WorldWideScience

Sample records for carlton power reactor

  1. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco Combined Heat and Power Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosfjord, Thomas J [UTC Power

    2007-11-01

    Under collaboration between DOE and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. This packaged CHP system integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller, directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 RT of chilled water at a 59F ambient temperature.

  2. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  3. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention efficiently calibrates a fixed type gamma ray thermometer of a reactor power measuring device of a BWR type reactor. Namely, the device of the present invention calculates peripheral fuel rod power distribution by calibrating the reactor power distribution by heat generation amount, the reactor power distribution being obtained by a calculation based on a reactor model for converting the signals of a plurality of the gamma ray thermometers in the reactor core based on a conversion formula. In this case, the conversion formula is a relational formula between the power of a thermocouple of the gamma ray thermometer, gamma ray heat generation amount, thermocouple zero power sensitivity relative to a temperature coefficient. A conversion efficient calculation means makes a calibration heater to generate heat at a predetermined power, and the thermocouple zero power sensitivity and the temperature coefficient are obtained based on the output of the gamma ray thermometer in this case. The calibration means updates to conversion type thermocouple zero power sensitivity and temperature coefficient. A calibration execution means executes the operations described above successively, and when the thermocouple zero power sensitivity and the temperature coefficient are out of an allowable range, the means informs it and eliminates the corresponding gamma ray thermometer from the measuring meters. (I.S.)

  4. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a control device which can conduct scram and avoid lowering of the power of a nuclear power plant upon occurrence of earthquakes. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises, in addition to an existent power control device, (1) an earthquake detector for detecting occurrence and annihilation of earthquakes and (2) a reactor control device for outputting control rod operation signals and reactor core flow rate control signals depending on the earthquake detection signals from the detector, and reactor and plant information. With such a constitution, although the reactor is vibrated by earthquakes, the detector detects slight oscillations of the reactor by initial fine vibration waves as premonitory symptoms of serious earthquakes. The earthquake occurrence signals are outputted to the reactor control device. The reactor control device, receiving the signals, changes the position of control rods by way of control rod driving mechanisms to make the axial power distribution in the reactor core to a top peak type. As a result, even if the void amount in the reactor core is reduced by the subsequent actual earthquakes, since the void amount is moved, effects on the increase of neutron fluxes by the actual earthquakes is small. (I.S.)

  5. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a method of controlling reactor power to shift it into a partial power operation upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of generator load. Operation state of a reactor is classified into a plurality of operation states based on values of the reactor core flow rate and the reactor power. Different insertion patterns for selected control rods are determined on every classified operation states. Then, an insertion pattern corresponding to the operation state upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of power generator load is carried out to shift into partial power operation. The operation is shifted to a load operation solely in the station while avoiding risks such as TPM scram. Then neutron fluxes are suppressed upon transient to increase margin of fuel integrity. Selected control rod pattern of the optimum reactivity is set to each of operation regions, thereby enabling to conduct flexible countermeasure so as to attain optimum operationability. (N.H.)

  6. Nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention monitors phenomena occurred in a nuclear reactor more accurately than usual case. that is, the device monitors a reactor power by signals sent from a great number of neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The device has a means for estimating a phenomenon occurred in the reactor based on the relationship of a difference of signals between each of the great number of neutron monitors to the positions of the neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The estimation of the phenomena is conducted by, for example, conversion of signals sent from the neutron monitors to a code train. Then, a phenomenon is estimated rapidly by matching the code train described above with a code train contained in a data base. Further. signals sent from the neutron monitors are processed statistically to estimate long term and periodical phenomena. As a result, phenomena occurred in the reactor are monitored more accurately than usual case, thereby enabling to improve reactor safety and operationability. (I.S.)

  7. Operating US power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the US which have been issued operating licenses. Table 1 shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of Dec. 31, 1986, the end of the three-month period covered in this report. Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three months (October, November, and December 1986) covered in this report and the cumulative values of these parameters since the beginning of commercial operation. They are defined as follows: In addition to the tabular data, this article discusses significant occurrences and developments that affected licensed US power reactors during this reporting period. It includes, but is not limited to, changes in operating status, regulatory actions and decisions, and legal actions involving the status of power reactors. We do not have space here for routine problems of operation and maintenance, but such information is available at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Public Document Room, 1717 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20555. Some significant operating events are summarized elsewhere in this section in the article ''Selected Safety-Related Events,'' and a report on activities relating to facilities still in the construction process is given in the article ''Status of Power-Reactor Projects Undergoing Licensing Review'' in the last section of each issue of this journal. The reader's attention is also called to the regular feature ''General Administrative Activities,'' which deals with more general aspects of regulatory and legal matters that are not covered elsewhere in the journal

  8. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude

  9. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention comprises a γ-thermometer disposed in a BWR type reactor, a first amplifier for amplifying the output thereof, a fission ionization chamber disposed in the reactor separately from the γ-thermometer, a second amplifier for amplifying the output thereof, a differential circuit for differentiating the output signal of the second amplifier and a first adding circuit for adding an output signal of the differential circuit and an output signal of the first amplifier. Alternatively, a γ-ray self-powered neutron detector may be disposed instead of the fission ionization chamber. A second adding circuit is also disposed for adding the output signals of plurality of differentiation circuits and inputting the result to the first adding circuit. A sensitivity controller is disposed upstream of the first adder for controlling the sensitivity of the fission ionization chamber. Then, even if time delay should be caused in the γ-thermometer, output signals with good time response characteristic can be obtained by using signals of LPRM or SPND, and currently changing output of the reactor can be measured accurately to provide an effect on the improvement of the safety and operation controllability of the reactor. (N.H.)

  10. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tokamak experimental power reactor has been designed that is capable of producing net electric power over a wide range of possible operating conditions. A net production of 81 MW of electricity is expected from the design reference conditions that assume a value of 0.07 for beta-toroidal, a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 9 T and a thermal conversion efficiency of 30%. Impurity control is achieved through the use of a low-Z first wall coating. This approach allows a burn time of 60 seconds without the incorporation of a divertor. The system is cooled by a dual pressurized water/steam system that could potentially provide thermal efficiencies as high as 39%. The first surface facing the plasma is a low-Z coated water cooled panel that is attached to a 20 cm thick blanket module. The vacuum boundary is removed a total of 22 cm from the plasma, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation damage in this vital component. Consideration is given in the design to the possible use of the EPR as a materials test reactor. It is estimated that the total system could be built for less than 550 million dollars

  11. Power calibrations for TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a framework for the calorimetric power calibration of TRIGA reactors so that reliable results can be obtained with a precision better than ± 5%. Careful application of the same procedures has produced power calibration results that have been reproducible to ± 1.5%. The procedures are equally applicable to the Mark I, Mark II and Mark III reactors as well as to reactors having much larger reactor tanks and to TRIGA reactors capable of forced cooling up to 3 MW in some cases and 15 MW in another case. In the case of forced cooled TRIGA reactors, the calorimetric power calibration is applicable in the natural convection mode for these reactors using exactly the same procedures as are discussed below for the smaller TRIGA reactors (< 2 MW)

  12. 78 FR 23949 - Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Penobscot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... and Carlton Pond WPA. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 14984... Fish and Wildlife Service Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl... Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area (WPA), located...

  13. Power Reactors. Appendix VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in many countries has evolved into a mature industry that has benefited from experience gained from previous projects and decommissioning costs can now be estimated to a good degree of accuracy. As a result of lessons learned, future decommissioning projects can be performed with higher levels of efficiency. Decommissioning of old power reactors is in progress in several countries. In some cases, decommissioning has been completed (i.e. plant sites have been released from regulatory control), while in other countries decommissioning is still in progress. Several large power reactors have been successfully decommissioned since 1995. The key areas of particular importance for decommissioning are decontamination, radiation protection, dismantling and demolition. The technologies which can be used for these tasks are commonly available on the market, but effective decommissioning still depends on an optimal choice of technologies, including site specific developments. It is not possible to recommend the use of a single specific technology for dismantling, demolition, segmentation or decontamination; rather, it is good practice to take into account as much information as possible from other decommissioning projects and to draw comparisons between various techniques in order to choose the one with the best performance in a particular situation. The exchange of information on all types of decommissioning experience, including decommissioning techniques and their applicability as well as disadvantages for specific tasks, is taking place on various levels, such as: — Collaborative working groups established by international organizations such as the IAEA, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the European Commission and the publication of technical reports by such organizations; — National and international conferences; — Bilateral or multilateral cooperation and information exchange between organizations with responsibilities for

  14. Calibration of RB reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first and only calibration of RB reactor power was done in 1962, and the obtained calibration ratio was used irrespective of the lattice pitch and core configuration. Since the RB reactor is being prepared for operation at higher power levels it was indispensable to reexamine the calibration ratio, estimate its dependence on the lattice pitch, critical level of heavy water and thickness of the side reflector. It was necessary to verify the reliability of control and dosimetry instruments, and establish neutron and gamma dose dependence on reactor power. Two series of experiments were done in June 1976. First series was devoted to tests of control and dosimetry instrumentation and measurements of radiation in the RB reactor building dependent on reactor power. Second series covered measurement of thermal and epithermal neuron fluxes in the reactor core and calculation of reactor power. Four different reactor cores were chosen for these experiments. Reactor pitches were 8, 8√2, and 16 cm with 40, 52 and 82 fuel channels containing 2% enriched fuel. Obtained results and analysis of these results are presented in this document with conclusions related to reactor safe operation

  15. RITZ-CARLTON Ladies & Gentlemen Arriving to Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    "We plan to make a very positive impact in our community" --Vincent Mercurio As Beijing celebrates its two-year countdown to the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C., which operates 61 luxury hotels all over the world, is intensively preparing for the debut of its first hotel in the city, scheduled to

  16. Automatic reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) of a BWR type reactor is judged to generate a signal based on a reactor power signal and a scram actuation demand signal. The ATWS signal and a predetermined water level signal to be generated upon occurrence of ATWS are inputted, and an injection water flow rate signal exhibiting injection water flow rate optimum to reactor flooding and power suppression is outputted. In addition, a reactor pressure setting signal is outputted based on injection performance of a high pressure water injection system or a lower pressure water injection system upon occurrence of ATWS. Further, the reactor pressure setting signal is inputted to calculate opening/closing setting pressure of a main steam relief valve and output an opening setting pressure signal and a closure setting pressure signal for the main steam relief valve. As a result, the reactor power and the reactor water level can be automatically controlled even upon occurrence of ATWS due to failure of insertion of all of the control rods thereby enabling to maintain integrity and safety of the reactor, the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor container. (N.H.)

  17. Fractals in Power Reactor Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the non- lineal dynamic problem of power reactor is analyzed using classic concepts of fractal analysis as: attractors, Hausdorff-Besikovics dimension, phase space, etc. A new non-linear problem is also analyzed: the discrimination of chaotic signals from random neutron noise signals and processing for diagnosis purposes. The advantages of a fractal analysis approach in the power reactor noise are commented in details

  18. Power reactor information system (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the very beginning of commercial operation of nuclear power plants, the nuclear power industry worldwide has accumulated more than 5000 reactor years of experience. The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants since 1970 which were computerized in 1980. The Agency has undertaken to make Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) available on-line to its Member States. The aim of this publication is to provide the users of PRIS from their terminals with description of data base and communication systems and to show the methods of accessing the data

  19. Online Dissemination of Official Information - the 2014 Carlton Complex Wildfires

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Apoorva

    2016-01-01

    Using the 2014 Carlton Complex wildfires as a case study, we explore how emergency responders and the news media shared official information online during this crisis event. We first identified the local emergency response and news media agencies for this event and then collected data from each agency’s Facebook account, Twitter account, and website. The data show that most of the online information about this event came from the local agencies handling the event. The data also show that in m...

  20. Low-power nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief development history of low-power nuclear reactors is presented in this paper. Nowadays, some countries have plans to build a series of small nuclear power plants (also floating ones) for use in remote regions. Present constructions of such NPP are presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants of the IAEA Member States since 1970. In order to facilitate an analysis of nuclear power plant performance as well as to produce relevant publications, all previously collected data supplied from the questionnaires were computerized in 1980 and the Power Reactor Information System was implemented. PRIS currently contains production records for the years up to and including 1990 and about 98% of the reactors-years operating experience in the world is contained in PRIS. (orig.)

  2. Cascade ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double-cone-shaped Cascade reaction chamber rotates at 50 rpm to keep a blanket of ceramic granules in place against the wall as they slide from the poles to the exit slots at the equator. The 1 m-thick blanket consists of layers of carbon, beryllium oxide, and lithium aluminate granules about 1 mm in diameter. The x rays and debris are stopped in the carbon granules; the neutrons are multiplied and moderated in the BeO and breed tritium in the LiAlO2. The chamber wall is made up of SiO tiles held in compression by a network of composite SiC/Al tendons. Cascade operates at a 5 Hz pulse rate with 300 MJ in each pulse. The temperature in the blanket reaches 1600 K on the inner surface and 1350 K at the outer edge. The granules are automatically thrown into three separate vacuum heat exchangers where they give up their energy to high pressure helium. The helium is used in a Brayton cycle to obtain a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of 55%. Studies have been done on neutron activation, debris recovery, vaporization and recondensation of blanket material, tritium control and recovery, fire safety, and cost. These studies indicate that Cascade appears to be a promising ICF reactor candidate from all standpoints. At the 1000 MWe size, electricity could be made for about the same cost as in a future fission reactor

  3. Nuclear reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When occurrence of earthquakes is judged in a BWR type reactor, the power is decreased by inserting a portion of control rods, reducing a speed of recycling pumps, stopping recycling pumps, increasing the opening degree of a main steam control valve and opening a main steam relief valve. The reactor scram can be avoided by bypassing neutron flux high signal, settling a filter to neutron flux signals and setting a reactor scram set value by neutron flux signals, for example, to 120%. There is constituted an interlock for performing reactor scram when both of a neutron flux high signal and a signal outputted if a surface heat flux corresponding signal formed by applying calculation to the neutron flux high signal exceeds a set value are valid, to avoid unnecessary reactor scram. As a measuring means, not only an acceleration meter in the power plant, but also acceleration meters at remote places, acceleration meters or displacement meters for various kinds of equipments in the power plant are used, and when signals from them exceed set values, earthquake judgement is conducted. (N.H.)

  4. Low power unattended defense reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small, low power, passive, nuclear reactor electric power supply has been designed for unattended defense applications. Through innovative utilization of existing proven technologies and components, a highly reliable, walk-away safe design has been obtained. Operating at a thermal power level of 200 kWt, the reactor uses low enrichment uranium fuel in a graphite block core to generate heat that is transferred through heat pipes to a thermoelectric (TE) converter. Waste heat is removed from the TEs by circulation of ambient air. Because such a power supply offers the promise of minimal operation and maintenance (O and M) costs as well as no fuel logistics, it is particularly attractive for remote, unattended applications such as the North Warning System

  5. Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement predication models and of pressure vessel integrity can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed, computerized data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for US commercial nuclear reactors. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has provided financial support, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has provided technical assistance in the quality assurance (QA) of the data to establish an industry-wide data base that will be maintained and updated on a long-term basis. Successful applications of the data base to several of NRC's evaluations have received favorable response and support for its continuation. The future direction of the data base has been designed to include the test reactor and other types of data of interest to the regulators and the researchers. 1 ref

  6. Experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following five topics are discussed using figures and diagrams: (1) energy storage and transfer program, (2) thermomechanical analysis, (3) a steam dual-cycle power conversion system for the EPR, (4) EPR tritium facility scoping studies, and (5) vacuum systems

  7. Tokamak experimental power reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal results of a scoping and project definition study for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor are presented. Objectives are discussed; a preliminary conceptual design is described; detailed parametric, survey and sensitivity studies are presented; and research and development requirements are outlined. (U.S.)

  8. Sarah and Constant Broyer, Pharmacist and Physician, of Carlton

    OpenAIRE

    Haig, David Addison

    2012-01-01

    Constant Broyer (1833–1911) trained as a herbalist in Victoria during the 1850s and practised as a medical botanist in Carlton in the 1860s. He obtained medical degrees from the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati (1875) and Harvard University (1879). He is perhaps the first Australian to have studied at Harvard. He was twice found guilty of manslaughter by a coroner’s jury in 1874 and 1896. Both cases were much publicised but Broyer was not prosecuted on either charge. His wife, Sarah Bro...

  9. 78 FR 66056 - Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Penobscot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... and Carlton Pond WPA. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 14984... Sunkhaze Meadows NWR and Carlton Pond WPA from April 23 to May 31, 2013 (78 FR 23949). During the comment... requesting comments in a notice of availability in the Federal Register (78 FR 23949). Currently,...

  10. TRIGA Reactor Power Upgrading Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor physics safety analysis supporting the power upgrading from 1MW to 2MW of a typical TRIGA Mark II reactor is presented for steady state and pulse operation. The analysis is performed for mixed core configuration consisting of two types of fuel elements: standard 8,5% or 12% stainless-steel clad fuel elements and LEU fuel elements (20% uranium concentration). The following reactor physics codes are applied: WIMS, TRIGAC, EXTERMINATOR, PULSTRI and TRISTAN. Results of the calculations are compared to experiments for steady state operation at 1 MW. The analysis shows that besides technical modifications of the core (installation of an additional control rod) also some strict administrative limitations have to be imposed on operational parameters (excess reactivity, pulse reactivity, core composition) to assure safe operation within design limits. (author)

  11. Neutronics of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review, prepared on the occasion of 25th ETAN Conference describes the research activities in the field of neutronics which started in 1947. A number of researchers in Yugoslav Institutes was engaged in development of neutronics theory and calculation methods related to power reactors since 1960. To illustrate the activities of Yugoslav authors, this review contains the list of the most important relevant papers published in international journals

  12. Reactor power for space exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential 21st century missions envisioned by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) planners encompass ambitious, wide-ranging human and robotic solar system exploration objectives and scenarios. A critical common element in many of these future civil space mission initiatives is the ability to generate, with a very high degree of reliability, the considerable amounts of power needed to realize the mission goals. The extended duration and/or high power level requirements for many missions and, in instances, the lack of adequate solar energy flux for others, render the use of versatile nuclear power sources as either missions-enabling or very advantageous. Further, the use of high-performance reactor systems, when coupled with very high impulse electric propulsion systems, can enable or significantly enhance both human near-planets operations and robotic scientific missions to the very farthest reaches of the solar system. It is important that this nation continue to develop the means of acquiring a space reactor power source to ensure availability at such time that approved missions and possibly political considerations warrant its use

  13. Prospects for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A searching examination of the present status of nuclear power technology and economics was made in 64 papers presented to the Conference on Small and Medium Power Reactors held by the IAEA in Vienna during the week 5 - 9 September 1960. The IAEA Conference concentrated on small and medium power reactors because these are the sizes of primary interest to less-developed countries around the world. The Conference brought forward information on a wide range of subjects related to power reactors, including power costs, summaries of national programs, applications in less-developed countries, process heat reactors, reactor safety, results of experience in the actual construction and operation of power reactors and technical appraisals of various reactor types

  14. Feasible reactor power cutback logic development for an integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Soon-Kyoo [KHNP Co., Ltd., Uljin-gun, Gyeong-buk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chung-Chan; Choi, Suhn; Kang, Han-Ok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Major features of integral reactors that have been developed around the world recently are simplified operating systems and passive safety systems. Even though highly simplified control system and very reliable components are utilized in the integral reactor, the possibility of major component malfunction cannot be ruled out. So, feasible reactor power cutback logic is required to cope with the malfunction of components without inducing reactor trip. Simplified reactor power cutback logic has been developed on the basis of the real component data and operational parameters of plant in this study. Due to the relatively high rod worth of the integral reactor the control rod assembly drop method which had been adapted for large nuclear power plants was not desirable for reactor power cutback of the integral reactor. Instead another method, the control rod assembly control logic of reactor regulating system controls the control rod assembly movements, was chosen as an alternative. Sensitivity analyses and feasibility evaluations were performed for the selected method by varying the control rod assembly driving speed. In the results, sensitivity study showed that the performance goal of reactor power cutback system could be achieved with the limited range of control rod assembly driving speed. (orig.)

  15. Feasible reactor power cutback logic development for an integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major features of integral reactors that have been developed around the world recently are simplified operating systems and passive safety systems. Even though highly simplified control system and very reliable components are utilized in the integral reactor, the possibility of major component malfunction cannot be ruled out. So, feasible reactor power cutback logic is required to cope with the malfunction of components without inducing reactor trip. Simplified reactor power cutback logic has been developed on the basis of the real component data and operational parameters of plant in this study. Due to the relatively high rod worth of the integral reactor the control rod assembly drop method which had been adapted for large nuclear power plants was not desirable for reactor power cutback of the integral reactor. Instead another method, the control rod assembly control logic of reactor regulating system controls the control rod assembly movements, was chosen as an alternative. Sensitivity analyses and feasibility evaluations were performed for the selected method by varying the control rod assembly driving speed. In the results, sensitivity study showed that the performance goal of reactor power cutback system could be achieved with the limited range of control rod assembly driving speed. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of higher power research reactors' parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this monograph was to analyze and compare parameters of different types of research reactors having higher power. This analysis could be used for decision making and choice of a reactor which could possibly replace the existing ageing RA reactor in Vinca. Present experimental and irradiation needs are taken into account together with the existing reactors operated in our country, RB and TRIGA reactor

  17. Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He3 reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored

  18. Performance indicators for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of Canadian and worldwide performance indicator definitions and data was performed to identify a set of indicators that could be used for comparison of performance among nuclear power plants. The results of this review are to be used as input to an AECB team developing a consistent set of performance indicators for measuring Canadian power reactor safety performance. To support the identification of performance indicators, a set of criteria was developed to assess the effectiveness of each indicator for meaningful comparison of performance information. The project identified a recommended set of performance indicators that could be used by AECB staff to compare the performance of Canadian nuclear power plants among themselves, and with international performance. The basis for selection of the recommended set and exclusion of others is provided. This report provides definitions and calculation methods for each recommended performance indicator. In addition, a spreadsheet has been developed for comparison and trending for the recommended set of indicators. Example trend graphs are included to demonstrate the use of the spreadsheet. (author). 50 refs., 11 tabs., 3 figs

  19. Safety analysis for non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-power reactors have been operating in Canada since 1945, with NRU (National Research Universal, 1957) being the oldest operating non-power reactor. Presently, there are five generic 'types' of non-power reactors: NRU, ZED-2, SLOWPOKE, MNR and MAPLE, the latter undergoing commissioning as the MDS Medical Isotope Reactor. These reactors range in thermal power from 200 Watts to more than 100 MW. Other non-power reactors are likely to be built for new applications and to replace older reactors. The uniqueness of each reactor, the wide range of power levels and the evolution of safety philosophy over time have lead to non-uniform practices for safety analysis. This non-uniformity may be a problem for the preparation by the licensee and review by the regulator of the safety analysis report required for licensing of the reactor facility. Clearly, there is no universally applicable practice, while at the same time, expectations for safety analyses have evolved in order to demonstrate higher levels of overall safety. This paper examines a new 'graded approach' to preparing the safety analysis report for reactors of diverse features but with a common standard of safety. It discusses necessary content, methods and the training and qualification of the safety analyst. (author)

  20. Reactor power measuring method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns measurement of a BWR type reactor power and provides a method of and a device for ensuring accuracy of calibration of sensitivity of neutron detectors and measurement of reactor power even if γ-ray thermometers are failed. Namely, the output signals of the γ-ray thermometers are compared with previously determined judging values to detect failures. The reactor power is measured based on the signals of neutron detectors calibrated by integral thermometers except for neutron detectors calibrated by γ-ray thermometers detected as failed. Calibration for sensitivity of neutron detectors as objects of γ-ray thermometers detected as failed is preferably prohibited. Accuracy of measurement of the reactor power can be ensured by the method described above. If axial power distribution of the reactor core is measured while eliminating the signals of γ-ray thermometers detected as failed, accuracy of the measurement of axial power distribution can be ensured. (N.H.)

  1. Applications of a low power nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Omaha Nebraska Veterans Administration Medical Center (OVAMC) TRIGA reactor is a research reactor designed and fabricated by General Atomic. The reactor first achieved criticality on June 30, 1959. It is a below grade, open-tank-type, ligh water moderated, cooled, and shielded reactor that currently is authorized to operate in the steady-state mode at thermal power levels up to 18KW with an excess reactivity limitation of 0.79% Delta K/K. (author)

  2. Automatic power control system for 235 MWe atomic power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper highlights the essential features of the design, fabrication and testing of microprocessor based reactor power regulating system of Narora Atomic Power Plant (NAPP) and Kakrapar Atomic Power Plant (KAPP). The improved system design at KAPP employs the reactor power control based on neutron flux signal after correction. The control system responses have been presented and compared with the responses using a reactor functional simulator. A new fault tolerant reactor regulating system has been designed using a dual active and hot stand-by microprocessor system to improve operational reliability. (author). 1 ref., 8 figs

  3. Power Control Method for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baang, Dane; Suh, Yongsuk; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Considering safety-oriented design concept and other control environment, we developed a simple controller that provides limiting function of power change- rate as well as fine tracking performance. The design result has been well-proven via simulation and actual application to a TRIGA-II type research reactor. The proposed controller is designed to track the PDM(Power Demand) from operator input as long as maintaining the power change rate lower than a certain value for stable reactor operation. A power control method for a TRIGA-II type research reactor has been designed, simulated, and applied to actual reactor. The control performance during commissioning test shows that the proposed controller provides fine control performance for various changes in reference values (PDM), even though there is large measurement noise from neutron detectors. The overshoot at low power level is acceptable in a sense of reactor operation.

  4. Fast reactors: potential for power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed as follows: basic facts about conventional and fast reactors; uranium economy; plutonium and fast reactors; cooling systems; sodium coolant; safety engineering; handling and recycling plutonium; safeguards; development of fast reactors in Britain and abroad; future progress. (U.K.)

  5. Higher power density TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium zirconium hydride (U-ZrH) fuel is the fundamental feature of the TRIGA family of reactors that accounts for its widely recognized safety, good performance, economy of operation, and its acceptance worldwide. Of the 65 TRIGA reactors or TRIGA fueled reactors, several are located in hospitals or hospital complexes and in buildings that house university classrooms. These examples are a tribute to the high degree of safety of the operating TRIGA reactor. In the early days, the majority of the TRIGA reactors had power levels in the range from 10 to 250 kW, many with pulsing capability. An additional number had power levels up to 1 MW. By the late 1970's, seven TRIGA reactors with power levels up to 2 MW had been installed. A reduction in the rate of worldwide construction of new research reactors set in during the mid 1970's but construction of occasional research reactors has continued until the present. Performance of higher power TRIGA reactors are presented as well as the operation of higher power density reactor cores. The extremely safe TRIGA fuel, including the more recent TRIGA LEU fuel, offers a wide range of possible reactor configurations. A long core life is assured through the use of a burnable poison in the TRIGA LEU fuel. In those instances where large neutron fluxes are desired but relatively low power levels are also desired, the 19-rod hexagonal array of small diameter fuel rods offers exciting possibilities. The small diameter fuel rods have provided extremely long and trouble-free operation in the Romanian 14 MW TRIGA reactor

  6. Power source device for reactor recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention prevents occurrence of an accident of a reactor forecast upon spontaneous power stoppage, loss of power source or trip of the reactor. Namely, a AC/DC converter and a DC/AC connector having an AC voltage frequency controller are connected in series between an AC (bus) in the plant and reactor recycling pumps. A DC voltage controller, a superconductive energy storing device and an excitation power source are connected to the input of the DC/AC converter. The control device receives signals of the spontaneous power stoppage, loss of power source or trip of the reactor to maintain the output voltage of the superconductive energy storing device to a predetermined value. Further, the ratio of AC power voltage and the frequency of AC voltage to be supplied to the reactor recycling pumps is constantly varied to control the flow rate of the pump to a predetermined value. With such procedures, a power source device for the reactor recycling pumps compact in size, easy for maintenance and having high reliability can be realized by adopting a static-type superconductive energy storing device as an auxiliary power source for the reactor recycling pumps. (I.S.)

  7. Thyristor Controlled Reactor for Power Factor Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Mahapatra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Power factor improvement is the essence of any power sector for reliable operation. This paper provides Thyristor Controlled Reactor regulated by programmed microcontroller which aids in improving power factor and retaining it close to unity under various loading conditions. The implementation is done on 8051 microcontrollerwhich isprogrammed using Keil software. To determine time lag between current and voltage PSpice softwareis used and to display power factor according tothe variation in loadProteus software is used. Whenever a capacitive load is connected to the transmission linea shunt reactor is connected which injects lagging reactive VARs to the power system. As a result the power factor is improved. The results given in this paper provides suitable microcontroller based reactive power compensation and power factor improvement technique using a Thyristor Controlled Reactor module.

  8. Small and medium power reactors 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This TECDOC follows the publication of TECDOC-347 Small and Medium Power Reactors Project Initiation Study - Phase I published in 1985 and TECDOC-376 Small and Medium Power Reactors 1985 published in 1986. It is mainly intended for decision makers in Developing Member States interested in embarking on a nuclear power programme. It consists of two parts: 1) Guidelines for the Introduction of Small and Medium Power Reactors in Developing Countries. These Guidelines were established during the Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna from 11 to 15 May 1987. Their purpose is to review key aspects relating to the introduction of Small and Medium Power Reactors in developing countries; 2) Up-dated Information on SMPR Concepts Contributed by Supplier Industries. According to the recommendations of the Second Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, this part contains the up-dated information formerly published in Annex I of the above mentioned TECDOC-347. Figs

  9. MIT research reactor. Power uprate and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is a university research reactor located on MIT campus. and has a long history in supporting research and education. Recent accomplishments include a 20% power rate to 6 MW and expanding advanced materials fuel testing program. Another important ongoing initiative is the conversion to high density low enrichment uranium (LEU) monolithic U-Mo fuel, which will consist of a new fuel element design and power increase to 7 MW. (author)

  10. reactor power control using fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    power stabilization is a critical issue in nuclear reactors. convention pd- controller is currently used in egypt second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). two fuzzy controllers are proposed to control the reactor power of ETRR-2 reactor. the design of the first one is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operators experience. after off-line fuzzy computations, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real time controller is achieved. comparing this f lc response with the pd-controller response, which already exists in the system, through studying the expected transients during the normal operation of ETRR-2 reactor, the simulation results show that, fl s has the better response, the second controller is adaptive fuzzy controller, which is proposed to deal with system non-linearity . The simulation results show that the proposed adaptive fuzzy controller gives a better integral square error (i se) index than the existing conventional od controller

  11. New generation of reactors for space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space nuclear reactor power is expected to enable many new space missions that will require several times to several orders of magnitude anything flown in space to date. Power in the 100-kW range may be required in high earth orbit spacecraft and planetary exploration. The technology for this power system range is under development for the Department of Energy with the Los Alamos National Laboratory responsible for the critical components in the nuclear subsystem. The baseline design for this particular nuclear sybsystem technology is described in this paper; additionally, reactor technology is reviewed from previous space power programs, a preliminary assessment is made of technology candidates covering an extended power spectrum, and the status is given of other reactor technologies

  12. BN-1200 reactor power unit design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February 2010, the RF Government has approved the Federal Target Program “New Generation Nuclear Power Technologies for the Period of 2010-2015 and for the long-term up to 2020”. Within this Program, the R&D work for new generation 1200MWe sodium fast reactor is provided. The BN-1200 design is based on the combination of approved and innovative technical decisions, which allow: – reliable power unit with large BN reactor to be developed in a short period of time for commercial construction as a part of closed nuclear fuel cycle; – qualitatively new technical level of power unit to be provided according to generation 4 NPP requirements. The paper characterizes the activities performed now for the power unit design in various areas: – power unit design; – reactor plant (RP) detailed design development; – R&D work to validate the RP system and equipment; – code upgrading and verification; – safety validation. (author)

  13. Extended Cooling System for High Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) and proposed for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) could provide sufficient heat removal for higher power reactors. This paper proposes a dual retention strategy to realize fail-proof defense-in-depth in the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) and the OPR 1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe). The dual retention has the advantage of IVR-ERVC as well as ex-vessel cooling (EVC) strategies. The multilateral, multidisciplinary project calls for national and international cutting-edge technologies to research and produce (R and P) the D2R2 (Duel Retention Demonstration Reactor) equipped with OASIS (Optimized Advanced Safety Injection System) and ROSIS (Reactor Outer Safety Injection System) to cope with design-basis accidents and beyond in a coherent, continual, comprehensive manner. The enterprise aims to develop the design-basis and severe accident engineering solutions. The enterprise aims to develop the design-basis and severe accident engineering solutions. The former embraces ISAIAH (Injection System Annular Interactive Aero Hydrodynamics) and MESIAH (Methodical Evaluation System Interactive Aero Hydrodynamics). The latter comprises GODIVA (Geo metrics of Direct Injection Versatile Arrangement), SONATA (Simulation of Narrow Annular Thermomechanical Arrest or), TOCATA (Termination of Corium Ablation Thermal Attack) and STRADA (Solution to Reactor Advanced Design Alternatives). D2R2 will contribute to enhancement of both safety and economics for an advanced high power particular and nuclear power in general

  14. Power calibration study at the Musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Musashi reactor (TRIGA-II,100 kW) initially went critical in January of 1963. The reactor had been used for training, isotope production and medical irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy (1). The initial power calibration was based on the use of a calibrated electrical heater in a calorimetric procedure where the rate of rise of the bulk pit water temperature was measured using 2 kW heaters x 6 pieces. The rate of rise of water temperature was determined to be 0.0474 C/kWh. The reactor was then operated to give the same rate of rise of water temperature. Thus the reactor power was established at the value produced by the electrical heaters. A stirrer for tank water mixing was not used. Recent communications (2)(3) indicated that power calibrations using a stirrer provided a much more uniform mixing, and heating in the reactor tank water which was essential for an accurate calibration. In this paper, the effect of mixing using a stirrer was investigated considering the physical factors such as room temperature, humidity, tank water temperature and it's distributions. The room temperature and humidity around the reactor varies 6-30 and 30-80 %, respectively, depending on four seasons. The heat flow through the surface of the pool was also evaluated because the reactor usually operates without cover on the surface of the pool. (orig.)

  15. Thorium utilization in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the recent (prior to Aug, 1976) literature on thorium utilization is reviewed briefly and the available information is updated. After reviewing the nuclear properties relevant to the thorium fuel cycle we describe briefly the reactor systems that have been proposed using thorium as a fertile material. (author)

  16. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  17. Heat pipe reactors for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, D. R.; Ranken, W. A.; Salmi, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kWe and operate in the temperature range 1200-1700 K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO2. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor. Virtues of the reactor designs are the avoidance of single-point failure mechanisms, the relatively high operating temperature, and the expected long lifetimes of the fuel element components.

  18. The Swedish Zero Power Reactor R0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor R0 is a critical facility built for heavy water and natural uranium or fuel of low enrichment,, The first criticality was achieved September 25, 1959. During a first period of more than two years the R0 will be operated as a bare reactor in order to simplify interpretation of results. The reactor tank is 3. 2 m high and 2. 25 m in diameter. The fuel suspension system is quite flexible in order to facilitate fuel exchange and lattice variations. The temperature of the water can be varied between about 10 and 90 C by means of a heater and a cooler placed in the external circulating system. The instrumentation of the reactor has to meet the safety requirements not only during operation but also during rearrangements of the core in the shut-down state. Therefore, the shut-down state is always defined by a certain low 'safe' moderator level in the reactor tank. A number of safety rods are normally kept above the moderator ready for action. For manual or automatic control of the reactor power a specially designed piston pump is needed, by which the moderator level is varied. The pump speed is controlled from the reactor power error by means of a Ward-Leonard system. Moderator level measurement is made by means of a water gauge with an accuracy of ± 0. 1 mm

  19. The Swedish Zero Power Reactor R0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landergaard, Olof; Cavallin, Kaj; Jonsson, Georg

    1961-05-15

    The reactor R0 is a critical facility built for heavy water and natural uranium or fuel of low enrichment,, The first criticality was achieved September 25, 1959. During a first period of more than two years the R0 will be operated as a bare reactor in order to simplify interpretation of results. The reactor tank is 3. 2 m high and 2. 25 m in diameter. The fuel suspension system is quite flexible in order to facilitate fuel exchange and lattice variations. The temperature of the water can be varied between about 10 and 90 C by means of a heater and a cooler placed in the external circulating system. The instrumentation of the reactor has to meet the safety requirements not only during operation but also during rearrangements of the core in the shut-down state. Therefore, the shut-down state is always defined by a certain low 'safe' moderator level in the reactor tank. A number of safety rods are normally kept above the moderator ready for action. For manual or automatic control of the reactor power a specially designed piston pump is needed, by which the moderator level is varied. The pump speed is controlled from the reactor power error by means of a Ward-Leonard system. Moderator level measurement is made by means of a water gauge with an accuracy of {+-} 0. 1 mm.

  20. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  1. Ritz-Carlton,Sanya,Helmsman Talks About HR Management and the Hotel Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    "There is not much difference between managing a hotel overseas and HR management in China,"said Michel L.Goget,the General Manager of the Ritz-Carlton,Sanya,who has been living and working in China for about four years."We look at our

  2. Power Nuclear Reactors: technology and innovation for development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference is about some historicals task of the fission technology as well as many types of Nuclear Reactors. Enrichment of fuel, wastes, research reactors and power reactors, a brief advertisment about Uruguay electric siystem and power generation, energetic worldwide, proliferation, safety reactors, incidents, accidents, Three-Mile Island accident, Chernobil accident, damages, risks, classification and description of Power reactors steam generation, nuclear reactor cooling systems, future view

  3. Power Reactors in Small Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R.

    1968-10-01

    This booklet discusses the introduction of nuclear power to remote places on earth where the resources of civilization are almost scarce. It also discusses nuclear power plants designed for use when warfare or natural catastrophes have wiped out the usual sources of energy, and in places beyond the reach of oil pipelines and coal trains. It also discusses how nuclear power may one day be used to manufacture chemical fuels for the world's vehicles when fossil fuels begin to run out.

  4. CNSC power reactor operating licence reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CNSC staff introduced a new Power Reactor Operating Licence (PROL) in order to strengthen the regulatory oversight of power reactor operation, while increasing regulatory effectiveness and efficiency by focusing on risk-significant issues and reducing purely administrative efforts. The PROLs have been simplified by incorporating a more risk-informed approach and by eliminating cascading references to working level licensee documentation and regulatory expectations. To ensure that there is a common understanding for each requirement specified in the PROL, CNSC staff prepared a Licence Conditions Handbook (LCH), which provides technical details and compliance verification criteria on how licence conditions are to be met. (author)

  5. Reactor power system deployment and startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetch, J. R.; Nelin, C. J.; Britt, E. J.; Klein, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems.

  6. Fusion experimental power reactor (EPR) design tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several key physics and technology problem areas which were identified in a previous Experimental Power Reactor study were investigated. These were plasma confinement, plasma heating, reactor refueling, and reactor first wall regeneration. The plasma confinement experimental studies showed no instabilities or enhanced transport in the trapped ion regime. The RF heating experiments indicated that RF could produce highly efficient plasma heating. Two reactor refueling schemes were considered in a theoretical analysis: the first was the convective transport from the cold plasma blanket to the plasma interior and the second was the use of high speed frozen pellets to carry the fuel to the plasma interior. Both schemes were shown to be feasible. Finally, the ''in-situ'' replacement of first walls using atomic coating processes were considered. The vapor deposition of carbon was shown to be promising

  7. Fusion experimental power reactor (EPR) design tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several key physics and technology problem areas which were identified in the previous Experimental Power Reactor study were investigated. These were plasma confinement, plasma heating, reactor refueling, and reactor first wall regeneration. The plasma confinement experimental studies showed no instabilities or enhanced transport in the trapped ion regime. The RF heating experiments indicated that RF could produce highly efficient plasma heating. Two reactor refueling schemes was considered in a theoretical analysis: the first was the convective transport from the cold plasma blanket to the plasma interior and the second was the use of high speed frozen pellets to carry the fuel to the plasma interior. Both schemes were shown to be feasible. Finally, the in-situ replacement of first walls using atomic coating processes was considered. The vapor deposition of carbon was shown to be promising

  8. Simulation of power excursions - Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the experimental work accomplished in the U.S.A. on Borax 1 and SPERT 1 and the accident of SL 1, the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' started a research program about the safety of its own swimming Pool reactors, with regard to power excursions. The first research work led to the design of programmed explosive charges, adapted to the simulation of a power excursion. This report describes the application of these methods to the investigation of Osiris safety. (author)

  9. Utilization of thorium in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA convened a Panel on the utilization of thorium in power reactors from 14 to 18 June 1965. 45 scientists from 14 countries and two international organizations took part in it. The proceedings of the Panel include 23 survey papers and brief reviews which stress the importance of utilizing thorium. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, tabs, figs

  10. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined

  11. Reactor power distribution pattern judging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The judging device of the present invention comprises a power distribution readout system for intaking a power value from a fuel segment, a neural network having an experience learning function for receiving a power distribution value as an input variant, mapping it into a desirable property and self-organizing the map, and a learning date base storing a plurality of learnt samples. The read power distribution is classified depending on the similarity thereof with any one of representative learnt power distribution, and the corresponding state of the reactor core is outputted as a result of the judgement. When an error is found in the classified judging operation, erroneous cases are additionally learnt by using the experience and learning function, thereby improving the accuracy of the reactor core characteristic estimation operation. Since the device is mainly based on the neural network having a self-learning function and a pattern classification and judging function, a judging device having a human's intuitive pattern recognition performance and a pattern experience and learning performance is obtainable, thereby enabling to judge the state of the reactor core accurately. (N.H.)

