamma radiation and neutron fluxes by these local concretes in the ordinary conditions. In addition to the heat effect on the shielding and physical properties of local concrete. Furthermore the neutron activation of the elements of the local concrete mixtures have been studied that for selection the low-activation materials (low dose rate and short half life radioisotopes). In this way biological shielding for nuclear reactor can be safe during operation of nuclear power reactor, in addition to be low radioactive waste after decommissioning the reactor. (author)

  11. New advanced small and medium nuclear power reactors: possible nuclear power plants for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dussol, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years interest has increased in small and medium sized nuclear power reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This interest has been driven by a desire to reduce capital costs, construction times and interest during construction, service remote sites and ease integration into small grids. The IAEA has recommended that the term 'small' be applied to reactors with a net electrical output less than 300 MWe and the term 'medium' to 300-700 MWe. A large amount of experience has been gained over 50 years in the design, construction and operation of small and medium nuclear power reactors. Historically, 100% of commercial reactors were in these categories in 1951-1960, reducing to 21% in 1991-2000. The technologies involved include pressurised water reactors, boiling water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors and molten salt reactors. Details will be provided of two of the most promising new designs, the South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) of about 110 MWe, and the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor of about 335 MWe. Their construction costs are estimated to be about US$l,000/kWe with a generating cost for the PBMR of about US1.6c/kWh. These costs are lower than estimated for the latest designs of large reactors such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) designed for 1,600 MWe for use in Europe in the next decade. It is concluded that a small or medium nuclear power reactor system built in modules to follow an increasing demand could be attractive for generating low cost electricity in many Australian states and reduce problems arising from air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels

  12. Power cycling experiments in INR-TRIGA-SSR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitru, M.

    2008-01-01

    The in-reactor experimental program started this summer with some power cycling experiments to provide date on fuel behaviour under abnormal reactor operating conditions. The paper describes the irradiation device, its operational features and an original 'under-flux' movement system. Also, there are presented main data of irradiation device (pressure, flow, temperature, construction), in-pile section, location, sample, instrumentation, experimental sequences and operating data of Interest for the experimenters. (author)

  13. Transient thermal analysis of a space reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, M.J.; Best, F.R.

    1993-01-01

    Space nuclear power systems utilize materials and processes that are completely different from terrestrial reactor systems. Therefore, the tools used to analyze ground-based systems are inappropriate for space reactor design and analysis. The purpose of this study was to develop a space reactor transient analysis tool and to apply this tool to scenarios of interest. The scope of the simulation includes the thermal and neutronic behavior of a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor, the electrical and thermal performance of the thermoelectric generators, the thermal dynamics of heat pipe radiators, and the thermal behavior of the coolant piping between major components. The thermal model of the system is explicitly coupled to a momentum model of the primary and secondary coolant loops. A one-dimensional conduction model is employed in all solid component models. The reactor model includes an expression for energy generation due to fission and decay heat. The thermoelectric heat exchanger model accounts for thermal energy conversion to useful electrical output. The two-node radiator heat pipe model includes normal operation as well as limited heat pipe operation under sonic limit conditions. The reactor, thermoelectric heat exchanger, and heat pipe models are coupled explicitly by the coolant piping thermal model. The computer program is used to simulate a variety of transients including reactor power changer, degradation of the radiator, and a temporary open circuit condition on the thermoelectrics

  14. Historical construction costs of global nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovering, Jessica R.; Yip, Arthur; Nordhaus, Ted

    2016-01-01

    The existing literature on the construction costs of nuclear power reactors has focused almost exclusively on trends in construction costs in only two countries, the United States and France, and during two decades, the 1970s and 1980s. These analyses, Koomey and Hultman (2007); Grubler (2010), and Escobar-Rangel and Lévêque (2015), study only 26% of reactors built globally between 1960 and 2010, providing an incomplete picture of the economic evolution of nuclear power construction. This study curates historical reactor-specific overnight construction cost (OCC) data that broaden the scope of study substantially, covering the full cost history for 349 reactors in the US, France, Canada, West Germany, Japan, India, and South Korea, encompassing 58% of all reactors built globally. We find that trends in costs have varied significantly in magnitude and in structure by era, country, and experience. In contrast to the rapid cost escalation that characterized nuclear construction in the United States, we find evidence of much milder cost escalation in many countries, including absolute cost declines in some countries and specific eras. Our new findings suggest that there is no inherent cost escalation trend associated with nuclear technology. - Highlights: •Comprehensive analysis of nuclear power construction cost experience. •Coverage for early and recent reactors in seven countries. •International comparisons and re-evaluation of learning. •Cost trends vary by country and era; some experience cost stability or decline.

  15. Power distribution effects on boiling water reactor stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.

    1989-01-01

    The work presented in this paper deals with the effects of spatial power distributions on the stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs). It is shown that a conservative power distribution exists for which the stability is minimal. These results are relevant because they imply that bounding stability calculations are possible and, thus, a worst-possible scenario may be defined for a particular BWR geometry. These bounding calculations may, then, be used to determine the maximum expected limit-cycle peak powers

  16. Study on reactor power change and ambiguous control of third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gongzhan

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of the average power reduction during long term full power operating in Third Qinshan nuclear power plant is analyzed . According to the basic conclusions of reactor power fluctuating derived by probability statistic and calculation the corresponding ambiguous control project is proposed. The operating performance could be achieved by the present controlling project is predicted additionally. (authors)

  17. Reactor power automatically controlling method and device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Akira; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Tanigawa, Naoshi.

    1997-01-01

    For an automatic control for a reactor power, when a deviation exceeds a predetermined value, the aimed value is kept at a predetermined value, and when the deviation is decreased to less than the predetermined value, the aimed value is increased from the predetermined value again. Alternatively, when a reactor power variation coefficient is decreased to less than a predetermine value, an aimed value is maintained at a predetermined value, and when the variation coefficient exceeds the predetermined value, the aimed value is increased. When the reactor power variation coefficient exceeds a first determined value, an aimed value is increased to a predetermined variation coefficient, and when the variation coefficient is decreased to less than the first determined value and also when the deviation between the aimed value and an actual reactor power exceeds a second determined value, the aimed value is maintained at a constant value. When the deviation is increased or when the reactor power variation coefficient is decreased, since the aimed value is maintained at predetermined value without increasing the aimed value, the deviation is not increased excessively thereby enabling to avoid excessive overshoot. (N.H.)

  18. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  19. Conceptual design of a Tokamak hybrid power reactor (THPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, F.; Imamura, Y.; Inoue, M.; Asami, N.; Kasai, M.; Yanagisawa, I.; Ida, T.; Takuma, T.; Yamaji, K.; Akita, S.

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design of a fusion-fission hybrid tokamak reactor has been carried out to investigate the engineering feasibility and promising scale of a commercial hybrid reactor power plant. A tokamak fusion driver based on the recent plasma scaling law is introduced in this design study. The major parameters and features of the reactor are R=6.06 m, a=1.66 m, Ip=11.8 MA, Pf=668 MW, double null divertor plasma and steady state burning with RF current drive. The fusion power has been determined with medium energy multiplication in the blanket so as to relieve thermal design problems and produce electric power around 1000 MW. Uranium silicide is used for the fast fission blanket material to promise good nuclear performance. The coolant of the blanket is FLIBE and the tritium breeding blanket material is Li 2 O ceramics providing breeding ratio above unity

  20. Assessment of Power Quality Problems for TRIGA PUSPATI Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fazli Zakaria; Ramachandaramurthy, V.K.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical power systems are exposed to different types of power quality disturbances. Investigation and monitoring of power quality is necessary to maintain accurate operation of sensitive equipment especially for nuclear installations. This paper will discuss the power quality problems observed at the electrical sources of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP). Assessment of power quality requires the identification of any anomalous behavior on a power system, which adversely affects the normal operation of electrical or electronic equipment. A power quality assessment involves gathering data resources; analyzing the data (with reference to power quality standards) then, if problems exist, recommendation of mitigation techniques must be considered. Field power quality data is collected by power quality recorder and analyzed with reference to power quality standards. Normally the electrical power is supplied to the RTP via two sources in order to keep a good reliability where each of them is designed to carry the full load. The assessment of power quality during reactor operation was performed for both electrical sources. There were several disturbances such as voltage harmonics and flicker that exceeded the thresholds. (author)

  1. Threshold self-powered gamma detector for use as a nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVert, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    A study of a threshold self-powered gamma detector for use as a nuclear reactor power monitor was conducted. Measurements were performed to ascertain whether certain detector material arrangements could be used to obtain significant discrimination against low energy gammas. Results indicating agreement between detector response and reactor power output are presented. Evidence of rejection of low energy gammas by the detector is presented. The simplicity of construction and ruggedness of the detector are also discussed

  2. Passive cooling systems in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharon, J.; Harrari, R.; Weiss, Y.; Barnea, Y.; Katz, M.; Szanto, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews several R and D activities associated with the subject of passive cooling systems, conducted by the N.R.C.Negev thermohydraulic group. A short introduction considering different types of thermosyphons and their applications is followed by a detailed description of the experimental work, its results and conclusions. An ongoing research project is focused on the evaluation of the external dry air passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in the AP-600 (Westinghouse advanced pressurized water reactor). In this context some preliminary theoretical results and planned experimental research are for the fature described

  3. Advanced materials: The key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural material for the first wail and blanket (FWB), (2) plasma-facing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications

  4. Transportation and storage of foreign spent power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report describes the generic actions to be taken by the Department of Energy, in cooperation with other US government agencies, foreign governments, and international organizations, in support of the implementation of Administration policies with respect to the following international spent fuel management activities: bilateral cooperation related to expansion of foreign national storage capacities; multilateral and international cooperation related to development of multinational and international spent fuel storage regimes; fee-based transfer of foreign spent power reactor fuel to the US for storage; and emergency transfer of foreign spent power reactor fuel to the US for storage

  5. Advanced materials - the key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), (2) plasmafacing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications. (author)

  6. Characteristics of a reactor with power reactivity feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengyu; Zhang Yusheng; Zhang Guangfu; Liu Ying

    2008-01-01

    The point-reactor model with power reactivity feedback becomes a nonlinear system. Its dynamic characteristic shows great complexity. According to the mathematic definition of stability in differential equation qualitative theory, the model of a reactor with power reactivity feedback is judged unstable. The equilibrium point is a saddle-node point. A portion of the trajectory in the neighborhood of the equilibrium point is parabolic fan curve, and the other is hyperbolic fan curve. Based on phase locus near the equilibrium point, it is pointed out that the model is still stable within physical limits. The difference between stabilities in the mathematical sense and in the physical sense is indicated. (authors)

  7. Power oscillation and stability in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.; Kis, G.

    1998-01-01

    Periodic oscillation in measured temperature fluctuation was observed near to surface of a heated rod in certain heat transfer range. The frequency of the peak found in power spectral density of temperature fluctuation and period estimated from the cross correlation function for two axially placed thermocouples change linearly with linear energy (or surface heat) production. It was concluded that a resonance of such surface (inlet) temperature oscillation with the pole of the reactor transfer function can be responsible for power oscillation in BWR and PWR, thus instability is not solely due to reactor transfer function. (author)

  8. Measurement of nuclear reactor noise at low power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velickovic, Lj.

    1968-01-01

    Theoretical interpretation of reactor noise experiments is based on stochastic model developed and described in this paper. Ratio l/β as well as subcriticality level can be determined bu measuring transfer function. In this paper the ratio l/β was determined directly from auto-correlation functions for different critical configurations of the RB zero power reactor core and not by transfer function. This simplified the procedure significantly. It was found that the 0.5 W power level is most suitable for experimental study of neutron fluctuations. In this case fluctuations are intense compared to noise of the detector and electronic devices used

  9. Power control of water reactors using nitrogen 16 activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariod, R.; Merchie, F.; O'byrne, G.

    1964-01-01

    At the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre, the open-core swimming pool reactors Melusine (2 MW) and Siloe (15 MW) are controlled at a constant overall power using nitrogen-16 channels. The conventional linear control channels react instantaneously to the rapid power fluctuations, this being necessary for the safety of the reactors, but their power indications are erroneous since they are affected by local deformations of the thermal flux caused by the compensation movements of the control rods. The nitrogen-16 channels on the other hand give an indication of the overall power proportional to the mean fission flux and independent of the rod movements, but their response time is 15 seconds, A constant overall power control is thus possible by a slow correction of the reference signal given by the automatic control governed by thu linear channels by means of a correction term given by the 'N-16' channels: This is done automatically in Melusine and manually in Siloe. (authors) [fr

  10. Nuclear Archeology for CANDU Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadhead, Bryan L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is the development of so-called 'nuclear archeology' techniques to predict the irradiation history of both fuel-related and non-fuel-related materials irradiated in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) family of nuclear reactors. In this application to CANDU-type reactors, two different scenarios for the collection of the appropriate data for use in these procedures will be assumed: the first scenario is the removal of the pressure tubes, calandria tubes, or fuel cladding and destructive analysis of the activation products contained in these structural materials; the second scenario is the nondestructive analysis (NDA) of the same hardware items via high-resolution gamma ray scans. There are obvious advantages and disadvantages for each approach; however, the NDA approach is the central focus of this work because of its simplicity and lack of invasiveness. The use of these techniques along with a previously developed inverse capability is expected to allow for the prediction of average flux levels and irradiation time, and the total fluence for samples where the values of selected isotopes can be measured.

  11. Specific power of liquid-metal-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-10-01

    Calculations of the core specific power for conceptual space-based liquid-metal-cooled reactors, based on heat transfer considerations, are presented for three different fuel types: (1) pin-type fuel; (2) cermet fuel; and (3) thermionic fuel. The calculations are based on simple models and are intended to provide preliminary comparative results. The specific power is of interest because it is a measure of the core mass required to produce a given amount of power. Potential problems concerning zero-g critical heat flux and loss-of-coolant accidents are also discussed because these concerns may limit the core specific power. Insufficient experimental data exists to accurately determine the critical heat flux of liquid-metal-cooled reactors in space; however, preliminary calculations indicate that it may be a concern. Results also indicate that the specific power of the pin-type fuels can be increased significantly if the gap between the fuel and the clad is eliminated. Cermet reactors offer the highest specific power because of the excellent thermal conductivity of the core matrix material. However, it may not be possible to take fuel advantage of this characteristic when loss-of-coolant accidents are considered in the final core design. The specific power of the thermionic fuels is dependent mainly on the emitter temperature. The small diameter thermionic fuels have specific powers comparable to those of pin-type fuels. 11 refs., 12 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  13. Feasibility study of self sustaining capability on water cooled thorium reactors for different power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, S.; Takaki, N.; Sekimoto, H.

    2007-01-01

    Thorium fuel cycle can maintain the sustainable system of the reactor for self sustaining system for future sustainable development in the world. Some characteristics of thorium cycle show some advantages in relation to higher breeding capability, higher performance of burn-up and more proliferation resistant. Several investigations was performed to improve the breeding capability which is essential for maintaining the fissile sustainability during reactor operation in thermal reactor such as Shippingport reactor and molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR) project. The preliminary study of breeding capability on water cooled thorium reactor has been investigated for various power output. The iterative calculation system is employed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of PIJ module of SRAC2000. In this calculation, 1238 fission products and 129 heavy nuclides are employed. In the cell calculation, 26 heavy metals and 66 fission products and 1 pseudo FP are employed. The employed nuclear data library was JENDL 3.2. The reactor is fueled by 2 33U-Th Oxide and it has used the light water coolant as moderator. Some characteristics such as conversion ratio and void reactivity coefficient performances are evaluated for the systems. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) values and average burnups are studied for survey parameter. The parametric survey for different power outputs are employed from 10 MWt to 3000 MWt for evaluating the some characteristics of core size and leakage effects to the spectra profile, required enrichment, breeding capability, fissile inventory condition, and void reactivity coefficient. Different power outputs are employed in order to evaluate its effect to the required enrichment for criticality, breeding capability, void reactivity and fissile inventory accumulation. The obtained value of the conversion ratios is evaluated by using the equilibrium atom composition. The conversion ratio is employed based on the

  14. Reactor power measuring device and measuring method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Kazumi; Izumi, Mikio; Sato, Michio; Goto, Yasushi.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, device for measuring a neutron flux level in a power region of a BWR type reactor is simplified and its life is elongated, to make a transfer mechanism unnecessary. Namely, an ultrasonic waveguide rod has cavities for heat insulation relative to coolants on every predetermined distance in the longitudinal direction, and is inserted into coolants in the reactor core. An ultrasonic wave transmitting/receiving device is electrically connected to the ultrasonic waveguide rod and placed outside of the reactor. A signal processing device converts the difference of transmitting time of ultrasonic wave pulses of the ultrasonic wave guide rod measured at the ultrasonic wave transmitting/receiving device into a reactor power. With such procedures, since the ultrasonic wave guide rod is inserted into the reactor core, the measurement can be conducted without moving the ultrasonic wave guide rod as a detector. As a result, a transfer device and transfer path are made unnecessary. In addition, since the ultrasonic wave guide rod is made of a single material, it is never broken. Since the ultrasonic wave transmitting/receiving device is placed at the outside with no high temperature, no high pressure and no high dose rate, the working life of the reactor can be extended. (I.S.)

  15. Survey of thorium utilization in power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.H.; Schleifer, P.; Dahlberg, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    It is clear that thorium-fueled thermal power reactor systems based on current technology can play a vital role in serving present and long-term energy needs. Advanced thorium converters and thermal breeders can provide an expanded resource base from which the world's growing energy demands can be met. Utilization of a symbiotic system of fast breeders and thorium-fueled thermal reactors can be particularly effective in providing low cost power while conserving uranium resources. Breeder reactors are characterized by high capital costs and very low fuel costs since they produce more fuel than they consume. This excess fuel can be used to fuel thermal converter reactors whose capital costs are low. This symbiosis is optimized when 233 U is bred in the fast breeders and then used to fuel high-conversion-ratio thermal converter reactors operating on the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The thorium-cycle HTGR, after undergoing more than fifteen years of development in both the United States and Europe, provides for the optimum utilization of our limited uranium resources. Other thermal reactor systems, previously operating on the uranium cycle, also show potential in their capability to utilize the thorium cycle effectively

  16. Modular Lead-Bismuth Fast Reactors in Nuclear Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Petrochenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the unique experience of operating reactors with heavy liquid metal coolant–eutectic lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear submarines, the concept of modular small fast reactors SVBR-100 for civilian nuclear power has been developed and validated. The features of this innovative technology are as follows: a monoblock (integral design of the reactor with fast neutron spectrum, which can operate using different types of fuel in various fuel cycles including MOX fuel in a self-providing mode. The reactor is distinct in that it has a high level of self-protection and passive safety, it is factory manufactured and the assembled reactor can be transported by railway. Multipurpose application of the reactor is presumed, primarily, it can be used for regional power to produce electricity, heat and for water desalination. The Project is being realized within the framework of state-private partnership with joint venture OJSC “AKME-Engineering” established on a parity basis by the State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” and the Limited Liability Company “EuroSibEnergo”.

  17. Radiological shielding of low power compact reactor: calculation and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Raul

    2004-01-01

    The development of compact reactors becoming a technology that offers great projection and innumerable use possibilities, both in electricity generation and in propulsion.One of the requirements for the operation of this type of reactor is that it must include a radiological shield that will allow for different types of configurations and that, may be moved with the reactor if it needs to be transported.The nucleus of a reactor emits radiation, mainly neutrons and gamma rays in the heat of power, and gamma radiation during the radioactive decay of fission products.This radiation must be restrained in both conditions of operation to avoid it affecting workers or the public.The combination of different materials and properties in layers results in better performance in the form of a decrease in radiation, hence causing the dosage outside the reactor, whether in operation or shut down, to fall within the allowed limits.The calculations and design of radiological shields is therefore of paramount importance in reactor design.The choice of material and the design of the shield have a strong impact on the cost and the load capacity, the latter being one of the characteristics to optimize.The imposed condition of design is that the reactor can be transported together with the decay shield in a standard container of 40 foot [es

  18. Reactor core cooling device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Masahiko.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor core cooling facility upon rupture of pipelines in a BWR type nuclear power plant. That is, when rupture of pipelines should occur in the reactor container, an releasing safety valve operates instantly and then a depressurization valve operates to depressurize the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. Further, an injection valve of cooling water injection pipelines is opened and cooling water is injected to cool the reactor core from the time when the pressure is lowered to a level capable of injecting water to the pressure vessel by the static water head of a pool water as a water source. Further, steams released from the pressure vessel and steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in a high pressure/low pressure emergency condensation device and the inside of the reactor container is depressurized and cooled. When the reactor is isolated, since the steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in the state that the steam supply valve and the return valve of a steam supply pipelines are opened and a vent valve is closed, the reactor can be maintained safely. (I.S.)

  19. Evaluation of plate type fuel options for small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzejewski, Claudio de Sa

    2005-01-01

    Plate type fuels are generally used in research reactor. The utilization of this kind of configuration improves significantly the overall performance fuel. The conception of new fuels for small power reactors based in plate-type configuration needs a complete review of the safety criteria originally used to conduce power and research reactor projects. In this work, a group of safety criteria is established for the utilization of plate-type fuels in small power reactors taking into consideration the characteristics of power and research reactors. The performance characteristics of fuel elements are strongly supported by its materials properties and the adopted configuration for its fissile particles. The present work makes an orientated bibliographic investigation searching the best material properties (structural materials and fuel compounds) related to the performance fuel. Looking for good parafermionic characteristics and manufacturing exequibility associated to existing facilities in national research centres, this work proposes several alternatives of plate type fuels, considering its utilization in small power reactors: dispersions of UO 2 in stainless steel, of UO 2 in zircaloy, and of U-Mo alloy in zircaloy, and monolithic plates of U-Mo cladded with zircaloy. Given the strong dependency of radiation damage with temperature increase, the safety criteria related to heat transfer were verified for all the alternatives, namely the DNBR; coolant temperature lower than saturation temperature; peak meat temperature to avoid swelling; peak fuel temperature to avoid meat-matrix reaction. It was found that all alternatives meet the safety criteria including the 0.5 mm monolithic U-Mo plate cladded with zircaloy. (author)

  20. CANDU fuel - fifteen years of power reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjoy, G.R.; Bain, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel has operated in power reactors since 1962. Analyses of performance statistics, supplemented by examinations of fuel from power reactors and experimental loops have yielded: (a) A thorough understanding of the fundamental behaviour of CANDU fuel. (b) Data showing that the predicted high utilization of uranium has been achieved. Actual fuelling costs in 1976 at the Pickering Generating Station are 1.2 m$/kWh (1976 Canadian dollars) with the simple oncethrough natural-UO 2 fuel cycle. (c) Criteria for operation, which have led to the current very low defect rate of 0.03% of all assemblies and to ''CANLUB'' fuel, which has a graphite interlayer between the fuel and sheath to reduce defects on power increases. (d) Proof that the short length (500 mm), collapsible cladding features of the CANDU bundle are successful and that the fuel can operate at high-power output (current peak outer-element linear power is 58 +- 15% kW/m). Involvement by the utility in all stages of fuel development has resulted in efficient application of this fundamental knowledge to ensure proper fuel specifications, procurement, scheduling into the reactor and feedback to developers, designers and manufacturers. As of mid-1976 over 3 x 10 6 individual elements have been built in a well-estabilished commercially competitive fuel fabrication industry and over 2 x 10 6 elements have been irradiated. Only six defects have been attributed to faulty materials or fabrication, and the use of high-density UO 2 with low-moisture content precluded defects from hydrogen contamination and densification. Development work on UO 2 and other fuel cycles (plutonium and thorium) is continuing, and, because CANDU reactors use on-power fuelling, bundles can be inserted into power reactors for testing. Thus new fuel designs can be quickly adopted to ensure that the CANDU system continues to provide low-cost energy with high reliability

  1. Effect of reactor conditions on MSIV-ATWS power level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a boiling water reactor (BWR) when there is closure of the main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), the energy generated in the core will be transferred to the pressure suppression pool (PSP) via steam that flows out of the relief valves. The pool has limited capacity as a heat sink and hence, if there is no reactor trip [an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event], there is the possibility that the pool temperature may rise beyond acceptable limits. The present study was undertaken to determine how the initial reactor conditions affect the power level during an MSIV-ATWS event. The time of interest is the 20- to 30-min period when it is assumed that the reactor is in a quasi equilibrium condition with the water level and pressure fixed, natural circulation conditions and no control rod movement or significant boron in the core. The initial conditions of interest are the time of the cycle and the operating state

  2. Comparison of Ontario Hydro's performance with world power reactors - 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumka, B.R.

