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Sample records for carlo transport code

  1. Parallel processing Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues related to distributed-memory multiprocessing as applied to Monte Carlo radiation transport are discussed. Measurements of communication overhead are presented for the radiation transport code MCNP which employs the communication software package PVM, and average efficiency curves are provided for a homogeneous virtual machine

  2. The MCNPX Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4c and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics, particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development

  3. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATERS, LAURIE S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCKINNEY, GREGG W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DURKEE, JOE W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FENSIN, MICHAEL L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JAMES, MICHAEL R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JOHNS, RUSSELL C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PELOWITZ, DENISE B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  4. Morse Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmett, M.B.

    1975-02-01

    The report contains sections containing descriptions of the MORSE and PICTURE codes, input descriptions, sample problems, deviations of the physical equations and explanations of the various error messages. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. The PICTURE code provide aid in preparing correct input data for the combinatorial geometry package CG. It provides a printed view of arbitrary two-dimensional slices through the geometry. By inspecting these pictures one may determine if the geometry specified by the input cards is indeed the desired geometry. 23 refs. (WRF)

  5. MORSE Monte Carlo radiation transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an addendum to the MORSE report, ORNL-4972, originally published in 1975. This addendum contains descriptions of several modifications to the MORSE Monte Carlo Code, replacement pages containing corrections, Part II of the report which was previously unpublished, and a new Table of Contents. The modifications include a Klein Nishina estimator for gamma rays. Use of such an estimator required changing the cross section routines to process pair production and Compton scattering cross sections directly from ENDF tapes and writing a new version of subroutine RELCOL. Another modification is the use of free form input for the SAMBO analysis data. This required changing subroutines SCORIN and adding new subroutine RFRE. References are updated, and errors in the original report have been corrected

  6. A New Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Code at UNIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo neutron transport code named MCS is under development at UNIST for the advanced reactor design and research purpose. This MC code can be used for fixed source calculation and criticality calculation. Continuous energy neutron cross section data and multi-group cross section data can be used for the MC calculation. This paper presents the overview of developed MC code and its calculation results. The real time fixed source calculation ability is also tested in this paper. The calculation results show good agreement with commercial code and experiment. A new Monte Carlo neutron transport code is being developed at UNIST. The MC codes are tested with several benchmark problems: ICSBEP, VENUS-2, and Hoogenboom-Martin benchmark. These benchmarks covers pin geometry to 3-dimensional whole core, and results shows good agreement with reference results

  7. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  8. MORSE Monte Carlo radiation transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a number of years the MORSE user community has requested additional help in setting up problems using various options. The sample problems distributed with MORSE did not fully demonstrate the capability of the code. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory the code originators had a complete set of sample problems, but funds for documenting and distributing them were never available. Recently the number of requests for listings of input data and results for running some particular option the user was trying to implement has increased to the point where it is not feasible to handle them on an individual basis. Consequently it was decided to package a set of sample problems which illustrates more adequately how to run MORSE. This write-up may be added to Part III of the MORSE report. These sample problems include a combined neutron-gamma case, a neutron only case, a gamma only case, an adjoint case, a fission case, a time-dependent fission case, the collision density case, an XCHEKR run and a PICTUR run

  9. TRIPOLI-3: a neutron/photon Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present version of TRIPOLI-3 solves the transport equation for coupled neutron and gamma ray problems in three dimensional geometries by using the Monte Carlo method. This code is devoted both to shielding and criticality problems. The most important feature for particle transport equation solving is the fine treatment of the physical phenomena and sophisticated biasing technics useful for deep penetrations. The code is used either for shielding design studies or for reference and benchmark to validate cross sections. Neutronic studies are essentially cell or small core calculations and criticality problems. TRIPOLI-3 has been used as reference method, for example, for resonance self shielding qualification. (orig.)

  10. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes by activation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increasing energies and intensities of heavy-ion accelerator facilities, the problem of an excessive activation of the accelerator components caused by beam losses becomes more and more important. Numerical experiments using Monte Carlo transport codes are performed in order to assess the levels of activation. The heavy-ion versions of the codes were released approximately a decade ago, therefore the verification is needed to be sure that they give reasonable results. Present work is focused on obtaining the experimental data on activation of the targets by heavy-ion beams. Several experiments were performed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung. The interaction of nitrogen, argon and uranium beams with aluminum targets, as well as interaction of nitrogen and argon beams with copper targets was studied. After the irradiation of the targets by different ion beams from the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI, the γ-spectroscopy analysis was done: the γ-spectra of the residual activity were measured, the radioactive nuclides were identified, their amount and depth distribution were detected. The obtained experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD. The discrepancies and agreements between experiment and simulations are pointed out. The origin of discrepancies is discussed. Obtained results allow for a better verification of the Monte Carlo transport codes, and also provide information for their further development. The necessity of the activation studies for accelerator applications is discussed. The limits of applicability of the heavy-ion beam-loss criteria were studied using the FLUKA code. FLUKA-simulations were done to determine the most preferable from the radiation protection point of view materials for use in accelerator components.

  12. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  13. KAMCCO, a reactor physics Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAMCCO is a 3-dimensional reactor Monte Carlo code for fast neutron physics problems. Two options are available for the solution of 1) the inhomogeneous time-dependent neutron transport equation (census time scheme), and 2) the homogeneous static neutron transport equation (generation cycle scheme). The user defines the desired output, e.g. estimates of reaction rates or neutron flux integrated over specified volumes in phase space and time intervals. Such primary quantities can be arbitrarily combined, also ratios of these quantities can be estimated with their errors. The Monte Carlo techniques are mostly analogue (exceptions: Importance sampling for collision processes, ELP/MELP, Russian roulette and splitting). Estimates are obtained from the collision and track length estimators. Elastic scattering takes into account first order anisotropy in the center of mass system. Inelastic scattering is processed via the evaporation model or via the excitation of discrete levels. For the calculation of cross sections, the energy is treated as a continuous variable. They are computed by a) linear interpolation, b) from optionally Doppler broadened single level Breit-Wigner resonances or c) from probability tables (in the region of statistically distributed resonances). (orig.)

  14. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes FLUKA, Mars and Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is a continuation of the project 'Verification of Monte Carlo Transport Codes' which is running at GSI as a part of activation studies of FAIR relevant materials. It includes two parts: verification of stopping modules of FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD-A (with ATIMA stopping module) and verification of their isotope production modules. The first part is based on the measurements of energy deposition function of uranium ions in copper and stainless steel. The irradiation was done at 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u, the experiment was held at GSI from September 2004 until May 2005. The second part is based on gamma-activation studies of an aluminium target irradiated with an argon beam of 500 MeV/u in August 2009. Experimental depth profiling of the residual activity of the target is compared with the simulations. (authors)

  15. Parallel implementation of the Monte Carlo transport code EGS4 on the hypercube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo transport codes are commonly used in the study of particle interactions. The CALOR89 code system is a combination of several Monte Carlo transport and analysis programs. In order to produce good results, a typical Monte Carlo run will have to produce many particle histories. On a single processor computer, the transport calculation can take a huge amount of time. However, if the transport of particles were divided among several processors in a multiprocessor machine, the time can be drastically reduced

  16. Vectorization techniques for neutron transport Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four Monte Carlo codes, KENO IV, MORSE-DD, MCNP and VIM, have been vectorized already at JAERI Computing Center aiming at an increase in clculation performance, and speed-up ratios of vectorized codes to the original ones were found to be low values between 1.3 and 1.5. In this report the vectorization processes for these four codes are reviewed comprehensively, and methods of analysis for vectorization, modification of control structures of codes and debugging techniques are discussed. The reason for low speed-up ratios is also discussed. (author)

  17. A comparison between the Monte Carlo radiation transport codes MCNP and MCBEND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Hidenori; Nishimura, Kazuya [Computer Software Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, almost of all radiation analysts are using the MCNP code and MVP code on there studies. But these codes have not had automatic variance reduction. MCBEND code made by UKAEA have automatic variance reduction. And, MCBEND code is user friendly more than other Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Codes. Our company was first introduced MCBEND code in Japan. Therefore, we compared with MCBEND code and MCNP code about functions and production capacity. (author)

  18. MCNP, a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport: a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP can be used for neutron, photon, or coupled neutron-photon transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical systems. The code treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some special fourth-degree surfaces

  19. A vectorized Monte Carlo code for modeling photon transport in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vectorized Monte Carlo computer code has been developed for modeling photon transport in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The code models photon transport in a uniform attenuating region and photon detection by a gamma camera. It is adapted from a history-based Monte Carlo code in which photon history data are stored in scalar variables and photon histories are computed sequentially. The vectorized code is written in FORTRAN77 and uses an event-based algorithm in which photon history data are stored in arrays and photon history computations are performed within DO loops. The indices of the DO loops range over the number of photon histories, and these loops may take advantage of the vector processing unit of our Stellar GS1000 computer for pipelined computations. Without the use of the vector processor the event-based code is faster than the history-based code because of numerical optimization performed during conversion to the event-based algorithm. When only the detection of unscattered photons is modeled, the event-based code executes 5.1 times faster with the use of the vector processor than without; when the detection of scattered and unscattered photons is modeled the speed increase is a factor of 2.9. Vectorization is a valuable way to increase the performance of Monte Carlo code for modeling photon transport in SPECT

  20. BALTORO a general purpose code for coupling discrete ordinates and Monte-Carlo radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general purpose code BALTORO was written for coupling the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo /MC/ with the one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates /DO/ radiation transport calculations. The quantity of a radiation-induced /neutrons or gamma-rays/ nuclear effect or the score from a radiation-yielding nuclear effect can be analysed in this way. (author)

  1. ITS - The integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TIGER series of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes is a group of multimaterial, multidimensional codes designed to provide a state-of-the-art description of the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade. The codes follow both electrons and photons from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV, and the user has the option of combining the collisional transport with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Source particles can be either electrons or photons. The most important output data are (a) charge and energy deposition profiles, (b) integral and differential escape coefficients for both electrons and photons, (c) differential electron and photon flux, and (d) pulse-height distributions for selected regions of the problem geometry. The base codes of the series differ from one another primarily in their dimensionality and geometric modeling. They include (a) a one-dimensional multilayer code, (b) a code that describes the transport in two-dimensional axisymmetric cylindrical material geometries with a fully three-dimensional description of particle trajectories, and (c) a general three-dimensional transport code which employs a combinatorial geometry scheme. These base codes were designed primarily for describing radiation transport for those situations in which the detailed atomic structure of the transport medium is not important. For some applications, it is desirable to have a more detailed model of the low energy transport. The system includes three additional codes that contain a more elaborate ionization/relaxation model than the base codes. Finally, the system includes two codes that combine the collisional transport of the multidimensional base codes with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence

  2. Parallelization of MCATNP MONTE CARLO particle transport code by using MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo code for simulating Atmospheric Transport of Neutrons and Photons (MCATNP) is used to simulate the ionization effects caused by high altitude nuclear detonation (HAND) and it was parallelized in MPI by adopting the leap random number producer and modifying the original serial code. The parallel results and serial results are identical. The speedup increases almost linearly with the number of processors used. The parallel efficiency is up to to 97% while 16 processors are used, and 94% while 32 are used. The experimental results show that parallelization can obviously reduce the calculation time of Monte Carlo simulation of HAND ionization effects. (authors)

  3. Systems guide to MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this report is the implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code - Version 3 (MCNP) on the different types of computer systems, especially the IBM MVS system. The report supplements the documentation of the RSIC computer code package CCC-200/MCNP. Details of the procedure to follow in executing MCNP on the IBM computers, either in batch mode or interactive mode, are provided

  4. Academic Training - The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Conference Room, bldg. 4 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona, A. FERRARI, CERN-AB, M. SILARI, CERN-SC Lecture 1. Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interaction models and multiple-scattering theories will be analyzed. Benchmark comparisons of simu...

  5. Applications of the COG multiparticle Monte Carlo transport code to simulated imaging of complex objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COG is a major multiparticle simulation code in the LLNL Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit. It was designed to solve deep-penetration radiation shielding problems in arbitrarily complex 3D geometries, involving coupled transport of photons, neutrons, and electrons. COG was written to provide as much accuracy as the underlying cross-sections will allow, and has a number of variance-reduction features to speed computations. Recently COG has been applied to the simulation of high- resolution radiographs of complex objects and the evaluation of contraband detection schemes. In this paper we will give a brief description of the capabilities of the COG transport code and show several examples of neutron and gamma-ray imaging simulations. Keywords: Monte Carlo, radiation transport, simulated radiography, nonintrusive inspection, neutron imaging

  6. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code)

  7. Modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for SPECT with a vectorized Monte Carlo code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M F

    1993-10-01

    A vectorized Monte Carlo code has been developed for modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT). The code is designed to compute photon detection kernels, which are used to build system matrices for simulating SPECT projection data acquisition and for use in matrix-based image reconstruction. Non-uniform attenuating and scattering regions are constructed from simple three-dimensional geometric shapes, in which the density and mass attenuation coefficients are individually specified. On a Stellar GS1000 computer, Monte Carlo simulations are performed between 1.6 and 2.0 times faster when the vector processor is utilized than when computations are performed in scalar mode. Projection data acquired with a clinical SPECT gamma camera for a line source in a non-uniform thorax phantom are well modelled by Monte Carlo simulations. The vectorized Monte Carlo code was used to stimulate a 99Tcm SPECT myocardial perfusion study, and compensations for non-uniform attenuation and the detection of scattered photons improve activity estimation. The speed increase due to vectorization makes Monte Carlo simulation more attractive as a tool for modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for SPECT. PMID:8248288

  8. Subroutines to Simulate Fission Neutrons for Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Lestone, J P

    2014-01-01

    Fortran subroutines have been written to simulate the production of fission neutrons from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and 240Pu, and from the thermal neutron induced fission of 239Pu and 235U. The names of these four subroutines are getnv252, getnv240, getnv239, and getnv235, respectively. These subroutines reproduce measured first, second, and third moments of the neutron multiplicity distributions, measured neutron-fission correlation data for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, and measured neutron-neutron correlation data for both the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the thermal neutron induced fission of 235U. The codes presented here can be used to study the possible uses of neutron-neutron correlations in the area of transparency measurements and the uses of neutron-neutron correlations in coincidence neutron imaging.

  9. Parallel processing of Monte Carlo code MCNP for particle transport problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Kawasaki, Takuji

    1996-06-01

    It is possible to vectorize or parallelize Monte Carlo codes (MC code) for photon and neutron transport problem, making use of independency of the calculation for each particle. Applicability of existing MC code to parallel processing is mentioned. As for parallel computer, we have used both vector-parallel processor and scalar-parallel processor in performance evaluation. We have made (i) vector-parallel processing of MCNP code on Monte Carlo machine Monte-4 with four vector processors, (ii) parallel processing on Paragon XP/S with 256 processors. In this report we describe the methodology and results for parallel processing on two types of parallel or distributed memory computers. In addition, we mention the evaluation of parallel programming environments for parallel computers used in the present work as a part of the work developing STA (Seamless Thinking Aid) Basic Software. (author)

  10. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iandola, F N; O' Brien, M J; Procassini, R J

    2010-11-29

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  11. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  12. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNP is a very general Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code system with approximately 250 person years of Group X-6 code development invested. It is extremely portable, user-oriented, and a true production code as it is used about 60 Cray hours per month by about 150 Los Alamos users. It has as its data base the best cross-section evaluations available. MCNP contains state-of-the-art traditional and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques to be applied to the solution of an ever-increasing number of problems. Excellent user-oriented documentation is available for all facets of the MCNP code system. Many useful and important variants of MCNP exist for special applications. The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is the contact point for worldwide MCNP code and documentation distribution. A much improved MCNP Version 3A will be available in the fall of 1985, along with new and improved documentation. Future directions in MCNP development will change the meaning of MCNP to Monte Carlo N Particle where N particle varieties will be transported

  13. Srna - Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtained through the PETRA and GEANT programs. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by means of the Multi-Layer Faraday Cup and spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by our program indicate the imminent application of Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice.

  14. Srna-Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D) dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtained through the PETRA and GEANT programs. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by means of the Multi-Layer Faraday Cup and spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by our program indicate the imminent application of Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. (author)

  15. The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Ferrari, Alfredo; Silari, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. In these codes, photon transport is simulated by using the detailed scheme, i.e., interaction by interaction. Detailed simulation is easy to implement, and the reliability of the results is only limited by the accuracy of the adopted cross sections. Simulations of electron and positron transport are more difficult, because these particles undergo a large number of interactions in the course of their slowing down. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interacti...

  16. Penelope - A code system for Monte Carlo simulation of electron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code system PENELOPE (version 2001) performs Monte Carlo simulation of coupled electron-photon transport in arbitrary materials for a wide energy range, from a few hundred eV to about 1 GeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A geometry package called PENGEOM permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres, cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the PENELOPE code system, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte-Carlo algorithm. (authors)

  17. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  18. MC++: A parallel, portable, Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MC++ is an implicit multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code written in C++ and based on the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. MC++ runs in parallel on and is portable to a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, SMPs, and clusters of UNIX workstations. MC++ is being developed to provide transport capabilities to the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). It is also intended to form the basis of the first transport physics framework (TPF), which is a C++ class library containing appropriate abstractions, objects, and methods for the particle transport problem. The transport problem is briefly described, as well as the current status and algorithms in MC++ for solving the transport equation. The alpha version of the POOMA class library is also discussed, along with the implementation of the transport solution algorithms using POOMA. Finally, a simple test problem is defined and performance and physics results from this problem are discussed on a variety of platforms

  19. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and α-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute α-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed

  20. Verification of Three Dimensional Triangular Prismatic Discrete Ordinates Transport Code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by Comparison with Monte Carlo Code GMVP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Yuto; Moriwaki, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Shigeo; Ikeda, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with verification of three dimensional triangular prismatic discrete ordinates transport calculation code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by comparison with multi-group Monte Carlo calculation code GMVP in a large fast breeder reactor. The reactor is a 750 MWe electric power sodium cooled reactor. Nuclear characteristics are calculated at beginning of cycle of an initial core and at beginning and end of cycle of equilibrium core. According to the calculations, the differences between the two methodologies are smaller than 0.0002 Δk in the multi-plication factor, relatively about 1% in the control rod reactivity, and 1% in the sodium void reactivity.

  1. A new assembly-level Monte Carlo neutron transport code for reactor physics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new assembly-level Monte Carlo neutron transport code, specifically intended for diffusion code group-constant generation and other reactor physics calculations. The code is being developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), under the working title 'Probabilistic Scattering Game', or PSG. The PSG code uses a method known as Woodcock tracking to simulate neutron histories. The advantages of the method include fast simulation in complex geometries and relatively simple handling of complicated geometrical objects. The main drawback is the inability to calculate reaction rates in optically thin volumes. This narrows the field of application to calculations involving parameters integrated over large volumes. The main features of the PSG code and the Woodcock tracking method are introduced. The code is applied in three example cases, involving infinite lattices of two-dimensional LWR fuel assemblies. Comparison calculations are carried out using MCNP4C and CASMO-4E. The results reveal that the code performs quite well in the calculation cases of this study, especially when compared to MCNP. The PSG code is still under extensive development and there are both flaws in the simulation of the interaction physics and programming errors in the source code. The results presented here, however, seem very encouraging, especially considering the early development stage of the code. (author)

  2. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results

  3. Srna-Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, R D; Stankovic, S J

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D) dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtaine...

  4. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  5. Overview of TRIPOLI-4 version 7, Continuous-energy Monte Carlo Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIPOLI-4 code is used essentially for four major classes of applications: shielding studies, criticality studies, core physics studies, and instrumentation studies. In this updated overview of the Monte Carlo transport code TRIPOLI-4, we list and describe its current main features, including recent developments or extended capacities like effective beta estimation, photo-nuclear reactions or extended mesh tallies. The code computes coupled neutron-photon propagation as well as the electron-photon cascade shower. While providing the user with common biasing techniques, it also implements an automatic weighting scheme. TRIPOLI-4 has support for execution in parallel mode. Special features and applications are also presented concerning: 'particles storage', resuming a stopped TRIPOLI-4 run, collision bands, Green's functions, source convergence in criticality mode, and mesh tally

  6. Application of ENDF nuclear data for testing a Monte-Carlo neutron and photon transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo photon and neutron transport code was developed at OAEP. The code was written in C and C++ languages in an object-oriented programming style. Constructive solid geometry (CSG), rather than combinatorial, was used such that making its input file more readable and recognizable. As the first stage of code validation, data from some ENDF files, in the MCNP's specific format, were used and compared with experimental data. The neutron (from a 300 mCi Am/Be source) attenuation by water was chosen to compare the results. The agreement of the quantity 1/Σ among the calculation from SIPHON and MCNP, and the experiment - which are 10.39 cm, 9.71 cm and 10.25 cm respectively - was satisfactorily well within the experimental uncertainties. These results also agree with the 10.8 cm result of N.M., Mirza, et al. (author)

  7. 3-D Monte Carlo neutron-photon transport code JMCT and its algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JMCT Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code has been developed which is based on the JCOGIN toolbox. JCOGIN includes the geometry operation, tally, the domain decomposition and the parallel computation about particle (MPI) and spatial domain (OpenMP) etc. The viewdata of CAD is equipped in JMCT preprocessor. The full-core pin-mode, which is from Chinese Qinshan-II nuclear power station, is design and simulated by JMCT. The detail pin-power distribution and keff results are shown in this paper. (author)

  8. The calculation of criticality using the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport code SPARTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods of calculating criticality are available in the 3D generalised geometry Monte Carlo particle transport code SPARTAN (Bending and Heffer, 1975). The first is a matrix technique in which the multiplication constant and source distribution of the system under study are calculated from estimates of fission probabilities and the second a method in which the multiplication constant is inferred from estimates of changes in neutron population over a number of neutron generations. Modifications are described which have been made to the way in which these methods are used in SPARTAN in order to improve the efficiency of criticality calculations. (author)

  9. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package authored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Shift has been developed to scale well from laptops to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers and includes features such as support for multiple geometry and physics engines, hybrid capabilities for variance reduction methods such as the Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology, advanced parallel decompositions, and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. The scaling studies presented in this paper demonstrate good weak and strong scaling behavior for the implemented algorithms. Shift has also been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks, including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors' Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems presented in this paper. These benchmark results compare well to those from other contemporary Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 and KENO.

  10. An object-oriented implementation of a parallel Monte Carlo code for radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pedro Duarte; Lani, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the main features of a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solver for radiation transport which has been implemented within COOLFluiD, a world-class open source object-oriented platform for scientific simulations. The Monte Carlo code makes use of efficient ray tracing algorithms (for 2D, axisymmetric and 3D arbitrary unstructured meshes) which are described in detail. The solver accuracy is first verified in testcases for which analytical solutions are available, then validated for a space re-entry flight experiment (i.e. FIRE II) for which comparisons against both experiments and reference numerical solutions are provided. Through the flexible design of the physical models, ray tracing and parallelization strategy (fully reusing the mesh decomposition inherited by the fluid simulator), the implementation was made efficient and reusable.

  11. ACCEPT: three-dimensional electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code using combinatorial geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACCEPT code provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through three-dimensional multimaterial geometries described by the combinational method. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. ACCEPT combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. The ACCEPT code is currently running on the CDC-7600 (66000) where the bulk of the cross-section data and the statistical variables are stored in Large Core Memory

  12. Point KENO V.a: A continuous-energy Monte Carlo code for transport applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KENO V.a is a multigroup Monte Carlo code that solves the Boltzmann transport equation and is used extensively in the criticality safety community to calculate the effective multiplication factor of systems with fissionable material. In this work, a continuous-energy or pointwise version of KENO V.a has been developed by first designing a new continuous-energy cross-section format and then by developing the appropriate Monte Carlo transport procedures to sample the new cross-section format. In order to generate pointwise cross sections for a test library, a series of cross-section processing modules were developed and used to process 50 ENDF/B-VI Release 7 nuclides for the test library. Once the cross-section processing procedures were in place, a continuous-energy version of KENO V.a was developed and tested by calculating 46 test cases that include critical and calculational benchmark problems. The Point KENO-calculated results for the test problems are in agreement with calculated results obtained with the multigroup version of KENO V.a and MCNP4C. Based on the calculated results with the prototypic cross-section library, a continuous-energy version of the KENO V.a code has been successfully developed and demonstrated for modeling systems with fissionable material. (authors)

  13. Improved Convergence Rate of Multi-Group Scattering Moment Tallies for Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Adam

    Multi-group scattering moment matrices are critical to the solution of the multi-group form of the neutron transport equation, as they are responsible for describing the change in direction and energy of neutrons. These matrices, however, are difficult to correctly calculate from the measured nuclear data with both deterministic and stochastic methods. Calculating these parameters when using deterministic methods requires a set of assumptions which do not hold true in all conditions. These quantities can be calculated accurately with stochastic methods, however doing so is computationally expensive due to the poor efficiency of tallying scattering moment matrices. This work presents an improved method of obtaining multi-group scattering moment matrices from a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. This improved method of tallying the scattering moment matrices is based on recognizing that all of the outgoing particle information is known a priori and can be taken advantage of to increase the tallying efficiency (therefore reducing the uncertainty) of the stochastically integrated tallies. In this scheme, the complete outgoing probability distribution is tallied, supplying every one of the scattering moment matrices elements with its share of data. In addition to reducing the uncertainty, this method allows for the use of a track-length estimation process potentially offering even further improvement to the tallying efficiency. Unfortunately, to produce the needed distributions, the probability functions themselves must undergo an integration over the outgoing energy and scattering angle dimensions. This integration is too costly to perform during the Monte Carlo simulation itself and therefore must be performed in advance by way of a pre-processing code. The new method increases the information obtained from tally events and therefore has a significantly higher efficiency than the currently used techniques. The improved method has been implemented in a code system

  14. Load balancing in highly parallel processing of Monte Carlo code for particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In parallel processing of Monte Carlo(MC) codes for neutron, photon and electron transport problems, particle histories are assigned to processors making use of independency of the calculation for each particle. Although we can easily parallelize main part of a MC code by this method, it is necessary and practically difficult to optimize the code concerning load balancing in order to attain high speedup ratio in highly parallel processing. In fact, the speedup ratio in the case of 128 processors remains in nearly one hundred times when using the test bed for the performance evaluation. Through the parallel processing of the MCNP code, which is widely used in the nuclear field, it is shown that it is difficult to attain high performance by static load balancing in especially neutron transport problems, and a load balancing method, which dynamically changes the number of assigned particles minimizing the sum of the computational and communication costs, overcomes the difficulty, resulting in nearly fifteen percentage of reduction for execution time. (author)

  15. A computer code package for Monte Carlo photon-electron transport simulation Comparisons with experimental benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code package (PTSIM) for particle transport Monte Carlo simulation was developed using object oriented techniques of design and programming. A flexible system for simulation of coupled photon, electron transport, facilitating development of efficient simulation applications, was obtained. For photons: Compton and photo-electric effects, pair production and Rayleigh interactions are simulated, while for electrons, a class II condensed history scheme was considered, in which catastrophic interactions (Moeller electron-electron interaction, bremsstrahlung, etc.) are treated in detail and all other interactions with reduced individual effect on electron history are grouped together using continuous slowing down approximation and energy straggling theories. Electron angular straggling is simulated using Moliere theory or a mixed model in which scatters at large angles are treated as distinct events. Comparisons with experimentally benchmarks for electron transmission and bremsstrahlung emissions energy and angular spectra, and for dose calculations are presented

  16. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP ca be used for neutron, photon, or coupled neutron-photon transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical systems. The code treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some special fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Pointwise cross-section data are used. For neutrons, all reactions given in a particular cross-section evaluation are accounted for. Thermal neutrons are described by both the free-gas and S(α,β) models. For photons, the code takes account of incoherent and coherent scattering, the possibility of fluorescent emission following photoelectric absorption, and absorption in pair production with local emission of annihilation radiation. MCNP includes an elaborate, interactive plotting capability that allows the user to view his input geometry to help check for setup errors. Standard features which are available to improve computational efficiency include geometry splitting and Russian roulette, weight cutoff with Russian roulette, correlated sampling, analog capture or capture by weight reduction, the exponential transformation, energy splitting, forced collisions in designated cells, flux estimates at point or ring detectors, deterministically transporting pseudo-particles to designated regions, track-length estimators, source biasing, and several parameter cutoffs. Extensive summary information is provided to help the user better understand the physics and Monte Carlo simulation of his problem. The standard, user-defined output of MCNP includes two-way current as a function of direction across any set of surfaces or surface segments in the problem. Flux across any set of surfaces or surface segments is available. 58 figures, 28 tables

  17. Measured performances on vectorization and multitasking with a Monte Carlo code for neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarized two improvements of a real production code by using vectorization and multitasking techniques. After a short description of Monte Carlo algorithms employed in our neutron transport problems, we briefly describe the work we have done in order to get a vector code. Vectorization principles will be presented and measured performances on the CRAY 1S, CYBER 205 and CRAY X-MP compared in terms of vector lengths. The second part of this work is an adaptation to multitasking on the CRAY X-MP using exclusively standard multitasking tools available with FORTRAN under the COS 1.13 system. Two examples will be presented. The goal of the first one is to measure the overhead inherent to multitasking when tasks become too small and to define a granularity threshold, that is to say a minimum size for a task. With the second example we propose a method that is very X-MP oriented in order to get the best speedup factor on such a computer. In conclusion we prove that Monte Carlo algorithms are very well suited to future vector and parallel computers. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of Space Radiation Calculations from Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Lin, Z. W.; Nasser, A. F.; Randeniya, S.; Tripathi, r. K.; Watts, J. W.; Yepes, P.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation outline includes motivation, radiation transport codes being considered, space radiation cases being considered, results for slab geometry, results from spherical geometry, and summary. ///////// main physics in radiation transport codes hzetrn uprop fluka geant4, slab geometry, spe, gcr,

  19. MCPT: A Monte Carlo code for simulation of photon transport in tomographic scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCPT is a special-purpose Monte Carlo code designed to simulate photon transport in tomographic scanners. Variance reduction schemes and sampling games present in MCPT were selected to characterize features common to most tomographic scanners. Combined splitting and biasing (CSB) games are used to systematically sample important detection pathways. An efficient splitting game is used to tally particle energy deposition in detection zones. The pulse height distribution of each detector can be found by convolving the calculated energy deposition distribution with the detector's resolution function. A general geometric modelling package, HERMETOR, is used to describe the geometry of the tomographic scanners and provide MCPT information needed for particle tracking. MCPT's modelling capabilites are described and preliminary experimental validation is presented. (orig.)

  20. Testing the accuracy of electron transport in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for calculation of ion chamber wall perturbation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable Monte Carlo based investigation of ion chambers in medical physics problems depends on the accuracy of the charged particle transport and implementations of the condensed history technique. Improper handling of media interfaces can lead to anomalous results or 'interface artefacts'. This work presents a rigorous investigation of the electron transport algorithm in the general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) code FLUKA (2008.3b.1). A 'Fano test' was implemented in order to benchmark the accuracy of the algorithm. Furthermore, the calculation of wall perturbation factors pwall of a Roos type chamber irradiated by electrons were performed and compared with values based on the EGSnrc MC code

  1. TART 2000: A Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TART2000 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input Preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2000 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2000 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART2000 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART2000 and its data files

  2. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  3. Tripoli-3: monte Carlo transport code for neutral particles - version 3.5 - users manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIPOLI-3 code applies the Monte Carlo method to neutron, gamma-ray and coupled neutron and gamma-ray transport calculations in three-dimensional geometries, either in steady-state conditions or having a time dependence. It can be used to study problems where there is a high flux attenuation between the source zone and the result zone (studies of shielding configurations or source driven sub-critical systems, with fission being taken into account), as well as problems where there is a low flux attenuation (neutronic calculations -- in a fuel lattice cell, for example -- where fission is taken into account, usually with the calculation on the effective multiplication factor, fine structure studies, numerical experiments to investigate methods approximations, etc). TRIPOLI-3 has been operational since 1995 and is the version of the TRIPOLI code that follows on from TRIPOLI-2; it can be used on SUN, RISC600 and HP workstations and on PC using the Linux or Windows/NT operating systems. The code uses nuclear data libraries generated using the THEMIS/NJOY system. The current libraries were derived from ENDF/B6 and JEF2. There is also a response function library based on a number of evaluations, notably the dosimetry libraries IRDF/85, IRDF/90 and also evaluations from JEF2. The treatment of particle transport is the same in version 3.5 as in version 3.4 of the TRIPOLI code; but the version 3.5 is more convenient for preparing the input data and for reading the output. The french version of the user's manual exists. (authors)

  4. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes: FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo transport codes like FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD are widely used for the estimation of radiation hazards in accelerator facilities. Accurate simulations are especially important with increasing energies and intensities of the machines. As the physical models implied in the codes are being constantly further developed, the verification is needed to make sure that the simulations give reasonable results. We report on the verification of electronic stopping modules and the verification of nuclide production modules of the codes. The verification of electronic stopping modules is based on the results of irradiation of stainless steel, copper and aluminum by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions. The stopping ranges achieved experimentally are compared with the simulated ones. The verification of isotope production modules is done via comparing the experimental depth profiles of residual activity (aluminum targets were irradiated by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions) with the results of simulations. Correspondences and discrepancies between the experiment and the simulations are discussed.