  12. Experimental development of power reactor intelligent control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US nuclear utility industry initiated an ambitious program to modernize the control systems at a minimum of ten existing nuclear power plants by the year 2000. That program addresses urgent needs to replace obsolete instrumentation and analog controls with highly reliable state-of-the-art computer-based digital systems. Large increases in functionality that could theoretically be achieved in a distributed digital control system are not an initial priority in the industry program but could be logically considered in later phases. This paper discusses the initial development of an experimental sequence for developing, testing, and verifying intelligent fault-accommodating control for commercial nuclear power plant application. The sequence includes an ultra-safe university research reactor (TRIGA) and a passively safe experimental power plant (Experimental Breeder Reactor 2)

  13. Utilization of stable isotopes in power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stable isotopes, besides uranium, used in EDF power nuclear reactors are mainly the boron 10 and the lithium 7. Boron is used in reactors as a neutrophagous agent for core reactivity control, and lithium, and more especially lithium 7, is extensively used as a solution in PWR moderators for primary fluid pH control. Boron and lithium ore reserves and producers are presented; industrial isotopic separation techniques are described: for the boron 10, they include dissociative distillation (Sulzer process) and separation on anionic resins, and for lithium 7, ion exchange columns (Cogema). 1 tab

  14. TRIGA research reactors with higher power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent trend in new or upgraded research reactors is to higher power densities (hence higher neutron flux levels) but not necessarily to higher power levels. The TRIGA LEU fuel with burnable poison is available in small diameter fuel rods capable of high power per rod (∼48 kW/rod) with acceptable peak fuel temperatures. The performance of a 10-MW research reactor with a compact core of hexagonal TRIGA fuel clusters has been calculated in detail. With its light water coolant, beryllium and D2O reflector regions, this reactor can provide in-core experiments with thermal fluxes in excess of 3 x 1014 n/cm2·s and fast fluxes (> 0.1 MeV) of 2 x 1014 n/cm2·s. The core centerline thermal neutron flux in the D2O reflector is about 2 x 1014 n/cm2·s and the average core power density is about 230 kW/liter. Using other TRIGA fuel developed for 25-MW test reactors but arranged in hexagonal arrays, power densities in excess of 300 kW/liter are readily available. A core with TRIGA fuel operating at 15-MW and generating such a power density is capable of producing thermal neutron fluxes in a D2O reflector of 3 x 1014 n/cm2·s. A beryllium-filled central region of the core can further enhance the core leakage and hence the neutron flux in the reflector. (author)

  15. Small power sodium cooled fast nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1.5 MW(e), 12 MW(e) and 170 MW(e) small power sodium cooled fast reactors have been developed. The reactor plants were developed as universal power units for economically effective energy and industrial steam generation and heat supply. The main features increasing the power unit economic efficiency are: serial fabrication of standard RPs at the factory and delivery of reactor vessels in ready made form; realization of self-protection principles and use of passive systems in RP; use of standard machine room equipment, fabricated in accordance with the rules of conventional heat power engineering; use of turbine plant with thermodynamic coefficient, exceeding the corresponding value for the plants of PWR type. For MBRU-1.5 and MBRU-12 RPs it is proposed to use a core without FA replacement during the whole service life (30 years) and for BMN-170 RP it is proposed to use a core with a 4 year operating period and 1 year between the refueling shutdowns. During the whole service life a minimal number of operating personnel will be needed for the plant servicing. The personnel functions will be periodically to observe the parameters of technological process. Passive principles are used in the main RP safety systems: a passive type system of emergency residual heat removal system provides heat removal directly through the reactor vessel forced air cooling due to the natural air chimney effect; an emergency reactor shut-down system is provided by emergency protection rods with active-passive action. (author)

  16. Safety Analysis for Power Reactor Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main function of a Reactor Protection System (RPS) is to safely shutdown the reactor and prevents the release of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to present a technique and its application for used in the analysis of safety system of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). A more advanced technique has been presented to accurately study such problems as the plant availability assessments and Technical Specifications evaluations that are becoming increasingly important. The paper provides the Markov model for the Reactor Protection System of the NPP and presents results of model evaluations for two testing policies in technical specifications. The quantification of the Markov model provides the probability values that the system will occupy each of the possible states as a function of time.

  17. 78 FR 64028 - Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... regulatory guide (RG) 1.184 ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors.'' This guide describes a method NRC... decommissioning process for nuclear power reactors. The revision takes advantage of the 13 years...

  18. Modular stellarator reactor: a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative analysis of the modular stellarator and the torsatron concepts is made based upon a steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, reactor embodiment of each concept for use as a central electric-power station. Parametric tradeoff calculations lead to the selection of four design points for an approx. 4-GWt plant based upon Alcator transport scaling in l = 2 systems of moderate aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-(0.08) and low-(0.04) beta versions of the modular stellarator and torsatron concepts. The physics basis of each design point is described together with supporting engineering and economic analyses. The primary intent of this study is the elucidation of key physics and engineering tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties with respect to the ultimate power reactor embodiment

  19. A series of lectures on operational physics of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses certain aspects of operational physics of power reactors. These form a lecture series at the Winter College on Nuclear Physics and Reactors, Jan. - March 1980, conducted at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy. The topics covered are (a) the reactor physics aspects of fuel burnup (b) theoretical methods applied for burnup prediction in power reactors (c) interpretation of neutron detector readings in terms of adjacent fuel assembly powers (d) refuelling schemes used in power reactors. The reactor types chosen for the discussion are BWR, PWR and PHWR. (author)

  20. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion

  1. Leaching of nuclear power reactor wastes forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching tests for power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN/CNEN-SP are described. These waste forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. 3 years leaching results are reported, determining cesium and strontium diffusivity coefficients for boric acid waste form and ion-exchange resins. (Author)

  2. Small and medium power reactors 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is intended for designers and planners concerned with Small and Medium Power Reactors. It provides a record of the presentations during the meetings held on this subject at the Agency's General Conference in September 1985. This information should be useful as it indicates the principal findings and main conclusions and recommendations resulting from these meetings. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 10 presentations in this report

  3. Nuclear power reactors and hydrogen storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among conclusions and results come by, a nuclear-electric-hydrogen integrated power system was suggested as a way to prevent the energy crisis. It was shown that the hydrogen power system using nuclear power as a leading energy resource would hold an advantage in the current international situation as well as for the long-term future. Results reported provide designers of integrated nuclear-electric-hydrogen systems with computation models and routines which will allow them to explore the optimal solution in coupling power reactors to hydrogen producing systems, taking into account the specific characters of hydrogen storage systems. The models were meant for average computers of a type easily available in developing countries. (author)

  4. Power reactor noise studies and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis deals with the neutron noise arising in power reactor systems. Generally, it can be divided into two major parts: first, neutron noise diagnostics, or more specifically, novel methods and algorithms to monitor nuclear industrial reactors; and second, contributions to neutron noise theory as applied to power reactor systems. Neutron noise diagnostics is presented by two topics. The first one is a theoretical study on the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) for the localisation of anomalies. The second topic concerns various methods to detect guide tube impacting in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The significance of these problems comes from the operational experience. The thesis describes a novel method to localise vibrating control rods in a PWR by using only one C/F detector. Another novel method, based on wavelet analysis, is put forward to detect impacting guide tubes in a BWR. Neutron noise theory is developed for both Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and traditional reactors. By design the accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and methods that have been developed for traditional reactors and also it poses a number of new problems. As for the latter, the thesis investigates the space-dependent neutron noise caused by a fluctuating source. It is shown that the frequency-dependent spatial behaviour exhibits some new properties that are different from those known in traditional critical systems. On the other hand, various reactor physics approximations (point kinetic, adiabatic etc.) have not been defined yet for the subcritical systems. In this respect the thesis presents a systematic formulation of the above mentioned approximations as well as investigations of their properties. Another important problem in neutron noise theory is the treatment of moving boundaries. In this case one

  5. Power reactor noise studies and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzhanov, V

    2002-03-01

    The present thesis deals with the neutron noise arising in power reactor systems. Generally, it can be divided into two major parts: first, neutron noise diagnostics, or more specifically, novel methods and algorithms to monitor nuclear industrial reactors; and second, contributions to neutron noise theory as applied to power reactor systems. Neutron noise diagnostics is presented by two topics. The first one is a theoretical study on the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) for the localisation of anomalies. The second topic concerns various methods to detect guide tube impacting in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The significance of these problems comes from the operational experience. The thesis describes a novel method to localise vibrating control rods in a PWR by using only one C/F detector. Another novel method, based on wavelet analysis, is put forward to detect impacting guide tubes in a BWR. Neutron noise theory is developed for both Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and traditional reactors. By design the accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and methods that have been developed for traditional reactors and also it poses a number of new problems. As for the latter, the thesis investigates the space-dependent neutron noise caused by a fluctuating source. It is shown that the frequency-dependent spatial behaviour exhibits some new properties that are different from those known in traditional critical systems. On the other hand, various reactor physics approximations (point kinetic, adiabatic etc.) have not been defined yet for the subcritical systems. In this respect the thesis presents a systematic formulation of the above mentioned approximations as well as investigations of their properties. Another important problem in neutron noise theory is the treatment of moving boundaries. In this case one

  6. Operating U.S. power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the United States which have been issued operating licenses. Table I shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of June 30, 1992, the end of the three-month period covered in this report Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three-months covered in each report and the cumulative values of these parameters at the end of the covered quarter since the beginning of commercial operation. The information for this table was obtained from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Information Resources Management. The Maximum Dependable Capacity (MDC) Unit Capacity (in percent) is defined as follows: (Net electrical energy generated during the reporting period x 100) divided by the product of the number of hours in the reporting period and the MDC of the reactor in question. The forced outage rate (in percent) is defined as: (The total number of hours in the reporting period during which the unit was inoperable as the result of a forced outage x 100) divided by the sum (forced outage hours + operating hours)

  7. Operating U.S. power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the United States which have been issued operating licenses. Table 1 shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of Sept. 30, 1990, the end of the three-month period covered in this report. Table 2 used to list the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three months covered in each report and the cummulative values of these parameters since the beginning of commercial operation. Since, however, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) publication NUREG-0200, known as 'The Gray Book,' which has been the source of this information, has been discontinued, in this issue, and henceforth until other data again become available from the NRC, this table will contain maximum dependable capacity (MDC) factors for each month and the year-to-date MDC capacity as of the end of the quarter covered, in this issue the end of September 1990. The information for this table is derived from World Nuclear Performance, published by McGraw-Hill Nuclear Publications and used with their permission. The MDC Unit Capacity (in percent) is defined as follows: (Net electrical energy generated during the reporting period x 100) divided by the product of the number of hours in the reporting period and the MDC of the reactor in question

  8. Study of power reactor dynamics by stochastic reactor oscillator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic reactor oscillator and cross correlation method were used for determining reactor dynamics characteristics. Experimental equipment, fast reactor oscillator (BOR-1) was activated by random pulses from the GBS-16 generator. Tape recorder AMPEX-SF-300 and data acquisition tool registered reactor response to perturbations having different frequencies. Reactor response and activation signals were cross correlated by digital computer for different positions of stochastic oscillator and ionization chamber

  9. Utilization of the low power Musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Musashi reactor is a low-power reactor of 100 kW, multi-purpose beam-experiments have been performed for the last ten years. Medical irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is the most unique utilization of the reactor. Eighty-two patients had been treated in the reactor up to the end of August 1987. One of the horizontal beam ports has been used for a time-of-flight experiment by using a slow-chopper since 1977. The authors measured the total neutron cross sections of Mg, Al, Si, Zr, Nb and Mo in the energy range from 0.001 to 0.3 eV. A neutron radiography facility was designed and installed at another beam port in 1984. A real-time neutron TV system has been also installed for investigation of moving objects and for a neutron computed tomography study. A third beam port has been used for a filtered beam experiment and a capture γ-ray measurement. An Fe-filter for 24 keV neutrons and Si-filter for 54 and 144 keV neutrons are available for generating monochromatic neutrons. These beams have been used for the precise measurement of total neutron cross sections. The capture γ-ray measurements have been applied for the measurement of boron concentration in tissue in connection with the BNCT. The reactor has a Joint Use Program for university researchers in Japan under a grant-in-aid by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. (author)

  10. Advanced power reactors with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of nuclear safety is the protection of individuals, society and environment against radiological hazards from accidental releases of radioactive materials contained in nuclear reactors. Hereto, these materials are enclosed by several successive barriers and the barriers protected against mishaps and accidents by a multi-level system of safety precautions. The evolution of reactor technology continuously improves this concept and its implementation. At a world-wide scale, several advanced reactor concepts are currently being considered, some of them already at a design stage. Essential safety objectives include both further strengthening the prevention of accidents and improving the containment of fission products should an accident occur. The proposed solutions differ considerably with regard to technical principles, plant size and time scales considered for industrial application. Two typical approaches can be distinguished: The first approach basically aims at an evolution of power reactors currently in use, taking into account the findings from safety research and from operation of current plants. This approach makes maximum use of proven technology and operating experience but may nevertheless include new safety features. The corresponding designs are often termed 'large evolutionary'. The second approach consists in more fundamental changes compared to present designs, often with strong emphasis on specific passive features protecting the fuel and fuel cladding barriers. Owing to the nature and capability of those passive features such 'innovative designs' are mostly smaller in power output. The paper describes the basic objectives of such developments and illustrates important technical concepts focusing on next generation plants, i.e. designs to be available for industrial application until the end of this decade. 1 tab. (author)

  11. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    therapy machines. Today the majority of the cancer therapy cobalt-60 sources used in the world are manufactured using material from the NRU reactor in Chalk River. The same technology that was used for producing cobalt-60 in a research reactor was then adapted and transferred for use in a CANDU power reactor. In the early 1970s, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors located east of Toronto. This was the first full scale production of millions of curies of cobalt-60 per year. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology in additional CANDUs. Over the years MDS Nordion has partnered with CANDU reactor owners to produce cobalt-60 at various sites. CANDU reactors that have, or are still producing cobalt-60, include Pickering A, Pickering B, Gentilly 2, Embalse in Argentina, and Bruce B. In conclusion, the technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada, has been safely, economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world. MDS Nordion is presently adding three more CANDU power reactors to its supply chain. These three additional cobalt producing CANDU's will help supplement the ability of the health care industry to provide safe, sterile, medical disposable products to people around the world. As new applications for cobalt-60 are identified, and the demand for bulk cobalt-60 increases, MDS Nordion and AECL

  12. Leaching of nuclear power reactor waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching tests for immobilized power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN are described. These wastes forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. Three years leaching results are reported. The cesium diffuvity coefficients determined out of these results are about 1 x 10-8 cm2/s for boric acid waste form and 9 x 10-9 cm2/s for ion-exchange resin waste. Strontium diffusivity coefficients found are about 3 x 10-11 cm2/s and 9 x 10-11 cm2/s respectively. (Author)

  13. Fuel assembly identification for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard refers to fuel assemblies of light-water power reactors. It contains stipulations for uniform marking in order that the fuel assemblies may be identified. A figure consisting of 8 alpha-numerical characters is used for marking, the first three of which represent the operator who ordered the fuel assembly, while the four characters to follow symbolize a series number. The last character serves as a test mark to scrutinize reading mistakes. The alpha-numerical characters include the Arabic numerals 0-9 and, following them, the letters A-Y of the German alphabet, leaving out B, F, I, O, Q, Z (30 characters). (orig./HP)

  14. Fuel assembly identification for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard refers to fuel assemblies of light-water power reactors. It contains stipulations for uniform marking in order that the fuel assemblies may be identified. A figure consisting of 8 alpha-numerical numbers is used for marking, the first three of which represent the operator who ordered the fuel assembly, while the four numbers to follow symbolize a series number. The last number serves as a test mark to scrutinize reading mistakes. The alpha-numerical numbers include the Arabic numerals 0-9 and, following them, the letters A-Y of the German alphabet, leaving out B, F, I, O, Q, Z (30 characters). (orig./HP)

  15. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  16. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance

  17. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance in the

  18. Nuclear Power Reactors in the World. 2010 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the thirtieth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: - General and technical information as of the end of 2009 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; - Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA.

  19. Safety systems of heavy water reactors and small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introductional descriptions of heavy water reactors and natural circulation boiling water reactors the safety philosophy and safety systems like ECCS, residual heat removal, protection systems etc., are described. (RW)

  20. Cascade: a high-efficiency ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascade attains a net power-plant efficiency of 49% and its cost is competitive with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, pressurized-water reactor, and coal-fired power plants. The Cascade reactor and blanket are made of ceramic materials and activation is 6 times less than that of the MARS Tandem Mirror Reactor operating at comparable power. Hands-on maintenance of the heat exchangers is possible one day after shutdown. Essentially all tritium is recovered in the vacuum system, with the remainder recovered from the helium power conversion loop. Tritium leakage external to the vacuum system and power conversion loop is only 0.03 Ci/d

  1. ATMEA and medium power reactors. The ATMEA joint venture and the ATMEA1 medium power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Power Point presentation presents the ATMEA company (a joint venture of Areva and Mitsubishi), the main features of its medium power reactor (ATMEA1) and its building arrangement, indicates the general safety objectives. It outlines the features of its robust design which aim at protecting, cooling down and containing. It indicates the regulatory and safety frameworks, comments the review of the safety options by the ASN and the results of this assessment

  2. Oregon State TRIGA reactor power calibration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of a recent review of the Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) power calibration procedure, an investigation was performed on the origin and correctness of the OSTR tank factor and the calibration method. It was determined that there was no clear basis for the tank factor which was being used (0.0525 deg. C/kwh) and therefore a new value was calculated (0.0493 deg. C/kwh). The calculational method and likely errors are presented in the paper. In addition, a series of experimental tests were conducted to decide if the power calibration was best performed with or without a mixer, at 100 KW or at 1 MW. The results of these tests along with the final recommendation are presented. (author)

  3. Neutron measurements at nuclear power reactors [55

    CERN Document Server

    Scherpelz, R I

    2002-01-01

    Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), have performed neutron measurements at a number of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Neutron radiation fields at light water reactor (LWR) power plants are typically characterized by low-energy distributions due to the presence of large amounts of scattering material such as water and concrete. These low-energy distributions make it difficult to accurately monitor personnel exposures, since most survey meters and dosimeters are calibrated to higher-energy fields such as those produced by bare or D sub 2 O-moderated sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf sources. Commercial plants typically use thermoluminescent dosimeters in an albedo configuration for personnel dosimetry and survey meters based on a thermal-neutron detector inside a cylindrical or spherical moderator for dose rate assessment, so their methods of routine monitoring are highly dependent on the energy of the neutron fields. Battelle has participate...

  4. UF6 breeder reactor power plants for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor concept analyzed is a 233UF6 core surrounded by a molten salt (Li7F, BeF2, ThF4) blanket. Nuclear survey calculations were carried out for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. A maximum breeding ratio of 1.22 was found. Thermodynamic cycle calculations were performed for a variety of Rankine cycles. Optimization of a Rankine cycle for a gas core breeder reactor employing an intermediate heat exchanger gave a maximum efficiency of 37 percent. A conceptual design is presented along with a system layout for a 1000 MW stationary power plant. The advantages of the GCBR are as follows: (1) high efficiency, (2) simplified on-line reprocessing, (3) inherent safety considerations, (4) high breeding ratio, (5) possibility of burning all or most of the long-lived nuclear waste actinides, and (6) possibility of extrapolating the technology to higher temperatures and MHD direct conversion

  5. UF6 breeder reactor power plants for electric power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, J. H.; Clement, J. D.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor concept analyzed is a U-233F6 core surrounded by a molten salt (Li(7)F, BeF2, ThF4) blanket. Nuclear survey calculations were carried out for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. Thermodynamic cycle calculations were performed for a variety of Rankine cycles. A conceptual design is presented along with a system layout for a 1000 MW stationary power plant. Advantages of the gas core breeder reactor (GCBR) are as follows: (1) high efficiency; (2) simplified on-line reprocessing; (3) inherent safety considerations; (4) high breeding ratio; (5) possibility of burning all or most of the long-lived nuclear waste actinides; and (6) possibility of extrapolating the technology to higher temperatures and MHD direct conversion.

  6. Power generation costs for alternate reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total electric generating costs at the power plant busbar are estimated for various nuclear reactor fuel cycles which may be considered for power generation in the future. The reactor systems include pressurized water reactors (PWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), light-water pre-breeder and breeder reactors (LWPR, LWBR), and a fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR). Fuel cycles include once-through, uranium-only recycle, and full recycle of the uranium and plutonium in the spent fuel assemblies. The U3O8 price for economic transition from once-through LWR fuel cycles to both PWR recycle and LMFBR systems is estimated. Electric power generation costs were determined both for a reference set of unit cost parameters and for a range of uncertainty in these parameters. In addition, cost sensitivity parameters are provided so that independent estimations can be made for alternate cost assumptions

  7. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve

  8. Experience in using a research reactor for the training of power reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research reactor facility such as the one at the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital would have much to offer in the way of training reactor operators. Although most of the candidates for the course had either received previous training in the Westinghouse Reactor Operator Training Program, had operated nuclear submarine reactors or had operated power reactors, they were not offered the opportunity to perform the extensive manipulations of a reactor that a small research facility will allow. In addition the AEC recommends 10 research reactor startups per student as a prerequisite for a cold operator?s license and these can easily be obtained during the training period

  9. Additional records for Stenosagola newtoni Park & Carlton, 2013 (Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae: Faronitae, with notes on aedeagal morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thorpe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this short note is to identify morphospecies sp. 0471 of the Hope River Forest Fragmentation Project. It is Stenosagola newtoni Park & Carlton, 2013. The material listed herein raises the number of published specimen records for S. newtoni from 2 to 51. All additional 49 specimens are fully winged males, collected in flight intercept traps (FITs, from the South Island of New Zealand. Examination of the new material has resulted in the detection of an error in the original description of S. newtoni, whereby the mirror image of the aedeagus was inadvertently illustrated. It is not a case of genitalic antisymmetry.

  10. Instrumentation and control for reactor power setback in PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), a 500 MWe plant, Reactor Power Setback is a special operation envisaged for bulk power reduction on occurrence of certain events in Balance of Plant. The bulk power reduction requires a large negative reactivity perturbation if reactor is operating on nominal power. This necessitates a reliable monitoring system with fault tolerant I and C architecture in order to inhibit reactor SCRAM on negative reactivity trip signal. The impact of above events on the process is described. Design of a functional prototype module to carry out RPSB logic operation and its interface with other instruments has been discussed. (author)

  11. Management of radioactive wastes at power reactor sites in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indian nuclear power programme, at the present stage, is based on natural uranium fuelled heavy water moderated CANDU type reactors except for the first nuclear power station consisting of two units of enriched uranium fuelled, light water moderated, BWR type of reactors. Some of the salient aspects of radioactive waste management at power reactor sites in India are discussed. Brief reviews are presented on treatment of wastes, their disposal and environmental aspects. Indian experience in power reactor waste management is also summarised identifying some of the areas needing further work. (auth.)

  12. Pellet bed reactor for multi-modal space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of forthcoming space power needs for both civil and military missions indicates that power requirements will be in tens of megawatts. It is envisioned that the electrical power requirements will be two-fold; long-duration low power will be needed for station keeping, communications and/or surveillance, while short-duration high power will be required for pulsed power devices. These power characteristics led to authors to propose a multi-modal space power reactor using a pellet bed design. Characteristics desired for such a multi-megawatt reactor power source are the following: standby, alert and pulsed power modes; high thermal output heat source (around 1000 MWt peak power); long lifetime standby power (10-30 yrs); high temperature output (1500-1750 K); rapid burst power transition; high reliability (>95%); and meets stringent safety requirements. The proposed pellet bed reactor concept is designed to satisfy these characteristics

  13. Nuclear problems of power reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this presentation is to emphasize the conditions that would be of high importance in safety analyses concerned first of all with reactor core. It describes reactor kinetics processes in the core and build up of fission products, classification of reactor accidents related to the core, risk estimation and includes a list of importance reactor accidents

  14. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Poullikkas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In contrast, generation III reactors, which are ...

  15. Reactor Physics Tests for the Full Power Operation of HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial criticality of HANARO was achieved on the Feb. 8th of 1995. As HANARO is a unique reactor, there were difficulties to get a license to its full power operation, in which the design power of HANARO is 30 MW. There were two operation license conditions that limited the operation power to 80% of the design power. They were resolved in 2003 and the power ascension tests were conducted for the full power operation. This paper presents the several reactor physics tests for the power ascension to the full power of HANARO

  16. Reactor/Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are currently underway to assess the technological feasibility of a nuclear-reactor-powered spacecraft propelled by electric thrusters. The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information on a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system

  17. Nuclear modular power stations with lead-based coolant reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present report, the projects of reactors with the lead-based coolant are considered. This class of reactors has the advantages and limitations. The main of advantages is enhanced safety and the main of restrictions is the limitation on power, both originate from natural properties of lead-based coolants. This limitation uniquely determines lead-technology reactors as medium - and small-power systems. (author)

  18. Comparison of Pickering NGS performance with world power reactors, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering NGS performance is compared, in highly graphic form, with the perfomance of other nuclear power plants around the world. The four Pickering reactors score in the top six, rated by gross capacity factor. Major system suppliers for world power reactors above 500 MW are cataloged. (E.C.B.)

  19. Axial power monitoring uncertainty in the Savannah River Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of this analysis quantified the uncertainty associated with monitoring the Axial Power Shape (APS) in the Savannah River Reactors. Thermocouples at each assembly flow exit map the radial power distribution and are the primary means of monitoring power in these reactors. The remaining uncertainty in power monitoring is associated with the relative axial power distribution. The APS is monitored by seven sensors that respond to power on each of nine vertical Axial Power Monitor (APM) rods. Computation of the APS uncertainty, for the reactor power limits analysis, started with a large database of APM rod measurements spanning several years of reactor operation. A computer algorithm was used to randomly select a sample of APSs which were input to a code. This code modeled the thermal-hydraulic performance of a single fuel assembly during a design basis Loss-of Coolant Accident. The assembly power limit at Onset of Significant Voiding was computed for each APS. The output was a distribution of expected assembly power limits that was adjusted to account for the biases caused by instrumentation error and by measuring 7 points rather than a continuous APS. Statistical analysis of the final assembly power limit distribution showed that reducing reactor power by approximately 3% was sufficient to account for APS variation. This data confirmed expectations that the assembly exit thermocouples provide all information needed for monitoring core power. The computational analysis results also quantified the contribution to power limits of the various uncertainties such as instrumentation error

  20. Quality surveillance for PWR power plant reactor internals manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and the function of the reactor internals of the improved generation Ⅱ PWR power plant is instructed briefly, the critical factors and difficulties in the manufacture process for reactor internals are analyzed, the quality control and surveillance of reactor internals manufacturing is discussed, especially the critical factors and difficulties of the quality control in the manufacture process for the main parts of reactor internals and in the reactor internals assembling process are represented in detail, the key points of the resident manufacture supervision is presented, and other key points of quality control in the manufacture process are also given, such as the documents control and personnel control. (author)

  1. Regulation concerning installation and operation of reactors for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulations applying to reactors for power generation mentioned in the law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors. Covered are the following: definitions of terms, application for the permission to install reactors, application for the permission to alter installations, reactor operation plans, keeping of various records, limitations on ingress and ingress in radiation controlled areas, measures concerning radiation exposure doses, operation of reactors, on-site transport, storage of nuclear fuel materials and radioactive waste, security regulations, steps taken during times of danger, making of various reports, and so on. (Mori, K.)

  2. Nuclear Power Reactors in the World. 2012 Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the 32nd edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, which presents the most recent reactor data available to the IAEA. It contains summarized information as of the end of 2011 on power reactors that are in operation, under construction and shut down, and performance data on reactors operating in IAEA Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected through designated national correspondents in the Member States and the data area used to maintain the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System.

  3. Power start up of the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After accomplishing the physical start-up of the reactor, the power start-up was carried out in February 1984. The power of the reactor has reached: 10 KW on 6/2/1984, 100 KW on 7/2/1984, 200 KW and 300 KW on 8/2/1984; 400 KW and nominal power 500 KW on 9/2/1984. The reactivity temperature coefficient and the xenon poisoning were determined. 3 figs., 12 tabs

  4. Burnup analysis of the power reactor, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several years of endeavors has been devoted to development of three-dimensional nuclear-thermal-hydro-dynamic simulators and research by basing the progress on the merits and demerits of the variational method, the functional approximation method, etc. As the result, the three-dimensional nuclear-thermal-hydro-dynamic code FLORA has been prepared. It has the following features. (1) The executive time is one third -- half as much as that by the convensional programs. (2) Numerical error is small when neutron spectrum mismatches. (3) In the fuels in which the distributions of Gd2O3 and enrichments are localized axially in the reactor core, three-dimensional nuclear-thermal-hydro-dynamic calculations are possible. (4) The transport kernel can be obtained by the coarse mesh method and the functional approximation method. (5) Albedo can be calculated by the two-group diffusion theory. (6) Power distribution can be obtained in the case of partial control rods inserted in the core. The course taken to the preparation, the theoretical background and example calculations with FLORA are described. The present report can be also used as a manual. (auth.)

  5. Power plant systems for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate and compare the applicability of thermal cycles for power generation to nuclear fusion, four plant systems, i.e. direct steam turbine, in-direct steam turbine, direct gas turbine and in-direct steam turbine with gas-cooled blanket, have been designed with the estimates of their thermal efficiencies. An plant designs here are based on the same power core: fusion power 2300 MW, external heating power 58 MW, thermal power of blanket 2420 MW and divertor 490 MW. In addition, it is assumed that the construction of the power plant is near future so that the structural material would be a ferritic/martensitic steel such as F82H to be used at temperatures lower than 500-550degC. Also the divertor is always cooled by water at pressure of 10 MPa, and inlet/outlet temperature of 150-200degC/200-250degC. The removal heat from the divertor is utilized to heat the coolant fed to the blanket inlet in all above plants. The direct steam turbine cycle employs supercritical pressure water at 25 MPa and blanket inlet/outlet temperatures of 280degC/500degC. The steam out from the blanket directly flows into a high pressure turbine. The steam intermediately extracted from the high pressure turbine and/or a part of main steam from the blanket outlet is utilized to reheat the steam coming out of the high pressure turbine. Also the regenerative cycle is applied by using steams extracted from high, medium and low pressure turbines. Eventually the obtained thermal efficiency is 41.4%. The in-direct steam turbine cycle consists of the primary loop which removes the heat from the blanket and the secondary (power generation) loop by using a steam generator at their interface. The primary coolant is supercritical pressure water similar to that of above direct steam cycle, i.e. 25 MPa, 290degC/510degC. The secondary coolant is also water but with the condition of a fast breeder fission reactor, i.e. 16.3 MPa, 210degC/480degC. With reheat and regenerative cycle, the thermal

  6. Consumption of the electric power inside silent discharge reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yehia, Ashraf, E-mail: yehia30161@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Arab Republic of Egypt and Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies at Alkharj, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 83, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-01-15

    An experimental study was made in this paper to investigate the relation between the places of the dielectric barriers, which cover the surfaces of the electrodes in the coaxial cylindrical reactors, and the rate of change of the electric power that is consumed in forming silent discharges. Therefore, silent discharges have been formed inside three coaxial cylindrical reactors. The dielectric barriers in these reactors were pasted on both the internal surface of the outer electrode in the first reactor and the external surface of the inner electrode in the second reactor as well as the surfaces of the two electrodes in the third reactor. The reactor under study has been fed by atmospheric air that flowed inside it with a constant rate at normal temperature and pressure, in parallel with the application of a sinusoidal ac voltage between the electrodes of the reactor. The electric power consumed in forming the silent discharges inside the three reactors was measured as a function of the ac peak voltage. The validity of the experimental results was investigated by applying Manley's equation on the same discharge conditions. The results have shown that the rate of consumption of the electric power relative to the ac peak voltage per unit width of the discharge gap improves by a ratio of either 26.8% or 80% or 128% depending on the places of the dielectric barriers that cover the surfaces of the electrodes inside the three reactors.

  7. Improvements in the management of safety in research reactor operation through appropriate application of selected power reactor good practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactor managers are increasingly implementing improvements in their management of safety through the application of good practices originally developed as power reactor programs. This paper considers ways to select practices to emulate, effectively incorporate them into a research reactor program and evaluate their contribution to safety. Relative to research reactors, power reactor programs look relatively homogeneous when considering source terms, stored energy, core power density, operating cycles, plant systems and staff sizes. They have potential hazard consequences that require effective safety management programs. Finally, power reactors generate a stream of revenue to fund these programs. The power reactor community has combined their resources with the homogeneity of their challenge to create impressive safety management tools, many of which can be effectively implemented in the research reactor community. However, not all programs can be effectively implemented in all research reactors. number of power reactor programs are analyzed in the paper with consideration of their effective implementation and potential contribution to research reactor. (author)

  8. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and AECL, has been safely,economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world

  9. KLT-20 reactor for a floating power unit. Annex VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KLT-20 reactor installation is being designed by the Experimental Design Bureau of Machine Building (OKBM, Nizhny Novgorod) as a power source for floating nuclear power plants (NPPs). At present, the activities are most advanced for the project of a pilot floating heat and power plant with the KLT-40S reactor installations, advanced analogues of the commercial KLT-40 reactors of the Russian icebreaker fleet. For the KLT-40S, detailed design of the reactor unit and floating power unit has been developed and approved; the Rostechnadzor of Russia license for plant siting and floating power unit construction in Severodvinsk (Russian Federation) has been obtained. The KLT-20, based on a pressurized light-water reactor of 20 MW(e), is a two-loop modification of the KLT-40S reactor with several improvements in the main equipment and a long-refuelling interval, achieved with the enrichment of less than 20%. The reactor design with a long refuelling interval was developed based on the engineering solutions of the pilot KLT-40S reactor installation; different from it, the KLT-20 provides for no on-site refuelling. The refuelling, radioactive waste management and repairs of a floating NPP with the KLT-20 would be performed at special maintenance centres. The infrastructure of nuclear ship maintenance centres in Russia could be used for these purposes

  10. Role of advanced reactors in further nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the national long-term nuclear R and D program launched in 1992, an endeavor has been made in Korea to develop advanced nuclear reactor systems with significantly enhanced safety and economics from those of the current generation nuclear power plants. The advanced PWR nuclear reactor systems under development in Korea include 1300 MWe Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR), 330 MWt Integral Type System Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART) for nuclear cogeneration, and 330 MWe Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER) in addition to the evolutionary enhancement of the 1000 MWt KSNPP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant). Three point design philosophy has been adopted for the development of the advanced reactors in Korea : enhancements on safety, economics and public acceptance of nuclear power. To enhance the safety of the advanced reactor systems, a strategy has been adopted to employ advanced design features as well as the passive safety design features. Economically viable design concepts also have been implemented in the evolutionary KSNPP, KNGR, and the SMART development. Economic competitiveness against the fossil plants also has been set as a major objective of the ALWR development program in Korea. These safer and more economical advanced reactors will better promote the public acceptance of the commercial use of the nuclear power and thus could be utilized to meet the forecasted national energy need in the early 21st century. International cooperation in the areas of ALWR development as well as improving public acceptance of the nuclear power is required. (author)

  11. Data management for spent fuel from power reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Updated data for the spent fuel management from the operating power reactors - as of December 31st, 2004 - as well as research reactors - as of March 1st, 2003 - in Argentina are presented. Data for the power reactor spent fuel are received from the nuclear power plant operator (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) twice a year for the cumulative spent fuel arising up to June 30th and December 31st. Data for the research reactor spent fuel are collected once a year from CNEA operators. At the time being, such data are not managed in a database management system but some of them are handled with a spreadsheet program in order to get total, average, lower and higher values. These values are being used to built the input of codes for calculating the composition, activity and thermal power for the spent fuel as a whole as well as the mass, activity and thermal power for spent fuel elements or nuclides. (author)

  12. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors)

  13. Tokamak power systems studies: A second stability power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of innovative physics and engineering features have been studied which promise to greatly improve the reactor prospects of tokamaks relative to STARFIRE. A reference design point has been developed with the following features: large aspect ratio (A = 6); high beta (β ≅ 0.20), with only mild shaping and no indentation, which brings the maximum toroidal field down to 7 T; low toroidal current (I ≅ 5MA), which reduces the cost of the current drive and EF coil system; and steady-state operation with combined fast wave and lower hybrid wave current drive. The key to high beta operation with low toroidal current lies in utilizing second stability regime equilibria with control of the current achieved by the appropriate choice of wave frequencies and spectra. By selecting an axial safety factor q(o) = 2.0, MHD stability has been found above β ≅ 0.20. Additional features include: impurity control with self-pumped limiters which bury helium on continuously deposited metal surfaces; liquid Li-cooled blanket which provides good performance with low pressure operation; vanadium alloy blanket structure for higher thermal efficiency (eta = 0.42), longer lifetime and reduced activation; and reduced reactor mass (higher power density) due to smaller TF coil, less shielding, fewer blanket penetrations, and higher wall loading. At low neutron wall loads this device represents a minimum capital cost unit. However, economies of scale are strong, and eventually higher wall loads (W ≅ 8 MW/m2, P/sub net/ = 1400 MW) may prove most attractive. Preliminary investigations show inherently safe operation is likely at W ≥ 5 MW/m2. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Radiation embrittlement in pressure vessels of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is presented the project to study the effect of lead factors on the mechanical behavior of Reactor Pressure Vessel steels. It is described the facility designed to irradiate Charpy specimens with V notch of SA-508 type 3 steel at power reactor temperature, installed in the RA-1 reactor. The objective is to obtain the fracture behavior of irradiated specimens with different lead factors and to know their dependence with the diffusion of alloy elements. (author)

  15. The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs

  16. EBT reactor characteristics consistent with stability and power balance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the results of a recent EBT reactor study that includes both ring and core plasma properties and consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters

  17. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 2003 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the twenty third edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 2002 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States and available at the Internet address http://www.iaea.or.at/programmes/a2

  18. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the twenty-first edition of Reference Data Series No.2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 2000 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States and is available at the Internet address http://www.iaea.or.at/programmes/a2

  19. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 2002 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the twenty-second edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 2001 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States and available at the Internet address http://www. iaea.or.at/programmes/a2

  20. Power coefficient of reactivity in CANDU 6 Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR) measures the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power and is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between the inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity in all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU reactor design takes advantage of the inherent nuclear characteristics of small reactivity coefficient, minimal excess reactivity and very long prompt neutron lifetime to mitigate the magnitude of the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with its design characteristics, such that the overall design of the reactor does not depend on the sign of the PCR. This is a contrast to other reactor design concepts which are dependent on a PCR which is both large and negative in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during a Loss of Regulation Control (LORC) event, the impact of having a positive power coefficient, or of hypothesizing a PCR larger than that estimated for CANDU, has no significant impact on the reactor safety. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, its role in the operation or safety of the reactor is not significant

  1. Nuclear Power Reactors in the World. 2016 Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Reactors in the World is an annual publication that presents the most recent data pertaining to reactor units in IAEA Member States. This thirty-sixth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2 provides a detailed comparison of various statistics up to and including 31 December 2015. The tables and figures contain the following information: — General statistics on nuclear reactors in IAEA Member States; — Technical data on specific reactors that are either planned, under construction or operational, or that have been shut down or decommissioned; — Performance data on reactors operating in IAEA Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The data compiled in this publication is a product of the IAEA’s Power Reactor Information System (PRIS). The PRIS database is a comprehensive source of data on all nuclear power reactors in the world. It includes specification and performance history data on operational reactors as well as on reactors under construction or in the decommissioning process. Data is collected by the IAEA via designated national correspondents in Member States