    1982-04-01

    The performance of Ontario Hydro's CANDU reactors in 1981 is compared with that of 123 world nuclear power reactors rated at 500 MW(e) or greater. The report is based on data extracted from publications, as well as correspondence with a number of utilities. The basis used is the gross capacity factor, which is defined as gross unit generation divided by the perfect gross output for the period of interest. The lowest of the published turbine and generator design ratings is used to determine the perfect gross output, unless the unit has been proven capable of consistently exceeding this value. The first six reactors in the rankings were CANDU reactors operated by Ontario Hydro

  3. Fast power cycle for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Fillo, J.; Makowitz, H.

    1978-01-01

    The unique, deep penetration capability of 14 MeV neutrons produced in DT fusion reactions allows the generation of very high temperature working fluid temperatures in a thermal power cycle. In the FAST (Fusion Augmented Steam Turbine) power cycle steam is directly superheated by the high temperature ceramic refractory interior of the blanket, after being generated by heat extracted from the relatively cool blanket structure. The steam is then passed to a high temperature gas turbine for power generation. Cycle studies have been carried out for a range of turbine inlet temperatures [1600 0 F to 3000 0 F (870 to 1650 0 C)], number of reheats, turbine mechanical efficiency, recuperator effectiveness, and system pressure losses. Gross cycle efficiency is projected to be in the range of 55 to 60%, (fusion energy to electric power), depending on parameters selected. Turbine inlet temperatures above 2000 0 F, while they do increase efficiency somewhat, are not necessarily for high cycle efficiency

  4. SNAP (Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power) Reactor Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    power l evel 8070C Peak Cladding temperature at design power level 742C Average fuel burnup (12,000 h at 600 kW) 0.22 metal atom % Control Drums Number ...Experiments. 9 8. Results. 14 9. Theoretical Predictions. 20 10. The Optimum Bow. 25 11. Conclusions. 26 12. Acknowledgements. 27 References. 29...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER (S) L. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER (S) Go. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION b. OFFICE SYMBOL 74. NAME OF

  5. Power Reactor Docket Information. Annual cumulation (citations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An annual cumulation of the citations to the documentation associated with civilian nuclear power plants is presented. This material is that which is submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of applications for construction and operating licenses. Citations are listed by Docket number in accession number sequence. The Table of Contents is arranged both by Docket number and by nuclear power plant name

  6. Safeguarding on-power fuelled reactors - instrumentation and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligura, A.; Konnov, Y.; Smith, R.M.; Head, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumentation and techniques applicable to safeguarding reactors that are fuelled on-power, particularly the CANDU type, have been developed. A demonstration is being carried out at the Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station in Canada. Irradiated nuclear materials in certain areas - the reactor and spent fuel storage bays - are monitored using photographic and television cameras, and seals. Item accounting is applied by counting spent-fuel bundles during transfer from the reactor to the storage bay and by placing these spent-fuel bundles in a sealed enclosure. Provision is made for inspection and verification of the bundles before sealing. The reactor's power history is recorded by a track-etch power monitor. Redundancy is provided so that the failure of any single piece of equipment does not invalidate the entire safeguards system. Several safeguards instruments and devices have beeen developed and evaluated. These include a super-8 mm surveillance camera system, a television surveillance system, a spent-fuel bundle counter, a device to detect dummy fuel bundles, a cover for enclosing a stack of spent-fuel bundles, and a seal suitable for underwater installation and ultrasonic interrogation. The information provided by these different instruments should increase the effectiveness of Agency safeguards and, when used in combination with other measures, will facilitate inspection at reactor sites

  7. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A.

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC's ''Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants'' (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC's preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant's research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified

  8. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  9. Study on the power control system for NPP power unit with the WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, N.D.; Naumov, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    Results of model investigations into basic version of the power control systems (PCS) conformably to the WWER-440 NPP power unit are stated. Transient processes in the power unit system when being two PCS versions during perturbations of different parameters: unit power, vapour pressure or position of control rods have been simulated. Investigations into the different PCS versions show that quality of operation of a traditional scheme with a turbine power controller and reactor pressure controller can be significantly improved with the introduction of a high-speed signal of pressure into the reactor controller. The PCS version with the compensation of interrelations between the turbine and reactor controllers constructed according to the same principles as the standard schemes of power units of thermal electric power plant is perspective as well [ru

  10. Power Peaking Effect of OTTO Fuel Scheme Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadipura, T.; Suwoto; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) type of Hight Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a very interesting nuclear reactor design to fulfill the growing electricity and heat demand with a superior passive safety features. Effort to introduce the PBR design to the market can be strengthen by simplifying its system with the Once-through-then-out (OTTO) cycle PBR in which the pebble fuel only pass the core once. Important challenge in the OTTO fuel scheme is the power peaking effect which limit the maximum nominal power or burnup of the design. Parametric survey is perform in this study to investigate the contribution of different design parameters to power peaking effect of OTTO cycle PBR. PEBBED code is utilized in this study to perform the equilibrium PBR core analysis for different design parameter and fuel scheme. The parameters include its core diameter, height-per-diameter (H/D), power density, and core nominal power. Results of this study show that diameter and H/D effectsare stronger compare to the power density and nominal core power. Results of this study might become an importance guidance for design optimization of OTTO fuel scheme PBR.

  11. Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicate but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: Nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat. (orig.)

  12. Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicates but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat: small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat. (author)

  13. Problems and prospects of small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Prior to 1973 it was generally believed that small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) had a potentially large market and only their high capital costs prevented their large scale commercial application. In December, 1973, crude oil price rose from US $2.50 per barrel to more than US $11 per barrel. This changed the economic position of SMPRs so much so that even 100-200 MWe nuclear reactors were considered economic compared to oil-fired plants. A Market Survey by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1974 showed that the potential market for reactors ranging from 150 to 400 MWe during 1980-1990 amounted to 140 units with a total installed capacity of 38,000 MWe. This potential market did not, however, generate the desired interest among the reactor manufacturers. So far only three manufacturers based in Europe have shown interest in SMPRs and at present small reactors are being built commercially only in India. Among developing countries, Bangladesh, Jamaica and Kuwait are seriously looking for reactors in sizes of 100-200 MWe. The paper analyses the historic background of SMPRs and problems related to their commercial application and suggests the following actions: i) The British 100 MWe SGHWR is considered proven and suitable for small grids and hence deserves financial support by British/International Financing Agencies. ii) Any re-engineered or slightly re-designed version of operating small light water reactors will find wider acceptability than available new adaptions of marine reactors. Manufacturers of operating small LWRs may be encouraged through international financial assistance to make such designs commercially available. iii) Small CANDU reactors may be suitable for most developing countries and need technical and economic support from Canada for their export. iv) The Agency must continue their effort more vigorously for making SMPRs commercially available to small developing countries

  14. Sodium fast reactor power monitoring using gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.; Normand, S.; Barbot, L.; Domenech, T.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Frelin, A.M. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, CEA - Saclay DRT/LIST/DETECS/SSTM, Batiment 516 - P.C. no 72, Gif sur Yvette, F-91191 (France); Montagu, T.; Dautremer, T.; Barat, E. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Processus Stochastiques et Spectres (France); Ban, G. [ENSICAEN (France)

    2009-06-15

    This work deals with the use of high flux gamma spectrometry to monitor the fourth generation of sodium fast reactor (SFR) power. The simulation study part of this work has shown that power monitoring in a short time response and with a good accuracy is possible. An experimental test is under preparation at the French SFR Phenix experimental reactor to validate simulation studies. First, physical calculations have been done to correlate gamma activity to the released thermal power. Gamma emitter production rate in the reactor core was calculated with technical and nuclear data as the sodium velocity, the atomic densities, Phenix neutron spectrum and incident neutron cross-sections of reactions producing gamma emitters. A thermal hydraulic transfer function was used for modeling primary sodium flow in our calculations. For the power monitoring problematic, use of a short decay period gamma emitter will allow to have a very fast response system without cumulative effect. We have determined that the best tagging agent is 20F which emits 1634 keV energy photons with a decay period of 11 s. The gamma spectrum was determined by flux point and a pulse high tally MCNP5.1.40 simulation and shown the possibility to measure the signal of this radionuclide. The experiment will be set during the reactor 'end life testing'. The Delayed Neutron Detection (DND) room has been chosen as the best available location on Phenix reactor to measure this kind of radionuclide due to a short transit time from reactor core to measurement sample. This location is optimum for global power measurement because homogenized sampling in the reactor hot pool. The main spectrometer is composed of a coaxial high purity germanium diode (HPGe) coupled with a transistor reset preamplifier. The HPGe diode signal will be processed by the Adonis digital signal processing due to high flux and fast activity measurement. Post-processing softwares will be used to limit statistical problems of the

  15. Status of power reactor fuel reprocessing in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansra, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    Spent fuel reprocessing in India started with the commissioning of the Trombay Plutonium Plant in 1964. This plant was intended for processing spent fuel from the 40 MWth research reactor CIRUS and recovering plutonium required for the research and development activities of the Indian Atomic Energy programme. India's nuclear energy programme aims at the recycle of plutonium in view of the limited national resources of natural uranium and abundant quantities of thorium. This is based on the approach which aims at separating the plutonium from the power reactor spent fuel, use it in the fast reactors to breed 233 U and utilise the 233 U generated to sustain a virtually endless source of power through thorium utilisation. The separated plutonium is also being utilised to fabricate MOX fuel for use in thermal reactors. Spent fuel treatment and extracting plutonium from it makes economic sense and a necessity for the Indian nuclear power programme. This paper describes the status and trends in the Indian programme for the reprocessing of power reactor fuels. The extraction of plutonium can also be seen as a far more positive approach to long-term waste management. The closed cycle approach visualised and pursued by the pioneers in the field is now steadily moving India towards the goal of a sustainable source of power through nuclear energy. The experience in building, operating and refurbishing the reprocessing facilities for uranium and thorium has resulted in acquiring the technological capability for designing, constructing, operating and maintaining reprocessing plants to match India's growing nuclear power programme. (author)

  16. Power supply requirements for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.L.

    1979-02-01

    The power supply requirements for a 7-M major radius commercial tokamak reactor have been examined, using a system approach combining models of the reactor and poloidal coil set, plasma burn cycle and MHD calculations, and power supply characteristics and cost data. A conventional system using an MGF set and solid-state rectifier/inverter power supplies was studied in addition to systems using a homopolar generator, superconducting energy storage inductor, and dump resistors. The requirements and cost of the power supplies depend on several factors but most critically on the ohmic heating ramp time used for startup. Long ramp times (approx. > 8 s) seems to be feasible, from the standpoint of resistive volt-second losses, and would appear to make conventional systems quite competitive with nonconventional ones, which require further research and development

  17. Reactor Core Design and Analysis for a Micronuclear Power Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater vehicle is designed to ensure the security of country sea boundary, providing harsh requirements for its power system design. Conventional power sources, such as battery and Stirling engine, are featured with low power and short lifetime. Micronuclear reactor power source featured with higher power density and longer lifetime would strongly meet the demands of unmanned underwater vehicle power system. In this paper, a 2.4 MWt lithium heat pipe cooled reactor core is designed for micronuclear power source, which can be applied for underwater vehicles. The core features with small volume, high power density, long lifetime, and low noise level. Uranium nitride fuel with 70% enrichment and lithium heat pipes are adopted in the core. The reactivity is controlled by six control drums with B4C neutron absorber. Monte Carlo code MCNP is used for calculating the power distribution, characteristics of reactivity feedback, and core criticality safety. A code MCORE coupling MCNP and ORIGEN is used to analyze the burnup characteristics of the designed core. The results show that the core life is 14 years, and the core parameters satisfy the safety requirements. This work provides reference to the design and application of the micronuclear power source.

  18. 76 FR 78173 - Options for Developing the Regulatory Basis for Streamlining Non-Power Reactor License Renewal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... the Regulatory Basis for Streamlining Non- Power Reactor License Renewal and Non-Power Reactor... non-power reactor license renewal and non-power reactor emergency preparedness. This meeting is a... establishing the technical basis for proposing rulemaking to streamline the non-power reactor license renewal...

  19. Revised design for the Tokamak experimental power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1977-03-01

    A new, preliminary design has been identified for the tokamak experimental power reactor (EPR). The revised EPR design is simpler, more compact, less expensive and has somewhat better performance characteristics than the previous design, yet retains many of the previously developed design concepts. This report summarizes the principle features of the new EPR design, including performance and cost.

  20. Comparison of Ontario Hydro with world power reactors 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Tables are given comparing the performance of Pickering units 1-4 and Bruce units 1-4 with other power reactors above 500Mw on the basis of capacity factor and scheduled-to-actual in-service dates. (LL)

  1. Fuel element concept for long life high power nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G. E.; Rom, F. E.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear reactor fuel elements have burnups that are an order of magnitude higher than can currently be achieved by conventional design practice. Elements have greater time integrated power producing capacity per unit volume. Element design concept capitalizes on known design principles and observed behavior of nuclear fuel.

  2. Reactor safety study applied to the Forsmark 3 Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, G.; Tiren, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    A reactor safety study of the Forsmark 3 BWR power plant has been carried out for the purpose of calculating core melt probabilities using WASH-1400 methods. A sensitivity analysis shows that the calculated core melt probability is changed by approximately a factor of 10 depending on assumptions made with respect to the probability of human error. The importance of the availability of off-site power and the influence of common cause failure is also discussed. (author)

  3. The zero-power basis of fast reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.E.

    1978-06-01

    Predictions of reaction rates, atomic displacements, and gamma-ray energy deposition in the Prototype Fast Reactor are based on cross-section data and calculation methods validated against the results of zero-power experiments. The paper reviews work in Zebra relevant to this dosimetry, including neutron spectrometry, power mapping, foil activations within core heterogeneities, and measurements with thermoluminescent detectors. Comparisons of experiment and calculation are discussed in relation to the accuracies required to meet materials testing objectives. (author)

  4. The zero-power basis of fast reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.E.

    1978-06-01

    Predictions of reaction rates, atomic displacements, and gamma-ray energy deposition in the Prototype Fast Reactor are based on cross-section data and calculation methods validated against the results of zero-power experiments. The paper reviews work in Zebra relevant to this dosimetry, including neutron spectrometry, power mapping, foil activations within core heterogeneities, and measurements with thermoluminescent detectors. Comparisons of experiment and calculation are discussed in relation to the accuracies required to meet material testing objectives. (author)

  5. Study of the power margins of RBMK-1000 reactor when operating at nominal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammari, M.; Jariri, S.

    1993-01-01

    This work presents a reliability and control study of the RBMK-1000 reactor. This study consists in determining the power margin of this plant when operating at nominal power in comparison with the physical phenomena limiting power extraction by a coolant fluid.49 figs., 8 tabs., 11 refs. (author)

  6. Estimates of power requirements for a manned Mars rover powered by a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, N.J.; El-Genk, M.S.; Cataldo, R.; Bloomfield, H.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the power requirement for a Manned Mars Rover vehicle. Auxiliary power needs are fulfilled using a hybrid solar photovoltaic/regenerative fuel cell system, while the primary power needs are met using an SP-100 type reactor. The primary electric power needs, which include 30-kW e net user power, depend on the reactor thermal power and the efficiency of the power conversion system. Results show that an SP-100 type reactor coupled to a Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) yields the lowest total vehicle mass and lowest specific mass for the power system. The second lowest mass was for a SP-100 reactor coupled to a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) using He/Xe as the working fluid. The specific mass of the nuclear reactor power systrem, including a man-rated radiation shield, ranged from 150-kg/kW e to 190-kg/kW e and the total mass of the Rover vehicle varied depend upon the cruising speed

  7. PWR reactors for BBR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and functioning of the nuclear steam generator system developed by BBR and its components are described. Auxiliary systems, control and load following behaviour and fuel management are discussed and the main data of PWR given. The brochure closes with a perspective of the future of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power plant. (GL) [de

  8. The basic concepts of a fuel-power detector for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Fuel power is proposed as an alternative to neutron or gamma-ray flux for control and safety functions in CANDU power reactors. To satisfy in-core power monitoring requirements, a detector whose dynamic response corresponds to the heat production rate in the fuel is needed. This report explores the concept of tailoring the response characteristics of a mixed-response self-powered flux detector to match the requirements of an ideal fuel-power detector. (author)

  9. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4-8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  10. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  11. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars

  12. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  13. Characterization of radioactive waste from nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piumetti, Elsa H.; Medici, Marcela A.

    2007-01-01

    Different kinds of radioactive waste are generated as result of the operation of nuclear power reactors and in all cases the activity concentration of several radionuclides had to be determined in order to optimize resources, particularly when dealing with final disposal or long-term storage. This paper describes the three basic approaches usually employed for characterizing nuclear power reactor wastes, namely the direct methods, the semi-empirical methods and the analytical methods. For some radionuclides or kind of waste, the more suitable method or combination of methods applicable is indicated, stressing that these methods shall be developed and applied during the waste generation step, i.e. during the operation of the reactor. In addition, after remarking the long time span expected from waste generation to their final disposal, the importance of an appropriate record system is pointed out and some basic requirements that should be fulfilled for such system are presented. It is concluded that the tools for a proper characterization of nuclear reactor radioactive waste are available though such tools should be tailored to each specific reactor and their history. (author) [es

  14. Burnup analysis of the power reactor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezure, Hideo

    1975-09-01

    In burnup analysis of JPDR-1 with FLARE, it was found to have problems. The program FLORA was developed for solution of the problems. By their bench mark tests FLORA was found to be useful for three-dimensional thermal-hydro-dynamic analysis of BWRs. It was applied to analysis of the burnup of JPDR-1. The input data and option of FLORA were corrected on referring to the results of gammer probe tests for JPDR-1. The void, source and burnup distributions were calculated each month during the operation. The burnup distribution in three assemblies revealed by a destructive test agrees better with that by FLORA than by FLARE. It was shown that the distortion of power distribution around the control rods by FLORA was smaller and closer to that by the gammer probe tests than by FLARE, and the connector of fuel assemblies and the plugs in the reflector had much influence on the power distribution. (auth.)

  15. The concept of the innovative power reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Won Lee; Sun Heo; Hui Un Ha; Han Gon Kim

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima accident reveals the vulnerability of existing active nuclear power plant (NPP) design against prolonged loss of external electricity events. The passive safety system is considered an attractive alternative to cope with this kind of disaster. Also, the passive safety system enhances both the safety and the economics of NPPs. The adoption of a passive safety system reduces the number of active components and can minimize the construction cost of NPPs. In this paper, reflecting o...

  16. Economic risks of nuclear power reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.P.; Aldrich, D.C.

    1984-04-01

    Models to be used for analyses of economic risks from events which occur during US LWR plant operation are developed in this study. The models include capabilities to estimate both onsite and offsite costs of LWR events ranging from routine plant forced outages to severe core-melt accidents resulting in large releases of radioactive material to the environment. The models have been developed for potential use by both the nuclear power industry and regulatory agencies in cost/benefit analyses for decision-making purposes. The new onsite cost models estimate societal losses from power production cost increases, plant capital losses, plant decontamination costs, and plant repair costs which may be incurred after LWR operational events. Early decommissioning costs, plant worker health impact costs, electric utility business costs, nuclear power industry costs, and litigation costs are also addressed. The newly developed offsite economic consequence models estimate The costs of post-accident population protective measures and public health impacts. The costs of population evacuation and temporary relocation, agricultural product disposal, land and property decontamination, and land interdiction are included in the economic models for population protective measures. Costs of health impacts and medical care costs are also included in the models

  17. Bulk outlet temperature limits and increased reactor power levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.S.

    1958-06-13

    In a recent report, means of circumventing the present bulk temperature limits are suggested. These have definite merit but do not present an over-all picture of the problem. Therefore, this bulk temperature limit is reviewed in order to place the problem in its full perspective. A program of action is suggested that should lead to: Revised operating conditions and process piping to obtain higher power levels at the same bulk outlet temperature; The completion of production tests to permit higher bulk outlet temperatures with no significant changes in reactor piping; or Redesign of the effluent system to eliminate bulk temperatures as a reactor operating limit.

  18. Advances in commercial heavy water reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Generating stations employing heavy water reactors have now firmly established an enviable record for reliable, economic electricity generation. Their designers recognize, however, that further improvements are both possible and necessary to ensure that this reactor type remains attractively competitive with alternative nuclear power systems and with fossil-fuelled generation plants. This paper outlines planned development thrusts in a number of important areas, viz., capital cost reduction, advanced fuel cycles, safety, capacity factor, life extension, load following, operator aida, and personnel radiation exposure. (author)

  19. Reactivity control of nuclear power reactors: new options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala, F.

    1984-01-01

    Some actual aspects (referring to economy, non-proliferation and environmental impact) of nuclear power reactors has been analyzed from the point of view of the reactivity control physics. Specially studied have been the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on those aspects. The analysis carried out suggested the application of the above method of control to reactors with non-hydrogenous fuel cells, which are mainly characterized by their high moderator/fuel ratio. Finally three different types of such fuel cells are presented and some results about one of them (belonging to a PHWR controlled by graphite rods) are given. (author)

  20. Engineering safety features for high power experimental reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doval, A.; Villarino, E.; Vertullo, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the present analysis we will focus our attention in the way engineering safety features are designed in order to prevent fuel damage in case of abnormal or accidental situations. To prevent fuel damage two main facts must be considered, the shutdown of the reactor and the adequate core cooling capacity, it means that both, neutronic and thermohydraulic aspects must be analysed. Some neutronic safety features are common to all power ranges like negative feedback reactivity coefficients and the required number of control rods containing the proper absorber material to shutdown the reactor. From the thermohydraulic point of view common features are siphon-breaker devices and flap valves for those powers requiring cooling in the forced convection regime. For the high power reactor group, the engineering safety features specially designed for a generic reactor of 20 MW, will be presented here. From the neutronic point of view besides the common features, and to comply with our National Regulatory Authority, a Second Shutdown System was designed as a redundant shutdown system in case the control plates fail. Concerning thermohydraulic aspects besides the pump flywheels and the flap valves providing the natural convection loop, a metallic Chimney and a Chimney Water Injection System were supplied. (author)

  1. Utilization experience with research reactors of various power levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudri, S.A.; Waheed, S.; Ahmad, S.

    1999-01-01

    Utilization of research reactor, PARR-1 at the power level of 5 MW, and then at 9 MW, after the up gradation and conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), has been described. In addition, the type of work carried out around a smaller facility, PARR-2, with power rating of 27kW has also been discussed. Utilization of PARR-1 in the area of neutron diffraction, neutron capture studies, radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, reactor physics, and in reactor controls etc has been illustrated. The benefits derived from the up gradation of the power for neutron diffraction studies, radioisotope production and neutron radiography have been discussed. The problem, which can be handed successfully on PARR-2, include neutron activation analysis, production of short-lived radioisotopes, and experimentation in reactor engineering and physics for training purposes. Suitable methodologies have been developed for the analysis of samples of varied nature using neutron activation technique, and the experience gained has been applied to the analysis of geological, environmental and biological samples and high purity materials. (author)

  2. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  3. Delayed gamma power measurement for sodium-cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R., E-mail: romain.coulon@cea.f [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Normand, S., E-mail: stephane.normand@cea.f [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ban, G., E-mail: ban@lpccaen.in2p3.f [ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France); Barat, E.; Montagu, T.; Dautremer, T. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Modelisation Simulation et Systemes, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Brau, H.-P. [ICSM, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171 F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Dumarcher, V. [AREVA NP, SET, F-84500 Bollene (France); Michel, M.; Barbot, L.; Domenech, T.; Boudergui, K.; Bourbotte, J.-M. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jousset, P. [CEA, LIST, Departement des Capteurs, du Signal et de l' Information, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barouch, G.; Ravaux, S.; Carrel, F. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Modelisation Simulation et Systemes, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saurel, N. [CEA, DAM, Laboratoire Mesure de Dechets et Expertise, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Frelin-Labalme, A.-M.; Hamrita, H. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: {sup 20}F and {sup 23}Ne tagging agents are produced by fast neutron flux. {sup 20}F signal has been measured at the SFR Phenix prototype. A random error of only 3% for an integration time of 2 s could be achieved. {sup 20}F and {sup 23}Ne power measurement has a reduced temperature influence. Burn-up impact could be limited by simultaneous {sup 20}F and {sup 23}Ne measurement. - Abstract: Previous works on pressurized water reactors show that the nitrogen 16 activation product can be used to measure thermal power. Power monitoring using a more stable indicator than ex-core neutron measurements is required for operational sodium-cooled fast reactors, in order to improve their economic efficiency at the nominal operating point. The fluorine 20 and neon 23 produced by (n,{alpha}) and (n,p) capture in the sodium coolant have this type of convenient characteristic, suitable for power measurements with low build-up effects and a potentially limited temperature, flow rate, burn-up and breeding dependence. This method was tested for the first time during the final tests program of the French Phenix sodium-cooled fast reactor at CEA Marcoule, using the ADONIS gamma pulse analyzer. Despite a non-optimal experimental configuration for this application, the delayed gamma power measurement was pre-validated, and found to provide promising results.