  5. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes: FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, Vera [IAP, J. W. Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Mustafin, Edil; Strasik, Ivan [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Ratzinger, Ulrich [IAP, J. W. Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Latysheva, Ludmila; Sobolevskiy, Nikolai [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Monte Carlo transport codes like FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD are widely used for the estimation of radiation hazards in accelerator facilities. Accurate simulations are especially important with increasing energies and intensities of the machines. As the physical models implied in the codes are being constantly further developed, the verification is needed to make sure that the simulations give reasonable results. We report on the verification of electronic stopping modules and the verification of nuclide production modules of the codes. The verification of electronic stopping modules is based on the results of irradiation of stainless steel, copper and aluminum by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions. The stopping ranges achieved experimentally are compared with the simulated ones. The verification of isotope production modules is done via comparing the experimental depth profiles of residual activity (aluminum targets were irradiated by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions) with the results of simulations. Correspondences and discrepancies between the experiment and the simulations are discussed.

  6. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, M.; Do Nascimento, E.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: mbellezzo@gmail.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  7. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  8. Development of CAD-Based Geometry Processing Module for a Monte Carlo Particle Transport Analysis Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As The Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport analysis for a complex system such as research reactor, accelerator, and fusion facility may require accurate modeling of the complicated geometry. Its manual modeling by using the text interface of a MC code to define the geometrical objects is tedious, lengthy and error-prone. This problem can be overcome by taking advantage of modeling capability of the computer aided design (CAD) system. There have been two kinds of approaches to develop MC code systems utilizing the CAD data: the external format conversion and the CAD kernel imbedded MC simulation. The first approach includes several interfacing programs such as McCAD, MCAM, GEOMIT etc. which were developed to automatically convert the CAD data into the MCNP geometry input data. This approach makes the most of the existing MC codes without any modifications, but implies latent data inconsistency due to the difference of the geometry modeling system. In the second approach, a MC code utilizes the CAD data for the direct particle tracking or the conversion to an internal data structure of the constructive solid geometry (CSG) and/or boundary representation (B-rep) modeling with help of a CAD kernel. MCNP-BRL and OiNC have demonstrated their capabilities of the CAD-based MC simulations. Recently we have developed a CAD-based geometry processing module for the MC particle simulation by using the OpenCASCADE (OCC) library. In the developed module, CAD data can be used for the particle tracking through primitive CAD surfaces (hereafter the CAD-based tracking) or the internal conversion to the CSG data structure. In this paper, the performances of the text-based model, the CAD-based tracking, and the internal CSG conversion are compared by using an in-house MC code, McSIM, equipped with the developed CAD-based geometry processing module

  9. Aurora T: a Monte Carlo code for transportation of neutral atoms in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper contains a short description of Aurora code. This code have been developed at Princeton with Monte Carlo method for calculating neutral gas in cylindrical plasma. In this work subroutines such one can take in account toroidal geometry are developed

  10. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport. Version 3A. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual is a practical guide for the use of our general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP. The first chapter is a primer for the novice user. The second chapter describes the mathematics, data, physics, and Monte Carlo simulation found in MCNP. This discussion is not meant to be exhaustive - details of the particular techniques and of the Monte Carlo method itself will have to be found elsewhere. The third chapter shows the user how to prepare input for the code. The fourth chapter contains several examples, and the fifth chapter explains the output. The appendices show how to use MCNP on particular computer systems at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and also give details about some of the code internals that those who wish to modify the code may find useful. 57 refs

  11. Criticality coefficient calculation for a small PWR using Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trombetta, Debora M.; Su, Jian, E-mail: dtrombetta@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chirayath, Sunil S., E-mail: sunilsc@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, TX (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Computational models of reactors are increasingly used to predict nuclear reactor physics parameters responsible for reactivity changes which could lead to accidents and losses. In this work, preliminary results for criticality coefficient calculation using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX were presented for a small PWR. The computational modeling developed consists of the core with fuel elements, radial reflectors, and control rods inside a pressure vessel. Three different geometries were simulated, a single fuel pin, a fuel assembly and the core, with the aim to compare the criticality coefficients among themselves.The criticality coefficients calculated were: Doppler Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Void Coefficient, Power Coefficient, and Control Rod Worth. The coefficient values calculated by the MCNP code were compared with literature results, showing good agreement with reference data, which validate the computational model developed and allow it to be used to perform more complex studies. Criticality Coefficient values for the three simulations done had little discrepancy for almost all coefficients investigated, the only exception was the Power Coefficient. Preliminary results presented show that simple modelling as a fuel assembly can describe changes at almost all the criticality coefficients, avoiding the need of a complex core simulation. (author)

  12. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP can be used for neutron, photon, or coupled neutron--photon transport. The code treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some special fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Pointwise cross-section data are used. For neutrons, all reactions given in a particular cross-section evaluation (such as ENDF/B-IV) are accounted for. For photons, the code takes account of incoherent and coherent scattering, the possibility of fluorescent emission following photoelectric absorption, and absorption in pair production with local emission of annihilation radiation. Standard optional variance reduction schemes include geometry splitting and Russian roulette, the exponential transformation, energy splitting, forced collisions in designated cells, flux estimates at point detectors, track-length estimators, and source biasing. The standard output of MCNP includes two-way current as a function of energy, time, and angle with the normal, across any subset of bounding surfaces in the problem. Fluxes across any set of bounding surfaces are available as a function of time and energy. Similarly, the flux at designated points and the average flux in a cell (track length per unit volume) are standard tallies. Reactions such as fissions or absorptions may be obtained in a subset of geometric cells. The heating tallies give the energy deposition per starting particle. In addition, particles may be flagged when they cross specified surfaces or enter designated cells, and the contributions of these flagged particles to certain of the tallies are listed separately. All quantities printed out have their relative errors listed also. 11 figures, 27 tables

  13. Modelling of a general purpose irradiation chamber using a Monte Carlo particle transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-text: The aim of this research is to stimulate the effectiveness use of a general purpose irradiation chamber to contain pure neutron particles obtained from a research reactor. The secondary neutron and gamma particles dose discharge from the chamber layers will be used as a platform to estimate the safe dimension of the chamber. The chamber, made up of layers of lead (Pb), shielding, polyethylene (PE), moderator and commercial grade aluminium (Al) cladding is proposed for the use of interacting samples with pure neutron particles in a nuclear reactor environment. The estimation was accomplished through simulation based on general Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code using Los Alamos MCNPX software. Simulations were performed on the model of the chamber subjected to high neutron flux radiation and its gamma radiation product. The model of neutron particle used is based on the neutron source found in PUSPATI TRIGA MARK II research reactor which holds a maximum flux value of 1 x 1012 neutron/ cm2s. The expected outcomes of this research are zero gamma dose in the core of the chamber and neutron dose rate of less than 10 μSv/ day discharge from the chamber system. (author)

  14. Memory bottlenecks and memory contention in multi-core Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The performance of nuclear reactor Monte Carlo transport applications is examined. • A “proxy-application” (XSBench) is presented representing the key kernel. • In-depth performance analyses reveal the algorithm is bottlenecked by bandwidth. • Strategies are discussed to improve scalability on next generation HPC systems. - Abstract: We have extracted a kernel that executes only the most computationally expensive steps of the Monte Carlo particle transport algorithm – the calculation of macroscopic cross sections – in an effort to expose bottlenecks within multi-core, shared memory architectures

  15. Its version 3.0. The integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITS system is described, which is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. It combines operational simplicity and physical accuracy in order to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Flexibility of construction permits tailoring of the codes to specific applications and extension of code capabilities to more complex applications through simple update procedures. (author)

  16. Monte-Carlo Impurity transport simulations in the edge of the DIII-D tokamak using the MCI code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is used to follow trace impurities through multiple ionization states in realistic 2-D tokamak geometries. The MCI code is used to study impurity transport along the open magnetic field lines of the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) and to understand how impurities get into the core from the SOL. An MCI study concentrating on the entrainment of carbon impurities ions by deuterium background plasma into the DIII-D divertor is discussed. MCI simulation results are compared to experimental DIII-D carbon measurements

  17. Development of a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Sempau, Josep; Choi, Dongju; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate method for absorbed dose calculations in radiotherapy. Its efficiency still requires improvement for routine clinical applications, especially for online adaptive radiotherapy. In this paper, we report our recent development on a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport. We have implemented the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo dose calculation package (Sempau et al, Phys. Med. Biol., 45(2000)2263-2291) on GPU architecture under CUDA platform. The implementation has been tested with respect to the original sequential DPM code on CPU in two cases. Our results demonstrate the adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for both electron and photon beams in radiotherapy energy range. A speed up factor of 4.5 and 5.5 times have been observed for electron and photon testing cases, respectively, using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card against a 2.27GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor .

  18. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  19. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability

  20. Randomly dispersed particle fuel model in the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels are composed of thousands of microscopic fuel particles, randomly dispersed in a graphite matrix. The modelling of such geometry is complicated, especially using continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, which are unable to apply any deterministic corrections in the calculation. This paper presents the geometry routine developed for modelling randomly dispersed particle fuels using the PSG Monte Carlo reactor physics code. The model is based on the delta-tracking method, and it takes into account the spatial self-shielding effects and the random dispersion of the fuel particles. The calculation routine is validated by comparing the results to reference MCNP4C calculations using uranium and plutonium based fuels. (authors)

  1. Vectorization and multitasking with a Monte-Carlo code for neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes two improvements of a Monte Carlo code by resorting to vectorization and multitasking techniques. After a short presentation of the physical problem to solve and a description of the main difficulties to produce an efficient coding, this paper introduces the vectorization principles employed and briefly describes how the vectorized algorithm works. Next, measured performances on CRAY 1S, CYBER 205 and CRAY X-MP are compared. The second part of this paper is devoted to multitasking technique. Starting from the standard multitasking tools available with FORTRAN on CRAY X-MP/4, a multitasked algorithm and its measured speed-ups are presented. In conclusion we prove that vector and parallel computers are a great opportunity for such Monte Carlo algorithms

  2. SPHERE: a spherical-geometry multimaterial electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPHERE provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through multimaterial configurations possessing spherical symmetry. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. SPHERE combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies, with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. 8 figs., 3 tables

  3. Exact modeling of the torus geometry with Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is valuable to model torus geometry exactry for the neutronics design of fusion reactor in order to assess neutronics characteristics such as tritium breeding ratio, heat generation rate, etc, near the plasma. Monte Carlo code MORSE-GG which plays important role in the radiation streaming calculation of fusion reactors had been able to deal with the geometry composed of second order surfaces. The MORSE-GG program is modified to be able to deal with torus geometry which has fourth order surface by solving biquadratic equations, hoping that MORSE-GG code becomes more effective for the neutronics calculation of the Tokamak fusion reactor. (author)

  4. Installation of Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system MCNP4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP-4 including its graphic functions has been installed on the Sun-4 sparc-2 work station with minor corrections. In order to validate the installed MCNP-4 code, 25 sample problems have been executed on the work station and these results have been compared with the original ones. And, the most of the graphic functions have been demonstrated by using 3 sample problems. Further, additional 14 nuclides have been included to the continuous cross section library edited from JENDL-3. (author)

  5. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  6. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi–Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds

  7. Neutron secondary-particle production cross sections and their incorporation into Monte-Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realistic simulations of the passage of fast neutrons through tissue require a large quantity of cross-sectional data. What are needed are differential (in particle type, energy and angle) cross sections. A computer code is described which produces such spectra for neutrons above ∼14 MeV incident on light nuclei such as carbon and oxygen. Comparisons have been made with experimental measurements of double-differential secondary charged-particle production on carbon and oxygen at energies from 27 to 60 MeV; they indicate that the model is adequate in this energy range. In order to utilize fully the results of these calculations, they should be incorporated into a neutron transport code. This requires defining a generalized format for describing charged-particle production, putting the calculated results in this format, interfacing the neutron transport code with these data, and charged-particle transport. The design and development of such a program is described. 13 refs., 3 figs

  8. Parallel Monte Carlo transport modeling in the context of a time-dependent, three-dimensional multi-physics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The fine-scale, multi-space resolution that is envisioned for accurate simulations of complex weapons systems in three spatial dimensions implies flop-rate and memory-storage requirements that will only be obtained in the near future through the use of parallel computational techniques. Since the Monte Carlo transport models in these simulations usually stress both of these computational resources, they are prime candidates for parallelization. The MONACO Monte Carlo transport package, which is currently under development at LLNL, will utilize two types of parallelism within the context of a multi-physics design code: decomposition of the spatial domain across processors (spatial parallelism) and distribution of particles in a given spatial subdomain across additional processors (particle parallelism). This implementation of the package will utilize explicit data communication between domains (message passing). Such a parallel implementation of a Monte Carlo transport model will result in non-deterministic communication patterns. The communication of particles between subdomains during a Monte Carlo time step may require a significant level of effort to achieve a high parallel efficiency.

  9. BOT3P: a mesh generation software package for transport analysis with deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOT3P consists of a set of standard Fortran 77 language programs that gives the users of the deterministic transport codes DORT, TORT, TWODANT, THREEDANT, PARTISN and the sensitivity code SUSD3D some useful diagnostic tools to prepare and check the geometry of their input data files for both Cartesian and cylindrical geometries, including graphical display modules. Users can produce the geometrical and material distribution data for all the cited codes for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional applications and, only in 3-dimensional Cartesian geometry, for the Monte Carlo Transport Code MCNP, starting from the same BOT3P input. Moreover, BOT3P stores the fine mesh arrays and the material zone map in a binary file, the content of which can be easily interfaced to any deterministic and Monte Carlo transport code. This makes it possible to compare directly for the same geometry the effects stemming from the use of different data libraries and solution approaches on transport analysis results. BOT3P Version 5.0 lets users optionally and with the desired precision compute the area/volume error of material zones with respect to the theoretical values, if any, because of the stair-cased representation of the geometry, and automatically update material densities on the whole zone domains to conserve masses. A local (per mesh) density correction approach is also available. BOT3P is designed to run on Linux/UNIX platforms and is publicly available from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA)/Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank. Through the use of BOT3P, radiation transport problems with complex 3-dimensional geometrical structures can be modelled easily, as a relatively small amount of engineer-time is required and refinement is achieved by changing few parameters. This tool is useful for solving very large challenging problems, as successfully demonstrated not only in some complex neutron shielding and criticality benchmarks but also in a power

  10. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department

  11. Domain decomposition and terabyte tallies with the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memory limitations are a key obstacle to applying Monte Carlo neutron transport methods to high-fidelity full-core reactor analysis. Billions of unique regions are needed to carry out full-core depletion and fuel performance analyses, equating to terabytes of memory for isotopic abundances and tally scores - far more than can fit on a single computational node in modern architectures. This work introduces an implementation of domain decomposition that addresses this problem, demonstrating excellent scaling up to a 2.39TB mesh-tally distributed across 512 compute nodes running a full-core reactor benchmark on the Mira Blue Gene/Q supercomputer at Argonne National Laboratory. (author)

  12. Radiation transport in random disperse media implemented in the Monte Carlo code PRIZMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes PRIZMA capabilities for modeling radiation transport in random disperse media by the Monte Carlo method. It proposes a method for simulating radiation transport in binary media with variable volume fractions. The method models the medium consequently from one grain crossed by a particle trajectory to another. Like in the Limited Chord Length Sampling (LCLS) method, particles in grains are tracked in the actual grain geometry, but unlike LCLS, the medium is modeled using only Matrix Chord Length Sampling (MCLS) from the exponential distribution and it is not necessary to know the grain chord length distribution. This helped us extend the method to media with randomly oriented, arbitrarily shaped convex grains. Other extensions include multicomponent media - grains of several sorts, and polydisperse media - grains of different sizes

  13. A New Monte Carlo Photon Transport Code for Research Reactor Hotcell Shielding Calculation using Splitting and Russian Roulette Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method was used to build a new code for the simulation of particle transport. Several calculations were done after that for verification, where different sources were used, the source term was obtained using the ORIGEN-S code. Water and lead shield were used with spherical geometry, and the tally results were obtained on the external surface of the shield, afterward the results were compared with the results of MCNPX for verification of the new code. The variance reduction techniques of splitting and Russian Roulette were implemented in the code to be more efficient, by reducing the amount of custom programming required, by artificially increasing the particles being tallied with decreasing the weight. The code shows lower results than the results of MCNPX, this can be interpreted by the effect of the secondary gamma radiation that can be produced by the electron, which is ejected by the primary radiation. In the future a more study will be made on the effect of the electron production and transport, either by a real transport of the electron or by simply using an approximation such the thick target bremsstahlung(TTB) option which is used in MCNPX

  14. A New Monte Carlo Photon Transport Code for Research Reactor Hotcell Shielding Calculation using Splitting and Russian Roulette Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnajjar, Alaaddin [Univ. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byunchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The Monte Carlo method was used to build a new code for the simulation of particle transport. Several calculations were done after that for verification, where different sources were used, the source term was obtained using the ORIGEN-S code. Water and lead shield were used with spherical geometry, and the tally results were obtained on the external surface of the shield, afterward the results were compared with the results of MCNPX for verification of the new code. The variance reduction techniques of splitting and Russian Roulette were implemented in the code to be more efficient, by reducing the amount of custom programming required, by artificially increasing the particles being tallied with decreasing the weight. The code shows lower results than the results of MCNPX, this can be interpreted by the effect of the secondary gamma radiation that can be produced by the electron, which is ejected by the primary radiation. In the future a more study will be made on the effect of the electron production and transport, either by a real transport of the electron or by simply using an approximation such the thick target bremsstahlung(TTB) option which is used in MCNPX.

  15. Testing the Accuracy of Electron Transport in the Monte Carlo Code FLUKA for Calculation of Ionization Chamber Wall Perturbation Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the Monte Carlo (MC) code FLUKA, regarding its ability to accurately simulate electron transport at density inhomogeneities and in ionization chamber geometries. In order to evaluate the accuracy of FLUKA's electron transport algorithm and the implementation of the condensed history technique, a Fano test was used. This test allows the comparison of calculated and theoretically expected results. The ratio of the two results is ideally equal to unity, and a deviation usually indicates artifacts in the treatment of density interfaces. As a more practical problem, wall perturbation factors pwall of a plane parallel chamber in electron beams were calculated and compared with results based on the EGSnrc MC code. Additionally, the impact of wall material and thickness on calculated cavity dose was investigated for two different thimble chambers irradiated by 60Co. The correct choice of parameters within FLUKA's electron transport algorithm ensured passing the Fano test within ∼0.7% and a good agreement for practical examples within 0.4% compared to results of the EGSnrc MC code. The latter is known to allow an artifact free simulation of ionization chamber response in photon and electron beams. Based on these results, the electron transport accuracy within the FLUKA code can generally be regarded as much better than 1% for typical ionization chamber dosimetry problems. (author)

  16. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...

  17. Towards scalable parellelism in Monte Carlo particle transport codes using remote memory access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Paul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forget, Benoit [MIT

    2010-01-01

    One forthcoming challenge in the area of high-performance computing is having the ability to run large-scale problems while coping with less memory per compute node. In this work, they investigate a novel data decomposition method that would allow Monte Carlo transport calculations to be performed on systems with limited memory per compute node. In this method, each compute node remotely retrieves a small set of geometry and cross-section data as needed and remotely accumulates local tallies when crossing the boundary of the local spatial domain. initial results demonstrate that while the method does allow large problems to be run in a memory-limited environment, achieving scalability may be difficult due to inefficiencies in the current implementation of RMA operations.

  18. Evaluation of Monte Carlo electron-Transport algorithms in the integrated Tiger series codes for stochastic-media simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic-media simulations require numerous boundary crossings. We consider two Monte Carlo electron transport approaches and evaluate accuracy with numerous material boundaries. In the condensed-history method, approximations are made based on infinite-medium solutions for multiple scattering over some track length. Typically, further approximations are employed for material-boundary crossings where infinite-medium solutions become invalid. We have previously explored an alternative 'condensed transport' formulation, a Generalized Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (GBFP) method, which requires no special boundary treatment but instead uses approximations to the electron-scattering cross sections. Some limited capabilities for analog transport and a GBFP method have been implemented in the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) codes. Improvements have been made to the condensed history algorithm. The performance of the ITS condensed-history and condensed-transport algorithms are assessed for material-boundary crossings. These assessments are made both by introducing artificial material boundaries and by comparison to analog Monte Carlo simulations. (authors)

  19. Geometry system used in the General Monte Carlo transport code SPARTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geometry routines used in the general-purpose, three-dimensional particle transport code SPARTAN are described. The code is designed to deal with the very complex geometries encountered in lattice cell and fuel handling calculations, health physics, and shielding problems. Regions of the system being studied may be represented by simple shapes (spheres, cylinders, and so on) or by multinomial surfaces of any order, and many simple shapes may be combined to make up a complex layout. The geometry routines are designed to allow the program to carry out a number of tasks (such as sampling for a random point or tracking a path through several regions) in any order, so that the use of the routines is not restricted to a particular tracking or scoring method. Routines for reading, checking, and printing the data are included. (U.S.)

  20. Modern calculations of pulsed-sphere time-of-flight experiments using the mercury Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern Monte Carlo transport simulations of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory pulsed-sphere time of flight experiments have recently been performed. In these experiments, 14 MeV neutrons, generated via the 3H(d, n)4He reaction, interact with a sphere of material that surrounds the neutron generating target. The time of arrival of the uncollided and collided neutrons are recorded in a detector system placed up to 10 meters from the center of the sphere. A collection of experiments with varying sphere materials, mean-free-paths and detector systems have been modeled using the Mercury Monte Carlo transport code. This effort serves to validate new features of the Mercury code, including general sources, tallies and point-detector / biased-collisions variance reduction methods, as well as assess the quality of evaluated nuclear data sets. In general, the level of agreement between the calculations and experiment is very good. However, for certain pulsed spheres, discrepancies are observed between the simulations using different nuclear data sets. (author)

  1. Parallelization of MCNP 4, a Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system, in highly parallel distributed memory type computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the accuracy and calculating speed of shielding analyses, MCNP 4, a Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system, has been parallelized and measured of its efficiency in the highly parallel distributed memory type computer, AP1000. The code has been analyzed statically and dynamically, then the suitable algorithm for parallelization has been determined for the shielding analysis functions of MCNP 4. This includes a strategy where a new history is assigned to the idling processor element dynamically during the execution. Furthermore, to avoid the congestion of communicative processing, the batch concept, processing multi-histories by a unit, has been introduced. By analyzing a sample cask problem with 2,000,000 histories by the AP1000 with 512 processor elements, the 82 % of parallelization efficiency is achieved, and the calculational speed has been estimated to be around 50 times as fast as that of FACOM M-780. (author)

  2. The geometry system of the three-dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport code SPARTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geometry routines used in the general-purpose three-dimensional particle transport code SPARTAN are described. The code is designed to deal with the very complex geometries encountered in lattice cell and fuel handling calculations, health physics and shielding problems. Regions of the system being studied may be represented by simple shapes (spheres, cylinders etc) or by multinomial surfaces of any order, and many simple shapes may be combined to make up a complex layout. The geometry routines are designed to allow the program to carry out a number of tasks (such as sampling for a random point or tracking a path through several regions) in any order, so that the use of the routines is not restricted to a particular tracking of scoring method. Routines for reading, checking and printing the data are included. Details of the computational package are also included to indicate the way in which the generalised geometry capability of SPARTAN could be incorporated into other codes. (author)

  3. User manual for version 4.3 of the Tripoli-4 Monte-Carlo method particle transport computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual relates to Version 4.3 TRIPOLI-4 code. TRIPOLI-4 is a computer code simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons and positrons. It can be used for radiation shielding calculations (long-distance propagation with flux attenuation in non-multiplying media) and neutronic calculations (fissile medium, criticality or sub-criticality basis). This makes it possible to calculate keff (for criticality), flux, currents, reaction rates and multi-group cross-sections. TRIPOLI-4 is a three-dimensional code that uses the Monte-Carlo method. It allows for point-wise description in terms of energy of cross-sections and multi-group homogenized cross-sections and features two modes of geometrical representation: surface and combinatorial. The code uses cross-section libraries in ENDF/B format (such as JEF2-2, ENDF/B-VI and JENDL) for point-wise description cross-sections in APOTRIM format (from the APOLLO2 code) or a format specific to TRIPOLI-4 for multi-group description. (authors)

  4. Mercury + VisIt: Integration of a Real-Time Graphical Analysis Capability into a Monte Carlo Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Validation of the problem definition and analysis of the results (tallies) produced during a Monte Carlo particle transport calculation can be a complicated, time-intensive processes. The time required for a person to create an accurate, validated combinatorial geometry (CG) or mesh-based representation of a complex problem, free of common errors such as gaps and overlapping cells, can range from days to weeks. The ability to interrogate the internal structure of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometry, prior to running the transport calculation, can improve the user's confidence in the validity of the problem definition. With regard to the analysis of results, the process of extracting tally data from printed tables within a file is laborious and not an intuitive approach to understanding the results. The ability to display tally information overlaid on top of the problem geometry can decrease the time required for analysis and increase the user's understanding of the results. To this end, our team has integrated VisIt, a parallel, production-quality visualization and data analysis tool into Mercury, a massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport code. VisIt provides an API for real time visualization of a simulation as it is running. The user may select which plots to display from the VisIt GUI, or by sending VisIt a Python script from Mercury. The frequency at which plots are updated can be set and the user can visualize the simulation results as it is running

  5. Tripoli-3: monte Carlo transport code for neutral particles - version 3.5 - users manual; Tripoli-3: code de transport des particules neutres par la methode de monte carlo - version 3.5 - manuel d'utilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergnaud, Th.; Nimal, J.C.; Chiron, M

    2001-07-01

    The TRIPOLI-3 code applies the Monte Carlo method to neutron, gamma-ray and coupled neutron and gamma-ray transport calculations in three-dimensional geometries, either in steady-state conditions or having a time dependence. It can be used to study problems where there is a high flux attenuation between the source zone and the result zone (studies of shielding configurations or source driven sub-critical systems, with fission being taken into account), as well as problems where there is a low flux attenuation (neutronic calculations -- in a fuel lattice cell, for example -- where fission is taken into account, usually with the calculation on the effective multiplication factor, fine structure studies, numerical experiments to investigate methods approximations, etc). TRIPOLI-3 has been operational since 1995 and is the version of the TRIPOLI code that follows on from TRIPOLI-2; it can be used on SUN, RISC600 and HP workstations and on PC using the Linux or Windows/NT operating systems. The code uses nuclear data libraries generated using the THEMIS/NJOY system. The current libraries were derived from ENDF/B6 and JEF2. There is also a response function library based on a number of evaluations, notably the dosimetry libraries IRDF/85, IRDF/90 and also evaluations from JEF2. The treatment of particle transport is the same in version 3.5 as in version 3.4 of the TRIPOLI code; but the version 3.5 is more convenient for preparing the input data and for reading the output. The french version of the user's manual exists. (authors)

  6. Enhancements to the Combinatorial Geometry Particle Tracker in the Mercury Monte Carlo Transport Code: Embedded Meshes and Domain Decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenman, G M; O' Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Two enhancements to the combinatorial geometry (CG) particle tracker in the Mercury Monte Carlo transport code are presented. The first enhancement is a hybrid particle tracker wherein a mesh region is embedded within a CG region. This method permits efficient calculations of problems with contain both large-scale heterogeneous and homogeneous regions. The second enhancement relates to the addition of parallelism within the CG tracker via spatial domain decomposition. This permits calculations of problems with a large degree of geometric complexity, which are not possible through particle parallelism alone. In this method, the cells are decomposed across processors and a particles is communicated to an adjacent processor when it tracks to an interprocessor boundary. Applications that demonstrate the efficacy of these new methods are presented.

  7. Determination of Linear and Mass Attenuation Coefficients of Building Materials By Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, radioactive isotopes are used in many different fields, for instance in industry, energy production, archaeology and mainly in medical applications. In addition, bricks and stones, which are used to build these buildings and our homes, have higher natural radiation levels than other building materials such as wood. In this work, the linear and mass attenuation coefficients of different types building materials, needed for the protection of human health against radiation hazards, were investigated with Monte Carlo particle-transport code (MCNP) technique. Simulations were performed in order to obtain these coefficients at photon energies from 80 keV to 1333 keV for clay, perlite and PP. As should be anticipated, the density and photon energy are the main parameters that affect the mass attenuation coefficient

  8. MC21 v.6.0 - A continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport code with integrated reactor feedback capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MC21 is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport code for the calculation of the steady-state spatial distributions of reaction rates in three-dimensional models. The code supports neutron and photon transport in fixed source problems, as well as iterated-fission-source (eigenvalue) neutron transport problems. MC21 has been designed and optimized to support large-scale problems in reactor physics, shielding, and criticality analysis applications. The code also supports many in-line reactor feedback effects, including depletion, thermal feedback, xenon feedback, eigenvalue search, and neutron and photon heating. MC21 uses continuous-energy neutron/nucleus interaction physics over the range from 10-5 eV to 20 MeV. The code treats all common neutron scattering mechanisms, including fast-range elastic and non-elastic scattering, and thermal- and epithermal-range scattering from molecules and crystalline materials. For photon transport, MC21 uses continuous-energy interaction physics over the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The code treats all common photon interaction mechanisms, including Compton scattering, pair production, and photoelectric interactions. All of the nuclear data required by MC21 is provided by the NDEX system of codes, which extracts and processes data from EPDL-, ENDF-, and ACE-formatted source files. For geometry representation, MC21 employs a flexible constructive solid geometry system that allows users to create spatial cells from first- and second-order surfaces. The system also allows models to be built up as hierarchical collections of previously defined spatial cells, with interior detail provided by grids and template overlays. Results are collected by a generalized tally capability which allows users to edit integral flux and reaction rate information. Results can be collected over the entire problem or within specific regions of interest through the use of phase filters that control which particles are allowed to score each

  9. Proposal of flexible atomic and molecular process management for Monte Carlo impurity transport code based on object oriented method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulation code on impurity transport has been developed by several groups to be utilized mainly for fusion related edge plasmas. State of impurity particle is determined by atomic and molecular processes such as ionization, charge exchange in plasma. A lot of atomic and molecular processes have been considered because the edge plasma has not only impurity atoms, but also impurity molecules mainly related to chemical erosion of carbon materials, and their cross sections have been given experimentally and theoretically. We need to reveal which process is essential in a given edge plasma condition. Monte Carlo simulation code, which takes such various atomic and molecular processes into account, is necessary to investigate the behavior of impurity particle in plasmas. Usually, the impurity transport simulation code has been intended for some specific atomic and molecular processes so that the introduction of a new process forces complicated programming work. In order to evaluate various proposed atomic and molecular processes, a flexible management of atomic and molecular reaction should be established. We have developed the impurity transport simulation code based on object-oriented method. By employing object-oriented programming, we can handle each particle as 'object', which enfolds data and procedure function itself. A user (notice, not programmer) can define property of each particle species and the related atomic and molecular processes and then each 'object' is defined by analyzing this information. According to the relation among plasma particle species, objects are connected with each other and change their state by themselves. Dynamic allocation of these objects to program memory is employed to adapt for arbitrary number of species and atomic/molecular reactions. Thus we can treat arbitrary species and process starting from, for instance, methane and acetylene. Such a software procedure would be useful also for industrial application plasmas

  10. Nanometer scale description of electron transport and damage in condensed media using the TRAX Monte Carlo Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single interaction Monte Carlo code TRAX has been extended to describe low-energy electron creation and transport in solids. Electrons with energies below 1 keV have ranges in solids on the nanometerscale. Complete sets of electron interaction cross sections for energies below 1 keV down to 1 eV have been compiled and assessed for various target materials. The applicability of the cross sections has been validated by comparisons with experimental data as far as available. The code has further been extended to handle the production of Auger electrons and cascades. Furthermore, the capability to handle non-uniform targets has been added. With the extended TRAX code, experimental data from GSI's Toroid electron spectrometer have been reproduced using thin solid state foils of carbon, nickel, silver and gold as targets. Furthermore, the radial dose distribution around ion tracks has been investigated on the nanometer scale. The explicit consideration of Auger electron cascades has been used to evaluate whether metallic nanoparticles can locally enhance the dose in combination with proton or electron irradiation.