  2. Design for reactor core safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide covers the neutronic, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and irradiation considerations important to the safe design of a nuclear reactor core. The Guide applies to the types of thermal neutron reactor power plants that are now in common use and fuelled with oxide fuels: advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR), boiling water reactor (BWR), pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) (pressure tube and pressure vessel type) and pressurized water reactor (PWR). It deals with the individual components and systems that make up the core and associated equipment and with design provisions for the safe operation of the core and safe handling of the fuel and other core components. The Guide discusses the reactor vessel internals and the reactivity control and shutdown devices mounted on the vessel. Possible effects on requirements for the reactor coolant, the reactor coolant system and its pressure boundary (including the pressure vessel) are considered only as far as necessary to clarify the interface with the Safety Guide on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13) and other Guides. In relation to instrumentation and control systems the guidance is mainly limited to functional requirements

  3. Small size modular fast reactors in large scale nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents an innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on usage of modular type fast reactors (FR) (SVBR-75/100) with heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC) i. e. eutectic lead-bismuth alloy mastered for Russian nuclear submarines' (NS) reactors. Use of this NPT makes it possible to eliminate a conflict between safety and economic requirements peculiar to the traditional reactors. Physical features of FRs, an integral design of the reactor and its small power (100 MWe), as well as natural properties of lead-bismuth coolant assured realization of the inherent safety properties. This made it possible to eliminate a lot of safety systems necessary for the reactor installations (RI) of operating NPPs and to design the modular NPP which technical and economical parameters are competitive not only with those of the NPP based on light water reactors (LWR) but with those of the steam-gas electric power plant. Multipurpose usage of transportable reactor modules SVBR-75/100 of entirely factory manufacture assures their production in large quantities that reduces their fabrication costs. The proposed NPT provides economically expedient change over to the closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). When the uranium-plutonium fuel is used, the breeding ratio is over one. Use of proposed NPT makes it possible to considerably increase the investment attractiveness of nuclear power (NP) with fast neutron reactors even today at low costs of natural uranium. (authors)

  4. Ultrasonic level and temperature sensor for power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasonic waveguide employing torsional and extensional acoustic waves has been developed for use as a level and temperature sensor in pressurized and boiling water nuclear power reactors. Features of the device include continuous measurement of level, density, and temperature producing a real-time profile of these parameters along a chosen path through the reactor vessel

  5. Gas core reactor power plants designed for low proliferation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of gas core nuclear power plants to provide adequate power while maintaining a low inventory and low divertability of fissile material is studied. Four concepts were examined. Two used a mixture of UF6 and helium in the reactor cavities, and two used a uranium-argon plasma, held away from the walls by vortex buffer confinement. Power levels varied from 200 to 2500 MWth. Power plant subsystems were sized to determine their fissile material inventories. All reactors ran, with a breeding ratio of unity, on 233U born from thorium. Fission product removal was continuous. Newly born 233U was removed continuously from the breeding blanket and returned to the reactor cavities. The 2500-MWth power plant contained a total of 191 kg of 233U. Less than 4 kg could be diverted before the reactor shut down. The plasma reactor power plants had smaller inventories. In general, inventories were about a factor of 10 less than those in current U.S. power reactors

  6. Radionuclides in United States commercial nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the next ten to twenty years, many of the commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States will be reaching their projected lifetime of forty years. As these power plants are decommissioned, it seems prudent to consider the recycling of structural materials such as stainless steel. Some of these materials and components have become radioactive through either nuclear activation of the elements within the components or surface contamination with radioactivity form the operational activities. In order to understand the problems associated with recycling stainless steel from decommissioned nuclear power reactors, it is necessary to have information on the radionuclides expected on or in the contaminated materials. A study has been conducted of radionuclide contamination information that is available for commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States. There are two types of nuclear power reactors in commercial use in the United States, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). Before presenting radionuclide activities information, a brief discussion is given on the major components and operational differences for the PWRs and BWRs. Radionuclide contamination information is presented from 11 PWRs and over 8 BWRs. These data include both the radionuclides within the circulating reactor coolant water as well as radionuclide contamination on and within component parts

  7. Decay Power Calculation for Safety Analysis of Innovative Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we verified the decay heat calculation capabilities of BGCore computer code system developed recently at Ben-Gurion University. Decay power was calculated for a typical UO2 fuel in Pressurized Water Reactor environment using BGCore code and using procedure prescribed by the ANS/ANSI-2005 standard. Very good agreement between the two methods was obtained. Once BGCore calculation capabilities were verified, we calculated decay power as a function of time after shutdown for various reactors with innovative fuels, for which no standard procedure is currently available. Notable differences were observed for decay power of the advanced reactors as compared with conventional UO2 LWR. The observed differences suggest that the design of new reactors safety systems must be based on corresponding decay power curves for each individual case in order to assure the desired performance of such systems. (authors)

  8. Cermet-fueled reactors for multimegawatt space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cermet-fueled reactor has evolved as a potential power source for a broad range of multimegawatt space applications. In particular, the fast spectrum reactor concept can be used to deliver 10s of megawatts of electric power for continuous, long term, unattended operation, and 100s of megawatts of electric power for times exceeding several hundred seconds. The system can also be utilized with either a gas coolant in a Brayton power conversion cycle, or a liquid metal coolant in a Rankine power conversion cycle. Extensive testing of the cermet fuel element has demonstrated that the fuel is capable of operating at very high temperatures under repeated thermal cycling conditions, including transient conditions which approach the multimegawatt burst power requirements. The cermet fuel test performance is reviewed and an advanced cermet-fueled multimegawatt nuclear reactor is described in this paper

  9. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of fission-fusion hybrid reactors based on breeding light water thermal fission systems is investigated. The emphasis is on fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) hybrid power reactors that are fueled with natural uranium. Other LWHRs considered include FSS-LWHRs that are fueled with spent fuel from LWRs, and LWHRs which are to supplement LWRs to provide a tandem LWR-LWHR power economy that is fuel-self-sufficient

  10. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios

  11. Power distribution control of CANDU reactors based on modal representation of reactor kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Lingzhi, E-mail: lxia4@uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Jiang, Jin, E-mail: jjiang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Luxat, John C., E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Linearization of the modal synthesis model of neutronic kinetic equations for CANDU reactors. • Validation of the linearized dynamic model through closed-loop simulations by using the reactor regulating system. • Design of a LQR state feedback controller for CANDU core power distribution control. • Comparison of the results of this new controller against those of the conventional reactor regulation system. - Abstract: Modal synthesis representation of a neutronic kinetic model for a CANDU reactor core has been utilized in the analysis and synthesis for reactor control systems. Among all the mode shapes, the fundamental mode of the power distribution, which also coincides with the desired reactor power distribution during operation, is used in the control system design. The nonlinear modal models are linearized around desired operating points. Based on the linearized model, linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control approach is used to synthesize a state feedback controller. The performance of this controller has been evaluated by using the original nonlinear models under load-following conditions. It has been demonstrated that the proposed reactor control system can produce more uniform power distribution than the traditional reactor regulation systems (RRS); in particular, it is more effective in compensating the Xenon induced transients.

  12. Studies on transferring the safety features of the module reactor to a large power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German industries and research institutions have developed the HTR module reactor, which is strongly characterized by inherent safety features. The power output is limited to about 200 MWth because of its core configuration. It has been investigated in this work, whether the safety features of the module reactor can be transferred to larger power reactors. For this purpose the conceptual design of a ring core pebble bed reactor has been made with a thermal power output of 3000 MW. By means of computer calculations, the principal physical, thermohydraulical and safety features of the ring reactor have been studied. It has been shown that the 3000-MWth ring reactor basically possesses the same safety characteristics as the small module reactor. At reactivity disturbances, the reactor is shut down passively by the strongly negative temperature coefficient. The decay heat removal is also realized based on the passive priniciple. In the case of a total loss of coolant, the maximum fuel element temperature remains below 1600deg C; and consequently the retention of fission products in the fuel elements is fully attained. The control of xenon oscillations takes place inherently due to the mutual coupling between the local power production and the fuel temperature. (orig.)

  13. Preliminary nuclear power reactor technology qualitative assessment for Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the worlds first nuclear reactor major breakthrough in December 02, 1942, the nuclear power industry has undergone tremendous development and evolution for more than half a century. After surpassing moratorium of nuclear power plant construction caused by catastrophic accidents at Three-mile island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986), today, nuclear energy is back on the policy agendas of many countries, both developed and developing, signaling nuclear revival or nuclear renaissance. Selection of suitable nuclear power technology has thus been subjected to primary attention. This short paper attempts to draw preliminary technology assessment for the first nuclear power reactor technology for Malaysia. Methodology employed is qualitative analysis collating recent finding of tnb-kepco preliminary feasibility study for nuclear power program in peninsular malaysia and other published presentations and/or papers by multiple experts. The results suggested that pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the prevailing technology in terms of numbers and plant performances, and while the commercialization of generation IV reactors is remote (e.g. Not until 2030), generation III/ III+ NPP models are commercially available on the market today. Five (5) major steps involved in reactor technology selection were introduced with a focus on introducing important aspects of selection criteria. Three (3) categories for the of reactor technology selection were used for the cursory evaluation. The outcome of these analyses shall lead to deeper and full analyses of the recommended reactor technologies for a comprehensive feasibility study in the near future. Recommendations for reactor technology option were also provided for both strategic and technical recommendations. The paper shall also implore the best way to select systematically the first civilian nuclear power reactor. (Author)

  14. Research and development into power reactor fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel in a power reactor must perform reliably during normal operation, and the consequences of abnormal events must be researched and assessed. The present highly reliable operation of the natural UO2 in the CANDU power reactors has reduced the need for further work in this area; however a core of expertise must be retained for purposes such as training of new staff, retaining the capability of reacting to unforeseen circumstances, and participating in the commercial development of new ideas. The assessment of fuel performance during accidents requires research into many aspects of materials, fuel and fission product behaviour, and the consolidation of that knowledge into computer codes used to evaluate the consequences of any particular accident. This work is growing in scope, much is known from out-reactor work at temperatures up to about 1500 degreesC, but the need for in-reactor verification and investigation of higher-temperature accidents has necessitated the construction of a major new in-reactor test loop and the initiation of the associated out-reactor support programs. Since many of the programs on normal and accident-related performance are generic in nature, they will be applicable to advanced fuel cycles. Work will therefore be gradually transferred from the present, committed power reactor system to support the next generation of thorium-based reactor cycles

  15. Self-operation type power control device for nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru.

    1993-07-23

    The device of the present invention operates by sensing the temperature change of a reactor core in all of LMFBR type reactors irrespective of the scale of the reactor core power. That is, a region where liquid poison is filled is disposed at the upper portion and a region where sealed gases are filled is disposed at the lower portion of a pipe having both ends thereof being closed. When the pipe is inserted into the reactor core, the inner diameter of the pipe is determined smaller than a predetermined value so that the boundary between the liquid poison and the sealed gases in the pipe is maintained relative to an assumed maximum acceleration. The sealed gas region is disposed at the reactor core region. If the liquid poison is expanded by the elevation of the reactor core exit temperature, it is moved to the lower gas region, to control the reactor power. Since high reliability can be maintained over a long period of time by this method, it is suitable to FBR reactors disposed in such environments that maintenance can not easily be conducted, such as desserts, isolated islands and undeveloped countries. Further, it is also suitable to ultra small sized nuclear reactors disposed at environments that the direction and the magnitude of gravity are different from those on the ground. (I.S.).

  16. Analysis of TRIGA reactor thermal power calibration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of thermal power method of the nuclear instrumentation of the TRIGA reactor in Ljubljana is described. Thermal power calibration was performed at different power levels and at different conditions. Different heat loss processes from the reactor pool to the surrounding are considered. It is shown that the use of proper calorimetric calibration procedure and the use of heat loss corrections improve the accuracy of the measurement. To correct the position of the control rods, perturbation factors are introduced. It is shown that the use of the perturbation factors enables power readings from nuclear instrumentation with accuracy better than without corrections.(author)

  17. Power instability and stochastic dynamics of periodic pulsed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that physicists dealing with conventional reactor dynamics recognize two types of instability and reactor behavior beyond the stability region: asymptotic excursions and nonlinear periodic oscillations. A periodically pulsed reactor (PPR) has another peculiar instability: Under certain conditions, its power tends to oscillate at a frequency just twice less than the reactor pulsation frequency. The PPR dynamics far beyond the stability region are analyzed by using a discrete nonlinear model. A PPR with a negative temperature reactivity effect inevitably shows the chaotic power pulse energy behavior known as deterministic chaos. The way by which a reactor goes to chaos is defined by the time dependence of the feedback and by the kind of dynamics model used

  18. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  19. Technology and use of low power research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains a summary of discussions and 10 papers presented at the Consultants' Meeting on the Technology and Use of Low Power Research Reactors organized by the IAEA and held in Beijing (China) during 30 April - 3 May 1985. The following topics have been covered: reactor utilization in medicine and biology, in universities, for training, as a neutron source for radiography and some remarks on the safety of low power research reactors. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper presented at the meeting

  20. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Poullikkas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA. In contrast, generation III reactors, which are an evolution of generation II reactors, incorporate passive or inherent safety features that require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. Today, partly due to the high capital cost of large power reactors generating electricity and partly due to the consideration of public perception, there is a shift towards the development of smaller units. These may be built independently or as modules in a larger complex, with capacity added incrementally as required. Small reactors most importantly benefit from reduced capital costs, simpler units and the ability to produce power away from main grid systems. These factors combined with the ability of a nuclear power plant to use process heat for co-generation, make the small reactors an attractive option. Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production and reduced installation costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction. Generation III+ designs are generally extensions of the generation III concept, which include advanced passive safety features. These designs can maintain the safe state without the use of any active control components. Generation IV reactors, which are future designs that are currently under research and development, will

  1. Regulation concerning installation and operation of reactors for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulation is defined under the law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors and provisions concerning installation and operation of reactors for power generation in the order for execution of the law. Basic concepts and terms are explained, such as: radioactive waste; fuel assembly; exposure dose; accumulative dose; controlled area; safeguarded area; inspected surrounding area and employee. The application for permission of installation of reactors shall include location and general structure of reactor facilities, structure and equipment of reactors, handling and storing facilities of nuclear fuel materials and facilities for measurement and control, etc. Operation program of reactors shall be prepared for each reactor according to the form attached and filed every fiscal year from that one when the operation is expected to begin. Records shall be made for each reactor and kept for particular periods on inspection of reactor facilities, operation, fuel assembly, control of radiation and maintenance, etc. Entrance to the controlled area shall be limited through specified measures. Exposure dose, inspection, check up, independent examination and operation of reactors, transport and disposal in the works or the enterprise and others are in detail stipulated. Reports shall be submitted to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on concentration of radioactive materials, exposure dose of employees and other designated matters. (Okada, K.)

  2. Nuclear power reactor development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the current situation in Japan that nearly 40 LWRs (PWR/BWR nearly 50/50) have been operating with excellent performance; the number of un-intended shutdown is the smallest, leaker fuel is practically zero and thus coolant activity is the lowest in the world, they proceed to introduce advanced LWR (ALWR) of 1,300 MWe in early '90s, followed by the further improvement into higher duty LWR (so-called next generation LWR). National program for advanced thermal reactor (ATR) and FBR development has been steadily performed; a demonstration reactor of ATR and a prototype of FBR are under construction, which are to be put into operation by middle 1990s. Lately-revised high temperature gas cooled reactor program for process heat generation is put into practice in 1989 and its experimental reactor to be used also for irradiation facility will be completed 7 years later. Smaller-size LWR and so-called 'inherent safety type reactor' have also been interested. Overview on those activities are presented. (author)

  3. Conceptual design of nuclear fusion power reactor DREAM. Reactor structures and remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fusion reactors are required to be able to compete another energy sources in economy, reliability, safety and environmental integrity for commercial use. In the DREAM (DRastically EAsy Maintenance) reactor, a very low activated material of SiC/SiC composite has been introduced for the structural material, a reactor configuration for very easy maintenance and the helium gas of a high temperature for the cooling system, and hence DREAM has been proven to be very attractively as the commercial power reactor due to the high availability and efficiency of the plant and minimization of radioactive wastes. (author)

  4. Fast-breeder-power reactor records in the INIS database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a statistical analysis of more than 19,700 records of publications concerned with research and technology in the field of fast breeder power fission reactors which are included in the INIS Bibliographic Database for the period from 1970. to 1999. The main objectives of this bibliometric study were: to make an inventory of the fast breeder power reactor related records in the INIS Database; to provide statistics and scientific indicators for the INIS users, namely science managers, researchers, engineers, operators, scientific editors and publishers, decision-makers in the field of fast breeder power reactors related subjects; to extract other useful information from the INIS Bibliographic Database about articles published in fast breeder reactors research and technology. The quantitative data in this report are obtained for various properties of relevant INIS records such as year of publication, secondary subject categories, countries of publication, language, publication types, literary types, etc. (author)

  5. Training simulator for nuclear power plant reactor monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of a method and apparatus for the real-time dynamic simulation of a nuclear power plant that includes a control and nuclear instrumentation console for operating the reactor and monitoring three-dimensional physical values in the reactor core. A digital computer is connected to the console to calculate physical values such as nuclear flux, power, and temperature including the distribution thereof throughout the core with such calculations including the effect of full length, part length, and malfunctioned reactor control rods, as well as xenon, decay heat and boron, for example, on the output and distribution of power within the core. The simulation also includes instrumentation that responds to the calculated physical values by recording a continuous trace of the flux value in the reactor core from the top to the bottom

  6. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options

  7. Study of reactor parameters of on critical systems, Phase I: Safety report for RB zero power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the safety analysis for the zero power RB reactor, this report contains a general description of the reactor, reactor components, auxiliary equipment and the reactor building. Reactor Rb has been reconstructed during 1961-1962 and supplied with new safety-control system as well as with a complete dosimetry instrumentation. Since RB reactor was constructed without shielding special attention is devoted to safety and protection of the staff performing experiments. Due to changed circumstances in the Institute ( start-up of the RA 7 MW power reactor) the role of the RB reactor was redefined

  8. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    An important niche for nuclear energy is the need for power at remote locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. Nuclear energy has potential applications at strategic defense locations, theaters of battle, remote communities, and emergency locations. With proper safeguards, a 1 to 10-MWe (megawatt electric) mobile reactor system could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term power in any environment. Heat pipe-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactors have been identified as a candidate for these applications. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than “traditional” reactors. The goal of this project was to develop a scalable conceptual design for a compact reactor and to identify scaling issues for compact heat pipe cooled reactors in general. Toward this goal two detailed concepts were developed, the first concept with more conventional materials and a power of about 2 MWe and a the second concept with less conventional materials and a power level of about 5 MWe. A series of more qualitative advanced designs were developed (with less detail) that show power levels can be pushed to approximately 30 MWe.

  9. Sealing device for nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sealing device is to stop a leak on a reactor pressure vessel where control of the output of reactor is arranged by control rods which are handled by drives connected to control rods and bars in tubes which penetrate the reactor wall. Each tube has a supporting case on the inside of the wall opened to the hole and welded to the tube. The weld may crack and leak. Then an inner sealing tube made of soft metallic material whose outer surface is conical is drawn on to the tube over which an outer sealing tube made of hard metallic material and conical inner surface is placed. On both sides of the crack special adhering planes are formed between the inner sealing tube and the tubes or the supporting case. When the outer sealing tube is pressed over the inner sealing tube, the conical surfaces tighten it against the tube and the supporting case

  10. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetti, T. E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technically or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming.

  11. Hiberarchy of requirement analysis of reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the security and the margin of safety of nuclear power plant, the research on requirement analysis of digital reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant was developed. Based on the known technology, a requirement analysis report was performed. A kind of three-levels pyramidal hierarchy was adopted in the requirement analysis, and the design characteristics of the requirement analysis were described in the analysis report. This hiberarchy can directly illuminate the design characters and logical achievement of the requirement analysis for advanced pressurized water reactor digital protection system. (authors)

  12. Automatic power control for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the reactivity is controlled by control rods, boron, and the average temperature of the primary coolant. Especially in load follow operation, the reactivity change is induced by changes in power level and effects of xenon concentration. The control of the core power distribution is concerned, mainly, with the axial power distribution which depends on insertion and withdrawal of the control rods resulting in additional reactivity compensation. The utilization of part strength control element assemblies (PSCEAs) is quite appropriate for a control of the power distribution in the case of Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN Unit 3). However, control of the PSCEAs is not automatic, and changes in the boron concentration by dilution/boration are done manually. Thus, manual control of the PSCEAs and the boron concentration require the operator's experience and knowledge for a successful load follow operation. In this thesis, the new concepts have been proposed to adapt for an automatic power control in a PWR. One of the new concepts is the mode K control, another is a fuzzy power control. The system in mode K control implements a heavy-worth bank dedicated to axial shape control, independent of the existing regulating banks. The heavy bank provides a monotonic relationship between its motion and the axial power shape change, which allows automatic control of the axial power distribution. And the mode K enables precise regulation, by using double closed-loop control of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power difference. Automatic reactor power control permits the nuclear power plant to accommodate the load follow operations, including frequency control, to respond to the grid requirements. The mode K reactor control concepts were tested using simulation responses of a Korean standardized 1000-MWe PWR which is a reference plant for the YGN Unit 3. The simulation results illustrate that the mode K would be

  13. Preliminary Development of Thermal Power Calculation Code H-Power for a Supercritical Water Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    SCWR (Supercritical Water Reactor) is one of the promising Generation IV nuclear systems, which has higher thermal power efficiency than current pressurized water reactor. It is necessary to perform the thermal equilibrium and thermal power calculation for the conceptual design and further monitoring and calibration of the SCWR. One visual software named H-Power was developed to calculate thermal power and its uncertainty of SCWR, in which the advanced IAPWS-IF97 industrial formulation was us...

  14. Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors

  15. Laser fusion power reactor system (LFPRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacik, W. P.

    1977-12-19

    This report gives detailed information for each of the following areas: (1) reference concept description, (2) nuclear design, (3) structural design, (4) thermal and fluid systems design, (5) materials design and analysis, (6) reactor support systems and balance of plant, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) environment and safety, (9) economics assessment, and (10) development requirements. (MOW)

  16. Laser fusion power reactor system (LFPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives detailed information for each of the following areas: (1) reference concept description, (2) nuclear design, (3) structural design, (4) thermal and fluid systems design, (5) materials design and analysis, (6) reactor support systems and balance of plant, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) environment and safety, (9) economics assessment, and (10) development requirements

  17. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  18. Special Nuclear Material Control by the Power Reactor Operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relatively new and extremely valuable fuel for electric power production, uranium, requires very careful inventory control from the time the reactor operator assumes financial responsibility for this material until, as partially expended fuel, it is transferred to another facility and the remaining part of its initial value is recovered. Most power reactor operators were operating fossil-fuelled power plants before the advent of nuclear power and have long since established rather complete and adequate controls for these fossil fuels. The reactor operator must have no less adequate controls for the special nuclear material used in his nuclear plant. Power reactor, operation is not an ancient science and during its relatively short history our engineers and scientists have been constantly improving plant designs and methods of operation to reduce costs and make our nuclear plants competitive with fossil-fuelled conventional plants. Nuclear material management must be as modern and efficient as is humanly possible to ensure that technological advances leading to reduced costs are not lost by poor handling of nuclear fuel and the records pertaining to fuel inventory. Nuclear material management requires the maintaining of complete and informative records by the power reactor operator. These records need not be complex to satisfy the criteria of completeness and adequacy. In fact, simplicity is extremely desirable. Despite the fact that nuclear fuel is new and completely different to our conventional fuels no mystery should be attached thereto. Nuclear material control as part of nuclear material management is not limited to simple inventory work but it is the basis for a great deal of other activity that is an inherent part of any power reactor operations such as irradiated fuel shipments, reprocessing of spent fuel, with its associated accounting for reclaimed fuel and material produced during reactor operation, and the establishing and maintaining of an adequate

  19. The core design of the advanced power reactor plus (APR+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advance Power Reactor Plus (APR+), a pressurized water reactor and an improved nuclear power reactor based on the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) in Korea, has been developed with 18-month cycle operation strategy from its initial core. The APR+ core power is 4290 MWth which corresponds to a 1500 MWe class nuclear power plant. The reactor core consists of 257 fuel assemblies. Comparing with APR1400 core design, 16 fuel assemblies are added. Its cycle length is expected about 450 EFPD directly from initial core, although most of previous other plants had been started according to their annual or 15-month cycle operation schedule at their initial core and gone to 18-month after third - fourth cycle. In order to reduce the peaking power, fuel pin configurations of the assembly, are optimized by using some low enriched fuel pins and gadolinia bearings. APR+ core has been met the requirements as well as the above cycle length requirement; 1) peaking factor, 2) Negative MTC(Moderator Temperature Coefficient), 3) sufficient shutdown margin, 4) convergent Xenon stability Index. The maximum rod burnup and the discharge fuel assembly burnup are also satisfied those of the limit. It is expected to acquire the standard design approval by the end of 2012 by the Korean nuclear regulatory. (authors)

  20. PC version of PRIS (Power Reactor Information System)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has been collecting operating experience data on nuclear power plants in the Member States since 1970. In 1980 a computerized database was established, the IAEA Power Reactor Information System (PRIS). To make PRIS data available to the Member States in a more convenient format, the development of a PC version of PRIS started in 1989

  1. Total loss of AC power analysis for EPR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnowski, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.darnowski@itc.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Heat Engineering, Nowowiejska 21/25, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Skrzypek, Eleonora, E-mail: eleonora.skrzypek@ncbj.gov.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Heat Engineering, Nowowiejska 21/25, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), A. Sołtana 7, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Mazgaj, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.mazgaj@itc.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Heat Engineering, Nowowiejska 21/25, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Świrski, Konrad [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Heat Engineering, Nowowiejska 21/25, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Gandrille, Pascal [AREVA NP SAS, Tour AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Total loss of AC power (Station Blackout) was simulated for the EPR reactor model. • In-vessel phase of the accident is under consideration. • Comparison of MELCOR and MAAP results is presented. • MELCOR and MAAP results are comparable. - Abstract: In this paper the results of severe accident simulations for the EPR reactor in the case of loss of offsite power combined with total failure of all diesel generators (total loss of AC power) are presented. Calculations were performed with MELCOR 2.1 computer code for in-vessel phase of the accident. In this scenario, the unavailability of all offsite and onsite power sources and the lack of cooling leads directly to core degradation, material relocation to the lower plenum and rupture of the reactor pressure vessel. MELCOR results were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with MAAP4 code results and show a good agreement.

  2. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs

  3. Research Reactor Power Control System Design by MATLAB/SIMULINK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baang, Dane; Suh, Yong Suk; Kim, Young Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ki Hong [Samsung Electronics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    In this study it is presented that MATLAB/SIMULINK can be efficiently used for modeling and power control system design for research reactors. The presented power control system deals with various functions including reactivity control, signals processing, reactivity calculation, alarm request generation, etc., thus it is required to test all the software logic using proper model for reactor, control rods, and field instruments. In MATLAB/SIMULINK tool, point kinetics, thermal model, control absorber rod model, and other instrument models were developed based on reactor parameters and known properties of each component or system. The software for power control system was invented and linked to the model to test each function. From the simulation result it is shown that the power control performance and other functions of the system can be easily tested and analyzed in the proposed simulation structure.

  4. Research Reactor Power Control System Design by MATLAB/SIMULINK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study it is presented that MATLAB/SIMULINK can be efficiently used for modeling and power control system design for research reactors. The presented power control system deals with various functions including reactivity control, signals processing, reactivity calculation, alarm request generation, etc., thus it is required to test all the software logic using proper model for reactor, control rods, and field instruments. In MATLAB/SIMULINK tool, point kinetics, thermal model, control absorber rod model, and other instrument models were developed based on reactor parameters and known properties of each component or system. The software for power control system was invented and linked to the model to test each function. From the simulation result it is shown that the power control performance and other functions of the system can be easily tested and analyzed in the proposed simulation structure

  5. Protective actions as a factor in power reactor siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, K.S.; Schweitzer, M.

    1984-06-01

    This report examines the relationship between a power reactor site and the ease of implementing protective actions (emergency measures a serious accident). Limiting populating density around a reactor lowers the number of people at risk but cannot assure that all protective actions are possible for those who reside near the reactor. While some protective measures can always be taken (i.e., expedient respiratory protection, sheltering) the ability to evacuate the area or find adequate shelter may depend on the characteristics of the area near the reactor site. Generic siting restrictions designed to identify and eliminate these site-specific constraints would be difficult to formulate. The authors suggest identifying possible impediments to protective actions at a proposed reactor site and addressing these problems in the emergency plans. 66 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  6. Protective actions as a factor in power reactor siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the relationship between a power reactor site and the ease of implementing protective actions (emergency measures a serious accident). Limiting populating density around a reactor lowers the number of people at risk but cannot assure that all protective actions are possible for those who reside near the reactor. While some protective measures can always be taken (i.e., expedient respiratory protection, sheltering) the ability to evacuate the area or find adequate shelter may depend on the characteristics of the area near the reactor site. Generic siting restrictions designed to identify and eliminate these site-specific constraints would be difficult to formulate. The authors suggest identifying possible impediments to protective actions at a proposed reactor site and addressing these problems in the emergency plans. 66 references, 6 figures, 8 tables

  7. Fast-power-reactor optimization by the game theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first stage of the use of fast breeder reactor - because fissile-material amounts are small - we are interested in fast breeder reactors which achieve minimum fissile-material mass, with maximum power. This problem shows a two-matrix-game structure. First, we determine a competive-game solution and second, a cooperative-game solution, obtaining in this way the optimum distribution of the fissile and fertile materials in the multizone fast reactors. Another optimization problem which is solved in this paper is finding the reactor structure for which the power non-uniformity factor and the flux non-uniformity factor are minimum. This is, also, a mathematical two-matrix game and it is solved as above. The two optimization problems have different solutions. (author)

  8. The optimum shielding for a power reactor using local components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some local concrete mixtures have been picked out (selected) to be studied as shielding concrete for prospective nuclear power reactor in Syria. This research has interested in the attenuation of gamma radiation and neutron fluxes by these local concretes in the ordinary conditions. In addition to the heat effect on the shielding and physical properties of local concrete. Furthermore the neutron activation of the elements of the local concrete mixtures have been studied that for selection the low-activation materials (low dose rate and short half life radioisotopes). In this way biological shielding for nuclear reactor can be safe during operation of nuclear power reactor, in addition to be low radioactive waste after decommissioning the reactor. (author)

  9. Nuclear safety. Concerns about the nuclear power reactors in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1976, the Soviet Union and Cuba concluded an agreement to construct two 440-megawatt nuclear power reactors near Cienfuegos on the south central coast of Cuba, about 180 miles south of Key West, Florida. The construction of these reactors, which began around 1983, was a high priority for Cuba because of its heavy dependence on imported oil. Cuba is estimated to need an electrical generation capacity of 3,000 megawatts by the end of the decade. When completed, the first reactor unit would provide a significant percentage (estimated at over 15 percent) of Cuba's need for electricity. It is uncertain when Cuba's nuclear power reactors will become operational. On September 5, 1992, Fidel Castro announced the suspension of construction at both of Cuba's reactors because Cuba could not meet the financial terms set by the Russian government to complete the reactors. Cuban officials had initially planned to start up the first of the two nuclear reactors by the end of 1993. However, before the September 5 announcement, it was estimated that this reactor would not be operational until late 1995 or early 1996. The civil construction (such as floors and walls) of the first reactor is currently estimated to be about 90 percent to 97 percent complete, but only about 37 percent of the reactor equipment (such as pipes, pumps, and motors) has been installed. The civil construction of the second reactor is about 20 percent to 30 percent complete. No information was available about the status of equipment for the second reactor. According to former Cuban nuclear power and electrical engineers and a technician, all of whom worked at the reactor site and have recently emigrated from Cuba, Cuba's nuclear power program suffers from poor construction practices and inadequate training for future reactor operators. One former official has alleged, for example, that the first reactor containment structure, which is designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material into

  10. New advanced small and medium nuclear power reactors: possible nuclear power plants for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years interest has increased in small and medium sized nuclear power reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This interest has been driven by a desire to reduce capital costs, construction times and interest during construction, service remote sites and ease integration into small grids. The IAEA has recommended that the term 'small' be applied to reactors with a net electrical output less than 300 MWe and the term 'medium' to 300-700 MWe. A large amount of experience has been gained over 50 years in the design, construction and operation of small and medium nuclear power reactors. Historically, 100% of commercial reactors were in these categories in 1951-1960, reducing to 21% in 1991-2000. The technologies involved include pressurised water reactors, boiling water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors and molten salt reactors. Details will be provided of two of the most promising new designs, the South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) of about 110 MWe, and the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor of about 335 MWe. Their construction costs are estimated to be about US$l,000/kWe with a generating cost for the PBMR of about US1.6c/kWh. These costs are lower than estimated for the latest designs of large reactors such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) designed for 1,600 MWe for use in Europe in the next decade. It is concluded that a small or medium nuclear power reactor system built in modules to follow an increasing demand could be attractive for generating low cost electricity in many Australian states and reduce problems arising from air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels

  11. Design and improvement of nuclear reactor power controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The proportion of nuclear power is gradually increasing in China's energy structure. Purpose: On one hand, power grid and power plant coordination in the electricity grid system requires the nuclear power plants to adapt the needs of the peak regulation, frequency modification (FM), and even the grid AGC (Automatic Gain Control) mode. On the other hand, it is necessary to design a control system that can adapt the model G for the operation requirements, and ensure the safe and economic performance. Methods: With an experimental reactor as the research object and MATLAB/SIMULINK as test toolkit, we designed an improved the reactor power control system, and adopted three-loop PID (Proportional, Integral, Derivative) control system to ensure the precision control of a control rod. Results: The simulation results show that the method presented in the paper achieved better tracking performance and robustness. It can work against the unmeasurable disturbances. Conclusion: It is of practical significance for the reactor participating in the peak regulation of power grid, and the three-loop PID control system shows its improvement for reactor power control. (authors)

  12. Power noise analysis at the IBM-2M nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The IBR-2M pulsed fast research reactor with the nominal power of 2 MW is a modernized version of the IBR-2 reactor which was shut down in 2006 because its service life had come to the end. The core and the shell, stationary reflectors and control and emergency protection elements were completely replaced in the course of modernizing. Neutronic processes in nuclear reactors have a probabilistic character due to the quantum mechanics of scattering and the stochastics of propagation in materials

  13. Reducing the Void Effect in a Large Fast Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coolant void effect has been recognized as one of the most serious safety problems of large, liquid-metal-cooled fast power reactors. Several proposals have been made to reduce the positive void reactivity effect. However, in all cases appreciable penalties with respect to internal breeding ratio, fissile inventory and, finally, economics have to be paid. All these proposals, like the pan-cake core reactor and the annular core reactor, have in common that neutron leakage out of all core zones is artificially increased. Some more detailed calculations of voiding characteristics of large sodium-cooled fast reactors with cylindrical cores indicate that the most important positive contribution to the void reactivity effect arises in the central core zone. Consequently it appears promising to reduce the void effect considerably by increasing deliberately neutron leakage only out of the central core region and not necessarily out of all core regions. Compared with other geometries discussed this suggestion should result in better breeding and economical performance concurrent with a satisfactory void effect. To support this proposal an investigation was conducted on some significant reactor data (breeding ratios, fissile enrichment, power distribution, etc.) for three geometrically different sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors with a power of 1000 MW(e) each. In the first case a normal cylindrical core geometry (2 core zones, 1 axial and 1 radial blanket) with an H: D ratio of roughly 0.33 was considered. The second reactor was similar to the first, except that the height of the inner core zone was reduced by approximately 50% to enhance neutron leakage in the core centre, the lost core volume being balanced by increasing the outer radius of the second core zone. The third reactor had an annular core with dimensions consistent with those of the first reactor. Results show a remarkable improvement in the void effect of the variable-core-height reactor compared with

  14. The Carem reactor: Bridging the gap to nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An idea is presented as an alternative for the introduction of nuclear power in presently non-nuclear countries. This idea involves going through an intermediate step between the traditional research reactor and the first commercial nuclear power plant. This intermediate step would consist of a very small nuclear power plant, with the principal goal of gaining in experience in the country on all the processes involved in introducing commercial nuclear generation. (author)

  15. Robust controller design of nuclear power reactor by parametric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The robust controller for the nuclear reactor power control system is designed. Since the reactor model is not exact, it is necessary to design the robust controller that can work in the real situations of perturbations. The reactor model is described in the form of transfer function and the bound of each coefficient is determined to set up the linear interval system. By the Kharitonov and the edge theorem, a frequency based design template is made and applied to the determination of the controller. The controller designed by this method is simpler than that obtained by the H∞. Although the controller is designed with the basis of high power, it could be used even at low power

  16. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  17. Passive cooling systems in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews several R and D activities associated with the subject of passive cooling systems, conducted by the N.R.C.Negev thermohydraulic group. A short introduction considering different types of thermosyphons and their applications is followed by a detailed description of the experimental work, its results and conclusions. An ongoing research project is focused on the evaluation of the external dry air passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in the AP-600 (Westinghouse advanced pressurized water reactor). In this context some preliminary theoretical results and planned experimental research are for the fature described

  18. Price of fission product transmutation in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The opportunity of Tc-99 and I-129 transmutation in Russian pressure water VVER-1000 reactor is discussed in this paper. Study of long-lived fission product transmutation shows that if Tc-99 or I-129 are located in VVER-type reactor for a total lifetime, then lifetime and burnup are reduced because of additional capture of neutrons. The reduction is proportional to the incinerated mass of nuclide. Transmutation of either 46.8 kg of Tc-99 or 45.8 kg of I-129 causes a reduction of burnup by 2.25 GW.d/ton that is 5.6 % with respect to the burnup without transmutation. This corresponds to a loss of electric power production of 49 GW.d. If both 42 kg Tc-99 and 43 kg I-129 are transmuted, then reduction of burnup is 4.51 GW.d/ton that is 11.3 % of the burnup without transmutation. Loss of electric power production is 99 GW.d. The result does not practically depend on way of transmuted nuclide placement. This loss of power is a price that should be paid for transmutation of nuclides without their removal during reactor operation. One would avoid the reduction of burnup and power loss if it would be possible to find such way of nuclide placement for irradiation in reactor, which would permit to extract nuclides from operating reactor a certain time before next fuel reloading

  19. Effects of pitching and rolling on reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present report is described about the effect of pitching and rolling on 'MUTSU' reactor power. Using the vertical gyro and the acceleration detectors, we measured pitching and rolling in addition to physical quantities from the nuclear reactor instrumentations on a voyage for N.S.'MUTSU' Power-Up Tests. This data was used to apply a multivariable autoregressive model to analyze the correlations between pitching-angle, rolling-angle, steam flow (load), neutron flux (power) and primary coolant temperature. Concerning reactor kinetics, we got a result that the pitching and rolling have no effect on primary coolant temperature and neutron flux. It is found that the frequencies at high coherence between load and power is lower and separate from the frequencies at the pitching and rolling. The pitching and rolling mainly depend on the size, weight and position of center of gravity of the ship, on the other hand the load-follow characteristics depend on the load and heat capacities of primary loop and secondary loop of the reactor. For this reason we interpret that the design of reactor and ship of N.S.'MUTSU' match well each other. (author)

  20. Safety criteria for plate type fuels in small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Plate type fuels are generally used in research reactor, and could also be used in small or large power reactors, but would require that a comprehensive set of safety criteria be established. In this work, a group of safety criteria is established for the utilization of plate type fuels in small power reactors taking into consideration the characteristics of power and research reactors. Several alternatives of plate type fuels are considered for using in small power reactors: dispersions of UO2 in stainless steel, of UO2 in zircaloy, and of U-Mo alloy in zircaloy, and monolithic plates of U-Mo cladded with zircaloy. Given the strong dependency of radiation damage with temperature, the heat transfer safety criteria were verified for all the alternatives, namely the DNBR, peak clad temperature to avoid clad embrittlement, meat temperature to avoid swelling, fuel temperature to avoid meat matrix reaction and coolant critical speed. It was found that all alternatives meet the safety criteria including the 0.5 mm monolithic U-Mo plate cladded with zircaloy. (author)

  1. New reactor technology: safety improvements in nuclear power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, M L

    2007-11-01

    Almost 450 nuclear power plants are currently operating throughout the world and supplying about 17% of the world's electricity. These plants perform safely, reliably, and have no free-release of byproducts to the environment. Given the current rate of growth in electricity demand and the ever growing concerns for the environment, nuclear power can only satisfy the need for electricity and other energy-intensive products if it can demonstrate (1) enhanced safety and system reliability, (2) minimal environmental impact via sustainable system designs, and (3) competitive economics. The U.S. Department of Energy with the international community has begun research on the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier, and that can offer significant advances toward these challenging goals; in particular, six candidate reactor system designs have been identified. These future nuclear power systems will require advances in materials, reactor physics, as well as thermal-hydraulics to realize their full potential. However, all of these designs must demonstrate enhanced safety above and beyond current light water reactor systems if the next generation of nuclear power plants is to grow in number far beyond the current population. This paper reviews the advanced Generation-IV reactor systems and the key safety phenomena that must be considered to guarantee that enhanced safety can be assured in future nuclear reactor systems. PMID:18049233

  2. Mathematical game type optimization of powerful fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain maximum speed of putting into operation fast breeders it is recommended on the initial stage of putting into operation these reactors to apply lower power which needs less fission materials. That is why there is an attempt to find a configuration of a high-power reactor providing maximum power for minimum mass of fission material. This problem has a structure of the mathematical game with two partners of non-zero-order total and is solved by means of specific aids of theory of games. Optimal distribution of fission and breeding materials in a multizone reactor first is determined by solution of competitive game and then, on its base, by solution of the cooperation game. The second problem the solution for which is searched is developed from remark on the fact that a reactor with minimum coefficient of flux heterogenity has a configuration different from the reactor with power coefficient heterogenity. Maximum burn-up of fuel needs minimum heterogenity of the flux coefficient and the highest power level needs minimum coefficient of power heterogenity. That is why it is possible to put a problem of finding of the reactor configuration having both coefficients with minimum value. This problem has a structure of a mathematical game with two partners of non-zero-order total and is solved analogously giving optimal distribution of fuel from the new point of view. In the report is shown that both these solutions are independent which is a result of the aim put in the problem of optimization. (author)

  3. Detecting, locating and identifying failed fuel in Canadian power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes how defected fuel elements are detected, located and identified in Canadian CANDU power reactors. Fuel defects are detected by monitoring the primary coolant for gaseous fission products and radioiodines, while location in core is usually performed on-power by delayed neutron monitoring of coolant samples from individual fuel channels or off-power by gamma-ray monitoring of the channel feeder pipes. The systems and techniques used to detect and locate defected fuel in both Ontario Hydro and CANDU 6 power stations are described, along with examples provided by station experience. The ability to detect and locate defected fuel in power stations was greatly enhanced by a fundamental R and D program, which provided an understanding and models of fission-product release and transport, and the post-defect deterioration of failed fuel. Techniques and equipment used to identify and store defected fuel after it has been discharged from the reactor are briefly reviewed

  4. Power control of water reactors using nitrogen 16 activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre, the open-core swimming pool reactors Melusine (2 MW) and Siloe (15 MW) are controlled at a constant overall power using nitrogen-16 channels. The conventional linear control channels react instantaneously to the rapid power fluctuations, this being necessary for the safety of the reactors, but their power indications are erroneous since they are affected by local deformations of the thermal flux caused by the compensation movements of the control rods. The nitrogen-16 channels on the other hand give an indication of the overall power proportional to the mean fission flux and independent of the rod movements, but their response time is 15 seconds, A constant overall power control is thus possible by a slow correction of the reference signal given by the automatic control governed by thu linear channels by means of a correction term given by the 'N-16' channels: This is done automatically in Melusine and manually in Siloe. (authors)

  5. Nuclear Archeology for CANDU Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadhead, Bryan L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is the development of so-called 'nuclear archeology' techniques to predict the irradiation history of both fuel-related and non-fuel-related materials irradiated in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) family of nuclear reactors. In this application to CANDU-type reactors, two different scenarios for the collection of the appropriate data for use in these procedures will be assumed: the first scenario is the removal of the pressure tubes, calandria tubes, or fuel cladding and destructive analysis of the activation products contained in these structural materials; the second scenario is the nondestructive analysis (NDA) of the same hardware items via high-resolution gamma ray scans. There are obvious advantages and disadvantages for each approach; however, the NDA approach is the central focus of this work because of its simplicity and lack of invasiveness. The use of these techniques along with a previously developed inverse capability is expected to allow for the prediction of average flux levels and irradiation time, and the total fluence for samples where the values of selected isotopes can be measured.