  4. Reactor power cutback system test experience at YGN 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Sung Goo; Kim, Se Chang; Seo, Jong Tae; Eom, Young Meen; Wook, Jeong Dae; Choi, Young Boo

    1995-01-01

    YGN 3 and 4 are the nuclear power plants having System 80 characteristics with a rated thermal output of 2815 MWth and a nominal net electrical output of 1040 MWe. YGN 3 achieved commercial operation on March 31, 1995 and YGN 4 completed Power Ascension Test (PAT) at 20%, 50%, 80% and 100% power by September 23, 1995. YGN 3 and 4 design incorporates the Reactor POwer Cutback System (RPCS) which reduces plant trips caused by Loss of Load (LOL)/ Turbine Trip and Loss of One Main Feedwater Pump (LOMFWP). The key design objective of the RPCS is to improve overall plant availability and performance, while minimizing challenges to the plant safety systems. The RPCS is designed to rapidly reduce reactor power by dropping preselected Control Element Assemblies (CEAs) while other NSSS control systems maintain process parameters within acceptable ranges. Extensive RPCS related tests performed during the initial startup of YGN 4 demonstrated that the RPCS can maintain the reactor on-line without opening primary or secondary safety valves and without actuating the Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS). It is expected that use of the RPCS at YGN will increase the overall availability of the units and reduce the number of challenges to plant safety systems

  5. Power generation versus fuel production in light water hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1977-06-01

    The economic potentials of fissile-fuel-producing light-water hybrid reactors (FFP-LWHR) and of fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) LWHR's are compared. A simple economic model is constructed that gives the capital investment allowed for the hybrid reactor so that the cost of electricity generated in the hybrid based energy system equals the cost of electricity generated in LWR's. The power systems considered are LWR, FSS-LWHR, and FFP-LWHR plus LWR, both with and without plutonium recycling. The economic potential of FFP-LWHR's is found superior to that of FSS-LWHR's. Moreover, LWHR's may compete, economically, with LWR's. Criteria for determining the more economical approach to hybrid fuel or power production are derived for blankets having a linear dependence between F and M. The examples considered favor the power generation rather than fuel production

  6. Status of small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Potential nuclear power requirements for developing countries, as a function of unit size, are examined. For those requiring units clustering around 400 NWe, the 600MWe size is recommended as being more economical and for those demanding capacity around 200 MWe, it is suggested that a unit approaching 400 MWe should be considered, this being the largest that can benefit from complete shop fabrication, resulting in lower construction times. Permissible capital costs for such units can be formulated based on the competitive situation with oil fired plants. Slightly higher availability is also expected from compact designs. Studies are in progress to determine whether complete shop fabrication can make smaller nuclear units competitive. (UK)

  7. Power cycle simulation for the Atucha II reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fait, Conrado; Grant, Carlos; Tarazaga, Ariel [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin, Prov Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes]. E-mail: grant@cnea.gov.ar; Yunes, Abelardo; Sanchez, F.A.; Torres, L. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche, Prov de Rio Negro (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    2007-07-01

    Atucha II is a 745 MWe (2160 MWt) Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) located in Argentina. The NPP is cooled and moderated by heavy water. It has 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO2 rods with an active length of 530 cm. Power regulation is performed through absorber control rods made of hafnium and steel tubes which are located between rows of channels and enter the core slightly obliquely. In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha II nuclear power plant, which had been progressing slowly between 1994 and 2004. This paper presents a detailed simulation of a power cycle (100%-80%-100%). In particular, channel and linear power distributions during the transients are calculated. The core calculations were performed with the code PUMA, a 3D diffusion program developed in Argentina. Spatial dependence of xenon, fuel and coolant temperature and coolant density are considered in the calculations. The global and spatial control of the control rods is simulated in a static way and xenon distribution in a transient way, adjusting slowly the positions of the control rods to keep the reactor critical, to minimize azimuthal asymmetries, and to keep the axial asymmetry factor as close as possible to the design values. The results indicate that the linear powers are below the acceptance limits for maximum linear powers and for pellet cladding interaction (PCI) thresholds established to prevent power ramp failures. (author)

  8. Power cycle simulation for the Atucha II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fait, Conrado; Grant, Carlos; Tarazaga, Ariel; Yunes, Abelardo; Sanchez, F.A.; Torres, L.

    2007-01-01

    Atucha II is a 745 MWe (2160 MWt) Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) located in Argentina. The NPP is cooled and moderated by heavy water. It has 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO2 rods with an active length of 530 cm. Power regulation is performed through absorber control rods made of hafnium and steel tubes which are located between rows of channels and enter the core slightly obliquely. In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha II nuclear power plant, which had been progressing slowly between 1994 and 2004. This paper presents a detailed simulation of a power cycle (100%-80%-100%). In particular, channel and linear power distributions during the transients are calculated. The core calculations were performed with the code PUMA, a 3D diffusion program developed in Argentina. Spatial dependence of xenon, fuel and coolant temperature and coolant density are considered in the calculations. The global and spatial control of the control rods is simulated in a static way and xenon distribution in a transient way, adjusting slowly the positions of the control rods to keep the reactor critical, to minimize azimuthal asymmetries, and to keep the axial asymmetry factor as close as possible to the design values. The results indicate that the linear powers are below the acceptance limits for maximum linear powers and for pellet cladding interaction (PCI) thresholds established to prevent power ramp failures. (author)

  9. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected

  10. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected.

  11. Characteristics of self-powered neutron detectors used in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, William H. Sr.

    1998-01-01

    Self-powered neutron detectors have been used effectively as in-core flux monitors for over twenty-five years in nuclear power reactors worldwide. This paper describes the basic properties of these radiation sensors including their nuclear, electrical and mechanical characteristics. Recommendations are given for the proper choice of the self-powered detector emitter to provide the proper response time and radiation sensitivity desired for use in an effective in-core radiation monitoring system. Examples are shown of specific self-powered detector designs, which are being effectively, used in in-core instrumentation systems for pressurized water, heavy water and graphite moderated light water reactors. Also examples are shown of the mechanical configurations of in-core assemblies of self-powered detectors combined with in-core thermocouples presently used in pressurized water and heavy water reactors worldwide. (author)

  12. ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor and power plant: conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Dudziak, D.J.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A complete power plant design of a 1200-MWe ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) is presented. An emphasis is placed on those features that are unique to the EBT confinement concept, with subsystems and balance-of-plant items that are more generic to magnetic fusion being adapted from past, more extensive tokamak reactor designs. Similar to the latter tokamak studies, this conceptual EBTR design also emphasizes the use of conventional or near state-of-the-art engineering technology and materials. An emphasis is also placed on system accessibility, reliability, and maintainability, as these crucial and desirable characteristics relate to the unique high-aspect-ratio configuration of EBTs. Equal and strong emphasis is given to physics, engineering/technology, and costing/economics components of this design effort. Parametric optimizations and sensitivity studies, using cost-of-electricity as an object function, are reported. Based on these results, the direction for future improvement on an already attractive reactor design is identified

  13. 77 FR 8902 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... draft regulatory guide (DG) DG-1271 ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors.'' This guide describes... Regulatory Guide 1.184, ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors,'' dated July 2000. This proposed...

  14. 10 CFR 50.44 - Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors. 50.44... for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions—(1) Inerted atmosphere means a containment atmosphere with... pressurized water nuclear power reactor with an operating license on October 16, 2003, except for those...

  15. Radioactive waste management and disposal scenario for fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabara, Takashi; Yamano, Naoki [Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Seki, Yasushi; Aoki, Isao

    1997-10-01

    The environmental and economic impact of radioactive waste (radwaste) generated from fusion power reactors using five types of structural materials and a light water reactor (LWR) have been evaluated and compared. At first, the amount and the radioactive level of the radwaste generated in five fusion reactors ware evaluated by an activation calculation code. Next, a possible radwaste disposal scenario applicable to fusion radwaste in Japan is considered and the disposal cost evaluated under certain assumptions. The exposure doses are evaluated for the skyshine of gamma-rays during the disposal operation, groundwater migration scenario during the institutional control period of 300 years and future site use scenario after the institutional period. The radwaste generated from a typical LWR was estimated based on a literature survey and the disposal cost was evaluated using the same assumptions as for the fusion reactors. It is found that the relative cost of disposal is strongly dependent on the cost for interim storage of medium level waste of fusion reactors and the cost of high level waste for the LWR. (author)

  16. Enabling autonomous control for space reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R. T.

    2006-01-01

    The application of nuclear reactors for space power and/or propulsion presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a space reactor power system (SRPS) employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. Thus, a SRPS control system must provide for operational autonomy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted an investigation of the state of the technology for autonomous control to determine the experience base in the nuclear power application domain, both for space and terrestrial use. It was found that control systems with varying levels of autonomy have been employed in robotic, transportation, spacecraft, and manufacturing applications. However, autonomous control has not been implemented for an operating terrestrial nuclear power plant nor has there been any experience beyond automating simple control loops for space reactors. Current automated control technologies for nuclear power plants are reasonably mature, and basic control for a SRPS is clearly feasible under optimum circumstances. However, autonomous control is primarily intended to account for the non optimum circumstances when degradation, failure, and other off-normal events challenge the performance of the reactor and near-term human intervention is not possible. Thus, the development and demonstration of autonomous control capabilities for the specific domain of space nuclear power operations is needed. This paper will discuss the findings of the ORNL study and provide a description of the concept of autonomy, its key characteristics, and a prospective

  17. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development

  18. Reactor Power for Large Displacement Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-24

    This is a PentaChart on reactor power for large displacement autonomous underwater vehicles. Currently AUVs use batteries or combinations of batteries and fuel cells for power. Battery/fuel cell technology is limited by duration. Batteries and cell fuels are a good match for some missions, but other missions could benefit greatly by a longer duration. The goal is the following: to design nuclear systems to power an AUV and meet design constraints including non-proliferation issues, power level, size constraints, and power conversion limitations. The action plan is to continue development of a range of systems for terrestrial systems and focus on a system for Titan Moon as alternative to Pu-238 for NASA.

  19. Alteration in reactor installation (reactor facility) in the Tokai No.2 Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Company (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A report to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry by the Nuclear Safety Commission, concerning the alteration of reactor facility in Tokai No.2 Power Station, JAPC, was presented; the technical capability and the safety after the alteration were confirmed by NSC. The alteration was the employment of new type 8x8 fuel as the replacement fuel and of average enrichment of about 2.9 wt.% from the previous 2.7 wt.% for the replacement fuel assemblies. The safety examination made by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety of NSC is described: meteorology, the safety design of reactor facility, exposure dose evaluation in normal operation, abnormal transient analysis in operation, accident analysis, and the credible accident analysis for site evaluation. (Mori, K.)

  20. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gas cooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language

  1. Recent activities at the zero-power teaching reactor CROCUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2011-01-01

    CROCUS is a zero-power critical facility used mainly for educational purposes at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland. It is a low-enriched-uranium fuelled, light-water moderated reactor, with the fission power limited to 100 W. The presentation will discuss the crucial role of CROCUS in teaching -- both as framework for reactor practicals offered to physics students at EPFL and as key educational tool in the recently established Swiss Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering. Regular development work is needed for the various instruments and components associated with the facility. As illustration, the recently completed refurbishment of the control rod system and the related calibration experiments will also be discussed.

  2. Imperatives for using plutonium in commercial power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, G.M.; Kunze, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of reprocessed or newly produced plutonium as a fissile fuel in commercial nuclear reactors in the US has been actively suppressed by the current US Administration. Yet, many other advanced nations have already adopted mixed oxide fuels which are manufactured from a mixture of plutonium and natural uranium compounds. These nations have successfully proven the use of such nuclear fuel in their commercial power reactors for many years. The full consequence of the restrictive nuclear policy in the US will greatly limit the lifetime of the nuclear fuel resources in the US from a nominal potential of 100 centuries or more of potential energy supply to about 50 years or less at economical prices for uranium. This paper addresses both the imperatives and the potential and the perceived hazards of plutonium utilization and examines the consequences of government policy regarding utilization of nuclear power

  3. Determination of reactor thermal power using a more accurate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papuga, J.; Madron, F.; Pliska, J.

    2005-01-01

    Reactor thermal power is an important operational parameter in many respects such as nuclear safety, reactor physics or evaluation of turbine thermal performance. Thermal power of a pressurized water reactor is determined on the basis of the steam generator thermal balance. The balance can be made in several variants differing from one another by the selection of different measuring circuits whose data are used in the balancing. In principle, no one such variant gives the true value of the thermal power. Among the variant values, the one nearest to the unknown true value of reactor thermal power is probably the value calculated with the lowest uncertainty. The determination of such uncertainty is not easy and its value can make even several percent, which has significant economic consequences. This paper presents the method of data reconciliation and its application to the data of the third of Dukovany NPP. The data reconciliation method allows to exploit all the information which process data contain. It is based on the statistical adjustment of the redundant data in such a way that the adjusted data obey generally valid laws of nature (e.g. conservation laws). Mass and energy balances based on the data not yet reconciled do not obey those laws because of measurement errors. For data reconciliation in Dukovany, a detailed model of mass and energy flows describing the 3rd unit from steam generators to alternator and condenser was set up. Laws of mass and energy conservation and phase equilibrium in water-steam systems are thus fulfilled. Moreover, the user can model momentum balances in pipelines and create other equations, which are respected during calculation. The data reconciliation is done regularly for hourly averages (Authors)

  4. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  5. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power

  6. Dynamic power behavior of a PWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology for the power level evaluation (dynamic behavior) in a Pressurized Water Reactor, during a transient is developed, by solving the point kinetic equation related to the control rod insertion effects and fuel or moderator temperature 'feed-back'. A new version of the thermal-hydraulic code COBRA III P/MIT, is used. In this new version was included, as an option, the methodology developed. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Additional records for Stenosagola newtoni Park & Carlton, 2013 (Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae: Faronitae, with notes on aedeagal morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thorpe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this short note is to identify morphospecies sp. 0471 of the Hope River Forest Fragmentation Project. It is Stenosagola newtoni Park & Carlton, 2013. The material listed herein raises the number of published specimen records for S. newtoni from 2 to 51. All additional 49 specimens are fully winged males, collected in flight intercept traps (FITs, from the South Island of New Zealand. Examination of the new material has resulted in the detection of an error in the original description of S. newtoni, whereby the mirror image of the aedeagus was inadvertently illustrated. It is not a case of genitalic antisymmetry.

  8. The future of nuclear power and fourth-generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Renault, C.

    2006-01-01

    Faced with the exhaustion of fossil fuel resources, the output of existing nuclear power must quadruple between now and 2050, and the Commissariat a l'Energie atomique (CEA) and its industrial partners are cooperating in a programme of R and D on future nuclear power. France strategy puts rapid neutron reactors (RNR) at the forefront, in view of their possible introduction by 2040. These reactors allow a more efficient use of uranium resources and minimise the production of long-life nuclear waste. Two technologies which use respectively, sodium and gas as their coolant are being studied. For the sodium RNR, which benefits from significant existing experience, the key is to first improve its economic performance. For the gas RNR, which draws on the principles and the generic assets of the RNR, for those using helium as the coolant, and those with applications at high temperature, it is important firstly to demonstrate the key technologies such as the fuel. The decision of President Chirac to launch the study of a prototype, fourth-generation reactor for 2020 is stimulating the research effort into France future nuclear power. (author)

  9. Optimization of air ducts for nuclear reactor power generation station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Katsumi; Yoshino, Hirokazu; Sonoda, Takayuki

    1991-01-01

    In the optimization study on the heating, ventilating and air conditions system in Nuclear Reactor Power Generation Station, proper arrangement of air ducts has been studied using the experimental and analytical investigation from a viewpoint of duct arrangement optimization. This study consists of two parts. Part I is optimization of air ducts in the corridors and Part II is optimization of air duct in each room. In part I, from viewpoints of confinement of radioactive materials in facilities having possible radioactive contamination and improvement of thermal environment for workers, the authors have studied air ducts system in which fresh air is supplied to corridors and heat removal and ventilation for each room are performed by transferring air from the corridors, instead of current ducts system with supply duct to each room. In part II, the condenser room with complex configuration and large space, and the electrical equipment room with simple space are selected for model areas. Based on these studies, experimental and analytical investigation (using a three-dimensional thermal hydraulic analysis) technique has been established, and the effective design method for duct arrangement of HVAC design has been verified for Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. The air-duct arrangements optimized in this study are applied to an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Power Station in trial and reduction of the air-duct quantity is confirmed

  10. Neural Network Controller for the Pressurized Water Reactor Power Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, S.S.; Kotb, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Although there have been some severe nuclear accidents such as Three Mile Island (USA), Chernobyl (Ukraine) and Fukushima (Japan), nuclear fission energy is still a source of clean energy that can substitute fossil fuels in a centralized way and in a great amount with commercial availability and economic competitiveness. Since the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used nuclear fission reactor, it is safe, stable and efficient operation is meaningful to the current rebirth of the nuclear fission energy industry. Power-level regulation is an important technique which can deeply affect the operation stability and efficiency of PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors ). This paper presents the effect of utilizing the Neural Network controller methodology in the power control model of the PWR. The Neural Network Controller was tested on a PWR model using the Matlab Simulink Interface. Two case studies were performed on the model using both the Neural Network method and the traditional rod speed program for controlling the nuclear power plant variables. The proposed controller presents a higher performance than that of the traditional rod speed program controller.

  11. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission

  12. Monitoring device for local power distribution in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1989-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a local power monitoring device of more excellent instant response and higher speed operation than usual. That is, counted values from each of reactor core present status data detector, movable type neutron flux detector and fixed type neutron flux detector are inputted to a data sampler. A neutron flux distribution calculation device calculates the neutron flux distribution in the reactor core for the inputs of the calculated values from the reactor core present status data detector based on previously incorporated physical models. The optimum neutron flux distribution calculation device is inputted with each of the calculated values from the movable neutron detector and the fixed neutron detector and signals of the incore neutron flux distribution from the data sampler described above. Then, the device compensates the neutron flux distribution in accordance with the change of the control rod positions from the calculation point of time of the incore neutron flux distribution. Then, the power distribution is calculated by using the compensated neutron flux distribution . Accordingly, it is possible to obtain a local power distribution monitor of more excellent rapid response and high speed operation than usual. (I.S.)

  13. Characteristics of self-powered neutron detectors used in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Self-Powered Neutron Detectors have been used effectively as in-core flux monitors for over twenty-five years in nuclear power reactors world-wide. The basic properties of these radiation sensors are described including their nuclear, electrical and mechanical characteristics. Recommendations are given for the proper choice of the self-powered detector emitter to provide the proper response time and radiation sensitivity desired for use in an effective in-core radiation monitoring system. Examples are shown of specific self-powered detector designs which are being effectively used in in-core instrumentation systems for pressurised water, heavy water and graphite moderated light water reactors. Examples are also shown of the mechanical configurations of in-core assemblies of self-powered detectors combined with in-core thermocouples presently used in pressurised water and heavy water reactors worldwide. This paper is a summary of a new IEC standard to be issued in 1996 describing the characteristics and test methods of self-powered detectors used in nuclear power reactors. (author)

  14. Nuclear power reactor licensing and regulation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The report is devoted to four subjects: an explanation of the origins, statutory basis and development of the present regulatory system in the United States; a description of the various actions which must be taken by a license applicant and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission before a nuclear power plant can be constructed and placed on-line, an account of the current regulatory practices followed by the US NRC in licensing nuclear power reactors; an identification of some of the 'lessons learned' from the Three Mile Island accident and some proposed regulatory and legislative solutions. (NEA) [fr

  15. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper

  16. Power control device for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Hidesuke; Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve self controllability of a nuclear power plant, as well as enable continuous power level control by a controlled flow of moderators in void pipes provided in a reactor core. Constitution: Hollow void pipes are provided in a reactor core to which a heavy water recycle loop for power control, a heavy water recycle pump for power control, a heavy water temperature regulator and a heavy water flow rate control valve for power control are connected in series to constitute a heavy water recycle loop for flowing heavy water moderators. The void ratio in each of the void pipes are calculated by a process computer to determine the flow rate and the temperature for the recycled heavy water. Based on the above calculation result, the heavy water temperature regulator is actuated by way of a temperature setter at the heavy water inlet and the heavy water flow rate is controlled by the actuation of the heavy water flow rate control valve. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. High-Temperature Reactor For Power Generation and District Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzberger, Karlheinz

    1987-01-01

    The multinational BBC Brown Brave Group, which has its head-quarters in Baden/Switzerland, was founded in 1891. Its German company is Brown, Brave and CIEs AGM, Mannheim. The field of operation covers wide areas of electrical engineering: These includes mainly the manufacture of installations and equipment for the generation, conversion, distribution and utilization of electric power, with special emphasis on the capital goods sector. BBC erects turnkey power plants and manufactures electrical equipment for industrial plants and urban transport and main line trains. Also of major importance are standard electrical products such as motors, switches, cables, semiconductor devices as well as measuring and control equipment. In the field of nuclear power BBC is engaged in particular in the development and construction of high-temperature reactors for the generation of electric power and process heat. The following presentation gives a short view on the milestones of the HTR development achieved in 1987

  18. Automated power control system for reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Anith Khairunnisa; Minhat, Mohd Sabri; Hassan, Mohd Khair

    2017-01-01

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type undergoes safe operation for more than 30 years and the only research reactor exists in Malaysia. The main safety feature of Instrumentation and Control (I&C) system design is such that any failure in the electronic, or its associated components, does not lead to an uncontrolled rate of reactivity. The existed controller using feedback approach to control the reactor power. This paper introduces proposed controllers such as Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Proportional Integral Derivatives (PID) controller for the RTP simulation. In RTP, the most important considered parameter is the reactor power and act as nervous system. To design a controller for complex plant like RTP is quite difficult due to high cost and safety factors cause by the failure of the controller. Furthermore, to overcome these problems, a simulator can be used to replace functions the hardware and test could then be simulated using this simulator. In order to find the best controller, several controllers were proposed and the result will be analysed for study the performances of the controller. The output result will be used to find out the best RTP power controller using MATLAB/Simulink and gives result as close as the real RTP performances. Currently, the structures of RTP was design using MATLAB/Simulink tool that consist of fission chamber, controller, control rod position, height-to-worth of control rods and a RTP model. The controller will control the control rod position to make sure that the reactivity still under the limitation parameter. The results given from each controller will be analysed and validated through experiment data collected from RTP.

  19. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-01-01

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency (ge)20%; Steam turbine outlet quality (ge)90%; and Pumping power (le)2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  20. Power Excursion Accident Analysis of Research Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, S.M.; Doaa, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional neutronic code POWEX-K has been developed, and it has been coupled with the sub-channel thermal-hydraulic core analysis code SV based on the Single Mass Velocity Model. This forms the integrated neutronic/thermal hydraulics code system POWEX-K/SV for the accident analysis. The Training and Research Reactors at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME-Reactor) has been taken as a reference reactor. The cross-section generation procedure based on WIMS. The code uses an implicit difference approach for both the diffusion equations and thermal-hydraulics modules, with reactivity feedback effects due to coolant and fuel temperatures. The code system was applied to analyzing power excursion accidents initiated by ramp reactivity insertion of 1.2 $. The results show that the reactor is inherently safe in case of such accidents i.e. no core melt is expected even if the safety rods do not fall into the core

  1. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Grossbeck J-P.A. Renier Tim Bigelow

    2003-09-30

    Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding.

  2. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Renier, J-P.A.; Bigelow, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding

  3. High power ring methods and accelerator driven subcritical reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahar, Malek Haj [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-07

    High power proton accelerators allow providing, by spallation reaction, the neutron fluxes necessary in the synthesis of fissile material, starting from Uranium 238 or Thorium 232. This is the basis of the concept of sub-critical operation of a reactor, for energy production or nuclear waste transmutation, with the objective of achieving cleaner, safer and more efficient process than today’s technologies allow. Designing, building and operating a proton accelerator in the 500-1000 MeV energy range, CW regime, MW power class still remains a challenge nowadays. There is a limited number of installations at present achieving beam characteristics in that class, e.g., PSI in Villigen, 590 MeV CW beam from a cyclotron, SNS in Oakland, 1 GeV pulsed beam from a linear accelerator, in addition to projects as the ESS in Europe, a 5 MW beam from a linear accelerator. Furthermore, coupling an accelerator to a sub-critical nuclear reactor is a challenging proposition: some of the key issues/requirements are the design of a spallation target to withstand high power densities as well as ensure the safety of the installation. These two domains are the grounds of the PhD work: the focus is on the high power ring methods in the frame of the KURRI FFAG collaboration in Japan: upgrade of the installation towards high intensity is crucial to demonstrate the high beam power capability of FFAG. Thus, modeling of the beam dynamics and benchmarking of different codes was undertaken to validate the simulation results. Experimental results revealed some major losses that need to be understood and eventually overcome. By developing analytical models that account for the field defects, one identified major sources of imperfection in the design of scaling FFAG that explain the important tune variations resulting in the crossing of several betatron resonances. A new formula is derived to compute the tunes and properties established that characterize the effect of the field imperfections on the

  4. Evaluation of the qualification of SPERT [Special Power Excursion Reactor Test] fuel for use in non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's evaluation of the qualification of the stainless-steel-clad uranium/oxide (UO 2 ) fuel pins for use in non-power reactors. The fuel pins were originally procured in the 1960's as part of the Special Power Excursion Reactor Test (SPERT) program. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) examined 600 SPERT fuel pins to verify that the pins were produced according to specification and to assess their present condition. The pins were visually inspected under 6X magnification and by X-radiographic, destructive, and metallographic examinations. Spectrographic and chemical analyses were performed on the UO 2 fuel. The results of the qualification examinations indicated that the SPERT fuel pins meet the requirements of Phillips Specification No. F-1-SPT and have suffered no physical damage since fabrication. Therefore, the qualification results give reasonable assurance that the SPERT fuel rods are suitable for use in non-power reactors provided that the effects of thin-wall defects in the region of the upper end cap and low-density fuel pellets are evaluated for the intended operating conditions. 1 ref., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  5. Mirror hybrid reactor blanket and power conversion system conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Backus, G.A.; Baxi, C.B.; Dee, J.B.; Estrine, E.A.; Rao, R.; Veca, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a gas-cooled mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor is presented. The designs of the fuel, blanket module and power conversion system are based on existing gas-cooled fission reactor technology that has been developed at General Atomic Company. The uranium silicide fuel is contained in Inconel-clad rods and is cooled by helium gas. The fuel is contained in 16 spherical segment modules which surround the fusion plasma. The hot helium is used to raise steam for a conventional steam cycle turbine generator. The details of the method of support for the massive blanket modules and helium ducts remain to be determined. Nevertheless, the conceptual design appears to be technically feasible with existing gas-cooled technology. A preliminary safety analysis shows that with the development of a satisfactory method of primary coolant circuit containment and support, the hybrid reactor could be licensed under existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations

  6. Design study of electrical power supply system for tokamak fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Design study of the electrical power supply system for a 2000MWt Tokamak-type fusion reactor has been carried out. The purposes are to reveal and study problems in the system, leading to a plan of the research and development. Performed were study of the electrical power supply system and design of superconducting inductive energy storages and power switches. In study of the system, specification and capability of various power supplies for the fusion power reactor and design of the total system with its components were investigated. For the superconducting inductive energy storages, material choice, design calculation, and structural design were conducted, giving the size, weight and performance. For thyristor switches, circuit design in the parallel / series connection of element valves and cooling design were studied, providing the size and weight. (auth.)