  11. Successful vectorization - reactor physics Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most particle transport Monte Carlo codes in use today are based on the ''history-based'' algorithm, wherein one particle history at a time is simulated. Unfortunately, the ''history-based'' approach (present in all Monte Carlo codes until recent years) is inherently scalar and cannot be vectorized. In particular, the history-based algorithm cannot take advantage of vector architectures, which characterize the largest and fastest computers at the current time, vector supercomputers such as the Cray X/MP or IBM 3090/600. However, substantial progress has been made in recent years in developing and implementing a vectorized Monte Carlo algorithm. This algorithm follows portions of many particle histories at the same time and forms the basis for all successful vectorized Monte Carlo codes that are in use today. This paper describes the basic vectorized algorithm along with descriptions of several variations that have been developed by different researchers for specific applications. These applications have been mainly in the areas of neutron transport in nuclear reactor and shielding analysis and photon transport in fusion plasmas. The relative merits of the various approach schemes will be discussed and the present status of known vectorization efforts will be summarized along with available timing results, including results from the successful vectorization of 3-D general geometry, continuous energy Monte Carlo. (orig.)

  12. Integrated Tiger Series of electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes: a user's guide for use on IBM mainframes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITS (Integrated Tiger Series) Monte Carlo code package developed at Sandia National Laboratories and distributed as CCC-467/ITS by the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) consists of eight codes - the standard codes, TIGER, CYLTRAN, ACCEPT; the P-codes, TIGERP, CYLTRANP, ACCEPTP; and the M-codes ACCEPTM, CYLTRANM. The codes have been adapted to run on the IBM 3081, VAX 11/780, CDC-7600, and Cray 1 with the use of the update emulator UPEML. This manual should serve as a guide to a user running the codes on IBM computers having 370 architecture. The cases listed were tested on the IBM 3033, under the MVS operating system using the VS Fortran Level 1.3.1 compiler

  13. Consistency test of the electron transport algorithm in the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the condensed history algorithm in GEANT4 (version 4.6.2.p01) is examined. We performed simulations of an ionization chamber composed of water for 1.25 MeV incident photon beams under Fano conditions, and evaluated the consistency of the cavity response for several combinations of electron transport parameters. GEANT4 permits electrons to reach geometric boundaries in large steps, and underestimates lateral displacement near interfaces. Step size artefacts due to distortions in electron fluence and angular distributions reduce the cavity dose by up to 39%. Accurate cavity response can be achieved using severe user-imposed step size restrictions. We suggest that improvements in the electron transport algorithm in GEANT4 should address the handling of boundary crossing

  14. Modeling of tungsten transport in the linear plasma device PSI-2 with the 3D Monte-Carlo code ERO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenkov, E.; Eksaeva, A.; Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A.; Laengner, M.; Kurnaev, V.; Kreter, A.; Coenen, J. W.; Rasinski, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ERO code was modified for modeling of plasma-surface interactions and impurities transport in the PSI-2 installation. Results of experiments on tungsten target irradiation with argon plasma were taken as a benchmark for the new version of the code. Spectroscopy data modeled with the code are in good agreement with experimental ones. Main factors contributing to observed discrepancies are discussed.

  15. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD for radiation protection purposes at relativistic heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crucial problem for radiation shielding design at heavy ion accelerator facilities with beam energies of several GeV/n is the source term problem. Experimental data on double differential neutron yields from thick targets irradiated with high-energy uranium nuclei are lacking. At present there are not many Monte Carlo multipurpose codes that can work with primary high-energy uranium nuclei. These codes use different physical models for simulating nucleus-nucleus reactions. Therefore, verification of the codes with available experimental data is very important for selection of the most reliable code for practical tasks. This paper presents comparisons of the FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD code simulations with experimental data on neutron production at 1 GeV/n 238U beam interaction with a thick Fe target

  16. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V and V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  17. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second

  18. Guideline for radiation transport simulation with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, the photon and neutron transport calculations with the Monte Carlo method have been progressed with advanced Monte Carlo codes and high-speed computers. Monte Carlo simulation is rather suitable expression than the calculation. Once Monte Carlo codes become more friendly and performance of computer progresses, most of the shielding problems will be solved by using the Monte Carlo codes and high-speed computers. As those codes prepare the standard input data for some problems, the essential techniques for solving the Monte Carlo method and variance reduction techniques of the Monte Carlo calculation might lose the interests to the general Monte Carlo users. In this paper, essential techniques of the Monte Carlo method and the variance reduction techniques, such as importance sampling method, selection of estimator, and biasing technique, are described to afford a better understanding of the Monte Carlo method and Monte Carlo code. (author)

  19. Common misconceptions in Monte Carlo particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Thomas E., E-mail: teb@lanl.gov [LANL, XCP-7, MS F663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Monte Carlo particle transport is often introduced primarily as a method to solve linear integral equations such as the Boltzmann transport equation. This paper discusses some common misconceptions about Monte Carlo methods that are often associated with an equation-based focus. Many of the misconceptions apply directly to standard Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP and some are worth noting so that one does not unnecessarily restrict future methods. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjoint variety and use from a Monte Carlo perspective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Misconceptions and preconceived notions about statistical weight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reasons that an adjoint based weight window sometimes works well or does not. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulse height/probability of initiation tallies and 'the' transport equation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlights unnecessary preconceived notions about Monte Carlo transport.

  20. General Monte Carlo code MONK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo code MONK is a general program written to provide a high degree of flexibility to the user. MONK is distinguished by its detailed representation of nuclear data in point form i.e., the cross-section is tabulated at specific energies instead of the more usual group representation. The nuclear data are unadjusted in the point form but recently the code has been modified to accept adjusted group data as used in fast and thermal reactor applications. The various geometrical handling capabilities and importance sampling techniques are described. In addition to the nuclear data aspects, the following features are also described; geometrical handling routines, tracking cycles, neutron source and output facilities. 12 references. (U.S.)

  1. Condensation and homogenization of cross sections for the deterministic transport codes with Monte Carlo method: Application to the GEN IV fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    calculation solver SNATCH in the PARIS code platform. The latter uses the transport theory which is indispensable for the new generation fast reactors analysis. The principal conclusions are as follows: The Monte-Carlo assembly calculation code is an interesting way (in the sense of avoiding the difficulties in the self-shielding calculation, the limited order development of anisotropy parameters, the exact 3D geometries) to validate the deterministic codes like ECCO or APOLLO3 and to produce the multi-group constants for deterministic or Monte-Carlo multi-group calculation codes. The results obtained for the moment with the multi-group constants calculated by TRIPOLI-4 code are comparable with those produced from ECCO, but did not show remarkable advantages. (author)

  2. MVP/GMVP 2: general purpose Monte Carlo codes for neutron and photon transport calculations based on continuous energy and multigroup methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to realize fast and accurate Monte Carlo simulation of neutron and photon transport problems, two vectorized Monte Carlo codes MVP and GMVP have been developed at JAERI. MVP is based on the continuous energy model and GMVP is on the multigroup model. Compared with conventional scalar codes, these codes achieve higher computation speed by a factor of 10 or more on vector super-computers. Both codes have sufficient functions for production use by adopting accurate physics model, geometry description capability and variance reduction techniques. The first version of the codes was released in 1994. They have been extensively improved and new functions have been implemented. The major improvements and new functions are (1) capability to treat the scattering model expressed with File 6 of the ENDF-6 format, (2) time-dependent tallies, (3) reaction rate calculation with the pointwise response function, (4) flexible source specification, (5) continuous-energy calculation at arbitrary temperatures, (6) estimation of real variances in eigenvalue problems, (7) point detector and surface crossing estimators, (8) statistical geometry model, (9) function of reactor noise analysis (simulation of the Feynman-α experiment), (10) arbitrary shaped lattice boundary, (11) periodic boundary condition, (12) parallelization with standard libraries (MPI, PVM), (13) supporting many platforms, etc. This report describes the physical model, geometry description method used in the codes, new functions and how to use them. (author)

  3. Simulation of interaction of ion beams with tissue-like media with the shield-hit Monte-Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SHIELD Monte-Carlo transport code [1-2] simulates the interactions of hadrons and atomic nuclei of arbitrary charge and mass number (Z,A) with complex extended targets in a wide energy range, from 1 TeV/u down to 1 MeV/u or thermal energies in the case of neutrons. SHIELD is used for solving the same type of problems as other well-known Monte-Carlo codes, e.g. LAHET, HERMES, FLUKA, GEANT or MCNPX. Nuclear reactions are taken into account in an exclusive approach where all stages of hadron nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions are described. Thus, SHIELD can be used to simulate interactions of heavy ions with complex macroscopic targets. The version of the SHIELD code extended to simulate heavy ions transport in the context of the beam therapy in oncology is called SHIELD-HIT (Heavy Ion Transport) [3]. The results presented in this work stem from a cooperative research project between the Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institute (Stockholm) and the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Science (Moscow). (author)

  4. Monte Carlo electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of nonplasma coupled electron/photon transport using Monte Carlo method is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linerarized formalisms at electron energies from 1 keV to 1000 MeV. Applications involving pulse-height estimation, transport in external magnetic fields, and optical Cerenkov production are discussed to underscore the importance of this branch of computational physics. Advances in electron multigroup cross-section generation is reported, and its impact on future code development assessed. Progress toward the transformation of MCNP into a generalized neutral/charged-particle Monte Carlo code is described. 48 refs

  5. SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SERPENT is a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup calculation code, developed at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland since 2004. The code is specialized in lattice physics applications, but the universe-based geometry description allows transport simulation to be carried out in complicated three-dimensional geometries as well. The suggested applications of SERPENT include generation of homogenized multi-group constants for deterministic reactor simulator calculations, fuel cycle studies involving detailed assembly-level burnup calculations, validation of deterministic lattice transport codes, research reactor applications, educational purposes and demonstration of reactor physics phenomena. The Serpent code has been publicly distributed by the OECD/NEA Data Bank since May 2009 and RSICC in the U. S. since March 2010. The code is being used in some 35 organizations in 20 countries around the world. This paper presents an overview of the methods and capabilities of the Serpent code, with examples in the modelling of WWER-440 reactor physics. (Author)

  6. ITS version 5.0: the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/Photon Monte Carlo transport codes with CAD geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability

  7. ITS version 5.0 :the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/Photon monte carlo transport codes with CAD geometry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2005-09-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  8. MC21 v.6.0 – A continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport code with integrated reactor feedback capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Overview of the capabilities and features of the MC21 Monte Carlo code, version 6. • Detailed description of in-line reactor feedback capabilities in MC21. • Discussion of running strategies for Monte Carlo simulations with feedback effects. • Includes representative MC21 results for massively-parallel 3D reactor simulations. - Abstract: MC21 is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport code for the calculation of the steady-state spatial distributions of reaction rates in three-dimensional models. The code supports neutron and photon transport in fixed source problems, as well as iterated-fission-source (eigenvalue) neutron transport problems. MC21 has been designed and optimized to support large-scale problems in reactor physics, shielding, and criticality analysis applications. The code also supports many in-line reactor feedback effects, including depletion, thermal feedback, xenon feedback, eigenvalue search, and neutron and photon heating. MC21 uses continuous-energy neutron/nucleus interaction physics over the range from 10−5 eV to 20 MeV. The code treats all common neutron scattering mechanisms, including fast-range elastic and non-elastic scattering, and thermal- and epithermal-range scattering from molecules and crystalline materials. For photon transport, MC21 uses continuous-energy interaction physics over the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The code treats all common photon interaction mechanisms, including Compton scattering, pair production, and photoelectric interactions. All of the nuclear data required by MC21 is provided by the NDEX system of codes, which extracts and processes data from EPDL-, ENDF-, and ACE-formatted source files. For geometry representation, MC21 employs a flexible constructive solid geometry system that allows users to create spatial cells from first- and second-order surfaces. The system also allows models to be built up as hierarchical collections of previously defined spatial cells

  9. DIANE multiparticle transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DIANE is a three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo code that performs coupled neutron-photon-electron and light charged particle Monte Carlo transport on a fixed geometry and/or an imploding material (for example an Inertial-Confinement- Fusion plasma target). DIANE's multigroup data are provided by the nuclear data code ZADIG. ZADIG groups cross sections from international data libraries in ENDF7 format. In order to better account for resonances, a specific multigroup treatment, called 'mini-group' has been implemented. For photons, photo-atomic interactions are considered as well as photonuclear reactions. Coherent scattering may include anomalous scattering factors. Incoherent scattering include scattering function from EPDL97. We also account for fluorescence X-rays and Auger electrons. For neutrons, all the reaction channels relevant are processed by ZADIG. The ZADIG code integrates the Secondary Source Bremsstrahlung (SSB) model that simulates electron-photon cascade from electron slowing down. For light ions, DIANE solves the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation. The continuous effect of Coulomb interaction with the background plasma can be treated by three Fokker- Planck terms (slowing-down, energy straggling and angular deflection). The effect of electric and magnetic fields through the Lorentz force can also be taken into account

  10. A validation report for the KALIMER core design computing system by the Monte Carlo transport theory code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the results of KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor) core design calculated by the K-CORE computing system are compared and analyzed with those of MCDEP calculation. The effective multiplication factor, flux distribution, fission power distribution and the number densities of the important nuclides effected from the depletion calculation for the R-Z model and Hex-Z model of KALIMER core are compared. It is confirmed that the results of K-CORE system compared with those of MCDEP based on the Monte Carlo transport theory method agree well within 700 pcm for the effective multiplication factor estimation and also within 2% in the driver fuel region, within 10% in the radial blanket region for the reaction rate and the fission power density. Thus, the K-CORE system for the core design of KALIMER by treating the lumped fission product and mainly important nuclides can be used as a core design tool keeping the necessary accuracy

  11. User manual for version 4.3 of the Tripoli-4 Monte-Carlo method particle transport computer code; Notice d'utilisation du code Tripoli-4, version 4.3: code de transport de particules par la methode de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, J.P.; Mazzolo, A.; Peneliau, Y.; Petit, O.; Roesslinger, B

    2003-07-01

    This manual relates to Version 4.3 TRIPOLI-4 code. TRIPOLI-4 is a computer code simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons and positrons. It can be used for radiation shielding calculations (long-distance propagation with flux attenuation in non-multiplying media) and neutronic calculations (fissile medium, criticality or sub-criticality basis). This makes it possible to calculate k{sub eff} (for criticality), flux, currents, reaction rates and multi-group cross-sections. TRIPOLI-4 is a three-dimensional code that uses the Monte-Carlo method. It allows for point-wise description in terms of energy of cross-sections and multi-group homogenized cross-sections and features two modes of geometrical representation: surface and combinatorial. The code uses cross-section libraries in ENDF/B format (such as JEF2-2, ENDF/B-VI and JENDL) for point-wise description cross-sections in APOTRIM format (from the APOLLO2 code) or a format specific to TRIPOLI-4 for multi-group description. (authors)

  12. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all optimization. PMID:24600168

  13. Monte Carlo simulation code modernization

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The continual development of sophisticated transport simulation algorithms allows increasingly accurate description of the effect of the passage of particles through matter. This modelling capability finds applications in a large spectrum of fields from medicine to astrophysics, and of course HEP. These new capabilities however come at the cost of a greater computational intensity of the new models, which has the effect of increasing the demands of computing resources. This is particularly true for HEP, where the demand for more simulation are driven by the need of both more accuracy and more precision, i.e. better models and more events. Usually HEP has relied on the "Moore's law" evolution, but since almost ten years the increase in clock speed has withered and computing capacity comes in the form of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors. To harness these opportunities we need to adapt our code to concurrent programming models taking advantages of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. Th...

  14. Monte Carlo photon transport techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of Monte Carlo calculation of photon transport problems is the computer simulation of individual photon histories and their subsequent averaging to provide the quantities of interest. As the history of a photon is followed the values of variables are selected and decisions made by sampling known distributions using random numbers. The transport of photon is simulated by creation of particles from a defined source region, generally with a random initial orientation in space, with tracking of particles as they travel through the system, sampling the probability density functions for their interactions to evaluate their trajectories and energy deposition at different points in the system. The interactions determine the penetration and the motion of particles. The computational model, for radiation transport problems includes geometry and material specifications. Every computer code contains a database of experimentally obtained quantities, known as cross-sections that determine the probability of a particle interacting with the medium through which it is transported. Every cross-section is peculiar to the type and energy of the incident particle and to the kind of interaction it undergoes. These partial cross-sections are summed to form the total cross-section; the ratio of the partial cross-section to the total cross-section gives the probability of this particular interaction occurring. Cross-section data for the interaction types of interest must be supplied for each material present. The model also consists of algorithms used to compute the result of interactions (changes in particle energy, direction, etc.) based on the physical principles that describe the interaction of radiation with matter and the cross-section data provided

  15. Intercomparison of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes to model TEPC response in low-energy neutron and gamma-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) can potentially be used as a portable and personal dosemeter in mixed neutron and gamma-ray fields, but what hinders this use is their typically large physical size. To formulate compact TEPC designs, the use of a Monte Carlo transport code is necessary to predict the performance of compact designs in these fields. To perform this modelling, three candidate codes were assessed: MCNPX 2.7.E, FLUKA 2011.2 and PHITS 2.24. In each code, benchmark simulations were performed involving the irradiation of a 5-in. TEPC with monoenergetic neutron fields and a 4-in. wall-less TEPC with monoenergetic gamma-ray fields. The frequency and dose mean lineal energies and dose distributions calculated from each code were compared with experimentally determined data. For the neutron benchmark simulations, PHITS produces data closest to the experimental values and for the gamma-ray benchmark simulations, FLUKA yields data closest to the experimentally determined quantities. (authors)

  16. Development of a New Monte Carlo reactor physics code

    OpenAIRE

    Leppänen, Jaakko

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are widely used in various reactor physics applications, traditionally related to criticality safety analyses, radiation shielding problems, detector modelling and validation of deterministic transport codes. The main advantage of the method is the capability to model geometry and interaction physics without major approximations. The disadvantage is that the modelling of complicated systems is very computing-intensive, which restricts the applications to so...

  17. SPQR: a Monte Carlo reactor kinetics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SPQR Monte Carlo code has been developed to analyze fast reactor core accident problems where conventional methods are considered inadequate. The code is based on the adiabatic approximation of the quasi-static method. This initial version contains no automatic material motion or feedback. An existing Monte Carlo code is used to calculate the shape functions and the integral quantities needed in the kinetics module. Several sample problems have been devised and analyzed. Due to the large statistical uncertainty associated with the calculation of reactivity in accident simulations, the results, especially at later times, differ greatly from deterministic methods. It was also found that in large uncoupled systems, the Monte Carlo method has difficulty in handling asymmetric perturbations

  18. Coded aperture optimization using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coded apertures using Uniformly Redundant Arrays (URA) have been unsuccessfully evaluated for two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging in Nuclear Medicine. The images reconstructed from coded projections contain artifacts and suffer from poor spatial resolution in the longitudinal direction. We introduce a Maximum-Likelihood Expectation-Maximization (MLEM) algorithm for three-dimensional coded aperture imaging which uses a projection matrix calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. The aim of the algorithm is to reduce artifacts and improve the three-dimensional spatial resolution in the reconstructed images. Firstly, we present the validation of GATE (Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography) for Monte Carlo simulations of a coded mask installed on a clinical gamma camera. The coded mask modelling was validated by comparison between experimental and simulated data in terms of energy spectra, sensitivity and spatial resolution. In the second part of the study, we use the validated model to calculate the projection matrix with Monte Carlo simulations. A three-dimensional thyroid phantom study was performed to compare the performance of the three-dimensional MLEM reconstruction with conventional correlation method. The results indicate that the artifacts are reduced and three-dimensional spatial resolution is improved with the Monte Carlo-based MLEM reconstruction.

  19. Monte Carlo solver for UWB1 nuclear fuel depletion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo solver was developed in order to speed-up depletion calculations. • For LWR model, UWB1 Monte Carlo solver is on average 10 times faster than MCNP6. • The UWB1 code will allow faster calculation analysis of BA parameters in fuel design. - Abstract: Recent nuclear reactor burnable absorber research tries to introduce new materials in the nuclear fuel. As a part of this effort, a fast computational tool is being developed for the advanced nuclear fuel. The first version of the newly developed UWB1 fast nuclear fuel depletion code significantly reduced calculation time by omitting the solution step for the Boltzmann transport equation. However, estimation of neutron multiplication factor during depletion was not sufficiently calculated. Therefore, at least one transport calculation for fuel depletion is necessary. This paper presents a new Monte Carlo solver that is implemented into the UWB1 code. The UWB1 Monte Carlo solver calculates neutron multiplication factor and neutron flux in the fuel for collapsed cross sections. Accuracy of the solver is supported by using current nuclear data stored in the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. Speed of the solver is the product of development focusing on minimization of CPU utilization at the expense of RAM demands. The UWB1 Monte Carlo solver is approximately 14 times faster than the MCNP6 reference code when one transport equation solution within fuel depletion is compared. Another speed-up can be achieved by employing advanced depletion scheme in the coupled transport and burnup equations. The resulting faster code will be used in optimization studies for ideal burnable absorber material selection where many various materials and concentrations will be evaluated

  20. Development of a New Monte Carlo reactor physics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are widely used in various reactor physics applications, traditionally related to criticality safety analyses, radiation shielding problems, detector modelling and validation of deterministic transport codes. The main advantage of the method is the capability to model geometry and interaction physics without major approximations. The disadvantage is that the modelling of complicated systems is very computing-intensive, which restricts the applications to some extent. The importance of Monte Carlo calculation is likely to increase in the future, along with the development in computer capacities and parallel calculation. An interesting near-future application for the Monte Carlo method is the generation of input parameters for deterministic reactor simulator codes. These codes are used in coupled LWR full-core analyses and typically based on few-group nodal diffusion methods. The input data consists of homogenised few-group constants, presently generated using deterministic lattice transport codes. The task is becoming increasingly challenging, along with the development in nuclear technology. Calculations involving high-burnup fuels, advanced MOX technology and next-generation reactor systems are likely to cause problems in the future, if code development cannot keep up with the applications. A potential solution is the use of Monte Carlo based lattice transport codes, which brings all the advantages of the calculation method. So far there has been only a handful of studies on group constant generation using the Monte Carlo method, although the interest has clearly increased during the past few years. The homogenisation of reaction cross sections is simple and straightforward, and it can be carried out using any Monte Carlo code. Some of the parameters, however, require the use of special techniques that are usually not available in general-purpose codes. The main problem is the calculation of neutron diffusion coefficients, which

  1. MCNP-POLIMI v1.0, Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System To Simulate Time-Analysis Quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: MCNP is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon-electron Monte Carlo transport code system. Based on the Los Alamos National Laboratory code MCNP4C (formerly distributed as CCC-700), MCNP-PoliMi was developed to simulate time-analysis quantities. In particular, the code includes the correlation between neutron interaction and the corresponding photon production. Conversely to the technique adopted by standard MCNP, MCNP PoliMi samples secondary photons according to the neutron collision type. A post-processing code, i.e. the Matlab script 'postmain', is included and can be tailored to model specific detector characteristics. These features make MCNP-PoliMi a versatile tool to simulate particle interactions and detection processes. 2 - Methods: MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some special fourth-degree surfaces. For neutrons, all reactions in a particular cross-section evaluation are accounted for. Both free gas and S(alpha, beta) thermal treatments are used. Criticality sources as well as fixed and surface sources are available. For photons, the code takes account of incoherent and coherent scattering with and without electron binding effects, the possibility of fluorescent emission following photoelectric absorption, and absorption in pair production with local emission of annihilation radiation. A very general source and tally structure is available. The tallies have extensive statistical analysis of convergence. Rapid convergence is enabled by a wide variety of variance reduction methods. Energy ranges are 0-60 MeV for neutrons (data generally only available up to 20 MeV) and 1 keV - 1 GeV for photons and electrons. The MCNP-PoliMi code was developed to simulate each neutron-nucleus interaction as closely as possible. In particular, neutron interaction and

  2. Comparison of the distribution of doses calculated with Monte Carlo N-particle transport code and those practically measured by 60Co therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility of Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) simulated calculation. Methods: The calculation in water phantom was contrasted with the practical measurements and the reported values using the percent depth dose (PDD) curve and normal peak scatter factor. Results: There Was no significant difference between calculated and measured results in the 10 cm×10 cm field (t=-0.41, P>0.05), however, there were significant differences in the 5 cm×5 cm field (t=7.2, P<0.05) and in the 12 cm×12 cm field (t=-4.6, P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the calculated results and the reported values (t=-1.91, P>0.05). In the same radiation field, the PDD decreased as the depth increased, but increased as the size of the radiation field increased at the same depth. PDD and normal peak scatter factor were both important parameters for calculation of prescribed dose. Conclusions: It is possible to establish a set of accurate and comprehensive percent depth doses and normal peak scatter factor parameters so as to provide the basis of clinical use, quality assurance and quality control for radiotherapy. (authors)

  3. Implict Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulations of Four Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, N

    2007-08-01

    Radiation transport codes, like almost all codes, are difficult to develop and debug. It is helpful to have small, easy to run test problems with known answers to use in development and debugging. It is also prudent to re-run test problems periodically during development to ensure that previous code capabilities have not been lost. We describe four radiation transport test problems with analytic or approximate analytic answers. These test problems are suitable for use in debugging and testing radiation transport codes. We also give results of simulations of these test problems performed with an Implicit Monte Carlo photonics code.

  4. Verification of Monte-Carlo transport codes FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD for radiation protection purposes at relativistic heavy-ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crucial problem for radiation shielding design at heavy-ion accelerator facilities with beam energies to several GeV/n is the source term problem. Experimental data on double differential neutron yields from thick target irradiated with high-energy uranium nuclei are lacking. At present, there are not many Monte-Carlo multipurpose codes that can work with primary high-energy uranium nuclei. These codes use different physical models for simulation of nucleus-nucleus reactions. Therefore, verification of the codes with available experimental data is very important for selection of the most reliable code for practical tasks. This paper presents comparisons of the FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD codes simulations with the experimental data on neutron production at 1 GeV/n 238U beam interaction with thick Fe target

  5. Evaluation of integral quantities in an accelerator driven system using different nuclear models implemented in the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We investigated the main quantities determining ADS performance. • We calculated ADS performance such as neutron yield, neutron leakage spectra, heating and neutron and proton spectra in the target and in the beam window. • We used the MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo code for three-dimensional calculations. - Abstract: The MCNPX code offers options based on physics packages; the Bertini, ISABEL, INCL4 intra-nuclear models, and Dresner, ABLA evaporation–fission models and CEM2k cascade-exciton model. This study analyzes the main quantities determining ADS performance, such as neutron yield, neutron leakage spectra, heating and neutron and proton spectra in the target and in the beam window calculated by the MCNPX-2.5.0 Monte Carlo transport code, which is a combination of LAHET and MCNP codes. The results obtained by simulating different models cited above and implemented in MCNPX are compared with each other. The investigated system is composed of a natural lead cylindrical target and stainless steel (HT9) beam window. The target has been optimized to produce maximum number of neutrons with a radius of 20 cm and 70 cm of height. The target is bombarded with a high intensity linear accelerator by a 1 GeV, 1 mA proton beam. The protons are assumed uniformly distributed across the beam of radius 3 cm, and entering the target through a hole of 5.3 cm radius. The proton beam has an outer radius of 5.3 cm and an inner radius of 5.0 cm. The maximum value of the neutron flux in the target is observed on the axis ∼10 cm below the beam window, where the maximum difference between 7 different models is ∼15%. The total neutron leakage of the target calculated with the Bertini/ABLA is 1.83 × 1017 n/s, and is about 14% higher than the value calculated by the INCL4/Dresner (1.60 × 1017 n/s). Bertini/ABLA calculates top, bottom and side neutron leakage fractions as 20%, 2.3%, 77.6% of the total leakage, respectively, whereas, the calculated fractions are 18

  6. Development of Monte Carlo machine for particle transport problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo machine, Monte-4 has been developed to realize high performance computing of Monte Carlo codes for particle transport. The calculation for particle tracking in a complex geometry requires (1) classification of particles by the region types using multi-way conditional branches, and (2) determination whether intersections of particle paths with surfaces of the regions are on the boundaries of the regions or not, using nests of conditional branches. However, these procedures require scalar operations or unusual vector operations. Thus the speedup ratios have been low, i.e. nearly two times, in vector processing of Monte Carlo codes for particle transport on conventional vector processors. The Monte Carlo machine Monte-4 has been equipped with the special hardware called Monte Carlo pipelines to process these procedures with high performance. Additionally Monte-4 has been equipped with enhanced load/store pipelines to realize fast transfer of indirectly addressed data for the purpose of resolving imbalances between the performance of data transfers and arithmetic operations in vector processing of Monte Carlo codes on conventional vector processors. Finally, Monte-4 has a parallel processing capability with four processors to multiply the performance of vector processing. We have evaluated the effective performance of Monte-4 using production-level Monte Carlo codes such as vectorized KENO-IV and MCNP. In the performance evaluation, nearly ten times speedup ratios have been obtained, compared with scalar processing of the original codes. (author)

  7. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes against measured small angle p-, d-, and t-emission in carbon fragmentation at 600 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, B. M. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Borodin, Yu. A. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Bulychjov, S. A. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Dukhovskoy, I. A. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Krutenkova, A. P. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Martemianov, M. A. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Matsyuk, M. A. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Turdakina, E. N. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Khanov, A. I. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Momentum spectra of hydrogen isotopes have been measured at 3.5° from 12C fragmentation on a Be target. Momentum spectra cover both the region of fragmentation maximum and the cumulative region. Differential cross sections span five orders of magnitude. The data are compared to predictions of four Monte Carlo codes: QMD, LAQGSM, BC, and INCL++. There are large differences between the data and predictions of some models in the high momentum region. The INCL++ code gives the best and almost perfect description of the data.

  8. Modelling of impurity transport in the linear plasma devices PISCES-B and pilot-PSI using the Monte-Carlo code ERO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulations for linear devices using the 3D Monte-Carlo code ERO have a number of particularities of both physical and technical nature. Many physical effects introduced and tested for these simulations (elastic collisions, population of metastable states, etc.) can be relevant for tokamaks as well. The current status of these activities is summarized. As an example some simulations reproducing the experimental observations at PISCES-B and Pilot-PSI are presented. Main deviations and ideas for their origins are discussed (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Criticality benchmarking of ANET Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the new Monte Carlo code ANET is tested on criticality calculations. ANET is developed based on the high energy physics code GEANT of CERN and aims at progressively satisfying several requirements regarding both simulations of GEN II/III reactors, as well as of innovative nuclear reactor designs such as the Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs). Here ANET is applied on three different nuclear configurations, including a subcritical assembly, a Material Testing Reactor and the conceptual configuration of an ADS. In the first case, calculation of the effective multiplication factor (keff) are performed for the Training Nuclear Reactor of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, while in the second case keff is computed for the fresh fueled core of the Portuguese research reactor (RPJ) just after its conversion to Low Enriched Uranium, considering the control rods at the position that renders the reactor critical. In both cases ANET computations are compared with corresponding results obtained by three different well established codes, including both deterministic (XSDRNPM/CITATION) and Monte Carlo (TRIPOLI, MCNP). In the RPI case, keff computations are also compared with observations during the reactor core commissioning since the control rods are considered at criticality position. The above verification studies show ANET to produce reasonable results since they are satisfactorily compared with other models as well as with observations. For the third case (ADS), preliminary ANET computations of keff for various intensities of the proton beam are presented, showing also a reasonable code performance concerning both the order of magnitude and the relative variation of the computed parameter. (author)

  10. Effect of the electron transport through thin slabs on the simulation of linear electron accelerators of use in therapy: A comparative study of various Monte Carlo codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches, M.; García-Pareja, S.; Guerrero, R.; Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2007-09-01

    When a therapeutic electron linear accelerator is simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code, the tuning of the initial spectra and the renormalization of dose (e.g., to maximum axial dose) constitute a common practice. As a result, very similar depth dose curves are obtained for different MC codes. However, if renormalization is turned off, the results obtained with the various codes disagree noticeably. The aim of this work is to investigate in detail the reasons of this disagreement. We have found that the observed differences are due to non-negligible differences in the angular scattering of the electron beam in very thin slabs of dense material (primary foil) and thick slabs of very low density material (air). To gain insight, the effects of the angular scattering models considered in various MC codes on the dose distribution in a water phantom are discussed using very simple geometrical configurations for the LINAC. The MC codes PENELOPE 2003, PENELOPE 2005, GEANT4, GEANT3, EGSnrc and MCNPX have been used.