  6. Transportation and storage of foreign spent power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the generic actions to be taken by the Department of Energy, in cooperation with other US government agencies, foreign governments, and international organizations, in support of the implementation of Administration policies with respect to the following international spent fuel management activities: bilateral cooperation related to expansion of foreign national storage capacities; multilateral and international cooperation related to development of multinational and international spent fuel storage regimes; fee-based transfer of foreign spent power reactor fuel to the US for storage; and emergency transfer of foreign spent power reactor fuel to the US for storage

  7. Characteristics of a reactor with power reactivity feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The point-reactor model with power reactivity feedback becomes a nonlinear system. Its dynamic characteristic shows great complexity. According to the mathematic definition of stability in differential equation qualitative theory, the model of a reactor with power reactivity feedback is judged unstable. The equilibrium point is a saddle-node point. A portion of the trajectory in the neighborhood of the equilibrium point is parabolic fan curve, and the other is hyperbolic fan curve. Based on phase locus near the equilibrium point, it is pointed out that the model is still stable within physical limits. The difference between stabilities in the mathematical sense and in the physical sense is indicated. (authors)

  8. Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with superconducting TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coils has been proposed. A center solenoid coil system and an inboard blanket were discarded. The key point was how to find the engineering design solution of the TF coil system with the high field and high current density. The coil system with the center post radius of less than 1 m can generate the maximum field of ∼ 20 T. This coil system causes a compact reactor concept, where the plasma major and minor radii of 3.75 m and 1.9 m, respectively and the fusion power of 1.8 GW. (author)

  9. Alternative fusion reactors as future commercial power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternative reactor based on a field-reversed configuration (FRC) has advantages of the cylindrical geometry, the open field line geometry (direct energy conversion (DEC) of the charged-particle flow), and high β (plasma pressure/magnetic-field pressure). This paper aims to evaluate the attractiveness of a low radioactive FRC fusion core. Analysis of a conceptual deuterium - helium-3 (D-3He) fusion power reactor is presented and reference point is defined. Principal parameters of the D-3He plasma reference case (RC) and comparison with conceptual D-3He tokamak and FRC power plants are shown. (author)

  10. Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with superconducting TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coils has been proposed. A center solenoid coil system and an inboard blanket were discarded. The key point was how to find the engineering design solution of the TF coil system with the high and high current density. The coil system with the center post radius of less than 1 m can generate the maximum field of ∼20 T. This coil system causes, a compact reactor concept, where the plasma major and minor radii o 3.75 m and 1.9 m, respectively and the fusion power of 1.8 GW. (author)

  11. Multivariable robust control of an integrated nuclear power reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Etchepareborda A.; Flury C.A.

    2002-01-01

    The design of the main control system of the CAREM nuclear power plant is presented. This plant is an inherently safe low-power nuclear reactor with natural convection on the primary coolant circuit and is self-pressurized with a steam dome on the top of the pressure vessel (PV). It is an integrated reactor as the whole primary coolant circuit is within the PV. The primary circuit transports the heat to the secondary circuit through once-through steam generators (SG). There is a feedwater val...

  12. Specific power of liquid-metal-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of the core specific power for conceptual space-based liquid-metal-cooled reactors, based on heat transfer considerations, are presented for three different fuel types: (1) pin-type fuel; (2) cermet fuel; and (3) thermionic fuel. The calculations are based on simple models and are intended to provide preliminary comparative results. The specific power is of interest because it is a measure of the core mass required to produce a given amount of power. Potential problems concerning zero-g critical heat flux and loss-of-coolant accidents are also discussed because these concerns may limit the core specific power. Insufficient experimental data exists to accurately determine the critical heat flux of liquid-metal-cooled reactors in space; however, preliminary calculations indicate that it may be a concern. Results also indicate that the specific power of the pin-type fuels can be increased significantly if the gap between the fuel and the clad is eliminated. Cermet reactors offer the highest specific power because of the excellent thermal conductivity of the core matrix material. However, it may not be possible to take fuel advantage of this characteristic when loss-of-coolant accidents are considered in the final core design. The specific power of the thermionic fuels is dependent mainly on the emitter temperature. The small diameter thermionic fuels have specific powers comparable to those of pin-type fuels. 11 refs., 12 figs, 2 tabs

  13. The reactor power control system based on digital control in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PLC (Programmable Logical Controller), digital communication and redundant techniques are applied in the rod control and position indication system(namely the reactor power control system) to perform the power control in the 300 MW reactor automatically and integrally in Qinshan Phase I project. This paper introduces the features, digital design methods of hardware of the instrumentation and control system (I and C) in the reactor power control. It is more convenient for the information exchange by human-machine interface (HMI), operation and maintenance, and the system reliability has been greatly improved after the project being reconstructed. (authors)

  14. Nuclear detectors for in-core power-reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor control is commonly obtained through neutronic measurements, ex-core and in-core. In large size reactors flux instabilities may take place. For a good monitoring of them, local in-core power measurements become particularly useful. This paper intends to review the questions about neutronic sensors with could be used in-core. A historical account about methods is given first, from early power reactors with brief description of each system. Sensors presently used (ionization fission chambers, self-powered detectors) are then considered and also those which could be developped such as gamma thermometers. Their physical basis, main characteristics and operation modes are detailed. Preliminary tests and works needed for an extension of their life-time are indicated. As an example present irradiation tests at the CEA are then proposed. Two tables will help comparing the characteristics of each type in terms of its precise purpose: fuel monitoring, safety or power control. Finally a table summarizes the kind of sensors mounted on working power reactors and another one is a review of characteristics for some detectors from obtainable commercial sheets

  15. Modular Lead-Bismuth Fast Reactors in Nuclear Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Petrochenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the unique experience of operating reactors with heavy liquid metal coolant–eutectic lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear submarines, the concept of modular small fast reactors SVBR-100 for civilian nuclear power has been developed and validated. The features of this innovative technology are as follows: a monoblock (integral design of the reactor with fast neutron spectrum, which can operate using different types of fuel in various fuel cycles including MOX fuel in a self-providing mode. The reactor is distinct in that it has a high level of self-protection and passive safety, it is factory manufactured and the assembled reactor can be transported by railway. Multipurpose application of the reactor is presumed, primarily, it can be used for regional power to produce electricity, heat and for water desalination. The Project is being realized within the framework of state-private partnership with joint venture OJSC “AKME-Engineering” established on a parity basis by the State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” and the Limited Liability Company “EuroSibEnergo”.

  16. Evaluation of plate type fuel options for small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plate type fuels are generally used in research reactor. The utilization of this kind of configuration improves significantly the overall performance fuel. The conception of new fuels for small power reactors based in plate-type configuration needs a complete review of the safety criteria originally used to conduce power and research reactor projects. In this work, a group of safety criteria is established for the utilization of plate-type fuels in small power reactors taking into consideration the characteristics of power and research reactors. The performance characteristics of fuel elements are strongly supported by its materials properties and the adopted configuration for its fissile particles. The present work makes an orientated bibliographic investigation searching the best material properties (structural materials and fuel compounds) related to the performance fuel. Looking for good parafermionic characteristics and manufacturing exequibility associated to existing facilities in national research centres, this work proposes several alternatives of plate type fuels, considering its utilization in small power reactors: dispersions of UO2 in stainless steel, of UO2 in zircaloy, and of U-Mo alloy in zircaloy, and monolithic plates of U-Mo cladded with zircaloy. Given the strong dependency of radiation damage with temperature increase, the safety criteria related to heat transfer were verified for all the alternatives, namely the DNBR; coolant temperature lower than saturation temperature; peak meat temperature to avoid swelling; peak fuel temperature to avoid meat-matrix reaction. It was found that all alternatives meet the safety criteria including the 0.5 mm monolithic U-Mo plate cladded with zircaloy. (author)

  17. Feasibility study of self sustaining capability on water cooled thorium reactors for different power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium fuel cycle can maintain the sustainable system of the reactor for self sustaining system for future sustainable development in the world. Some characteristics of thorium cycle show some advantages in relation to higher breeding capability, higher performance of burn-up and more proliferation resistant. Several investigations was performed to improve the breeding capability which is essential for maintaining the fissile sustainability during reactor operation in thermal reactor such as Shippingport reactor and molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR) project. The preliminary study of breeding capability on water cooled thorium reactor has been investigated for various power output. The iterative calculation system is employed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of PIJ module of SRAC2000. In this calculation, 1238 fission products and 129 heavy nuclides are employed. In the cell calculation, 26 heavy metals and 66 fission products and 1 pseudo FP are employed. The employed nuclear data library was JENDL 3.2. The reactor is fueled by 233U-Th Oxide and it has used the light water coolant as moderator. Some characteristics such as conversion ratio and void reactivity coefficient performances are evaluated for the systems. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) values and average burnups are studied for survey parameter. The parametric survey for different power outputs are employed from 10 MWt to 3000 MWt for evaluating the some characteristics of core size and leakage effects to the spectra profile, required enrichment, breeding capability, fissile inventory condition, and void reactivity coefficient. Different power outputs are employed in order to evaluate its effect to the required enrichment for criticality, breeding capability, void reactivity and fissile inventory accumulation. The obtained value of the conversion ratios is evaluated by using the equilibrium atom composition. The conversion ratio is employed based on the

  18. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  19. Radiological shielding of low power compact reactor: calculation and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of compact reactors becoming a technology that offers great projection and innumerable use possibilities, both in electricity generation and in propulsion.One of the requirements for the operation of this type of reactor is that it must include a radiological shield that will allow for different types of configurations and that, may be moved with the reactor if it needs to be transported.The nucleus of a reactor emits radiation, mainly neutrons and gamma rays in the heat of power, and gamma radiation during the radioactive decay of fission products.This radiation must be restrained in both conditions of operation to avoid it affecting workers or the public.The combination of different materials and properties in layers results in better performance in the form of a decrease in radiation, hence causing the dosage outside the reactor, whether in operation or shut down, to fall within the allowed limits.The calculations and design of radiological shields is therefore of paramount importance in reactor design.The choice of material and the design of the shield have a strong impact on the cost and the load capacity, the latter being one of the characteristics to optimize.The imposed condition of design is that the reactor can be transported together with the decay shield in a standard container of 40 foot

  20. The pressure tubes in the CANDU power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power reactors using zirconium alloy pressure tubes generate electricity in several countries. In Ontario CANDU reactors generate about 30 percent of the electricity produced in the province. The pressure tubes of the first five CANDU reactors were made of cold-worked Zircaloy-2, an alloy of zirconium and tin developed by the US Navy. In 1958 the USSR published information on a Zr-2.5 wt percent Nb alloy, in which the Nb promotes stabilization of the β phase, thus presenting opportunities of exploiting metallurgically strong pressure tubes analogous to the heat-treatable α-β titanium alloys. After two reactors using Zr-2.5 wt percent Nb in a quenched and aged condition were constructed, an extensive development program on cold-worked Zr-2.5 wt percent Nb pressure tubes resulted in their becoming the reference tubes for all future CANDU reactors. Pressure tubes of Zr-3.3 wt percent Sn-0.8 wt percent Nb-0.8 wt percent Mo (Excel) are in an advanced state of development. These tubes will be used in an annealed condition; projections show that they will have improved dimensional stability over the lifetime of the reactors. These improvements result from experimental programs leading to an understanding of the relationship between microstructures and fabrication variables and effects of the environment during service in nuclear reactors. (author)

  1. Status of fusion power reactor design activity in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of fusion power reactor design studies conducted in JAERI over the past 22 years are reviewed and the present status of reactor studies is introduced. A helium gas cooled power reactor which has a blanket with solid lithium ceramics such as Li2O for the breeding material and incolloy-800 for the structural material was proposed in 1973. This is one of the first reactor design using a lithium ceramics blanket concept. Another power reactor design called the Swimming Pool-type Tokamak Reactor (SPTR-P) was completed in 1983. In SPTR-P, the tokamak reactor is submerged in a water pool to utilize water as the shield to reduce long term radioactive waste and to achieve easy repair and maintenance. In 1990, the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept was proposed as a realistic fusion reactor to be built in the near future. The major feature of SSTR is the maximum utilization of a bootstrap current in order to reduce the power required to maintain steady state operation. It is cooled by pressurized water and uses low activation ferritic steel as the structural material. A study of SSTR-2 to improve the safety and economic aspects of SSTR by replacing the water coolant by a mixture of helium gas and fine solid particles was carried out in 1992. Light yet highly heat resistant material, titanium aluminide intermetallic compound (TiAl), is used as the structural material. The net thermal efficiency larger than 40 % can be achieved with the gas-particulate mixture at 5 MPa and the outlet coolant temperature of 700degC. A concept of a Drastically Easy Maintenance (DREAM) tokamak reactor has recently been proposed. For easy replacement of blanket and divertor, a plasma configuration with high aspect ratio around 6 and a small number of torus sectoring of 12 are selected. A 1/12 torus sector is horizontally pulled out between the TF coils with a straight radial motion. It is estimated that the availability of 85 % can be achieved. (author)

  2. Background Radiation Measurements at High Power Research Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ashenfelter, J; Baldenegro, C X; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Fan, S; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Martinez, D; McKeown, R D; Morrell, S; Mueller, P E; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Thompson, S J; Varner, R L; Wang, W; Watson, S M; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including $\\gamma$-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  3. Physics considerations for utilization of thorium in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molten Salt Reactor design concepts suit the needs of India's Three-Stage nuclear power program for efficient thorium utilization. An effort is being made in BARC to design a MSR configuration for Indian requirements. As a preliminary study, reactor physics analysis of 850 MWe, molten salt reactor operating in fast spectrum is being carried out in hot and static condition. The LiF-ThF4-UF4 is being considered as the primary coolants and fuel. The blanket material is LiF-ThF4. The talk will give an overview of the neutronic properties of thorium and the bred fissile material and then proceed to present the major design features in AHWR and the Indian Molten Salt Breeder Reactor under consideration at present

  4. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  5. Electric power from near-term fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-term fusion reactors such as FED or INTOR will probably have primary cooling systems which operate at temperatures lower than is optimal for power production using a conventional steam cycle. This limitation may be imposed by uncertainties in materials behavior or structural limitations. There are economic motivations to demonstrate electric power production from fusion at the earliest possible date. A greater motivation is the elicitation of public interest in and support of fusion as a viable power source. This paper examines requirements and possibilities of electric power production on near-term fusion reactors using low temperature cycle technology similar to that used in some geothermal power systems. Requirements include the need for a working fluid with suitable thermodynamic properties and which is free of oxygen and hydrogen to facilitate tritium management. Thermal storage will also be required due to the short system thermal time constants on near-term reactors. It is possible to use the FED shield in a binary power cycle, and results are presented of thermodynamic analyses of this system. Thermal storage is accomplished by using the latent heat of fusion of a PbBi eutectic. The secondary loop can use R-11, R-113, or hexafluorobenzene as a working fluid. Such a system would cost about $50 million and would generate about 10 MW of electric power

  6. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC's ''Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants'' (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC's preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant's research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified

  7. Shielding assessment of the ETRR-1 Reactor Under power upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of existing shielding of the ETRR-1 reactor in case of power upgrading is presented and discussed. It was carried out using both the present EK-10 type fuel elements and some other types of fuel elements with different enrichments. The shielding requirements for the ETRR-1 when power is upgraded are also discussed. The optimization curves between the upgraded reactor power and the shield thickness are presented. The calculation have been made using the ANISN code with the DLC-75 data library. The results showed that the present shield necessitates an additional layer of steel with thickness of 10.20 and 25 cm. When its power is upgraded to 3, 6 and 10 MWt in order to cutoff all neutron energy groups to be adequately safe under normal operating conditions. 4 figs

  8. Design considerations for an inertial confinement fusion reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To further define the engineering and economic concerns for inertial confinement fusion reactors (ICR's), a conceptual design study was performed by Bechtel Group Incorporated under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study examined alternatives to the LLNL HYLIFE concept and expanded the previous balance of plant design to incorporate information from recent liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) power plant studies. The majority of the effort was to incorporate present laser and target physics models into a reactor design with a low coolant flowrate and a high driver repetition rate. An example of such a design is the LLNL JADE concept. In addition to producing a power plant design for LLNL using the JADE example, Bechtel has also examined the applicability of the EAGLE (Energy Absorbing Gas Lithium Ejector) concept

  9. Study of the power margins of RBMK-1000 reactor when operating at nominal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a reliability and control study of the RBMK-1000 reactor. This study consists in determining the power margin of this plant when operating at nominal power in comparison with the physical phenomena limiting power extraction by a coolant fluid.49 figs., 8 tabs., 11 refs. (author)

  10. PWR reactors for BBR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and functioning of the nuclear steam generator system developed by BBR and its components are described. Auxiliary systems, control and load following behaviour and fuel management are discussed and the main data of PWR given. The brochure closes with a perspective of the future of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power plant. (GL)

  11. Sodium fast reactor power monitoring using gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.; Normand, S.; Barbot, L.; Domenech, T.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Frelin, A.M. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, CEA - Saclay DRT/LIST/DETECS/SSTM, Batiment 516 - P.C. no 72, Gif sur Yvette, F-91191 (France); Montagu, T.; Dautremer, T.; Barat, E. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Processus Stochastiques et Spectres (France); Ban, G. [ENSICAEN (France)

    2009-06-15

    This work deals with the use of high flux gamma spectrometry to monitor the fourth generation of sodium fast reactor (SFR) power. The simulation study part of this work has shown that power monitoring in a short time response and with a good accuracy is possible. An experimental test is under preparation at the French SFR Phenix experimental reactor to validate simulation studies. First, physical calculations have been done to correlate gamma activity to the released thermal power. Gamma emitter production rate in the reactor core was calculated with technical and nuclear data as the sodium velocity, the atomic densities, Phenix neutron spectrum and incident neutron cross-sections of reactions producing gamma emitters. A thermal hydraulic transfer function was used for modeling primary sodium flow in our calculations. For the power monitoring problematic, use of a short decay period gamma emitter will allow to have a very fast response system without cumulative effect. We have determined that the best tagging agent is 20F which emits 1634 keV energy photons with a decay period of 11 s. The gamma spectrum was determined by flux point and a pulse high tally MCNP5.1.40 simulation and shown the possibility to measure the signal of this radionuclide. The experiment will be set during the reactor 'end life testing'. The Delayed Neutron Detection (DND) room has been chosen as the best available location on Phenix reactor to measure this kind of radionuclide due to a short transit time from reactor core to measurement sample. This location is optimum for global power measurement because homogenized sampling in the reactor hot pool. The main spectrometer is composed of a coaxial high purity germanium diode (HPGe) coupled with a transistor reset preamplifier. The HPGe diode signal will be processed by the Adonis digital signal processing due to high flux and fast activity measurement. Post-processing softwares will be used to limit statistical problems of the

  12. Sodium fast reactor power monitoring using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the use of high flux gamma spectrometry to monitor the fourth generation of sodium fast reactor (SFR) power. The simulation study part of this work has shown that power monitoring in a short time response and with a good accuracy is possible. An experimental test is under preparation at the French SFR Phenix experimental reactor to validate simulation studies. First, physical calculations have been done to correlate gamma activity to the released thermal power. Gamma emitter production rate in the reactor core was calculated with technical and nuclear data as the sodium velocity, the atomic densities, Phenix neutron spectrum and incident neutron cross-sections of reactions producing gamma emitters. A thermal hydraulic transfer function was used for modeling primary sodium flow in our calculations. For the power monitoring problematic, use of a short decay period gamma emitter will allow to have a very fast response system without cumulative effect. We have determined that the best tagging agent is 20F which emits 1634 keV energy photons with a decay period of 11 s. The gamma spectrum was determined by flux point and a pulse high tally MCNP5.1.40 simulation and shown the possibility to measure the signal of this radionuclide. The experiment will be set during the reactor 'end life testing'. The Delayed Neutron Detection (DND) room has been chosen as the best available location on Phenix reactor to measure this kind of radionuclide due to a short transit time from reactor core to measurement sample. This location is optimum for global power measurement because homogenized sampling in the reactor hot pool. The main spectrometer is composed of a coaxial high purity germanium diode (HPGe) coupled with a transistor reset preamplifier. The HPGe diode signal will be processed by the Adonis digital signal processing due to high flux and fast activity measurement. Post-processing softwares will be used to limit statistical problems of the signal. An

  13. Fast neutron reactor fuel elements and power grid duty cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PHENIX power grid cycling operation in 1982-1983 will allow verification of the models and criteria developed in the interim. It will provide indispensible statistical data and will open the way to power grid duty for Super PHENIX beginning in 1986. Although at the present time it is impossible to resolve the question of weekly or daily load variations, it is felt that fast neutron reactor fuel subassemblies should provide satisfactory performance for primary and secondary frequency adjustments

  14. Power stabilization in CREN-K TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to eliminate power oscillations in the TRIGA MARK II reactor at the 'Centre Regional d'Etudes Nucleaires de Kinshasa' (CREN-K), Zaire, specially made adapters were put around the control rods in the top grid plate. The paper briefly describes how investigations were made to find out the basic reason of the power oscillations and the way these adapters were conceived and installed. (author)

  15. Space reactor power 1986: A year of choices and transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year has been an eventful one for the Space Reactor Programs. Both the SP-100 and Multimegawatt programs have made significant progress over the last year and that progress is the focus of this paper. In the SP-100 program the thermoelectric energy conversion concept powered by a compact, high-temperature, lithium-cooled, uranium-nitride-fueled fast spectrum reactor was selected for engineering development and ground demonstration testing at an electrical power level of 300 kilowatts. In addition, the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory was selected as the preferred site for the reactor ground test and a request for proposals (RFP) was issued to obtain an industrial contractor to design, develop, fabricate and direct the testing of the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. Moreover, a Reference Mission has been established for SP-100; this will help to focus efforts during the current phase of the program. In the Multimegawatt (MMW) program, activities moved from the planning phase into one of technology development and assessment with attendant preliminary definition and evaluation of power concepts against requirements of the Strategic Defencse Initiative

  16. Spatial oscillation control in power reactors and numerical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work uses the neutron two-groups model to establish the basic equations of spatial Xe oscillations control in power reactors. It is considered that slow neutrons and temperature alignment are in equilibrium with the neutron flux. (A.C.A.S.)

  17. For zero maintenance in nuclear reactors and power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of 'zero maintenance' in nuclear reactors and power plants can be achieved by implementing on line condition monitoring along with concepts of predictive maintenance, quality control, maintainability, reliability, human engineering, zero defect, operations research, tribology and good maintenance management system. Instruments for condition monitoring are also listed. (author)

  18. Improvement of maintenance at French power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the end of 1984 an availability of 83.2% had been achieved with the thirty-one 900 MW reactors operated by the Electricite de France (EDF) since the beginning of commercial operation. Outages occurred for the following reasons: shutdowns for refuelling and other planned shutdowns, repairs following incidents, and trips. Improvements in maintenance have an impact mainly on the first two causes mentioned above, and their principal objectives are to reduce plant outages, to cut down the overall dosimetry costs involved in interventions, and to improve the quality of the interventions. This is achieved by staff training and feedback from plant outages. Among the resources employed, mention should be made in particular of the methods used for preparing shutdowns and monitoring shutdown plans, which have reached an advanced stage of development. EDF has developed or arranged for the development of much special equipment for routine maintenance, control operations and repairs on PWR plant components; a management catalogue lists 132 operational pieces of equipment and 20 under development. (author)

  19. High density operation for reactor-relevant power exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmeier, M.

    2015-08-01

    With increasing size of a tokamak device and associated fusion power gain an increasing power flux density towards the divertor needs to be handled. A solution for handling this power flux is crucial for a safe and economic operation. Using purely geometric arguments in an ITER-like divertor this power flux can be reduced by approximately a factor 100. Based on a conservative extrapolation of current technology for an integrated engineering approach to remove power deposited on plasma facing components a further reduction of the power flux density via volumetric processes in the plasma by up to a factor of 50 is required. Our current ability to interpret existing power exhaust scenarios using numerical transport codes is analyzed and an operational scenario as a potential solution for ITER like divertors under high density and highly radiating reactor-relevant conditions is presented. Alternative concepts for risk mitigation as well as strategies for moving forward are outlined.

  20. High density operation for reactor-relevant power exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischmeier, M., E-mail: marco.wischmeier@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    With increasing size of a tokamak device and associated fusion power gain an increasing power flux density towards the divertor needs to be handled. A solution for handling this power flux is crucial for a safe and economic operation. Using purely geometric arguments in an ITER-like divertor this power flux can be reduced by approximately a factor 100. Based on a conservative extrapolation of current technology for an integrated engineering approach to remove power deposited on plasma facing components a further reduction of the power flux density via volumetric processes in the plasma by up to a factor of 50 is required. Our current ability to interpret existing power exhaust scenarios using numerical transport codes is analyzed and an operational scenario as a potential solution for ITER like divertors under high density and highly radiating reactor-relevant conditions is presented. Alternative concepts for risk mitigation as well as strategies for moving forward are outlined.

  1. Economic risks of nuclear power reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models to be used for analyses of economic risks from events which occur during US LWR plant operation are developed in this study. The models include capabilities to estimate both onsite and offsite costs of LWR events ranging from routine plant forced outages to severe core-melt accidents resulting in large releases of radioactive material to the environment. The models have been developed for potential use by both the nuclear power industry and regulatory agencies in cost/benefit analyses for decision-making purposes. The new onsite cost models estimate societal losses from power production cost increases, plant capital losses, plant decontamination costs, and plant repair costs which may be incurred after LWR operational events. Early decommissioning costs, plant worker health impact costs, electric utility business costs, nuclear power industry costs, and litigation costs are also addressed. The newly developed offsite economic consequence models estimate The costs of post-accident population protective measures and public health impacts. The costs of population evacuation and temporary relocation, agricultural product disposal, land and property decontamination, and land interdiction are included in the economic models for population protective measures. Costs of health impacts and medical care costs are also included in the models

  2. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000 kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4 -8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear , plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes

  3. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4-8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  4. Devitrification of the Carlton Rhyolite in the Blue Creek Canyon area, Wichita Mountains, southwestern Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigger, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology); Hanson, R.E. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    The Cambrian Carlton Rhyolite is a sequence of lava flows and ignimbrites extruded in association with rifting in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. Rhyolite exposed in the Blue Creek Canyon area consists of a single, originally glassy, porphyritic lava flow > 300 m thick. Abundant flow banding is deformed by variably oriented flow folds present on both outcrop and thin-section scales. A variety of complex texture record the cooling, degassing, and devitrification history of the flow. Acicular Fe, Ti-oxide crystallites aligned in the flow banding document nucleation and limited crystal growth during flow. Spherical microvesicles and larger lithophysal cavities up to 10 cm long crosscut flow banding, showing that degassing continued after flow had ceased. Pseudomorphs of quartz after cristobalite and tridymite are present on cavity walls and are products of high-T vapor-phase crystallization. Devitrification textures overprint the flow banding and developed in two stages. Primary devitrification occurred during initial cooling and formed spherulitic intergrowths in distinct areas bound by sharp devitrification fronts. Spherulites nucleated on phenocrysts, vesicles, and flow bands and show evidence of multiple episodes of growth. Rhyolite outside of the devitrification fronts initially remained glassy but underwent later, low-T hydration to form perlitic texture, which was followed by prolonged secondary devitrification to form extremely fine-grained, equigranular quartzofeldspathic mosaics. Snowflake texture (micropoikilitic quartz surrounding randomly oriented alkali feldspar) developed during both primary and secondary devitrification. Spherical bodies up to 30 cm across are present in discrete horizons within the flow and weather out preferentially from the host rhyolite.

  5. Long operation life reactor for lunar surface power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We developed a nuclear reactor with >66 year operation life for surface power. → The reactor, placed below grade and surrounded by regolith, is loaded with fuel pellet on the Moon. → Fuel pellets are launched in separate subcritical canisters. → Examined is the effect of using lunar regolith reflector on the launch mass. - Abstract: The Pellet Bed Reactor (PeBR) with an operational life of 66 full-power years is developed for lunar surface power. It has Inconel X750 structure and vessel and would be launched unfueled then loaded with spherical fuel pellets (∼1.0 cm dia.) on the lunar surface after being placed below grade and surrounded with regolith. The pellets, comprised of ZrC-coated UC particles (∼850 μm in dia.) dispersed in ZrC matrix, are delivered to the lunar surface in subcritical canisters. The canisters are designed to remain sufficiently subcritical during launch and when submerged in wet sand and flooded with seawater in the unlikely event of a launch abort accident. The PeBR power system nominally generates ∼100 kWe at a thermal efficiency of ∼21% and a reactor exit temperature of 910 K. It employs three separate closed Brayton cycle (CBC) loops each with a turbo-machine unit for energy conversion and two water heat pipes radiator panels for heat rejection. The reactor coolant and CBC working fluid is He-Xe binary gas mixture (40 g/mol). Estimates of the hot-clean excess reactivity and the full-power operation life are obtained using neutronics and fuel depletion analyses. In addition, estimates of the total radioactivity in post-operation PeBR, while being stored below grade on the lunar surface, are determined for up to 1000 years.

  6. SIRIUS 2: A versatile medium power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the Research Reactors in the world have been critical in the Sixties and operated for twenty to thirty years. Some of them have been completely shut down, modified, or simply refurbished; the total number of RR in operation has decreased but there is still an important need for medium power research reactors in order: - to sustain a power program with fuel and material testing for NPP or fusion reactors; - to produce radioisotopes for industrial or medical purposes, doped silicon, NAA or neutron radiography; - to investigate further the condensed matter, with cold neutrons routed through neutron guides to improved equipment; - to develop new technologies and applications such as medical alphatherapy. Hence, taking advantage of nearly hundred reactor x years operation and backed up by the CEA experience, TECHNICATOME assisted by FRAMATOME has designed a new versatile multipurpose Research Reactor (20-30 Mw) SIRIUS 2 taking into account: - more stringent safety rules; - the lifetime; - the flexibility enabling a wide range of experiments and, - the future dismantling of the facility according to the ALARA criteria

  7. Characterization of radioactive waste from nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different kinds of radioactive waste are generated as result of the operation of nuclear power reactors and in all cases the activity concentration of several radionuclides had to be determined in order to optimize resources, particularly when dealing with final disposal or long-term storage. This paper describes the three basic approaches usually employed for characterizing nuclear power reactor wastes, namely the direct methods, the semi-empirical methods and the analytical methods. For some radionuclides or kind of waste, the more suitable method or combination of methods applicable is indicated, stressing that these methods shall be developed and applied during the waste generation step, i.e. during the operation of the reactor. In addition, after remarking the long time span expected from waste generation to their final disposal, the importance of an appropriate record system is pointed out and some basic requirements that should be fulfilled for such system are presented. It is concluded that the tools for a proper characterization of nuclear reactor radioactive waste are available though such tools should be tailored to each specific reactor and their history. (author)

  8. Methods of power reactor decommissioning cost recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes rate-regulatory tax, accounting and cost recovery factors, and these analyses lead to the following overall conclusions in connection with decommissioning cost recovery. 1) The internal use of accumulated decommissioning funds is strongly recommended because it results in the lowest net ratepayer cost of decommissioning, and 2) The most equitable decommissioning cost recovery method is based on current costs and on the prompt and continuous maintenance of the purchasing power of accumulated funds. Finally, it is noted that the cost recovery approach recommended for decommissioning would have similar advantage if applied to spent fuel cost recovery as well

  9. Delayed gamma power measurement for sodium-cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R., E-mail: romain.coulon@cea.f [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Normand, S., E-mail: stephane.normand@cea.f [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ban, G., E-mail: ban@lpccaen.in2p3.f [ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France); Barat, E.; Montagu, T.; Dautremer, T. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Modelisation Simulation et Systemes, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Brau, H.-P. [ICSM, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171 F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Dumarcher, V. [AREVA NP, SET, F-84500 Bollene (France); Michel, M.; Barbot, L.; Domenech, T.; Boudergui, K.; Bourbotte, J.-M. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jousset, P. [CEA, LIST, Departement des Capteurs, du Signal et de l' Information, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barouch, G.; Ravaux, S.; Carrel, F. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Modelisation Simulation et Systemes, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saurel, N. [CEA, DAM, Laboratoire Mesure de Dechets et Expertise, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Frelin-Labalme, A.-M.; Hamrita, H. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: {sup 20}F and {sup 23}Ne tagging agents are produced by fast neutron flux. {sup 20}F signal has been measured at the SFR Phenix prototype. A random error of only 3% for an integration time of 2 s could be achieved. {sup 20}F and {sup 23}Ne power measurement has a reduced temperature influence. Burn-up impact could be limited by simultaneous {sup 20}F and {sup 23}Ne measurement. - Abstract: Previous works on pressurized water reactors show that the nitrogen 16 activation product can be used to measure thermal power. Power monitoring using a more stable indicator than ex-core neutron measurements is required for operational sodium-cooled fast reactors, in order to improve their economic efficiency at the nominal operating point. The fluorine 20 and neon 23 produced by (n,{alpha}) and (n,p) capture in the sodium coolant have this type of convenient characteristic, suitable for power measurements with low build-up effects and a potentially limited temperature, flow rate, burn-up and breeding dependence. This method was tested for the first time during the final tests program of the French Phenix sodium-cooled fast reactor at CEA Marcoule, using the ADONIS gamma pulse analyzer. Despite a non-optimal experimental configuration for this application, the delayed gamma power measurement was pre-validated, and found to provide promising results.

  10. Delayed gamma power measurement for sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: →20F and 23Ne tagging agents are produced by fast neutron flux. →20F signal has been measured at the SFR Phenix prototype. → A random error of only 3% for an integration time of 2 s could be achieved. →20F and 23Ne power measurement has a reduced temperature influence. → Burn-up impact could be limited by simultaneous 20F and 23Ne measurement. - Abstract: Previous works on pressurized water reactors show that the nitrogen 16 activation product can be used to measure thermal power. Power monitoring using a more stable indicator than ex-core neutron measurements is required for operational sodium-cooled fast reactors, in order to improve their economic efficiency at the nominal operating point. The fluorine 20 and neon 23 produced by (n,α) and (n,p) capture in the sodium coolant have this type of convenient characteristic, suitable for power measurements with low build-up effects and a potentially limited temperature, flow rate, burn-up and breeding dependence. This method was tested for the first time during the final tests program of the French Phenix sodium-cooled fast reactor at CEA Marcoule, using the ADONIS gamma pulse analyzer. Despite a non-optimal experimental configuration for this application, the delayed gamma power measurement was pre-validated, and found to provide promising results.

  11. Reactor power cutback system test experience at YGN 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YGN 3 and 4 are the nuclear power plants having System 80 characteristics with a rated thermal output of 2815 MWth and a nominal net electrical output of 1040 MWe. YGN 3 achieved commercial operation on March 31, 1995 and YGN 4 completed Power Ascension Test (PAT) at 20%, 50%, 80% and 100% power by September 23, 1995. YGN 3 and 4 design incorporates the Reactor POwer Cutback System (RPCS) which reduces plant trips caused by Loss of Load (LOL)/ Turbine Trip and Loss of One Main Feedwater Pump (LOMFWP). The key design objective of the RPCS is to improve overall plant availability and performance, while minimizing challenges to the plant safety systems. The RPCS is designed to rapidly reduce reactor power by dropping preselected Control Element Assemblies (CEAs) while other NSSS control systems maintain process parameters within acceptable ranges. Extensive RPCS related tests performed during the initial startup of YGN 4 demonstrated that the RPCS can maintain the reactor on-line without opening primary or secondary safety valves and without actuating the Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS). It is expected that use of the RPCS at YGN will increase the overall availability of the units and reduce the number of challenges to plant safety systems

  12. Problems and prospects of small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to 1973 it was generally believed that small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) had a potentially large market and only their high capital costs prevented their large-scale commercial application. The increase in the price of crude oil in December 1973 changed the economic position of SMPRs so much that even 100-200MW(e) nuclear reactors were considered economic compared with oil-fired plants. The IAEA 1974 market survey showed a potential for 154 units from 150-500MW(e) during 1980-1989 with a total installed capacity of 45000MW(e). This did not generate the desired interest among reactor manufacturers. So far only three European-based manufacturers have shown interest in SMPRs and at present small reactors are being built commercially mostly in India. The reported capital costs of a 215MW(e) Indian CANDU reactor compare favourably with those for European-built reactors. Bangladesh, Jamaica and Kuwait are seriously looking for reactors of 50-150MW(e). The paper analyses the historical background of SMPRs and their commercial application and suggests the following action: (1) A realistic reappraisal of the changed market potential for SMPRs and a critical analysis of the Indian and European figures, possibly carried out by the IAEA; (2) a Special Nuclear Fund be created by contributions from Member States to provide financial support to selected reactor manufacturers willing to make SMPRs commercially available; (3) the proposed Special Nuclear Fund may also provide credit on soft terms to developing countries interested in building SMPRs; (4) the IAEA should expand the scope of its activities and take up the responsibility of collecting and administering such a Special Nuclear Fund. (author)

  13. Power control of linear stepping motor of WWER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation is described of the power feeding of a linear stepping motor designed for driving control elements of a WWER-1000 reactor. This provides a control of the size and time course of current flow into the electromagnets of the drive, a switch-over to standby dc supply, motor upwards and downwards run according to orders from the reactor control system, and continuous self-control. The motor is supplied from a three phase insulated system 3x220 V, 50 Hz; standby supply is from a 110 V battery. A block diagram is given of the power feeding. Power feeding units are mounted in groups of four into one switchboard. (Z.M.)