  7. Multivariable robust control of an integrated nuclear power reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Etchepareborda

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The design of the main control system of the CAREM nuclear power plant is presented. This plant is an inherently safe low-power nuclear reactor with natural convection on the primary coolant circuit and is self-pressurized with a steam dome on the top of the pressure vessel (PV. It is an integrated reactor as the whole primary coolant circuit is within the PV. The primary circuit transports the heat to the secondary circuit through once-through steam generators (SG. There is a feedwater valve at the inlet of the SG and a turbine valve at the outlet of the SG. The manipulated variables are the aperture of these valves and the reactivity of the control rods. The control target is to regulate the primary and secondary pressures and to monitor steam flow reference ramps on a range of nominal flow from 100% to 40%. The requirements for the control system are robust stability, low-order simple controllers and transient/permanent error bounding. The controller design is based on a detailed RETRAN plant model, from which linear perturbed open-loop dynamic models at different powers are identified. Two low-order nominal models with their associated uncertainties are chosen for two different power ranges. Robust controllers with acceptable performances are designed for each range. Numerical optimization based on the loop-shaping method is used for the controller design. The designed controllers are implemented in the RETRAN model and tested in simulations achieving successful results.

  8. Nuclear piston engine and pulsed gaseous core reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    The investigated nuclear piston engines consist of a pulsed, gaseous core reactor enclosed by a moderating-reflecting cylinder and piston assembly and operate on a thermodynamic cycle similar to the internal combustion engine. The primary working fluid is a mixture of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , and helium, He, gases. Highly enriched UF 6 gas is the reactor fuel. The helium is added to enhance the thermodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the primary working fluid and also to provide a neutron flux flattening effect in the cylindrical core. Two and four-stroke engines have been studied in which a neutron source is the counterpart of the sparkplug in the internal combustion engine. The piston motions which have been investigated include pure simple harmonic, simple harmonic with dwell periods, and simple harmonic in combination with non-simple harmonic motion. The results of the conducted investigations indicate good performance potential for the nuclear piston engine with overall efficiencies of as high as 50 percent for nuclear piston engine power generating units of from 10 to 50 Mw(e) capacity. Larger plants can be conceptually designed by increasing the number of pistons, with the mechanical complexity and physical size as the probable limiting factors. The primary uses for such power systems would be for small mobile and fixed ground-based power generation (especially for peaking units for electrical utilities) and also for nautical propulsion and ship power

  9. Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle

  10. Manufacturing aspects of toroidal field magnets for tokamak power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacturing aspects of two different toroidal field (TF) coils are discussed briefly. The first of these is the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) TF coil, which is presently in the design phase at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The second coil configuration reflects a reference design for a large experimental power reactor (EPR) which originated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This configuration was used by the Grumman Aerospace Corporation of Bethpage, N.Y. as the basis for an investigation of the manufacturing aspects of a large superconducting TF coil, the results of which are summarized. For each of these coils, the major characteristics of the design are first briefly described and the significant manufacturing aspects are then summarized

  11. Operational margin monitoring system for boiling water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, S.; Takigawa, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-line operational margin monitoring system which has been developed for boiling water reactor power plants to improve safety, reliability, and quality of reactor operation. The system consists of a steady-state core status prediction module, a transient analysis module, a stability analysis module, and an evaluation and guidance module. This system quantitatively evaluates the thermal margin during abnormal transients as well as the stability margin, which cannot be evaluated by direct monitoring of the plant parameters, either for the current operational state or for a predicted operating state that may be brought about by the intended operation. This system also gives operator guidance as to appropriate or alternate operations when the operating state has or will become marginless

  12. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  13. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Database - Version 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Subramani, Ranjit [ORNL

    2008-03-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water reactor pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials depends on many factors, such as neutron fluence, flux, and energy spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules are needed to develop a generally applicable damage prediction model that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Furthermore, the investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes, Standard Review Plans (SRPs), and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized database. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Database (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for U.S. designed commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB lists the test results of 104 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials, 115 weld materials, and 141 base materials, including 103 plates, 35 forgings, and 3 correlation monitor materials that were irradiated in 321 capsules from 106 commercial power reactors. The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the Windows operating system. "User-friendly" utility programs have been written to investigate radiation embrittlement using this database. Utility programs allow the user to retrieve, select and manipulate specific data, display data to the screen or printer, and fit and plot Charpy impact data. The PR-EDB Version 3.0 upgrades Version 2.0. The package was developed based on the Microsoft .NET framework technology and uses Microsoft Access for

  14. Nuclear power plant laundry drain treatment using membrane bio reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Masaaki; Kohanawa, Osamu; Kinugasa, Atsushi; Ogawa, Naoki; Murogaki, Kenta

    2012-01-01

    In nuclear power plant, the radioactive effluent generated by washing the clothes worn in controlled area and the hand and shower water used at the controlled area are treated in laundry drain treatment system. Although various systems which treat such liquid waste preexist, the traditional treatment system has disadvantages such as high running cost and a large amount of secondary waste generation. To solve these matters, we have considered application of an activated sludge system, membrane bio reactor, which has been practically used in general industry. For nuclear power plant, the activated sludge system has been developed, tested in its adaptability and the adequacy has been proved. Some preexisting treatment systems have been replaced with this activated sludge system for the first time in a domestic nuclear power plant, and the renewal system is now in operation. The result is reported. (author)

  15. Medium-Power Lead-Alloy Reactors: Missions for This Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, Neil E.; MacDonald, Philip E.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Loewen, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [∼100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant.These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO 2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a

  16. Conceptual design of small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Horiuchi, Tetsuo; Akita, Minoru; Niino, Tsuyoshi.

    1988-01-01

    Under the circumstance that with the slowdown of the growth of electric power demand, the forecast of the demand becomes difficult, as the plants that can delicately respond to the short term change of the demand regardless of the size of electric power networks, the expectation to small and medium nuclear power plants becomes high. The target was set to combine with ABWRs based on the technical progress of BWRs, to assume the output of 600 MW and 300 MW as the series of capacity, how to maintain and improve the economical efficiency while reducing to the medium and small types, and what peculiar characteristics small and medium nuclear reactors can have, and the development of the design concept was carried out. At the time of the development, the LWR technology that has been fostered so far is to beutilized up to the maximum limit, the economical efficiency is to be ensured by simplifying the facilities, and the safety is to be heightened by utilizing the characteristics peculiar to small reactors. As the results, the design concept of medium and small LWRs was established, which have such features as natural circulation type core using short fuel, natural heat dissipation type containment vessel, pressure-accumulating injection system, compact building with a few stories, and the possibility of continuous operation for two years. (Kako, I.)

  17. WITAMIR-I: A tandem mirror power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Beyer, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design of a near term commercial tandem mirror power reactor will be presented. The basic configuration utilizes Yin-yang minimum B end plugs with inboard thermal barriers, which are pumped by neutral beam injection. The maximum magnetic fields are 6.1 T, 8.1 T and 15 T in the central cell, Yin-yang, and thermal barrier magnets, respectively. The blanket utilizes Pb 83 Li 17 as the coolant and breeder, and HT-9 as the structural material. This configuration yields a high energy multiplication (1.37), a sufficient tritium breeding ratio (1.07) and has a major advantage with respect to maintenance. A single stage direct convertor is used at one end and an electron thermal dump at the other end. The plasma Q is 28 at a fusion power level of 3000 MWsub(th); the net electrical output is 1530 MWe and the overall efficiency is 39%. Cost estimates indicate that WITAMIR-I is competitive with recent tokamak power reactor designs. (author)

  18. SWR 1000: The new boiling water reactor power plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    1999-01-01

    Siemens' Power Generation Group (KWU) is currently developing - on behalf of and in close co-operation with the German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners - the boiling water reactor SWR 1000. This advanced design concept marks a new era in the successful tradition of boiling water reactor technology in Germany and is aimed, with an electric output of 1000 MW, at assuring competitive power generating costs compared to large-capacity nuclear power plants as well as coal-fired stations, while at the same time meeting the highest of safety standards, including control of a core melt accident. This objective is met by replacing active safety systems with passive safety equipment of diverse design for accident detection and control and by simplifying systems needed for normal plant operation on the basis of past operating experience. A short construction period, flexible fuel cycle lengths of between 12 and 24 months and a high fuel discharge burnup all contribute towards meeting this goal. The design concept fulfils international nuclear regulatory requirements and will reach commercial maturity by the year 2000. (author)

  19. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model

  20. Demographic statistics pertaining to nuclear power reactor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    Population statistics are presented for 145 nuclear power plant sites. Summary tables and figures are included that were developed to aid in the evaluation of trends and general patterns associated with the various parameters of interest, such as the proximity of nuclear plant sites to centers of population. The primary reason for publishing this information at this time is to provide a factual basis for use in discussions on the subject of reactor siting policy. The report is a revised and updated version of a draft report published in December 1977. Errors in the population data base have been corrected and new data tabulations added

  1. Experimental power reactor dc generator energy storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, F.M.; Smeltzer, G.S.; Myers, E.H.; Kilgore, L.

    1978-01-01

    This study covers the use of dc generators for meeting the Experimental Power Reactor Ohmic Heating Energy Storage Requirements. The dc generators satisfy these requirements which are the same as defined in WFPS-TME-038 which covered the use of ac generators and homopolar generators. The costs of the latter two systems have been revised to eliminate first-of-a-kind factors. The cost figures for dc generators indicate a need to develop larger machines in order to take advantage of the economy-of-scale that the large ac machines have. Each of the systems has its own favorable salient features on which to base a system selection

  2. A new control strategy for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, H.; Sasaki, K.; Takegaki, M.

    1990-01-01

    A new automatic direct digital control strategy for nuclear power reactors is presented. It is based on a simple control logic of comparison between the available time (the time for the error signal to disappear) and the required time (the time for the time derivative to match that of the target trend). The method aims to control the system to an acceptable state within a minimum time under a number of restraints. The control capability of the method is shown for two typical transients. This method is generally applicable to process control in which time-optimal control based on the maximum principle is sought

  3. Severe accident considerations in Canadian nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, A.M.; Measures, M.P.; Scott, C.K.; Lewis, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes a current study on severe accidents being sponsored by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) and provides background on other related Canadian work. Scoping calculations are performed in Phase I of the AECB study to establish the relative consequences of several permutations resulting from six postulated initiating events, nine containment states, and a selection of meteorological conditions and health effects mitigating criteria. In Phase II of the study, selected accidents sequences would be analyzed in detail using models suitable for the design features of the Canadian nuclear power reactors

  4. Neutronics and photonics calculations for the tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Baker, V.C.; Barnes, J.M.

    1977-03-01

    The results of one-dimensional neutronic and photonic calculations that compare the nuclear performance of blanket and shield designs proposed for use in the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor are presented. The nuclear analysis was carried out for both nonbreeding and tritium-breeding blanket modules to compare the spatial variations of the radiation flux and energy distributions, nuclear heating, radiation damage, and tritium breeding. Nonbreeding blanket modules that contain potassium plus SS-316 or potassium only as the energy-absorbing medium and breeding blankets that use natural lithium as the fertile material were evaluated as a function of the first-wall cooling scheme

  5. A locking device for fuel bundles of power nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, John; Flora, B.S.

    1974-01-01

    The present invention relates to a locked assembly associated by brace rods and easily dismountable. It comprises a locking sleeve provided with lugs engaged in bores of the upper plate, said sleeve being biassed towards said plate by a spring. For dismounting the bundle, the plate is pushed against the action of the springs and each sleeve, provided with flat faces is pivoted until it reaches the unlocking position. A guide member prevents each brace rod from being unscrewed from the lower plate. This can be applied to the remote dis-assembling of the fuel rods of a power reactor [fr

  6. Radial heat conduction in a power reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Two radial conduction models, one for steady state and another for unsteady state, in a nuclear power reactor fuel element are developed. The objective is to obtain the temperatures in the fuel pellet and the cladding. The lumped-parameter hypothesis are adopted to represent the system. Both models are verified and their results are compared with similar ones. A method to calculate the conductance in the gap between the UO 2 pellet and the clad and its associated uncertainty is included in the steady state model. (author) [es

  7. Comparative Study on Cyber Securities between Power Reactor and Research Reactor with Bayesian Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jinsoo; Heo, Gyunyoung; Son, Han Seong

    2016-01-01

    The Stuxnet has shown that nuclear facilities are no more safe from cyber-attack. Due to practical experiences and concerns on increasing of digital system application, cyber security has become the important issue in nuclear industry. Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and control (KINAC) published a regulatory standard (KINAC/RS-015) to establish cyber security framework for nuclear facilities. However, it is difficult to research about cyber security. It is hard to quantify cyber-attack which has malicious activity which is different from existing design basis accidents (DBAs). We previously proposed a methodology on development of a cyber security risk model with BBN. However, the methodology had a limitation in which the input data as prior information was solely on expert opinions. In this study, we propose a cyber security risk model for instrumentation and control (I and C) system of nuclear facilities with some equation for quantification by using Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) in order to overcome the limitation of previous research. The proposed model has been used for comparative study on cyber securities between large-sized nuclear power plants (NPPs) and small-sized Research Reactors (RR). In this study, we proposed the cyber security risk evaluation model with BBN. It includes I and C architecture, which is a target system of cyber-attack, malicious activity, which causes cyber-attack from attacker, and mitigation measure, which mitigates the cyber-attack risk. Likelihood and consequence as prior information are evaluated by considering characteristics of I and C architecture and malicious activity. The BBN model provides posterior information with Bayesian update by adding any of assumed cyber-attack scenarios as evidence. Cyber security risk for nuclear facilities is analyzed by comparing between prior information and posterior information of each node. In this study, we conducted comparative study on cyber securities between power reactor

  8. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  9. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cooled Power Reactors J Appendix J to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. J Appendix J to Part 50—Primary Reactor Containment... basis accident and specified either in the technical specification or associated bases. J. Pt (p.s.i.g...

  10. Maximizing the use of research reactors in training power reactor operating staff with special reference to US experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research reactors have been used in training nuclear power plant personnel for many years. Using the experience in the United States of America a programme is proposed that will maximize the training conducted at a research reactor and lessen the time that the staff must spend training elsewhere. The programme is adaptable to future training of replacement staff and for staff retraining. (author)

  11. Culham conceptual Tokamak reactor MkII. Conceptual layout of buildings for a twin reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.A.S.; Harding, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual design of the nuclear complex of a 2400 MWe twin fusion reactor power station utilising common services and a single containment building. The design is based upon environmental and maintenance logistical requirements, the provision of adequate storage, workshop and construction facilities and the constraints imposed by the geometry of the main and auxiliary reactor coolant systems. (author)

  12. The working lifetime of nuclear power plants and new types of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Ch.; Birraux, C.

    2003-01-01

    The report on the working lifetime of nuclear power plants and new reactor types, by Mr Christian Bataille, deputy for the Nord, and Mr Claude Birraux, deputy for Haute-Savoie as well as President of the Office, supplements the studies carried out by the Parliamentary Office on the Safety of Nuclear Installations and Radioactive Wastes: it examines the remaining working life of the EDF nuclear power plants and the current status of projects that might, if circumstances were right, replace the reactors at present in service. The report investigates the different physical and other factors that influence the ageing of nuclear power plants and tackles the question of whether the design life of 40 years could be exceeded in practice. The whole issue of French nuclear power plant is put in perspective and compared with the situation of nuclear plants in Finland, Sweden, Germany and the United States, from the technical and regulatory standpoints. Believing that any attempt to optimise the working lifetime of the power plants currently in service must be accompanied by simultaneous moves aimed at their replacement, Messrs. Christian Bataille and Claude Birraux go on to review in detail the various light water reactor projects being proposed around the world for completion by 2015, as developments of existing models, in particular the EPR reactor of Framatome ANP, characterised by its competitiveness. They suggest that a first such reactor should be built as quickly as possible. Describing the other nuclear systems being investigated by research organisations not only in France but also in the United States and Sweden, Mrs. Christian Bataille and Claude Birraux review the objectives of these and the circumstances in which they might be developed, which would be unlikely to be before 2035 in view of the technological problems to be overcome and the industrial demonstration plants that would be needed

  13. Estimation, comparison, and evaluation of advanced fission power reactor generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddell, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The study compares the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR), the molten-salt breeder reactor (MSBR), the light water breeder reactor (LWBR), and the heavy water reactor (HWR) with proposed light water reactors (LWR) and liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). The relative electrical generation costs, including the effects of the introduction of advanced reactor fuel cycles into the U.S. nuclear power economy, were projected through the year 2030. The study utilized the NEEDS computer code which is a simulation of the U.S. nuclear power economy. The future potential electrical generation costs and cumulative consumption of uranium ore were developed using characterizations of the advanced systems. The reactor-fuel cycle characterizations were developed from literature reviews and personal discussions with the proponents of the various systems. The study developed a ranking of the concepts based on generation costs and uranium consumption

  14. Method of controlling power of a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To adjust a level of heavy water in a region of reflection body to control power in a heavy water reactor. Structure: The interior of a core tank filled with heavy water is divided by a partition into a core heavy water region and a reflection body region formed by surrounding the core heavy water region, and a level of heavy water within the reflection body region is adjusted to control power. Preferably, it is desirable to communicate the core heavy water region with the reflection body heavy water region at their lower portion, and gas pressure applied to an upper portion within at least one of said regions is adjusted to adjust the level of heavy water within the reflection body heavy water region. Thereby, the heavy water within the reflection body heavy water region may be introduced into the core region, thus requiring no tank which stores heavy water within the reflection body region. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Fuel element for high-temperature nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloesser, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fuel element of the HTGR consists of a spherical graphite body with a spherical cavity. A deposit of fissile material, e.g. coated particles of uranium carbide, is fixed to the inner wall using binders. In addition to the fissile material, there are concentric deposits of fertile material, e.g. coated thorium carbide particles. The remaining cavity is filled with a graphite mass, preferably graphite powder, and the filling opening with a graphite stopper. At the beginning of the reactor operation, the fissile material layer provides the whole power. With progressing burn-up, the energy production is taken over by the fertile layer, which provides the heat production until the end of burn-up. Due to the relatively small temperature difference between the outer wall of the outer graphite body and the maximum fuel temperature, the power of the fuel element can be increased. (DG) [de

  16. Robust reactor power control system design by genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Joon; Cho, Kyung Ho; Kim, Sin [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The H{sub {infinity}} robust controller for the reactor power control system is designed by use of the mixed weight sensitivity. The system is configured into the typical two-port model with which the weight functions are augmented. Since the solution depends on the weighting functions and the problem is of nonconvex, the genetic algorithm is used to determine the weighting functions. The cost function applied in the genetic algorithm permits the direct control of the power tracking performances. In addition, the actual operating constraints such as rod velocity and acceleration can be treated as design parameters. Compared with the conventional approach, the controller designed by the genetic algorithm results in the better performances with the realistic constraints. Also, it is found that the genetic algorithm could be used as an effective tool in the robust design. 4 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  17. Development of methods for monitoring and controlling power in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos; Silva, Vitor Vasconcelos Araujo

    2012-01-01

    Redundancy and diversity are two important criteria for power measurement in nuclear reactors. Other criteria such as accuracy, reliability and response speed are also of major concern. Power monitoring of nuclear reactors is normally done by means of neutronic instruments, i.e. by the measurement of neutron flux. The greater the number of channels for power measuring the greater is the reliability and safety of reactor operations. The aim of this research is to develop new methodologies for on-line monitoring of nuclear reactor power using other reliable processes. One method uses the temperature difference between an instrumented fuel element and the pool water below the reactor core. Another method consists of the steady-state energy balance of the primary and secondary reactor cooling loops. A further method is the calorimetric procedure whereby a constant reactor power is monitored as a function of the temperature-rise rate and the system heat capacity. Another methodology, which does not employ thermal methods, is based on measurement of Cherenkov radiation produced within and around the core. The first three procedures, fuel temperature, energy balance and calorimetric, were implemented in the IPR-R1 TRIGA nuclear research reactor at Belo Horizonte (Brazil) and are the focus of the work described here. Knowledge of the reactor thermal power is very important for precise neutron flux and fuel element burnup calculations. The burnup is linearly dependent on the reactor thermal power and its accuracy is important in the determination of the mass of burned 235 U, fission products, fuel element activity, decay heat power generation and radiotoxicity. The thermal balance method developed in this project is now the standard methodology used for IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor power calibration and the fuel temperature measuring is the most reliable way of on-line monitoring of the reactor power. This research project primarily aims at increasing the reliability and safety of

  18. Structural design features for commercial fusion power reactor magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Young, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of structural design features for commercial fusion power reactor magnet systems is discussed. Changing concepts in plasma physics and impurity control, new data on radiation damage in materials and developments in the maintainability and repairability of the magnet systems are the driving influences in this evolution. Generic problems in the magnet designs are discussed for several proposed magnetic confinement system configurations, including tokamaks, tandem mirrors, the Elmo Bumpy Torus, and the reversed field theta pinch. These systems are compared on the basis of how efficiently the magnets make use of structural materials. A measure of the effectiveness of a magnet system is found by determining the ratio of net electric power output from the reactor to the stored energy in the magnetic fields produced by the magnet coils in a given system. The stored energy in the magnetic field can then be used to establish a minimum structural volume and mass by use of the virial theorem. Experience with coil types such as solenoids, toroids, Yin-Yang, etc. has established factors by which the minima must be multiplied to yield anticipated volumes and masses of realistic magnet systems. These initial, admittedly approximate, calculations allow designers to estimate early in the process the contribution of the magnet systems to the overall cost of a fusion reactor. As work progresses these estimates can be used to indicate the degree to which the designers is making effective use of the structural material. Basic rules for effective placement of structure, common to all magnet systems, are also discussed in detail. Factors are presented which make it possible to compare structural savings to the cost of researching the parameters involved in the stability of superconductors. (orig.)

  19. Pressurized heavy water reactor fuel behaviour in power ramp conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, S.; Uta, O.; Parvan, M.; Ohai, D.

    2009-01-01

    In order to check and improve the quality of the Romanian CANDU fuel, an assembly of six CANDU fuel rods has been subjected to a power ramping test in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at INR. After testing, the fuel rods have been examined in the hot cells using post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques such as: visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burn-up determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testing. This paper describes the PIE results from one out of the six fuel rods. The PIE results concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the sheath, the fission-products activity distribution in the fuel column, the pressure, volume and composition of the fission gas, the burn-up, the isotopic composition and structural changes of the fuel enabled the characterization of the behaviour of the Romanian CANDU fuel in power ramping conditions performed in the TRIGA materials testing reactor

  20. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study scoping report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-03-01

    This report presents the scoping studies performed as the initial part of the program to produce a conceptual design for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR). The EPR as considered in this study is to employ all systems necessary for significant electric power production at continuous high duty cycle operation; it is presently scheduled to be the final technological step before a Demonstration Reactor Plant (Demo). The scoping study tasks begin with an exploration and identification of principal problem areas and then concentrate on consideration and evaluation of alternate design choices for each of the following major systems: Plasma Engineering and Physics, Nuclear, Electromagnetics, Neutral Beam Injection, and Tritium Handling. In addition, consideration has been given to the integration of these systems and requirements arising out of their incorporation into an EPR. One intent of this study is to document the paths explored in search of the appropriate EPR characteristics. To satisfy this intent, the explorations are presented in chart form outlining possible options in key areas with extensive supporting footnotes. An important result of the scoping study has been the development and definition of an EPR reference design to serve as (1) a common focus for the continuing design study and (2) a guide for associated development programs. In addition, the study has identified research and development requirements essential to facilitate the successful conceptual design, construction, and operation of an EPR.

  1. The optimum design of power distribution for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Chunhui; Wei, Xinyu; Tai, Yun; Zhao, Fuyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A two-level optimization method is developed. ► LP is optimized by backward diffusion calculation theory. ► Pontryagin’s maximum principle is used to investigate the optimum BP arrangement. ► NSGA-II is applied to coordinate the interrelationship between LP and BP. ► The optimized core saves fuel while providing a large power. -- Abstract: The aim of this work is to develop a two-level optimization method for designing the optimum initial fuel loading pattern and burnable poison placement in pressurized water reactors. At the lower level, based on the fuel loading pattern (LP) optimized by backward diffusion calculation theory, Pontryagin’s maximum principle is employed to investigate the optimum arrangement of burnable poison (BP) that can generate the lowest radial power peaking factor (PPF). At the upper level a multi-objective problem (MOP), with LP and BP as two objective functions, is proposed by coordinate the interrelationship of LP and BP, and optimized by non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). The results of optimum designs called ‘Pareto optimum solutions’ are a set of multiple optimum solutions. After sensitivity analysis is performed, the final optimum solution which is chosen based on a typical VVER-1000 reactor reveals that the method could not only save the fuel consumption but also reduce the PPF in comparison to published data.

  2. Power ramp failures in water reactor fuel elements. Experience from power reactors, likely mechanisms and potential remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.; Pickman, D.O.