  11. Proton therapy Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful feature of the Monte Carlo method is the possibility of simulating all individual particle interactions in three dimensions and performing numerical experiments with a preset error. These facts were the motivation behind the development of a general-purpose Monte Carlo SRNA program for proton transport simulation in technical systems described by standard geometrical forms (plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, cube. Some of the possible applications of the SRNA program are: (a a general code for proton transport modeling, (b design of accelerator-driven systems, (c simulation of proton scattering and degrading shapes and composition, (d research on proton detectors; and (e radiation protection at accelerator installations. This wide range of possible applications of the program demands the development of various versions of SRNA-VOX codes for proton transport modeling in voxelized geometries and has, finally, resulted in the ISTAR package for the calculation of deposited energy distribution in patients on the basis of CT data in radiotherapy. All of the said codes are capable of using 3-D proton sources with an arbitrary energy spectrum in an interval of 100 keV to 250 MeV.

  12. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere; Il codice PREMAR per la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione dell`atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Borgia, M.G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Energia; Premuda, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Ist. FISBAT

    1997-03-01

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department.

  13. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house opti...

  14. Monte Carlo methods for particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighat, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become the de facto standard in radiation transport. Although powerful, if not understood and used appropriately, the method can give misleading results. Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport teaches appropriate use of the Monte Carlo method, explaining the method's fundamental concepts as well as its limitations. Concise yet comprehensive, this well-organized text: * Introduces the particle importance equation and its use for variance reduction * Describes general and particle-transport-specific variance reduction techniques * Presents particle transport eigenvalue issues and methodologies to address these issues * Explores advanced formulations based on the author's research activities * Discusses parallel processing concepts and factors affecting parallel performance Featuring illustrative examples, mathematical derivations, computer algorithms, and homework problems, Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport provides nuclear engineers and scientists with a practical guide ...

  15. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  16. Status of the MCNPX transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX and its associated data have been the focus of a major development effort at Los Alamos for several years. The system has reached a mature state, and has become a significant tool for many intermediate and high-energy particle transport applications. A recent version has been released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). A recent report provides an overview of the code and an extensive set of references for the component physics modules used in the code. In this paper we review the status of the developmental version of MCNPX, and describe some important new enhancements, including the use of evaluated nuclear data files for proton transport; the use of photonuclear reaction data; improved elastic and inelastic react ion cross sections for nucleons, antinucleons, pions, and kaons; and two new modes of operation of the code. We also illustrate the use of the new proton and photonuclear data in two representative applications

  17. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear energy study (II). Annual report on Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report, research results discussed in 1999 fiscal year at Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee of Nuclear Code Research Committee were summarized. Present status of Monte Carlo simulation on nuclear energy study was described. Especially, besides of criticality, shielding and core analyses, present status of applications to risk and radiation damage analyses, high energy transport and nuclear theory calculations of Monte Carlo Method was described. The 18 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Parallel MCNP Monte Carlo transport calculations with MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steady increase in computational performance has made Monte Carlo calculations for large/complex systems possible. However, in order to make these calculations practical, order of magnitude increases in performance are necessary. The Monte Carlo method is inherently parallel (particles are simulated independently) and thus has the potential for near-linear speedup with respect to the number of processors. Further, the ever-increasing accessibility of parallel computers, such as workstation clusters, facilitates the practical use of parallel Monte Carlo. Recognizing the nature of the Monte Carlo method and the trends in available computing, the code developers at Los Alamos National Laboratory implemented the message-passing general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP (version 4A). The PVM package was chosen by the MCNP code developers because it supports a variety of communication networks, several UNIX platforms, and heterogeneous computer systems. This PVM version of MCNP has been shown to produce speedups that approach the number of processors and thus, is a very useful tool for transport analysis. Due to software incompatibilities on the local IBM SP2, PVM has not been available, and thus it is not possible to take advantage of this useful tool. Hence, it became necessary to implement an alternative message-passing library package into MCNP. Because the message-passing interface (MPI) is supported on the local system, takes advantage of the high-speed communication switches in the SP2, and is considered to be the emerging standard, it was selected

  20. High Energy Transport Code HETC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics contained in the High Energy Transport Code (HETC), in particular the collision models, are discussed. An application using HETC as part of the CALOR code system is also given. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Weighted-delta-tracking for Monte Carlo particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper presents an alteration to the Monte Carlo Woodcock tracking technique. • The alteration improves computational efficiency within regions of high absorbers. • The rejection technique is replaced by a statistical weighting mechanism. • The modified Woodcock method is shown to be faster than standard Woodcock tracking. • The modified Woodcock method achieves a lower variance, given a specified accuracy. - Abstract: Monte Carlo particle transport (MCPT) codes are incredibly powerful and versatile tools to simulate particle behavior in a multitude of scenarios, such as core/criticality studies, radiation protection, shielding, medicine and fusion research to name just a small subset applications. However, MCPT codes can be very computationally expensive to run when the model geometry contains large attenuation depths and/or contains many components. This paper proposes a simple modification to the Woodcock tracking method used by some Monte Carlo particle transport codes. The Woodcock method utilizes the rejection method for sampling virtual collisions as a method to remove collision distance sampling at material boundaries. However, it suffers from poor computational efficiency when the sample acceptance rate is low. The proposed method removes rejection sampling from the Woodcock method in favor of a statistical weighting scheme, which improves the computational efficiency of a Monte Carlo particle tracking code. It is shown that the modified Woodcock method is less computationally expensive than standard ray-tracing and rejection-based Woodcock tracking methods and achieves a lower variance, given a specified accuracy

  2. The present of shielding analysis with nuclear data for continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following three problems are analyzed by continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP with JENDL-3.2, 3.3, and ENDF/B-VI. 1. Shielding analysis of WINFRITH-Aspins iron deep penetration experiment. 2. Shielding analysis of TN-12A spent fuel transport cask experiment. 3. Shielding analysis of modular shielding house keeping spent fuel transportable casks. (author)

  3. MCNP4B-GN, Monte Carlo Code System for (gamma,n) production and transport in high-Z materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: MCNP4B-GN is used to treat (gamma,n) production and transport in medical accelerator heads, to study the undesired neutron dose to patients, employing a single code for both the electromagnetic and the neutron transport. 2 - Methods: The code simulates the production of giant dipole resonance (GDR) photoneutrons in thick layers of high-Z elements. Neutrons are generated through evaporation of the compound nucleus or through direct channel; the photoneutron origin coordinates, evaluated as the electromagnetic shower develops are taken into account as well as the energy spectrum of the generated photoneutron. Photoneutron production routines have been inserted into MCNP4B, thus allowing a handling of complicated geometries with a single input definition, a fundamental requirement for this kind of application. The modifications to the standard MCNP4B were made as a 'patch' (i.e. a series of instructions on how to modify the basic code) which is distributed together with a preprocessor. The preprocessor reads the patch, reads MCNP4B and writes MCNP4B-GN. A new subroutine 'GAMMN' has been written, analogous to the subroutine 'ACEGAM' for (n,gamma). GAMMN is called from subroutine 'COLIDP' at a photon collision with one of the 6 elements in question when the energy of the photon is such that there is a non-zero probability of producing a neutron. In analogy with the (n,gamma) capability, the production or not of a neutron is not correlated with the subsequent history of the photon and in particular the choice of the type of photon collision at that spatial point. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The upper energy limit, imposed by theoretical considerations, is 30 MeV for photons and 20 MeV for photoneutrons. The physical model breaks down at higher photon energies, whilst the neutron transport performed with MCNP cannot be simulated for neutron energies greater than 20 MeV (the neutron energy regime in MCNP is

  4. Monte Carlo 2000 Conference : Advanced Monte Carlo for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baräo, Fernando; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Távora, Luis; Vaz, Pedro

    2001-01-01

    This book focusses on the state of the art of Monte Carlo methods in radiation physics and particle transport simulation and applications, the latter involving in particular, the use and development of electron--gamma, neutron--gamma and hadronic codes. Besides the basic theory and the methods employed, special attention is paid to algorithm development for modeling, and the analysis of experiments and measurements in a variety of fields ranging from particle to medical physics.

  5. Development of Monte Carlo-based pebble bed reactor fuel management code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo-based fuel management code for OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor was developed. • The double-heterogeneity was modeled using statistical method in MVP-BURN code. • The code can perform analysis of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase. • Code-to-code comparisons for Once-Through-Then-Out case were investigated. • Ability of the code to accommodate the void cavity was confirmed. - Abstract: A fuel management code for pebble bed reactors (PBRs) based on the Monte Carlo method has been developed in this study. The code, named Monte Carlo burnup analysis code for PBR (MCPBR), enables a simulation of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle of a PBR from the running-in phase to the equilibrium condition. In MCPBR, a burnup calculation based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MVP-BURN, is coupled with an additional utility code to be able to simulate the OTTO cycle of PBR. MCPBR has several advantages in modeling PBRs, namely its Monte Carlo neutron transport modeling, its capability of explicitly modeling the double heterogeneity of the PBR core, and its ability to model different axial fuel speeds in the PBR core. Analysis at the equilibrium condition of the simplified PBR was used as the validation test of MCPBR. The calculation results of the code were compared with the results of diffusion-based fuel management PBR codes, namely the VSOP and PEBBED codes. Using JENDL-4.0 nuclide library, MCPBR gave a 4.15% and 3.32% lower keff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. While using JENDL-3.3, MCPBR gave a 2.22% and 3.11% higher keff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. The ability of MCPBR to analyze neutron transport in the top void of the PBR core and its effects was also confirmed

  6. MCMG: a 3-D multigroup P3 Monte Carlo code and its benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a 3-D Monte Carlo multigroup neutron transport code MCMG has been developed from a coupled neutron and photon transport Monte Carlo code MCNP. The continuous-energy cross section library of the MCNP code is replaced by the multigroup cross section data generated by the transport lattice code, such as the WIMS code. It maintains the strong abilities of MCNP for geometry treatment, counting, variance reduction techniques and plotting. The multigroup neutron scattering cross sections adopt the Pn (n ≤ 3) approximation. The test results are in good agreement with the results of other methods and experiments. The number of energy groups can be varied from few groups to multigroup, and either macroscopic or microscopic cross section can be used. (author)

  7. ITS: integrated TIGER series of electron/photon transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITS system of linear, time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes is a group of multimaterial, multidimensional codes designed to provide an accurate description of the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. It is based primarily on the ETRAN system, which combines microscopic photon transport with a macroscopic random walk for electron transport. Emphasis is on simplicity of application without sacrificing sophistication of the physical model. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications

  8. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Matthew Joseph [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  9. Fast code for Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code to generate the dynamic evolution of the Ising model on a square lattice, following the Metropolis algorithm is presented. The computer time consumption is reduced by a factor of 8 when one compares our code with traditional multiple spin codes. The memory allocation size is also reduced by a factor of 4. The code is easily generalizable for other lattices and models. (author)

  10. Critical and shielding parametric studies with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI to identify the key points to take into account during the transportation of blanket assemblies with high ratio of americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of French research program on Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor, one possible option consists in burning minor actinides in this kind of Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor. Two types of transmutation mode are studied in the world : the homogeneous mode of transmutation where actinides are scattered with very low enrichment ratio in fissile assemblies and the heterogeneous mode where fissile core is surrounded by blanket assemblies filled with minor actinides with ratio of incorporated actinides up to 20%. Depending on which element is considered to be burnt and on its content, these minor actinides contents imply constraints on assemblies' transportation between Nuclear Power Plants and fuel cycle facilities. In this study, we present some academic studies in order to identify some key constraints linked to the residual power and neutron/gamma load of such kind of blanket assemblies. To simplify the approach, we considered a modeling of a 'model cask' dedicated to the transportation of a unique irradiated blanket assembly loaded with 20% of Americium and basically inspired from an existent cask designed initially for the damaged fissile Superphenix assembly transport. Thermal calculations performed with EDF-SYRTHES code have shown that due to thermal limitations on cladding temperature, the decay time to be considered before transportation is 20 years. This study is based on explicit 3D representations of the cask and the contained blanket assembly with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI/JEFF3.1.1 library and concludes that after such a decay time, the transportation of a unique Americium radial blanket is feasible only if the design of our model cask is modified in order to comply with the dose limitation criterion. (author)

  11. Applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit at LLNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Kenneth E.; Bergstrom, Paul M., Jr.; Buck, Richard M.; Cullen, Dermot; Fujino, D.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine

    1999-09-01

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions.

  12. Sub-Transport Layer Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Krigslund, Jeppe; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani;

    2014-01-01

    Packet losses in wireless networks dramatically curbs the performance of TCP. This paper introduces a simple coding shim that aids IP-layer traffic in lossy environments while being transparent to transport layer protocols. The proposed coding approach enables erasure correction while being...... oblivious to the congestion control algorithms of the utilised transport layer protocol. Although our coding shim is indifferent towards the transport layer protocol, we focus on the performance of TCP when ran on top of our proposed coding mechanism due to its widespread use. The coding shim provides gains...... in throughput that exceed 10x for TCP traffic while requiring a limited sacrifice in terms of fairness towards other flows on the channel....

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of medical linear accelerator using primo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of monte Carlo simulation has become very important in the medical field and especially in calculation in radiotherapy. Various Monte Carlo codes were developed simulating interactions of particles and photons with matter. One of these codes is PRIMO that performs simulation of radiation transport from the primary electron source of a linac to estimate the absorbed dose in a water phantom or computerized tomography (CT). PRIMO is based on Penelope Monte Carlo code. Measurements of 6 MV photon beam PDD and profile were done for Elekta precise linear accelerator at Radiation and Isotopes Center Khartoum using computerized Blue water phantom and CC13 Ionization Chamber. accept Software was used to control the phantom to measure and verify dose distribution. Elektalinac from the list of available linacs in PRIMO was tuned to model Elekta precise linear accelerator. Beam parameter of 6.0 MeV initial electron energy, 0.20 MeV FWHM, and 0.20 cm focal spot FWHM were used, and an error of 4% between calculated and measured curves was found. The buildup region Z max was 1.40 cm and homogenous profile in cross line and in line were acquired. A number of studies were done to verily the model usability one of them is the effect of the number of histories on accuracy of the simulation and the resulted profile for the same beam parameters. The effect was noticeable and inaccuracies in the profile were reduced by increasing the number of histories. Another study was the effect of Side-step errors on the calculated dose which was compared with the measured dose for the same setting.It was in range of 2% for 5 cm shift, but it was higher in the calculated dose because of the small difference between the tuned model and measured dose curves. Future developments include simulating asymmetrical fields, calculating the dose distribution in computerized tomographic (CT) volume, studying the effect of beam modifiers on beam profile for both electron and photon beams.(Author)

  14. MORET: Version 4.B. A multigroup Monte Carlo criticality code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MORET 4 is a three dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo code which calculates the effective multiplication factor (keff) of any configurations more or less complex as well as reaction rates in the different volumes of the geometry and the leakage out of the system. MORET 4 is the Monte Carlo code of the APOLLO2-MORET 4 standard route of CRISTAL, the French criticality package. It is the most commonly used Monte Carlo code for French criticality calculations. During the last four years, the MORET 4 team has developed or improved the following major points: modernization of the geometry, implementation of perturbation algorithms, source distribution convergence, statistical detection of stationarity, unbiased variance estimation and creation of pre-processing and post-processing tools. The purpose of this paper is not only to present the new features of MORET but also to detail clearly the physical models and the mathematical methods used in the code. (author)

  15. MOx benchmark calculations by deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MOx based depletion calculation. ► Methodology to create continuous energy pseudo cross section for lump of minor fission products. ► Mass inventory comparison between deterministic and Monte Carlo codes. ► Higher deviation was found for several isotopes. - Abstract: A depletion calculation benchmark devoted to MOx fuel is an ongoing objective of the OECD/NEA WPRS following the study of depletion calculation concerning UOx fuels. The objective of the proposed benchmark is to compare existing depletion calculations obtained with various codes and data libraries applied to fuel and back-end cycle configurations. In the present work the deterministic code NEWT/ORIGEN-S of the SCALE6 codes package and the Monte Carlo based code MONTEBURNS2.0 were used to calculate the masses of inventory isotopes. The methodology to apply the MONTEBURNS2.0 to this benchmark is also presented. Then the results from both code were compared.

  16. Usage of burnt fuel isotopic compositions from engineering codes in Monte-Carlo code calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshin, Sergey S.; Gorodkov, Sergey S.; Shcherenko, Anna I. [Nuclear Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    A burn-up calculation of VVER's cores by Monte-Carlo code is complex process and requires large computational costs. This fact makes Monte-Carlo codes usage complicated for project and operating calculations. Previously prepared isotopic compositions are proposed to use for the Monte-Carlo code (MCU) calculations of different states of VVER's core with burnt fuel. Isotopic compositions are proposed to calculate by an approximation method. The approximation method is based on usage of a spectral functionality and reference isotopic compositions, that are calculated by engineering codes (TVS-M, PERMAK-A). The multiplication factors and power distributions of FA and VVER with infinite height are calculated in this work by the Monte-Carlo code MCU using earlier prepared isotopic compositions. The MCU calculation data were compared with the data which were obtained by engineering codes.

  17. Recent transportation calculation code systems and their accuracy evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of shielding design, many studies have been carried out for the development of radiation transportation calculation codes (transportation codes) including Monte Carlo codes. The present report outlines major transportation codes used in Japan for design of shielding. Major one-dimensional codes include ANISN (Sn), PALLAS-PL and SP-Br (direct integration) whili two-dimensional ones include DOT-3.5 and TWOTRAN-II. All these transportation codes have been developed on the basis of numerical solution to the Boltzmann's transportation equation. These codes are roughly divided into two groups: discrete ordinates type and Monte Carlo type. The former include Sn-type codes and direct integration type codes. Sn-type codes are currently used most widely. The accuracy and other features of a code should be tested before applysing it to practical shielding design. One of the techniques for this purpose is the benchmark method, which consists of benchmark tests and analysis of the test results. The possible overall error involved in calculations can be determined from the benchmark tests. (Nogami, K.)

  18. A Monte Carlo track structure code for low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, S; Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Hoshi, M; Ishikawa, M; Shizuma, K

    2002-01-01

    A code is described for simulation of protons (100 eV to 10 MeV) track structure in water vapor. The code simulates molecular interaction by interaction for the transport of primary ions and secondary electrons in the form of ionizations and excitations. When a low velocity ion collides with the atoms or molecules of a target, the ion may also capture or lose electrons. The probabilities for these processes are described by the quantity cross-section. Although proton track simulation at energies above Bragg peak (>0.3 MeV) has been achieved to a high degree of precision, simulations at energies near or below the Bragg peak have only been attempted recently because of the lack of relevant cross-section data. As the hydrogen atom has a different ionization cross-section from that of a proton, charge exchange processes need to be considered in order to calculate stopping power for low energy protons. In this paper, we have used state-of-the-art Monte Carlo track simulation techniques, in conjunction with the pub...

  19. The Monte Carlo code MCSHAPE: Main features and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCSHAPE is a general purpose Monte Carlo code developed at the University of Bologna to simulate the diffusion of X- and gamma-ray photons with the special feature of describing the full evolution of the photon polarization state along the interactions with the target. The prevailing photon–matter interactions in the energy range 1–1000 keV, Compton and Rayleigh scattering and photoelectric effect, are considered. All the parameters that characterize the photon transport can be suitably defined: (i) the source intensity, (ii) its full polarization state as a function of energy, (iii) the number of collisions, and (iv) the energy interval and resolution of the simulation. It is possible to visualize the results for selected groups of interactions. MCSHAPE simulates the propagation in heterogeneous media of polarized photons (from synchrotron sources) or of partially polarized sources (from X-ray tubes). In this paper, the main features of MCSHAPE are illustrated with some examples and a comparison with experimental data. - Highlights: • MCSHAPE is an MC code for the simulation of the diffusion of photons in the matter. • It includes the proper description of the evolution of the photon polarization state. • The polarization state is described by means of the Stokes vector, I, Q, U, V. • MCSHAPE includes the computation of the detector influence in the measured spectrum. • MCSHAPE features are illustrated with examples and comparison with experiments

  20. Benchmarking Monte Carlo codes for criticality safety using subcritical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo codes that are used for criticality safety evaluations are typically validated using critical experiments in which the neutron multiplication factor is unity. However, the conditions for most fissile material operations do not coincide to those of the critical experiments. This paper demonstrates that Monte Carlo methods and nuclear data can be validated using subcritical measurements whose conditions may coincide more closely to actual configurations of fissile material. (orig.)

  1. Design of shielding of LILW containers by Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate prediction of dose rates from containers with radioactive waste is becoming more important regarding more rigorous regulative in this area. The usual approach to the problem consists in combining numerical and measuring methods. In this paper a Monte Carlo calculations were used for calculating doses from a standard 200 liter drum which contains the intermediate level radioactive waste. Two different Monte Carlo codes were applied and compared, for the same combination of parameters. (author)

  2. Development of 3d reactor burnup code based on Monte Carlo method and exponential Euler method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup analysis plays a key role in fuel breeding, transmutation and post-processing in nuclear reactor. Burnup codes based on one-dimensional and two-dimensional transport method have difficulties in meeting the accuracy requirements. A three-dimensional burnup analysis code based on Monte Carlo method and Exponential Euler method has been developed. The coupling code combines advantage of Monte Carlo method in complex geometry neutron transport calculation and FISPACT in fast and precise inventory calculation, meanwhile resonance Self-shielding effect in inventory calculation can also be considered. The IAEA benchmark text problem has been adopted for code validation. Good agreements were shown in the comparison with other participants' results. (authors)

  3. JCOGIN. A parallel programming infrastructure for Monte Carlo particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of the Monte Carlo method for reactor analysis are well known, but the full-core reactor analysis challenges the computational time and computer memory. Meanwhile, the exponential growth of computer power in the last 10 years is now creating a great opportunity for large scale parallel computing on the Monte Carlo full-core reactor analysis. In this paper, a parallel programming infrastructure is introduced for Monte Carlo particle transport, named JCOGIN, which aims at accelerating the development of Monte Carlo codes for the large scale parallelism simulations of the full-core reactor. Now, JCOGIN implements the hybrid parallelism of the spatial decomposition and the traditional particle parallelism on MPI and OpenMP. Finally, JMCT code is developed on JCOGIN, which reaches the parallel efficiency of 70% on 20480 cores for fixed source problem. By the hybrid parallelism, the full-core pin-by-pin simulation of the Dayawan reactor was implemented, with the number of the cells up to 10 million and the tallies of the fluxes utilizing over 40GB of memory. (author)

  4. Hybrid Deterministic-Monte Carlo Methods for Neutral Particle Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the history of transport analysis methodology for nuclear systems, there have been two fundamentally different methods, i.e., deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Even though these two methods coexisted for the past 60 years and are complementary each other, they never been coded in the same computer codes. Recently, however, researchers have started to consider to combine these two methods in a computer code to make use of the strengths of two algorithms and avoid weaknesses. Although the advanced modern deterministic techniques such as method of characteristics (MOC) can solve a multigroup transport equation very accurately, there are still uncertainties in the MOC solutions due to the inaccuracy of the multigroup cross section data caused by approximations in the process of multigroup cross section generation, i.e., equivalence theory, interference effects, etc. Conversely, the MC method can handle the resonance shielding effect accurately when sufficiently many neutron histories are used but it takes a long calculation time. There was also a research to combine a multigroup transport and a continuous energy transport solver in a computer code system depending on the energy range. This paper proposes a hybrid deterministic-MC method in which a multigroup MOC method is used for high and low energy range and continuous MC method is used for the intermediate resonance energy range for efficient and accurate transport analysis

  5. MCOR - Monte Carlo depletion code for reference LWR calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Introduction of a reference Monte Carlo based depletion code with extended capabilities. → Verification and validation results for MCOR. → Utilization of MCOR for benchmarking deterministic lattice physics (spectral) codes. - Abstract: The MCOR (MCnp-kORigen) code system is a Monte Carlo based depletion system for reference fuel assembly and core calculations. The MCOR code is designed as an interfacing code that provides depletion capability to the LANL Monte Carlo code by coupling two codes: MCNP5 with the AREVA NP depletion code, KORIGEN. The physical quality of both codes is unchanged. The MCOR code system has been maintained and continuously enhanced since it was initially developed and validated. The verification of the coupling was made by evaluating the MCOR code against similar sophisticated code systems like MONTEBURNS, OCTOPUS and TRIPOLI-PEPIN. After its validation, the MCOR code has been further improved with important features. The MCOR code presents several valuable capabilities such as: (a) a predictor-corrector depletion algorithm, (b) utilization of KORIGEN as the depletion module, (c) individual depletion calculation of each burnup zone (no burnup zone grouping is required, which is particularly important for the modeling of gadolinium rings), and (d) on-line burnup cross-section generation by the Monte Carlo calculation for 88 isotopes and usage of the KORIGEN libraries for PWR and BWR typical spectra for the remaining isotopes. Besides the just mentioned capabilities, the MCOR code newest enhancements focus on the possibility of executing the MCNP5 calculation in sequential or parallel mode, a user-friendly automatic re-start capability, a modification of the burnup step size evaluation, and a post-processor and test-matrix, just to name the most important. The article describes the capabilities of the MCOR code system; from its design and development to its latest improvements and further ameliorations

  6. MCOR - Monte Carlo depletion code for reference LWR calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puente Espel, Federico, E-mail: fup104@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Tippayakul, Chanatip, E-mail: cut110@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin, E-mail: kni1@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Misu, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Misu@areva.com [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: > Introduction of a reference Monte Carlo based depletion code with extended capabilities. > Verification and validation results for MCOR. > Utilization of MCOR for benchmarking deterministic lattice physics (spectral) codes. - Abstract: The MCOR (MCnp-kORigen) code system is a Monte Carlo based depletion system for reference fuel assembly and core calculations. The MCOR code is designed as an interfacing code that provides depletion capability to the LANL Monte Carlo code by coupling two codes: MCNP5 with the AREVA NP depletion code, KORIGEN. The physical quality of both codes is unchanged. The MCOR code system has been maintained and continuously enhanced since it was initially developed and validated. The verification of the coupling was made by evaluating the MCOR code against similar sophisticated code systems like MONTEBURNS, OCTOPUS and TRIPOLI-PEPIN. After its validation, the MCOR code has been further improved with important features. The MCOR code presents several valuable capabilities such as: (a) a predictor-corrector depletion algorithm, (b) utilization of KORIGEN as the depletion module, (c) individual depletion calculation of each burnup zone (no burnup zone grouping is required, which is particularly important for the modeling of gadolinium rings), and (d) on-line burnup cross-section generation by the Monte Carlo calculation for 88 isotopes and usage of the KORIGEN libraries for PWR and BWR typical spectra for the remaining isotopes. Besides the just mentioned capabilities, the MCOR code newest enhancements focus on the possibility of executing the MCNP5 calculation in sequential or parallel mode, a user-friendly automatic re-start capability, a modification of the burnup step size evaluation, and a post-processor and test-matrix, just to name the most important. The article describes the capabilities of the MCOR code system; from its design and development to its latest improvements and further ameliorations. Additionally

  7. Monte Carlo method in radiation transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In neutral radiation transport problems (neutrons, photons), two values are important: the flux in the phase space and the density of particles. To solve the problem with Monte Carlo method leads to, among other things, build a statistical process (called the play) and to provide a numerical value to a variable x (this attribution is called score). Sampling techniques are presented. Play biasing necessity is proved. A biased simulation is made. At last, the current developments (rewriting of programs for instance) are presented due to several reasons: two of them are the vectorial calculation apparition and the photon and neutron transport in vacancy media

  8. Adjoint electron-photon transport Monte Carlo calculations with ITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general adjoint coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code for solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation has recently been created. It is a modified version of ITS 3.0, a coupled electronphoton Monte Carlo code that has world-wide distribution. The applicability of the new code to radiation-interaction problems of the type found in space environments is demonstrated

  9. Verification of the shift Monte Carlo code with the C5G7 reactor benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sly, N. C.; Mervin, B. T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee, 311 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Mosher, S. W.; Evans, T. M.; Wagner, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee, 311 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Shift is a new hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic radiation transport code being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At its current stage of development, Shift includes a parallel Monte Carlo capability for simulating eigenvalue and fixed-source multigroup transport problems. This paper focuses on recent efforts to verify Shift's Monte Carlo component using the two-dimensional and three-dimensional C5G7 NEA benchmark problems. Comparisons were made between the benchmark eigenvalues and those output by the Shift code. In addition, mesh-based scalar flux tally results generated by Shift were compared to those obtained using MCNP5 on an identical model and tally grid. The Shift-generated eigenvalues were within three standard deviations of the benchmark and MCNP5-1.60 values in all cases. The flux tallies generated by Shift were found to be in very good agreement with those from MCNP. (authors)

  10. Accélération de la convergence dans le code de transport de particules Monte-Carlo TRIPOLI-4® en criticité

    OpenAIRE

    Dehaye, Benjamin,

    2014-01-01

    Fields such as criticality studies need to compute some values of interest in neutron physics. Two kind of codes may be used : deterministic ones and stochastic ones. The stochastic codes do not require approximation and are thus more exact. However, they may require a lot of time to converge with a sufficient precision.The work carried out during this thesis aims to build an efficient acceleration strategy in the TRIPOLI-4®. We wish to implement the zero variance game. To do so, the method r...

  11. PEREGRINE: An all-particle Monte Carlo code for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver a lethal dose to the tumor while minimizing the dose to normal tissues. To carry out this task, it is critical to calculate correctly the distribution of dose delivered. Monte Carlo transport methods have the potential to provide more accurate prediction of dose distributions than currently-used methods. PEREGRINE is a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the specific purpose of modeling the effects of radiation therapy. PEREGRINE transports neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles, including protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, and alpha particles. This paper describes the PEREGRINE transport code and some preliminary results for clinically relevant materials and radiation sources

  12. Differential measurements and transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lot of projects involving particle beams of intermediate energy are calculated by using computerized simulation. TIERCE code system is dedicated to particle transport and is made up of 2 main codes HETC and MCNP, linked to their specialized nuclear data libraries. Here we present some results from TIERCE and we compare them with measured values. The quality of such simulation greatly depends on the nuclear reaction models used in the codes, so an important effort is made to improve these models. (A.C.)

  13. Proton therapy Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code

    OpenAIRE

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2012-01-01

    The most powerful feature of the Monte Carlo method is the possibility of simulating all individual particle interactions in three dimensions and performing numerical experiments with a preset error. These facts were the motivation behind the development of a general-purpose Monte Carlo SRNA program for proton transport simulation in technical systems described by standard geometrical forms (plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, cube). Some of the possible applications of the SRNA program are:...

  14. A Monte Carlo code for ion beam therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Initially developed for applications in detector and accelerator physics, the modern Fluka Monte Carlo code is now used in many different areas of nuclear science. Over the last 25 years, the code has evolved to include new features, such as ion beam simulations. Given the growing use of these beams in cancer treatment, Fluka simulations are being used to design treatment plans in several hadron-therapy centres in Europe.   Fluka calculates the dose distribution for a patient treated at CNAO with proton beams. The colour-bar displays the normalized dose values. Fluka is a Monte Carlo code that very accurately simulates electromagnetic and nuclear interactions in matter. In the 1990s, in collaboration with NASA, the code was developed to predict potential radiation hazards received by space crews during possible future trips to Mars. Over the years, it has become the standard tool to investigate beam-machine interactions, radiation damage and radioprotection issues in the CERN accelerator com...