  14. Power density mapping in a 14-MW TRIGA MTR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Lupu, M.; Costescu, C.; Racataianu, I.; Simionovici, D. (Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors, Pitesti (Romania))

    1984-07-01

    For small, high-flux testing reactors, tri dimensional analysis of power density is required to control hot points and core configuration to design and conduct the irradiation experiments. In this respect, an experimental program and computational system are reported. The experimental program, based on fuel gamma scanning, provides reference data on reactor power peaking. Particular attention is paid to transversal and axial perturbations introduced by the typical control rods insertion and to gradients near irradiation locations. The computational system, based on three-dimensional neutronic analyses, two groups with control rod regions tested on the above data, shows the general, influence of the control system on the power peaking (pin and axial) and on the experimental location fluxes, which fill a gap in the GA Safety Report Analysis data. (orig.)

  15. Utilization experience with research reactors of various power levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilization of research reactor, PARR-1 at the power level of 5 MW, and then at 9 MW, after the up gradation and conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), has been described. In addition, the type of work carried out around a smaller facility, PARR-2, with power rating of 27kW has also been discussed. Utilization of PARR-1 in the area of neutron diffraction, neutron capture studies, radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, reactor physics, and in reactor controls etc has been illustrated. The benefits derived from the up gradation of the power for neutron diffraction studies, radioisotope production and neutron radiography have been discussed. The problem, which can be handed successfully on PARR-2, include neutron activation analysis, production of short-lived radioisotopes, and experimentation in reactor engineering and physics for training purposes. Suitable methodologies have been developed for the analysis of samples of varied nature using neutron activation technique, and the experience gained has been applied to the analysis of geological, environmental and biological samples and high purity materials. (author)

  16. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Sanchez, Travis

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  17. Reactivity control of nuclear power reactors: new options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some actual aspects (referring to economy, non-proliferation and environmental impact) of nuclear power reactors has been analyzed from the point of view of the reactivity control physics. Specially studied have been the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on those aspects. The analysis carried out suggested the application of the above method of control to reactors with non-hydrogenous fuel cells, which are mainly characterized by their high moderator/fuel ratio. Finally three different types of such fuel cells are presented and some results about one of them (belonging to a PHWR controlled by graphite rods) are given. (author)

  18. EURATOM's Programme of Participation in Power Reactor Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the means used by the Commission of EURATOM to promote the development of a European nuclear industry is a programme of ''Community participation'', under which the Commission will participate in power reactor construction up to a total expenditure of 32 million European Monetary Agreement units of account. The return for this will be the acquisition of information on the design, construction, start-up and operation of such reactors. So far, proposals from three companies have resulted in the signing of contracts. These companies are: (a) The Societa Elettronucleare Nazionale (SENN), which is constructing a station of 150 MW(e) net in Italy, equipped with a double-cycle boiling-water reactor; (b) The Societa Italiana Meridionale Energia Atomica (SIMEA), which has undertaken to construct a station f 200 MW(e) net in Italy, equipped with a natural uranium-graphite-CO2 reactor; (c) The Societe d'Energie Nucleaire Franco-Belge des Ardennes (SENA), which has undertaken to construct, on the French-Belgian border, a station which will be equipped with a pressurized-water reactor and whose output will reach, and probably exceed, 242 MW(e) net. Further, the Commission has been requested by the Rheinisch-Westfalisches Elektrizitatswerk - Bayernwerke (RWE-BW) group and the N.V. Samenwerkende Electriciteits-Productiebedrijve to take part in the construction o f two other power reactors - the first a 237 MW(e) double-cycle boiling-water reactor, and the second a 50 MW(e) single-cycle, natural-circulation boiling-water reactor. Community participation can take various forms, one of them being the sharing of any deficit that might result from the production of electricity by the stations during their first years of operation. The effect of EURATOM's participation has been to encourage the construction of some of these nuclear power stations. Moreover, it has resulted in the gathering of extremely useful information and w ill continue to do so in the years to come

  19. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected.

  20. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected

  1. A novel reactor concept for boron neutron capture therapy: annular low-low power reactor (ALLPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, B.; Levine, S.H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNC), originally proposed in 50's, has been getting renewed attention over the last {approx}10 years. This is in particular due to its potential for treating deep-seated brain tumors by employing epithermal neutron beams. Large (several MW) research reactors are currently used to obtain epithermal beams for BNCT, but because of cost and licensing issues it is not likely that such high-power reactors can be placed in regular medical centers. This paper describes a novel reactor concept for BNCT devised to overcome this obstacle. The design objective was to produce a beam of epithermal neutrons of sufficient intensity for BNCT at <50 kW using low enriched uranium. It is achieved by the annular reactor design, which is called Annular Low-Low Power Reactor (ALLPR). Preliminary studies using Monte Carlo simulations are summarized in this paper. The ALLPR should be relatively economical to build, and safe and easy to operate. This novel concept may increase the viability of using BNCT in medical centers worldwide. (author)

  2. Uncertainty Evaluation for Core Thermal Power in a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) also has three separated and independent channels of the neutron detectors to measure the core power. To calibrate these detectors, the thermal power of Primary Cooling System (PCS) which cools down the heat generated in reactor core is used as calibration reference. The core thermal power can be estimated by the measured values of the mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, and core outlet temperature of coolant in the PCS. In general, the uncertainty of the core thermal power is required to be controlled below a certain value. To meet this requirement, the uncertainty of core thermal power should be evaluated based on the uncertainty of the measured parameters. In this paper, the uncertain evaluation is conducted with variation of the uncertainty of the measured parameters such as mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, core outlet temperature. In addition, the numbers of inlet and outlet temperature are considered to get a higher allowable uncertainty of temperature sensors. The core thermal power uncertainty has been valuated according to measuring parameters such as mass flow rate, temperatures, and number of RTDs. In this parametric study, allowable uncertainties for measuring devices have been obtained to guarantee 5% of the core thermal power uncertainty

  3. 20F power measurement for generation IV sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phenix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) prototype producing electrical power between 1973 and 2010. The power was monitored using ex-core neutron measurements. This kind of measurement instantly estimates the power but needs to be often calibrated with the heat balance thermodynamic measurement. Large safety and security margins have then been set not to derive above the nominal operating point. It is important for future SFR to reduce this margin and working closer to the nominal operating point. This work deals with the use of delayed gamma to measure the power. The main activation product contained in the primary sodium coolant is the 24Na which is not convenient for neutron flux measurement due to its long decay period. The experimental study done at the Phenix reactor shows that the use of 20F as power tagging agent gives a fast and accurate power measurement closed to the thermal balance measurement thanks to its high energy photon emission (1.634 MeV) and its short decay period (11 s). (authors)

  4. Uncertainty Evaluation for Core Thermal Power in a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sunil; Seo, Kyoung-Woo; Kim, Seong-Hoon; Chi, Dae-Young; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) also has three separated and independent channels of the neutron detectors to measure the core power. To calibrate these detectors, the thermal power of Primary Cooling System (PCS) which cools down the heat generated in reactor core is used as calibration reference. The core thermal power can be estimated by the measured values of the mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, and core outlet temperature of coolant in the PCS. In general, the uncertainty of the core thermal power is required to be controlled below a certain value. To meet this requirement, the uncertainty of core thermal power should be evaluated based on the uncertainty of the measured parameters. In this paper, the uncertain evaluation is conducted with variation of the uncertainty of the measured parameters such as mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, core outlet temperature. In addition, the numbers of inlet and outlet temperature are considered to get a higher allowable uncertainty of temperature sensors. The core thermal power uncertainty has been valuated according to measuring parameters such as mass flow rate, temperatures, and number of RTDs. In this parametric study, allowable uncertainties for measuring devices have been obtained to guarantee 5% of the core thermal power uncertainty.

  5. The evaluation of operator reliability factors on power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sophisticated technology system was not assured the reliability system itself because it has contained a part of human dependence affected successfully of reactor operation either how work smoothly and safe or failure ac cured and then accident appears promptly. The evaluation of operator reliability factor on ABWR power reactor has been carried out which consist of criterion skill and workload according to NUREG/CR-2254, NUREG/CR-4016 and NUREG-0835 the reactor operation reliability emphasize to the operator are synergic between skill and workload themselves. The employee's skill will affect to the type and level of their tasks. The operator's skill depend on education and experiences, position or responsibility of tasks, physical conditions (age uninvalid of physic/mental

  6. ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor and power plant: conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete power plant design of a 1200-MWe ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) is presented. An emphasis is placed on those features that are unique to the EBT confinement concept, with subsystems and balance-of-plant items that are more generic to magnetic fusion being adapted from past, more extensive tokamak reactor designs. Similar to the latter tokamak studies, this conceptual EBTR design also emphasizes the use of conventional or near state-of-the-art engineering technology and materials. An emphasis is also placed on system accessibility, reliability, and maintainability, as these crucial and desirable characteristics relate to the unique high-aspect-ratio configuration of EBTs. Equal and strong emphasis is given to physics, engineering/technology, and costing/economics components of this design effort. Parametric optimizations and sensitivity studies, using cost-of-electricity as an object function, are reported. Based on these results, the direction for future improvement on an already attractive reactor design is identified

  7. 75 FR 79423 - In the Matter of All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent Nuclear Fuel; Order... entities participating under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR... Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation under 10 CFR 50.4. In addition, licensee submittals...

  8. Fuzzy controller for real time supervision of nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally nuclear energy provides about 60% of the whole electricity production. A modulation of the nuclear power plants must be able to respond to the demand on the network. The pressurized water nuclear reactor has to yield correctly a load set point. Fundamentally, two parameters are concerned in leading this task to a successful conclusion: the power axial-offset and the control rods position. The focus of this study is the automation of the control of the power axial-offset by adding soluble boron and by minimizing the volume flows through the water pump. It is also important to take into consideration the liquid waste volume. Water or boron is injected into the reactor primary circuit. At the present time this task is still performed manually by an operator, for all previous attempts to automate it failed. That device, sketchily described in the paper, gave rise to the development of a real-time fuzzy controller for the power axial-offset and the control rods insertion in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The fuzzy controller, which is the main subject of the paper, expresses more naturally the human expertise, thus avoiding the previous issue of empirical tunings. It was implemented in simulation using Matlab-Simulink on a Sun workstation. Two realistic tests discussed show that the fuzzy controller runs as efficiently as an expert operator does

  9. A CANDU-type small/medium power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assembly known as a CANDU power reactor consists of a number of standardized fuel channels or 'power modules'. Each of these channels produces about 5 thermal megawatts on average. Within practical limitations on fuel enrichment and ultimately on economics, the number of these channels is variable between about 50 and approximately 700. Small reactors suffer from inevitable disadvantages in terms of specific cost of design/construction as well as operating cost. Their natural 'niche' for application is in remote off-grid locations. At the same time this niche application imposes new and strict requirements for staff complement, power system reliability, and so on. The distinct advantage of small reactors arises if the market requires installation of several units in a coordinated installation program - a feature well suited to power requirements in Canada's far North. This paper examines several of the performance requirements and constraints for installation of these plants and presents means for designers to overcome the consequent negative feasibility factors.

  10. Gas-core reactor power transient analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas core reactor is a proposed device which features high temperatures. It has applications in high specific impulse space missions, and possibly in low thermal pollution MHD power plants. The nuclear fuel is a ball of uranium plasma radiating thermal photons as opposed to gamma rays. This thermal energy is picked up before it reaches the solid cavity liner by an inflowing seeded propellant stream and convected out through a rocket nozzle. A wall-burnout condition will exist if there is not enough flow of propellant to convect the energy back into the cavity. A reactor must therefore operate with a certain amount of excess propellant flow. Due to the thermal inertia of the flowing propellant, the reactor can undergo power transients in excess of the steady-state wall burnout power for short periods of time. The objective of the study was to determine how long the wall burnout power could be exceeded without burning out the cavity liner. The model used in the heat-transfer calculation was one-dimensional, and thermal radiation was assumed to be a diffusion process. (auth)

  11. Partial dismantling of research reactor-Sofia prior its refurbishment into low power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategy for the Research Reactor IRT-Sofia, after decision of the Government for its refurbishment, is a partial dismantling of the old systems and equipment. Removal of the reactor core and replacement of old equipment will not pose any significant problems for dismantling. For most efficient use of resources there is a need for implementation of the engineering project, 'Plan for partial dismantling of equipment of the IRT-Sofia as a part of its refurbishment and conversion into low power RR', which has been already prepared. (author)

  12. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development

  13. IDLING AND NATURAL POWER TRANSFER LOSS SAVING BY MEANS OF SHUNT REACTORS AND REACTIVE POWER SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsiuk V.I

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The closed formulas for definition of the steady–state values of voltages, currents, active and reactive power in a line with the distributed and lumped constants are shown. The influence of the shunt reactors and reactive power sources in the form of capacitor banks on losses of idling with various wave lengths is investigated. For the half-wave transmissions line the optimal parameters (which allow increasing of the output during the natural-power transfer of the shunt reactors were obtained.

  14. 10 CFR 73.58 - Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors. 73.58 Section 73.58 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF... requirements for nuclear power reactors. (a) Each operating nuclear power reactor licensee with a...

  15. 77 FR 8902 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... COMMISSION Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors.'' This guide describes a method NRC considers acceptable for use in... Revision 1 of Regulatory Guide 1.184, ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors,'' dated July 2000....

  16. Power distribution monitoring and control in the RBMK type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered are the structures of monitoring and control systems for the RBMK-1000 reactor including three main systems with high independence: the control and safety system (CSS); the system for physical control of energy distribution (SPCED) as well as the Scala system for centralized control (SCC). Main functions and peculiarities of each system are discussed. Main attention is paid to new structural solutions and new equipment components used in these systems. Described are the RBMK operation software and routine of energy distribution control in it. It is noted that the set of reactor control and monitoring systems has a hierarchical structure, the first level of which includes analog systems (CSS and SPCED) normalizing and transmitting detector signals to the systems of the second level based on computers and realizing computer data processing, data representation to the operator, automatic (through CSS) control for energy distribution, diagnostics of equipment condition and local safety with provision for existing reserves with respect to crisis and thermal loading of fuel assemblies. The third level includes a power computer carrying out complex physical and optimization calculations and providing interconnections with the external computer of power system. A typical feature of the complex is the provision of local automatic safety of the reactor from erroneous withdrawal of any control rod. The complex is designed for complete automatization of energy distribution control in reactor in steady and transient operation conditions

  17. Space craft thermal thermionic reactors with flat power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear reactors are potential candidates for energy generation in space missions over longer periods where high power output is required. Among different nuclear energy conversion options, the statical ones, such as thermo-electric or thermionic reactors, are preferable in order to avoid the kinetic disturbances of the space craft and furthermore in order to reduce the failure probabilities to a minimum, caused by lubricants and seals. In the present study, the main parameters of different types of thermal thermionic reactors are discussed which are fueled with U-233 or U-235 and moderated with ZrH1.7 or Beryllium. The investigated thermionic reactors will be layed out to have a constant heat production density on the emitter surface over the space variable, so as to achieve a maximum engineering efficiency with respect to the electrical conversion, nuclear fuel utilization, material damage, thermal and radiation gradients. The power flattening procedure is performed by varying the moderator to fuel ratio, both in axial and radial directions

  18. Enabling autonomous control for space reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of nuclear reactors for space power and/or propulsion presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a space reactor power system (SRPS) employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. Thus, a SRPS control system must provide for operational autonomy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted an investigation of the state of the technology for autonomous control to determine the experience base in the nuclear power application domain, both for space and terrestrial use. It was found that control systems with varying levels of autonomy have been employed in robotic, transportation, spacecraft, and manufacturing applications. However, autonomous control has not been implemented for an operating terrestrial nuclear power plant nor has there been any experience beyond automating simple control loops for space reactors. Current automated control technologies for nuclear power plants are reasonably mature, and basic control for a SRPS is clearly feasible under optimum circumstances. However, autonomous control is primarily intended to account for the non optimum circumstances when degradation, failure, and other off-normal events challenge the performance of the reactor and near-term human intervention is not possible. Thus, the development and demonstration of autonomous control capabilities for the specific domain of space nuclear power operations is needed. This paper will discuss the findings of the ORNL study and provide a description of the concept of autonomy, its key characteristics, and a prospective

  19. Environmental impacts of nonfusion power systems. [Data on environmental effects of all power sources that may be competitive with fusion reactor power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouns, R.J.

    1976-09-01

    Data were collected on the environmental effects of power sources that may be competitive with future fusion reactor power plants. Data are included on nuclear power plants using HTGR, LMBR, GCFR, LMFBR, and molten salt reactors; fossil-fuel electric power plants; geothermal power plants; solar energy power plants, including satellite-based solar systems; wind energy power plants; ocean thermal gradient power plants; tidal energy power plants; and power plants using hydrogen and other synthetic fuels as energy sources.

  20. Studying the possibilities of the IRT-2000 Sophia research reactor reconstruction into a low-power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work is aimed at substantiating the possibility of the IRT-2000-Sofia research reactor reconstruction into the low-power reactor (LPR). The IRT-2000 reactor was shutdown on July 13, 1989 due to the safety-related causes. The following aspects of this reconstruction are discussed: namely, the LPR possibilities; the possibility of utilizing the IRT-2000 reactor site, fuel, buildings and equipment; auxiliary technological systems and mechanical equipment; measures for providing the LPR safety

  1. Recent activities at the zero-power teaching reactor CROCUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CROCUS is a zero-power critical facility used mainly for educational purposes at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland. It is a low-enriched-uranium fuelled, light-water moderated reactor, with the fission power limited to 100 W. The presentation will discuss the crucial role of CROCUS in teaching -- both as framework for reactor practicals offered to physics students at EPFL and as key educational tool in the recently established Swiss Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering. Regular development work is needed for the various instruments and components associated with the facility. As illustration, the recently completed refurbishment of the control rod system and the related calibration experiments will also be discussed.

  2. Characteristics of a reactor with power reactivity feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The point-reactor model with power reactivity feedback becomes a nonlinear system. Its dynamic characteristic shows great complexity. According to the mathematic definition of stability in differential equa-tion qualitative theory, the model of a reactor with power reactivity feedback is judged unstable. The equilib-rium point is a saddle-node point. A portion of the trajectory in the neighborhood of the equilibrium point is parabolic fan curve, and the other is hyperbolic fan curve. Based on phase locus near the equilibrium point, it is pointed out that the model is still stable within physical limits. The difference between stabilities in the mathematical sense and in the physical sense is indicated.

  3. Imperatives for using plutonium in commercial power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of reprocessed or newly produced plutonium as a fissile fuel in commercial nuclear reactors in the US has been actively suppressed by the current US Administration. Yet, many other advanced nations have already adopted mixed oxide fuels which are manufactured from a mixture of plutonium and natural uranium compounds. These nations have successfully proven the use of such nuclear fuel in their commercial power reactors for many years. The full consequence of the restrictive nuclear policy in the US will greatly limit the lifetime of the nuclear fuel resources in the US from a nominal potential of 100 centuries or more of potential energy supply to about 50 years or less at economical prices for uranium. This paper addresses both the imperatives and the potential and the perceived hazards of plutonium utilization and examines the consequences of government policy regarding utilization of nuclear power

  4. Determination of reactor thermal power using a more accurate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor thermal power is an important operational parameter in many respects such as nuclear safety, reactor physics or evaluation of turbine thermal performance. Thermal power of a pressurized water reactor is determined on the basis of the steam generator thermal balance. The balance can be made in several variants differing from one another by the selection of different measuring circuits whose data are used in the balancing. In principle, no one such variant gives the true value of the thermal power. Among the variant values, the one nearest to the unknown true value of reactor thermal power is probably the value calculated with the lowest uncertainty. The determination of such uncertainty is not easy and its value can make even several percent, which has significant economic consequences. This paper presents the method of data reconciliation and its application to the data of the third of Dukovany NPP. The data reconciliation method allows to exploit all the information which process data contain. It is based on the statistical adjustment of the redundant data in such a way that the adjusted data obey generally valid laws of nature (e.g. conservation laws). Mass and energy balances based on the data not yet reconciled do not obey those laws because of measurement errors. For data reconciliation in Dukovany, a detailed model of mass and energy flows describing the 3rd unit from steam generators to alternator and condenser was set up. Laws of mass and energy conservation and phase equilibrium in water-steam systems are thus fulfilled. Moreover, the user can model momentum balances in pipelines and create other equations, which are respected during calculation. The data reconciliation is done regularly for hourly averages (Authors)

  5. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power

  6. Dynamic power behavior of a PWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for the power level evaluation (dynamic behavior) in a Pressurized Water Reactor, during a transient is developed, by solving the point kinetic equation related to the control rod insertion effects and fuel or moderator temperature 'feed-back'. A new version of the thermal-hydraulic code COBRA III P/MIT, is used. In this new version was included, as an option, the methodology developed. (E.G.)

  7. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  8. Economic evaluation of nuclear reactor operation utilizing power effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a reactor at the so-called power effect may substantially increase the burnup of fuel to be removed. The aim of the evaluation of such reactor operation is the optimal determination of the time over which the yield of the higher use of fuel exceeds economic losses resulting from the increased share of constant expenditure of the price of generated kWh of electric power which ensues from such operation. A mathematical model is presented for such evaluation of reactor operation with regard to benefits for the national economy which is the basis of the ESTER 2 computer program. The calculations show that the prices of generated and delivered kWh are minimally 2% less than the prices of generated power without the power effect use. The minimum ranges in the interval of 30 to 50 days. The dependence of the price of generated and delivered kWh from the point of view of the operator of the power plant as well as the component of fuel price of generated kWh will not reach the minimum even after 50 days of operation. From the operating and physical points of view the duration of power effect is not expected to exceed 20 to 30 days which means that from the point of view of the national economy the price of generated and delivered kWh will be 1.6 to 2% less and the fuel component of the price of the generated kWh will be 3 to 4.5% lower. (Z.M.). 5 figs., 3 refs

  9. Preliminary assessment of the accident probabilities of a NERVA derivative reactor for space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas cooled, solid core graphite reactors based on the Nuclear Engine Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) technology are attractive space nuclear power sources for SDI multimegawatt applications. A reactor of this type is called a NERVA Derivative Reactor (NDR). A simplified accident probability analysis of a NDR reactor for space power mission was carried out. The objective of the analysis was to identify the worst case accident and critical reactor design areas where the incorporation of appropriate design features may reduce the risks involved

  10. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission.

  11. Optimization of air ducts for nuclear reactor power generation station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the optimization study on the heating, ventilating and air conditions system in Nuclear Reactor Power Generation Station, proper arrangement of air ducts has been studied using the experimental and analytical investigation from a viewpoint of duct arrangement optimization. This study consists of two parts. Part I is optimization of air ducts in the corridors and Part II is optimization of air duct in each room. In part I, from viewpoints of confinement of radioactive materials in facilities having possible radioactive contamination and improvement of thermal environment for workers, the authors have studied air ducts system in which fresh air is supplied to corridors and heat removal and ventilation for each room are performed by transferring air from the corridors, instead of current ducts system with supply duct to each room. In part II, the condenser room with complex configuration and large space, and the electrical equipment room with simple space are selected for model areas. Based on these studies, experimental and analytical investigation (using a three-dimensional thermal hydraulic analysis) technique has been established, and the effective design method for duct arrangement of HVAC design has been verified for Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. The air-duct arrangements optimized in this study are applied to an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Power Station in trial and reduction of the air-duct quantity is confirmed

  12. A CANDU-type small/medium power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation reviews some of the main factors that will govern the design and operation of reactors in remote Northern Canadian communities, as applied to a small CANDU-type power plant. The central advantage of the CANDU is the fact that it is modular at the level of a single fuel channel. Examining each of the main features of this SMR plant on a hypothetical site in the Canadian Arctic reveals some of the unique characteristics that will be either desirable or mandatory for any such power plant applied to service in this remote region. (author)

  13. Standardisation of nuclear power reactors - From theory to practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives an overview of the development of the standardisation concept for nuclear power reactors, highlighting the differences between its application at national level and in international context. The various initiatives, by both industry and regulatory organisations, are reviewed with the objective of drawing a conclusion on the long-term perspectives for standardisation of nuclear power plants in Europe, together with the conditions that would have to be met in order to allow for this concept to be put in practice. (author)

  14. Nuclear power reactor licensing and regulation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is devoted to four subjects: an explanation of the origins, statutory basis and development of the present regulatory system in the United States; a description of the various actions which must be taken by a license applicant and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission before a nuclear power plant can be constructed and placed on-line, an account of the current regulatory practices followed by the US NRC in licensing nuclear power reactors; an identification of some of the 'lessons learned' from the Three Mile Island accident and some proposed regulatory and legislative solutions. (NEA)

  15. Reactor Power for Large Displacement Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-24

    This is a PentaChart on reactor power for large displacement autonomous underwater vehicles. Currently AUVs use batteries or combinations of batteries and fuel cells for power. Battery/fuel cell technology is limited by duration. Batteries and cell fuels are a good match for some missions, but other missions could benefit greatly by a longer duration. The goal is the following: to design nuclear systems to powr an AUV and meet design constraints including non-proliferation issues, power level, size constraints, and power conversion limitations. The action plan is to continue development of a range of systems for terrestrial systems and focus on a system for TItan Moon as alternative to Pu-238 for NASA.

  16. New designs of medium power WWER reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task of constructing NPPs as the objects of regional power industry is included into the Federal Target Program on nuclear power technologies of new generation for the period till 2020. Such NPPs are considered as perspective sources of energy for solution of the problems concerning provision of electric energy, household and industrial heat to the regions with limited capabilities of the power grid. OKB 'GIDROPRESS' present the conceptual study of RP design for the Unit of 600 MW (el.) power, taking into account their long-term experience in the field of development and operation of WWER reactor plants. Practical implementation of WWER-600 and WWER-300 RP designs seems to be feasible: practice in manufacturing the main equipment is available; cooperation of design, scientific organizations and manufacturers of equipment; is established; basic design solutions for equipment are of reference character

  17. Design Concept for a Nuclear Reactor-Powered Mars Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John O.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Poston, David I.

    2003-01-01

    A study was recently carried out by a team from JPL and the DOE to investigate the utility of a DOE-developed 3 kWe surface fission power system for Mars missions. The team was originally tasked to perform a study to evaluate the usefulness and feasibility of incorporation of such a power system into a landed mission. In the course of the study it became clear that the application of such a power system was enabling to a wide variety of potential missions. Of these, two missions were developed, one for a stationary lander and one for a reactor-powered rover. This paper discusses the design of the rover mission, which was developed around the concept of incorporating the fission power system directly into a large rover chassis to provide high power, long range traverse capability. The rover design is based on a minimum extrapolation of technology, and adapts existing concepts developed at JPL for the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, lander and EDL systems. The small size of the reactor allowed its incorporation directly into an existing large MSL rover chassis design, allowing direct use of MSL aeroshell and pallet lander elements, beefed up to support the significantly greater mass involved in the nuclear power system and its associated shielding. This paper describes the unique design challenges encountered in the development of this mission architecture and incorporation of the fission power system in the rover, and presents a detailed description of the final design of this innovative concept for providing long range, long duration mobility on Mars.

  18. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-04-25

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  19. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency (ge)20%; Steam turbine outlet quality (ge)90%; and Pumping power (le)2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  20. Evaluation of the qualification of SPERT [Special Power Excursion Reactor Test] fuel for use in non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's evaluation of the qualification of the stainless-steel-clad uranium/oxide (UO2) fuel pins for use in non-power reactors. The fuel pins were originally procured in the 1960's as part of the Special Power Excursion Reactor Test (SPERT) program. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) examined 600 SPERT fuel pins to verify that the pins were produced according to specification and to assess their present condition. The pins were visually inspected under 6X magnification and by X-radiographic, destructive, and metallographic examinations. Spectrographic and chemical analyses were performed on the UO2 fuel. The results of the qualification examinations indicated that the SPERT fuel pins meet the requirements of Phillips Specification No. F-1-SPT and have suffered no physical damage since fabrication. Therefore, the qualification results give reasonable assurance that the SPERT fuel rods are suitable for use in non-power reactors provided that the effects of thin-wall defects in the region of the upper end cap and low-density fuel pellets are evaluated for the intended operating conditions. 1 ref., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  1. Power Excursion Accident Analysis of Research Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional neutronic code POWEX-K has been developed, and it has been coupled with the sub-channel thermal-hydraulic core analysis code SV based on the Single Mass Velocity Model. This forms the integrated neutronic/thermal hydraulics code system POWEX-K/SV for the accident analysis. The Training and Research Reactors at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME-Reactor) has been taken as a reference reactor. The cross-section generation procedure based on WIMS. The code uses an implicit difference approach for both the diffusion equations and thermal-hydraulics modules, with reactivity feedback effects due to coolant and fuel temperatures. The code system was applied to analyzing power excursion accidents initiated by ramp reactivity insertion of 1.2 $. The results show that the reactor is inherently safe in case of such accidents i.e. no core melt is expected even if the safety rods do not fall into the core

  2. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding

  3. Is construction of fast power reactors more expensive than for thermal reactors in the present day Russian nuclear power industry?r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates obtained both in Russia and abroad show tat fast reactors can be re-oriented from breeding to address new global problems - accumulated civil and weapons-grade plutonium stocks management and minor actinide transmutation. Construction cost still is one primary development challenge for fast reactors. This paper points that capital cost of last reactors within the Russian nuclear power industry could be very similar to the cost of new generation medium size VVER type improved safety reactors. (authors)

  4. Increasing the power of the high temperature reactor module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To alleviate the economic problems of the modular pebble bed high temperature reactor, its design was modified in such a way that the power output was increased from 200 to 350 MWth. The core geometry was changed from cylindrical to annular, and the pressure vessel diameter was increased to 6.7 m. Control rods are placed in both the outer reflector and the graphite central column. In a safety analysis, loss of heat sink, loss of coolant and water ingress accident were examined. Reactor shutdown and decay heat removal take place passively, and the maximum fuel temperature stays theoretically below 1600 C, implying full retention of the fission products in the fuel elements. The central column has a diminishing effect on the positive reactivity effect of water ingress. A cost analysis shows that the specific investment costs of a four-module plant would decrease by 26% and the electricity generating costs would reduce by 19%. ((orig.))

  5. Cyclic gaseous core reactors for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive theoretical-experimental investigations have been performed at the University of Florida on cyclic gaseous core reactors. Neutronics-energetics analyses have led to a basic scientific understanding of the behavior associated with conceptual operation of these devices. Thermal-physical properties studies have resulted in the identification of desirable working fluids and UF6-materials interaction studies have identified a number of potential problems as well as corresponding potential solutions. The results of these research efforts indicate that the cyclic gaseous core reactor is a versatile and promising nuclear energy concept that has attractive features for space power generation. These include low critical mass, high fuel utilization, high output temperature and good thermal efficiency, wide operating ranges, excellent control and safety characteristics, and adaptability to a wide variety of different energy conversion systems

  6. Operational margin monitoring system for boiling water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on an on-line operational margin monitoring system which has been developed for boiling water reactor power plants to improve safety, reliability, and quality of reactor operation. The system consists of a steady-state core status prediction module, a transient analysis module, a stability analysis module, and an evaluation and guidance module. This system quantitatively evaluates the thermal margin during abnormal transients as well as the stability margin, which cannot be evaluated by direct monitoring of the plant parameters, either for the current operational state or for a predicted operating state that may be brought about by the intended operation. This system also gives operator guidance as to appropriate or alternate operations when the operating state has or will become marginless

  7. Nuclear power plant laundry drain treatment using membrane bio reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear power plant, the radioactive effluent generated by washing the clothes worn in controlled area and the hand and shower water used at the controlled area are treated in laundry drain treatment system. Although various systems which treat such liquid waste preexist, the traditional treatment system has disadvantages such as high running cost and a large amount of secondary waste generation. To solve these matters, we have considered application of an activated sludge system, membrane bio reactor, which has been practically used in general industry. For nuclear power plant, the activated sludge system has been developed, tested in its adaptability and the adequacy has been proved. Some preexisting treatment systems have been replaced with this activated sludge system for the first time in a domestic nuclear power plant, and the renewal system is now in operation. The result is reported. (author)

  8. Low power density ion cyclotron arrays for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A low power density, high directivity, FW heating and current drive launching structure is proposed for use in a commercial fusion reactor. • The structure, integrated in the reactor blanket first wall, is modular, unobtrusive and imposes no specific constraints to the blanket functions. • It may significantly reduce the undesirable effects of FW evanescence in the plasma scrape off layer such as increased thermal wall loading, localized hot spots, impurity production, and enhanced E × B0 particles convection. - Abstract: Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) Heating and Current Drive (H&CD) is a well established technique of auxiliary heating in present tokamaks, as it features high on-axis heating and current drive efficiencies associated with proven and low cost technology. An important limiting factor to the use of ICRF as candidate heating method in a commercial reactor is linked to the evanescence of the fast wave in vacuum and in most of the SOL layer, imposing proximity of the launching structure to the plasma boundary and causing high RF standing and DC rectified voltages at the plasma periphery, possible voltage breakdowns and enhanced local wall loading. Further to previous work (Bosia et al., Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Arrays applicable to Current Drive in Fusion Reactors, in: AIP Proc. of 20th Topical Conf on RF Power in plasmas No. 1580, 2013, 215) developing new concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Heating & Current Drive arrays, based on the use of periodic structures, a practical example for an in-blanket IC array for DEMO1 is presented in this study

  9. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Database Version 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aging and degradation of light-water reactor pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials depends on many factors, such as neutron fluence, flux, and energy spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules are needed to develop a generally applicable damage prediction model that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Furthermore, the investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes, Standard Review Plans (SRPs), and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized database. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Database (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for U.S. designed commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB lists the test results of 104 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials, 115 weld materials, and 141 base materials, including 103 plates, 35 forgings, and 3 correlation monitor materials that were irradiated in 321 capsules from 106 commercial power reactors. The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the Windows operating system. 'User-friendly' utility programs have been written to investigate radiation embrittlement using this database. Utility programs allow the user to retrieve, select and manipulate specific data, display data to the screen or printer, and fit and plot Charpy impact data. The PR-EDB Version 3.0 upgrades Version 2.0. The package was developed based on the Microsoft .NET framework technology and uses Microsoft Access for

  10. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Database - Version 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Subramani, Ranjit [ORNL

    2008-03-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water reactor pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials depends on many factors, such as neutron fluence, flux, and energy spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules are needed to develop a generally applicable damage prediction model that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Furthermore, the investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes, Standard Review Plans (SRPs), and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized database. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Database (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for U.S. designed commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB lists the test results of 104 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials, 115 weld materials, and 141 base materials, including 103 plates, 35 forgings, and 3 correlation monitor materials that were irradiated in 321 capsules from 106 commercial power reactors. The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the Windows operating system. "User-friendly" utility programs have been written to investigate radiation embrittlement using this database. Utility programs allow the user to retrieve, select and manipulate specific data, display data to the screen or printer, and fit and plot Charpy impact data. The PR-EDB Version 3.0 upgrades Version 2.0. The package was developed based on the Microsoft .NET framework technology and uses Microsoft Access for

  11. SP-100 space reactor power system readiness and mission flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SP-100 Space Reactor Power System (SRPS) is being developed by GE, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, to provide electrical power in the range of 10s to 100s of kW. The system represents an enabling technology for a wide variety of earth orbital and interplanetary science missions, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) stages, and lunar/Mars surface power for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). An effective infracture of Industry, National Laboratories and Government agencies has made substantial progress since the 1988 System Design Review. Hardware development and testing has progressed to the point of resolving the key technical feasibility issues. The technology and design is now at a state of readiness to support the definition of early flight demonstration missions. The benefits of utilizing a low power (6 to 20 kWe range) early flight mission as a precursor to operational missions in the 100 kWe range has received renewed interest among Government Agencies and Industry. Studies and assessments were performed throughout 1992 to further refine the potential missions and the SP-100 Space Reactor Power Systems that could be available to support these missions. The results of assessment showed that the ''first generation'' technology available now from the SP-100 program can support a wide range of candidate missions. The status of the nuclear technology was matured to the level of supporting a flight design with the present available data base. The conductively coupled thermoelectric cell technology is now in the cell level testing and verification phase and component level readiness is projected to be complete by the end of GFY94. Power system designs using the present day flight proven RTG unicouple have been established and also represent an attractive option for early launches. These design concepts are discussed in further detail in a companion paper. (Josloff 1993)

  12. Medium-Power Lead-Alloy Reactors: Missions for This Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [∼100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant.These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a

  13. SWR 1000: The new boiling water reactor power plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens' Power Generation Group (KWU) is currently developing - on behalf of and in close co-operation with the German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners - the boiling water reactor SWR 1000. This advanced design concept marks a new era in the successful tradition of boiling water reactor technology in Germany and is aimed, with an electric output of 1000 MW, at assuring competitive power generating costs compared to large-capacity nuclear power plants as well as coal-fired stations, while at the same time meeting the highest of safety standards, including control of a core melt accident. This objective is met by replacing active safety systems with passive safety equipment of diverse design for accident detection and control and by simplifying systems needed for normal plant operation on the basis of past operating experience. A short construction period, flexible fuel cycle lengths of between 12 and 24 months and a high fuel discharge burnup all contribute towards meeting this goal. The design concept fulfils international nuclear regulatory requirements and will reach commercial maturity by the year 2000. (author)

  14. Radial heat conduction in a power reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two radial conduction models, one for steady state and another for unsteady state, in a nuclear power reactor fuel element are developed. The objective is to obtain the temperatures in the fuel pellet and the cladding. The lumped-parameter hypothesis are adopted to represent the system. Both models are verified and their results are compared with similar ones. A method to calculate the conductance in the gap between the UO2 pellet and the clad and its associated uncertainty is included in the steady state model. (author)

  15. Severe accident considerations in Canadian nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a current study on severe accidents being sponsored by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) and provides background on other related Canadian work. Scoping calculations are performed in Phase I of the AECB study to establish the relative consequences of several permutations resulting from six postulated initiating events, nine containment states, and a selection of meteorological conditions and health effects mitigating criteria. In Phase II of the study, selected accidents sequences would be analyzed in detail using models suitable for the design features of the Canadian nuclear power reactors

  16. Demographic statistics pertaining to nuclear power reactor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population statistics are presented for 145 nuclear power plant sites. Summary tables and figures are included that were developed to aid in the evaluation of trends and general patterns associated with the various parameters of interest, such as the proximity of nuclear plant sites to centers of population. The primary reason for publishing this information at this time is to provide a factual basis for use in discussions on the subject of reactor siting policy. The report is a revised and updated version of a draft report published in December 1977. Errors in the population data base have been corrected and new data tabulations added

  17. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model.

  18. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model

  19. Modularity of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor for use by the commercial power industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hanlon-Hyssong, Jaime E.

    2008-01-01

    CIVINS The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor is a small high temperature helium cooled reactor that is being considered for both electric power and hydrogen production. Pebble bed reactors are being developed in South Africa, China and the US. To make smaller 120 Mwe reactors economically competitive with larger 1500 Mwe traditional light water reactors changes in the way these plants are built are needed. Economies of production need to be sufficiently large to compete with economies of sca...