    1980-01-01

    Power ramp failure experience in PWR, BWR, CANDU, and SGHWR fuel elements is reviewed. The mechanism of failure is described and the proven and potential remedies are listed and the actual or hoped-for benefits explained. Power ramp failures are produced, most probably, by stress corrosion cracking of the Zircaloy fuel sheaths. The stress is produced by thermal expansion of the UO 2 pellet, which stretches the clad and can produce yielding. The stress is highest in arcs of cladding that bridge cracks in the pellet. Iodine vapour, produced by transmutation is the likely corrodant in the stress corrosion failure process. It is probably released by the radiolytic dissociation of CsI and diffuses as interstitial atoms to the UO 2 grain boundaries from which it escapes to attack the clad. Power reactor experience shows that there is a threshold rating, below which failure is unlikely and that power can be safety ramped to above threshold levels providing this is done slowly. Prepressurisation with helium seems to have halved the power ramp failure rate in PWRs whilst the adoption of hollow pellets virtually eliminated power ramp failures in AGR. CANLUB, a pellet clad barrier layer, has reduced the failure rate in CANDU. Other remedies, such as copper barrier layers and fission product retentive pellets are under development

  3. Small nuclear power reactor emergency electric power supply system reliability comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfietti, Gerson

    2003-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the reliability of the emergency power supply system, of a small size nuclear power reactor. Three different configurations are investigated and their reliability analyzed. The fault tree method is used as the main tool of analysis. The work includes a bibliographic review of emergency diesel generator reliability and a discussion of the design requirements applicable to emergency electrical systems. The influence of common cause failure influences is considered using the beta factor model. The operator action is considered using human failure probabilities. A parametric analysis shows the strong dependence between the reactor safety and the loss of offsite electric power supply. It is also shown that common cause failures can be a major contributor to the system reliability. (author)

  4. 10 CFR 50.36a - Technical specifications on effluents from nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Technical specifications on effluents from nuclear power...; Ineligibility of Certain Applicants § 50.36a Technical specifications on effluents from nuclear power reactors..., including expected occurrences, as low as is reasonably achievable, each licensee of a nuclear power reactor...

  5. Review of tokamak power reactor and blanket designs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Gohar, Y.; Smith, D.; Sze, D.

    1986-01-01

    The last major conceptual design study of a tokamak power reactor in the United States was STARFIRE which was carried out in 1979-1980. Since that time US studies have concentrated on engineering test reactors, demonstration reactors, parametric systems studies, scoping studies, and studies of selected critical issues such as pulsed vs. steady-state operation and blanket requirements. During this period, there have been many advancements in tokamak physics and reactor technology, and there has also been a recognition that it is desirable to improve the tokamak concept as a commercial power reactor candidate. During 1984-1985 several organizations participated in the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS) with the objective of developing ideas for improving the tokamak as a power reactor. Also, the US completed a comprehensive Blanket Comparison and Selection Study which formed the basis for further studies on improved blankets for fusion reactors

  6. A preliminary investigation of the Topaz II reactor as a lunar surface power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polansky, G.F.; Houts, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    Reactor power supplies offer many attractive characteristics for lunar surface applications. The Topaz II reactor resulted from an extensive development program in the former Soviet Union. Flight quality reactor units remain from this program and are currently under evaluation in the United States. This paper examines the potential for applying the Topaz II, originally developed to provide spacecraft power, as a lunar surface power supply

  7. A preliminary investigation of the Topaz II reactor as a lunar surface power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polansky, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Houts, M.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Reactor power supplies offer many attractive characteristics for lunar surface applications. The Topaz II reactor resulted from an extensive development program in the former Soviet Union. Flight quality reactor units remain from this program and are currently under evaluation in the United States. This paper examines the potential for applying the Topaz II, originally developed to provide spacecraft power, as a lunar surface power supply.

  8. New applications of neutron noise theory in power reactor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzhanov, Vasiliy

    2000-04-01

    The present thesis deals with neutron noise theory as applied to three comparatively different topics (or problems) in power reactor physics. Namely they are: theoretical investigation of the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the localisation of anomalies; both definition and studies on the point kinetic and adiabatic approximations for the relatively recently proposed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); development of the general theory of linear reactor kinetics and neutron noise in systems with varying size. One important practical problem is to detect and localise a vibrating control rod pin. The significance comes from the operational experience which indicates that individual pins can execute excessive mechanical vibrations that may lead to damage. Such mechanical vibrations induce neutron noise that can be detected. While the detection is relatively easy, the localisation of a vibrating control rod is much more complicated because only one measuring position is available and one needs to have at least three measured quantities. Therefore it has currently been proposed that the fluctuations of the neutron current vector, called the current noise, can be used in addition to the scalar noise in reactor diagnostic problems. The thesis investigates the possibility of the localization of a vibrating control rod pin in a PWR control assembly by using the scalar neutron noise and the 2-D radial current noise as measured at one central point in the control assembly. An explicit localisation technique is elaborated in which the searched position is determined as the absolute minimum of a minimisation function. The technique is investigated in numerical simulations. The results of the simulation tests show the potential applicability of the method. By design accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and

  9. A comparative analysis of the domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, J. C.; Youn, Y. K.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART), a small to medium sized integral type Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been developed in Korea. Now, SMART-P, a 1/5 scaled-down of the SMART, is being developed for the purpose of demonstrating the safety and performance of SMART design. The SMART-P is a first-of-a-kind reactor which is utilized for the research and development of a power reactor. Since the licensing process of such a reactor is not clearly specified in the current Atomic Energy Act, a comparative survey and analysis of domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors has been carried out to develop the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of such a reactor. The domestic and foreign licensing processes of power and non-power reactors have been surveyed and compared, including those of the U.S.A., Japan, France, U.K., Canada, and IAEA. The general trends in nuclear reactor classification, licensing procedures, regulatory technical requirements, and other licensing requirements and regulations have been investigated. The results of this study will be used as the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of reactors at development stage such as SMART-P

  10. 10 CFR 50.60 - Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for lightwater nuclear power reactors for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... lightwater nuclear power reactors for normal operation. 50.60 Section 50.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... lightwater nuclear power reactors for normal operation. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all light-water nuclear power reactors, other than reactor facilities for which the...

  11. Remerschen nuclear power station with BBR pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of many decades of successful cooperation in the electricity supply sector with the German RWE utility, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg and RWE jointly founded Societe Luxembourgeoise d'Energie Nucleaire S.A. (SENU) in 1974 in which each of the partners holds a fifty percent interest. SENU is responsible for planning, building and operating this nuclear power station. Following an international invitation for bids on the delivery and turnkey construction of a nuclear power station, the consortium of the German companies of Brown, Boveri and Cie. AG (BBC), Babcock - Brown Boveri Reaktor GmbH (BBR) and Hochtief AG (HT) received a letter of intent for the purchase of a 1,300 MW nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The 1,300 MW station of Remerschen will be largely identical with the Muelheim-Kaerlich plant under construction by the same consortium near Coblence on the River Rhine since early 1975. According to present scheduling, the Remerschen nuclear power station could start operation in 1981. (orig.) [de

  12. CANDU fuel - fifteen years of power reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjoy, G.R.; Bain, A.S.

    1977-05-01

    Analyses of performance statistics, supplemented by examinations of fuel from power reactors and experimental loops have yielded: (a) a thorough understanding of the fundamental behaviour of CANDU fuel; (b) data showing that the predicted high utilization of uranium has been achieved; (c) criteria for operation, which have led to the current very low defect rate of 0.03% of all assemblies and to 'CANLUB' fuel, which has a graphite interlayer between the fuel and sheath to reduce defects on power increases; (d) proof that the short length (500 mm), collapsible cladding features of the CANDU bundle are successful and that the fuel can operate at high-power output (current peak outer-element linear power is 58 +- 15% kW/m). As of mid-1976 over 3 x 10 6 individual elements have been built and over 2 x 10 6 elements have been irradiated. Only six defects have been attributed to faulty materials or fabrication, and the use of high-density UO 2 with low-moisture content precluded defects from hydrogen contamination and densification

  13. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  14. Questions to the reactors power upgrade of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas M, B.

    2014-08-01

    The two reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) were subjected to power upgrade labors with the purpose of achieving 20% upgrade on the original power; these labors concluded in August 24, 2010 for the Reactor 1 and in January 16, 2011 for the Reactor 2, however in January of 2014, the NNP-L V has not received by part of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) the new Operation License to be able to work with the new power, because it does not fulfill all the necessary requirements of safety. In this work is presented and analyzed the information obtained in this respect, with data provided by the Instituto Federal de Acceso a la Informacion Publica y Proteccion de Datos (IFAI) and the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) in Mexico, as well as the opinion of some workers of the NPP-L V. The Governing Board of the CFE announcement that will give special continuation to the behavior on the operation and reliability of the NPP-L V, because the frequency of not announced interruptions was increased 7 times more in the last three years. (Author)

  15. Calculations on heavy-water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo V, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    One of the codes that the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) has for the nuclear reactors design calculations is the LEOPARD code. This work studies the reliability of this code in reactors design calculations which component materials are the same of the heavy water moderated and cooled, natural uranium fuelled power reactors. (author)

  16. Analysis of Opportunity to Create Self-Regulating Reactor Facility of Extra-Low Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansky, Y.A.; Levtchenko, V.A.; Yuriev, Y.S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with fundamental possibilities (economy, safety, self-regulation) of creating an extra-low power reactor facility for heat supply. It contains the results of calculations for thermal and fast neutron reactors. The concept of this type of a reactor had been developed by the contributors earlier

  17. Improvement of system code importing evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis of tokamak fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobori, Hikaru [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hiwatari, Ryoji [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We incorporated the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code. • We calculated CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. • We found that the objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. • The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. • The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant. - Abstract: This study incorporate the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code to calculate CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. Competitiveness of tokamak fusion power reactors is expected to be evaluated by the cost and environmental impact represented by the CO{sub 2} emissions, compared with present and future power generating systems such as fossil, nuclear and renewables. Result indicated that (1) The objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. (2) The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. (3) The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant.

  18. Improvement of system code importing evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis of tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobori, Hikaru; Kasada, Ryuta; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Konishi, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We incorporated the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code. • We calculated CO 2 emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. • We found that the objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. • The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO 2 emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. • The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant. - Abstract: This study incorporate the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code to calculate CO 2 emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. Competitiveness of tokamak fusion power reactors is expected to be evaluated by the cost and environmental impact represented by the CO 2 emissions, compared with present and future power generating systems such as fossil, nuclear and renewables. Result indicated that (1) The objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. (2) The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO 2 emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. (3) The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant.

  19. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive ''box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs

  20. Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honekamp, John R.; Fryer, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

  1. High Local Power Densities Permissible at Siemens Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnel, Klaus; Richter, Klaus-Deiter; Drescher, Gerhard; Endrizzi, Ivo

    2002-01-01

    Operating nuclear fuel to higher discharge burnups reduces not only fuel cycle costs but also the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), high local power densities are a prerequisite for achieving a high batch burnup.The range of maximum power densities that can be exploited for in-core fuel management and operational flexibility is restricted by the limiting conditions for operation obtained from analyses of anticipated operational occurrences and hypothetical accidents.Since utilities mainly use available margins for implementing advanced in-core fuel management strategies or for power uprating, a suitable parameter for making a rough comparison of the present thermal-hydraulic design status of different PWRs is the maximum local heat flux achieved during actual cycles under steady-state full-power conditions. A comparison between Siemens PWRs and the PWR designs of other vendors shows that the maximum local power densities during steady-state operation are usually higher in Siemens PWRs.The main reasons why higher power densities are permissible can usually be attributed to different core surveillance concepts (instrumentation and control) in conjunction with different control assembly management schemes. Moreover, two representative studies conducted with a new methodology using the three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupled code PANBOX for core transient analysis present additional margins. Especially in plants using the Siemens core surveillance concept, the new methodology yields significant additional margins for PWRs to be operated with even higher permissible local power densities.The additional departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) margin gained in the representative studies was 0.38. However, utilization of this additional margin is accompanied by larger void fractions within the upper section of the hot channel during normal operation. Therefore, increasing steady-state maximum power

  2. Low-power lead-cooled fast reactor for education purposes

    OpenAIRE

    D.S. Samokhin; G.L. Khorasanov; I.V. Tormyshev; E.A. Zemskov; A.L. Gostev; A.M. Terekhova; S.A. Kuzmichyov

    2015-01-01

    The possibility is examined to develop fast reactor for the purpose of implementation of research, education of undergraduate and doctoral students in handling innovative fast reactors and training specialists for atomic research centers and nuclear power plants. Main characteristics of liquid lead-cooled reactor using commercially implemented uranium dioxide with 19.7% enrichment with 235U isotope as the fuel load are examined. Hard neutron spectrum achieved in the fast reactor with compact ...

  3. Status and trends in plutonium recycling in nuclear power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoufriev, Vladimir

    2000-07-01

    Already during the well-known IAEA International Fuel Cycle Evaluation Study of 1976-80,[1] the different aspects of plutonium utilization in the form of MOX fuel were discussed and followed up in the many international meetings during the last two decades. An International Symposium on MOX Fuel Cycle Technologies for Medium and Long Term Deployment, organized by the IAEA in co-operation with OECD/NEA and held in Vienna in May 1999, was a milestone which reviewed the past, present and future of Pu recycling in nuclear power reactors.[2] This paper presents major results of the Symposium in the context of present conditions of deregulated electricity market and in the future and its role in the reduction of stockpiles of separated civil and surplus ex-weapons plutonium.

  4. Thermoelectric converter for SP-100 space reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrill, W.R.; Haley, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Conductively coupling the thermoelectric converter to the heat source and the radiator maximizes the utilization of the reactor and radiator temperatures and thereby minimizes the power system weight. This paper presents the design for the converter and the individual thermoelectric cells that are the building block modules for the converter. It also summarizes progress on the fabrication of initial cells and the results obtained from the preparation of a manufacturing plan. The design developed for the SP-100 system utilizes thermally conductive compliant pads that can absorb the displacement and distortion caused by the combinations of temperatures and thermal expansion coefficients. The converter and cell designs provided a 100 kWe system which met the system requirements. Initial cells were fabricated and tested. The manufacturing plan showed that the chosen materials and processes are compatible with today's production techniques, that the production volume can readily be achieved and that the costs are reasonable

  5. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  6. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, this standard will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  7. Superconducting coil design for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Smelser, P.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting toroidal field (TF) and polodial-field (PF) coils have been designed for the proposed Argonne National Laboratory experimental power reactor (EPR). Features of the design include: (1) Peak field of 8 T at 4.2 K or 10 T at 3.0 K. (2) Constant-tension shape for the TF coils, corrected for the finite number (16) of coils. (3) Analysis of errors in coil alignment. (4) Comparison of safety aspects of series-connected and parallel-connected coils. (5) A 60 kA sheet conductor of NbTi with copper stabilizer and stainless steel for support. (6) Superconducting PF coils outside the TF coils. (7) The TF coils shielded from pulsed fields by high-purity aluminum

  8. Evolution of the Fusion Power Demonstration tandem mirror reactor configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.; Lousteau, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper gives a presentation of the evolution of configurations proposed for tandem mirror Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) machines. The FPD study was undertaken to scope the mission as well as the technical and design requirements of the next tandem mirror device. Three configurations, entitled FPD I, II, and III were studied. During this process new systems were conceived and integrated into the design, resulting in a significantly changed overall machine configuration. The machine can be divided into two areas. A new center cell configuration, minimizing magnetic field ripple and thus maximizing center cell fusion power, features a semicontinuous solenoid. A new end cell has evolved which maintains the required thermal barrier in a significantly reduced axial length. The reduced end cell effective length leads to a shorter central cell length being required to obtain minimum ignition conditions. Introduced is the concept of an electron mantle stabilized octopole arrangement. The engineering features of the new end cell and maintenance concepts developed are influenced to a great extent by the octopole-based design. The new ideas introduced during the FPD study have brought forth a new perspective of the size, design, and maintenance of tandem mirror reactors, making them more attractive as commercial power sources

  9. Nuclear power reactor analysis, methods, algorithms and computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V

    1981-01-01

    Full text: For a developing country buying its first nuclear power plants from a foreign supplier, disregarding the type and scope of the contract, there is a certain number of activities which have to be performed by local stuff and domestic organizations. This particularly applies to the choice of the nuclear fuel cycle strategy and the choice of the type and size of the reactors, to bid parameters specification, bid evaluation and final safety analysis report evaluation, as well as to in-core fuel management activities. In the Nuclear Engineering Department of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences (NET IBK) the continual work is going on, related to the following topics: cross section and resonance integral calculations, spectrum calculations, generation of group constants, lattice and cell problems, criticality and global power distribution search, fuel burnup analysis, in-core fuel management procedures, cost analysis and power plant economics, safety and accident analysis, shielding problems and environmental impact studies, etc. The present paper gives the details of the methods developed and the results achieved, with the particular emphasis on the NET IBK computer program package for the needs of planning, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. The main problems encountered so far were related to small working team, lack of large and powerful computers, absence of reliable basic nuclear data and shortage of experimental and empirical results for testing theoretical models. Some of these difficulties have been overcome thanks to bilateral and multilateral cooperation with developed countries, mostly through IAEA. It is the authors opinion, however, that mutual cooperation of developing countries, having similar problems and similar goals, could lead to significant results. Some activities of this kind are suggested and discussed. (author)

  10. Irradiation Tests Supporting LEU Conversion of Very High Power Research Reactors in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Cole, J. I.; Glagolenko, I.; Holdaway, K. K.; Housley, G. K.; Rabin, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    The US fuel development team is developing a high density uranium-molybdenum alloy monolithic fuel to enable conversion of five high-power research reactors. Previous irradiation tests have demonstrated promising behavior for this fuel design. A series of future irradiation tests will enable selection of final fuel fabrication process and provide data to qualify the fuel at moderately-high power conditions for use in three of these five reactors. The remaining two reactors, namely the Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor, require additional irradiation tests to develop and demonstrate the fuel’s performance with even higher power conditions, complex design features, and other unique conditions. This paper reviews the program’s current irradiation testing plans for these moderately-high irradiation conditions and presents conceptual testing strategies to illustrate how subsequent irradiation tests will build upon this initial data package to enable conversion of these two very-high power research reactors.

  11. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  12. Identification of reactor failure states using noise methods, and spatial power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrin, J.; Blazek, J.

    1981-01-01

    A survey is given of the results achieved. Methodical means and programs were developed for the control computer which may be used in noise diagnostics and in the control of reactor power distribution. Statistical methods of processing the noise components of the signals of measured variables were used for identifying failures of reactors. The method of the synthesis of the neutron flux was used for modelling and evaluating the reactor power distribution. For monitoring and controlling the power distribution a mathematical model of the reactor was constructed suitable for control computers. The uses of noise analysis methods are recommended and directions of further development shown. (J.P.)

  13. The inherently-safe power reactor DYONISOS (Dynamic Nuclear Inherently-Safe Reactor Operating with Spheres)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, M.; Lanfranchi, M.; Weissenfluh, Th. von; Ligou, J.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Taube, P.

    1986-01-01

    A philosophy of inherent safety is formulated and an inherently-safe thermal power reactor is presented. Solid fuel in the form of spheres a few centimetres in diameter is suspended under the hydro-dynamic pressure of molten lead coolant in vertical channels within the graphite moderator. Loss of main pump pressure, or a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), results in immediate removal of the fuel to rigid sieves below the core, with consequent subcriticality. Residual and decay heat are carried away by thermal conduction through the coolant or, in the case of a LOCA, by a combination of radiation and natural convection of cover gas or incoming air from the fuel to the reactor vessel and convection of air between the vessel and steel containment wall. All decay heat removal systems are passive, though actively initiated external spray cooling of the containment can be used to reduce wall temperature. This, however, is only necessary in the case of a LOCA and after a period of 24 h. (author)

  14. Alteration in reactor installation (reactor facilities) of the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report of the Nuclear Safety Commission to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry concerning the alteration in reactor facilities in the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Stations, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., was presented; its technical capability and the safety of the alteration were confirmed. The items which the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety has examined for alteration safety are as follows: reactor core design including shutdown margin and mechanical design (involving subcriticality, mechanical strength, etc.), solid waste treatment system (plastic solidification), laundry waste liquid system (dry cleaning), the analysis of abnormal transient change in reactor operation (returning to normal operation without damaging the reactor core), the analysis of various accidents. (Mori, K.)

  15. 76 FR 74630 - Making Changes to Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 50 and 52 RIN 3150-AI10 [NRC-2008-0122] Making Changes to Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... guide (RG) 1.219, ``Guidance on Making Changes to Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors.'' This...

  16. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  17. Use of Russian technology of ship reactors with lead-bismuth coolant in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Chitaykin, V.I.; Gromov, B.F.; Grigoryv, O.G.; Dedoul, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The experience of using lead-bismuth coolant in Russian nuclear submarine reactors has been presented. The fundamental statements of the concept of using the reactors cooled by lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear power have been substantiated. The results of developments for using lead bismuth coolant in nuclear power have been presented. (author)

  18. Response of pressurized water reactor (PWR) to network power generation demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The flexibility of the PWR type reactor in terms of response to the variations of the network power demands, is demonstrated. The factors that affect the transitory flexibility and some design prospects that allow the reactor fits the requirements of the network power demands, are also discussed. (M.J.A.)

  19. 78 FR 73898 - Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    [email protected] . Both of the Office of New Reactors; or Timothy Kolb, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U...: timothy.kolb@nrc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Accessing Information and Submitting Comments A...

  20. A design study of high electric power for fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to achieve high electric power by a fast reactor with supercritical light water, the design study was carried out on a large fast reactor core with high coolant outlet temperature (SCFR-H). Since the reactor coolant circuit uses once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure, it is possible to design much simpler and more compact reactor systems and to achieve higher thermal efficiency than those of current light water reactors. The once-through direct cycle system is employed in current fossil-fired power plants. In the present study, three types of core were designed. The first is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by ascending flow, the second is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by descending flow and the third is SCFR-H with high thermal power. Every core was designed to achieve the thermal efficiency over 43%, positive coolant density reactivity coefficient and electric power over 1600 MW. Core characteristics of SCFR-Hs were compared with those of SCLWR-H (electric power: 1212 MW), which is a thermal neutron spectrum reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water, with the same diameter of the reactor pressure vessel. It was shown that SCFR-H could increase the electric power about 1.7 times maximally. From the standpoint of the increase of a reactor thermal power, a fast reactor has advantages as compared with a thermal neutron reactor, because it can increase the power density by adopting tight fuel lattices and eliminating the moderator region. Thus, it was concluded that a reactor cooled by supercritical light water could further improve the cost competitiveness by using a fast neutron spectrum and achieving a higher thermal power. (author)

  1. Fission power: a search for a ''second-generation'' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report touches on the history of US fission reactors and explores the current technical status of such reactors around the world, including experimental reactors. Its purpose is to identify, evaluate, and rank the most promising concepts among existing reactors, proposed but unadopted designs, and what can be described as ''new'' concepts. Also discussed are such related concerns as utility requirements and design considerations. The report concludes with some recommendations for possible future LLNL involvement

  2. Estimation of a Reactor Core Power Peaking Factor Using Support Vector Regression and Uncertainty Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, In Ho; Naa, Man Gyun; Lee, Yoon Joon; Park, Goon Cherl

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring of detailed 3-dimensional (3D) reactor core power distribution is a prerequisite in the operation of nuclear power reactors to ensure that various safety limits imposed on the LPD and DNBR, are not violated during nuclear power reactor operation. The LPD and DNBR should be calculated in order to perform the two major functions of the core protection calculator system (CPCS) and the core operation limit supervisory system (COLSS). The LPD at the hottest part of a hot fuel rod, which is related to the power peaking factor (PPF, F q ), is more important than the LPD at any other position in a reactor core. The LPD needs to be estimated accurately to prevent nuclear fuel rods from melting. In this study, support vector regression (SVR) and uncertainty analysis have been applied to estimation of reactor core power peaking factor

  3. Simulation of fuel rods vibration in power reactors by vibration of tape coated with cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, L.

    1982-01-01

    The circulation of cooling water in light water power reactor makes a vibration in internal components. The monitoring of those vibrations is necessary aiming to the safety use of reactors. Aiming at study those vibrations a neutron absorber, type vibratory tape was introduced in the core of a research reactor type Pulstar, operating at 80 W of power. The induced power variations were measured with an ionization chamber put besides the reactor core. The detector signal was recorded and analysed in a PDP-11 computer. The analysis of the results show that the power density of the detector signal, and thus, the power reactor, increase in the O-25 Hz range with an increase in the pulse height vibration. (E.G.) [pt

  4. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 years. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min., with an approximate 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2-cm thick stainless steel, and has 2-cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. An 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H 2 O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal-field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic-heating and equilibrium-field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam-injectors, which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-converters

  5. Job analysis of nuclear power reactor health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.T.; Mazour, T.J.; Clark, P.V.; Todd, R.C.; Marotta, F.J.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes a project, an industry-wide Job Analysis of Nuclear Power Reactor Health Physics Technicians (HPTs), conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Analysis and Technology, Inc. to provide the industry with job-performance data that can be used in systematically defining training programs in terms of required job functions responsibilities, and performance standards. The job-analysis methodology is consistent with that used by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in similar industry-wide projects and includes administration of over 850 job task questionnaires to utility and contractor Health Physics Technicians throughout the country. Data collected includes task performance (difficulty, importance, and frequency) and industry-wide demographics (job levels, experience, education, and training). The results of this project discussed herein include model job descriptions for HPT positions, summaries of HPT experience, education, and training, industry-wide task listings with task-performance characteristics, and recommendations of selected tasks as a basis for HPT training development. Finally, potential future applications of the data base by utility and contractor organizations in training program development and evaluation and personnel qualifications are discussed

  6. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Aksan, N.; Andersen, J.; Yan, J.; Simoneau, J.P.; Leung, L.; Bertrand, F.; Aoto, K.; Kamide, H.