  15. Computer codes in particle transport physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation of transport and interaction of various particles in complex media and wide energy range (from 1 MeV up to 1 TeV) is very complicated problem that requires valid model of a real process in nature and appropriate solving tool - computer code and data library. A brief overview of computer codes based on Monte Carlo techniques for simulation of transport and interaction of hadrons and ions in wide energy range in three dimensional (3D) geometry is shown. Firstly, a short attention is paid to underline the approach to the solution of the problem - process in nature - by selection of the appropriate 3D model and corresponding tools - computer codes and cross sections data libraries. Process of data collection and evaluation from experimental measurements and theoretical approach to establishing reliable libraries of evaluated cross sections data is Ion g, difficult and not straightforward activity. For this reason, world reference data centers and specialized ones are acknowledged, together with the currently available, state of art evaluated nuclear data libraries, as the ENDF/B-VI, JEF, JENDL, CENDL, BROND, etc. Codes for experimental and theoretical data evaluations (e.g., SAMMY and GNASH) together with the codes for data processing (e.g., NJOY, PREPRO and GRUCON) are briefly described. Examples of data evaluation and data processing to generate computer usable data libraries are shown. Among numerous and various computer codes developed in transport physics of particles, the most general ones are described only: MCNPX, FLUKA and SHIELD. A short overview of basic application of these codes, physical models implemented with their limitations, energy ranges of particles and types of interactions, is given. General information about the codes covers also programming language, operation system, calculation speed and the code availability. An example of increasing computation speed of running MCNPX code using a MPI cluster compared to the code sequential option

  16. AGENT code - neutron transport benchmark examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses on description of representative benchmark problems to demonstrate the versatility and accuracy of the AGENT (Arbitrary Geometry Neutron Transport) code. AGENT couples the method of characteristics and R-functions allowing true modeling of complex geometries. AGENT is optimized for robustness, accuracy, and computational efficiency for 2-D assembly configurations. The robustness of R-function based geometry generator is achieved through the hierarchical union of the simple primitives into more complex shapes. The accuracy is comparable to Monte Carlo codes and is obtained by following neutron propagation through true geometries. The computational efficiency is maintained through a set of acceleration techniques introduced in all important calculation levels. The selected assembly benchmark problems discussed in this paper are: the complex hexagonal modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, the Purdue University reactor and the well known C5G7 benchmark model. (author)

  17. The Monte Carlo code TRAMO - Capabilities and instructions for application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended for readers familiar with the fundamentals of the Monte Carlo method. Those readers might be interested in learning about successful generalisations as well as new ideas for curbing the statistical errors involved. Another intention however is to explain the significant basic features of the multigroup Monte Carlo code TRAMO, including the required input, so that readers will be able to performing the required adjustments to the specific calculation technique and develop their own tools for performing their specific calculations. An indispensable code needed for such TRAMO applications is the TRAWEI Monte Carlo code which calculates he required weightings for applications of the variance reducing Weight Window Method; other codes required are those for generating the neutron cross-section data and the group data. The TRAMO code calculates, with given source distribution of neutrons in multigroup approximation, multigroup flux data, integrated group flux data, and dose values for given partial volumes and surfaces. There are further code versions for calculation of neutron and gamma fluxes, or criticality data, but these are not considered in the report. (orig./CB)

  18. Taylor series development in the Monte Carlo code Tripoli-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolo, Alain; Zoia, Andrea; Martin, Brunella

    2014-06-01

    Perturbation methods for one or several variables based on the Taylor series development up to the second order is presented for the collision estimator in the framework of the Monte Carlo code Tripoli-4. Comparisons with the correlated sampling method implemented in Tripoli-4 demonstrate the need of including the cross derivatives in the development.

  19. Discrete angle biasing in Monte Carlo radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An angular biasing procedure is presented for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport with discretized scattering angle data. As in more general studies, the method is shown to reduce statistical weight fluctuations when it is combined with the exponential transformation. This discrete data application has a simple analytic form which is problem independent. The results from a sample problem illustrate the variance reduction and efficiency characteristics of the combined biasing procedures, and a large neutron and gamma ray integral experiment is also calculated. A proposal is given for the possible code generation of the biasing parameter p and the preferential direction /ovr/Omega//0 used in the combined biasing schemes

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FORTEC-3D code, which solves the drift-kinetic equation for torus plasmas and radial electric field using the δf Monte Carlo method, has developed to study the variety of issues relating to neoclassical transport phenomena in magnetic confinement plasmas. Here the numerical techniques used in FORTEC-3D are reviewed, and resent progress in the simulation method to simulate GAM oscillation is also explained. A band-limited white noise term is introduced in the equation of time evolution of radial electric field to excite GAM oscillation, which enables us to analyze GAM frequency using FORTEC-3D even in the case the collisionless GAM damping is fast. (author)

  1. Monte Carlo methods in electron transport problems. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The condensed-history Monte Carlo method for charged particles transport is reviewed and discussed starting from a general form of the Boltzmann equation (Part I). The physics of the electronic interactions, together with some pedagogic example will be introduced in the part II. The lecture is directed to potential users of the method, for which it can be a useful introduction to the subject matter, and wants to establish the basis of the work on the computer code RECORD, which is at present in a developing stage

  2. ALEPH 1.1.2: A Monte Carlo burn-up code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last 40 years, Monte Carlo particle transport has been applied to a multitude of problems such as shielding and medical applications, to various types of nuclear reactors, . . . The success of the Monte Carlo method is mainly based on its broad application area, on its ability to handle nuclear data not only in its most basic but also most complex form (namely continuous energy cross sections, complex interaction laws, detailed energy-angle correlations, multi-particle physics, . . . ), on its capability of modeling geometries from simple 1D to complex 3D, . . . There is also a current trend in Monte Carlo applications toward high detail 3D calculations (for instance voxel-based medical applications), something for which deterministic codes are neither suited nor performant as to computational time and precision. Apart from all these fields where Monte Carlo particle transport has been applied successfully, there is at least one area where Monte Carlo has had limited success, namely burn-up and activation calculations where the time parameter is added to the problem. The concept of Monte Carlo burn-up consists of coupling a Monte Carlo code to a burn-up module to improve the accuracy of depletion and activation calculations. For every time step the Monte Carlo code will provide reaction rates to the burn-up module which will return new material compositions to the Monte Carlo code. So if static Monte Carlo particle transport is slow, then Monte Carlo particle transport with burn-up will be even slower as calculations have to be performed for every time step in the problem. The computational issues to perform accurate Monte Carlo calculations are however continuously reduced due to improvements made in the basic Monte Carlo algorithms, due to the development of variance reduction techniques and due to developments in computer architecture (more powerful processors, the so-called brute force approach through parallel processors and networked systems

  3. CTCN: Colloid transport code -- nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential-algebraic equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential-algebraic systems

  4. MCAM 5: an advanced interface program for multiple Monte Carlo Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport Simulation (MCAM) developed in China, is an advanced interface program between CAD (Computer Aided Design) systems and Monte Carlo (MC) codes. It can significantly reduce the manpower and enhance reliability for constructing MC codes input of complex systems. The latest version MCAM 4.8 was a mature and efficient version which was benchmarked with ITER benchmark model and has been used by hundreds of institutes in more than 40 countries all over the world. It can deal with MCNP and TRIPOLI models. The main function of MCAM is to convert geometries in CAD systems to geometries in MC codes input files. The MCAM version 5.2 is going to be released with added capabilities to support SuperMC, Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes

  5. Study on random number generator in Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo code uses a sequence of pseudo-random numbers with a random number generator (RNG) to simulate particle histories. A pseudo-random number has its own period depending on its generation method and the period is desired to be long enough not to exceed the period during one Monte Carlo calculation to ensure the correctness especially for a standard deviation of results. The linear congruential generator (LCG) is widely used as Monte Carlo RNG and the period of LCG is not so long by considering the increasing rate of simulation histories in a Monte Carlo calculation according to the remarkable enhancement of computer performance. Recently, many kinds of RNG have been developed and some of their features are better than those of LCG. In this study, we investigate the appropriate RNG in a Monte Carlo code as an alternative to LCG especially for the case of enormous histories. It is found that xorshift has desirable features compared with LCG, and xorshift has a larger period, a comparable speed to generate random numbers, a better randomness, and good applicability to parallel calculation. (author)

  6. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons (2H+) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  7. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions (3He2+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the U.S. Government 2010. (authors)

  8. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons (3H+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the US Government 2010. (authors)

  9. Application of artificial intelligence techniques to the acceleration of Monte Carlo transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of learning theory and pattern recognition are used to learn splitting surface locations for the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCN. A study is performed to determine default values for several pattern recognition and learning parameters. The modified MCN code is used to reduce computer cost for several nontrivial example problems

  10. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  11. The Monte Carlo estimation of an effect of uncertainties in initial data on solving the transport equation by means of the MCU code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new version of the tally module of the MCU software package is developed in which the approach for taking directly into account the uncertainty in initial data is implemented that is recommended by the international standard on estimating the uncertainty in results of measuring (ISO 13005). The new module makes it possible to evaluate the effect of uncertainty in initial data (caused by technological tolerances in fabrication of structural members of the core) on neutronic characteristics of the reactor. The developed software is adapted to parallel computing with the use of multiprocessor computers, which significantly reduces the computation time: the parallelization coefficient is almost equal to 1. Testing is performed by examples of solving the problem on criticality for the Godiva benchmark experiment and also for the infinite lattice of fuel assemblies of the VVER-440, VVER-1000, and VVER-1200. The results of calculations of the uncertainty in neutronic characteristics (effective multiplication factor, fission reaction rate), which is caused by uncertainties in initial data due to technological tolerances, are compared (in the first case) to the published results obtained using the precision MCNP5 code and (in the second case) to those obtained by means of the RADAR engineering program. A good agreement of results is achieved for all cases

  12. The Monte Carlo estimation of an effect of uncertainties in initial data on solving the transport equation by means of the MCU code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleynik, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    A new version of the tally module of the MCU software package is developed in which the approach for taking directly into account the uncertainty in initial data is implemented that is recommended by the international standard on estimating the uncertainty in results of measuring (ISO 13005). The new module makes it possible to evaluate the effect of uncertainty in initial data (caused by technological tolerances in fabrication of structural members of the core) on neutronic characteristics of the reactor. The developed software is adapted to parallel computing with the use of multiprocessor computers, which significantly reduces the computation time: the parallelization coefficient is almost equal to 1. Testing is performed by examples of solving the problem on criticality for the Godiva benchmark experiment and also for the infinite lattice of fuel assemblies of the VVER-440, VVER-1000, and VVER-1200. The results of calculations of the uncertainty in neutronic characteristics (effective multiplication factor, fission reaction rate), which is caused by uncertainties in initial data due to technological tolerances, are compared (in the first case) to the published results obtained using the precision MCNP5 code and (in the second case) to those obtained by means of the RADAR engineering program. A good agreement of results is achieved for all cases.

  13. The Monte Carlo estimation of an effect of uncertainties in initial data on solving the transport equation by means of the MCU code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleynik, D. S., E-mail: oleynik-ds@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A new version of the tally module of the MCU software package is developed in which the approach for taking directly into account the uncertainty in initial data is implemented that is recommended by the international standard on estimating the uncertainty in results of measuring (ISO 13005). The new module makes it possible to evaluate the effect of uncertainty in initial data (caused by technological tolerances in fabrication of structural members of the core) on neutronic characteristics of the reactor. The developed software is adapted to parallel computing with the use of multiprocessor computers, which significantly reduces the computation time: the parallelization coefficient is almost equal to 1. Testing is performed by examples of solving the problem on criticality for the Godiva benchmark experiment and also for the infinite lattice of fuel assemblies of the VVER-440, VVER-1000, and VVER-1200. The results of calculations of the uncertainty in neutronic characteristics (effective multiplication factor, fission reaction rate), which is caused by uncertainties in initial data due to technological tolerances, are compared (in the first case) to the published results obtained using the precision MCNP5 code and (in the second case) to those obtained by means of the RADAR engineering program. A good agreement of results is achieved for all cases.

  14. EGS code system: computer programs for the Monte Carlo simulation of electromagnetic cascade showers. Version 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code to simulate almost any electron--photon transport problem conceivable is described. The report begins with a lengthy historical introduction and a description of the shower generation process. Then the detailed physics of the shower processes and the methods used to simulate them are presented. Ideas of sampling theory, transport techniques, particle interactions in general, and programing details are discussed. Next, EGS calculations and various experiments and other Monte Carlo results are compared. The remainder of the report consists of user manuals for EGS, PEGS, and TESTSR codes; options, input specifications, and typical output are included. 38 figures, 12 tables

  15. On the use of SERPENT Monte Carlo code to generate few group diffusion constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovezan, Pamela, E-mail: pamela.piovezan@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carluccio, Thiago; Domingos, Douglas Borges; Rossi, Pedro Russo; Mura, Luiz Felipe, E-mail: fermium@cietec.org.b, E-mail: thiagoc@ipen.b [Fermium Tecnologia Nuclear, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The accuracy of diffusion reactor codes strongly depends on the quality of the groups constants processing. For many years, the generation of such constants was based on 1-D infinity cell transport calculations. Some developments using collision probability or the method of characteristics allow, nowadays, 2-D assembly group constants calculations. However, these 1-D and 2-D codes how some limitations as , for example, on complex geometries and in the neighborhood of heavy absorbers. On the other hand, since Monte Carlos (MC) codes provide accurate neutro flux distributions, the possibility of using these solutions to provide group constants to full-core reactor diffusion simulators has been recently investigated, especially for the cases in which the geometry and reactor types are beyond the capability of the conventional deterministic lattice codes. The two greatest difficulties on the use of MC codes to group constant generation are the computational costs and the methodological incompatibility between analog MC particle transport simulation and deterministic transport methods based in several approximations. The SERPENT code is a 3-D continuous energy MC transport code with built-in burnup capability that was specially optimized to generate these group constants. In this work, we present the preliminary results of using the SERPENT MC code to generate 3-D two-group diffusion constants for a PWR like assembly. These constants were used in the CITATION diffusion code to investigate the effects of the MC group constants determination on the neutron multiplication factor diffusion estimate. (author)

  16. A semianalytic Monte Carlo code for modelling LIDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Elisa; Kostadinov, Ivan; Petritoli, Andrea; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Bortoli, Daniele; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margherita; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2007-10-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) is an optical active remote sensing technology with many applications in atmospheric physics. Modelling of LIDAR measurements appears useful approach for evaluating the effects of various environmental variables and scenarios as well as of different measurement geometries and instrumental characteristics. In this regard a Monte Carlo simulation model can provide a reliable answer to these important requirements. A semianalytic Monte Carlo code for modelling LIDAR measurements has been developed at ISAC-CNR. The backscattered laser signal detected by the LIDAR system is calculated in the code taking into account the contributions due to the main atmospheric molecular constituents and aerosol particles through processes of single and multiple scattering. The contributions by molecular absorption, ground and clouds reflection are evaluated too. The code can perform simulations of both monostatic and bistatic LIDAR systems. To enhance the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation, analytical estimates and expected value calculations are performed. Artificial devices (such as forced collision, local forced collision, splitting and russian roulette) are moreover foreseen by the code, which can enable the user to drastically reduce the variance of the calculation.

  17. Monte Carlo capabilities of the SCALE code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Foundational Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE are described. • Improvements in continuous-energy treatments are detailed. • New methods for problem-dependent temperature corrections are described. • New methods for sensitivity analysis and depletion are described. • Nuclear data, users interfaces, and quality assurance activities are summarized. - Abstract: SCALE is a widely used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a “plug-and-play” framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE’s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. An overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2

  18. The use of an inbuilt importance generator for acceleration of the Monte Carlo code MCBEND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo is currently the most accurate method for the analysis of neutron and gamma-ray transport. However its application, especially to deep penetration studies, is costly in terms of the man-days to set up the calculation and in terms of computer usage. The MAGIC module, developed at the Winfrith Technology Centre, addresses both these problems. It employs an automated procedure based upon the established technique of splitting/roulette with an importance function derived from the solution of the adjoint diffusion equation. Examples are given of the application of the module with Monte Carlo code MCBEND

  19. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svatos, M M

    1998-09-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to prove the feasibility of basing electron depth dose calculations in a phantom on first-principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is equal to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that are on the order of conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history, with the potential to be much faster. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to-Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, in this case, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel" A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV - 8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code. It was compared to Peregrine's class II condensed history electron transport package, EGS4, and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. Since the kugels completed in the library were of relatively small size, the zoning of the phantoms was scaled down from a clinical size, so that the energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel could

  20. Burnup calculation methodology in the serpent 2 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents two topics related to the burnup calculation capabilities in the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code: advanced time-integration methods and improved memory management, accomplished by the use of different optimization modes. The development of the introduced methods is an important part of re-writing the Serpent source code, carried out for the purpose of extending the burnup calculation capabilities from 2D assembly-level calculations to large 3D reactor-scale problems. The progress is demonstrated by repeating a PWR test case, originally carried out in 2009 for the validation of the newly-implemented burnup calculation routines in Serpent 1. (authors)

  1. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, O

    2016-01-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic SEDs and intensity maps from Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy (1999) Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets, emitted from external and/or embedded sources, as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The density is not mapped onto a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Second, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  2. Optimization of Monte Carlo transport simulations in stochastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient approach to optimize radiation transport simulations in a stochastic medium of high heterogeneity, like the Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) configurations packed with TRISO fuel particles. Based on a fast nearest neighbor search algorithm, a modified fast Random Sequential Addition (RSA) method is first developed to speed up the generation of the stochastic media systems packed with both mono-sized and poly-sized spheres. A fast neutron tracking method is then developed to optimize the next sphere boundary search in the radiation transport procedure. In order to investigate their accuracy and efficiency, the developed sphere packing and neutron tracking methods are implemented into an in-house continuous energy Monte Carlo code to solve an eigenvalue problem in VHTR unit cells. Comparison with the MCNP benchmark calculations for the same problem indicates that the new methods show considerably higher computational efficiency. (authors)

  3. Simulating fast transients with fuel behavior feedback using the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulating transients with reactivity feedback effects using Monte Carlo neutron transport codes can be used for validating deterministic transient codes or estimating for example the total deposited energy in a fuel rod following a known reactivity insertion in the system. Recent increases in computational power as well as developments in calculation methodology makes it possible to obtain a coupled solution for several aspects of the multi-physics problem in a single calculation. This paper describes the different methods implemented in Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code that enable it to model fast transients with fuel behavior feedback. The capability is demonstrated in a prompt critical pin-cell case, where the transient is shut down by the negative reactivity from rising fuel temperature. (author)

  4. ERSN-OpenMC, a Java-based GUI for OpenMC Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar EL Bakkali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available OpenMC is a new Monte Carlo transport particle simulation code focused on solving two types of neutronic problems mainly the k-eigenvalue criticality fission source problems and external fixed fission source problems. OpenMC does not have any Graphical User Interface and the creation of one is provided by our java-based application named ERSN-OpenMC. The main feature of this application is to provide to the users an easy-to-use and flexible graphical interface to build better and faster simulations, with less effort and great reliability. Additionally, this graphical tool was developed with several features, as the ability to automate the building process of OpenMC code and related libraries as well as the users are given the freedom to customize their installation of this Monte Carlo code. A full description of the ERSN-OpenMC application is presented in this paper.

  5. TRIMARAN: a three dimensional multigroup P1 Monte Carlo code for criticallity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIMARAN is developed for safety analysis of nuclar components containing fissionnable materials: shipping casks, storage and cooling pools, manufacture and reprocessing plants. It solves the transport equation by Monte Carlo method in general three dimensional geometry with multigroup P1 approximation. A special representation of cross sections and numbers has been developed in order to reduce considerably the computing cost and allow this three dimensional code to compete with standard numerical program used in parametric studies

  6. Development of Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the DT fusion reactor, it is critical concern to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates after the reactor shutdown exactly. In order to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates exactly, three dimensional Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system have been developed by connecting the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code and the induced activity calculation code. The developed calculation system consists of the following four functions. (1) The operational neutron flux distribution is calculated by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. (2) The induced activities are calculated by the induced activity calculation code. (3) The decay gamma-ray source distribution is obtained from the induced activities. (4) The decay gamma-rays are generated by using the decay gamma-ray source distribution, and the decay gamma-ray transport calculation is conducted by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. In order to reduce the calculation time drastically, a biasing system for the decay gamma-ray source distribution has been developed, and the function is also included in the present system. In this paper, the outline and the detail of the system, and the execution example are reported. The evaluation for the effect of the biasing system is also reported. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo Capabilities of the SCALE Code System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rearden, B. T.; Petrie, L. M.; Peplow, D. E.; Bekar, K. B.; Wiarda, D.; Celik, C.; Perfetti, C. M.; Ibrahim, A. M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    SCALE is a widely used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a "plug-and-play" framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE's graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2, to be released in 2014, will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. An overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  8. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  9. Criticality qualification of a new Monte Carlo code for reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to accurately simulate Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), the utilization of at least two computational tools is necessary (the thermal-hydraulic problem is not considered in the frame of this work), namely: (a) A High Energy Physics (HEP) code system dealing with the 'Accelerator part' of the installation, i.e. the computation of the spectrum, intensity and spatial distribution of the neutrons source created by (p, n) reactions of a proton beam on a target and (b) a neutronics code system, handling the 'Reactor part' of the installation, i.e. criticality calculations, neutron transport, fuel burn-up and fission products evolution. In the present work, a single computational tool, aiming to analyze an ADS in its integrity and also able to perform core analysis for a conventional fission reactor, is proposed. The code is based on the well qualified HEP code GEANT (version 3), transformed to perform criticality calculations. The performance of the code is tested against two qualified neutronics code systems, the diffusion/transport SCALE-CITATION code system and the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI code, in the case of a research reactor core analysis. A satisfactory agreement was exhibited by the three codes.

  10. Criticality qualification of a new Monte Carlo code for reactor core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catsaros, N. [Institute of Nuclear Technology - Radiation Protection, NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Gaveau, B. [MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Jaekel, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris (France); Maillard, J. [MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IDRIS, Bt 506, BP167, 91403 Orsay (France); CNRS-IN2P3, 3 rue Michel Ange, 75794 Paris (France); Maurel, G. [Faculte de Medecine, Universite Paris VI, 27 rue de Chaligny, 75012 Paris (France); MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Savva, P., E-mail: savvapan@ipta.demokritos.g [Institute of Nuclear Technology - Radiation Protection, NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Silva, J. [MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Varvayanni, M.; Zisis, Th. [Institute of Nuclear Technology - Radiation Protection, NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2009-11-15

    In order to accurately simulate Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), the utilization of at least two computational tools is necessary (the thermal-hydraulic problem is not considered in the frame of this work), namely: (a) A High Energy Physics (HEP) code system dealing with the 'Accelerator part' of the installation, i.e. the computation of the spectrum, intensity and spatial distribution of the neutrons source created by (p, n) reactions of a proton beam on a target and (b) a neutronics code system, handling the 'Reactor part' of the installation, i.e. criticality calculations, neutron transport, fuel burn-up and fission products evolution. In the present work, a single computational tool, aiming to analyze an ADS in its integrity and also able to perform core analysis for a conventional fission reactor, is proposed. The code is based on the well qualified HEP code GEANT (version 3), transformed to perform criticality calculations. The performance of the code is tested against two qualified neutronics code systems, the diffusion/transport SCALE-CITATION code system and the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI code, in the case of a research reactor core analysis. A satisfactory agreement was exhibited by the three codes.

  11. Neutron spectrum obtained with Monte Carlo and transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the computer, resulting in increasing memory capacity and processing speed, has enabled the application of Monte Carlo method to estimate the fluxes in thousands of fine bin energy structure. Usually the MC calculation is made using continuous energy nuclear data and exact geometry. Self shielding and interference of nuclides resonances are properly considered. Therefore, the fluxes obtained by this method may be a good estimation of the neutron energy distribution (spectrum) for the problem. In an early work it was proposed to use these fluxes as weighting spectrum to generate multigroup cross section for fast reactor analysis using deterministic codes. This non-traditional use of MC calculation needs a validation to gain confidence in the results. The work presented here is the validation start step of this scheme. The spectra of the JOYO first core fuel assembly MK-I and the benchmark Godiva were calculated using the tally flux estimator of the MCNP code and compared with the reference. Also, the two problems were solved with the multigroup transport theory code XSDRN of the AMPX system using the 171 energy groups VITAMIN-C library. The spectra differences arising from the utilization of these codes, the influence of evaluated data file and the application to fast reactor calculation are discussed. (author)

  12. Efficient data management techniques implemented in the Karlsruhe Monte Carlo code KAMCCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Karlsruhe Monte Carlo Code KAMCCO is a forward neutron transport code with an eigenfunction and a fixed source option, including time-dependence. A continuous energy model is combined with a detailed representation of neutron cross sections, based on linear interpolation, Breit-Wigner resonances and probability tables. All input is processed into densely packed, dynamically addressed parameter fields and networks of pointers (addresses). Estimation routines are decoupled from random walk and analyze a storage region with sample records. This technique leads to fast execution with moderate storage requirements and without any I/O-operations except in the input and output stages. 7 references. (U.S.)

  13. Nanodosimetric verification in proton therapy: Monte Carlo Codes Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nanodosimetry strives to develop a novel dosimetry concept suitable for advanced modalities of cancer radiotherapy, such as proton therapy. This project aims to evaluate the plausibility of the physical models implemented in the Geant4 Very Low Energy (Geant4-DNA) extensions by comparing nanodosimetric quantities calculated with Geant4-DNA and the PTB Monte Carlo track structure code. Nanodosimetric track structure parameters were calculated for cylindrical targets representing DNA and nucleosome segments and converted into the probability of producing a DSB using the model proposed by Garty et al. [1]. Monoenergetic protons and electrons of energies typical for 6-electron spectra were considered as primary particles. Good agreement was found between the two codes for electrons of energies above 200 eV. Below this energy Geant4-DNA produced slightly higher numbers of ionisations in the sensitive volumes and higher probabilities for DSB formation. For protons, Geant4-DNA also gave higher numbers of ionisations and DSB probabilities, particularly in the low energy range, while a satisfactory agreement was found for energies higher than I MeV. Comparing two codes can be useful as any observed divergence in results between the two codes provides valuable information as to where further consideration of the underlying physical models used in each code may be required. Consistently it was seen that the largest difference between the codes was in the low energy ranges for each particle type. (author)

  14. Introduction to the simulation with MCNP Monte Carlo code and its applications in Medical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation by Monte Carlo is tool which Medical Physics counts with it for the development of its research, the interest by this tool is growing, as we may observe in the main scientific journals for the years 1995-1997 where more than 27 % of the papers treat over Monte Carlo and/or its applications in the radiation transport.In the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy we are implementing and making use of the MCNP4 and EGS4 codes. In this work are presented the general features of the Monte Carlo method and its more useful applications in Medical Physics. Likewise, it is made a simulation of the calculation of isodose curves in an interstitial treatment with Ir-192 wires in a mammary gland carcinoma. (Author)

  15. Status of vectorized Monte Carlo for particle transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional particle transport Monte Carlo algorithm is ill suited for modern vector supercomputers because the random nature of the particle transport process in the history based algorithm inhibits construction of vectors. An alternative, event-based algorithm is suitable for vectorization and has been used recently to achieve impressive gains in performance on vector supercomputers. This review describes the event-based algorithm and several variations of it. Implementations of this algorithm for applications in particle transport are described, and their relative merits are discussed. The implementation of Monte Carlo methods on multiple vector parallel processors is considered, as is the potential of massively parallel processors for Monte Carlo particle transport simulations

  16. An analytical solution to a simplified EDXRF model for Monte Carlo code verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to obtain an analytical solution to the scalar photon transport equation that can be used to obtain benchmark results for the verification of energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Monte Carlo simulation codes. The multi-collided flux method (multiple scattering method) is implemented to obtain analytical expressions for the space-, energy-, and angle-dependent scalar photon flux for a one dimensional EDXRF model problem. In order to obtain benchmark results, higher-order multiple scattering terms are included in the multi-collided flux method. The details of the analytical solution and of the proposed EDXRF model problem are presented. Analytical expressions obtained are then used to calculate the energy-dependent current. The analytically-calculated energy-dependent current is compared with Monte Carlo code results. The findings of this study show that analytical solutions to the scalar photon transport equation with the proposed model problem can be used as a verification tool in EDXRF Monte Carlo code development.

  17. Computed radiography simulation using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulating x-ray images has been of great interest in recent years as it makes possible an analysis of how x-ray images are affected owing to relevant operating parameters. In this paper, a procedure for simulating computed radiographic images using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is proposed. The sensitivity curve of the BaFBr image plate detector as well as the characteristic noise of a 16-bit computed radiography system were considered during the methodology's development. The results obtained confirm that the proposed procedure for simulating computed radiographic images is satisfactory, as it allows obtaining results comparable with experimental data. (author)

  18. Adjoint Monte Carlo techniques and codes for organ dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjoint Monte Carlo simulations can be effectively used for the estimation of doses in small targets when the sources are extended in large volumes or surfaces. The main features of two computer codes for calculating doses at free points or in organs of an anthropomorphic phantom are described. In the first program (REBEL-3) natural gamma-emitting sources are contained in the walls of a dwelling room; in the second one (POKER-CAMP) the user can specify arbitrary gamma sources with different spatial distributions in the environment: in (or on the surface of) the ground and in the air. 3 figures

  19. TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo code ITER A-lite neutronic model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: jean-charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cayla, Pierre-Yves; Fausser, Clement [MILLENNIUM, 16 Av du Québec Silic 628, F-91945 Villebon sur Yvette (France); Damian, Frederic; Lee, Yi-Kang; Puma, Antonella Li; Trama, Jean-Christophe [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-10-15

    3D Monte Carlo transport codes are extensively used in neutronic analysis, especially in radiation protection and shielding analyses for fission and fusion reactors. TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} is a Monte Carlo code developed by CEA. The aim of this paper is to show its capability to model a large-scale fusion reactor with complex neutron source and geometry. A benchmark between MCNP5 and TRIPOLI-4{sup ®}, on the ITER A-lite model was carried out; neutron flux, nuclear heating in the blankets and tritium production rate in the European TBMs were evaluated and compared. The methodology to build the TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} A-lite model is based on MCAM and the MCNP A-lite model. Simplified TBMs, from KIT, were integrated in the equatorial-port. A good agreement between MCNP and TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} is shown; discrepancies are mainly included in the statistical error.

  20. Review of the Monte Carlo and deterministic codes in radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modelling a physical system can be carried out either stochastically or deterministically. An example of the former method is the Monte Carlo technique, in which statistically approximate methods are applied to exact models. No transport equation is solved as individual particles are simulated and some specific aspect (tally) of their average behaviour is recorded. The average behaviour of the physical system is then inferred using the central limit theorem. In contrast, deterministic codes use mathematically exact methods that are applied to approximate models to solve the transport equation for the average particle behaviour. The physical system is subdivided in boxes in the phase-space system and particles are followed from one box to the next. The smaller the boxes the better the approximations become. Although the Monte Carlo method has been used for centuries, its more recent manifestation has really emerged from the Manhattan project of the Word War II. Its invention is thought to be mainly due to Metropolis, Ulah (through his interest in poker), Fermi, von Neuman and Richtmeyer. Over the last 20 years or so, the Monte Carlo technique has become a powerful tool in radiation transport. This is due to users taking full advantage of richer cross section data, more powerful computers and Monte Carlo techniques for radiation transport, with high quality physics and better known source spectra. This method is a common sense approach to radiation transport and its success and popularity is quite often also due to necessity, because measurements are not always possible or affordable. In the Monte Carlo method, which is inherently realistic because nature is statistical, a more detailed physics is made possible by isolation of events while rather elaborate geometries can be modelled. Provided that the physics is correct, a simulation is exactly analogous to an experimenter counting particles. In contrast to the deterministic approach, however, a disadvantage of the

  1. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  2. Neutron cross section library production code system for continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP. LICEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code system has been developed to produce neutron cross section libraries for the MVP continuous energy Monte Carlo code from an evaluated nuclear data library in the ENDF format. The code system consists of 9 computer codes, and can process nuclear data in the latest ENDF-6 format. By using the present system, MVP neutron cross section libraries for important nuclides in reactor core analyses, shielding and fusion neutronics calculations have been prepared from JENDL-3.1, JENDL-3.2, JENDL-FUSION file and ENDF/B-VI data bases. This report describes the format of MVP neutron cross section library, the details of each code in the code system and how to use them. (author)

  3. Uncertainties associated with the use of the KENO Monte Carlo criticality codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KENO multi-group Monte Carlo criticality codes have earned the reputation of being efficient, user friendly tools especially suited for the analysis of situations commonly encountered in the storage and transportation of fissile materials. Throughout their twenty years of service, a continuing effort has been made to maintain and improve these codes to meet the needs of the nuclear criticality safety community. Foremost among these needs is the knowledge of how to utilize the results safely and effectively. Therefore it is important that code users be aware of uncertainties that may affect their results. These uncertainties originate from approximations in the problem data, methods used to process cross sections, and assumptions, limitations and approximations within the criticality computer code itself. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  4. Vectorization of continuous energy Monte Carlo code VIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code for criticality calculation. The random walk control system which uses combinatorial geometry system has been vectorized on FACOM VP-100. Vectorization has been done by the event bank method which controls simultaneous multiple particle's random walks, since behavior of neutron is independent. In vectorization of VIM code, we have two problems. One is a large overhead introduced by program modifications for vectorization. Another is a lowering of vector processing efficiency, since the vector length decreases with time according to the absorption and leakage of neutron and cut off of neutron for variance reduction. The average vector length during the random walks has been kept long by utilizing cross section library of single energy band and by reducing the number of the event banks. The performance ratio of vectorized version to the original one is 1.39 for the simple geometry and 1.13 for the complex geometry. (author)

  5. Neutron transport calculations using Quasi-Monte Carlo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines the use of quasirandom sequences of points in place of pseudorandom points in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. For two simple demonstration problems, the root mean square error, computed over a set of repeated runs, is found to be significantly less when quasirandom sequences are used ({open_quotes}Quasi-Monte Carlo Method{close_quotes}) than when a standard Monte Carlo calculation is performed using only pseudorandom points.