  20. Examples of in-service inspections and typical maintenance schedule for low-power research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-service inspection methods for low-power research reactors are described which have been developed during the past 37 years of the operation of the TRIGA reactor Vienna. Special tools have been developed during this period and their application for maintenance and in-serve inspection is discussed. Two practical in-service inspections at a TRIGA reactor and at a MTR reactor are presented. Further a typical maintenance plan for a TRIGA reactor is listed in the annex. (author)

  1. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  2. A new log-linear safety channel for reactor power measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Pakistan Research Reactor 1(PARR-1) the safety channels measure reactor power from few kW to 150% of full reactor power and provide reactor scram in case of high neutron flux or malfunctioning in the electronics of the channels. The channels are linear and they cover only three decades of reactor power level. So, the channels can not provide any information about the reactor power and channel operating condition at low reactor power up to few kW. A new log-linear safety channel has been developed for reactor power measurements in logarithmic and linear mode. The channel also measures reactor period. Due to the logarithmic mode of operation the channel can cover from startup range up to 200% of full reactor power. The new channel with one ion chamber has complete functionality of existing safety channels and intermediate power range logarithmic channels. So, on the replacement of existing safety channels with the new log-linear channels the existing logarithmic dc channels will not be required. The new channel will reduce the number of channels, improve fault capabilities and, hence, improve safety and availability of the system. The new channel will also be used in nuclear power plant. The log-linear safety channel has been tested at PARR-1 and the results are found in very good agreement with the designed specifications. This paper presents design and construction of the channel and field test results. (author)

  3. Power spectra of stochastic signals in reactor TRIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On TRIGA Mark II reactor measurements and analyses of some stochastic signals were performed to determine their reference spectra in the frequency band from 0.01 Hz to 100 Hz. Autopower spectra of neutron flux fluctuations were computed for full power and for 50 KW and 5 KW at different cooling conditions. The spectra show a significant resonance at the frequency of 2.3 Hz which dependence on the state of the cooling system. To determine the cause of the resonance vibrations of coolant water inlet pipe, ionization chamber and control rod were also investigated. Reference power spectra of these vibrations were found and only a slight correlation between the ionization chamber and control rod vibrations and the resonance were established. Since control rod vibration are most probable cause of the resonance preliminary measurements of control rod vibrations should be improved to prove this hypothesis

  4. Burnup determination of power reactor fuel elements by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a method for determining by γ spectrometry the burn up and the specific power of fuel elements irradiated in power reactors. The energy spectrum of γ rays emitted by fission products is measured by means of a simple equipment using a sodium iodide detector and a multichannel analyzer. In order to extract from the spectrum a quantity proportional to the burn up, it is necessary to: - isolate an activity specific of one emitter,- give the same importance to fissions in uranium and plutonium - take into account the radioactive decay during and after irradiation. One hundred fuel elements were studied and burn up values obtained by γ spectrometry are compared to results given by chemical analyses. Preliminary measurements show that the accuracy of the results is greatly increased by the use of a germanium detector, due to its good resolution. (authors)

  5. Robust reactor power control system design by genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H∞ robust controller for the reactor power control system is designed by use of the mixed weight sensitivity. The system is configured into the typical two-port model with which the weight functions are augmented. Since the solution depends on the weighting functions and the problem is of nonconvex, the genetic algorithm is used to determine the weighting functions. The cost function applied in the genetic algorithm permits the direct control of the power tracking performances. In addition, the actual operating constraints such as rod velocity and acceleration can be treated as design parameters. Compared with the conventional approach, the controller designed by the genetic algorithm results in the better performances with the realistic constraints. Also, it is found that the genetic algorithm could be used as an effective tool in the robust design

  6. Robust reactor power control system design by genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Joon; Cho, Kyung Ho; Kim, Sin [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The H{sub {infinity}} robust controller for the reactor power control system is designed by use of the mixed weight sensitivity. The system is configured into the typical two-port model with which the weight functions are augmented. Since the solution depends on the weighting functions and the problem is of nonconvex, the genetic algorithm is used to determine the weighting functions. The cost function applied in the genetic algorithm permits the direct control of the power tracking performances. In addition, the actual operating constraints such as rod velocity and acceleration can be treated as design parameters. Compared with the conventional approach, the controller designed by the genetic algorithm results in the better performances with the realistic constraints. Also, it is found that the genetic algorithm could be used as an effective tool in the robust design. 4 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  7. The measuring set: reactor power meter (type of SG-8), reactor energy meter (type of SG-11) and digital dose meter (type of SG-9) for reactor rigs operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measuring set consisting of the Reactor Power Meter, Reactor Energy Meter and Digital Dose Meter is described. The gamma radiation of water in the reactor primary cooling circuit reaches the ionisation chamber and involves the output current, driving the Reactor Power Meter and Reactor Energy Meter. The Digital Dose Meter is controlled by the output current of the self-powered detector mounted inside the reactor rig. (author)

  8. 75 FR 70042 - In the Matter of All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent Nuclear Fuel; Order...). Any answer or request for hearing, must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139... above, shall be submitted to the NRC to the attention of the Director, Office of Nuclear...

  9. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  10. Improvement of the axial power distribution control capabilities in WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes an automatic reactor power control system for WWER-1000 reactor and reports simulation analysis results for a typical daily load follow operation. The associated reactor control algorithm is called 'mode G' that uses a heavy-worth bank (H-bank) dedicated to axial power shape control and the light-gray banks (G-banks) for reactor power change and reactivity compensation. The simulation results for daily load follow operation in three burnup states of first cycle illustrate that the load follow capability of WWER-1000 reactors using this algorithm will be improved

  11. Small nuclear power reactor emergency electric power supply system reliability comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an analysis of the reliability of the emergency power supply system, of a small size nuclear power reactor. Three different configurations are investigated and their reliability analyzed. The fault tree method is used as the main tool of analysis. The work includes a bibliographic review of emergency diesel generator reliability and a discussion of the design requirements applicable to emergency electrical systems. The influence of common cause failure influences is considered using the beta factor model. The operator action is considered using human failure probabilities. A parametric analysis shows the strong dependence between the reactor safety and the loss of offsite electric power supply. It is also shown that common cause failures can be a major contributor to the system reliability. (author)

  12. Pressurized heavy water reactor fuel behaviour in power ramp conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, S.; Uţă, O.; Pârvan, M.; Ohâi, D.

    2009-03-01

    In order to check and improve the quality of the Romanian CANDU fuel, an assembly of six CANDU fuel rods has been subjected to a power ramping test in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at INR. After testing, the fuel rods have been examined in the hot cells using post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques such as: visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burn-up determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testing. This paper describes the PIE results from one out of the six fuel rods. The PIE results concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the sheath, the fission-products activity distribution in the fuel column, the pressure, volume and composition of the fission gas, the burn-up, the isotopic composition and structural changes of the fuel enabled the characterization of the behaviour of the Romanian CANDU fuel in power ramping conditions performed in the TRIGA materials testing reactor.

  13. Pressurized heavy water reactor fuel behaviour in power ramp conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionescu, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania)], E-mail: silviu.ionescu@nuclear.ro; Uta, O.; Parvan, M.; Ohai, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania)

    2009-03-31

    In order to check and improve the quality of the Romanian CANDU fuel, an assembly of six CANDU fuel rods has been subjected to a power ramping test in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at INR. After testing, the fuel rods have been examined in the hot cells using post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques such as: visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burn-up determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testing. This paper describes the PIE results from one out of the six fuel rods. The PIE results concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the sheath, the fission-products activity distribution in the fuel column, the pressure, volume and composition of the fission gas, the burn-up, the isotopic composition and structural changes of the fuel enabled the characterization of the behaviour of the Romanian CANDU fuel in power ramping conditions performed in the TRIGA materials testing reactor.

  14. Development of methods for monitoring and controlling power in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redundancy and diversity are two important criteria for power measurement in nuclear reactors. Other criteria such as accuracy, reliability and response speed are also of major concern. Power monitoring of nuclear reactors is normally done by means of neutronic instruments, i.e. by the measurement of neutron flux. The greater the number of channels for power measuring the greater is the reliability and safety of reactor operations. The aim of this research is to develop new methodologies for on-line monitoring of nuclear reactor power using other reliable processes. One method uses the temperature difference between an instrumented fuel element and the pool water below the reactor core. Another method consists of the steady-state energy balance of the primary and secondary reactor cooling loops. A further method is the calorimetric procedure whereby a constant reactor power is monitored as a function of the temperature-rise rate and the system heat capacity. Another methodology, which does not employ thermal methods, is based on measurement of Cherenkov radiation produced within and around the core. The first three procedures, fuel temperature, energy balance and calorimetric, were implemented in the IPR-R1 TRIGA nuclear research reactor at Belo Horizonte (Brazil) and are the focus of the work described here. Knowledge of the reactor thermal power is very important for precise neutron flux and fuel element burnup calculations. The burnup is linearly dependent on the reactor thermal power and its accuracy is important in the determination of the mass of burned 235U, fission products, fuel element activity, decay heat power generation and radiotoxicity. The thermal balance method developed in this project is now the standard methodology used for IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor power calibration and the fuel temperature measuring is the most reliable way of on-line monitoring of the reactor power. This research project primarily aims at increasing the reliability and safety of

  15. Review of the status of low power research reactors and considerations for its development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, In Cheol; Wu, Sang Ik; Lee, Byung Chul; Ha, Jae Joo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    At present, 232 research reactors in the world are in operation and two thirds of them have a power less than 1 MW. Many countries have used research reactors as the tools for educating and training students or engineers and for scientific service such as neutron activation analysis. As the introduction of a research reactor is considered a stepping stone for a nuclear power development program, many newcomers are considering having a low power research reactor. The IAEA has continued to provide forums for the exchange of information and experiences regarding low power research reactors. Considering these, the Agency is recently working on the preparation of a guide for the preparation of technical specification possibly for a member state to use when wanting to purchase a low power research reactor. In addition, ANS has stated that special consideration should be given to the continued national support to maintain and expand research and test reactor programs and to the efforts in identifying and addressing the future needs by working toward the development and deployment of next generation nuclear research and training facilities. Thus, more interest will be given to low power research reactors and its role as a facility for education and training. Considering these, the status of low power research reactors was reviewed, and some aspects to be considered in developing a low power research reactor were studied.

  16. New applications of neutron noise theory in power reactor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzhanov, Vasiliy

    2000-04-01

    The present thesis deals with neutron noise theory as applied to three comparatively different topics (or problems) in power reactor physics. Namely they are: theoretical investigation of the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the localisation of anomalies; both definition and studies on the point kinetic and adiabatic approximations for the relatively recently proposed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); development of the general theory of linear reactor kinetics and neutron noise in systems with varying size. One important practical problem is to detect and localise a vibrating control rod pin. The significance comes from the operational experience which indicates that individual pins can execute excessive mechanical vibrations that may lead to damage. Such mechanical vibrations induce neutron noise that can be detected. While the detection is relatively easy, the localisation of a vibrating control rod is much more complicated because only one measuring position is available and one needs to have at least three measured quantities. Therefore it has currently been proposed that the fluctuations of the neutron current vector, called the current noise, can be used in addition to the scalar noise in reactor diagnostic problems. The thesis investigates the possibility of the localization of a vibrating control rod pin in a PWR control assembly by using the scalar neutron noise and the 2-D radial current noise as measured at one central point in the control assembly. An explicit localisation technique is elaborated in which the searched position is determined as the absolute minimum of a minimisation function. The technique is investigated in numerical simulations. The results of the simulation tests show the potential applicability of the method. By design accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and

  17. New applications of neutron noise theory in power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis deals with neutron noise theory as applied to three comparatively different topics (or problems) in power reactor physics. Namely they are: theoretical investigation of the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the localisation of anomalies; both definition and studies on the point kinetic and adiabatic approximations for the relatively recently proposed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); development of the general theory of linear reactor kinetics and neutron noise in systems with varying size. One important practical problem is to detect and localise a vibrating control rod pin. The significance comes from the operational experience which indicates that individual pins can execute excessive mechanical vibrations that may lead to damage. Such mechanical vibrations induce neutron noise that can be detected. While the detection is relatively easy, the localisation of a vibrating control rod is much more complicated because only one measuring position is available and one needs to have at least three measured quantities. Therefore it has currently been proposed that the fluctuations of the neutron current vector, called the current noise, can be used in addition to the scalar noise in reactor diagnostic problems. The thesis investigates the possibility of the localization of a vibrating control rod pin in a PWR control assembly by using the scalar neutron noise and the 2-D radial current noise as measured at one central point in the control assembly. An explicit localisation technique is elaborated in which the searched position is determined as the absolute minimum of a minimisation function. The technique is investigated in numerical simulations. The results of the simulation tests show the potential applicability of the method. By design accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and

  18. General Atomic Company fusion experimental power reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a two-year, conceptual design study of a fusion experimental power reactor (EPR) are presented. For this study, the primary objectives of the EPR are to obtain plasma ignition conditions and produce net electrical power. The design features a Doublet plasma configuration with a major radius of 4.5 meters. The average plasma beta is 10 percent which yields a thermonuclear power level of 410 MW during a 105 second burn period. With a duty factor of 0.84, the gross electrical output is 124 MW(e) while the net output is 37 MW(e). The design features a 25 cm thick, helium cooled, modular, stainless steel blanket with a 1 cm thick, thermal radiation-cooled silicon carbide first wall. Sufficient shielding is provided to permit contact maintenance outside the shield envelop within 24 hours after shutdown. An overall facility concept was developed, including a superheated steam cycle power conversion system. Preliminary cost estimates and construction schedules were also developed

  19. Compensation by RGMS for misreading reactor power in case of D2O dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sang Hoon; Park, Jae Yoon; Choi, Young San; Kim, Young Ki [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In a research reactor Neutron Measurement System (NMS) which uses wide range fission chamber as neutron detector is applied to measure the reactor power. This system has rapid response to power and stable accuracy for wide range. But this has some concerns of relative measured values depending on the installed location of neutron detector and also may cause the loss of accuracy when dilution of heavy water in the D2O tank happens. The NMS is not only used for reactor control and but also used for reactor protection system. Accordingly faulted reactor power with high deviation for second case may lead unexpected increase of the reactor power. In order to prevent this occurrence, Reactor Gamma Measurement System (RGMS) is necessarily applied. Herein the structure, measuring method and application of RGMS will be introduced.

  20. Questions to the reactors power upgrade of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) were subjected to power upgrade labors with the purpose of achieving 20% upgrade on the original power; these labors concluded in August 24, 2010 for the Reactor 1 and in January 16, 2011 for the Reactor 2, however in January of 2014, the NNP-L V has not received by part of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) the new Operation License to be able to work with the new power, because it does not fulfill all the necessary requirements of safety. In this work is presented and analyzed the information obtained in this respect, with data provided by the Instituto Federal de Acceso a la Informacion Publica y Proteccion de Datos (IFAI) and the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) in Mexico, as well as the opinion of some workers of the NPP-L V. The Governing Board of the CFE announcement that will give special continuation to the behavior on the operation and reliability of the NPP-L V, because the frequency of not announced interruptions was increased 7 times more in the last three years. (Author)

  1. Study on regimes of nuclear power plants with WWER-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems are considered of optimization of nuclear fuel loading, the peculiarities of the NPP operation at decreased power, and also the problem of stability operation of NPP with WWER type reactors taking into account specific features of these reactors (partial fuel overloads, change in reactor reactivity with power changes). The two particular interconnected problems discussed are: choice of such a sequence of partial rechargings which ensures the minimum cost of the electric power generated, and increasing the reactor operating time by reducing its power output. Besides the technical and economic estimates, much attention is given to analysing the stability of NPP operation

  2. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are still many problems in the field of measurement and control of neutron flux. The present studies in connexion with high flux reactors contribute to the solution of these problems which concern specialists in reactor control. The present state of this investigation and the results of different studies carried out in France by the C A and the EDF are pointed out: A - In the nuclear instrumentation field, work is at present devoted to the technologies used to develop detectors and cables, which have to work at high temperature and in a high γ background; fast electronic techniques are applied to fission counters to measure low neutron fluxes in a high γ background (10 Rh). B - In the control and safety field, there is a real need for studies on the behaviour of reactors in the subcritical state. This increases the margin of security during restarts when poison effects must be overcome The perturbations due to control rod movements necessitate a new organisation of power level safety and control assemblies, in connexion with thermal or activation measurements. Two methods of fast start-up are described. They are related to the fission rate measurement as a function of time. This is done either continuously by a constant and high reactivity change, or step by step. The application of automatic techniques to detector motion seems to give the answer to control and safety in normal start-up. C - The scope of these studies covers the methods used for the control of E.D.F. 3, which are described. (authors)

  3. Energy analysis and carbon dioxide emission of Tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy gain and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission of tokamak fusion power reactors are evaluated in this study compared with other reactor types, structural materials, and other Japanese energy sources currently in use. The reactors treated in this study are (1) a conventional physics performance international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), like a reactor based upon the ITER engineering design activity (ITER-EDA), (2) a RS (reversed shear) reactor using the reversed shear safety-factor/plasma current profile, and (3) a ST (spherical torus) reactor based upon the final version of the advanced reactor innovative engineering study ST (ARIES-ST). The input energy and CO2 emission from these reactors are calculated by multiplying the weight or cost of the fusion reactor components by the energy intensity and/or with the CO2 intensity data, which are updated as often as possible. The ITER cost estimation is estimated based on the component unit costs. The following results were obtained: (1) The RS and the ST reactor can double the energy gain and reduce CO2 emission by one-half compared with the ITER-like reactor. (2) Silicon carbide (SiC) used as the structural material of inner vessel components is best for energy gain and CO2 emission reduction. (3) The ITER-like reactor is slightly superior to a photovoltaic (PV) with regard to CO2 emission. (4) The energy gain and CO2 emission intensity of the RS reactor and the ST reactor are as excellent as those of a fission reactor and a hydro-powered generator. These results indicate that a tokamak fusion power reactor can be one of the most effective power-generating technologies both in high-energy payback gains and reduction of CO2

  4. System simulation of a multicell thermionic space power reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Alan Vincent

    For many years, thermionic power has been considered for space application. The prominent feature of the power conversion system is that there are no moving parts. Although designs have been developed by various organizations, no comprehensive system models are known to exist which can simulate transient behavior of a multicell design nor is there a method to directly couple these models to other codes that can calculate variations in reactivity. Thus, a procedure has been developed to couple the performance calculations of a space nuclear reactor thermal/hydraulics code with a neutron diffusion code to analyze temperature feedback. Thermionic power is based on the thermionic emissions principle where free electrons in a conductor have sufficient energy to escape the surface. Kinetic energy is given to the electrons by heating the conductor. Specifically, a 48 kWe thermionic power converter system model has been developed and used to model startup and other transients. Less than 10% of the fuel heat is converted to electricity, and the rest is rejected to space via a heat pipe radiator. An electromagnetic pump circulates the liquid metal coolant. First, a startup transient model was developed which showed stable operation through ignition of the Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs) and thawing of the radiator heat pipes. Also, the model's capability was expanded to include two-phase heat transfer to model boiling using coupled mass and thermal energy conservation equations. The next step incorporated effects of reactivity feedback---showing that various mechanisms will prevent power and temperature run-up for a flow reduction scenario where the reactor control systems fail to respond. In particular, the Doppler effect was shown to counter a positive worth due to partial core voiding although steps must be taken to preclude film boiling in that high superheats will result in TFE failures. Finally, analysis of the core grid spacer location suggests it should be located at

  5. Calculations on heavy-water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the codes that the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) has for the nuclear reactors design calculations is the LEOPARD code. This work studies the reliability of this code in reactors design calculations which component materials are the same of the heavy water moderated and cooled, natural uranium fuelled power reactors. (author)

  6. Testing Measurement Of Absolute Power Of The Dalat Nuclear Reactor By Neutron Noise Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some recent years, technique of detection and analysis of neutron noise in nuclear reactor has been applied as a new method of experiment for studying physics characteristics of the Dalat nuclear reactor. This report will summarize the theoretical basis of the technique, instrumentation and experimental result in the low power range (0-50 W) of the Dalat nuclear reactor. (author)

  7. Reactivity control rod for controlling reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a cladding tube is situated at the outer side, it undergoes neutron irradiation in a reactor core and also undergoes compression force due to high pressure of reactor coolants to cause a creep phenomenon, and the diameter is reduced as it is used. Then, neutron absorbing rods as reactivity control rods for controlling the power distribution are constituted with a cladding tube, a spacer tube disposed at the central portion of the cladding tube and a borosilicate glass tube disposed between the cladding tube and the spacer tube. The gap between the borosilicate glass tube and the spacer tube is gradually changed so that the inner diameter of the borosilicate glass is increased as it comes closer to the lower end plug. The time of contact between the cladding tube and the spacer tube in the inside is delayed by the constitution of the borosilicate glass tube disposed in the cladding tube of the neutron absorbing rod as the reactivity control rod thereby capable of extending the integral working life time with no rupture of the cladding tube. (N.H.)

  8. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

  9. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive ''box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs

  10. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience.

  11. Emergency response to a nuclear power reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Province of Ontario recently reviewed its plans for an emergency response to a possible nuclear power reactor accident that might contaminate some of the surrounding countryside with radioactivity. The Province requested some comments from a small Panel (the present authors) that was formed for this purpose by the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering. This note is a summary of our findings. It presents, first, a short account of the probabilistic risk assessment of accidents and the probability and severity of accidents for which response training should be undertaken; and second, the mitigation of possible harmful effects of escaped radiation and the radiation level at which action should be taken. (author)

  12. Thermoelectric converter for SP-100 space reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conductively coupling the thermoelectric converter to the heat source and the radiator maximizes the utilization of the reactor and radiator temperatures and thereby minimizes the power system weight. This paper presents the design for the converter and the individual thermoelectric cells that are the building block modules for the converter. It also summarizes progress on the fabrication of initial cells and the results obtained from the preparation of a manufacturing plan. The design developed for the SP-100 system utilizes thermally conductive compliant pads that can absorb the displacement and distortion caused by the combinations of temperatures and thermal expansion coefficients. The converter and cell designs provided a 100 kWe system which met the system requirements. Initial cells were fabricated and tested. The manufacturing plan showed that the chosen materials and processes are compatible with today's production techniques, that the production volume can readily be achieved and that the costs are reasonable

  13. Safety assessment of nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety studies of the nuclear generating units of Greifswald and Rheinsberg have produced important basic findings for the assessment of nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors. Deficits in engineered safeguards design have been found in the three lines, i.e. VVER-440/V-230, VVER-440/V-213, and VVER-1000. The oldest line is thought to be beyond backfitting, while design deficits in the two other lines can largely be corrected by backfitting measures. In Eastern Europe, safety studies are conducted by GRS and IPSN in close cooperation with national authorities. This is demonstrated by the safety assessment of units 1 to 4 on the Kosloduj site. Studies performed on a national level are supported by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment and, internationally, by the European Community. (orig.)

  14. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  15. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, this standard will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  16. Superconducting toroidal magnets for fusion feasibility experiments and power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been recognized that large superconducting magnets will have to be developed in order to obtain power economically from a thermonuclear reactor. In the present paper, compelling reasons are offered to illustrate how vital they are even for the sizes envisioned for hydrogen feasibility and D-T burning experiments. Detailed discussion is given on the type of magnets used for the plasma confinement in a tokamak-type machine. Illustrations are given to show that their development is within the present technological progress of superconductivity. The methods used to estimate the cost of such a toroidal system are provided along with how the cost varies with changes in magnet aspect ratio, major radius (proportional to Rsup(1.95) and stored energy (proportional to Esub(S)sup(0.65)). The latter quantity is presented as a valid figure of merit for quickly estimating the cost of any large superconducting toroidal system. (author)

  17. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  18. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  19. Decommissioning of light-water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the technical and economic questions posed by the decommissioning of light-water reactor nuclear power plants of the 900-1300 MW class, account being taken of the distinctions between boiling- and pressurized-water reactors. Possible decommissioning alternatives and the disposal or confinement of activity are discussed. It emerges from the discussion that decommissioning, and even total dismantlement of these nuclear power plants is in principle feasible. The activity inventory, one year after shutdown, is calculated to be about 3 X 107 Ci for the BWR and 4 X 106 Ci for the PWR; 40 years after shutdown these figures are reduced to 2 X 106 and 4 X 105 Ci, respectively. The decommissioning costs to be expected are also estimated. This estimate serves as the basis for an economic comparison by the present worth method. The economic comparison shows that total dismantlement after a cooling time of one year is more than four times as expensive as interim confinement followed by total dismantlement waiting period of 40 years. The present worths for immediate total dismantlement are estimated at DM 200 million for the BWR and DM 170 million for the PWR; for the other alternative, they are put at DM 45 million for the BWR and DM 42 million for the PWR. A still open question is posed by the final storage of the large quantities of bulky radioactive waste arising in partial or total dismantlement. Since no decision on the storage method has yet been taken, disposal in casks is stipulated as a boundary condition in the estimation of the costs, although this is an unrealistic assumption. It is to be presumed that the costs of disposal can be reduced given appropriate final storage. (Auth.)

  20. The energy analysis of burner reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently most commercial nuclear power stations are based on thermal reactor designs called burner reactors which are net consumers of fissile material. These power stations form one part of a larger system that generates electricity from uranium. However, in addition to producing energy, such systems also consume energy, in the form of various fuels, during construction and operation. This thesis describes the use of energy analysis to determine the total energy required by these systems. A number of factors are shown to influence energy consumption and, in particular, the effect of extracting uranium from different sources is studied in detail. For ores, an important inverse relationship between energy use and ore grade is investigated and quantified. The physical limit at which the energy input to the system is equal to its output is shown to correspond to an average grade of 15 parts per million of 'triuranium octoxide'. Analysis of proposals for extracting uranium from seawater indicates that the only schemes giving a positive energy balance are costly (500 dollars/lb U3O8) and limited to low production rates. The effects of feedback within fuel systems are analysed and the results are used to formulate an economic model in which nuclear electricity prices determine uranium ore costs as well as vice versa. The model demonstrates that, with present techniques, the average economic limit to ore grade is 50 ppm U3O8 with subsequent resources, on current assessment, of only 107 tonnes U3O8. This contradicts most traditional studies which, by assuming fixed, non-dependent fuel costs, suggest an ore grade limit of less than 4 ppm U3O8 and economically recoverable resources in excess of 1010 tonnes U3O8. (author)

  1. Radiation streaming analysis in the korean standard nuclear power plant reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation shield plugs are provided in the reactor cavity of the KSNP (Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant) to assure an acceptable low level of radiation streaming up through the reactor cavity. An analysis of radiation streaming in the reactor cavity was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the reactor cavity shield plugs in meeting their design goals. The MCNP code was used for this analysis with DORT leakage flux at the reactor vessel outer surface. Based on the results of this analysis, the upper and lower shield plugs are important design features to reduce dose rates at the reactor vessel flange level and at the operating floor

  2. Power monitoring in space nuclear reactors using silicon carbide radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Patel, Jagdish U.; Williams, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Space reactor power monitors based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor neutron detectors are proposed. Detection of fast leakage neutrons using SiC detectors in ex-core locations could be used to determine reactor power: Neutron fluxes, gamma-ray dose rates and ambient temperatures have been calculated as a function of distance from the reactor core, and the feasibility of power monitoring with SiC detectors has been evaluated at several ex-core locations. Arrays of SiC diodes can be configured to provide the required count rates to monitor reactor power from startup to full power Due to their resistance to temperature and the effects of neutron and gamma-ray exposure, SiC detectors can be expected to provide power monitoring information for the fill mission of a space reactor.

  3. Helium turbine power generation in high temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents studies on the helium turbine power generator and important components in the indirect cycle of high temperature helium cooled reactor with multi-purpose use of exhaust thermal energy from the turbine. The features of this paper are, firstly the reliable estimation of adiabatic efficiencies of turbine and compressor, secondly the introduction of heat transfer enhancement by use of the surface radiative heat flux from the thin metal plates installed in the hot helium and between the heat transfer coil rows of IHX and RHX, thirdly the use of turbine exhaust heat to produce fresh water from seawater for domestic, agricultural and marine fields, forthly a proposal of plutonium oxide fuel without a slight possibility of diversion of plutonium for nuclear weapon production and finally the investigation of GT-HTGR of large output such as 500 MWe. The study of performance of GT-HTGR reduces the result that for the reactor of 450 MWt the optimum thermal efficiency is about 43% when the turbine expansion ratio is 3.9 for the turbine efficiency of 0.92 and compressor efficiency of 0.88 and the helium temperature at the compressor inlet is 45degC. The produced amount of fresh water is about 8640 ton/day. It is made clear that about 90% of the reactor thermal output is totally used for the electric power generation in the turbine and for the multi-puposed utilization of the heat from the turbine exhaust gas and compressed helium cooling seawater. The GT-Large HTGR is realized by the separation of the pressure and temperature boundaries of the pressure vessel, the increase of burning density of the fuel by 1.4 times, the extention of the nuclear core diameter and length by 1.2 times, respectively, and the enhancement of the heat flux along the nuclear fuel compact surface by 1.5 times by providing riblets with the peak in the flow direction. (J.P.N.)

  4. Impulse power stochastically fluctuations of the modernized fast pulsed reactor IBR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : Stochastically fluctuations of the power of the IBR-2 reactor have been quite significant, they affect the dynamics of the reactor, the process of regulation, starting on the work of the experimental equipment. On the other hand, the presence of large fluctuations in power at the IBR-2M has had its advantages. Investigation of stochastic fluctuations has allowed to estimate some physical parameters of the nuclear reactor core, for example, the mean lifetime of prompt neutrons in the reactor, source of spontaneous neutrons and absolute power of the reactor. The main results of the investigation impulse power stochastically fluctuations of the IBR-2 periodic pulsed reactor after modernization have been presented. It has been shown that the experimental results have been close to the calculated ones

  5. Incorporating the operation of a small research reactor facility to support a national nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small research reactor similar to the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor, which is a 1 Megawatt TRIGA, can be invaluable in supporting a national nuclear power programme. The research reactor provides an operating reactor for training nuclear engineers, nuclear operators, and other nuclear specialists required to construct, operate, and maintain the nuclear power plant. When operation of the power plant begins, highly trained, well-qualified and competent personnel will be available to operate, supervise, and maintain a safe and efficient power plant operation. The paper describes the organization of a nuclear science centre as well as research reactor activities. An example of an actual two week training programme of an electric utility is included with a list of experiments and demonstrations. University projects and experiments using the reactor are listed. (author)

  6. Solid state track recorder pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid State Track Recorder neutron dosimetry methods developed under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program have been applied for pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry at commercial nuclear power reactors. More than 800 SSTR neutron dosimeters have been deployed at twelve different power reactors during twenty-two cycles of operation. More than 300 SSTR have been analyzed, and results with uncertainties in the 2-5% range have been generally obtained. Several new areas of application of SSTRs for radiation damage assessment for safe routine operation or extended life operation of power reactors are planned and these applications are discussed. (author). 14 refs

  7. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  8. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  9. A Basic LEGO Reactor Design for the Provision of Lunar Surface Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Darrell Bess

    2008-06-01

    A final design has been established for a basic Lunar Evolutionary Growth-Optimized (LEGO) Reactor using current and near-term technologies. The LEGO Reactor is a modular, fast-fission, heatpipe-cooled, clustered-reactor system for lunar-surface power generation. The reactor is divided into subcritical units that can be safely launched with lunar shipments from Earth, and then emplaced directly into holes drilled into the lunar regolith to form a critical reactor assembly. The regolith would not just provide radiation shielding, but serve as neutron-reflector material as well. The reactor subunits are to be manufactured using proven and tested materials for use in radiation environments, such as uranium-dioxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and structural support, and liquid-sodium heatpipes. The LEGO Reactor system promotes reliability, safety, and ease of manufacture and testing at the cost of an increase in launch mass per overall rated power level and a reduction in neutron economy when compared to a single-reactor system. A single unshielded LEGO Reactor subunit has an estimated mass of approximately 448 kg and provides approximately 5 kWe. The overall envelope for a single subunit with fully extended radiator panels has a height of 8.77 m and a diameter of 0.50 m. Six subunits could provide sufficient power generation throughout the initial stages of establishing a lunar outpost. Portions of the reactor may be neutronically decoupled to allow for reduced power production during unmanned periods of base operations. During later stages of lunar-base development, additional subunits may be emplaced and coupled into the existing LEGO Reactor network, subject to lunar base power demand. Improvements in reactor control methods, fuel form and matrix, shielding, as well as power conversion and heat rejection techniques can help generate an even more competitive LEGO Reactor design. Further modifications in the design could provide power generative opportunities for

  10. The test of the fuel assembly of the IVV-2M reactor at the IGR reactor under emergency modes with the flow rate blockage and power leap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results on studying into the IVV-2M fuel assembly operation in the IGR pulse reactor under conditions of coolant flow blockage and power pulse growth, simulating an accident with prompt rupture of pipeline in the primary coolant circuit for reactor operating at nominal power level and an accident connected with positive reactivity insertion at nominal reactor power with the account for reactor protection system signal delay are presented

  11. Development of Power Controller System based on Model Reference Adaptive Control for a Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)-type TRIGA Mark II was installed in the year 1982. The Power Controller System (PCS) or Automated Power Controller System (APCS) is very important for reactor operation and safety reasons. It is a function of controlled reactivity and reactor power. The existing power controller system is under development and due to slow response, low accuracy and low stability on reactor power control affecting the reactor safety. The nuclear reactor is a nonlinear system in nature, and it is power increases continuously with time. The reactor parameters vary as a function of power, fuel burnup and control rod worth. The output power value given by the power control system is not exactly as real value of reactor power. Therefore, controller system design is very important, an adaptive controller seems to be inevitable. The method chooses is a linear controller by using feedback linearization, for example Model Reference Adaptive Control. The developed APCS for RTP will be design by using Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC). The structured of RTP model to produce the dynamic behaviour of RTP on entire operating power range from 0 to 1MWatt. The dynamic behavior of RTP model is produced by coupling of neutronic and thermal-hydraulics. It will be developed by using software MATLAB/Simulink and hardware module card to handle analog input signal. A new algorithm for APCS is developed to control the movement of control rods with uniformity and orderly for RTP. Before APCS test to real plant, simulation results shall be obtained from RTP model on reactor power, reactivity, period, control rod positions, fuel and coolant temperatures. Those data are comparable with the real data for validation. After completing the RTP model, APCS will be tested to real plant on power control system performance by using real signal from RTP including fail-safe operation, system reliable, fast response, stability and accuracy. The new algorithm shall be a satisfied

  12. A New Approach to Nuclear Power The Multi-Module Reactor (MMR) Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While fuel cost for nuclear power is incredibly low relative to fossil fuel, the capital investment needed to build today's nuclear power plant is substantial. Utilities are reluctant to build new nuclear power plants because of the long construction time and the associated uncertainty of investment recovery. This paper introduces a new modular reactor concept, the Multi-Module Reactor (MMR), that reduces both the construction cost and time in an attempt to renew commercial interest in nuclear power. (authors)

  13. Response of pressurized water reactor (PWR) to network power generation demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flexibility of the PWR type reactor in terms of response to the variations of the network power demands, is demonstrated. The factors that affect the transitory flexibility and some design prospects that allow the reactor fits the requirements of the network power demands, are also discussed. (M.J.A.)

  14. Application of Molten Salt Reactor Technology to MMW In-Space NEP and Surface Power Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anticipated manned nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and planetary surface power missions will require multi-megawatt nuclear reactors that are lightweight, operationally robust, and sealable in power for widely varying scientific mission objectives. Molten salt reactor technology meets all of these requirements and offers an interesting alternative to traditional multi-megawatt gas-cooled and liquid metal concepts. (authors)

  15. Application of Molten Salt Reactor Technology to MMW In-Space NEP and Surface Power Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Bruce; Sorensen, Kirk; Rodgers, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Anticipated manned nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and planetary surface power missions will require multimegawatt nuclear reactors that are lightweight, operationally robust, and scalable in power for widely varying scientific mission objectives. Molten salt reactor technology meets all of these requirements and offers an interesting alternative to traditional multimegawatt gas-cooled and liquid metal concepts.

  16. Use of Russian technology of ship reactors with lead-bismuth coolant in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience of using lead-bismuth coolant in Russian nuclear submarine reactors has been presented. The fundamental statements of the concept of using the reactors cooled by lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear power have been substantiated. The results of developments for using lead bismuth coolant in nuclear power have been presented. (author)

  17. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  18. 76 FR 74630 - Making Changes to Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 50 and 52 RIN 3150-AI10 Making Changes to Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors... Emergency Plans for Nuclear Power Reactors.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers... (DG)-1237 was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2009 (74 FR 23220), for a 60 day...

  19. 10 CFR 50.44 - Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors. 50.44 Section 50.44 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.44 Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors....

  20. Nuclear power technology system with molten salt reactor for transuranium nuclides burning in closed fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept of nuclear power technology system with homogeneous molten salt reactors for burning and transmutation of long-lived radioactive toxic nuclides is considered in the paper. Disposition of such reactors in enterprises of fuel cycle allows to provide them with power and facilitate solution of problems with rad waste with minimal losses. (Authors)

  1. C and I power supply for research reactors (Paper No. CP 33)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety and availability of a nuclear reactor depends greatly on the quality and reliability of control and instrumentation (C and I) power supply. It may not be practical to incorporate fail-safe philosophy in all safety systems of a reactor due to fact that one has to pay huge penalty for spurious actuation of certain systems. A reliable power supply system can solve this problem. Availability of the status of reactor and various systems is essential for the safe operation of the plant. In small size reactors the C and I is powered from normal power supply. It is not practical to provide battery power backup for the whole C and I due to charging and maintenance problems associated with large batteries. This is more so since the reactor is not operated on a continuous basis. But it becomes mandatory to provide some amount of battery power atleast to indicate certain vital information like reactor status etc. in case of failure of normal power supply. This paper describes various aspects of C and I power supply for the research reactors DHRUVA, PURNIMA and KAMINI and highlights their evolution in order to ensure safe and reliable operation of the reactor. (author). 6 refs

  2. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item's test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship's demand. (author)

  3. Management of spent fuel from power reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentina has two nuclear power plants (NPP) in operation, supplying 12% of the national electricity production. The Atucha-1 NPP started commercial operation in 1974, it is a 340 MWe Heavy Water Reactor with pressure vessel, of Siemens design. The Embalse NPP started commercial operation in 1984, it is a 600 MWe PHWR with pressure tubes of AECL design (CANDU). The nuclear power plants are owned and operated by the state company Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. The fuel assembly (FA) of Atucha-1 has an active length of 5.3 m, it has circular cross-section of 0,10 m diameter with 36 fuel rods plus one structural rod. Each FA is loaded with approximately 176 Kg of UO2. Atucha-1 was fuelled with natural uranium during the first 27 years of operation, the average extraction burnup of the fuel was approximately 6,000 MWd/tU. In January 1995 the utility started a program to gradually convert the fuelling to slightly enriched uranium (SEU), using an enrichment of 0.85 % U-235. The program was completed in August 2001, since then the whole core is fuelled with SEU and the average extraction burnup of the fuel is approximately 11,300 MWd/tU . This change produced an important saving in fuel consumption: from approximately 395 FA/full power years (fpy) to approximately 210 FA/fpy. In Atucha-1 the SF is stored in water pools located at the reactor site. The storage pools are made of concrete with stainless steel lining. The monitoring program of the whole installation has not detected any failure or degradation of the components neither of the SF. The original management strategy considered the transfer of the SF to dry interim storage after the final shutdown of the NPP. Nevertheless, it is foreseen the necessity of operate the wet storage installation during at least 10 years after the final shut down, to allow for thermal cooling and radioactive decay of the SF belonging to the last core. At present Atucha-1 is planning a re-racking of the SF in order to enlarge the capacity

  4. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 years. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min., with an approximate 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2-cm thick stainless steel, and has 2-cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. An 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H2O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal-field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic-heating and equilibrium-field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam-injectors, which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-converters

  5. Job analysis of nuclear power reactor health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a project, an industry-wide Job Analysis of Nuclear Power Reactor Health Physics Technicians (HPTs), conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Analysis and Technology, Inc. to provide the industry with job-performance data that can be used in systematically defining training programs in terms of required job functions responsibilities, and performance standards. The job-analysis methodology is consistent with that used by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in similar industry-wide projects and includes administration of over 850 job task questionnaires to utility and contractor Health Physics Technicians throughout the country. Data collected includes task performance (difficulty, importance, and frequency) and industry-wide demographics (job levels, experience, education, and training). The results of this project discussed herein include model job descriptions for HPT positions, summaries of HPT experience, education, and training, industry-wide task listings with task-performance characteristics, and recommendations of selected tasks as a basis for HPT training development. Finally, potential future applications of the data base by utility and contractor organizations in training program development and evaluation and personnel qualifications are discussed

  6. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 years. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min., with an approximate 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2-cm thick stainless steel, and has 2-cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. An 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H/sub 2/O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal-field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic-heating and equilibrium-field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam-injectors, which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-converters.