    2013-01-01

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs

  7. Power spectral density measurements with 252Cf for a light water moderated research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A method of determining the reactivity of far subcritical systems from neutron noise power spectral density measurements with 252 Cf has previously been tested in fast reactor critical assemblies: a mockup of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor and a uranium metal sphere. Calculations indicated that this measurement was feasible for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to evaluate the ability to perform these measurements with moderated reactors which have long prompt neutron lifetimes, measurements were performed with a small plate-type research reactor whose neutron lifetime (57 microseconds) was about a factor of three longer than that of a PWR and approx. 50% longer than that of a boiling water reactor. The results of the first measurements of power spectral densities with 252 Cf for a water moderated reactor are presented

  8. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, J.A.

    2002-04-17

    Burnable poisons are used in all modern nuclear reactors to permit higher loading of fuel without the necessity of an overly large control rod system. This not only permits a longer core life but can also be used to level the power distribution. Commercial nuclear reactors commonly use B{sub 4}C in separate non-fueled rods and more recently, zirconium boride coatings on the fuel pellets or gadolinium oxide mixed with the fuel. Although the advantages are great, there are problems with using these materials. Boron, which is an effective neutron absorber, transmutes to lithium and helium upon absorption of a neutron. Helium is insoluble and is eventually released to the interior of the fuel rod, where it produces an internal pressure. When sufficiently high, this pressure stress could cause separation of the cladding from the fuel, causing overly high centerline temperatures. Gadolinium has several very strongly absorbing isotopes, but not all have large cross sections and result in residual burnable poison reactivity worth at the end of the fuel life. Even if the amount of this residual absorber is small and the penalty in operation small, the cost of this penalty, even if only several days, can be very high. The objective of this investigation was to study the performance of single isotopes in order to reduce the residual negative reactivity left over at the end of the fuel cycle. Since the behavior of burnable poisons can be strongly influenced by their configuration, four forms for the absorbers were studied: homogeneously mixed with the fuel, mixed with only the outer one-third of the fuel pellet, coated on the perimeter of the fuel pellets, and alloyed with the cladding. In addition, the numbers of fuel rods containing burnable poison were chosen as 8, 16, 64, and 104. Other configurations were chosen for a few special cases. An enrichment of 4.5 wt% {sup 235}U was chosen for most cases for study in order to achieve a 4-year fuel cycle. A standard pressurized

  9. Study of power peak migration due to insertion of control bars in a PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Costa, Danilo Leite; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Lava, Deise Diana; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present a study on the power distribution behavior in a PWR reactor, considering the intensity and the migration of power peaks as is the insertion of control rods in the core banks. For this, the study of the diffusion of neutrons in the reactor was adopted by computer simulation that uses the finite difference method for numerically solving the neutron diffusion equation to two energy groups in steady state and in symmetry of a fourth quarter core. We decided to add the EPRI-9R 3D benchmark thermal-hydraulic parameters of a typical power PWR. With a new configuration for the reactor, the positions of the control rods banks were also modified. Due to the new positioning of these banks in the reactor, there was intense power gradients, favoring the occurrence of critical situations and logically unconventional for operation of a nuclear reactor. However, these facts have led interesting times for the study on the power distribution behavior in the reactor, showing axial migration of power peaks and mainly the effect of the geometry of the core on the latter. Based on the distribution of power was evident the increase of the power in elements located in the central region of the reactor core and, concomitantly, the reduction in elements of its periphery. Of course, the behavior exhibited by the simulated reactor is not in agreement with that expected in an actual reactor, where the insertion of control rods banks should lead to reduced power throughout the core as evenly as possible, avoiding sharp power peaks, standardizing the burning fuel, controlling reactivity deviations and acting in reactor shutdown

  10. Nuclear reactor capable of electric power generation during in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shinsuke; Nogami, Hitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear power plant according to the present invention can generate electric power even in a period when one of a pair of reactors is put to in-service inspection. That is, the nuclear power plant of the present invention comprises a system constitution of two nuclear reactors each of 50% thermal power and one turbine power generator of 100% electric power. Further, facilities of various systems relevant to the two reactors each of 50% thermal power, as a pair, are used in common as much as possible in order to reduce the cost for construction and maintenance/ inspection. Further, a reactor building and a turbine building disposed in adjacent with each for paired two reactors each of 50% thermal power are arranged vertically. This arrangement can facilitate the common use of the facilities for various systems and equipments to attain branching and joining of fluids in reactor feed water systems and main steam system pipelines easily with low pressure loss and low impact shocks. The facility utilization factor of such reactors is remarkably improved by doubling the period of continuous power generation. As a result, economic property is remarkably improved. (I.S.)

  11. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1986: A second stability power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.; Baker, C.; Billone, M.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the results of the work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during FY-1986 on the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS). The purpose of the TPSS is to explore and develop ideas that would lead to improvements in the tokamak as a power reactor concept. The work at ANL concentrated on plasma engineering, impurity control, and the blanket/first wall/shield system. The work in FY-1986 extended these studies and focused them on a reference design point. The key features of the design point include: second stability regime with higher β and larger aspect ratio, steady-state operation with fast wave current drive, impurity control via a self-pumped slot limiter, a self-cooled liquid lithium, vanadium alloy blanket with simplified poloidal flow, and reduced reactor building volume with vertical lift maintenance. Sufficient work was carried out to report a preliminary cost estimate. In addition, reactor implications of steady-state operation in the first stability regime were also studied. 174 refs., 124 figs., 65 tabs

  12. Characterization of noise sources in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andhill, Gustav

    2004-03-01

    Algorithms for unfolding noise sources in nuclear power reactors are investigated. No preliminary knowledge of the functional form of the space dependence is assumed in contrast to the usual methods. The advantage of this is that the algorithms can be applied to various noise sources and the results can be interpreted without expert knowledge. The results can therefore be directly displayed to the plant operators. The precision will however be lower than that of the traditional methods because of the arbitrariness in the type of the noise source. Two different reactor models are studied. First a simple one-dimensional and homogeneous core is considered. Three methods for finding the noise source from the measured flux noise are investigated here. The first one is based on the inversion of an appropriate pre-calculated noise source-to-measured induced neutron noise transfer function. The second one relies on the use of the measured neutron noise as the solution of the equations giving the neutron noise induced by a given noise source. The advantage of this second method is that the noise source can be determined directly, i.e., without any Inversion of a transfer function. The second method is thus called the direct method. The last method is based on a reconstruction of the noise source by spatial Fourier expansion. The two latter techniques are found usable for different locations of the actual noise source in the 1D core. They are therefore tried on more sophisticated two-dimensional models of cores. The direct method is able both to determine the nature of the noise source and its location in 2D

  13. Characteristics of the combined operation of thermal and fast power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litkin, V.B.; Kagramanyahn, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal reactors have several deficiencies, in particular, their low efficiency in the use of national uranium resources. The advantages of joint use of thermal and fast reactors in a nuclear power system are indicated. Current fast reactors assessments however, show higher specific capital costs than for thermal reactors. To determine the combination of both types for which the economic effect is a maximum, optimization calculations are necessary including optimization of reactor characteristics. Some of the problems involved are examined. Analysis of the results shows that in the period of mass introduction of fast reactors, thermal reactors of high plutonium production are required in the early stages and that the significance of expenditure on the initial fuel inventory in the cycle increases sharply in comparison with that for established fast reactors. (U.K.)

  14. Design features of Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae-Jung; Park, Jun-Soo; Kim, Moo-Yong

    2004-01-01

    Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) which is to achieve the improvement of the safety and economical efficiency has been developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) with the support from industries and research institutes. The steam generator for APR 1400 is an evolutionary type from System 80 + , which is the recirculating U-tube heat exchanger with integral economizer. Compared to the System 80 + steam generator, it is focused on the improved design features, operating and design conditions of APR 1400 steam generator. Especially, from the operation experience of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) steam generator, the lessons-learned measures are incorporated to prevent the tube wear caused by flow-induced vibration (FIV). The concepts for the preventive design features against FIV are categorized to two fields; flow distribution and dynamic response characteristics. From the standpoint of flow distribution characteristics, the egg-crate flow distribution plate (EFDP) is installed to prevent the local excessive flow loaded on the most susceptible tube to wear. The parametric study is performed to select the optimum design with the efficient mitigation of local excessive flow. ATHOS3 Mod-01 is used and partly modified to analyze the flow field of the APR 1400 steam generator. In addition, the upper tube bundle support is designed to eliminate the presence of tube with a low natural frequency. Based on the improved upper tube bundle support, the modal analysis is performed and compared with that of System 80 + . Using the results of flow distribution and modal analysis, the two mechanisms of flow-induced vibration are investigated; fluid-elastic instability (FEI) and random turbulence excitation (RTE). (authors)

  15. State-Space Model Predictive Control Method for Core Power Control in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Stations

    OpenAIRE

    Guoxu Wang; Jie Wu; Bifan Zeng; Zhibin Xu; Wanqiang Wu; Xiaoqian Ma

    2017-01-01

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reacto...

  16. Considerations in the design of a high power medical isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Russell M.; Nordyke, William H.; Brown, Roy

    2002-01-01

    For the low enriched aqueous homogeneous reactor to be economic in the production of medical isotopes, such as Mo-99 and Sr-89, the power level should be of the order of 100 kWth. This is double the earlier designs and this paper discusses the design changes which must be considered to meet this goal. The topics considered are: 1. Heat removal from the reactor solution; 2. Recombination of radiolytic gases; 3. Adequate radiation shielding; 4. Stability of reactor power with fluctuating reactivity; 5. Adequate cooling of the reflector; 6. Independent shutdown mechanisms; 7. Required volume of the reactor; 8. Economic implementation. (author)

  17. Device for the nuclear reactor automatic start-up and power control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, B.N.; Volkov, A.V.; Ogon'kov, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    A description and flowsheet of a reactor start-up and power-control automatic device containing no nonlinear elements with a relay characteristic are presented. The device consists of two independent channels for measuring the physical power and time (period) constant of the reactor. Requirements for the device are considered, based on the condition of a minimum permissible number of a servomechanism operations due to fluctuations of an input signal which appear because of the statistical nature of processes taking place in the reactor. It is noted that the threshold amplifier used in the device allows a considerable decrease of the reactor start-up time

  18. Power maximization of a spheric reflected reactor with optimized fuel distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reade, Joamar Rodrigues Vincent

    1979-01-01

    The maximum power of a spheric reflected reactor was determined using the theory of optimal control. The control variable employed was the fuel distribution, in accordance to constraints on the power density and on the concentration fuel. It was considered a thermal reactor with a fixed radius. The reactor was fuelled with U-235 and moderated with light water. The nuclear reactor was described by a diffusion theory model. The analytical solution was obtained for both two and four groups of energy and a FORTRAN program was developed to obtain the numerical results. (author)

  19. Selected power reactor projects in Canada and the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    As part of its activities in connection with the development of nuclear power, the IAEA has undertaken a continuing study of the technology and economics of power reactors, with particular reference to the needs of the developing countries. Information on the progress made in eight power reactor projects, namely those of Bonus, Pathfinder, Elk River, Piqua, Hallam, Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor (EGCR), High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGCR) and Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD), is presented in this report. Developments during the past year are shown, emphasis being placed on operating experience in the case of those reactors which have become critical. The Agency is grateful to the Governments of Canada and the USA, who have extended the necessary facilities for covering he different power reactor projects in their respective countries. The cooperation received from the reactor manufacturers, builders and operators is also gratefully acknowledged. It is hoped that this report will be of interest to reactor technologists and operators and those interested in the application of nuclear power

  20. Use of self powered neutron detectors in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galo Rocha, F. del.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of self-powered neutron detectors, SPND, which are used as part of the in-core instrumentation of nuclear reactors is presented. Measurements with Co and Er SPND's were made in the IEA-R1 reactor for determining the neutron flux distribution and the integral reactor power. Due to the size of the available detectors, the neutron flux distribution could not be obtained with accuracy. The results obtained in the reactor power measurements demonstrate that the SPND have the linearity and the quick response necessary for a reactor power channel. This work also presents a proposed design of a SPND using Pt as wire emissor. This proposed design is based in the experience gained in building two prototypes. The greatest difficulties encountered include materials and technology to perform the delicate weldings. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional Core Design of a Super Fast Reactor with a High Power Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Liangzhi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ju, Haitao

    2010-01-01

    The SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) pursues high power density to reduce its capital cost. The fast spectrum SCWR, called a super fast reactor, can be designed with a higher power density than thermal spectrum SCWR. The mechanism of increasing the average power density of the super fast reactor is studied theoretically and numerically. Some key parameters affecting the average power density, including fuel pin outer diameter, fuel pitch, power peaking factor, and the fraction of seed assemblies, are analyzed and optimized to achieve a more compact core. Based on those sensitivity analyses, a compact super fast reactor is successfully designed with an average power density of 294.8 W/cm 3 . The core characteristics are analyzed by using three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupling method. Numerical results show that all of the design criteria and goals are satisfied

  2. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Associate Directorate for Advanced Reactors and License Renewal

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC`s ``Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants`` (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC`s preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant`s research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified.

  3. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  4. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekly, Z.J.J.; Lucas, E.J.

    1976-12-01

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  5. Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Commission of the European Community (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided in 1989 to update the state of the art concerning hydrogen in water cooled nuclear power reactors by commissioning a report which would review, all the available information to-date and make recommendations for the future. This joint report was prepared by committees formed by the IAEA and by the CEC. The aim of this report is to review the current understanding on the areas in which the research on hydrogen in LWR is conventionally presented, taking into account the results of the latest reported research developments. The main reactions through which hydrogen is produced are assessed together with their timings. An estimation of the amount of hydrogen produced by each reaction is given, in order to reckon their relative contribution to the hazard. An overview is then given of the state of knowledge of the most important phenomena taking place during its transport from the place of production and the phenomena which control the hydrogen combustion and the consequences of combustion under various conditions. Specific research work is recommended in each sector of the presented phenomena. The last topics reviewed in this report are the hydrogen detection and the prevent/mitigation of pressure and temperature loads on containment structures and structures and safety related equipment caused by hydrogen combustion

  6. Diagnostics of control element drives of WWER-440 power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, J.

    1986-01-01

    The process is described of the regulating assembly drop in the accident protection mode of a WWER-440 reactor. The assembly electric motor is disconnected from the power supply and is started as a generator to speed proportional to that of the assembly drop. The assembly drop speed is steadied at a constant value depending on the adjustment of the centrifugal brake of the equipment drive. The electric motor in the function of a generator is connected to an oscillograph recording the voltage signal during the assembly fall. The diagram obtained allows evaluating the quality of the regulator and the overall condition of the drive mechanism. The regulating assembly position is detected using a magnetic position sensor connected to the oscillograph. A new measuring system was designed for the diagnostics of drives featuring a position sensor connected to an electronic counter calculating the average drop speed from the measured drop time and the respective distance. The permissible steady-state speed of the regulating assembly drop is determined within the range 240 and 250 mm/s. (J.B.)

  7. Reactor building design of nuclear power plant ATUCHA II, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufino, R.E.; Hermann, E.R.; Richter, E.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented the civil engineering project carried out by the joint venture Hochtief - Techint-Bignoli (HTB) for the reactor building at the Atucha II power plant (PHWR of 745 MWe) in Buenos Aires. All the other civil projects at Atucha II are also being carried out by HTB. This building has the same general characteristics of the PWR plants developed by KWU in Germany, known for the spherical steel containment 56m in diameter. Nevertheless, it differs from those principally in the equipment lay-out and the remarkable foundation depth. From the basic engineering provided by ENACE, the joint venture has had to face the challenge of designing a tridimensional structure of large size. This has necessitated using simplified models which had to be superimposed, since the use of only one spatial mode would be highly inadequate, lacking the flexibility necessary to absorb the numerous modifications that this type of project undergoes during construction. In addition, this procedure has eliminated resorting to numerous and costly computer processings. (Author) [pt

  8. Desalination of seawater with nuclear power reactors in cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores E, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    The growing demand for energy and hydraulic resources for satisfy the domestic, industrial, agricultural activities, etc. has wakened up the interest to carry out concerning investigations to study the diverse technologies guided to increase the available hydraulic resources, as well as to the search of alternatives of electric power generation, economic and socially profitable. In this sense the possible use of the nuclear energy is examined in cogeneration to obtain electricity and drinkable water for desalination of seawater. The technologies are analysed involved in the nuclear cogeneration (desalination technology, nuclear and desalination-nuclear joining) available in the world. At the same time it is exemplified the coupling of a nuclear reactor and a process of hybrid desalination that today in day the adult offers and economic advantages. Finally, the nuclear desalination is presented as a technical and economically viable solution in regions where necessities of drinkable water are had for the urban, agricultural consumption and industrial in great scale and that for local situations it is possible to satisfy it desalinating seawater. (Author)

  9. Development Project of Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Oka, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2002-01-01

    A Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor (SCPR) development project (Feb. 2001- Mar. 2005) is being performed by a joint team consisting of Japanese universities and nuclear venders with a national fund. The main objective of this project is to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through concentrating three sub-themes: 'plant conceptual design', 'thermohydraulics', and 'material and water chemistry'. The target of the 'plant conceptual design sub-theme' is simplify the whole plant systems compared with the conventional LWRs while achieving high thermal efficiency of more than 40 % without sacrificing the level of safety. Under the 'thermohydraulics sub-theme', heat transfer characteristics of supercritical-water as a coolant of the SCPR are examined experimentally and analytically focusing on 'heat transfer deterioration'. The experiments are being performed using fron-22 for water at a fossil boiler test facility. The experimental results are being incorporated in LWR analytical tools together with an extended steam/R22 table. Under the 'material and water chemistry sub-theme', material candidates for fuel claddings and internals of the SCPR are being screened mainly through mechanical tests, corrosion tests, and simulated irradiation tests under the SCPR condition considering water chemistry. In particular, stress corrosion cracking sensitivity is being investigated as well as uniform corrosion and swelling characteristics. Influences of water chemistry on the corrosion product characteristics are also being examined to find preferable water condition as well as to develop rational water chemistry controlling methods. (authors)

  10. Small and medium power reactors: project initiation study, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    In conformity with the Agency's promotional role in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, IAEA has provided, over the past 20 years, assistance to Member States, particularly developing countries, in planning for the introduction of nuclear power plants in the Small and Medium range (SMPR). However these efforts did not produce any significant results in the market introduction of these reactors, due to various factors. In 1983 the Agency launched a new SMPR Project Initiation Study with the objective of surveying the available designs, examining the major factors influencing the decision-making processes in Developing Countries and thereby arriving at an estimate of the potential market. Two questionnaires were used to obtain information from possible suppliers and prospective buyers. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD assisted in making a study of the potential market in industrialized countries. The information gained during the study and discussed during a Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, along with the contribution by OECD-NEA is embodied in the present report

  11. Fusion reactor development using high power particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines major applications of the ion source/accelerator to fusion research and also addresses the present status and future plans for accelerator development. Applications of ion sources/accelerators for fusion research are discussed first, focusing on plasma heating, plasma current drive, plasma current profile control, and plasma diagnostics. The present status and future plan of ion sources/accelerators development are then described focusing on the features of existing and future tokamak equipment. Positive-ion-based NBI systems of 100 keV class have contributed to obtaining high temperature plasmas whose parameters are close to the fusion break-even condition. For the next tokamak fusion devices, a MeV class high power neutral beam injector, which will be used to obtain a steady state burning plasma, is considered to become the primary heating and current drive system. Development of such a system is a key to realize nuclear fusion reactor. It will be entirely indebted to the development of a MeV class high current negative deuterium ion source/accelerator. (N.K.)

  12. Next generation LP system for maintenance in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Naruhiko; Uehara, Takuya; Suezono, Nobuichi; Saeki, Ryoichi; Sano, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Laser peening (LP) is a process to introduce residual compressive stress on metal surface by irradiating laser pulses underwater without any surface preparations. Toshiba has developed and applied LP system to preventive maintenance against stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power reactors since 1999. The system is composed of laser oscillators, a beam delivery system, a laser irradiation head, remote handling equipment and a monitor/control system. In the early applications, a rigidly laser beam delivery system with many mirrors and beam guide pipes was accomplished. A flexible fiber-delivery system has been developed for accessing to the narrow place, and presently it is adopted mainly. As these beam-delivery systems require a wide installation space and difficult operation, a simple and small system is desired. In order to meet this demand, we are developing the small-sized next generation LP system that builds in the laser oscillator inside the remote handling equipment. In the next generation system new irradiating method is adopted, stress improvement speed is faster than the present system. (author)

  13. Reactor power setback: A procedure to reduce thermal shock on FBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Kasinathan, N.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Automatic procedure for implementation of reactor power setback in a fast reactor. ► Plant dynamic modeling of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. ► Selection of optimum value for the reduced power level and set of plant parameters for triggering power setback. - Abstract: Reactor power setback is a procedure to avoid reactor SCRAM for events originating from balance of plant, which do not affect the operation of boiler feed pumps that supply coolant to steam generators. This procedure is envisaged to avoid reactor components from being subjected to thermal shock due to SCRAM for some of the events which do not affect nuclear safety. In this procedure, all control rods of the reactor are driven down simultaneously to achieve a pre-determined lower power level. Appropriate plant parameters have been identified for the automatic triggering of power setback procedure on the occurrence of those events which are envisaged to be managed through this procedure. Knowledge of the transient thermal hydraulic behavior of the whole plant during various events is essential to formulate the operating procedure. Plant dynamics code DYANA-P developed for PFBR has been utilized for this purpose. This paper discusses (i) events for which this procedure can be adopted, (ii) detailed implantation scheme of power setback, (iii) transient thermal hydraulic behavior of the whole plant during this procedure and (iv) benefits of this procedure

  14. Storage of spent fuel from power reactors. 2003 conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    An International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors was organized by the IAEA in co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The conference gave an opportunity to exchange information on the state of the art and prospects of spent fuel storage, to discuss the worldwide situation and the major factors influencing the national policies in this field and to identify the most important directions that national efforts and international co-operation in this area should take. The conference confirmed that the primary spent fuel management solution for the next decades will be interim storage. While the next step can be reprocessing or disposal, all spent fuel or high level waste from reprocessing must sooner or later be disposed of. The duration of interim storage is now expected to be much longer than earlier projections (up to 100 years and beyond). The storage facilities will have to be designed for these longer storage times and also for receiving spent fuel from advanced fuel cycle practices (i.e. high burnup and MOX spent fuel). It was noted that the handling and storage of spent fuel is a mature technology and meets the stringent safety requirements applicable in the different countries. The changes in nuclear policy and philosophy across the world, and practical considerations, have made storage a real necessity in the nuclear power industry. Utilities, vendors and regulators alike are addressing this adequately. The IAEA wishes to express appreciation to all chairs and co-chairs as well as all authors for their presentations to the conference and papers included in these proceedings

  15. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide... (RG) 1.110, ``Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors... components for light water nuclear power reactors. ADDRESSES: Please refer to Docket ID NRC-2013-0237 when...

  16. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Approvals § 50.46 Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide...

  17. 10 CFR 50.64 - Limitations on the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in domestic non-power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... domestic non-power reactors. 50.64 Section 50.64 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF... Permits § 50.64 Limitations on the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in domestic non-power reactors. (a) Applicability. The requirements of this section apply to all non-power reactors. (b) Requirements. (1) The...

  18. Use of Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Materials for Extended Life Evaluations Using Power and Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Nanstad, R.K.; Odette, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    The most important component in assuring safety of the nuclear power plant is the reactor pressure (RPV). Surveillance programs have been designed to cover the licensed life of operating nuclear RPVs. The original surveillance programs were designed when the licensed life was 40 years. More than one-half of the operating nuclear plants in the USA have an extended license out to 60 years, and there are plans to continue to operate many plants out to 80 years. Therefore, the surveillance programs have had to be adjusted or enhanced to generate key data for 60 years, and now consideration must be given for 80 or more years. To generate the necessary data to assure safe operation out to these extended license lives, test reactor irradiations have been initiated with key RPV and model alloy steels, which include several steels irradiated in the current power reactor surveillance programs out to relatively high fluence levels. These data are crucial in understanding the radiation embrittlement mechanisms and to enable extrapolation of the irradiation effects on mechanical properties for these extended time periods. This paper describes the potential radiation embrittlement mechanisms and effects when assessing much longer operating times and higher neutron fluence levels. Potential methods for adjusting higher neutron flux test reactor data for use in predicting power reactor vessel conditions are discussed. (author)

  19. Civilian Power Program. Part 1, Summary, Current status of reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Author, Not Given

    1959-09-01

    This study group covered the following: delineation of the specific objectives of the overall US AEC civilian power reactor program, technical objectives of each reactor concept, preparation of a chronological development program for each reactor concept, evaluation of the economic potential of each reactor type, a program to encourage the the development, and yardsticks for measuring the development. Results were used for policy review by AEC, program direction, authorization and appropriation requests, etc. This evaluation encompassed civilian power reactors rated at 25 MW(e) or larger and related experimental facilities and R&D. This Part I summarizes the significant results of the comprehensive effort to determine the current technical and economic status for each reactor concept; it is based on the 8 individual technical status reports (Part III).

  20. SP-100 space reactor power system for lunar, Mars, and robotic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondt, Jack F.

    1992-01-01

    The SP-100 power system is described which was developed for three missions, namely, Pluto Orbiter with nuclear electric propulsion; human-rated surface reactor power system for lunar and Mars exploration; and earth surveillance with an integrated nuclear electric propulsion system. The reactor power systems technology is being developed to meet these requirements so that the technical database, design tools, and specifications will be applicable to these missions. The SP-100 power system design includes the following subsystems: reactor, reactor instrumentation and control, shield, heat transport, converter, heat rejection, power conditioning control and distribution, and mechanical/structural. Particular attention is given to a demonstration mission aimed at validating technology readiness for robotic, lunar, and Mars operational missions.