  6. The three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIPOLI-2 solves the transport equation for neutrons or gamma rays in tridimensional geometrical configurations. TRIPOLI uses the Monte Carlo method. This method allows to treat exactly the geometrical configurations, the energy losses and the scattering laws. TRIPOLI 2 allows to treat the following problems: gamma transport problems, neutrons transport problems with fixed source (the problems can be time dependent or not), critical problems without fixed source and research of multiplication factor due to fissions, subcritical problems with fixed source and with multiplication by fission. These problems can be separate in two types. First type: shielding problems essentially with deep penetration and streaming through voids. Biasing technics are used to reduce the computing time. Second type: core problems for cell calculations or for small core calculations. In this case, it is necessary to have a fine representation of the cross sections. The thermalization is also treated exactly

  7. Importance function by collision probabilities for Monte Carlo code Tripoli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a completely automatic biasing technique where the parameters of the biased simulation are deduced from the solution of the adjoint transport equation calculated by collision probabilities. In this study we shall estimate the importance function through collision probabilities method and we shall evaluate its possibilities thanks to a Monte Carlo calculation. We have run simulations with this new biasing method for one-group transport problems with isotropic shocks (one dimension geometry and X-Y geometry) and for multigroup problems with anisotropic shocks (one dimension geometry). For the anisotropic problems we solve the adjoint equation with anisotropic collision probabilities. The results show that for the one-group and homogeneous geometry transport problems the method is quite optimal without Splitting and Russian Roulette technique but for the multigroup and heterogeneous X-Y geometry ones the figures of merit are higher if we add Splitting and Russian Roulette technique

  8. Parallel computing by Monte Carlo codes MVP/GMVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General-purpose Monte Carlo codes MVP/GMVP are well-vectorized and thus enable us to perform high-speed Monte Carlo calculations. In order to achieve more speedups, we parallelized the codes on the different types of parallel computing platforms or by using a standard parallelization library MPI. The platforms used for benchmark calculations are a distributed-memory vector-parallel computer Fujitsu VPP500, a distributed-memory massively parallel computer Intel paragon and a distributed-memory scalar-parallel computer Hitachi SR2201, IBM SP2. As mentioned generally, linear speedup could be obtained for large-scale problems but parallelization efficiency decreased as the batch size per a processing element(PE) was smaller. It was also found that the statistical uncertainty for assembly powers was less than 0.1% by the PWR full-core calculation with more than 10 million histories and it took about 1.5 hours by massively parallel computing. (author)

  9. The application of Monte Carlo method to electron and photon beams transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of a Monte Carlo method to study a transport in matter of electron and photon beams is presented, especially for electrons with energies up to 18 MeV. The SHOWME Monte Carlo code, a modified version of GEANT3 code, was used on the CONVEX C3210 computer at Swierk. It was assumed that an electron beam is mono directional and monoenergetic. Arbitrary user-defined, complex geometries made of any element or material can be used in calculation. All principal phenomena occurring when electron beam penetrates the matter are taken into account. The use of calculation for a therapeutic electron beam collimation is presented. (author). 20 refs, 29 figs

  10. Calculation of Gamma-ray Responses for HPGe Detectors with TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Kang; Garg, Ruchi

    2014-06-01

    The gamma-ray response calculation of HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detector is one of the most important topics of the Monte Carlo transport codes for nuclear instrumentation applications. In this study the new options of TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code for gamma-ray spectrometry were investigated. Recent improvements include the gamma-rays modeling of the electron-position annihilation, the low energy electron transport modeling, and the low energy characteristic X-ray production. The impact of these improvements on the detector efficiency of the gamma-ray spectrometry calculations was verified. Four models of HPGe detectors and sample sources were studied. The germanium crystal, the dead layer of the crystal, the central hole, the beryllium window, and the metal housing are the essential parts in detector modeling. A point source, a disc source, and a cylindrical extended source containing a liquid radioactive solution were used to study the TRIPOLI-4 calculations for the gamma-ray energy deposition and the gamma-ray self-shielding. The calculations of full-energy-peak and total detector efficiencies for different sample-detector geometries were performed. Using TRIPOLI-4 code, different gamma-ray energies were applied in order to establish the efficiency curves of the HPGe gamma-ray detectors.

  11. The Physical Models and Statistical Procedures Used in the RACER Monte Carlo Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the MCV (Monte Carlo - Vectorized)Monte Carlo neutron transport code [Brown, 1982, 1983; Brown and Mendelson, 1984a]. MCV is a module in the RACER system of codes that is used for Monte Carlo reactor physics analysis. The MCV module contains all of the neutron transport and statistical analysis functions of the system, while other modules perform various input-related functions such as geometry description, material assignment, output edit specification, etc. MCV is very closely related to the 05R neutron Monte Carlo code [Irving et al., 1965] developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 05R evolved into the 05RR module of the STEMB system, which was the forerunner of the RACER system. Much of the overall logic and physics treatment of 05RR has been retained and, indeed, the original verification of MCV was achieved through comparison with STEMB results. MCV has been designed to be very computationally efficient [Brown, 1981, Brown and Martin, 1984b; Brown, 1986]. It was originally programmed to make use of vector-computing architectures such as those of the CDC Cyber- 205 and Cray X-MP. MCV was the first full-scale production Monte Carlo code to effectively utilize vector-processing capabilities. Subsequently, MCV was modified to utilize both distributed-memory [Sutton and Brown, 1994] and shared memory parallelism. The code has been compiled and run on platforms ranging from 32-bit UNIX workstations to clusters of 64-bit vector-parallel supercomputers. The computational efficiency of the code allows the analyst to perform calculations using many more neutron histories than is practical with most other Monte Carlo codes, thereby yielding results with smaller statistical uncertainties. MCV also utilizes variance reduction techniques such as survival biasing, splitting, and rouletting to permit additional reduction in uncertainties. While a general-purpose neutron Monte Carlo code, MCV is optimized for reactor physics calculations. It has the

  12. Monte Carlo Particle Transport Capability for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brantley, P S; Stuart, L M

    2006-11-06

    A time-dependent massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport calculational module (ParticleMC) for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications is described. The ParticleMC package is designed with the long-term goal of transporting neutrons, charged particles, and gamma rays created during the simulation of ICF targets and surrounding materials, although currently the package treats neutrons and gamma rays. Neutrons created during thermonuclear burn provide a source of neutrons to the ParticleMC package. Other user-defined sources of particles are also available. The module is used within the context of a hydrodynamics client code, and the particle tracking is performed on the same computational mesh as used in the broader simulation. The module uses domain-decomposition and the MPI message passing interface to achieve parallel scaling for large numbers of computational cells. The Doppler effects of bulk hydrodynamic motion and the thermal effects due to the high temperatures encountered in ICF plasmas are directly included in the simulation. Numerical results for a three-dimensional benchmark test problem are presented in 3D XYZ geometry as a verification of the basic transport capability. In the full paper, additional numerical results including a prototype ICF simulation will be presented.

  13. Electron transport in radiotherapy using local-to-global Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local-to-Global (L-G) Monte Carlo methods are a way to make three-dimensional electron transport both fast and accurate relative to other Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by breaking the simulation into two stages: a local calculation done over small geometries having the size and shape of the ''steps'' to be taken through the mesh; and a global calculation which relies on a stepping code that samples the stored results of the local calculation. The increase in speed results from taking fewer steps in the global calculation than required by ordinary Monte Carlo codes and by speeding up the calculation per step. The potential for accuracy comes from the ability to use long runs of detailed codes to compile probability distribution functions (PDFs) in the local calculation. Specific examples of successful Local-to-Global algorithms are given

  14. Implementation of a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT with MCNP code

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tongming Tony

    In IMRT inverse planning, inaccurate dose calculations and limitations in optimization algorithms introduce both systematic and convergence errors to treatment plans. The goal of this work is to practically implement a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT. The intention is to minimize both types of error in inverse planning and obtain treatment plans with better clinical accuracy than non-Monte Carlo based systems. The strategy is to calculate the dose matrices of small beamlets by using a Monte Carlo based method. Optimization of beamlet intensities is followed based on the calculated dose data using an optimization algorithm that is capable of escape from local minima and prevents possible pre-mature convergence. The MCNP 4B Monte Carlo code is improved to perform fast particle transport and dose tallying in lattice cells by adopting a selective transport and tallying algorithm. Efficient dose matrix calculation for small beamlets is made possible by adopting a scheme that allows concurrent calculation of multiple beamlets of single port. A finite-sized point source (FSPS) beam model is introduced for easy and accurate beam modeling. A DVH based objective function and a parallel platform based algorithm are developed for the optimization of intensities. The calculation accuracy of improved MCNP code and FSPS beam model is validated by dose measurements in phantoms. Agreements better than 1.5% or 0.2 cm have been achieved. Applications of the implemented model to clinical cases of brain, head/neck, lung, spine, pancreas and prostate have demonstrated the feasibility and capability of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for clinical IMRT. Dose distributions of selected treatment plans from a commercial non-Monte Carlo based system are evaluated in comparison with Monte Carlo based calculations. Systematic errors of up to 12% in tumor doses and up to 17% in critical structure doses have been observed. The clinical importance of Monte Carlo based

  15. SWAT4.0 - The integrated burnup code system driving continuous energy Monte Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and deterministic calculation code SRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been two versions of SWAT depending on details of its development history: the revised SWAT that uses the deterministic calculation code SRAC as a neutron transportation solver, and the SWAT3.1 that uses the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP or MCNP5 for the same purpose. It takes several hours, however, to execute one calculation by the continuous energy Monte Carlo code even on the super computer of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Moreover, two-dimensional burnup calculation is not practical using the revised SWAT because it has problems on production of effective cross section data and applying them to arbitrary fuel geometry when a calculation model has multiple burnup zones. Therefore, SWAT4.0 has been developed by adding, to SWAT3.1, a function to utilize the deterministic code SARC2006, which has shorter calculation time, as an outer module of neutron transportation solver for burnup calculation. SWAT4.0 has been enabled to execute two-dimensional burnup calculation by providing an input data template of SRAC2006 to SWAT4.0 input data, and updating atomic number densities of burnup zones in each burnup step. This report describes outline, input data instruction, and examples of calculations of SWAT4.0. (author)

  16. Qualification of the two-dimensional transport code Paragon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARAGON is a new two-dimensional transport based on collision probability/coupled interface currents methods and written entirely in FORTRAN 90/95. The qualification of PARAGON has been completed and the results are very good. This qualification included a number of critical experiments. Comparisons to the Monte Carlo code MCNP for a wide variety of PWR assembly lattice types were also performed. In addition, PARAGON-based core simulator models have been compared against PWR plant start up and operational data for a large number of plants. Some results of these calculations and also comparisons against models developed with a licensed Westinghouse lattice code, PHOENIX-P, will be presented

  17. Monte Carlo Code System Development for Liquid Metal Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyo; Shim, Hyung Jin; Han, Beom Seok; Park, Ho Jin; Park, Dong Gyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We have implemented the composition cell class and the use cell to MCCARD for hierarchy input processing. For the inputs of KALlMER-600 core consisted of 336 assemblies, we require the geometric data of 91,056 pin cells. Using hierarchy input processing, it was observed that the system geometries are correctly handled with the geometric data of total 611 cells; 2 cells for fuel rods, 2 cells for guide holes, 271 translation cells for rods, and 336 translation cells for assemblies. We have developed monte carlo decay-chain models based on decay chain model of REBUS code for liquid metal reactor analysis. Using developed decay-chain models, the depletion analysis calculations have performed for the homogeneous and heterogeneous model of KALlMER-600. The k-effective for the depletion analysis agrees well with that of REBUS code. and the developed decay chain models shows more efficient performance for time and memories, as compared with the existing decay chain model The chi-square criterion has been developed to diagnose the temperature convergence for the MC TjH feedback calculations. From the application results to the KALlMER pin and fuel assembly problem, it is observed that the new criterion works well Wc have applied the high efficiency variance reduction technique by splitting Russian roulette to estimate the PPPF of the KALIMER core at BOC. The PPPF of KALlMER core at BOC is 1.235({+-}0.008). The developed technique shows four time faster calculation, as compared with the existin2 calculation Subject Keywords Monte Carlo

  18. Analysis of the tritium breeding ratio benchmark experiments using the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium breeding is an essential element of fusion nuclear technology. A tritium breeding ratio greater than unity is necessary for self-sufficient fueling. To simulate the 14 MeV neutron transport in tritium breeding systems from the D-T fusion reaction, the 3D realistic modeling with Monte Carlo code and the point-wise nuclear data are recommended. Continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code has been widely used on the radiation shielding, criticality safety, and fission reactor physics. For supporting the ITER TBM (test blanket module) neutronics study with TRIPOLI-4 code, this paper presents the TRIPOLI-4 simulation of TBR (tritium breeding ratio) for six OKTAVIAN spherical assemblies of Osaka University: Li, Li-C, Pb-Li, Pb-Li-C, Be-Li, and Be-Li-C. It also investigates the impact of nuclear data libraries on TBR calculations from ENDF/B-VI.4, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-3.3, and FENDL-2.1. In general, TRIPOLI-4 produced satisfactory C/E values. Only beryllium of JEFF-3.1 library introduces higher uncertainties.

  19. Applicability of deterministic and Monte Carlo neutron transport models coupled with thermo-fluiddynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seubert, A.; Langenbuch, S.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Garching (Germany). Forschungsinstitute

    2007-07-01

    An overview is given of the recent progress at GRS concerning deterministic transport and Monte Carlo methods with thermal-hydraulic feedback. The development of the time-dependent 3D discrete ordinates transport code TORT-TD is described which has also been coupled with ATHLET. TORT-TD/ATHLET allows 3D pin-by-pin coupled analyses of transients using few energy groups and anisotropic scattering. As a step towards Monte Carlo steady-state calculations with nuclear point data and thermal-hydraulic feedback, MCNP has been prepared to incorporate thermal-hydraulic parameters. Results obtained for selected test cases demonstrate the applicability of deterministic and Monte Carlo neutron transport models coupled with thermo-fluiddynamics. (orig.)

  20. Experimental transport analysis code system in JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport analysis codes have been developed in order to study confinement properties related to particle and energy balance in ohmically and neutral beam heated plasmas of JT-60. The analysis procedure is divided into three steps as follows: 1) LOOK ; The shape of the plasma boundary is identified with a fast boundary identification code of FBI by using magnetic data, and flux surfaces are calculated with a MHD equilibrium code of SELENE. The diagnostic data are mapped to flux surfaces for neutral beam heating calculation and/or for radial transport analysis. 2) OFMC ; On the basis of transformed data, an orbit following Monte Carlo code of OFMC calculates both profiles of power deposition and particle source of neutral beam injected into a plasma. 3) SCOOP ; In the last stage, a one dimensional transport code of SCOOP solves particle and energy balance for electron and ion, in order to evaluate transport coefficients as well as global parameters such as energy confinement time and the stored energy. The analysis results are provided to a data bank of DARTS that is used to find an overview of important consideration on confinement with a regression analysis code of RAC. (author)

  1. Analysing the statistics of group constants generated by Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important topic in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations is to verify that the statistics of the calculated estimates are correct. Undersampling, non-converged fission source distribution and inter-cycle correlations may result in inaccurate results. In this paper, we study the effect of the number of neutron histories on the distributions of homogenized group constants and assembly discontinuity factors generated using Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code. We apply two normality tests and a so-called “drift-in-mean” test to the batch-wise distributions of selected parameters generated for two assembly types taken from the MIT BEAVRS benchmark. The results imply that in the tested cases the batch-wise estimates of the studied group constants can be regarded as normally distributed. We also show that undersampling is an issue with the calculated assembly discontinuity factors when the number of neutron histories is small. (author)

  2. Validation the Monte Carlo code RMC with C5G7 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The RMC code was verified based on the benchmark of C5G7. • Calculation speed of RMC is better than MCNP, especially in the flux tallies. • Eigenvalues calculated by RMC were within 2σ of the benchmark in all cases. • The pin by pin flux tallies of RMC are consistent with MCNP well. - Abstract: RMC (Reactor Monte Carlo code) is a new 3D Monte Carlo neutron transport code being developed by Department of Engineering Physics in Tsinghua University. The current version of RMC is a β version. In this paper, based on 2D and 3D benchmark of C5G7, the criticality calculation capacity of RMC was verified. Comparisons were made between the benchmark eigenvalues and those outputs by the RMC code. The RMC-generated eigenvalues were within two standard deviations of the benchmark and MCNP values in all cases. Additionally, the flux was compared pin by pin between MCNP and RMC. The flux tallies generated by RMC were found to be in well agreement with those from MCNP

  3. Monte Carlo simulation in UWB1 depletion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UWB1 depletion code is being developed as a fast computational tool for the study of burnable absorbers in the University of West Bohemia in Pilsen, Czech Republic. In order to achieve higher precision, the newly developed code was extended by adding a Monte Carlo solver. Research of fuel depletion aims at development and introduction of advanced types of burnable absorbers in nuclear fuel. Burnable absorbers (BA) allow the compensation of the initial reactivity excess of nuclear fuel and result in an increase of fuel cycles lengths with higher enriched fuels. The paper describes the depletion calculations of VVER nuclear fuel doped with rare earth oxides as burnable absorber based on performed depletion calculations, rare earth oxides are divided into two equally numerous groups, suitable burnable absorbers and poisoning absorbers. According to residual poisoning and BA reactivity worth, rare earth oxides marked as suitable burnable absorbers are Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho and Er, while poisoning absorbers include Sc, La, Lu, Y, Ce, Pr and Tb. The presentation slides have been added to the article

  4. Tracklength biassing in Monte Carlo radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracklength stretching is employed in deep penetration Monte Carlo studies for variance reduction. Incorporating a dependence of the biassing on the angular disposition of the track improves the procedure. Linear and exponential forms for this dependence are investigated here, using Spanier's self-learning technique. Suitable biassing parameters are worked out for representative shield systems, for use in practical simulations. Of the two, we find that the exponential scheme performs better. (orig.)

  5. Monte Carlo N Particle code - Dose distribution of clinical electron beams in inhomogeneous phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    H A Nedaie; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Allahverdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Electron dose distributions calculated using the currently available analytical methods can be associated with large uncertainties. The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for dose calculation in electron beams. Most of the clinical electron beam simulation studies have been performed using non- MCNP [Monte Carlo N Particle] codes. Given the differences between Monte Carlo codes, this work aims to evaluate the accuracy of MCNP4C-simulated electron dose distributions in a homogenous...

  6. Development of transient neutron transport calculation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transient neutron transport code for time-dependent analyses of neutronics systems, named DOT4-T, has been developed. The code is based on the Discrete Ordinates code DOT4.2, which solves the steady-state neutron transport equation in two dimensions. For the discretization of time variable, a direct method, the fully implicit and unconditionally stable time integration scheme, has been employed. The resulting code has been tested using several one-dimensional and two-dimensional benchmark problems, and the results obtained with DOT4-T shows very satisfactory agreement with the benchmark problem results. (authors)

  7. In-facility transport code review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spore, J.W.; Boyack, B.E.; Bohl, W.R. [and others

    1996-07-01

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used.

  8. In-facility transport code review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used

  9. Method of tallying adjoint fluence and calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of using iterated fission probability to estimate the adjoint fluence during particles simulation, and using it as the weighting function to calculate kinetics parameters βeff and A in Monte Carlo codes, was introduced in this paper. Implements of this method in continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP and multi-group Monte Carlo code MCMG are both elaborated. Verification results show that, with regardless additional computing cost, using this method, the adjoint fluence accounted by MCMG matches well with the result computed by ANISN, and the kinetics parameters calculated by MCNP agree very well with benchmarks. This method is proved to be reliable, and the function of calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes is carried out effectively, which could be the basement for Monte Carlo codes' utility in the analysis of nuclear reactors' transient behavior. (authors)

  10. A user`s manual for MASH 1.0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the ``dose importance`` of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user`s manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  11. A user's manual for MASH 1. 0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. (ed.)

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the dose importance'' of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  12. The application of Monte Carlo method to electron and photon beams transport; Zastosowanie metody Monte Carlo do analizy transportu elektronow i fotonow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zychor, I. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The application of a Monte Carlo method to study a transport in matter of electron and photon beams is presented, especially for electrons with energies up to 18 MeV. The SHOWME Monte Carlo code, a modified version of GEANT3 code, was used on the CONVEX C3210 computer at Swierk. It was assumed that an electron beam is mono directional and monoenergetic. Arbitrary user-defined, complex geometries made of any element or material can be used in calculation. All principal phenomena occurring when electron beam penetrates the matter are taken into account. The use of calculation for a therapeutic electron beam collimation is presented. (author). 20 refs, 29 figs.

  13. OpenMC: A state-of-the-art Monte Carlo code for research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • OpenMC is an open source Monte Carlo particle transport code. • Solid geometry and continuous-energy physics allow high-fidelity simulations. • Development has focused on high performance and modern I/O techniques. • OpenMC is capable of scaling up to hundreds of thousands of processors. • Other features include plotting, CMFD acceleration, and variance reduction. - Abstract: This paper gives an overview of OpenMC, an open source Monte Carlo particle transport code recently developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. OpenMC uses continuous-energy cross sections and a constructive solid geometry representation, enabling high-fidelity modeling of nuclear reactors and other systems. Modern, portable input/output file formats are used in OpenMC: XML for input, and HDF5 for output. High performance parallel algorithms in OpenMC have demonstrated near-linear scaling to over 100,000 processors on modern supercomputers. Other topics discussed in this paper include plotting, CMFD acceleration, variance reduction, eigenvalue calculations, and software development processes

  14. Monte Carlo method for neutron transport calculations in graphics processing units (GPUs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulation is well suited for solving the Boltzmann neutron transport equation in an inhomogeneous media for complicated geometries. However, routine applications require the computation time to be reduced to hours and even minutes in a desktop PC. The interest in adopting Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for Monte Carlo acceleration is rapidly growing. This is due to the massive parallelism provided by the latest GPU technologies which is the most promising solution to the challenge of performing full-size reactor core analysis on a routine basis. In this study, Monte Carlo codes for a fixed-source neutron transport problem were developed for GPU environments in order to evaluate issues associated with computational speedup using GPUs. Results obtained in this work suggest that a speedup of several orders of magnitude is possible using the state-of-the-art GPU technologies. (author)

  15. Deterministic and Monte Carlo transport models with thermal-hydraulic feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seubert, A.; Langenbuch, S.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of recent developments concerning deterministic transport and Monte Carlo methods with thermal-hydraulic feedback. The timedependent 3D discrete ordinates transport code TORT-TD allows pin-by-pin analyses of transients using few energy groups and anisotropic scattering by solving the timedependent transport equation using the unconditionally stable implicit method. To account for thermal-hydraulic feedback, TORT-TD has been coupled with the system code ATHLET. Applications to, e.g., a control rod ejection in a 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement demonstrate the applicability of the coupled code TORT-TD/ATHLET for test cases. For Monte Carlo steady-state calculations with nuclear point data and thermalhydraulic feedback, MCNP has been prepared to incorporate thermal-hydraulic parameters. As test case has been chosen the uncontrolled steady state of the 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement for which the thermal-hydraulic parameter distribution has been obtained from a preceding coupled TORT-TD/ATHLET analysis. The result demonstrates the applicability of MCNP to problems with spatial distributions of thermal-fluiddynamic parameters. The comparison with MCNP results confirms that the accuracy of deterministic transport calculations with pin-wise homogenised few-group cross sections is comparable to Monte Carlo simulations. The presented cases are considered as a pre-stage of performing calculations of larger configurations like a quarter core which is in preparation. (orig.)

  16. Deterministic and Monte Carlo transport models with thermal-hydraulic feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of recent developments concerning deterministic transport and Monte Carlo methods with thermal-hydraulic feedback. The timedependent 3D discrete ordinates transport code TORT-TD allows pin-by-pin analyses of transients using few energy groups and anisotropic scattering by solving the timedependent transport equation using the unconditionally stable implicit method. To account for thermal-hydraulic feedback, TORT-TD has been coupled with the system code ATHLET. Applications to, e.g., a control rod ejection in a 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement demonstrate the applicability of the coupled code TORT-TD/ATHLET for test cases. For Monte Carlo steady-state calculations with nuclear point data and thermalhydraulic feedback, MCNP has been prepared to incorporate thermal-hydraulic parameters. As test case has been chosen the uncontrolled steady state of the 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement for which the thermal-hydraulic parameter distribution has been obtained from a preceding coupled TORT-TD/ATHLET analysis. The result demonstrates the applicability of MCNP to problems with spatial distributions of thermal-fluiddynamic parameters. The comparison with MCNP results confirms that the accuracy of deterministic transport calculations with pin-wise homogenised few-group cross sections is comparable to Monte Carlo simulations. The presented cases are considered as a pre-stage of performing calculations of larger configurations like a quarter core which is in preparation. (orig.)

  17. Development of burnup calculation function in reactor Monte Carlo code RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the burnup calculation capability of RMC, which is a new Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport code developed by Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (REAL) in Tsinghua University of China. Unlike most of existing MC depletion codes which explicitly couple the depletion module, RMC incorporates ORIGEN 2.1 in an implicit way. Different burn step strategies, including the middle-of-step approximation and the predictor-corrector method, are adopted by RMC to assure the accuracy under large burnup step size. RMC employs a spectrum-based method of tallying one-group cross section, which can considerably saves computational time with negligible accuracy loss. According to the validation results of benchmarks and examples, it is proved that the burnup function of RMC performs quite well in accuracy and efficiency. (authors)

  18. Shielding properties of iron at high energy proton accelerators studied by a Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding properties of a lateral iron shield and of iron and concrete shields at angles between 5deg and 30deg are studied by means of the Monte Carlo program FLUNEV (DESY-D3 version of the FLUKA code extended for emission and transport of low energy neutrons). The following quantities were calculated for a high energy proton beam hitting an extended iron target: total and partial dose equivalents, attenuation coefficients, neutron spectra, star densities (compared also with the CASIM code) and quality factors. The dependence of the dose equivalent on the energy of primary protons, the effect of a concrete layer behind a lateral iron shielding and the total number of neutrons produced in the target were also estimated. (orig.)

  19. A 3DHZETRN Code in a Spherical Uniform Sphere with Monte Carlo Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    The computationally efficient HZETRN code has been used in recent trade studies for lunar and Martian exploration and is currently being used in the engineering development of the next generation of space vehicles, habitats, and extra vehicular activity equipment. A new version (3DHZETRN) capable of transporting High charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation is under development. In the present report, new algorithms for light ion and neutron propagation with well-defined convergence criteria in 3D objects is developed and tested against Monte Carlo simulations to verify the solution methodology. The code will be available through the software system, OLTARIS, for shield design and validation and provides a basis for personal computer software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  20. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry; Les codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordy, J.M.; Kodeli, I.; Menard, St.; Bouchet, J.L.; Renard, F.; Martin, E.; Blazy, L.; Voros, S.; Bochud, F.; Laedermann, J.P.; Beaugelin, K.; Makovicka, L.; Quiot, A.; Vermeersch, F.; Roche, H.; Perrin, M.C.; Laye, F.; Bardies, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Gschwind, R.; Fernandez, F.; Quesne, B.; Fritsch, P.; Lamart, St.; Crovisier, Ph.; Leservot, A.; Antoni, R.; Huet, Ch.; Thiam, Ch.; Donadille, L.; Monfort, M.; Diop, Ch.; Ricard, M

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  1. Calculation of extended shields in the Monte Carlo method using importance function (BRAND and DD code systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given of a technique and algorithms of constructing neutron trajectories in the Monte-Carlo method taking into account the data on adjoint transport equation solution. When simulating the transport part of transfer kernel the use is made of piecewise-linear approximation of free path length density along the particle motion direction. The approach has been implemented in programs within the framework of the BRAND code system. The importance is calculated in the multigroup P1-approximation within the framework of the DD-30 code system. The efficiency of the developed computation technique is demonstrated by means of solution of two model problems. 4 refs.; 2 tabs

  2. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  3. A Monte Carlo Green's function method for three-dimensional neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a Monte Carlo transport kernel capability, which has recently been incorporated into the RACER continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. The kernels represent a Green's function method for neutron transport from a fixed-source volume out to a particular volume of interest. This method is very powerful transport technique. Also, since kernels are evaluated numerically by Monte Carlo, the problem geometry can be arbitrarily complex, yet exact. This method is intended for problems where an ex-core neutron response must be determined for a variety of reactor conditions. Two examples are ex-core neutron detector response and vessel critical weld fast flux. The response is expressed in terms of neutron transport kernels weighted by a core fission source distribution. In these types of calculations, the response must be computed for hundreds of source distributions, but the kernels only need to be calculated once. The advance described in this paper is that the kernels are generated with a highly accurate three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport calculation instead of an approximate method such as line-of-sight attenuation theory or a synthesized three-dimensional discrete ordinates solution

  4. Monte Carlo burnup analysis code development and application to an incore thermionic space nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design of the incore thermionic reactor system developed under the Advanced Thermionic Initiative (ATI), the fuel is highly enriched uranium dioxide and the moderating medium is zirconium hydride. The traditional burnup and fuel depletion analysis codes have been found to be inadequate for these calculations, largely because of the material and geometry modeled and because the neutron spectra assumed for the codes such as LEOPARD and ORIGEN do not even closely fit that for a small, thermal reactor using ZrH as moderator. More sophisticated codes such as the transport lattice type code WIMS often lack some materials, such as ZrH. Thus a new method which could accurately calculate the neutron spectrum and the appropriate reaction rates within the fuel element is needed. The method developed utilizes and interconnects the accuracy of the Monte Carlo Neutron/Photon (MCNP) method to calculate reaction rates for the important isotopes, and a time dependent depletion routine to calculate the temporal effects on isotope concentrations. This effort required the modification of MCNP itself to perform the additional task of accomplishing burnup calculations. The modified version called, MCNPBURN, evolved to be a general dual purpose code which can be used for standard calculations as well as for burn-up

  5. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems

  6. Users manual for the UEDGE edge-plasma transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E; Smith, G R

    2000-01-10

    Operational details are given for the two-dimensional UEDGE edge-plasma transport code. The model applies to nearly fully-ionized plasmas in a strong magnetic field. Equations are solved for the plasma density, velocity along the magnetic field, electron temperature, ion temperature, and electrostatic potential. In addition, fluid models of neutrals species are included or the option to couple to a Monte Carlo code description of the neutrals. Multi-species ion mixtures can be simulated. The physical equations are discretized by a finite-difference procedure, and the resulting system of algebraic equations are solved by fully-implicit techniques. The code can be used to follow time-dependent solutions or to find steady-state solutions by direct iteration.