  7. TMRBAR power balance code for tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revised version of the tandem mirror multi-point code TMRBAR developed at LLNL has been used to examine various reactor designs using MARS-like ''c'' coils. We solve 14 to 16 non-linear equations to obtain the densities, temperatures, plasma potential and magnetic field on axis at the cardinal points. Since ICRH, ECRH, and neutral beams may be used to stabilize the central cell, various combinations of rf and neutral beam powers may satisfy the physics. To select a desired set of physics parameters, we use nonlinear optimization techniques. Whit these routines, we minimize or maximize a physics variable subject to the physics constraints being satisfied. For example, for a given fusion power we may find the minimum length needed to have an ignited central cell or the maximum fusion Q. Finally, we have coupled this physics model to the LLNL magnetics-MHD code. This code runs the EFFI magnetic field generator and uses TEBASCO to calculate 1-D MHD equilibria and stability

  8. Fission power: a search for a ''second-generation'' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report touches on the history of US fission reactors and explores the current technical status of such reactors around the world, including experimental reactors. Its purpose is to identify, evaluate, and rank the most promising concepts among existing reactors, proposed but unadopted designs, and what can be described as ''new'' concepts. Also discussed are such related concerns as utility requirements and design considerations. The report concludes with some recommendations for possible future LLNL involvement

  9. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1986: A second stability power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during FY-1986 on the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS). The purpose of the TPSS is to explore and develop ideas that would lead to improvements in the tokamak as a power reactor concept. The work at ANL concentrated on plasma engineering, impurity control, and the blanket/first wall/shield system. The work in FY-1986 extended these studies and focused them on a reference design point. The key features of the design point include: second stability regime with higher β and larger aspect ratio, steady-state operation with fast wave current drive, impurity control via a self-pumped slot limiter, a self-cooled liquid lithium, vanadium alloy blanket with simplified poloidal flow, and reduced reactor building volume with vertical lift maintenance. Sufficient work was carried out to report a preliminary cost estimate. In addition, reactor implications of steady-state operation in the first stability regime were also studied. 174 refs., 124 figs., 65 tabs

  10. Neutronics and pumping power analyses on the Tokamak reactor for the fusion-biomass hybrid concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MCNP analyses on a Tokamak with LiPb-cooled components shows concentrations of nuclear heating at the in-board region in addition to the out-board region. • Required pumping power of LiPb coolants for the nuclear heating exponentially increases as fusion power increases. • Pumping power analysis for the divertor also indicates the increasing pumping power as the fusion power increases. -- Abstract: The authors aim to develop a fusion-biomass combined plant concept with a small power fusion reactor. A concern for the small power reactor is the coolant pumping power which may significantly decreases the apparent energy outcome. Thus pressure loss and corresponding pumping power were studied for a designed Tokamak reactor: GNOME. First, 3-D Monte-Carlo Neutron transport analysis for the reactor model with dual-coolant blankets was taken in order to simulate the tritium breeding ability and the distribution of nuclear heat. Considering calculated concentration of nuclear heat on the in-board blankets, pressure loss of the liquid LiPb at coolant pipes due to MHD and friction forces was analyzed as a function of fusion power. It was found that as the fusion power increases, the pressure loss and corresponding pumping power exponentially increase. Consequently, the proportion of the pumping power to the fusion power increases as the fusion power increases. In case of ∼360 MW fusion power operation, pumping power required for in-board cooling pipes was estimated as ∼1% of the fusion power

  11. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnable poisons are used in all modern nuclear reactors to permit higher loading of fuel without the necessity of an overly large control rod system. This not only permits a longer core life but can also be used to level the power distribution. Commercial nuclear reactors commonly use B4C in separate non-fueled rods and more recently, zirconium boride coatings on the fuel pellets or gadolinium oxide mixed with the fuel. Although the advantages are great, there are problems with using these materials. Boron, which is an effective neutron absorber, transmutes to lithium and helium upon absorption of a neutron. Helium is insoluble and is eventually released to the interior of the fuel rod, where it produces an internal pressure. When sufficiently high, this pressure stress could cause separation of the cladding from the fuel, causing overly high centerline temperatures. Gadolinium has several very strongly absorbing isotopes, but not all have large cross sections and result in residual burnable poison reactivity worth at the end of the fuel life. Even if the amount of this residual absorber is small and the penalty in operation small, the cost of this penalty, even if only several days, can be very high. The objective of this investigation was to study the performance of single isotopes in order to reduce the residual negative reactivity left over at the end of the fuel cycle. Since the behavior of burnable poisons can be strongly influenced by their configuration, four forms for the absorbers were studied: homogeneously mixed with the fuel, mixed with only the outer one-third of the fuel pellet, coated on the perimeter of the fuel pellets, and alloyed with the cladding. In addition, the numbers of fuel rods containing burnable poison were chosen as 8, 16, 64, and 104. Other configurations were chosen for a few special cases. An enrichment of 4.5 wt% 235U was chosen for most cases for study in order to achieve a 4-year fuel cycle. A standard pressurized water reactor

  12. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, J.A.

    2002-04-17

    Burnable poisons are used in all modern nuclear reactors to permit higher loading of fuel without the necessity of an overly large control rod system. This not only permits a longer core life but can also be used to level the power distribution. Commercial nuclear reactors commonly use B{sub 4}C in separate non-fueled rods and more recently, zirconium boride coatings on the fuel pellets or gadolinium oxide mixed with the fuel. Although the advantages are great, there are problems with using these materials. Boron, which is an effective neutron absorber, transmutes to lithium and helium upon absorption of a neutron. Helium is insoluble and is eventually released to the interior of the fuel rod, where it produces an internal pressure. When sufficiently high, this pressure stress could cause separation of the cladding from the fuel, causing overly high centerline temperatures. Gadolinium has several very strongly absorbing isotopes, but not all have large cross sections and result in residual burnable poison reactivity worth at the end of the fuel life. Even if the amount of this residual absorber is small and the penalty in operation small, the cost of this penalty, even if only several days, can be very high. The objective of this investigation was to study the performance of single isotopes in order to reduce the residual negative reactivity left over at the end of the fuel cycle. Since the behavior of burnable poisons can be strongly influenced by their configuration, four forms for the absorbers were studied: homogeneously mixed with the fuel, mixed with only the outer one-third of the fuel pellet, coated on the perimeter of the fuel pellets, and alloyed with the cladding. In addition, the numbers of fuel rods containing burnable poison were chosen as 8, 16, 64, and 104. Other configurations were chosen for a few special cases. An enrichment of 4.5 wt% {sup 235}U was chosen for most cases for study in order to achieve a 4-year fuel cycle. A standard pressurized

  13. Coupled Monte Carlo neutronics and thermal hydraulics for power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernnat, W.; Buck, M.; Mattes, M. [Institut fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme IKE, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Zwermann, W.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit GRS MbH, Forschungszentrum, Boltzmannstrase 14, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The availability of high performance computing resources enables more and more the use of detailed Monte Carlo models even for full core power reactors. The detailed structure of the core can be described by lattices, modeled by so-called repeated structures e.g. in Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 or MCNPX. For cores with mainly uniform material compositions, fuel and moderator temperatures, there is no problem in constructing core models. However, when the material composition and the temperatures vary strongly a huge number of different material cells must be described which complicate the input and in many cases exceed code or memory limits. The second problem arises with the preparation of corresponding temperature dependent cross sections and thermal scattering laws. Only if these problems can be solved, a realistic coupling of Monte Carlo neutronics with an appropriate thermal-hydraulics model is possible. In this paper a method for the treatment of detailed material and temperature distributions in MCNP5 is described based on user-specified internal functions which assign distinct elements of the core cells to material specifications (e.g. water density) and temperatures from a thermal-hydraulics code. The core grid itself can be described with a uniform material specification. The temperature dependency of cross sections and thermal neutron scattering laws is taken into account by interpolation, requiring only a limited number of data sets generated for different temperatures. Applications will be shown for the stationary part of the Purdue PWR benchmark using ATHLET for thermal- hydraulics and for a generic Modular High Temperature reactor using THERMIX for thermal- hydraulics. (authors)

  14. The combined hybrid system: A symbiotic thermal reactor/fast reactor system for power generation and radioactive waste toxicity reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If there is to be a next generation of nuclear power in the United States, then the four fundamental obstacles confronting nuclear power technology must be overcome: safety, cost, waste management, and proliferation resistance. The Combined Hybrid System (CHS) is proposed as a possible solution to the problems preventing a vigorous resurgence of nuclear power. The CHS combines Thermal Reactors (for operability, safety, and cost) and Integral Fast Reactors (for waste treatment and actinide burning) in a symbiotic large scale system. The CHS addresses the safety and cost issues through the use of advanced reactor designs, the waste management issue through the use of actinide burning, and the proliferation resistance issue through the use of an integral fuel cycle with co-located components. There are nine major components in the Combined Hybrid System linked by nineteen nuclear material mass flow streams. A computer code, CHASM, is used to analyze the mass flow rates CHS, and the reactor support ratio (the ratio of thermal/fast reactors), IFR of the system. The primary advantages of the CHS are its essentially actinide-free high-level radioactive waste, plus improved reactor safety, uranium utilization, and widening of the option base. The primary disadvantages of the CHS are the large capacity of IFRs required (approximately one MWe IFR capacity for every three MWe Thermal Reactor) and the novel radioactive waste streams produced by the CHS. The capability of the IFR to burn pure transuranic fuel, a primary assumption of this study, has yet to be proven. The Combined Hybrid System represents an attractive option for future nuclear power development; that disposal of the essentially actinide-free radioactive waste produced by the CHS provides an excellent alternative to the disposal of intact actinide-bearing Light Water Reactor spent fuel (reducing the toxicity based lifetime of the waste from roughly 360,000 years to about 510 years)

  15. Analytic initialization method for xenon oscillation in power reactor simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of simulating nuclear power reactor core transients is to predict variations in core behavior due to changes in operating conditions. In the simulation, the initial condition of the core transient should be consistent with the real core state. Especially, the initial conditions of iodine and xenon distributions, which cannot be measured in the core, have dominant effects on the accuracy of the simulation for the transients related with xenon dynamics. If the transient starts from non-equilibrium xenon condition, the accurate initialization of the non-equilibrium iodine and xenon distributions is essential for the prediction of the core transient behavior. In this study, a simple initialization method of non-equilibrium iodine and xenon distributions for the core transient simulation was developed using axial power difference, which is the only measurable parameter related with the non-equilibrium state of the core. For this purpose, the spatial distribution of two-group one-dimensional neutron diffusion equation combined with xenon dynamics equation was expanded with Fourier sine series. It was found that the nonlinearly combined terms of flux and xenon distributions in the equations were canceled by the orthogonal characteristics of the Fourier series using adequate approximation. Therefore, the dynamics equations for axial difference parameters of power, iodine and xenon can be completely linearized and can be converted into an equation system which can be solved analytically. Because the equation system provides with an analytic relationship between the axial differences of power, iodine and xenon, the non-equilibrium iodine and xenon can be represented as functions of the axial power difference. It implies that the initial condition of the transient starting from a non-equilibrium state can be determined from the initial condition of the axial power difference which is a measurable parameter of the core. Using the analytic solution obtained in this

  16. Design features of Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) which is to achieve the improvement of the safety and economical efficiency has been developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) with the support from industries and research institutes. The steam generator for APR 1400 is an evolutionary type from System 80+, which is the recirculating U-tube heat exchanger with integral economizer. Compared to the System 80+ steam generator, it is focused on the improved design features, operating and design conditions of APR 1400 steam generator. Especially, from the operation experience of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) steam generator, the lessons-learned measures are incorporated to prevent the tube wear caused by flow-induced vibration (FIV). The concepts for the preventive design features against FIV are categorized to two fields; flow distribution and dynamic response characteristics. From the standpoint of flow distribution characteristics, the egg-crate flow distribution plate (EFDP) is installed to prevent the local excessive flow loaded on the most susceptible tube to wear. The parametric study is performed to select the optimum design with the efficient mitigation of local excessive flow. ATHOS3 Mod-01 is used and partly modified to analyze the flow field of the APR 1400 steam generator. In addition, the upper tube bundle support is designed to eliminate the presence of tube with a low natural frequency. Based on the improved upper tube bundle support, the modal analysis is performed and compared with that of System 80+. Using the results of flow distribution and modal analysis, the two mechanisms of flow-induced vibration are investigated; fluid-elastic instability (FEI) and random turbulence excitation (RTE). (authors)

  17. The Improvement of Plant Efficiency by Testing and Revising of the Reactor Thermal Power Calculation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the uncertainty of flow measurement mostly affects the result of reactor thermal power calculation, reactor power in most of Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs) is controlled by excore Nuclear Instrumentation System(NIS) based on SPPC which has less uncertainty of flow measurement by using venture-meter. Real time monitoring system for reactor thermal power of Kori unit 3 and 4 has been established since 1992, and plant efficiency was improved by detecting errors and revising the program in 2012 following the engineering judgement that reactor thermal power varies according to steam generator blowdown flow change, unit conversion constant, and thermal expansion coefficient, etc. The reactor thermal power calculation program for Kori unit 3 and 4 was developed in 1992 and operated for 20 years without any correction or revision. Based on the engineering judgement that reactor thermal power varies according to change of steam generator blowdown flow, we conducted a research and found a couple of errors in steam generator blowdown specific volume, unit conversion constants for differential pressure of main feed water inlet flow, and thermal expansion coefficient of venture-meter which measures main feed water flow for steam generator. By correcting the errors in reactor thermal power program, generator power increased by 3.2 MWe for two units, Kori 3 and 4. Considering recent capacity factor of the plant, additional net electricity of 26,434 MWh was produced annually

  18. Nuclear reactor capable of electric power generation during in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power plant according to the present invention can generate electric power even in a period when one of a pair of reactors is put to in-service inspection. That is, the nuclear power plant of the present invention comprises a system constitution of two nuclear reactors each of 50% thermal power and one turbine power generator of 100% electric power. Further, facilities of various systems relevant to the two reactors each of 50% thermal power, as a pair, are used in common as much as possible in order to reduce the cost for construction and maintenance/ inspection. Further, a reactor building and a turbine building disposed in adjacent with each for paired two reactors each of 50% thermal power are arranged vertically. This arrangement can facilitate the common use of the facilities for various systems and equipments to attain branching and joining of fluids in reactor feed water systems and main steam system pipelines easily with low pressure loss and low impact shocks. The facility utilization factor of such reactors is remarkably improved by doubling the period of continuous power generation. As a result, economic property is remarkably improved. (I.S.)

  19. Study of power peak migration due to insertion of control bars in a PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to present a study on the power distribution behavior in a PWR reactor, considering the intensity and the migration of power peaks as is the insertion of control rods in the core banks. For this, the study of the diffusion of neutrons in the reactor was adopted by computer simulation that uses the finite difference method for numerically solving the neutron diffusion equation to two energy groups in steady state and in symmetry of a fourth quarter core. We decided to add the EPRI-9R 3D benchmark thermal-hydraulic parameters of a typical power PWR. With a new configuration for the reactor, the positions of the control rods banks were also modified. Due to the new positioning of these banks in the reactor, there was intense power gradients, favoring the occurrence of critical situations and logically unconventional for operation of a nuclear reactor. However, these facts have led interesting times for the study on the power distribution behavior in the reactor, showing axial migration of power peaks and mainly the effect of the geometry of the core on the latter. Based on the distribution of power was evident the increase of the power in elements located in the central region of the reactor core and, concomitantly, the reduction in elements of its periphery. Of course, the behavior exhibited by the simulated reactor is not in agreement with that expected in an actual reactor, where the insertion of control rods banks should lead to reduced power throughout the core as evenly as possible, avoiding sharp power peaks, standardizing the burning fuel, controlling reactivity deviations and acting in reactor shutdown

  20. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs

  1. Evaluation of CO2 emission in the life cycle of tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global warming problem is one of the most serious problems which human beings are currently face. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) from power plants is considered one of the major causes of the global warming this study, CO2 emission from Tokamak fusion power plants are compared with those from conventional present power generating technologies. Plasma parameters are calculated by a systems code couples the ITER physics, TF coil shape, and cost calculation. CO2 emission from construction and operation is evaluated from summing up component volume times CO2 emission intensities of the composing materials. The uncountable components on such as reactor building, balance of plants, etc., are scaled from the ITER referenced power reactor (ITER-like) by use of Generomak model. Two important findings are revealed. Most important finding- is that CO2 emissions from fusion reactors are less than that from PV, and less than double of that from fission reactor. The other findings are that (i) most CO2 emissions from fusion reactors are from materials, (ii) CO2 emissions from reactor construction becomes almost 60% to 70%, rest from reactor operation, and (m) the RS reactor can reduce CO2 emission half compared with the ITER-like reactor. In conclusion, tokamak fusion reactors are excellent because of their small CO2 emission intensity, and they can be one of effective energy supply technologies to solve global warming. (author)

  2. Thorium fuel cycle in VBER reactor for floating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of Floating Nuclear Power Plants, FNPPs, is currently under way for supplying power in remote regions in the coastal zone, power-generating units as components of nuclear water desalination complexes and for supplying power for marine oil drilling platforms, etc. In this paper the innovative small sized VBER-150 reactor plant, based on the experience in design and operation of marine modular reactors and NPPs with reactors of the VVER type, is reviewed and their neutron-physical characteristics for Thorium based fuel cycles are calculated with the well-known MCNP computational code. (Author)

  3. Study of a new automatic reactor power control for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The installation of a new Instrumentation and Control (IC) system for the TRIGA Mark-II reactor at University of Pavia has recently been completed in order to assure a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future. The intervention involved nearly the whole IC system and required a channel-by-channel component substitution. One of the most sensitive part of the intervention concerned the Automatic Reactor Power Controller (ARPC) which permits to keep the reactor at an operator-selected power level acting on the control rod devoted to the fine regulation of system reactivity. This controller installed can be set up using different control logics: currently the system is working in relay mode. The main goal of the work presented in this paper is to set up a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) configuration of the new controller installed on the TRIGA reactor of Pavia so as to optimize the response to system perturbations. The analysis have shown that a continuous PID offers generally better results than the relay mode which causes power oscillations with an amplitude of 3% of the nominal power

  4. Design of nuclear reactor power regulator based on frequency-domain method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor power control system is the core of the reactor control system in the nuclear power plant. Based on an experimental reactor as the research object, the simulation model of the power regulating system was built, and the power regulator in the nuclear power plant by using the frequency domain method was designed. Compared with the traditional PID control structure, this method has the obvious advantages, such as the clear and simple design steps, the wider industrial control requirements, etc. The simulation results show that this method has the better tracking control performance, strong robustness, and can eliminate uncertain interference. It is also practically significant for the reactor participating in the peak shaving of the power grid. (authors)

  5. Development of small and medium reactors for power and heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are given on the current state of development of small and medium-power reactors designed mainly for electric power production in small power grids, for heat production for small- and medium-power desalination plants with possible electric power generation, for process steam production and heat development for district heating systems, again combined with electric power generation, and for propelling big and fast passenger ships. A diagram is shown of the primary system of an integrated PWR derived from the Otto Hahn reactor. The family is listed of the standard sizes of the integral INTERATOM company pressurized water reactors. Also listed are the specifications and design of CAS 2CG and AS 3G type reactors used mainly for long-distance heating systems. (J.B.)

  6. Selected power reactor projects in Canada and the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its activities in connection with the development of nuclear power, the IAEA has undertaken a continuing study of the technology and economics of power reactors, with particular reference to the needs of the developing countries. Information on the progress made in eight power reactor projects, namely those of Bonus, Pathfinder, Elk River, Piqua, Hallam, Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor (EGCR), High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGCR) and Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD), is presented in this report. Developments during the past year are shown, emphasis being placed on operating experience in the case of those reactors which have become critical. The Agency is grateful to the Governments of Canada and the USA, who have extended the necessary facilities for covering he different power reactor projects in their respective countries. The cooperation received from the reactor manufacturers, builders and operators is also gratefully acknowledged. It is hoped that this report will be of interest to reactor technologists and operators and those interested in the application of nuclear power

  7. Alteration in reactor installation (addition of Unit 2) in the Sendai Nuclear Power Station of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deliveration by the Nuclear Safety Commission was commenced on the alteration in reactor installation, as it had been inquired by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. The alteration is the additional installation of the reactor No. 2 in the Sendai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. It is a PWR power plant with thermal output of about 2,660 MW (electric output of 890 MW), to be installed, adjoining to the reactor No. 1 of the same type and capacity under construction. In the examination by MITI, it was confirmed that the technological capabilities for its construction and operation and the radiation protection measures in power generation are both sufficient. The contents of the examination include the siting conditions, the location and construction of reactor facilities, etc. (J.P.N.)

  8. Development of technical requirements on the in-reactor control system (SVRK) in WWER reactor with medium output power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General concepts of in-reactor control in WWER reactors with medium output power and development of requirements on in-reactor control starting with the first generation of WWER-440 up WWER-640 with regard to the assurance of monitoring core conditions are dealt within the paper. The basis of WWER in-reactor control is provided by in-reactor sensors distributed in a stationary pattern (thermocouples for control of coolant temperature at assembly exits and sensors of local energy generation of self-powered detectors of SPD type). A new generation of WWER reactors with medium output is planned to operate both in basic load mode, as well as in maneuverability mode and SVRK systems in WWER-640 thus have to ensure the implementation of the following new requirements:generation of control signals for local core parameters;complex diagnostics of core conditions;prognosis of core characteristics. The new requirements on in-core control system (including class B from IEC 1226) need also a modernization and development of basic elements including in-reactor sensors for coolant temperature control. Issues and experience from in-core control system modernization at existing WWER reactors are also analyzed in the paper. While modernizing the existing WWER in relation to the use of new fuel cycles, up rating of thermal output and maneuverability of power units, it is advisable to perform a complete modernization and assure a possibility for phased implementation of current technical requirements on the in-core control system and on its basic elements. (Authors)

  9. Installation modification of the reactor in Onagawa Nuclear Power Station, Tohoku Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The head of Japan Atomic Energy Commission submitted on September 29, 1978, to the Prime Minister the report that the modification of the reactor installation in Onagawa Nuclear Power Station which is constructed by the Tohoku Electric Power Company, Inc., is in conformity with the relevant laws, annexing the evaluating report that had been deliberated by the Nuclear Reactor Safety Evaluation Committee. The modification is related to the fuel assemblies, the minimum critical power ratio (MCPR), the falling speed of control rods, the maximum reactivity worth of control rods, the independent back-up reactor shut down system, the concentration control system for burnable gas, the iodine removal efficiency of emergency gas process system and the discharge position of condenser-cooling water. The evaluated results of these modifications are explained one by one. By the adoption of 8 x 8 fuel pin array, the maximum linear output density of a fuel pin is decreased, and it was confirmed that the MCPR would be kept always more than the minimum critical value of 1.06. Also, it was evaluated that the channel hydraulics, the core and the plant are stable, and the xenon spatial oscillation can be sufficiently controlled. The limit of the free falling speed of control rods is modified to 0.95 m/s from 1.5 m/s, and the scram time for 90% stroke is revised to less than 3.5 s from about 5.0 s. The maximum reactivity worth of control rods is corrected to less than 0.015 Δk from 0.025 Δk. Considering LOCA, the concentrations of hydrogen and oxygen gases are kept less than 4% and 5%, respectively, utilizing the recombining system in the containment vessel. The discharge point of condenser cooling water is relocated to the offshore about 260 m from the coast. (Nakai, Y.)

  10. Use of self powered neutron detectors in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of self-powered neutron detectors, SPND, which are used as part of the in-core instrumentation of nuclear reactors is presented. Measurements with Co and Er SPND's were made in the IEA-R1 reactor for determining the neutron flux distribution and the integral reactor power. Due to the size of the available detectors, the neutron flux distribution could not be obtained with accuracy. The results obtained in the reactor power measurements demonstrate that the SPND have the linearity and the quick response necessary for a reactor power channel. This work also presents a proposed design of a SPND using Pt as wire emissor. This proposed design is based in the experience gained in building two prototypes. The greatest difficulties encountered include materials and technology to perform the delicate weldings. (author)

  11. Power maximization of a spheric reflected reactor with optimized fuel distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum power of a spheric reflected reactor was determined using the theory of optimal control. The control variable employed was the fuel distribution, in accordance to constraints on the power density and on the concentration fuel. It was considered a thermal reactor with a fixed radius. The reactor was fuelled with U-235 and moderated with light water. The nuclear reactor was described by a diffusion theory model. The analytical solution was obtained for both two and four groups of energy and a FORTRAN program was developed to obtain the numerical results. (author)

  12. Storage of spent fuel from power reactors. 2003 conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors was organized by the IAEA in co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The conference gave an opportunity to exchange information on the state of the art and prospects of spent fuel storage, to discuss the worldwide situation and the major factors influencing the national policies in this field and to identify the most important directions that national efforts and international co-operation in this area should take. The conference confirmed that the primary spent fuel management solution for the next decades will be interim storage. While the next step can be reprocessing or disposal, all spent fuel or high level waste from reprocessing must sooner or later be disposed of. The duration of interim storage is now expected to be much longer than earlier projections (up to 100 years and beyond). The storage facilities will have to be designed for these longer storage times and also for receiving spent fuel from advanced fuel cycle practices (i.e. high burnup and MOX spent fuel). It was noted that the handling and storage of spent fuel is a mature technology and meets the stringent safety requirements applicable in the different countries. The changes in nuclear policy and philosophy across the world, and practical considerations, have made storage a real necessity in the nuclear power industry. Utilities, vendors and regulators alike are addressing this adequately. The IAEA wishes to express appreciation to all chairs and co-chairs as well as all authors for their presentations to the conference and papers included in these proceedings

  13. Activation analysis of the PULSAR-II fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PULSAR-II pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes a blanket made of the vanadium alloy, V-5Cr-5Ti, and cooled with liquid lithium. The shield is made of a mixture of the low activation austenitic steel (Tenelon) and vanadium. The blanket is assumed to be replaced every 5.6 full power years (FPY) and the shield is assumed to stay in place for 30 FPY. The activity induced in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is higher than the activity induced in the shield after 30 FPY. At shutdown, the blanket and shield activities are 2678 MCi and 1747 MCi, respectively. One year after shutdown the shield activity drops to 18 MCi compared to 84 MCi for the blanket. The total decay heat generated in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is 34.7 MW and drops to 17.6 MW within an hour. At shutdown, 25.3 MW of decay heat are generated in the shield, dropping to only 0.1 MW within the first year. One week after shutdown, the values of the integrated decay heat are 1770 GJ for the blanket and 469 GJ for the shield. The radwaste classification of the reactor structure is evaluated according to both the NRC 10CFR61 and Fetter waste disposal concentration limits. After 5.6 years of irradiation, the blanket will only qualify for Class C low level waste. After 30 years of operation, the shield will also qualify for disposal as Class C waste. Only remote maintenance will be allowed inside the containment building

  14. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Associate Directorate for Advanced Reactors and License Renewal

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC`s ``Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants`` (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC`s preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant`s research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified.

  15. Estimated decommissioning cost for the 23 operating nuclear power reactors in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of nuclear power reactors requires considerable funds and is carried out over a long period. In order to forecast the total decommissioning funds needed by the licensee as well as provide a basis for industrial strategy and decommissioning activity planning, hence, this paper estimates the annual costs for decommissioning the 23 nuclear power plants in Korea between 2014 and 2083. For this estimation, 4 scenarios for decommissioning the 23 nuclear power reactors were developed and evaluated. (orig.)

  16. Floating power unit with KLT-40S reactor for seawater desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the growing fresh water demand forecasts one makes a conclusion about the future of the nuclear desalination. Paper reviews the world-wide state of the art and records of the nuclear desalination. One dwells upon the requirements for the nuclear power-desalinating systems and substantiates the expediency and the feasibility to construct the vessel reactor base floating power plants. Paper presents the key design parameters of the KLT-40S reactor floating power unit

  17. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  18. Silicon carbide composites as fusion power reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide was first proposed as a low activation fusion reactor material in the mid 1970s. However, serious development of this material did not begin until the early 1990s, driven by the emergence of composite materials that provided enhanced toughness and an implied ability to use these typically brittle materials in engineering application. In the decades that followed, SiC composite system was successfully transformed from a poorly performing curiosity into a radiation stable material of sufficient maturity to be considered for near term nuclear and non-nuclear systems. In this paper the recent progress in the understanding and of basic phenomenon related to the use of SiC and SiC composite in fusion applications will be presented. This work includes both fundamental radiation effects in SiC and engineering issues such as joining and general materials properties. Additionally, this paper will briefly discuss the technological gaps remaining for the practical application of this material system in fusion power devices such as DEMO and beyond.

  19. Nuclear analysis of a tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed nuclear analysis of a reference conceptual design for a tokamak experimental power reactor (EPR) is presented. The reference EPR has a 6.25-m major radius and a 2.1-m minor radius circular plasma with a nominal neutron wall loading of 0.5 MW/m2. A 0.28-m-thick blanket of stainless steel surrounds a stainless-steel vacuum vessel. The inner shield consists of stainless steel and B4C and is 0.58 m thick. The 0.97-m-thick outer shield employs lead mortar, stainless steel, and graphite. The neutronics results in the first wall and blanket vary significantly in the poloidal direction due to an outward shift in the deuterium-tritium neutron source distribution and the toroidal curvature. The infinite cylinder approximation overestimates response rates in the first wall compared with toroidal geometry calculations. Neutral beam lines, vacuum ducts, and other penetrations of the blanket and bulk shield represent large (approximately 0.6- to 1.0-m2 cross section) streaming paths for neutrons and require special shielding. A special 0.75-m-thick annular shield surrounds the neutral beam duct after it exists from the bulk shield and extends beyond the toroidal field coil and out to the beam injectors. A pneumatically operated movable shield plug, opening during the pumpdown phase and closing during the plasma burn, is selected as the principal design option for shielding the evacuation ducts

  20. Reduced enrichment neutronic study on high power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FG2DB two dimensional two group diffusion/burnup code and the CELL few group cell parameter code with 69 groups neutron cross section database have been used for reduced enrichment neutronic study on high power research reactor with LEU fuel elements of uranium density 3.6-7.2 g/cm3 and cladding thickness 0.38-0.56 mm. Results show the equivalence of fuel meat uranium density on the thickness changing. Control rod worth and other operation safety parameters of core are acceptable. Parts of the results have been fitted to linear or quadratic expression for easy application. The minimum critical value, excess reactivity, cycle length, fast and thermal fluxes and integrated fluxes, etc. are given. Analysis of these parameters shows that with the U-235 content increased by 20% or more, the LEU core main physical characteristics are similar to those of the HEU core; reduced enrichment almost has no influence on the fast neutron flux; the decreasing rate of the thermal neutron fluxes proportional approximately to the increasing rate of the U-235 content in fuel element; because of the cycle length prolonging, common radioisotope production and fuel element irradiation testing are apparently not influenced. (author)

  1. Fusion reactor development using high power particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper outlines major applications of the ion source/accelerator to fusion research and also addresses the present status and future plans for accelerator development. Applications of ion sources/accelerators for fusion research are discussed first, focusing on plasma heating, plasma current drive, plasma current profile control, and plasma diagnostics. The present status and future plan of ion sources/accelerators development are then described focusing on the features of existing and future tokamak equipment. Positive-ion-based NBI systems of 100 keV class have contributed to obtaining high temperature plasmas whose parameters are close to the fusion break-even condition. For the next tokamak fusion devices, a MeV class high power neutral beam injector, which will be used to obtain a steady state burning plasma, is considered to become the primary heating and current drive system. Development of such a system is a key to realize nuclear fusion reactor. It will be entirely indebted to the development of a MeV class high current negative deuterium ion source/accelerator. (N.K.)

  2. Desalination of seawater with nuclear power reactors in cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing demand for energy and hydraulic resources for satisfy the domestic, industrial, agricultural activities, etc. has wakened up the interest to carry out concerning investigations to study the diverse technologies guided to increase the available hydraulic resources, as well as to the search of alternatives of electric power generation, economic and socially profitable. In this sense the possible use of the nuclear energy is examined in cogeneration to obtain electricity and drinkable water for desalination of seawater. The technologies are analysed involved in the nuclear cogeneration (desalination technology, nuclear and desalination-nuclear joining) available in the world. At the same time it is exemplified the coupling of a nuclear reactor and a process of hybrid desalination that today in day the adult offers and economic advantages. Finally, the nuclear desalination is presented as a technical and economically viable solution in regions where necessities of drinkable water are had for the urban, agricultural consumption and industrial in great scale and that for local situations it is possible to satisfy it desalinating seawater. (Author)

  3. Reactor building design of nuclear power plant ATUCHA II, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is presented the civil engineering project carried out by the joint venture Hochtief - Techint-Bignoli (HTB) for the reactor building at the Atucha II power plant (PHWR of 745 MWe) in Buenos Aires. All the other civil projects at Atucha II are also being carried out by HTB. This building has the same general characteristics of the PWR plants developed by KWU in Germany, known for the spherical steel containment 56m in diameter. Nevertheless, it differs from those principally in the equipment lay-out and the remarkable foundation depth. From the basic engineering provided by ENACE, the joint venture has had to face the challenge of designing a tridimensional structure of large size. This has necessitated using simplified models which had to be superimposed, since the use of only one spatial mode would be highly inadequate, lacking the flexibility necessary to absorb the numerous modifications that this type of project undergoes during construction. In addition, this procedure has eliminated resorting to numerous and costly computer processings. (Author)

  4. Small and medium power reactors: project initiation study, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conformity with the Agency's promotional role in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, IAEA has provided, over the past 20 years, assistance to Member States, particularly developing countries, in planning for the introduction of nuclear power plants in the Small and Medium range (SMPR). However these efforts did not produce any significant results in the market introduction of these reactors, due to various factors. In 1983 the Agency launched a new SMPR Project Initiation Study with the objective of surveying the available designs, examining the major factors influencing the decision-making processes in Developing Countries and thereby arriving at an estimate of the potential market. Two questionnaires were used to obtain information from possible suppliers and prospective buyers. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD assisted in making a study of the potential market in industrialized countries. The information gained during the study and discussed during a Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, along with the contribution by OECD-NEA is embodied in the present report

  5. Development Project of Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor (SCPR) development project (Feb. 2001- Mar. 2005) is being performed by a joint team consisting of Japanese universities and nuclear venders with a national fund. The main objective of this project is to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through concentrating three sub-themes: 'plant conceptual design', 'thermohydraulics', and 'material and water chemistry'. The target of the 'plant conceptual design sub-theme' is simplify the whole plant systems compared with the conventional LWRs while achieving high thermal efficiency of more than 40 % without sacrificing the level of safety. Under the 'thermohydraulics sub-theme', heat transfer characteristics of supercritical-water as a coolant of the SCPR are examined experimentally and analytically focusing on 'heat transfer deterioration'. The experiments are being performed using fron-22 for water at a fossil boiler test facility. The experimental results are being incorporated in LWR analytical tools together with an extended steam/R22 table. Under the 'material and water chemistry sub-theme', material candidates for fuel claddings and internals of the SCPR are being screened mainly through mechanical tests, corrosion tests, and simulated irradiation tests under the SCPR condition considering water chemistry. In particular, stress corrosion cracking sensitivity is being investigated as well as uniform corrosion and swelling characteristics. Influences of water chemistry on the corrosion product characteristics are also being examined to find preferable water condition as well as to develop rational water chemistry controlling methods. (authors)

  6. Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Commission of the European Community (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided in 1989 to update the state of the art concerning hydrogen in water cooled nuclear power reactors by commissioning a report which would review, all the available information to-date and make recommendations for the future. This joint report was prepared by committees formed by the IAEA and by the CEC. The aim of this report is to review the current understanding on the areas in which the research on hydrogen in LWR is conventionally presented, taking into account the results of the latest reported research developments. The main reactions through which hydrogen is produced are assessed together with their timings. An estimation of the amount of hydrogen produced by each reaction is given, in order to reckon their relative contribution to the hazard. An overview is then given of the state of knowledge of the most important phenomena taking place during its transport from the place of production and the phenomena which control the hydrogen combustion and the consequences of combustion under various conditions. Specific research work is recommended in each sector of the presented phenomena. The last topics reviewed in this report are the hydrogen detection and the prevent/mitigation of pressure and temperature loads on containment structures and structures and safety related equipment caused by hydrogen combustion

  7. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  8. Quantitative analysis of economy and environmental compatibility of tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current worth of the economy, energy gain, carbon dioxide (CO2) emission, and waste disposal of tokamak fusion power reactors are quantitatively evaluated compared with other current Japanese energy sources. The following results were obtained : (1) CO2 emission intensity (i.e., CO2 emission per unit kWh) from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Engineering Design Activity (ITER-EDA) scale power reactor (referred to here as the ITER-like reactor), whose physics performance is conventional, can be 25% lower than that of a common household photovoltaic. The energy gain of the ITER-like reactor is comparable to that of a coalfired power plant. The cost is four times higher than that of a fission reactor; however, note that this cost evaluation is based upon FOAK (first-of-a-kind) cost evaluation. (2) The CO2 emission intensities and energy gains of RS and ST reactors are comparable to those of fission reactors. (3) Radioactive waste disposal volume for the ITER-like reactor is similar to that for a fission reactor. We believe that continuing tokamak fusion research and development is worthy, since tokamak fusion is an environmentally compatible future technology. (author)

  9. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  10. Nuclear Power Station Kalkar, 300 MWe Nuclear Prototype Power Station with Fast Sodium Cooled Reactor (SNR-300), Short Description of the Reactor Core Mark-Ia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power station Kalkar is a prototype with a sodium cooled fast reactor (SNR-300) and a thermal power of 762 MW. The initial licensing procedure in 1972 was based on the so-called Mark-I core. During the following years, this core underwent some changes, for instance the thickness of the radial blanket was reduced to lower the electricity generation costs, the design of the absorber systems had been further optimized, and it became clear, that a full core with plutonium from MAGNOX-reactors could not be realized and that fuel from light-water reactors had also to be used. In this licensing document the modified reactor core Mark-Ia is described, and the radiological consequences of the core modification are quantified to be tolerable

  11. Reactor power setback: A procedure to reduce thermal shock on FBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Automatic procedure for implementation of reactor power setback in a fast reactor. ► Plant dynamic modeling of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. ► Selection of optimum value for the reduced power level and set of plant parameters for triggering power setback. - Abstract: Reactor power setback is a procedure to avoid reactor SCRAM for events originating from balance of plant, which do not affect the operation of boiler feed pumps that supply coolant to steam generators. This procedure is envisaged to avoid reactor components from being subjected to thermal shock due to SCRAM for some of the events which do not affect nuclear safety. In this procedure, all control rods of the reactor are driven down simultaneously to achieve a pre-determined lower power level. Appropriate plant parameters have been identified for the automatic triggering of power setback procedure on the occurrence of those events which are envisaged to be managed through this procedure. Knowledge of the transient thermal hydraulic behavior of the whole plant during various events is essential to formulate the operating procedure. Plant dynamics code DYANA-P developed for PFBR has been utilized for this purpose. This paper discusses (i) events for which this procedure can be adopted, (ii) detailed implantation scheme of power setback, (iii) transient thermal hydraulic behavior of the whole plant during this procedure and (iv) benefits of this procedure

  12. 10 CFR 73.55 - Requirements for physical protection of licensed activities in nuclear power reactors against...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... nuclear power reactors licensed under 10 CFR parts 50 or 52 and authorized to use special nuclear material... activities in nuclear power reactors against radiological sabotage. 73.55 Section 73.55 Energy NUCLEAR... power reactors against radiological sabotage. (a) Introduction. (1) By March 31, 2010, each...

  13. Physical and power start-up of the modernized IBR-2M research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IBR-2M pulsed research reactor of periodic operation at a power of 2 MW is intended for use as a neutron source for investigations in the field of condensed matter physics, biology, chemistry, materials science. The reactor generates a power pulse of ∼1830 MW of 200 μs duration with a frequency of 5 Hz. The IBR-2M is a modernized version of the IBR-2 reactor, which was shut down in 2006 having completed its intended service life period. The physical and power start-up of the IBR-2M reactor was carried out from December 10, 2010 to October 28, 2011. The IBR-2M reactor produces one of the most intense pulse neutron flux at the moderator surface among the world's reactors (∼1016 n/cm2/s). The paper covers the main results of the investigation of the modernized IBR-2M reactor carried out within the framework of the program of the power start-up of the reactor operated at a power of up to rated 2 MW. (authors)

  14. Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, G. T.; Wong, C. P. C.; Kapich, D. D.; McDonald, C. F.; Schleicher, R. W.

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankine and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed.