  1. Development of technology for next generation reactor - Research of evaluation technology for nuclear power plant -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1993-09-01

    For development of next generation reactor, a project for evaluation technology for nuclear power plant is performed. Evaluation technology is essential to next generation reactor for reactor safety and system analysis. For design concept, detailed evaluation technologies are studied as follows: evaluation of safety margin, evaluation of safety facilities, evaluation of measurement and control technology; man-machine interface. Especially for thermal efficiency, thermal properties and chemical composition of inconel 690 tube, instead of inconel 600 tube, are measured for steam generator. (Author).

  2. Method and apparatus for reducing the power level in a nuclear reactor during temperature transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Devices for moving control rods with respect to reactor cores are described. Objects of the present invention include prevention of damage to a reactor and its surroundings during a temperature excursion and especially during a loss of flow accident and reduction of the power level in a nuclear reactor in a manner that is directly proportional to the increase in temperature of the primary coolant. Preferably the present invention provides a system that produces a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor and is able to reduce the power level in a nuclear reactor after a loss of flow accident to less than 15 percent of full power without the intervention of any sensing devices or control rod actuators. (U.K.)

  3. Optimization of a thermal power reactor by means of a non-linear programming model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Dumitrescu, H.; Ghilea, S.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of optimizing a power reactor of the HWGCR type is dealt with. The reactor will be operated with a Roumanian vitroceramic fuel, essentially a mixture of UO 2 and SiO 2 , that has to meet a great number of irradiation behaviour and reliability requirements. The purpose of optimization is to find the optimum reactor structure for which fuel burnup during the first campaign is maximum with some restrictions on the reactor integral parameters, such as thermal power, fuel mass, and cell power density, as well as some lattice and cell parameters, e.g. the reactor radius and the fuel cell pitch. Due to the problem structure corresponding to a non-linear programming model the SUMT method has been used for solving it by means of the ORPN computing programme. (author)

  4. A facility for testing 10- to 100-kWe space power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, W F; Bitten, E J

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes an existing facility that could be used in a cost-effective manner to test space power reactors in the 10 to 100-kWe range before launch. The facility has been designed to conduct full power tests of 100-kWe SP-100 reactor systems and already has the structural feature that would be required for lower power testing. The paper describes a reasonable scenario starting with the acceptance at the test site of the unfueled reactor assembly and the separately shipped nuclear fuel. After fueling the reactor and installing it in the facility, cold critical tests are performed, and the reactor is then shipped to the launch site. The availability of this facility represents a cost-effective means of performing the required prelaunch test program.

  5. Maintenance management of nuclear power reactors at the stage of research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, Shigeru; Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Kubo, Shigenobu; Hayashida, Kiichi; Tagawa, Akihiro; Yamashita, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    A maintenance management required to nuclear power reactors at the R and D stage was discussed in this report. It is the most important to ensure safety of nuclear power plants by taking account of characteristics of nuclear power reactors at the R and D stage. In addition, it is needed to establish a system of maintenance management technologies suitable for reactor types. In this report, objectives of maintenance management of nuclear power reactors at the R and D stage were clarified. Next, requirements and consideration for maintenance management of nuclear power reactors at the R and D stage were discussed according to the objectives. 'Code for Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants' and 'Guide for Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants' published by the Japan Electric Association were refereed in the discussion. Then, a draft of codes for maintenance management of nuclear power plants at the R and D stage was newly proposed. Finally, an example that the draft codes were applied to components containing sodium, typical components of sodium-cooled fast reactor, was presented. (author)

  6. Reactor coolant and associated systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Guide outlines the design requirements for the reactor coolant and associated systems (RCAS) and the features required in order to achieve their safety functions. It covers design considerations for various reactor types and encompasses the safety aspects of the functions of the RCAS both during normal operation and following postulated initiating events, and to some extent also for decommissioning

  7. The stand prototype of minimum power NRE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogurov, A.I.; Grigorenko, L.N.; Mamontov, Yu.I.; Rachuk, V.S.; Stukalov, A.I.; Konyukhov, G.V.

    1995-01-01

    For ensuring of full-scale development of nuclear rocket engine (NRE) reactor was created stand prototype (reactor IRGIT?) The main differences of its are as follows: 1) Fasteners of technologies channels contents fuel assemblies in bottom are worked out the split. It is provides possibility a distance channels change without disassembly of reactor stand prototype from stand; 2) Cooling of the vessels, the moderator, the reflector and the barrel actuate is carried out by hydrogen; 3) The lower bottom modified for organization the hydrogen efflux in the form a reactor jet; 4) Radiation defence is introduced as part of stand prototype for ensuring of serviceability of stand accessories and tests routine service; 5) Each technology channels is provided of critical nozzle; 6) Control, regulation and defence of reactor has being carried out on stand system

  8. Water chemistry of the secondary circuit at a nuclear power station with a VVER power reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyapkov, V. F.; Erpyleva, S. F.

    2017-05-01

    Results of implementation of the secondary circuit organic amine water chemistry at Russian nuclear power plant (NPP) with VVER-1000 reactors are presented. The requirements for improving the reliability, safety, and efficiency of NPPs and for prolonging the service life of main equipment items necessitate the implementation of new technologies, such as new water chemistries. Data are analyzed on the chemical control of power unit coolant for quality after the changeover to operation with the feed of higher amines, such as morpholine and ethanolamine. Power units having equipment containing copper alloy components were converted from the all-volatile water chemistry to the ethanolamine or morpholine water chemistry with no increase in pH of the steam generator feedwater. This enables the iron content in the steam generator feedwater to be decreased from 6-12 to 2.0-2.5 μg/dm3. It is demonstrated that pH of high-temperature water is among the basic factors controlling erosion and corrosion wear of the piping and the ingress of corrosion products into NPP steam generators. For NPP power units having equipment whose construction material does not include copper alloys, the water chemistries with elevated pH of the secondary coolant are adopted. Stable dosing of correction chemicals at these power units maintains pH25 of 9.5 to 9.7 in the steam generator feedwater with a maximum iron content of 2 μg/dm3 in the steam generator feedwater.

  9. Generic environmental impact statement on handling and storage of spent light water power reactor fuel. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Detailed appendices are included with the following titles: light water reactor fuel cycle, present practice, model 1000MW(e) coal-fired power plant, increasing fuel storage capacity, spent fuel transshipment, spent fuel generation and storage data (1976-2000), characteristics of nuclear fuel, and ''away-from-reactor'' storage concept

  10. Control and instrumentation system of the Zero Power Reactor at IEA, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peluso, M.A.V.; Matsuda, K.; Hukai, R.

    1974-01-01

    The control and instrumentation system of the Zero Power Reactor at the IEA (Institute of Atomic Energy - Sao Paulo, Brazil) is described. Technical specifications of the main items of equipment are presented in a general way. Information is also given on the connection between the system described and the electrical supply system of the IEA reactor physics laboratory [pt

  11. Operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the results of calculations for CANDU reactor operation in thorium fuel cycle. Calculations are performed to estimate the feasibility of operation of heavy-water thermal neutron power reactor in self-sufficient thorium cycle. Parameters of active core and scheme of fuel reloading were considered to be the ...

  12. Steam water cycle chemistry of liquid metal cooled innovative nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurmanov, Victor; Lemekhov, Vadim; Smykov, Vladimir

    2012-09-01

    The Federal Target Program (FTP) of Russian Federation 'Nuclear Energy Technologies of the New Generation for 2010-2015 and for Perspective up to 2020' is aimed at development of advanced nuclear energy technologies on the basis of closed fuel cycle with fast reactors. There are advanced fast reactor technologies of the 4. generation with liquid metal cooled reactors. Development stages of maturity of fast sodium cooled reactor technology in Russia includes experimental reactors BR-5/10 (1958-2002) and BOR-60 (since 1969), nuclear power plants (NPPs) with BN-350 (1972-1999), BN-600 (since 1980), BN-800 (under construction), BN-1200 (under development). Further stage of development of fast sodium cooled reactor technology in Russia is commercialization. Lead-bismuth eutectic fast reactor technology has been proven at industrial scale for nuclear submarines in former Soviet Union. Lead based technology is currently under development and need for experimental justification. Current status and prospects of State Corporation 'Rosatom' participation in GIF activities was clarified at the 31. Meeting of Policy Group of the International Forum 'Generation-IV', Moscow, May 12-13, 2011. In June, 2010, 'Rosatom' joined the Sodium Fast Reactor Arrangement as an authorized representative of the Russian Government. It was also announced the intention of 'Rosatom' to sign the Memorandum on Lead Fast Reactor based on Russia's experience with lead-bismuth and lead cooled fast reactors. In accordance with the above FTP some innovative liquid metal cooled reactors of different design are under development in Russia. Gidropress, well known as WER designer, develops innovative lead-bismuth eutectic cooled reactor SVBR-100. NIKIET develops innovative lead cooled reactor BRESTOD-300. Some other nuclear scientific centres are also involved in this activity, e.g. Research and Development Institute for Power Engineering (RDIPE). Optimum

  13. Dynamic problems of power reactors and analogic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braffort, P.

    1955-01-01

    The raise of the nuclear physics came with heavy mathematical developments. The analogical installations became especially useful for precise calculations of parameters which depend the running of a reactor. They permit between other to study of kinetic problems and especially ''cybernetics'' of nuclear reactors. It doesn't make a doubt that their use will become widespread, not only in the calculations laboratories, in services for servo-mechanisms study, but also in the control panels of the reactors themselves. (M.B.) [fr

  14. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of nuclear power reactor security plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It contains specific criteria for use in evaluating the acceptability of nuclear power reactor security programs as detailed in security plans

  15. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  16. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commerical electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate

  17. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development - The SP-100 program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future.

  18. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description

  19. EDF's PWR power plants: anomalies concerning the reactor core instrumentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This report presents the problems of fatigue and leaks found on the internal core instrumentation thimbles of several French PWR power plants, as also the solutions chosen according the reactor has already or not been operating [fr

  20. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0010] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power... comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2104, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  1. Reactor power level monitoring system using an Alpha-Beta tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussa, L.W. Jr.; Greenberg, L.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a reactor power level monitor for a pressurized light water nuclear reactor, comprising: neutron detecting means for detecting neutrons emitted from the pressurized light water nuclear reactor and outputting a sample signal f(k) indicative of the neutrons detecting during a sampling period k having a predetermined length T; rate means for converting the sample signal k into a rate of power level change signal p(k) in accordance with rho(k) =rho(k-1) + β/T [f(k) - rho/sub rho/(k)], where p(k-1) is the rate of power level change for an immediately previous sampling period k-1, β is a constant with a value between zero and one, inclusive, and rho/sub rho/(k) is a predicted power level for a next sampling period; power signal means for converting the sample signal into a reactor power level signal p(k) in accordance with rho(k) - rho/sub rho/(k) - rho[f(k) - rho/sub rho/(k)], where α is equal to 2√β - β; and predicted power signal means for converting the sample signal into a predicted reactor power level signal p/sub p/(k) in accordance with rho/sub rho/(k) = rho(k-1) + T rho(k-1), is the power level signal for the immediately previous sampling period

  2. Adaptive control method for core power control in TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri Minhat, Mohd; Selamat, Hazlina; Subha, Nurul Adilla Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The 1MWth Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type has undergone more than 35 years of operation. The existing core power control uses feedback control algorithm (FCA). It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands to meet the safety demand of RTP due to the sensitivity of nuclear research reactor operation. Currently, the system is not satisfied with power tracking performance and can be improved. Therefore, a new design core power control is very important to improve the current performance in tracking and regulate reactor power by control the movement of control rods. In this paper, the adaptive controller and focus on Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Self-Tuning Control (STC) were applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, adaptive controller model, and control rods selection programming. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on point kinetics model, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The adaptive control model was presented using Lyapunov method to ensure stable close loop system and STC Generalised Minimum Variance (GMV) Controller was not necessary to know the exact plant transfer function in designing the core power control. The performance between proposed adaptive control and FCA will be compared via computer simulation and analysed the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF SYSTEMS FOR PASSIVE AFTERHEAT REMOVAL FROM REACTOR CONTAINMENT OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WITH WATER-COOLED POWER REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A classification on systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment has been developed in the paper.  The classification permits to make a detailed analysis of various concepts pertaining to systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment of new generation. The paper considers main classification features of the given systems.

  4. The use of ferritic materials in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of ferritic materials in LWR power plant components. The two principal types of LWR systems, the boiling water reactor (BWR) and the pressurized water reactor (PWR) are described. The evolution of the construction materials, including plates and forgings, is presented. The fabrication process for both reactors constructed with plates and forgings are described in detail. Typical mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials are presented. Finally, one critical issue radiation embrittlement dealing with ferritic materials is discussed. This has been one of the major issues regarding the use of ferritic material in the construction of LWR pressure vessels

  5. Alteration of reactor installation (alteration of No.1, No.2 and No.5 reactor facilities) in Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission presented the report to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on this alteration, on which the inguiry was made on July 17, 1987, after the prudent investigation and deliberation. The technical capability of the applicant was recognized as appropriate as the result of examination. It was judged that the safety after this alteration of reactor facilities can be ensured, as the result of examination. The main items of investigation were as follows: the safety related to the removal of leak control system from main steam isolation valves of No.2 and No.5 reactors, the safety related to the change of the number of relief safety valves of No.2 and No.5 reactors from 18 to 15, the safety related to the change of residual heat removal system of No.2 and No.5 reactors, the safety related to the change of power source for neutron flux monitors and reactor emergency shutdown system circuits of No.2 and No.5 reactors, the safety related to the change of liquid waste treatment system of No.5 reactor, the effect of incinerating spent resin to the environment, and the analysis of abnormal transient change during operation. (Kako, I.)

  6. On End-of-Life Storage Options for Space Reactor Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2010-09-01

    Fission reactor power systems are enabling to interplanetary exploration, outposts on Mars and Earth moon, and select civilian missions in Earth orbits with altitudes > 1000 km. This paper discusses radiological concerns, design choices and the potential of these power systems and briefly reviews deployment history of earlier systems. Also presented are practical options for end-of-life storage of fission reactors that might be employed in future missions.

  7. Method of power self-regulation of CFBR-II reactor based on DSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Zhongxiong; Zhou Wenxiang

    2007-01-01

    To the control system of Power Self-regulation of CFBR-II Reactor, a new digital control scheme based on DSP has been brought forward. The TMS320F2812 DSP chip is adopted as the core controller to realize Power self-regulation of CFBR-II Reactor. In this paper, the successful program of DSP control system is introduced in both hardware and software technology in detail. (authors)

  8. Method of controlling the power up by fluid poisons in heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Mikio; Masuoka, Ryuzo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To increase power by the gradual decrease in the amount of fluid poisons mixed in moderators or coolants of heavy water moderated reactors. Method: Power fluctuation rate for the period of time in multiple integer of one cycle period in the main loop of moderators (coolants) is determined by the detection signals for the reactor power and the deviation between it and the power fluctuation rate required for the operation is determined. Pulse signals of different series are generated depending on the polarities of the deviation by the number corresponding to the magnitude of the deviation, and the power control in the reactor power up is conducted by these pulses while operating the fluid supply device which issues a certain amount of fluid per one pulse and mixing the moderators (coolants) containing no substantial poisons or moderators (coolants) having poison density higher than that in the moderators (coolants) in the main loop. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Neutron beam applications using low power research reactor Malaysia perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Azali Muhammad; Faridah Idris; Adnan Bokhari; Muhd Noor Yunus

    2003-01-01

    The TRIGA MARK II Research reactor at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Research (MINT) was commissioned in July 1982. Since then various works have been performed to utilise the neutrons produced from this steady state reactor. One area currently focussed on is the utilisation of neutron beam ports available at this 1MW reactor. Projects undertaken are the development and utilisation of the Neutron Radiography (myNR), Small Angle Neutron Scattering (mySANS) and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) - preliminary study. In order to implement active research programmes, a group comprised of researcher from research institutes and academic institutions, has formed: known as Malaysian Reactor Interest Group (MRIG). This paper describes the recent status the above neutron beam facilities and their application in industrial, health and material technology research and education. The related activities of MRIG are also highlighted. (author)

  10. Nuclear Power: Outlook for New U.S. Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Larry; Holt, Mark

    2007-01-01

    ...) are also likely to improve the economic viability of qualifying new reactors. New nuclear plant applications can also take advantage of amendments to the Atomic Energy Act made in the early 1990s to reduce licensing delays...

  11. Study of the Utilization BWR Type Nuclear Power Reactor for Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itjeu Karliana; Sumijanto; Dhandhang Purwadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The needs of fresh water increased by rapid population growth and industrials expansion, but these demands can not be prepared naturally. Following this case, seawater desalination becomes the primer option which can fulfill the need through the nuclear desalination technology. The coupled nuclear power reactor enables to supply thermal energy for auxiliary equipment and pumps operation. The utilization study of power reactor type BWR coupled with desalination process has been performed. The goal of study is to obtain characteristic data of desalted water specification which desalination system coupling with nuclear power plant produced energy for desalination process. The study is carried out by browsing data and information, and comprehensive review of thermal energy correlation between NPP with desalination process installation. According to reviewing are found that the thermal energy and electric power utilization from the nuclear power reactor are enable to remove the seawater to produce desalted water and also to operate auxiliary equipments. The assessment results is VK-300 reactor prototype, BWR type 250 MW(e) power are cogeneration unit can supplied hot steam temperature 285 °C to the extraction turbine to empower 150 MW electric power, and a part of hot steam 130 °C is use to operate desalination process and remind heat is distribute to the municipal and offices at that region. The coupled of VK-300 reactor power type BWR with desalination installation of MED type enable to produce desalted water with high quality distillate. Based on the economic calculation that the VK-300 reactor power of BWR type produced water distillate capacity is 300.000 m 3 /hour with cost US$ 0.58/m 3 . The coupling VK-300 reactor power type BWR with MED desalination plant is competitive economically. (author)

  12. Tritium instrumentation for a fusion reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.

    1976-09-01

    A review of tritium instrumentation is presented. This includes a discussion of currently available in-plant instrumentation and methods required for sampling stacks, monitoring process streams and reactor coolants, analyzing occupational work areas for air and surface contamination, and personnel monitoring. Off-site instrumentation and collection techniques are also presented. Conclusions are made concerning the adequacy of existing instrumentation in relation to the monitoring needs for fusion reactors

  13. Future of nuclear power plants and reactor dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Cregut, A.

    1994-01-01

    After some considerations on dismantling experience, technology, legislation and costs, the various causes for dismantling a reactor are reviewed (research program termination, plant obsolescence, ageing and safety problems) and the present and future situation concerning the French nuclear park is examined. The various tools, equipment and techniques for reactor dismantling and the related researches are presented: cutting techniques, decontamination techniques, remote control, robotics and automation, waste processing and conditioning

  14. Nuclear reactor application for high temperature power industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollezhal', N.A.; Zaicho, N.D.; Alexeev, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.; Karyakin, Yu.I.; Nazarov, E.K.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Protzenko, A.M.; Chernyaev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives the results of considerations on industrial heat and technology processes (in chemistry, steelmaking, etc.) from the point of view of possible ways, technical conditions and nuclear safety requirements for the use of high temperature reactors in these processes. Possible variants of energy-technological diagrams of nuclear-steelmaking, methane steam-reforming reaction and other processes, taking into account the specific character of nuclear fuel are also given. Technical possibilities and economic conditions of the usage of different types of high temperature reactors (gas cooled reactors and reactors which have other means of transport of nuclear heat) in heat processes are examined. The report has an analysis of the problem, that arises with the application of nuclear reactors in energy-technological plants and an evaluation of solutions of this problem. There is a reason to suppose that we will benefit from the use of high temperature reactors in comparison with the production based on high quality fossil fuel [ru

  15. Thermal power evaluation of the TRIGA nuclear reactor at CDTN in operations of long duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal; Rezende, Hugo Cesar, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b, E-mail: avf@cdtn.b, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The standard operations of nuclear research reactor IPR-R1 TRIGA located at CDTN (Belo Horizonte) usually have duration of not more than 8h. However in 2009 two operations for samples irradiations lasted about 12 hours each at a power of 100 kW. These long lasting operations started in the evening and most of them were carried out at night, when there are only small fluctuations in atmosphere temperature. Therefore the conditions were ideal for evaluating the thermal balance of the power dissipated by the reactor core through the forced cooling system. Heat balance is the standard methodology for power calibration of the IPR-R1 reactor. As in any reactor operation, the main operating parameters were monitored and stored by the Data Acquisition System developed for the reactor. These data have been used for the analysis and calculation of the evolution of several neutronic and thermalhydraulic parameters involved in the reactor operation. This paper analyzes the two long lasting operations of the IPR-R1 TRIGA and compares the recorded results for the power dissipated through the primary cooling loop with the results of the power calibration conducted in March 2009. The results corresponded to those of the thermal power calibration within the uncertainty of this methodology, indicating system stability over a period of six months. (author)

  16. Dead-time measurement of neutron counters by reactor-power variational technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Kengo; Ohsawa, Takaaki

    1994-01-01

    The measurements of dead time of BF 3 , 3 He, fission and proton-recoil neutron counters were performed on the basis of the reactor-power variational technique in the reactor, UTR-KINKI reactor. The advantage of this method consists in making it possible to change the flux of irradiation field continuously and over a wide range. The reactor UTR-KINKI is well suited for the measurements since the power of the reactor can be easily changed and the range of flux is just appropriate to evaluate the dead time. The results indicate that the nonparalysable model for the dead time characteristics is applicable to the counters employed. The measured dead time of fission counter is about 1.4 μs, while those of others range of 6-9 μs. (author)

  17. Low-power lead-cooled fast reactor loaded with MOX-fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitdikov, E. R.; Terekhova, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast reactor for the purpose of implementation of research, education of undergraduate and doctoral students in handling innovative fast reactors and training specialists for atomic research centers and nuclear power plants (BRUTs) was considered. Hard neutron spectrum achieved in the fast reactor with compact core and lead coolant. Possibility of prompt neutron runaway of the reactor is excluded due to the low reactivity margin which is less than the effective fraction of delayed neutrons. The possibility of using MOX fuel in the BRUTs reactor was examined. The effect of Keff growth connected with replacement of natural lead coolant to 208Pb coolant was evaluated. The calculations and reactor core model were performed using the Serpent Monte Carlo code.

  18. Operation of the low power reactor assembly in the University of Illinois TRIGA bulk shielding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, G.P.; Thayer, G.

    1972-01-01

    The Low Power Reactor Assembly (LOPRA) is a rectangular assembly of TRIGA fuel elements located in the bulk shielding facility of the Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor (TRIGA). The LOPRA is coupled to the TRIGA by a thermal column that extends from the TRIGA core to the bulk shielding facility. The LOPRA will be utilized for studying steady-state and transient coupling between the two reactors. Spatial variations in the flux at the LOPRA will be measured for different operating conditions of the TRIGA. These measurements will be made with both systems in low power critical states or in subcritical states

  19. IPR-R1 reactor power control by the gamma radiation of N16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasiulevicius, R.; Maretti Junior, F.

    1987-01-01

    The IPR-R1 reactor power control is realized by the ion chambers use. The information that the chambers send to the control console are deformed due the control rods movements during the operation. With the purpose to eliminate these interferences, was installed close the reactor water cooling circuit, one power control auxiliary system using the detection of the N 16 formed in the water. this paper presents an analysis of the results and propose one complete project that permits the control of the radioactives nuclides localized in the reactor cooling water. (Author) [pt

  20. PRIS-STATISTICS: Power Reactor Information System Statistical Reports. User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA developed the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)-Statistics application to assist PRIS end users with generating statistical reports from PRIS data. Statistical reports provide an overview of the status, specification and performance results of every nuclear power reactor in the world. This user's manual was prepared to facilitate the use of the PRIS-Statistics application and to provide guidelines and detailed information for each report in the application. Statistical reports support analyses of nuclear power development and strategies, and the evaluation of nuclear power plant performance. The PRIS database can be used for comprehensive trend analyses and benchmarking against best performers and industrial standards.

  1. Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron detector performance characterization & reactor power tracking capability experiments performed in ZED-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFontaine, M.W., E-mail: physics@execulink.com [LaFontaine Consulting, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada); Zeller, M.B. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Nielsen, K. [Royal Military College of Canada, SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron flux detectors (SPDs), are typically used for flux monitoring and control applications in low temperature, test reactors such as the SLOWPOKE-2. A collaborative program between Atomic Energy of Canada, academia (Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC)) and industry (LaFontaine Consulting) was initiated to characterize the incore performance of a typical Cd-emitter SPD; and to obtain a definitive measure of the capability of the detector to track changes in reactor power in real time. Prior to starting the experiment proper, Chalk River Laboratories' ZED-2 was operated at low power (5 watts nominal) to verify the predicted moderator critical height. Test measurements were then performed with the vertical center of the SPD emitter positioned at the vertical mid-plane of the ZED-2 reactor core. Measurements were taken with the SPD located at lattice position L0 (near center), and repeated at lattice position P0 (in D{sub 2}O reflector). An ionization chamber (part of the ZED-2 control instrumentation) monitored reactor power at a position located on the south side of the outside wall of the reactor's calandria. These experiments facilitated measurement of the absolute thermal neutron sensitivity of the subject Cd-emitter SPD, and validated the power tracking capability of said SPD. Procedural details of the experiments, data, calculations and associated graphs, are presented and discussed. (author)

  2. Reactor-Capaсitor Device for Flexible Link Between Non-Synchronous Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosneaga V.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In present flexible interconnections for transmission of required active power between different power systems is used, as a rule, so-called DC back-to-back link. The aim of this work is the investigation of proposed reactor-capacitor device for flexible connection of asynchronously alternating current power systems with the same nominal values of frequencies for parallel operation. The reactor-capacitor device was elaborated. The installation develops the idea of controlled reactor alternating current link, and provides reactive power balance in the unit and needed value of the output voltage module. The basic characteristics of reactor-capacitor device for controlled power transmission were investigated. Analytical expressions for device elements parameters were derived. These ensure necessary ratio of voltages modules of linked power systems and reactive power balance of the device at circular output voltage vector rotation for a given load admittance. Obtained parameters ensure constant active power flow between linked asynchronously power systems and device reactive power internal balance.