  7. Confidence interval procedures for Monte Carlo transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of obtaining valid confidence intervals based on estimates from sampled distributions using Monte Carlo particle transport simulation codes such as MCNP is examined. Such intervals can cover the true parameter of interest at a lower than nominal rate if the sampled distribution is extremely right-skewed by large tallies. Modifications to the standard theory of confidence intervals are discussed and compared with some existing heuristics, including batched means normality tests. Two new types of diagnostics are introduced to assess whether the conditions of central limit theorem-type results are satisfied: the relative variance of the variance determines whether the sample size is sufficiently large, and estimators of the slope of the right tail of the distribution are used to indicate the number of moments that exist. A simulation study is conducted to quantify the relationship between various diagnostics and coverage rates and to find sample-based quantities useful in indicating when intervals are expected to be valid. Simulated tally distributions are chosen to emulate behavior seen in difficult particle transport problems. Measures of variation in the sample variance s2 are found to be much more effective than existing methods in predicting when coverage will be near nominal rates. Batched means tests are found to be overly conservative in this regard. A simple but pathological MCNP problem is presented as an example of false convergence using existing heuristics. The new methods readily detect the false convergence and show that the results of the problem, which are a factor of 4 too small, should not be used. Recommendations are made for applying these techniques in practice, using the statistical output currently produced by MCNP

  8. Particle and heavy ion transport code system; PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermediate and high energy nuclear data are strongly required in design study of many facilities such as accelerator-driven systems, intense pulse spallation neutron sources, and also in medical and space technology. There is, however, few evaluated nuclear data of intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions. Therefore, we have to use some models or systematics for the cross sections, which are essential ingredients of high energy particle and heavy ion transport code to estimate neutron yield, heat deposition and many other quantities of the transport phenomena in materials. We have developed general purpose particle and heavy ion transport Monte Carlo code system, PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System), based on the NMTC/JAM code by the collaboration of Tohoku University, JAERI and RIST. The PHITS has three important ingredients which enable us to calculate (1) high energy nuclear reactions up to 200 GeV, (2) heavy ion collision and its transport in material, (3) low energy neutron transport based on the evaluated nuclear data. In the PHITS, the cross sections of high energy nuclear reactions are obtained by JAM model. JAM (Jet AA Microscopic Transport Model) is a hadronic cascade model, which explicitly treats all established hadronic states including resonances and all hadron-hadron cross sections parametrized based on the resonance model and string model by fitting the available experimental data. The PHITS can describe the transport of heavy ions and their collisions by making use of JQMD and SPAR code. The JQMD (JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics) is a simulation code for nucleus nucleus collisions based on the molecular dynamics. The SPAR code is widely used to calculate the stopping powers and ranges for charged particles and heavy ions. The PHITS has included some part of MCNP4C code, by which the transport of low energy neutron, photon and electron based on the evaluated nuclear data can be described. Furthermore, the high energy nuclear

  9. PROBLEM DEPENDENT DOPPLER BROADENING OF CONTINUOUS ENERGY CROSS SECTIONS IN THE KENO MONTE CARLO COMPUTER CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, S. W. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Celik, Cihangir [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    For many Monte Carlo codes cross sections are generally only created at a set of predetermined temperatures. This causes an increase in error as one moves further and further away from these temperatures in the Monte Carlo model. This paper discusses recent progress in the Scale Monte Carlo module KENO to create problem dependent, Doppler broadened, cross sections. Currently only broadening the 1D cross sections and probability tables is addressed. The approach uses a finite difference method to calculate the temperature dependent cross-sections for the 1D data, and a simple linear-logarithmic interpolation in the square root of temperature for the probability tables. Work is also ongoing to address broadening theS (alpha , beta) tables. With the current approach the temperature dependent cross sections are Doppler broadened before transport starts, and, for all but a few isotopes, the impact on cross section loading is negligible. Results can be compared with those obtained by using multigroup libraries, as KENO currently does interpolation on the multigroup cross sections to determine temperature dependent cross-sections. Current results compare favorably with these expected results.

  10. COG10, Multiparticle Monte Carlo Code System for Shielding and Criticality Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: COG is a modern, full-featured Monte Carlo radiation transport code which provides accurate answers to complex shielding, criticality, and activation problems. COG was written to be state-of-the-art and free of physics approximations and compromises found in earlier codes. COG is fully 3-D, uses point-wise cross sections and exact angular scattering, and allows a full range of biasing options to speed up solutions for deep penetration problems. Additionally, a criticality option is available for computing Keff for assemblies of fissile materials. ENDL or ENDFB cross section libraries may be used. COG home page: http://www-phys.llnl.gov/N_Div/COG/. Cross section libraries are included in the package. COG can use either the LLNL ENDL-90 cross section set or the ENDFB/VI set. Analytic surfaces are used to describe geometric boundaries. Parts (volumes) are described by a method of Constructive Solid Geometry. Surface types include surfaces of up to fourth order, and pseudo-surfaces such as boxes, finite cylinders, and figures of revolution. Repeated assemblies need be defined only once. Parts are visualized in cross-section and perspective picture views. Source and random-walk biasing techniques may be selected to improve solution statistics. These include source angular biasing, importance weighting, particle splitting and Russian roulette, path-length stretching, point detectors, scattered direction biasing, and forced collisions. Criticality - For a fissioning system, COG will compute Keff by transporting batches of neutrons through the system. Activation - COG can compute gamma-ray doses due to neutron-activated materials, starting with just a neutron source. Coupled Problems - COG can solve coupled problems involving neutrons, photons, and electrons. 2 - Methods:COG uses Monte Carlo methods to solve the Boltzmann transport equation for particles traveling through arbitrary 3-dimensional geometries. Neutrons, photons

  11. FOTELP - Monte Carlo simulation of photons, electrons and positrons transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the development of the algorithm and computer program FOTELP for photons, electrons and positrons transport by the Monte Carlo analog method. This program can be used in numerical experiments on the computer for dosimetry, radiation protection and radiation therapy. (author)

  12. Overview of particle and heavy ion transport code system PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We developed a general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS. • PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles over wide energy ranges. • More than 1500 researchers have been used PHITS for various applications. • Physics models and special functions implemented in PHITS are briefly summarized. - Abstract: A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1500 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions

  13. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulation of the Ghana Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic Monte Carlo neutron particle transport methods have been applied to successfully model in 3-D, the HEU-fueled Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1), a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) using the MCNP version 4c3 particle transport code. The preliminary multigroup neutronic criticality calculations yielded a keff is contained in 1.00449 with a corresponding cold clean excess reactivity of 4.47mk (447pcm) compared with experimental values of keff is contained in 1.00402 and excess reactivity of 4.00mk (400pcm). The Monte Carlo simulations also show comparable results in the neutron fluxes in the HEU core and some regions of interest. The observed trends in the radial and axial flux distributions in the core, beryllium annular reflector and the water region in the top shim reflector tray were reproduced, indicating consistency of the results, accuracy of the model, precision of the MCNP transport code and the comparability of the Monte Carlo simulations. The results further illustrate the close agreement between stochastic transport theory and the experimental measurements conducted during off-site zero power cold tests. (author)

  14. Implementation of the probability table method in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, T.M.; Brown, F.B. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-10-01

    RACER is a particle-transport Monte Carlo code that utilizes a continuous-energy treatment for neutrons and neutron cross section data. Until recently, neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance range (URR) have been treated in RACER using smooth, dilute-average representations. This paper describes how RACER has been modified to use probability tables to treat cross sections in the URR, and the computer codes that have been developed to compute the tables from the unresolved resonance parameters contained in ENDF/B data files. A companion paper presents results of Monte Carlo calculations that demonstrate the effect of the use of probability tables versus the use of dilute-average cross sections for the URR. The next section provides a brief review of the probability table method as implemented in the RACER system. The production of the probability tables for use by RACER takes place in two steps. The first step is the generation of probability tables from the nuclear parameters contained in the ENDF/B data files. This step, and the code written to perform it, are described in Section 3. The tables produced are at energy points determined by the ENDF/B parameters and/or accuracy considerations. The tables actually used in the RACER calculations are obtained in the second step from those produced in the first. These tables are generated at energy points specific to the RACER calculation. Section 4 describes this step and the code written to implement it, as well as modifications made to RACER to enable it to use the tables. Finally, some results and conclusions are presented in Section 5.

  15. Overview and applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport kit at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions

  16. MONTE-CARLO SIMULATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Torok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are microscopic, mezoscopic and macroscopic models in road traffic analysis and forecasting. From microscopic models one can calculate the macroscopic data by aggregation. The following paper describes the disaggregation method of macroscopic state, which could lead to microscopic properties of traffic. In order to ensure the transform between macroscopic and microscopic states Monte-Carlo simulation was used. MS Excel macro environment was built to run Monte-Carlo simulation. With this method the macroscopic data can be disaggregated to macroscopic data and as a byproduct mezoscopic, regional data can be gained. These mezoscopic data can be used further on regional environmental or transport policy assessment.

  17. Generic programming for deterministic neutron transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the implementation of neutron transport codes via generic programming techniques. Two different Boltzmann equation approximations have been implemented, namely the Sn and SPn methods. This implementation experiment shows that generic programming allows us to improve maintainability and readability of source codes with no performance penalties compared to classical approaches. In the present implementation, matrices and vectors as well as linear algebra algorithms are treated separately from the rest of source code and gathered in a tool library called 'Generic Linear Algebra Solver System' (GLASS). Such a code architecture, based on a linear algebra library, allows us to separate the three different scientific fields involved in transport codes design: numerical analysis, reactor physics and computer science. Our library handles matrices with optional storage policies and thus applies both to Sn code, where the matrix elements are computed on the fly, and to SPn code where stored matrices are used. Thus, using GLASS allows us to share a large fraction of source code between Sn and SPn implementations. Moreover, the GLASS high level of abstraction allows the writing of numerical algorithms in a form which is very close to their textbook descriptions. Hence the GLASS algorithms collection, disconnected from computer science considerations (e.g. storage policy), is very easy to read, to maintain and to extend. (authors)

  18. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations

  19. Present status of vectorization for particle transport Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional particle transport Monte Carlo algorithm is ill-suited for modern vector supercomputers. This history-based algorithm is not amenable to vectorization due to the random nature of the particle transport process, which inhibits the construction of vectors that are necessary for efficient utilization of a vector (pipelined) processor. An alternative algorithm, the event-based algorithm, is suitable for vectorization and has been used by several researchers in recent years to achieve impressive gains (5-20) in performance on modern vector supercomputers. This paper describes the event-based algorithm in some detail and discusses several implementations of this algorithm for specific applications in particle transport, including photon transport in a nuclear fusion plasma and neutron transport in a nuclear reactor. A discussion of the relative merits of these alternative approaches is included. A short discussion of the implementation of Monte Carlo methods on parallel processors, in particular multiple vector processors such as the Cray X-MP/48 and the IBM 3090/400, is included. The paper concludes with some thoughts regarding the potential of massively parallel processors (vector and scalar) for Monte Carlo simulation

  20. New Physics Data Libraries for Monte Carlo Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Augelli, M; Kuster, M; Han, M; Kim, C H; Pia, M G; Quintieri, L; Seo, H; Saracco, P; Weidenspointner, G; Zoglauer, A

    2010-01-01

    The role of data libraries as a collaborative tool across Monte Carlo codes is discussed. Some new contributions in this domain are presented; they concern a data library of proton and alpha ionization cross sections, the development in progress of a data library of electron ionization cross sections and proposed improvements to the EADL (Evaluated Atomic Data Library), the latter resulting from an extensive data validation process.

  1. On the use of the Serpent Monte Carlo code for few-group cross section generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → B1 methodology was used for generation of leakage-corrected few-group cross sections in the Serpent Monte-Carlo code. → Few-group constants generated by Serpent were compared with those calculated by Helios deterministic lattice transport code. → 3D analysis of a PWR core was performed by a nodal diffusion code DYN3D employing two-group cross section sets generated by Serpent and Helios. → An excellent agreement in the results of 3D core calculations obtained with Helios and Serpent generated cross-section libraries was observed. - Abstract: Serpent is a recently developed 3D continuous-energy Monte Carlo (MC) reactor physics burnup calculation code. Serpent is specifically designed for lattice physics applications including generation of homogenized few-group constants for full-core core simulators. Currently in Serpent, the few-group constants are obtained from the infinite-lattice calculations with zero neutron current at the outer boundary. In this study, in order to account for the non-physical infinite-lattice approximation, B1 methodology, routinely used by deterministic lattice transport codes, was considered for generation of leakage-corrected few-group cross sections in the Serpent code. A preliminary assessment of the applicability of the B1 methodology for generation of few-group constants in the Serpent code was carried out according to the following steps. Initially, the two-group constants generated by Serpent were compared with those calculated by Helios deterministic lattice transport code. Then, a 3D analysis of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core was performed by the nodal diffusion code DYN3D employing two-group cross section sets generated by Serpent and Helios. At this stage thermal-hydraulic (T-H) feedback was neglected. The DYN3D results were compared with those obtained from the 3D full core Serpent MC calculations. Finally, the full core DYN3D calculations were repeated taking into account T-H feedback and

  2. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, L S; Wilson, T L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be useful in the design and analysis of experiments such as ACCESS (Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station), which is an Office of Space Science payload currently under evaluation for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). FLUKA will be significantly improved and tailored for use in simulating space radiation in four ways. First, the additional physics not presently within the code that is necessary to simulate the problems of interest, namely the heavy ion inelastic processes, will be incorporated. Second, the internal geometry package will be replaced with one that will substantially increase the calculation speed as well as simplify the data input task. Third, default incident flux packages that include all of the different space radiation sources of interest will be included. Finally, the user interface and internal data structure will be melded together with ROOT, the object-oriented data analysis infrastructure system. Beyond

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport in semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several Monte Carlo all-particle transport codes are under active development around the world. In this paper we focused on the capabilities of the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) to follow the particle transport in semiconductor detector of fast neutrons. Semiconductor detector based on semi-insulating GaAs was the object of our investigation. As converter material capable to produce charged particles from the (n, p) interaction, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was employed. As the source of fast neutrons, the 239Pu–Be neutron source was used in the model. The simulations were performed using the MCNPX code which makes possible to track not only neutrons but also recoiled protons at all interesting energies. Hence, the MCNPX code enables seamless particle transport and no other computer program is needed to process the particle transport. The determination of the optimal thickness of the conversion layer and the minimum thickness of the active region of semiconductor detector as well as the energy spectra simulation were the principal goals of the computer modeling. Theoretical detector responses showed that the best detection efficiency can be achieved for 500 μm thick HDPE converter layer. The minimum detector active region thickness has been estimated to be about 400 μm. -- Highlights: ► Application of the MCNPX code for fast neutron detector design is demonstrated. ► Simulations of the particle transport through conversion film of HDPE are presented. ► Simulations of the particle transport through detector active region are presented. ► The optimal thickness of the HDPE conversion film has been calculated. ► Detection efficiency of 0.135% was reached for 500 μm thick HDPE conversion film

  4. Coupling of system thermal–hydraulics and Monte-Carlo code: Convergence criteria and quantification of correlation between statistical uncertainty and coupled error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Coupling of Monte Carlo code Serpent and thermal–hydraulics code RELAP5. • A convergence criterion is developed based on the statistical uncertainty of power. • Correlation between MC statistical uncertainty and coupled error is quantified. • Both UO2 and MOX single assembly models are used in the coupled simulation. • Validation of coupling results with a multi-group transport code DeCART. - Abstract: Coupled multi-physics approach plays an important role in improving computational accuracy. Compared with deterministic neutronics codes, Monte Carlo codes have the advantage of a higher resolution level. In the present paper, a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup calculation code, Serpent, is coupled with a thermal–hydraulics safety analysis code, RELAP5. The coupled Serpent/RELAP5 code capability is demonstrated by the improved axial power distribution of UO2 and MOX single assembly models, based on the OECD-NEA/NRC PWR MOX/UO2 Core Transient Benchmark. Comparisons of calculation results using the coupled code with those from the deterministic methods, specifically heterogeneous multi-group transport code DeCART, show that the coupling produces more precise results. A new convergence criterion for the coupled simulation is developed based on the statistical uncertainty in power distribution in the Monte Carlo code, rather than ad-hoc criteria used in previous research. The new convergence criterion is shown to be more rigorous, equally convenient to use but requiring a few more coupling steps to converge. Finally, the influence of Monte Carlo statistical uncertainty on the coupled error of power and thermal–hydraulics parameters is quantified. The results are presented such that they can be used to find the statistical uncertainty to use in Monte Carlo in order to achieve a desired precision in coupled simulation

  5. Development of a Monte Carlo software to photon transportation in voxel structures using graphic processing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo Method (MCM) has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this thesis, the CUBMC code is presented, a GPU-based MC photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in PENELOPE, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the MATERIAL routine, also present in PENELOPE code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. There are two distinct approaches used for transport simulation. The rst of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon ignores the existence of borders and travels in homogeneous fictitious media. The CUBMC code aims to be an alternative of Monte Carlo simulator code that, by using the capability of parallel processing of graphics processing units (GPU), provide high performance simulations in low cost compact machines, and thus can be applied in clinical cases and incorporated in treatment planning systems for radiotherapy. (author)

  6. On the inner workings of Monte Carlo codes

    OpenAIRE

    Dubbeldam, D.; Torres Knoop, A.; Walton, K.S.

    2013-01-01

    We review state-of-the-art Monte Carlo (MC) techniques for computing fluid coexistence properties (Gibbs simulations) and adsorption simulations in nanoporous materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks. Conventional MC is discussed and compared to advanced techniques such as reactive MC, configurational-bias Monte Carlo and continuous fractional MC. The latter technique overcomes the problem of low insertion probabilities in open systems. Other modern methods are (hyper-)parallel...

  7. A Transport Condensed History Algorithm for Electron Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced multiple scattering algorithm for the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport problems is developed. Unlike established multiple scattering algorithms, this new method, called transport condensed history (TCH), is a true transport process - it simulates a transport equation that approximates the exact Boltzmann transport process. In addition to having a larger mean free path and a more isotropic scattering operator than the Boltzmann equation, the approximate transport equation also preserves the zeroth- and first-order angular moments of the exact equation. These features enable TCH to accurately predict electron position as a function of energy (path length) and to move particles across material boundaries and interfaces with acceptable accuracy and efficiency. Numerical results and dose calculations are shown to reveal the advantages of TCH over conventional condensed history schemes

  8. Analysis of error in Monte Carlo transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method for neutron transport calculations suffers, in part, because of the inherent statistical errors associated with the method. Without an estimate of these errors in advance of the calculation, it is difficult to decide what estimator and biasing scheme to use. Recently, integral equations have been derived that, when solved, predicted errors in Monte Carlo calculations in nonmultiplying media. The present work allows error prediction in nonanalog Monte Carlo calculations of multiplying systems, even when supercritical. Nonanalog techniques such as biased kernels, particle splitting, and Russian Roulette are incorporated. Equations derived here allow prediction of how much a specific variance reduction technique reduces the number of histories required, to be weighed against the change in time required for calculation of each history. 1 figure, 1 table

  9. Recent developments of JAEA’s Monte Carlo code MVP for reactor physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper describes the recent development status of the Monte Carlo code MVP. • The basic features and capabilities of MVP are briefly described. • New capabilities useful for reactor analysis are also described. - Abstract: This paper describes the recent development status of a Monte Carlo code MVP developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The basic features and capabilities of MVP are overviewed. In addition, new capabilities useful for reactor analysis are also described

  10. Intracoin - International Nuclide Transport Code Intercomparison Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the project is to obtain improved knowledge of the influence of various strategies for radionuclide transport modelling for the safety assessment of final repositories for nuclear waste. This is a report of the first phase of the project which was devoted to a comparison of the numerical accuracy of the computer codes used in the study. The codes can be divided into five groups, namely advection-dispersion models, models including matrix diffusion and chemical effects and finally combined models. The results are presented as comparisons of calculations since the objective of level 1 was code verification. (G.B.)

  11. Vectorization and parallelization of Monte-Carlo programs for calculation of radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The versatile MCNP-3B Monte-Carlo code written in FORTRAN77, for simulation of the radiation transport of neutral particles, has been subjected to vectorization and parallelization of essential parts, without touching its versatility. Vectorization is not dependent on a specific computer. Several sample tasks have been selected in order to test the vectorized MCNP-3B code in comparison to the scalar MNCP-3B code. The samples are a representative example of the 3-D calculations to be performed for simulation of radiation transport in neutron and reactor physics. (1) 4πneutron detector. (2) High-energy calorimeter. (3) PROTEUS benchmark (conversion rates and neutron multiplication factors for the HCLWR (High Conversion Light Water Reactor)). (orig./HP)

  12. OpenMC: a state-of-the-Art Monte Carlo code for research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of OpenMC, an open source Monte Carlo particle transport code recently developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. OpenMC uses continuous-energy cross sections and a constructive solid geometry representation, enabling high-fidelity modeling of nuclear reactors and other systems. Modern, portable input/output file formats are used in OpenMC: XML for input, and HDF5 for output. High performance parallel algorithms in OpenMC have demonstrated near-linear scaling to over 100,000 processors on modern supercomputers. Other topics discussed in this paper include plotting, CMFD acceleration, variance reduction, eigenvalue calculations, and software development processes. (authors)

  13. Running the EGS4 Monte Carlo code with Fortran 90 on a pentium computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to run the EGS4 Monte Carlo code radiation transport system for medical radiation modelling on a microcomputer is discussed. This has been done using a Fortran 77 compiler with a 32-bit memory addressing system running under a memory extender operating system. In addition a virtual memory manager such as QEMM386 was required. It has successfully run on a SUN Sparcstation2. In 1995 faster Pentium-based microcomputers became available as did the Windows 95 operating system which can handle 32-bit programs, multitasking and provides its own virtual memory management. The paper describe how with simple modification to the batch files it was possible to run EGS4 on a Pentium under Fortran 90 and Windows 95. This combination of software and hardware is cheaper and faster than running it on a SUN Sparcstation2. 8 refs., 1 tab

  14. An Analysis of the Nuclear Data Libraries' Impact on the Criticality Computations Performed using Monte Carlo Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major aim of this work is a sensitivity analysis related to the influence of the different nuclear data libraries on the k-infinity values and on the void coefficient estimations performed for various CANDU fuel projects, and on the simulations related to the replacement of the original stainless steel adjuster rods by cobalt assemblies in the CANDU reactor core. The computations are performed using the Monte Carlo transport codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS 1.0 for the actual, detailed geometry and material composition of the fuel bundles and reactivity devices. Some comparisons with deterministic and probabilistic codes involving the WIMS library are also presented

  15. Description of the impurity transport code 'STRAHL'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'STRAHL' is an interactive, stand-alone impurity transport code which is used on JET for the interpretation of spectroscopic measurements. It calculates the impurity ionisation balance on the basis of given plasma parameters and empirical transport models, using atomic physics data sets especially compiled for that purpose. The paper explains the basic ideas and formulas behind STRAHL in order to allow potential users to design their own special version. (U.K.)

  16. Reactive transport codes for subsurface environmental simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Steefel, C. I.; Appelo, C. A. J.; B Arora; Kalbacher, D.; Kolditz, O.; V. Lagneau; Lichtner, P. C.; Mayer, K.U.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Molins, S.; Moulton, D; Shao, D; Simunek, J.; Spycher, N.; Yabusaki, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    A general description of the mathematical and numerical formulations used in modern numerical reactive transport codes relevant for subsurface environmental simulations is presented. The formulations are followed by short descriptions of commonly used and available subsurface simulators that consider continuum representations of flow, transport, and reactions in porous media. These formulations are applicable to most of the subsurface environmental benchmark problems included in this special ...

  17. Development of a Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Code for the Juno/JIRAM Limb Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindoni, G.; Adriani, A.; Mayorov, B.; Aoki, S.; Grassi, D.; Moriconi, M.; Oliva, F.

    2013-09-01

    The Juno/JIRAM instrument will acquire limb spectra of the Jupiter atmosphere in the infrared spectral range. The analysis of these spectra requires a radiative transfer code that takes into account the multiple scattering by particles in a spherical-shell atmosphere. Therefore, we are developing a code based on the Monte-Carlo approach to simulate the JIRAM observations. The validation of the code was performed by comparison with DISORT-based codes.

  18. New developments of the MCNP/CTF/NEM/NJOY code system – Monte Carlo based coupled code for high accuracy modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► New coupled Monte Carlo code system for reference results at operating conditions. ► Automated methodology to create and use temperature-dependent cross section libraries. ► Multi-level coupling scheme between MCNP5 and COBRA-TF with different options. ► Acceleration strategy for coupled Monte Carlo calculations including hybrid approach. ► Sensitivity studies on thermal-scattering models and different sub-channel approaches. -- Abstract: High accuracy code systems are necessary to model core environments with considerable geometry complexity and great material heterogeneity. These features are typical of current and innovative nuclear reactor core designs. Advanced methodologies and state-of-the art coupled code systems must be put into practice in order to model with high accuracy these challenging core designs. The presented research comprises the development and implementation of the thermal–hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and of speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods with detailed and accurate thermal–hydraulic models. The development and verification of such reference high-fidelity coupled multi-physics scheme is performed at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in cooperation with AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH in Erlangen, Germany, on the basis of MCNP5, NEM, NJOY and COBRA-TF (CTF) computer codes. This paper presents the latest studies and ameliorations developed to this coupled hybrid system, which includes a new methodology for generation and interpolation of Temperature-Dependent Thermal Scattering Cross Section Libraries for MCNP5, a comparison between sub-channel approaches, and acceleration schemes.

  19. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user's guide, and a programmer's guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user's guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user's guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer's guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer's guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements

  20. Evaluation and comparison of SN and Monte-Carlo charged particle transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was done to evaluate a 3-D SN charged particle transport code called SMARTEPANTS1 and another 3-D Monte Carlo code called Integrated Tiger Series, ITS2. The evaluation study of SMARTEPANTS code was based on angular discretization and reflected boundary sensitivity whilst the evaluation of ITS was based on CPU time and variance reduction. The comparison of the two code was based on energy and charge deposition calculation in block of Gallium Arsenide with embedded gold cylinders. The result of evaluation tests shows that an S8 calculation maintains both accuracy and speed and calculations with reflected boundaries geometry produces full symmetrical results. As expected for ITS evaluation, the CPU time and variance reduction are opposite to a point beyond which the history augmentation while increasing the CPU time do not result in variance reduction. The comparison test problem showed excellent agreement in total energy deposition calculations

  1. Application of Monte Carlo code EGS4 to calculate gamma exposure buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure buildup factors up to 40 mean free paths ranging from 0.015 MeV to 15 MeV photon energy were calculated by using the Monte Carlo simulation code EGS4 for ordinary concrete. The calculation involves PHOTX cross section library, a point isotropic source, infinite uniform medium model and a particle splitting method and considers the Bremsstrahlung, fluorescent effect, correlative (Rayleigh) scatter. The results were compared with the relevant data. Results show that the data of the buildup factors calculated by the Monte Carlo code EGS4 was reliable. The Monte Carlo method can be used widely to calculate gamma-ray exposure buildup factors. (authors)

  2. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for Hadron Therapy Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo (M C) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadron therapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. M C methods are being utilized at several institutions for a wide range of activities spanning from beam characterization to quality assurance and dosimetric/radiobiological studies. The suitability of a M C code for application to hadron therapy demands accurate and reliable physical models for the description of the transport and the interaction of all components of the expected radiation field (ions, hadrons, electrons, positrons and photons). This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, accurate prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in emerging areas of research aiming to in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the specific case of the general-purpose particle and interaction code FLUKA. Validations and applications at several experimental sites as well as proton/ion therapy facilities with active beam delivery systems will be presented: Generation of synchrotron accelerator library of proton/carbon ion beam energies and foci (i.e., lateral widths at the iso centre of the treatment unit). Physical database generation: laterally integrated depth-dose profiles, lateral-dose distributions at different depths, secondary fragments yields and fragment energy spectra at different depths. Forward M C re-calculations of physical/RBE-weighted dose distributions of proton and carbon ion treatment plans. M C-based treatment planning in proton therapy. The satisfactorily agreement of FLUKA against several dosimetric/nuclear yields data indicates that the code already represents a valuable choice for supporting a large variety of applications in proton and ion beam therapy

  3. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Codes Regarding the Calculated Detector Response Function in NDP Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of the NDP is the irradiation of a sample with a thermal or cold neutron beam and the subsequent release of charged particles due to neutron-induced exoergic charged particle reactions. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of elements and release mono-energetic charged particles, e.g. alpha particles or protons, and recoil atoms. Depth profile of the analyzed element can be obtained by making a linear transformation of the measured energy spectrum by using the stopping power of the sample material. A few micrometer of the material can be analyzed nondestructively, and on the order of 10nm depth resolution can be obtained depending on the material type with NDP method. In the NDP method, the one first steps of the analytical process is a channel-energy calibration. This calibration is normally made with the experimental measurement of NIST Standard Reference Material sample (SRM-93a). In this study, some Monte Carlo (MC) codes were tried to calculate the Si detector response function when this detector accounted the energy charges particles emitting from an analytical sample. In addition, these MC codes were also tried to calculate the depth distributions of some light elements (10B, 3He, 6Li, etc.) in SRM-93a and SRM-2137 samples. These calculated profiles were compared with the experimental profiles and SIMS profiles. In this study, some popular MC neutron transport codes are tried and tested to calculate the detector response function in the NDP method. The simulations were modeled based on the real CN-NDP system which is a part of Cold Neutron Activation Station (CONAS) at HANARO (KAERI). The MC simulations are very successful at predicting the alpha peaks in the measured energy spectrum. The net area difference between the measured and predicted alpha peaks are less than 1%. A possible explanation might be bad cross section data set usage in the MC codes for the transport of low energetic lithium atoms inside the silicon substrate

  4. Progress on burnup calculation methods coupling Monte Carlo and depletion codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, Francisco [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche, RN (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche]. E-mail: lesinki@cab.cnea.gob.ar

    2005-07-01

    Several methods of burnup calculations coupling Monte Carlo and depletion codes that were investigated and applied for the author last years are described. here. Some benchmark results and future possibilities are analyzed also. The methods are: depletion calculations at cell level with WIMS or other cell codes, and use of the resulting concentrations of fission products, poisons and actinides on Monte Carlo calculation for fixed burnup distributions obtained from diffusion codes; same as the first but using a method o coupling Monte Carlo (MCNP) and a depletion code (ORIGEN) at a cell level for obtaining the concentrations of nuclides, to be used on full reactor calculation with Monte Carlo code; and full calculation of the system with Monte Carlo and depletion codes, on several steps. All these methods were used for different problems for research reactors and some comparisons with experimental results of regular lattices were performed. On this work, a resume of all these works is presented and discussion of advantages and problems found are included. Also, a brief description of the methods adopted and MCQ system for coupling MCNP and ORIGEN codes is included. (author)

  5. The Monte Carlo srna code as the engine in istar proton dose planning software for the tesla accelerator installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application of SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material composition. SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The compound nuclei decay was simulated by our own and the Russian MSDM models using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in the combinatorial geometry and SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield’s data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of proton beam characterization by Multi-Layer Faraday Cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by SRNA-2KG code, and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate the immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in SRNA pack age, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumor.

  6. The Monte Carlo SRNA code as the engine in ISTAR proton dose planning software for the tesla accelerator installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the application of SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material composition. SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The compound nuclei decay was simulated by our own and the Russian MSDM models using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in the combinatorial geometry and SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of proton beam characterization by Multi-Layer Faraday Cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by SRNA-2KG code, and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate the immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumor. (author)

  7. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilic, Radovan D [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Spasic-Jokic, Vesna [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Belicev, Petar [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Dragovic, Milos [Center for Nuclear Medicine MEDICA NUCLEARE, Bulevar Despota Stefana 69, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-03-07

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour.

  8. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Radovan D.; Spasic-Jokic, Vesna; Belicev, Petar; Dragovic, Milos

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour.