  15. Russian concepts of nuclear power plants with small reactors without on-site refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an overview of activities for the development of cogeneration nuclear power plants with small sized reactors on-going in the Russian Federation. Small sized nuclear reactors and power plants on their basis represent a prospective class of power sources for the effective solution of several problems such as provision of isolated consumers in many regions of the world with the electric energy, district heating and/or process heat, potable water etc. The economic expediency and social importance of such power units for the provision of heat and power supply to various consumers in the extreme North and Far East regions of Russia, where fuel supplies are costly and unreliable, has been comprehensively justified through a series studies. The paper outlines the criteria developed for the selection of small reactor designs and concepts and provides a technical overview of 15 concepts of NPPs with small reactors currently developed in the Russian Federation. (author)

  16. Civilian Power Program. Part 1, Summary, Current status of reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Author, Not Given

    1959-09-01

    This study group covered the following: delineation of the specific objectives of the overall US AEC civilian power reactor program, technical objectives of each reactor concept, preparation of a chronological development program for each reactor concept, evaluation of the economic potential of each reactor type, a program to encourage the the development, and yardsticks for measuring the development. Results were used for policy review by AEC, program direction, authorization and appropriation requests, etc. This evaluation encompassed civilian power reactors rated at 25 MW(e) or larger and related experimental facilities and R&D. This Part I summarizes the significant results of the comprehensive effort to determine the current technical and economic status for each reactor concept; it is based on the 8 individual technical status reports (Part III).

  17. Design optimization and modification of reactor trip protection system of nuclear power unit of WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When carrying out periodic test of nuclear power unit reactor trip protection system, it is necessary to disconnect trip breakers in turn. There are big risks in such kind of periodic tests and many unplanned trip events happened because of malfunction of equipment in reactor trip protection system periodic tests of foreign and domestic nuclear power units under operation, which caused great economic loss. The paper introduces the practical results of design optimization and modification of reactor trip protection system of a nuclear power unit of WWER. (authors)

  18. Neutron noise analysis techniques in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main techniques used in neutron noise analysis of BWR and PWR nuclear reactors are reviewed. Several applications such as control of vibrations in both reactor types, determination of two phase flow parameters in BWR and stability control in BWR are discussed with some detail. The paper contains many experimental results obtained by the main author of this paper. (author)

  19. Reactor coolant and associated systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide outlines the design requirements for the reactor coolant and associated systems (RCAS) and the features required in order to achieve their safety functions. It covers design considerations for various reactor types and encompasses the safety aspects of the functions of the RCAS both during normal operation and following postulated initiating events, and to some extent also for decommissioning

  20. A review of stainless steel as mechanical material in power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear reactor system that includes pressure vessel, stands on major components, piping and cooling system of fuel cladding, it has different requirements materials for different type of reactor. In particular, material requirements power reactors include physical or mechanical conditions and requirements for nuclear material. Stainless steel is an austenitic stainless steel, metal alloys consisting of Fe and Cr and Ni which provide good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. (author)

  1. Application of bilinear control technology in nuclear reactor power adjustment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilinear control technology of modern control theory is applied to nuclear reactor engineering. One group point reactor model is used as a bilinear model of nuclear fission. This bilinear system is assured of being globe stability with Lyapunov's stability theorem. And Riccati equation is adopted to realize the optimal control of the system. The simulation results show that a better control effect can be obtained when using the bilinear control of the nuclear reactor power adjustment system

  2. NUSCALE (NuScale Power, Inc., USA) [Passive Safety Systems in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NuScale plant consists of 1 to 12 independent modules, each capable of producing a net electric power of 45 MW(e). Each module includes a Pressurized Light Water Reactor operated under natural circulation primary flow conditions. Each reactor is housed within its own high pressure containment vessel which is submerged underwater in a stainless steel lined concrete pool. The cross-sectional view of NuScale reactor building is shown

  3. Calculation of the optimum fuel distribution which maximizes the power output of a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using optimal control techniques, the optimum fuel distribution - which maximizes the power output of a thermal reactor - is obtained. The nuclear reactor is described by a diffusion theory model with four energy groups and by assuming plane geometry. Since the analytical solution is impracticable, by using a perturbation method, a FORTRAN program was written, in order to obtain the numerical solution. Numerical results, for a thermal reactor light water moderated, non reflected, are shown. The fissile fuel material considered is Uranium-235. (Author)

  4. Nuclear power station with nuclear reactor accommodated largely secure against catastrophes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the nuclear reactor is installed underground near the power station unit, then danger to the environment due to radiation contamination can be largely or nearly completely prevented by a covering of constant thickness or by a covering which can be installed by a catastrophic accident. The extinguishing of a burning reactor is also relatively simple for a reactor accommodated in a pit. The above-mentioned measures can be used individually or combined. (orig./HP)

  5. Educational laboratory based on a multifunctional analyzer of a reactor of a nuclear power plant with a water-moderated water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors presents an educational laboratory Safety and Control of a Nuclear Power Facility established by the Department of Automation for students and specialists of the nuclear power industry in the field of control, protection, and safe exploitation of reactor facilities at operating, constructing, and designing nuclear power plants with water-moderated water-cooled reactors

  6. Thermoemission reactor-converters for nuclear power units in outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a thermoemission reactor-converter, the direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy is based on the thermoelectric emission of electrons in electricity-generating channels. The paper describes the following: the electricity-generating channel, characteristics of the electricity-generating channels and the reactor-converter, a thermal neutron reactor-converter, a fast neutron reactor-converter, and estimating the mass-limit characteristics of the thermoemission units. Thermoemission nuclear power units with built-in generators in the nuclear reactor core can be regarded as a promising source of electric power for supplying the needs of space equipment for various purposes with a wide range of electric power demands over a long service life and with acceptable mass-limit characteristics

  7. Adaptation of WWR-K reactor for irradiation work at low power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to INAA in Sept 2000 there were 288 research reactors in operation in the world. 67 % of these reactors were operating in power mode below 1.1 MW. The profile of an available scientific and technological program depends to a great extent on reactor power. High-power reactors are used mainly for isotope production and material testing, specially for needs of power generation programs. Low-power reactors are used mainly for education and for irradiation for purposes of activation analysis. TRIGA, Slowpoke and the Chinese Mini Reactor are typical instruments in this class. High neutron flux can also be utilized for activation analysis. In this case, samples for irradiation should be tightly sealed in aluminium or in quartz, and organic samples can be irradiated for a relatively short time only. Another important issue is that reactor operation on a high power level is connected with higher expenses for fuel, for electric power, for coolant and for general maintenance. Many reactor centers use to charge prices like USD 200 to 400 for 1 day irradiation of a single container 10-12 cm high and 2.5 to 5 cm in diameter. For many users this price is prohibitive. In a low-power reactor all the expenses are smaller and samples of organic origin can be much larger. The WWR-K is 6 MW light water research reactor with the maximum neutron flux 1.4·1014 n·cm-2·s-1 and, correspondingly, rather high operation expenses. However, it can be operated at lower power levels, with much less electric power consumption for cooling systems. To check a possibility of use of the WWR-K as a low-power reactor, to decrease expenses for activation analysis, three experimental runs were performed on 200 k W power. Samples were irradiated in a specially built aluminium container 6 cm in diameter and 60 cm high. Inside the aluminium container there were located 6·120 ml bottles (jars). The total volume available in one irradiation was 720 ml. Analysis of economical and technological

  8. Reactor dynamics and stability analysis of a burst-mode gas core reactor, Brayton cycle space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor dynamics and system stability studies are performed on a conceptual burst-mode gaseous core reactor space nuclear power system. This concept operates on a closed Brayton cycle in the burst mode (on the order of 100-MW output for a few thousand seconds) using a disk magnetohydrodynamic generator for energy conversion. The fuel is a gaseous mixture of UF4 or UF6 and helium. Nonlinear dynamic analysis is performed using circulating-fuel, point-reactor-kinetics equations along with thermodynamic, lumped-parameter heat transfer and one-dimensional isentropic flow equations. The gaseous nature of the fuel plus the fact that the fuel is circulating lead to dynamic behavior that is quite different from that of conventional solid-core systems. For the transients examined, Doppler fuel temperature and moderator temperature feedbacks are insignificant when compared with reactivity feedback associated with fuel gas density variations. The gaseous fuel density power coefficient of reactivity is capable of rapidly stabilizing the system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed; however, because of the strength of this feedback, standard external reactivity insertions alone are inadequate to bring about significant power level changes during normal reactor operation. Additional methods of reactivity control, such as changes in the gaseous of fuel mass flow rate or core inlet pressure, are required to achieve desired power level control. Finally, linear stability analysis gives results that are qualitatively in agreement with the nonlinear analysis

  9. Nuclear power in Kazakhstan and current status of the BN-350 fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic scientific-industrial complex of the Republic of Kazakhstan consists of: Uranium mining, production and power industry which includes enterprises of uranium ores geological searching and a number of natural mines (using the mining and underground leaching techniques); two plants of U3O8 production at the towns Aktau and Stepnogorsk; metallurgical plant producing uranium fuel pellets for fuel assemblies of RBMK and WWER reactors types; energy plant at Aktau (MAEK) is used for production of heat, electricity and desalination of water and based on three energy blocks using natural gas and one nuclear unit with fast breeder reactor BN-350. The fast breeder reactor BN-350 at Aktau was commissioned in November 1972 and finally stopped in April 1999. Three different types of the research reactors on the territory of the former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site and one research reactor and sub critical assembly nearly Almaty are exploited for the investigation in field of reactors nuclear safety and other type of investigations. These are: WWR-K - light water reactor, power - 10 MW; EWG-1M thermal light water heterogeneous vessel reactor with light water moderator and coolant, beryllium reflector, maximum thermal power - 35 MW; RA - thermal neutron high temperature gas heterogeneous reactor with air coolant, zirconium hydride moderator, and beryllium reflector. A brief description of the project on BN-350 spent fuel storage is included with the calculations on safety validity during packaging and storage of the spent fuel elements

  10. Nuclear Education and Training Courses as a Commercial Product of a Low Power Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vienna University of Technology (VUT) operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II research reactor at the Atominstitut (ATI) since March 1962. This reactor is uniquely devoted to nuclear education and training with the aim to offer an instrument to perform academic research and training. During the past decade a number of requests to the Atominstitut asked for the possibility to offer this reactor for external training courses. Over the years, such courses have been developed as regular courses for students during their academic curricula at the VUT/ATI. The courses cover such subjects as “Reactor physics and kinetics”, and “Reactor instrumentation and control”, in total about 20 practical exercises. Textbooks have been developed in English language for both courses. Target groups for commercial courses are other universities without an access to research reactors (i.e., the Technical University of Bratislava, Slovak Republic, or the University of Manchester, UK), international organisations (i.e., IAEA Dept of Safeguards, training section), research centres (ie. Mol, Belgium) for retraining of their reactor staff or nuclear power plants for staff retraining. These courses have been very successful during the past five years in such a manner that the Atominstitut has now to decline new course applications as the reactor is also used for Masters thesis and PhD work which requires full power operation while courses require low power operation. The paper describes typical training programs, target groups and possible transfers of these courses to other reactors. (author)

  11. Safety system challenges in US commercial power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    United States operating experience, especially the events at Three Mile Island Unit 2 in 1979, Salem Unit 1 in 1983, and Davis-Besse in 1985, has demonstrated that human errors should be expected, that multiple failures can occur, and that the frequency of challenge to safety systems is becoming an important consideration in the probability of a serious transient. To reduce challenges to plant safety, emphasis is shifting from just the mitigation of transients to attention to plant operating systems, the operator, and the routine activities of technicians. Since that date, over 300 reactor years of experience have been accumulated. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has analysed that experience and this paper presents the safety system challenge information for that period (approximately three years). This experience and the root causes for the various challenges are discussed along with the efforts of the NRC and the US operating industry to reduce the frequency. Nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors, utilities, and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations of the US industry have formulated various programmes to reduce operational transients. Some of the highlights of these programmes are discussed. In addition to reducing the challenge frequency for the matured US plants, both the NRC and the utilities are engaged in programmes to improve substantially the learning curve in the first few years of plant operation. The NRC recently completed an evaluation of the causes for this behaviour. Selected results of this work are discussed. Invariably, these analyses of the US operating experience lead to an identification of the unreliability of some balance-of-plant systems. These balance-of-plant systems in some plants had little redundancy. NRC regulation strategy has not previously focused on this equipment since it was not directly considered to be safety related. Moreover, US plants vary in design, with little or no attention to

  12. Loviisa Power Station - final disposal of reactor waste - tracer investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer measurements by radioactive isotopes have been carried out at the Loviisa power plant site in order to assess the suitability of the bedrock for the final disposal of low- and intermediate-level reactor waste. The aim of these tracer measurements was to study the flow geometry, the flow velocity and dispersion in the selected sections between boreholes with nonsorbing tracers. The most open fractures were selected for the measurements and so the results given in this report represent the most conductive part of the bedrock, which also bears the greatest influence on the safety analysis. The groundwater flow in fractures was caused by pumping water out of one borehole. In single-well measurements, vertical flow velocities and the locations of the hydraulically well conducting fractured zones were checked in order to facilitate the planning of the subsequent multi-well measurements. The results obtained were used to determine the sections of the boreholes suitable for injecting the tracer and to position the packers so that vertical short-circuiting flows could be prevented in boreholes between the fractured zones. The multi-well measurements were started with a short half-life tracer to find out how fast tracers would go from one borehole to another. Later long half-life tracers were used to obtain the final results. The tracers were lanthanides in the DTPA complex form. The breakthrough curves were measured both from the pumped water and from samples taken from the borehole. Combined with sampling from the borehole the tracer techniques revealed that groundwater flowed in the fractured zone through different pathways and entered the pumped borehole at several distinct depths. Simple flow models were fitted to the results to form a suitable network of pathways for subsequent safety analysis

  13. Equipment and piping for nuclear power plants, test and research reactors, and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard concerns the primary and secondary circuits as well as the safety and protection equipment in nuclear power plants with PWR or LWGR type reactors. Rules for design, manufacturing, erection, operation, and maintenance of the reactors, steam generators, vessels, pumps and housings, and pressure pipes are provided

  14. Refurbishment and power upgrade of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was commissioned in 1965 at a power level of 5 MW. The reactor was originally designed for HEU fuel with 93% enrichment in the form of UAlx-Al. The reactor equipment remained unchanged for the first 20 years of its operation. However, several factors, such as obsolescence of equipment and the non-availability of spare parts, forced a refurbishment programme of the facility. For this purpose, the old thermionic tube-based instrumentation and control system was replaced with new and modern instrumentation, the reactor pool was lined with stainless steel, and the old cooling system was removed and a new enhanced cooling system was installed for a power upgrade. In order to increase reactor safety, a new emergency core cooling system was installed, the reactor building was repaired, the HVAC system was improved, and a new compressor and additional diesel generators were installed. In order to meet international requirements, the reactor core was converted from HEU to LEU fuel. Due to changing experimental needs and demand for a higher neutron flux, reactor power was increased from 5 MW to 10 MW. The refurbished and upgraded PARR-1 achieved first criticality with LEU fuel on 31 October 1991 and full power of 9 MW on 7 May 1992. (author)

  15. Generic environmental impact statement on handling and storage of spent light water power reactor fuel. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed appendices are included with the following titles: light water reactor fuel cycle, present practice, model 1000MW(e) coal-fired power plant, increasing fuel storage capacity, spent fuel transshipment, spent fuel generation and storage data (1976-2000), characteristics of nuclear fuel, and ''away-from-reactor'' storage concept

  16. Modular reactor strategy as new-generation nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear industries of the U.S. have been plaqued by serious loss of new orders due to the disturbed construction schedule, the uncertainty of public requirement, etc. It is in the midst of this gloomy environment that the modular reactor strategy emerged out in the U.S. as a new step toward recovering self-supporting nuclear industries. Given the clear incentive to revitalize the sluggish nuclear industries, their modular reactor approach is intended to create trouble-less, low management-risk reactors. Their major goals seem to be a low management risk, suitability for export, and shortened construction schedule. Modular reactors appear to have many advantages over large reactors that can apply not only to the U.S. but to Japan as well, serving for improvement of manufactures' productivity, significant saving of engineering costs, design simplification, reduction of licensing procedures and plant site work, improvement of plant availability, high export potential, significant reduction of total learning costs, expanded selection of plant sites, market-proximate and dispersed siting, reasonable reduction of required isolation distance, and creation of competitive environs. In Japan, most of the R and D items scheduled for the next decade are geared towards large reactors. The advantages of modular reactors, however, would be far-reaching even in Japan, and it would be desirable that their design details and characteristics be evaluated immediately, based on which appropriate follow-on activities should be initiated. (Nogami, K.)

  17. Steam water cycle chemistry of liquid metal cooled innovative nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Federal Target Program (FTP) of Russian Federation 'Nuclear Energy Technologies of the New Generation for 2010-2015 and for Perspective up to 2020' is aimed at development of advanced nuclear energy technologies on the basis of closed fuel cycle with fast reactors. There are advanced fast reactor technologies of the 4. generation with liquid metal cooled reactors. Development stages of maturity of fast sodium cooled reactor technology in Russia includes experimental reactors BR-5/10 (1958-2002) and BOR-60 (since 1969), nuclear power plants (NPPs) with BN-350 (1972-1999), BN-600 (since 1980), BN-800 (under construction), BN-1200 (under development). Further stage of development of fast sodium cooled reactor technology in Russia is commercialization. Lead-bismuth eutectic fast reactor technology has been proven at industrial scale for nuclear submarines in former Soviet Union. Lead based technology is currently under development and need for experimental justification. Current status and prospects of State Corporation 'Rosatom' participation in GIF activities was clarified at the 31. Meeting of Policy Group of the International Forum 'Generation-IV', Moscow, May 12-13, 2011. In June, 2010, 'Rosatom' joined the Sodium Fast Reactor Arrangement as an authorized representative of the Russian Government. It was also announced the intention of 'Rosatom' to sign the Memorandum on Lead Fast Reactor based on Russia's experience with lead-bismuth and lead cooled fast reactors. In accordance with the above FTP some innovative liquid metal cooled reactors of different design are under development in Russia. Gidropress, well known as WER designer, develops innovative lead-bismuth eutectic cooled reactor SVBR-100. NIKIET develops innovative lead cooled reactor BRESTOD-300. Some other nuclear scientific centres are also involved in this activity, e.g. Research and Development Institute for Power Engineering (RDIPE). Optimum

  18. About the operation efficiency increase of high-power shunt reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Жорняк, Людмила Борисовна; Осинская, Валентина Ивановна; Пальцун, Андрей Сергеевич

    2014-01-01

    Ways to increase the voltage quality in energy-intensive customers’ networks are investigated. Presence of the reactive power in transmission networks decreases essentially quality of electric energy input that results in power losses, voltage subsidences and drops in power transmission lines, enforced increase of power transformers’ power and cable sections in such networks. An engineering solution to decrease additional losses of a shunt reactor is proposed, analysis of different types of w...

  19. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description

  20. Searching for full power control rod patterns in a boiling water reactor using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Jose Luis [Departamento Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx; Ortiz, Juan Jose [Departamento Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: jjortiz@nuclear.inin.mx; Requena, Ignacio [Departamento Ciencias Computacion e I.A. ETSII, Informatica, Universidad de Granada, C. Daniel Saucedo Aranda s/n. 18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.es; Perusquia, Raul [Departamento Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: rpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-11-01

    One of the most important questions related to both safety and economic aspects in a nuclear power reactor operation, is without any doubt its reactivity control. During normal operation of a boiling water reactor, the reactivity control of its core is strongly determined by control rods patterns efficiency. In this paper, GACRP system is proposed based on the concepts of genetic algorithms for full power control rod patterns search. This system was carried out using LVNPP transition cycle characteristics, being applied too to an equilibrium cycle. Several operation scenarios, including core water flow variation throughout the cycle and different target axial power distributions, are considered. Genetic algorithm fitness function includes reactor security parameters, such as MLHGR, MCPR, reactor k{sub eff} and axial power density.

  1. Thermohydraulic assessment of the RP-10 reactor core to determine the maximum power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermohydraulic parameters assessment of the RP-10 reactor core from the most thermally demanded (hot channel). Determination of the operation thermal maximum power considering security margins and statistical treatment of uncertainty factors

  2. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of nuclear power reactor security plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It contains specific criteria for use in evaluating the acceptability of nuclear power reactor security programs as detailed in security plans

  3. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development. The SP-100 program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future. 5 references

  4. The handling system for monocrystalline silicon neutron doping in the low-power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology and transport for monocrystalline silicon neutron doping in the low-power reactor and the new method for automatic griping and self centring to monocrystalline silicon irradiating facility are introduced

  5. Welding of stainless steel pool of pressurized water reactor nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of stainless steel lining of million kilowatt grade pressurized water reactor nuclear power station is a new technology. The author introduces its welding method, parameter verification measure and key factors of construction quality control and so on

  6. On the domestically-made heavy forging for reactor pressure vessels of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present situation of the foreign heavy forgings for nuclear reactor pressure vessels and the heavy forgings condition which is used for the Qinshan 300MWe nuclear power plant are described. Some opinions of domestic products is proposed

  7. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  8. Experience of the standardization of the vibratory condition pipe line when working the reactor on powers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the experience of the standardization of the vibratory condition pipe line and considered approaches of the motivation of the normative requirements is organized in article to vibratory load on pipe lines when working the reactor on powers

  9. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commerical electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate

  10. CLASSIFICATION OF SYSTEMS FOR PASSIVE AFTERHEAT REMOVAL FROM REACTOR CONTAINMENT OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WITH WATER-COOLED POWER REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khaled

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A classification on systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment has been developed in the paper.  The classification permits to make a detailed analysis of various concepts pertaining to systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment of new generation. The paper considers main classification features of the given systems.

  11. Classification of systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment of nuclear power plant with water-cooled power reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled, N.; D. V. Shevelev; A. S. Balashevsky

    2014-01-01

    A classification on systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment has been developed in the paper.  The classification permits to make a detailed analysis of various concepts pertaining to systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment of new generation. The paper considers main classification features of the given systems.

  12. The behavior of reactor power and flux resulting from changes in core-coolant temperature for a miniature neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, measurements were performed to verify the theoretical predictions of reactor power and flux parameters that result from changes in core inlet temperature (Tin) and the temperature difference between the coolant inlet and outlet (ΔT) in the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1), which is a Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). The measured data shows that there is a strong dependence of the reactor power on coolant temperature in agreement with the design of MNSR. The experimental parameters were found to be in good agreement with data obtained using a semi-empirical relationship between the reactor power, flux parameters, core inlet temperature, and the coolant temperature rise. The relationship was therefore used to predict the power level of NIRR-1 from its neutron flux parameters to which it has been found to be proportional. The variation of Tin and ΔT with the reactor power and flux was also investigated and the results obtained are hereby discussed

  13. Serious accidents of PWR type reactors for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the great lines of current knowledge on serious accidents relative to PWR type reactors. First, is exposed the physics of PWR type reactor core meltdown and the possible failure modes of the containment building in such a case. Then, are presented the dispositions implemented with regards to such accidents in France, particularly the pragmatic approach that prevails for the already built reactors. Then, the document tackles the case of the European pressurized reactor (E.P.R.), for which the dimensioning takes into account explicitly serious accidents: it is a question of objectives conception and their respect must be the object of a strict demonstration, by taking into account uncertainties. (N.C.)

  14. Experimental results from the BNL zero power reactor HITREX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitching, S.J.; Lewis, T.A.; Playle, T.S.

    1973-10-15

    This report presents experimental results obtained with the BNL reactor Hitrex. Measurements of reactivity, and of thermal and fast neutron reaction rate distributions have been made with various experimental control rod configurations.

  15. Neutron beam applications using low power research reactor Malaysia perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA MARK II Research reactor at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Research (MINT) was commissioned in July 1982. Since then various works have been performed to utilise the neutrons produced from this steady state reactor. One area currently focussed on is the utilisation of neutron beam ports available at this 1MW reactor. Projects undertaken are the development and utilisation of the Neutron Radiography (myNR), Small Angle Neutron Scattering (mySANS) and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) - preliminary study. In order to implement active research programmes, a group comprised of researcher from research institutes and academic institutions, has formed: known as Malaysian Reactor Interest Group (MRIG). This paper describes the recent status the above neutron beam facilities and their application in industrial, health and material technology research and education. The related activities of MRIG are also highlighted. (author)

  16. Perfection of power release in WWER reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial processes (AP) during reactor transition regime were studied. An algorithm for supporting a stationary AP value was developed. It was realised at Khmelnitsky NPP, is connected with boron regulation and satisfies all regulatory requirements

  17. Study of the Utilization BWR Type Nuclear Power Reactor for Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The needs of fresh water increased by rapid population growth and industrials expansion, but these demands can not be prepared naturally. Following this case, seawater desalination becomes the primer option which can fulfill the need through the nuclear desalination technology. The coupled nuclear power reactor enables to supply thermal energy for auxiliary equipment and pumps operation. The utilization study of power reactor type BWR coupled with desalination process has been performed. The goal of study is to obtain characteristic data of desalted water specification which desalination system coupling with nuclear power plant produced energy for desalination process. The study is carried out by browsing data and information, and comprehensive review of thermal energy correlation between NPP with desalination process installation. According to reviewing are found that the thermal energy and electric power utilization from the nuclear power reactor are enable to remove the seawater to produce desalted water and also to operate auxiliary equipments. The assessment results is VK-300 reactor prototype, BWR type 250 MW(e) power are cogeneration unit can supplied hot steam temperature 285 °C to the extraction turbine to empower 150 MW electric power, and a part of hot steam 130 °C is use to operate desalination process and remind heat is distribute to the municipal and offices at that region. The coupled of VK-300 reactor power type BWR with desalination installation of MED type enable to produce desalted water with high quality distillate. Based on the economic calculation that the VK-300 reactor power of BWR type produced water distillate capacity is 300.000 m3/hour with cost US$ 0.58/m3. The coupling VK-300 reactor power type BWR with MED desalination plant is competitive economically. (author)

  18. Nuclear power engineering development on the basis of new conceptions of nuclear reactor and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One analyzes the status of nuclear power industry (NPI) and lists the excuses explaining the modest progress of NPI in contrast to the predicted one. It is shown that progress of NPI equivalent to the expansion of power consumers may be ensured by construction of large breeder NPPs. One lists the requirements for reactor and for fuel cycle technologies. The design of the BREST fast UN-PuN fuel and lead-cooling reactor enables to meet the listed requirements

  19. Characterization of the TRIGA Mark II reactor full-power steady state

    OpenAIRE

    Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Magrotti, Giovanni; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the characterization of the full-power steady state of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor of the University of Pavia is performed by coupling Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for neutronics with "Multiphysics" model for thermal-hydraulics. Neutronic analyses have been performed starting from a MC model of the entire reactor system, based on the MCNP5 code, that was already validated in fresh fuel and zero-power configuration (in which thermal effects are negligible) using the availabl...

  20. Determination of the theoretical and experimental zero-power frequency response of Ghana Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency response measurements of a reactor at low power help in determining the kinetic parameters of a reactor and ultimately in investigating its stability with respect to small perturbations in reactivity. In this report, we present the results of the zero-power frequency response measurements of GHARR-1 by rod method and its analytical analogue. The comparison in calculated and measured values is reasonably good in the frequency range used (author)

  1. Hot zero power reactor calculations using the Insilico code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Steven P.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Johnson, Seth R.; Pandya, Tara M.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe the reactor physics simulation capabilities of the Insilico code. A description of the various capabilities of the code is provided, including detailed discussion of the geometry, meshing, cross section processing, and neutron transport options. Numerical results demonstrate that Insilico using an SPN solver with pin-homogenized cross section generation is capable of delivering highly accurate full-core simulation of various pressurized water reactor problems. Comparison to both Monte Carlo calculations and measured plant data is provided.

  2. Advanced-power-reactor design concepts and performance characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, H. W.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Springborn, R. H.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    Five reactor cooling concepts which allow continued reactor operation following a single rupture of the coolant system are presented for application with the APR. These concepts incorporate convective cooling, double containment, or heat pipes to ensure operation after a coolant line rupture. Based on an evaluation of several control system concepts, a molybdenum clad, beryllium oxide sliding reflector located outside the pressure vessel is recommended.

  3. Analysis and application of countermeasures for reactor protection system failures in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor protection system of nuclear power plant should be designed can ensure safety as any part of the system is failure. According to the requirements of reactor trip system and engineering safety features actuation system for fail-safe design, The countermeasure against single-failure and common cause failure is researched, and according to characteristics of second-generation reactor types, designed the protection system basic architecture. The reactor trip system used the 2oo4 voting logic and the engineered safety features actuation system used the 2oo3 voting logic in this architecture, and degradation rule of voting logic as input signal failure are proposed. (author)

  4. Zirconium-hydride solid zero power reactor and its application research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zirconium Hydride Solid Zero Power Reactor built at China Institute of Atomic Energy is introduced. In the reactor Zirconium-hydride is used as moderator, plexiglass as reflector and U3O8 with enrichment of 20% as the fuel, Since its initial criticality, the physical characteristics and safety features have been measured with the result showing that the reactor has sound stability and high sensitivity, etc. It has been successfully used for the personnel training and for the testing of reactor control instruments and experiment devices. It also presents the special advantage for the pre-research of some applications

  5. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Masa-aki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kimio; Yao, Toshiaki; Kamai, Satoshi; Kitamura, Toshikatsu

    1992-08-01

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item`s test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship`s demand. (author).

  6. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Masa-aki (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment); Tanaka, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kimio; Yao, Toshiaki; Kamai, Satoshi; Kitamura, Toshikatsu.

    1992-08-01

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item's test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship's demand. (author).

  7. IBR-2 reactor power start-up and first physical experiments on its beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design is described of the IBR-2 pulse fast reactor designated for investigations into nuclear physics, condensed medium physics, molecular biology, elementary particle physics (fundamental properties of the neutron) as well as for solving various applied problems. The IBR-2 core is loaded with plutonium dioxide fuel of about 90 kg total mass. The fuel elements are sodium, cooled with a 300 deg C inlet temperature. The cooling system is two-circuit, two-loop with the 100 m3/h sodium flow rate. The reactor is surrounded by water neutron moderators which are ''scanned'' by 14 horizontal channels. The power pulse is formed by the reactivity modulator in the form of two coaxially positioned mobile neutron reflectors - the basic one (BR) and additional one (AR). The BR rotation frequency equals 1500 min-1. The pulse frequency is varied discretely by the AR, being at rest or rotating at a lower rate. In 1982 the IBR-2 attained the average power 2 MW at a BR rotation frequency equal to 1500 mm-1 and a pulse frequency equal to 25 Hz, which corresponds to pulse reactor power of 270 MW. The reactor main frequency mode 5 Hz at 2 MW power was realized in 1984, the reactor peak power achieved 1350 MW. Results of first physical studies conducted during the reactor power start-up are presented

  8. Thermal power evaluation of the TRIGA nuclear reactor at CDTN in operations of long duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard operations of nuclear research reactor IPR-R1 TRIGA located at CDTN (Belo Horizonte) usually have duration of not more than 8h. However in 2009 two operations for samples irradiations lasted about 12 hours each at a power of 100 kW. These long lasting operations started in the evening and most of them were carried out at night, when there are only small fluctuations in atmosphere temperature. Therefore the conditions were ideal for evaluating the thermal balance of the power dissipated by the reactor core through the forced cooling system. Heat balance is the standard methodology for power calibration of the IPR-R1 reactor. As in any reactor operation, the main operating parameters were monitored and stored by the Data Acquisition System developed for the reactor. These data have been used for the analysis and calculation of the evolution of several neutronic and thermalhydraulic parameters involved in the reactor operation. This paper analyzes the two long lasting operations of the IPR-R1 TRIGA and compares the recorded results for the power dissipated through the primary cooling loop with the results of the power calibration conducted in March 2009. The results corresponded to those of the thermal power calibration within the uncertainty of this methodology, indicating system stability over a period of six months. (author)

  9. Contribution of the TRIGA - INR Pitesti reactor to implementation of National Program for Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti, designed for nuclear fuel and structural materials testing, was commissioned in 1979. It has two reactor cores completely independent that share the same pool, which are practically two distinct nuclear reactors, a 14 MW steady-state unit and a second pulse reactor, working at 20,000 MW/pulse. The last unit may also be operated in a steady state regime of 500 KW power. Being of pool type it allows easy handling of the irradiation devices. The two TRIGA reactors are described. These reactors are used mainly for irradiation testing, particularly, for Cernavoda NPP fuel elements and production of radioisotopes as, for instance, Ir-131, Mo-99 for non-destructive industrial analyses and Co-60 for cobalt therapy. Also, programs for experimental physical research were developed as for instance crystallographic studies by means of neutron diffraction, prompt gamma spectrometry for isotopic composition of Ga poison at Cernavoda NPP and neutron activation analyses. A program RERTR is now undergoing for converting the highly enriched-fuel research reactors into slightly enriched-fuel reactors. This project is developed in the frame of a cooperation with IAEA-Vienna and DOE - USA. Also a program of power cycling testing for the study of CANDU fuel power followup in collaboration with AECL - Canada is currently implemented. Several research programs were established aiming at testing slightly enriched fuel for Cernavoda NPP, testing of CANDU fuel in LOCA accident conditions, preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, etc

  10. The fission power of a conceptual fluidised bed thermal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluidised bed thermal nuclear reactor investigated in this paper is an innovative reactor design in which 1 mm diameter TRISO-coated fuel particles are fluidised by helium gas coolant in a 2,5 m diameter and 6 m high cylindrical bed. The coolant flow rate provides part of the reactivity control mechanism. The TRISO-coated particles have an enriched uranium oxide kernel surrounded by layers of porous carbon, pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. This paper presents detailed transient modelling results of this conceptual fluidised bed thermal nuclear reactor obtained using the FETCH nuclear criticality model. Previous work has provided evidence to suggest that such a reactor can be dynamically stable for low power outputs of ∝20 MWt. This work focuses on a reactor with a much higher thermal output of 100 MWt. To simulate the fluidised bed reactor the FETCH model has been used to solve the neutron transport equation in full-phase space, coupled to multi-phase gas-particle fluid dynamics. The main difficulty in modelling such a reactor is that its reactivity is a sensitive function of the fuel particle distribution inside the inner fluidised bed reactor cavity. This fuel particle distribution varies chaotically with time which is the root cause of the reactor's power variability. (orig.)

  11. Synthesis of Model Based Robust Stabilizing Reactor Power Controller for Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Habib Malik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nominal SISO (Single Input Single Output model of PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor type nuclear power plant is developed based on normal moderator pump-up rate capturing the moderator level dynamics using system identification technique. As the plant model is not exact, therefore additive and multiplicative uncertainty modeling is required. A robust perturbed plant model is derived based on worst case model capturing slowest moderator pump-up rate dynamics and moderator control valve opening delay. Both nominal and worst case models of PHWR-type nuclear power plant have ARX (An Autoregressive Exogenous structures and the parameters of both models are estimated using recursive LMS (Least Mean Square optimization algorithm. Nominal and worst case discrete plant models are transformed into frequency domain for robust controller design purpose. The closed loop system is configured into two port model form and H? robust controller is synthesized. The H?controller is designed based on singular value loop shaping and desired magnitude of control input. The selection of desired disturbance attenuation factor and size of the largest anticipated multiplicative plant perturbation for loop shaping of H? robust controller form a constrained multi-objective optimization problem. The performance and robustness of the proposed controller is tested under transient condition of a nuclear power plant in Pakistan and found satisfactory.

  12. PRIS-STATISTICS: Power Reactor Information System Statistical Reports. User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA developed the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)-Statistics application to assist PRIS end users with generating statistical reports from PRIS data. Statistical reports provide an overview of the status, specification and performance results of every nuclear power reactor in the world. This user's manual was prepared to facilitate the use of the PRIS-Statistics application and to provide guidelines and detailed information for each report in the application. Statistical reports support analyses of nuclear power development and strategies, and the evaluation of nuclear power plant performance. The PRIS database can be used for comprehensive trend analyses and benchmarking against best performers and industrial standards.

  13. Continuous thermal balance monitoring for IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor power determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research deals with thermal balance calculation for real time power level determination of IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. It is also shown the development of a supervision software (Visual Basic) of operation parameters. The assembled data acquisition system allows data analysis during reactor operation, giving a reliable measurement of reactor power, and the organization of a data base allows a back-up surveillance of reactor operation whenever necessary. Results obtained from temperature and primary flow are shown in a continuous form and also the Data Base implementation for further studies and analysis of energy balance behavior of the many reactor components. Besides it is planned to manage N-16 activity measurement channel (monitoring) for comparison of acquired data results for thermal calculations. The results of this acquisition and related thermal balance calculations are shown in a continuous shape (On-Line) by means of windows operational system using Visual Basic VB6 software for development. (author)

  14. The present status of nuclear power and prospects for fast reactors - the IAEA outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power continues to provide a significant amount of the world's electricity supply. Based on the experience gained from about 6000 reactor years of operation, improvements are continuing to be made in the design of nuclear power plants of all types including liquid metal cooled fast reactors. Five demonstration, prototypical or semi-commercial nuclear plants with liquid metal-cooled reactors (LMR) are in operation in the world. Although the commercial deployment of fast reactors has not been seen as urgent due to the availability of adequate low-cost uranium resources there is an awareness in many countries that breeder reactors will be needed in the early decades of the next century. Adequate energy supply for all countries of the world is vital. The exploitation of all non-polluting forms of energy, of which nuclear energy is the most abundant, must be planned now to meet the growing worldwide energy demand. (author)

  15. Erection of reactor vessel support of Angra-2 nuclear power plant reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The erection of Reactor Pressure Vessel Support (RPV) on site can be divided in 3 different phases, according to the course of construction activities of the plant itself. They are, as follow: 1. Erection of the Embedded Parts in concrete. 2. Erection of Support before installation of RPV. 3. Erection of Support after installation of Reactor Pressure Vessel. The work will be restricted to part of item 2 of above mentioned phases, comprising since the lifting of the component inside of Reactor Building, until the dimensional records, after welding works of segments in their final localization, which steps can be considered as critical in the erection sequence. (author)

  16. Performance evaluation on reactor power control by H{sup {infinity}} controller with gain scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    A `gain scaling method` is proposed to improve the performance of reactor power control by the controller based on linear control theory. The method is derived from the simple nonlinearity of the neutron kinetics of reactor that is caused by the cross term of input reactivity and neutronic output. It is the main idea to scale down the control input generated by the linear controller with respect to the reactor power level. The evaluation of the performance of H{sup {infinity}} control system with the gain scaling in time and frequency domains indicates the effectiveness of the proposed method. (author)

  17. Simulation and primary circuit control of the SP-100 space nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space nuclear power reactors with thermoelectric conversion are one of the main sources for space application that can provide enough electric power. In this paper we discuss the working conditions, basic structure and operational characteristics of an EMTE pump needed to flow control of a metal liquid nuclear space reactor primary circuit. The BEMTE-1 program is used to study this system during normal operation to simulate the SP-100 american reactor primary cooling circuit and to obtain the actuation point of the system. (author)

  18. Neutronics and activation analysis of a SS316 based experimental D-T fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronics and activation analysis for a SS316 based experimental tokamak fusion power reactor was completed using a two-dimensional neutronics model because of its practical features. Operating and decay power densities in all reactor components were obtained. The significant increase of neutron fluxes in the vacuum duct region was revealed. Maintenance and waste management aspects of the reactor components were investigated. Impacts on these aspects due to important minor alloying elements and impurities such as Mn, Co, Mo, and Nb were addressed

  19. Power distribution control in BN-600 reactor by method of gamma-scanning of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptability, convenience and reliability of γ-scanning of fuels assembles at fast reactor NPP have been analyzed and demonstrated. Error of the procedure is amount 3-6% for different fuel assemblies. The procedure is recommended as optimum one for the constructed BN-800 and perspective fast reactors. Findings allow conclusion on the accordance of BN-600 fuel assemblies powers with design parameters and insignificant (in the limits of observation accuracy) changing power distribution in new BN-600 01M2 reactor core. Experimental procedure is modernized and optimized, three cycles of measurement are realized, new experimental data on the character of radial and axial distributions of neutron field are received

  20. IPR-R1 reactor power control by the gamma radiation of N16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IPR-R1 reactor power control is realized by the ion chambers use. The information that the chambers send to the control console are deformed due the control rods movements during the operation. With the purpose to eliminate these interferences, was installed close the reactor water cooling circuit, one power control auxiliary system using the detection of the N 16 formed in the water. this paper presents an analysis of the results and propose one complete project that permits the control of the radioactives nuclides localized in the reactor cooling water. (Author)