  3. Synthesis of Model Based Robust Stabilizing Reactor Power Controller for Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Habib Malik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nominal SISO (Single Input Single Output model of PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor type nuclear power plant is developed based on normal moderator pump-up rate capturing the moderator level dynamics using system identification technique. As the plant model is not exact, therefore additive and multiplicative uncertainty modeling is required. A robust perturbed plant model is derived based on worst case model capturing slowest moderator pump-up rate dynamics and moderator control valve opening delay. Both nominal and worst case models of PHWR-type nuclear power plant have ARX (An Autoregressive Exogenous structures and the parameters of both models are estimated using recursive LMS (Least Mean Square optimization algorithm. Nominal and worst case discrete plant models are transformed into frequency domain for robust controller design purpose. The closed loop system is configured into two port model form and H? robust controller is synthesized. The H?controller is designed based on singular value loop shaping and desired magnitude of control input. The selection of desired disturbance attenuation factor and size of the largest anticipated multiplicative plant perturbation for loop shaping of H? robust controller form a constrained multi-objective optimization problem. The performance and robustness of the proposed controller is tested under transient condition of a nuclear power plant in Pakistan and found satisfactory.

  4. The software safety analysis based on SFTA for reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhaohui; Yang Xiaohua; Liao Longtao; Wu Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of Nuclear power plants can provide many advantages. However, digital control systems induce new failure modes that differ from those of analog control systems. While the cost effectiveness and flexibility of software is widely recognized, it is very difficult to achieve and prove high levels of dependability and safety assurance for the functions performed by process control software, due to the very flexibility and potential complexity of the software itself. Software safety analysis (SSA) was one way to improve the software safety by identify the system hazards caused by software failure. This paper describes the application of a software fault tree analysis (SFTA) at the software design phase. At first, we evaluate all the software modules of the reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant and identify various hazards. The SFTA was applied to some critical modules selected from the previous step. At last, we get some new hazards that had not been identified in the prior processes of the document evaluation which were helpful for our design. (author)

  5. The power control system of the Siemens-KWU nuclear power station of the PWR [pressurized water reactors] type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Starting with the first nuclear power plant constructed by Siemens AG of the pressurized light water reactor line (PWR), the Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant (340 MWe net), until the recently constructed plants of 1300 MWe (named 'Konvoi'), the design of the power control system of the plant was continuously improved and optimized using the experience gained in the operation of the earlier generations of plants. The reactor power control system of the Siemens - KWU nuclear power plants is described. The features of this design and of the Siemens designed heavy water power plants (PHWR) Atucha I and Atucha II are mentioned. Curves showing the behaviour of the controlled variables during load changes obtained from plant tests are also shown. (Author) [es

  6. Stress analysis of nuclear power plants reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujeiv, A.

    1977-01-01

    During the nuclear reactor operation, one of the most important limiting factors in fuel element duty is the mechanical iteraction of fuel and clad. This interaction produces cyclic stresses and strains in the cladding, and these in turn consume clad fatigue life. It is expected, that compressive hoop stress at the clad ID reaches 14500 psi (100 MPa=MN/m 2 , ie. 1000 bar). Tensile stresses could be created once the clad has come in contact with the fuel pellet, approximately after 15000 hours in the reactor core. Reactor pressure vessel is also being exposed to high mechanical load and to an intensive neutron flux irradiation. During the life time of the NPP, this leads to a gradual deportant in the event of LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) with action of ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System), and thus with an instant vessel temperature drop. The reactor containment has to comprise relatively high pressure developed during the accidental fluid release from the reactor piping. The steel structure is additionally loaded by a crane circular rail under the dome, and the strength and stability analyses prove to be very difficult. (author)

  7. Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elkins, Ned Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

  8. Power probability density function control and performance assessment of a nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abharian, Amir Esmaeili; Fadaei, Amir Hosein

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In this paper, the performance assessment of static PDF control system is discussed. • The reactor PDF model is set up based on the B-spline functions. • Acquaints of Nu, and Th-h. equations solve concurrently by reformed Hansen’s method. • A principle of performance assessment is put forward for the PDF of the NR control. - Abstract: One of the main issues in controlling a system is to keep track of the conditions of the system function. The performance condition of the system should be inspected continuously, to keep the system in reliable working condition. In this study, the nuclear reactor is considered as a complicated system and a principle of performance assessment is used for analyzing the performance of the power probability density function (PDF) of the nuclear research reactor control. First, the model of the power PDF is set up, then the controller is designed to make the power PDF for tracing the given shape, that make the reactor to be a closed-loop system. The operating data of the closed-loop reactor are used to assess the control performance with the performance assessment criteria. The modeling, controller design and the performance assessment of the power PDF are all applied to the control of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) power in a nuclear process. In this paper, the performance assessment of the static PDF control system is discussed, the efficacy and efficiency of the proposed method are investigated, and finally its reliability is proven

  9. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapernick, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dixon, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werner, James [INL; Qualls, Louis [ORNL; Radel, Ross [SNL

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO{sub 2}-fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  10. Nuclear reactor control method for maintaining an appreciably constant axial distribution of power with load variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Toshio.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control method is described in which the power variations of the reactor are controlled partly by varying the concentration of the neutron absorbing element and partly by varying the positions of the control rods, in order to maintain the axial distribution of power appreciably symmetrical during the normal operation of the reactor. The control points are located in the upper and lower halves of the core. The controls are operated to maintain the output power difference between the upper and lower halves of the core, based on the total output power (axial deviation) significantly equal to a predetermined optimum figure during the entire running of the reactor, including when there are power variations. The optimum value is obtained by determining the axial deviation at full power with the xenon in balance and all the control rods withdrawn from the fuel area of the core. This optimum value is recalculated after a period appreciably equal to that of a month's operation at full power. This method applies in particular to PWR type reactors [fr

  11. Verification of the linearity of the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor power channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Rose Mary Gomes do Prado; Campolina, Daniel de Almeida Magalhaes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to verify the linearity of the three power channels of the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor. Located at Nuclear Technology Development Center-CDTN in Belo Horizonte, the IPR-R1 reactor is a typical 100 kW Mark I light-water reactor cooled by natural convection. When the experiments were performed, the reactor core had 59 fuel elements, containing 8% by weight of uranium enriched to 20% in 235 U. The core has cylindrical configuration with an annular graphite reflector. The responses of the detectors of the Linear, Log N and Percent Power channels were compared with the responses of detectors which only depend on the overall neutron flux within the reactor. Gold and cobalt foils were activated at low and high powers, respectively, and the specific count results were compared with measurements performed, simultaneously, with a fission chamber, and with the power registered by the three channels. The results show that the Linear channel responds linearly up to 100 kW, and the Log N channel responses are linear at low powers. In the range of high power, the Log N and the Percent Power channels exhibit linearity only from 10 kW to 50 kW. (author)

  12. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  13. Management and storage of commercial power reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In May 1976, a technical document, ERDA--76-43, entitled ''Alternatives for Managing Wastes from Reactors and Post-Fission Operations in the LWR Fuel Cycle'' was published by the United States Energy Research and Development Administration. This 1500-page document describes technical alternatives for managing wastes from the commercial light-water-reactor fuel cycle. It does not select preferred waste management technologies or make comparative assessments. This report, ERDA--76-162, is a brief summary of the salient points in the 1500-page document and should provide an appreciation of the present technology and methods for handling the various forms of radioactive waste. In a major expansion of ERDA's waste management program, the U.S. has initiated efforts to identify acceptable geologic formations within the continental U.S. for ultimate disposition of reactor wastes. This technique represents the most advanced alternative presently available for the long-term management of these wastes

  14. Nuclear power plant design characteristics. Structure of nuclear power plant design characteristics in the IAEA Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    One of the IAEA's priorities has been to maintain the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) database as a viable and useful source of information on nuclear reactors worldwide. To satisfy the needs of PRIS users as much as possible, the PRIS database has included also a set of nuclear power plant (NPP) design characteristics. Accordingly, the PRIS Technical Meeting, organized in Vienna 4-7 October 2004, initiated a thorough revision of the design data area of the PRIS database to establish the actual status of the data and make improvements. The revision first concentrated on a detailed review of the design data completion and the composition of the design characteristics. Based on the results of the review, a modified set and structure of the unit design characteristics for the PRIS database has been developed. The main objective of the development has been to cover all significant plant systems adequately and provide an even more comprehensive overview of NPP unit designs stored in the PRIS database

  15. Conversion of the redundant research nuclear reactor into low power facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saralidze, Z.K.; Abramidze, S.P.; Katamadze, N.M.; Kiknadze, G.G.

    2000-01-01

    Most of reactors of the first generation have exhausted their operating life and should be dismantled. But nuclear reactor dismantling is a very complex process, full-scale realization of which generates a lot of other problems, solution of which is apparently beyond many countries strength. The goal of this report is to attract attention to the problem of decommissioning of the research nuclear reactor of the Institute of Physics of the Georgian Academy of Sciences, which has outlined its usefulness, and to search the acceptable ways of the nuclear reactor conversion into a state the maintenance of full radiation safety of which would not demand constant supervision and large expenditures. It is stated that the option of decommissioning of nuclear reactor IRT-M suggested by the Institute of Physics is: Radiation safe, ecologically clean and seismic stable; Comparably less labor-consuming and feasible; Not connected with the problem of formation of additional solid or liquid radioactive waste, and hence, with the problem of their accumulation and transportation; Not connected with large financial and material expenditures; Provides the possibility to give to the reactor a new function by installing a low power nuclear facility in the radiation-free part of the reactor tank for the purpose of Neutron Activation Analysis; Gives the possibility to use a new low power nuclear facility for attracting and training the young generation of specialists in the field of reactor physics and nuclear technology

  16. Burst slug detection system in french power reactors (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.; Roguin, A.

    1961-01-01

    Gas samples are taken from the channels of the reactor and the short lived fission products are electrostatically collected to be analysed by a phosphor and photomultiplier system. The electrostatic collection and rotating electrode detector is described and its main uses exposed. Experience has shown the interest of measuring the evolution of fission products activities and not their absolute value only. In this way, data processing equipment have been designed and adapted to the detection apparatus. The system developed and realized for the G-l - G-2 - G-3 - EDF-1 - EDF-2 reactors are compared. (authors) [fr

  17. 10-75-kWe-reactor-powered organic Rankine-cycle electric power systems (ORCEPS) study. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-30

    This 10-75 kW(e) Reactor-ORCEPS study was concerned with the evaluation of several organic Rankine cycle energy conversion systems which utilized a /sup 235/U-ZrH reactor as a heat source. A liquid metal (NaK) loop employing a thermoelectric converter-powered EM pump was used to transfer the reactor energy to the organic working fluid. At moderate peak cycle temperatures (750/sup 0/F), power conversion unit cycle efficiencies of up to 25% and overall efficiencies of 20% can be obtained. The required operating life of seven years should be readily achievable. The CP-25 (toluene) working fluid cycle was found to provide the highest performance levels at the lowest system weights. Specific weights varies from 100 to 50 lb/kW(e) over the power level range 10 to 75 kW(e). (DLC)

  18. Nuclear Power Station Kalkar, 300 MWe Prototype Nuclear Power Plant with Fast Sodium Cooled Reactor (SNR-300), Plant description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    The nuclear power station Kalkar (SNR-300) is a prototype with a sodium cooled fast reactor and a thermal power of 762 MW. The present plant description has been made available in parallel to the licensing procedure for the reactor plant and its core Mark-Ia as supplementary information for the public. The report gives a detailed description of the whole plant including the prevention measures against the impact of external and plant internal events. The radioactive materials within the reactor cooling system and the irradiation protection and surveillance measures are outlined. Finally, the operation of the plant is described with the start-up procedures, power operation, shutdown phases with decay heat removal and handling procedures

  19. Modeling of a double fission chamber using MCNPX for power calibration at the zero-power teaching reactor CROCUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, Gaetan; Epiney, Aaron; Joneja, Om Parkash

    2010-01-01

    MCNPX-2.5 simulations and experiments were performed to improve the power prediction of the zero-power teaching reactor CROCUS at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) using a calibrated double fission chamber (DFC). The CROCUS facility is a zero-power critical reactor used for educational purposes. Traditionally, the core power is determined by irradiating thin gold foils placed along the core centre and by measuring the 411 keV γ-rays on HPGe detectors. The average 197 Au(n,γ) self-shielded macroscopic cross-section obtained with the deterministic BOXER code (1σ - 10%) is employed to determine the flux and the reactor power. To benchmark the BOXER calculations, a DFC containing known amounts of enriched 235 U and 239 Pu deposits was installed within the reflector core and simulated with MCNPX-2.5/JEF-2.2. Particular care was taken to model the fissile deposits allowing to reduce the power uncertainty to 2% compared to the gold foil technique. A code-to-code comparison (BOXER vs. MCNPX) was performed and the results have shown a good agreement (2 to 5%) for most of the quantities calculated (flux, reaction rates). However, the normalization factor differed by 17% (flux-to-power ratio). Consequently, the core power was overestimated by 17% until now. Finally, the current investigations lead to an improved fission power determination and contribute to better core safety standard. (author)

  20. THE IMPACT OF POWER COEFFICIENT OF REACTIVITY ON CANDU 6 REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. KASTANYA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU® reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant.

  1. Proven power reactor systems - novel features and developments in operation performance, safety and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugl, J.

    1975-01-01

    As the development of nuclear reactors for the generation of electric power started after the end of the Second World War, the prospective use of diverse materials as fuel, moderator and coolant resulted in a wide diversity of design possibilities. Of the 10 nuclear reactor types which were being considered most seriously in those days, only a few have achieved acceptance. This development is best illustrated by listing the nuclear power plants in service, under construction and on order at present, separately by reactor types (table). In the lead at present and for some years to come are the thermal reactors and especially the light water reactors (LWR). In the LWR group the lead is held by the pressurised water reactor (PWR) which accounts for 44% of the installed capacity of all the nuclear power plants in service at present. In the early 1980s this share will increase to 58%, whereas the share of the boiling water reactor (BWR) will increase to only 28% from 23% at present. (orig./TK) [de

  2. Circuit designs for measuring reactor period, peak power, and pulse fluence on TRIGA and other pulse reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.D.; Thome, F.V.; Williams, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Inexpensive circuits for use in evaluating reactor pulse prompt period, peak power, and pulse fluence (NVT) are presented. In addition to low cost, these circuits are easily assembled and calibrated and operate with a high degree of accuracy. The positive period measuring system has been used in evaluating reactivity additions as small as 5 cents (with an accuracy of ±0.1 cents) and as large as $4.50 (accuracy ±2 cents). Reactor peak power is measured digitally with a system accuracy of ±0.04% of a 10 Volt input (±4 mV). The NVT circuit measures over a 2-1/2 decade range, has 3 place resolution and an accuracy of better than 1%. (author)

  3. State-Space Model Predictive Control Method for Core Power Control in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxu Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  4. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  5. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  6. IAEA specialists' meeting on power ramping and cycling behaviour of water reactor fuel. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    At its fourth Annual Meeting, the IAEA International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) recommended that the Agency should hold a second Specialists' Meeting on 'Power Ramping and Cycling Behaviour of Water Reactor Fuel'. As research activities related to power ramping and cycling of water reactor fuel have been pursued vigorously, it was the objective of this meeting to review and discuss today's State of the Art and current understanding of water reactor fuel behaviour related to this these. Emphasis should be on practical experience and experimental investigations. The meeting was organised in five sessions: Power ramping and power cycling programs in power and and research reactors; Experimental methods; Power ramping and cycling results; Investigations and results of separate effects, especially related to PCI, defect mechanism, mechanical response, fuel design, and specially related to fission gas release; Operational strategies, recommendations and economic implications. The session chairmen, together with the speakers, prepared and presented reports with summary, conclusions and recommendations of the individual sessions. These reports are added to this summary report

  7. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrodnikov, A. V.; Toshinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.

    2011-08-01

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  8. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zrodnikov, A.V. [FSUE State Scientific Center of Russian Federation Institute for Physics and Power Engineering 1, Bondarenko sq., Obninsk, Kaluga rg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Toshinsky, G.I., E-mail: toshinsky@ippe.ru [FSUE State Scientific Center of Russian Federation Institute for Physics and Power Engineering 1, Bondarenko sq., Obninsk, Kaluga rg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Komlev, O.G. [FSUE State Scientific Center of Russian Federation Institute for Physics and Power Engineering 1, Bondarenko sq., Obninsk, Kaluga rg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N. [JSC Experimental Design Bureau ' Gidropress' 21, Ordzhonikidze st., Podolsk, Moscow rg. 142103 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-31

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  9. Adaptive fuzzy control of neutron power of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas R, E.

    2014-01-01

    The design and implementation of an identification and control scheme of the TRIGA Mark III research nuclear reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) of Mexico is presented in this thesis work. The identification of the reactor dynamics is carried out using fuzzy logic based systems, in which a learning process permits the adjustment of the membership function parameters by means of techniques based on neural networks and bio-inspired algorithms. The resulting identification system is a useful tool that allows the emulation of the reactor power behavior when different types of insertions of reactivity are applied into the core. The identification of the power can also be used for the tuning of the parameters of a control system. On the other hand, the regulation of the reactor power is carried out by means of an adaptive and stable fuzzy control scheme. The control law is derived using the input-output linearization technique, which permits the introduction of a desired power profile for the plant to follow asymptotically. This characteristic is suitable for managing the ascent of power from an initial level n o up to a predetermined final level n f . During the increase of power, a constraint related to the rate of change in power is considered by the control scheme, thus minimizing the occurrence of a safety reactor shutdown due to a low reactor period value. Furthermore, the theory of stability in the sense of Lyapunov is used to obtain a supervisory control law which maintains the power error within a tolerance region, thus guaranteeing the stability of the power of the closed loop system. (Author)

  10. A survey of thorium utilization in thermal power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    The present status of thorium utilization in thermal reactors HTGR's, HWR's and LWR's has been reviewed. Physics considerations are made to obtain the optimum use of thorium. Existing information on reprocessing and refabrication is given together with the properties of thorium metal and thoria

  11. Spatial effects on the fluctuations of a nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Rodriguez, R.F.; Wio, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spatial inhomogeneities in a nuclear system are studied by using the compounding moments method. In particular, the neutron density and temperature equilibrium correlation functions are explicitly calculated for a realistic linearized nuclear reactor model described in terms of a master equation. (author)

  12. Cobalt-60 production in the BN-350 fast power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonarev, A.V.; Korobejnikov, V.V.; Matveenko, I.P.

    1994-01-01

    A possibility of Co-60 isotope production in the BN-350 fast reactor was considered. A special irradiating device, which is an assembly with a central hole, where a container containing cobalt and zirconium hydride is placed. The irradiating device tested permits generating 60 Co with specific activity of 100 Ci/g

  13. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)

  14. Threshold self-powered gamma detector for use as a monitor of power in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVert, F.E.; Cox, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    A self-powered gamma monitor for placement near the core of a nuclear reactor comprises a lead prism surrounded by a coaxial thin nickel sheet, the combination forming a collector. A coaxial polyethylene electron barrier encloses the collector and is separated from the nickel sheet by a vacuum region. The electron barrier is enclosed by a coaxial stainless steel emitter which, in turn, is enclosed within a lead casing. When the detector is placed in a flux of gamma rays, a measure of the current flow in an external circuit between emitter and collector provides a measure of the power level of the reactor

  15. Stationary low power reactor No. 1 (SL-1) accident site decontamination ampersand dismantlement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.F.

    1995-01-01

    The Army Reactor Area (ARA) II was constructed in the late 1950s as a test site for the Stationary Low Power Reactor No. 1 (SL-1). The SL-1 was a prototype power and heat source developed for use at remote military bases using a direct cycle, boiling water, natural circulation reactor designed to operate at a thermal power of 3,000 kW. The ARA II compound encompassed 3 acres and was comprised of (a) the SL-1 Reactor Building, (b) eight support facilities, (c) 50,000-gallon raw water storage tank, (d) electrical substation, (e) aboveground 1,400-gallon heating oil tank, (f) underground 1,000-gallon hazardous waste storage tank, and (g) belowground power, sewer, and water systems. The reactor building was a cylindrical, aboveground facility, 39 ft in diameter and 48 ft high. The lower portion of the building contained the reactor pressure vessel surrounded by gravel shielding. Above the pressure vessel, in the center portion of the building, was a turbine generator and plant support equipment. The upper section of the building contained an air cooled condenser and its circulation fan. The major support facilities included a 2,500 ft 2 two story, cinder block administrative building; two 4,000 ft 2 single story, steel frame office buildings; a 850 ft 2 steel framed, metal sided PL condenser building, and a 550 ft 2 steel framed decontamination and laydown building

  16. Control of the axial offset in a nuclear reactor at power maneuvering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim V. Maksimov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High reliability and security of power unit are basic requirements when the power unit maneuvering mode operation. The reactor stability under disturbances both at steady load and maneuvering load embodies the guarantees of power unit safe and reliable operation. A quantitative measure of the reactor stability is assessed by the axial offset representing the technological characteristics of energy release uniformity, therefore the axial offset minimum deviation is WWER-1000 operation efficiency measure. The power unit capacity automated control systems’ influence on axial offset under maneuvering mode is investigated. Considered is the power unit compromise-combined control program, which maintains a constant axial offset value when power unit switching from one power level to another.

  17. 75 FR 7634 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the Subcommittee on Power Uprates...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the Subcommittee on Power Uprates; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Power Uprates will hold a meeting on... arrangements can be made. Thirty-five hard copies of each presentation or handout should be provided to the DFO...

  18. Inventory of nuclear power plants and research reactors temporary or definitively stopped in industrialized countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauzon, J.; Vaubert, B.

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents data and information on the end of the life of nuclear reactors. One deals more particularly with installations of industrialized countries. This report gives the motivations which have involved the definitive shut down of nuclear power plants and of research reactors in the concerned countries. A schedule of definitive reactor shutdowns is presented. Then, one deals with nuclear power plants of which the construction has been stopped. The reasons of these situations are also given. The temporary difficulties met during the construction or the starting of nuclear power plants these last years are mentioned. Most times, there are economical or political considerations, or safety reasons. Finally, the nuclear power plants stopped for more than two years are mentioned [fr

  19. Sodium fast reactor power monitoring using {sup 20}F tagging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.; Normand, S. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ban, G. [ENSICAEN, F-14050 Caen (France); Dumarcher, V.; Brau, H. P.; Barbot, L.; Domenech, T.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Frelin, A. M.; Montagu, T.; Dautremer, T.; Barat, E.

    2009-07-01

    This work deals with the use of gamma spectrometry to monitor the fourth generation sodium fast reactor (SFR) power. Simulation part has shown that power monitoring in short response time and with high accuracy is possible measuring delayed gamma emitters produced in the liquid sodium. An experimental test is under preparation at French SFR Phenix experimental reactor to validate simulation studies. Physical calculations have been done to correlate gamma activity to the released thermal power. Gamma emitter production rate in the reactor core was calculated with technical and nuclear data as sodium velocity, atomic densities, neutron spectra and incident neutron cross-sections of fission reactions, and also sodium activation reactions producing gamma emitters. Then, a thermal hydraulic transfer function was used for taking into account primary sodium flow in our calculations. Gamma spectra were then determined by Monte-Carlo simulations. The experiment will be set during the reactor 'ultimate testing'. The Delayed Neutron Detection (DND) system cell has been chosen as the best available primary sodium sample for gamma power monitoring on Phenix reactor due to short sodium transit time from reactor core to measurement sample and homogenized sampling in the reactor hot pool. The main gamma spectrometer is composed of a coaxial high purity germanium diode (HPGe) coupled with a transistor reset preamplifier. The signal is then processed by a digital signal processing system (called Adonis) which always gives optimum answer even for high count rate and various time activity measurements. For power monitoring problematic, use of a short decay period gamma emitter as the {sup 20}F will allow to obtain a very fast response system without cumulative and flow distortion effects. These works introduce advantages and performances of this new power monitoring system for future SFR. (authors)

  20. Development of a research reactor power measurement system using Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, Brício M.; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear research reactors are usually located in open pools, to allow visibility to the core and bluish luminosity of Cherenkov radiation. Usually the thermal power released in these reactors is monitored by chambers that measure the neutron flux, as it is proportional to the power. There are other methods used for power measurement, such as monitoring the core temperature and the energy balance in the heat exchanger. The brightness of Cherenkov's radiation is caused by the emission of visible electromagnetic radiation (in the blue band) by charged particles that pass through an insulating medium (water in nuclear research reactors) at a speed higher than that of light in this medium. This effect was characterized by Pavel Cherenkov, which earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1958. The project's objective is to develop an innovative and alternative method for monitoring the power of nuclear research reactors. It will be performed by analyzing and monitoring the intensity of luminosity generated by Cherenkov radiation in the reactor core. This method will be valid for powers up to 250 kW, since above that value the luminosity saturates, as determined by previous studies. The reactor that will be used to test the method is the TRIGA, located at Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which currently has a maximum operating power of 250 kW. This project complies with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommendations on reactor safety. It will give more redundancy and diversification in this measure and will not interfere with its operation. (author)