  9. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour

  10. Recent R and D around the Monte-Carlo code Tripoli-4 for criticality calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugot, F.X.; Lee, Y.K.; Malvagi, F. [CEA - DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LTSD, Saclay (France)

    2008-07-01

    TRIPOLI-4 [1] is the fourth generation of the TRIPOLI family of Monte Carlo codes developed from the 60's by CEA. It simulates the 3D transport of neutrons, photons, electrons and positrons as well as coupled neutron-photon propagation and electron-photons cascade showers. The code addresses radiation protection and shielding problems, as well as criticality and reactor physics problems through both critical and subcritical neutronics calculations. It uses full pointwise as well as multigroup cross-sections. The code has been validated through several hundred benchmarks as well as measurement campaigns. It is used as a reference tool by CEA as well as its industrial and institutional partners, and in the NURESIM [2] European project. Section 2 reviews its main features, with emphasis on the latest developments. Section 3 presents some recent R and D for criticality calculations. Fission matrix, Eigen-values and eigenvectors computations will be exposed. Corrections on the standard deviation estimator in the case of correlations between generation steps will be detailed. Section 4 presents some preliminary results obtained by the new mesh tally feature. The last section presents the interest of using XML format output files. (authors)

  11. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; /CERN /INFN, Milan; Fasso, A.; /SLAC; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  12. Implementation of hybrid variance reduction methods in a multi group Monte Carlo code for deep shielding problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, E.; Palmer, T. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97332-5902 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the work that has been done to implement variance reduction techniques in a three dimensional, multi group Monte Carlo code - Tortilla, that works within the frame work of the commercial deterministic code - Attila, is presented. This project is aimed to develop an integrated Hybrid code that seamlessly takes advantage of the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for deep shielding radiation detection problems. Tortilla takes advantage of Attila's features for generating the geometric mesh, cross section library and source definitions. Tortilla can also read importance functions (like adjoint scalar flux) generated from deterministic calculations performed in Attila and use them to employ variance reduction schemes in the Monte Carlo simulation. The variance reduction techniques that are implemented in Tortilla are based on the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) method and the LIFT (Local Importance Function Transform) method. These methods make use of the results from an adjoint deterministic calculation to bias the particle transport using techniques like source biasing, survival biasing, transport biasing and weight windows. The results obtained so far and the challenges faced in implementing the variance reduction techniques are reported here. (authors)

  13. Implementation of hybrid variance reduction methods in a multi group Monte Carlo code for deep shielding problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the work that has been done to implement variance reduction techniques in a three dimensional, multi group Monte Carlo code - Tortilla, that works within the frame work of the commercial deterministic code - Attila, is presented. This project is aimed to develop an integrated Hybrid code that seamlessly takes advantage of the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for deep shielding radiation detection problems. Tortilla takes advantage of Attila's features for generating the geometric mesh, cross section library and source definitions. Tortilla can also read importance functions (like adjoint scalar flux) generated from deterministic calculations performed in Attila and use them to employ variance reduction schemes in the Monte Carlo simulation. The variance reduction techniques that are implemented in Tortilla are based on the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) method and the LIFT (Local Importance Function Transform) method. These methods make use of the results from an adjoint deterministic calculation to bias the particle transport using techniques like source biasing, survival biasing, transport biasing and weight windows. The results obtained so far and the challenges faced in implementing the variance reduction techniques are reported here. (authors)

  14. Multipurpose Monte Carlo simulator for photon transport in turbid media

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Pedro; Aguirre, Juan; Ortuño, Juan E.; María J Ledesma-Carbayo; Vaquero, Juan José; Desco, Manuel; Santos, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods provide a flexible and rigorous solution to the problem of light transport in turbid media, which enable approaching complex geometries for a closed analytical solution is not feasible. The simulator implements local rules of propagation in the form of probability density functions that depend on the local optical properties of the tissue. This work presents a flexible simulator that can be applied in multiple applications related to optical tomography. In particular...

  15. The analog linear interpolation approach for Monte Carlo simulation of PGNAA: The CEARPGA code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Gardner, Robin P.

    2004-01-01

    The analog linear interpolation approach (ALI) has been developed and implemented to eliminate the big weight problem in the Monte Carlo simulation code CEARPGA. The CEARPGA code was previously developed to generate elemental library spectra for using the Monte Carlo - library least-squares (MCLLS) approach in prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA). In addition, some other improvements to this code have been introduced, including (1) adopting the latest photon cross-section data, (2) using an improved detector response function, (3) adding the neutron activation backgrounds, (4) generating the individual natural background libraries, (5) adding the tracking of annihilation photons from pair production interactions outside of the detector and (6) adopting a general geometry package. The simulated result from the new CEARPGA code is compared with those calculated from the previous CEARPGA code and the MCNP code and experimental data. The new CEARPGA code is found to give the best result.

  16. Colloid transport code-nuclear user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential systems

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in heterogeneous organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Pyie Phyo; Khanal, Kiran; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells depends on the morphology and electronic properties of the active layer. Research teams have been experimenting with different conducting materials to achieve more efficient solar panels. In this work, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to study charge transport in heterogeneous materials. We have developed a coarse-grained lattice model of polymeric photovoltaics and use it to generate active layers with ordered and disordered regions. We determine carrier mobilities for a range of conditions to investigate the effect of the morphology on charge transport.

  18. On the inner workings of Monte Carlo codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Dubbeldam; A. Torres Knoop; K.S. Walton

    2013-01-01

    We review state-of-the-art Monte Carlo (MC) techniques for computing fluid coexistence properties (Gibbs simulations) and adsorption simulations in nanoporous materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks. Conventional MC is discussed and compared to advanced techniques such as reactive MC

  19. Data libraries as a collaborative tool across Monte Carlo codes

    CERN Document Server

    Augelli, Mauro; Han, Mincheol; Hauf, Steffen; Kim, Chan-Hyeung; Kuster, Markus; Pia, Maria Grazia; Quintieri, Lina; Saracco, Paolo; Seo, Hee; Sudhakar, Manju; Eidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The role of data libraries in Monte Carlo simulation is discussed. A number of data libraries currently in preparation are reviewed; their data are critically examined with respect to the state-of-the-art in the respective fields. Extensive tests with respect to experimental data have been performed for the validation of their content.

  20. Calculations for a BWR Lattice with Adjacent Gadolinium Pins Using the Monte Carlo Cell Code Serpent v.1.1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ferraro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are usually used to perform criticality calculations and to solve shielding problems due to their capability to model complex systems without major approximations. However, these codes demand high computational resources. The improvement in computer capabilities leads to several new applications of Monte Carlo neutron transport codes. An interesting one is to use this method to perform cell-level fuel assembly calculations in order to obtain few group constants to be used on core calculations. In the present work the VTT recently developed Serpent v.1.1.7 cell-oriented neutronic calculation code is used to perform cell calculations of a theoretical BWR lattice benchmark with burnable poisons, and the main results are compared to reported ones and with calculations performed with Condor v.2.61, the INVAP's neutronic collision probability cell code.

  1. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  2. Consistent comparison of Monte Carlo and whole-core transport solutions for cores with thermal feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For systematic and consistent comparison of Monte Carlo and whole-core transport solutions in various core states including power generating conditions, a test problem set that spans from two-dimensional uniform temperature pin cell problems to three-dimensional core problems involving thermal feedback is solved by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCCARD and a multigroup whole-core transport code DeCART. The neutron spectra, k-effective, pin-wise power distribution, fuel temperature distribution, and Doppler coefficients obtained from the two solutions are compared taking the MCCARD solution as the reference. For the uniform temperature problems, excellent agreement between the two solutions is observed in every solution aspect. The pin power distribution error is less than 1% and the k-effective error is within 100 pcm in most cases. For the problems with thermal feedback, the discrepancy becomes larger, yet within the tolerable range. In the hot-full-power mini-core calculation, a maximum of 3.7% error in the radial pin power distribution and the k-effective error of about 260 pcm are observed. Through this comparison, it is demonstrated that accurate multigroup direct whole-core calculations are possible even at power generating conditions with a much less computing time than the corresponding Monte Carlo calculations. (authors)

  3. Jetto a free boundary plasma transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JETTO is a one-and-a-half-dimensional transport code calculating the evolution of plasma parameters in a time dependent axisymmetric MHD equilibrium configuration. A splitting technique gives a consistent solution of coupled equilibrium and transport equations. The plasma boundary is free and defined either by its contact with a limiter (wall) or by a separatrix or by the toroidal magnetic flux. The Grad's approach to the equilibrium problem with adiabatic (or similar) constraints is adopted. This method consists of iterating by alternately solving the Grad-Schluter-Shafranov equation (PDE) and the ODE obtained by averaging the PDE over the magnetic surfaces. The bidimensional equation of the poloidal flux is solved by a finite difference scheme, whereas a Runge-Kutta method is chosen for the averaged equilibrium equation. The 1D transport equations (averaged over the magnetic surfaces) for the electron and ion densities and energies and for the rotational transform are written in terms of a coordinate (ρ) related to the toroidal flux. Impurity transport is also considered, under the hypothesis of coronal equilibrium. The transport equations are solved by an implicit scheme in time and by a finite difference scheme in space. The centering of the source terms and transport coefficients is performed using a Predictor-Corrector scheme. The basic version of the code is described here in detail; input and output parameters are also listed

  4. New developments of the MCNP/CTF/NEM/NJOY code system - Monte Carlo based coupled code for high accuracy modeling - 277

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High accuracy code systems are necessary to model core environments with considerable geometry complexity and great material heterogeneity. These features are typical of current and innovative nuclear reactor core designs. Advanced methodologies and state-of-the art coupled code systems must be put into practice in order to model with high accuracy these challenging core designs. The presented research comprises the development and implementation of the thermal-hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and of speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods with detailed and accurate thermal-hydraulic models. The development and verification of such reference high-fidelity coupled multi-physics scheme is performed at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in cooperation with AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH in Erlangen, Germany, on the basis of MCNP5, NEM, NJOY and COBRA-TF (CTF) computer codes. This paper presents the latest studies and ameliorations developed to this coupled hybrid system, which includes a new methodology for generation and interpolation of Temperature-Dependent Thermal Scattering Cross Section Libraries for MCNP5, a comparison between sub-channel approaches, and acceleration schemes. (authors)

  5. Using deterministic codes to accelerate continuous energy Monte-Carlo standards calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deterministic codes are usually used for critical parameters or one dimension geometry calculations. Advantages of the use of deterministic codes are speed of the calculation and the absence of standard deviation on the keff results. Nevertheless, the deterministic results are affected by several intrinsic uncertainties as energetic condensation or self-shielding. So the way to proceed at CEA expert criticality group (CEA/SERMA/CP2C) is to always check the main results (minimum critical or maximal permissible values and un-moderated values) with a punctual Monte Carlo calculation. These last years, in particular cases (pure actinide fissile media, exotic reflectors), large discrepancies have been observed between the keff calculated by the CRISTAL V1 route reference (continuous energy Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4) and the keff target (by the standard route APOLLO2-Sn). The problematic for these cases was how to transpose the keff discrepancies observed between standard and reference routes to the dimensions (mass, thickness...) or how to reduce the keff discrepancies using optimized options of the deterministic code. One solution to transpose discrepancies is to iterate on dimensions using a punctual Monte Carlo code to achieve the desired keff eigenvalue. But, the amount of time for obtaining a good standard deviation and also the desired keff eigenvalue inside the Monte Carlo calculation uncertainty can quickly increase. The principle of the method presented in this paper is that the discrepancy between deterministic code and Monte-Carlo code, calculated at the same dimension, is low variable with the dimension. Therefore, correcting the keff eigenvalue on which the deterministic code converge with the discrepancy observed, leads to a dimension nearer to the true dimension (i.e. the dimension where Monte-Carlo code keff calculation is close to the keff eigenvalue). If the keff eigenvalue is outside the Monte Carlo uncertainty, the discrepancy is recalculated and

  6. Calculations of neutron penetration through graphite medium with Monte Carlo code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments for fast neutron penetration through graphite are analysed with the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. Reaction rates and energy spectra obtained with the MCNP are compared with measured values and calculated ones with McBEND code. And validity of penetration calculation with the MCNP is comfirmed. In addition, it is revealed that the MCNP code using Weight-Window method is well applicable to calculations of neutron penetration through graphite up to 70 cm in depth. (author)

  7. Analytical band Monte Carlo analysis of electron transport in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, K. H.; Ong, D. S.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Yong, T. K.; Lim, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    An analytical band Monte Carlo (AMC) with linear energy band dispersion has been developed to study the electron transport in suspended silicene and silicene on aluminium oxide (Al2O3) substrate. We have calibrated our model against the full band Monte Carlo (FMC) results by matching the velocity-field curve. Using this model, we discover that the collective effects of charge impurity scattering and surface optical phonon scattering can degrade the electron mobility down to about 400 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and thereafter it is less sensitive to the changes of charge impurity in the substrate and surface optical phonon. We also found that further reduction of mobility to ∼100 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 as experimentally demonstrated by Tao et al (2015 Nat. Nanotechnol. 10 227) can only be explained by the renormalization of Fermi velocity due to interaction with Al2O3 substrate.

  8. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport Through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Richers, S; O'Connor, Evan; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the case of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45 degrees from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentiall...

  9. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  10. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Furuta, Takuya; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Chiba, Satoshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2014-06-01

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1,000 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions.

  11. The KFA-Version of the high-energy transport code HETC and the generalized evaluation code SIMPEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the updates that have been made to the high-energy transport code HETC for use in the German spallation-neutron source project SNQ. Performance and purpose of the subsidiary code SIMPEL that has been written for general analysis of the HETC output are also described. In addition means of coupling to low energy transport programs, such as the Monte-Carlo code MORSE is provided. As complete input descriptions for HETC and SIMPEL are given together with a sample problem, this document can serve as a user's manual for these two codes. The document is also an answer to the demand that has been issued by a greater community of HETC users on the ICANS-IV meeting, Oct 20-24 1980, Tsukuba-gun, Japan for a complete description of at least one single version of HETC among the many different versions that exist. (orig.)

  12. A computationally efficient moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method with implementation in Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A., E-mail: ddixon@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS P365, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Prinja, A.K., E-mail: prinja@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, MSC01 1120, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Franke, B.C., E-mail: bcfrank@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87123 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical demonstration of a moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method. Foremost, a full implementation of the moment-preserving (MP) method within the Geant4 particle simulation toolkit is demonstrated. Beyond implementation details, it is shown that the MP method is a viable alternative to the condensed history (CH) method for inclusion in current and future generation transport codes through demonstration of the key features of the method including: systematically controllable accuracy, computational efficiency, mathematical robustness, and versatility. A wide variety of results common to electron transport are presented illustrating the key features of the MP method. In particular, it is possible to achieve accuracy that is statistically indistinguishable from analog Monte Carlo, while remaining up to three orders of magnitude more efficient than analog Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, it is shown that the MP method can be generalized to any applicable analog scattering DCS model by extending previous work on the MP method beyond analytical DCSs to the partial-wave (PW) elastic tabulated DCS data.

  13. Comparison of Sensitivity Analysis Techniques in Monte Carlo Codes for Multi-Region Criticality Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, sensitivity and uncertainty (S/U) techniques have been used to determine the area of applicability (AOA) of critical experiments used for code and data validation. These techniques require the computation of energy-dependent sensitivity coefficients for multiple reaction types for every nuclide in each system included in the validation. The sensitivity coefficients, as used for this application, predict the relative change in the system multiplication factor due to a relative change in a given cross-section data component or material number density. Thus, a sensitivity coefficient, S, for some macroscopic cross section, Σ, is expressed as S = Σ/k ∂k/∂Σ, where k is the effective neutron multiplication factor for the system. The sensitivity coefficient for the density of a material is equivalent to that of the total macroscopic cross section. Two distinct techniques have been employed in Monte Carlo radiation transport codes for the computation of sensitivity coefficients. The first, and most commonly employed, is the differential sampling technique. The second is the adjoint-based perturbation theory approach. This paper briefly describes each technique and presents the results of a simple test case, pointing out discrepancies in the computed results and proposing a remedy to these discrepancies

  14. ORPHEE research reactor: 3D core depletion calculation using Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, F.; Brun, E.

    2014-06-01

    ORPHEE is a research reactor located at CEA Saclay. It aims at producing neutron beams for experiments. This is a pool-type reactor (heavy water), and the core is cooled by light water. Its thermal power is 14 MW. ORPHEE core is 90 cm height and has a cross section of 27x27 cm2. It is loaded with eight fuel assemblies characterized by a various number of fuel plates. The fuel plate is composed of aluminium and High Enriched Uranium (HEU). It is a once through core with a fuel cycle length of approximately 100 Equivalent Full Power Days (EFPD) and with a maximum burnup of 40%. Various analyses under progress at CEA concern the determination of the core neutronic parameters during irradiation. Taking into consideration the geometrical complexity of the core and the quasi absence of thermal feedback for nominal operation, the 3D core depletion calculations are performed using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® [1,2,3]. A preliminary validation of the depletion calculation was performed on a 2D core configuration by comparison with the deterministic transport code APOLLO2 [4]. The analysis showed the reliability of TRIPOLI-4® to calculate a complex core configuration using a large number of depleting regions with a high level of confidence.

  15. Monte Carlo burnup code acceleration with the correlated sampling method. Preliminary test on an UOX cell with TRIPOLI-4{sup R}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieudonne, C.; Dumonteil, E.; Malvagi, F.; Diop, C. M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, Service d' Etude des Reacteurs et de Mathematiques Appliquees, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LTSD, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    For several years, Monte Carlo burnup/depletion codes have appeared, which couple a Monte Carlo code to simulate the neutron transport to a deterministic method that computes the medium depletion due to the neutron flux. Solving Boltzmann and Bateman equations in such a way allows to track fine 3 dimensional effects and to get rid of multi-group hypotheses done by deterministic solvers. The counterpart is the prohibitive calculation time due to the time-expensive Monte Carlo solver called at each time step. Therefore, great improvements in term of calculation time could be expected if one could get rid of Monte Carlo transport sequences. For example, it may seem interesting to run an initial Monte Carlo simulation only once, for the first time/burnup step, and then to use the concentration perturbation capability of the Monte Carlo code to replace the other time/burnup steps (the different burnup steps are seen like perturbations of the concentrations of the initial burnup step). This paper presents some advantages and limitations of this technique and preliminary results in terms of speed up and figure of merit. Finally, we will detail different possible calculation scheme based on that method. (authors)

  16. Benchmarking of proton transport in Super Monte Carlo simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of the publication follows. The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been traditionally applied in nuclear design and analysis due to its capability of dealing with complicated geometries and multi-dimensional physics problems as well as obtaining accurate results. The Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC) is developed by FDS Team in China for fusion, fission, and other nuclear applications. The simulations of radiation transport, isotope burn-up, material activation, radiation dose, and biology damage could be performed using SuperMC. Complicated geometries and the whole physical process of various types of particles in broad energy scale can be well handled. Bi-directional automatic conversion between general CAD models and full-formed input files of SuperMC is supported by MCAM, which is a CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for neutronics and radiation transport simulation. Mixed visualization of dynamical 3D dataset and geometry model is supported by RVIS, which is a nuclear radiation virtual simulation and assessment system. Continuous-energy cross section data from hybrid evaluated nuclear data library HENDL are utilized to support simulation. Neutronic fixed source and critical design parameters calculates for reactors of complex geometry and material distribution based on the transport of neutron and photon have been achieved in our former version of SuperMC. Recently, the proton transport has also been integrated in SuperMC in the energy region up to 10 GeV. The physical processes considered for proton transport include electromagnetic processes and hadronic processes. The electromagnetic processes include ionization, multiple scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and pair production processes. Public evaluated data from HENDL are used in some electromagnetic processes. In hadronic physics, the Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with excitons, preequilibrium model, nucleus explosion model, fission model, and evaporation model are incorporated to

  17. Sodium void reactivity effect analysis using the newly developed exact perturbation theory in Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of void reactivity effect is prominent interest for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) safety. Indeed, in case of sodium leakage of the primary circuit, void reactivity represents the main passive negative feedback to ensure reactivity control. The core can be designed to maximize neutron leakage and lower the average neutron multiplication factor in the event of sodium disappearing from within assemblies. Thus, the nuclear chain reaction is stopped. The most promising solution is to place a sodium region above the fuel in order for neutrons to be reflected when the region is filled and escape when the region is empty. In terms of simulation, this configuration is a challenge for usual calculation schemes: 1. Deterministic codes are typically limited in their ability to homogenize a sub-critical medium as the sodium plenum. 2. Monte Carlo codes are typically not able to split the total reactivity effect on different components, which prevents to achieve straightforward uncertainty analysis. Furthermore, since experimental values can sometimes be small, Monte Carlo codes may not converge within a reasonable computation time. A new feature recently available in the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4® based on the Exact Perturbation Theory allows very small reactivity perturbations to be computed accurately as well as reactivity effect to be estimated on distinct isotopes cross-sections. In the first part of this paper, this new feature of the code is described and then applied in the second part to a core configuration composed of several layers of fuel and fertile zones below a sodium plenum. Reactivity and its contributions from specific reactions and energy groups are calculated and compared with the results of the deterministic code ERANOS. The aim of this work is twofold: (1) Achieve a numerical validation of the new TRIPOLI-4® features and (2) Identify where deterministic codes might be less accurate and why – even when using them at full capacity (S16

  18. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    CERN Document Server

    Svatos, M M

    1999-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates the feasibility of basing dose calculations for electrons in radiotherapy on first-principles single scatter physics, in a calculation time that is comparable to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The macro response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that have potential to be much faster than conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history. The problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position, and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel." A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25-8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, in which steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the...

  19. Condensed history Monte Carlo methods for photon transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study methods for accelerating Monte Carlo simulations that retain most of the accuracy of conventional Monte Carlo algorithms. These methods - called Condensed History (CH) methods - have been very successfully used to model the transport of ionizing radiation in turbid systems. Our primary objective is to determine whether or not such methods might apply equally well to the transport of photons in biological tissue. In an attempt to unify the derivations, we invoke results obtained first by Lewis, Goudsmit and Saunderson and later improved by Larsen and Tolar. We outline how two of the most promising of the CH models - one based on satisfying certain similarity relations and the second making use of a scattering phase function that permits only discrete directional changes - can be developed using these approaches. The main idea is to exploit the connection between the space-angle moments of the radiance and the angular moments of the scattering phase function. We compare the results obtained when the two CH models studied are used to simulate an idealized tissue transport problem. The numerical results support our findings based on the theoretical derivations and suggest that CH models should play a useful role in modeling light-tissue interactions

  20. Application of neutron/gamma transport codes for the design of explosive detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applications of neutron and gamma transport codes to the design of nuclear techniques for detecting concealed explosives material are discussed. The methodology of integrating radiation transport computations in the development, optimization and analysis phases of these new technologies is discussed. Transport and Monte Carlo codes are used for proof of concepts, guide the system integration, reduce the extend of experimental program and provide insight into the physical problem involved. The paper concentrates on detection techniques based on thermal and fast neutron interactions in the interrogated object. (authors). 6 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  1. Parallel Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration methods for discrete transport problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Stuart R.

    This work researches and develops Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration (MCSA) methods as a new class of solution techniques for discrete neutron transport and fluid flow problems. Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration methods use a traditional Monte Carlo process to approximate the solution to the discrete problem as a means of accelerating traditional fixed-point methods. To apply these methods to neutronics and fluid flow and determine the feasibility of these methods on modern hardware, three complementary research and development exercises are performed. First, solutions to the SPN discretization of the linear Boltzmann neutron transport equation are obtained using MCSA with a difficult criticality calculation for a light water reactor fuel assembly used as the driving problem. To enable MCSA as a solution technique a group of modern preconditioning strategies are researched. MCSA when compared to conventional Krylov methods demonstrated improved iterative performance over GMRES by converging in fewer iterations when using the same preconditioning. Second, solutions to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations were obtained by developing the Forward-Automated Newton-MCSA (FANM) method for nonlinear systems based on Newton's method. Three difficult fluid benchmark problems in both convective and driven flow regimes were used to drive the research and development of the method. For 8 out of 12 benchmark cases, it was found that FANM had better iterative performance than the Newton-Krylov method by converging the nonlinear residual in fewer linear solver iterations with the same preconditioning. Third, a new domain decomposed algorithm to parallelize MCSA aimed at leveraging leadership-class computing facilities was developed by utilizing parallel strategies from the radiation transport community. The new algorithm utilizes the Multiple-Set Overlapping-Domain strategy in an attempt to reduce parallel overhead and add a natural element of replication to the algorithm. It

  2. Coupled MHD-Monte Carlo transport model for dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional, two fluid model of the MHD equations has been coupled to a Monte Carlo transport model of high energy, non-Maxwellian ions. The MHD part of the model assumes complete ionization and includes a perfect gas law for a scalar pressure, a tensor artificial viscosity, electron and ion thermal conduction, electron-ion coupling, and a radiation loss term. A simple Ohm's Law is used with a B/sub theta/ magnetic field. The MHD equations were solved in Lagrangian coordinates. The conservation equations were differenced explicitly and the diffusion-type equations implicitly using the splitting technique. The Monte Carlo model solves the equation of motion for high energy ions, moving through and suffering small and large angle collisions with the fluid Maxwellian plasma. The source of high energy ions is the thermonuclear reactions of the hydrogen isotopes, or it may be an externally injected beam of neutralized ions. In addition to using the usual Maxwell averaged thermonuclear cross sections for calculating the number of reactions taking place within the Maxwellian plasma, the high energy ions may suffer collisions resulting in a reaction. In the Monte Carlo model all neutrons are assumed to escape, and all energetic ions of Z less than or equal to 2 are followed

  3. Accurate simulation of ionization chamber response with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempau, Josep [Technical University of Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Full text. Ionization chambers (IC) are routinely used in hospitals for the dosimetry of the photon and electron beams used for radiotherapy treatments. The determination of absorbed dose to water from the absorbed dose to the air filling the cavity requires the introduction of stopping power ratios and perturbation factors, which account for the disturbance caused by the presence of the chamber. Although this may seem a problem readily amenable to Monte Carlo simulation, the fact is that the accurate determination of IC response has been, during the last 20 years, one of the most important challenges of the simulation of electromagnetic showers. The main difficulty stems from the use of condensed history techniques for electron and positron transport. This approach, which involves grouping a large number of interactions into a single artificial event, is known to produce the so-called interface effects when particles travel across surfaces separating different media. These effects are extremely important when the electron step length is not negligible compared to the size of the region being crossed, as it is the case with the cavity of an IC. The artifact, which becomes apparent when the chamber response shows a marked dependence on the adopted step size, can be palliated with the use of sophisticated electron transport algorithms. These topics will be discussed in the context of the transport model implemented in the Penelope code. The degree of violation of the Fano theorem for a simple, planar geometry, will be used as a measure of the stability of the algorithm with respect to variations of the electron step length, thus assessing the 'quality' of its condensed history scheme. It will be shown that, with a suitable choice of transport parameters, Penelope can simulate IC response with an accuracy of the order of 0.1%. (author)

  4. Accurate simulation of ionisation chamber response with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionisation chambers (IC) are routinely used in hospitals for the dosimetry of the photon and electron beams used for radiotherapy treatments. The determination of absorbed dose to water from the absorbed dose to the air filling the cavity requires the introduction of stopping power ratios and perturbation factors, which account for the disturbance caused by the presence of the chamber. Although this may seem a problem readily amenable to Monte Carlo simulation, the fact is that the accurate determination of IC response has been, for various decades, one of the most important challenges of the simulation of electromagnetic showers. The main difficulty stems from the use of condensed history techniques for electron and positron transport. This approach, which involves grouping a large number of interactions into a single artificial event, is known to produce the so-called interface effects when particles travel across surfaces separating different media. These effects can be sizeable when the electron step length is not negligible compared to the size of the region being crossed, as it is the case with the cavity of an IC. The artefact, which becomes apparent when the chamber response shows a marked dependence on the adopted step size, can be palliated with the use of sophisticated electron transport algorithms. These topics are discussed in the context of the transport model implemented in the PENELOPE code. The degree of violation of the Fano theorem for a simple, planar geometry, is used as a measure of the stability of the algorithm with respect to variations of the electron step length, thus assessing the 'quality' of its condensed history scheme. It is shown that, with a suitable choice of transport parameters, PENELOPE simulates IC response with an accuracy of the order of 0.1%.

  5. Accurate simulation of ionization chamber response with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Ionization chambers (IC) are routinely used in hospitals for the dosimetry of the photon and electron beams used for radiotherapy treatments. The determination of absorbed dose to water from the absorbed dose to the air filling the cavity requires the introduction of stopping power ratios and perturbation factors, which account for the disturbance caused by the presence of the chamber. Although this may seem a problem readily amenable to Monte Carlo simulation, the fact is that the accurate determination of IC response has been, during the last 20 years, one of the most important challenges of the simulation of electromagnetic showers. The main difficulty stems from the use of condensed history techniques for electron and positron transport. This approach, which involves grouping a large number of interactions into a single artificial event, is known to produce the so-called interface effects when particles travel across surfaces separating different media. These effects are extremely important when the electron step length is not negligible compared to the size of the region being crossed, as it is the case with the cavity of an IC. The artifact, which becomes apparent when the chamber response shows a marked dependence on the adopted step size, can be palliated with the use of sophisticated electron transport algorithms. These topics will be discussed in the context of the transport model implemented in the Penelope code. The degree of violation of the Fano theorem for a simple, planar geometry, will be used as a measure of the stability of the algorithm with respect to variations of the electron step length, thus assessing the 'quality' of its condensed history scheme. It will be shown that, with a suitable choice of transport parameters, Penelope can simulate IC response with an accuracy of the order of 0.1%. (author)

  6. The information education using EGS4 Monte Carlo code of Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences has done The Information Education using EGS4 Monte Carlo code since the 1998 fiscal year. Two items under practical training item were done. 1. The interaction between photon of 0.1 ∼ 10 MeV (Mega Electron Volt: MeV) and Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe) and Lead (Pb). 2. The simulation of gamma ray energy measurement of the radiation detector. As the result, the student was possible the understanding of the radiation physics for the easiness at Practical training of EGS4 Monte Carlo code. (author)

  7. The Monte Carlo code MCBEND - where it is and where it's going

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method forms a corner stone to the calculational procedures established in the UK for shielding design and assessment. The emphasis of the work in the shielding area is centred on the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The work programme in support of the code is broadly directed towards utilisation of new hardware, the development of improved modelling algorithms, the development of new acceleration methods for specific applications and enhancements to user image. This paper summarises the current status of MCBEND and reviews developments carried out over the past two years and planned for the future. (author)

  8. Generalized Albedo option on the Morse Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advisability of using the albedo procedure for solving deep penetration shielding problems which have ducts and other penetrations is investigated. It is generally accepted that the use of albedo data can dramatically improve the computational efficiency of certain Monte Carlo calculations - however the accuracy of these results may be unacceptable because of lost information during the albedo event and serious errors in the available differential albedo data. This study has been done to evaluate and appropriately modify the MORSE/BREESE package, to develop new methods for generating the required albedo data, and to extend the adjoint capability to the albedo modified calculations. The major modifications include the tracking of special particles inside albedo media, an option to displace the point-of-emergence during an albedo event, and an option to read, process, and use spatially-dependent albedo data for both forward and adjoint calculations. (author)

  9. Vector processing of the neutron transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the large computations in JAERI is the neutron transport ones used for reactor shielding and criticality analyses. The adaptability of vector processings has been investigated on the neutron transport codes under the assumption of future use of super-computer. Five codes have been tested. They are DOT3.5, TWOTRAN and ANISN based on finite difference method, and PALLAS-2DCY and BERMUDA on the direct integration method. It has been found that the gain from vectorization depends upon the numerical methods, geometries, and problems types to be solved. That is, the direct integration is rather suited for vector processing. But in the conventional finite difference method, the difference equation has an unvectorizable recurrence form in (r, z) and (r, -)-geometries. But by altering the interative process, the equation can be vectorized and some gains have been found to be achieved in a criticality problem. For each code, described are some views on vectorization, program restructurings, speedup ratio on F75 APU, numerical studies on the interative process, and so forth. (author)

  10. Longitudinal development of extensive air showers: hybrid code SENECA and full Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, J A; De Souza, V; Ortiz, Jeferson A.; Tanco, Gustavo Medina

    2004-01-01

    New experiments, exploring the ultra-high energy tail of the cosmic ray spectrum with unprecedented detail, are exerting a severe pressure on extensive air hower modeling. Detailed fast codes are in need in order to extract and understand the richness of information now available. Some hybrid simulation codes have been proposed recently to this effect (e.g., the combination of the traditional Monte Carlo scheme and system of cascade equations or pre-simulated air showers). In this context, we explore the potential of SENECA, an efficient hybrid tridimensional simulation code, as a valid practical alternative to full Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We extensively compare hybrid method with the traditional, but time consuming, full Monte Carlo code CORSIKA which is the de facto standard in the field. The hybrid scheme of the SENECA code is based on the simulation of each particle with the traditional Monte Carlo method at two steps of the shower devel...

  11. Estimation of skyshine dose from turbine building of BWR plant using Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) was adopted to calculate the skyshine dose from the turbine building of a BWR plant for obtaining precise estimations at the site boundary. In MCNP calculation, the equipment and piping arranged on the operating floor of the turbine building were considered and modeled in detail. The inner and outer walls of the turbine building, the shielding materials around the high-pressure turbine, and the piping connected from the moisture separator to the low-pressure turbine were all considered. A three-step study was conducted to estimate the applicability of MCNP code. The first step is confirming the propriety of calculation models. The atmospheric relief diaphragms, which are installed on top of the low-pressure turbine exhaust hood, are not considered in the calculation model. There was little difference between the skyshine dose distributions that were considered when using and not using the atmospheric relief diaphragms. The calculated dose rates agreed well with the measurements taken around the turbine. The second step is estimating the dose rates on the outer roof surface of the turbine building. This calculation was made to confirm the dose distribution of gamma-rays on the turbine roof before being scattered into the air. The calculated dose rates agreed well with the measured data. The third step is making a final confirmation by comparing the calculations and measurements of skyshine dose rates around the turbine building. The source terms of the main steam system are based on the measured activity data of N-16 and C-15. As a conclusion, we were able to calculate reasonable skyshine dose rates by using MCNP code. (authors)

  12. Depletion of a BWR lattice using the racer continuous energy Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past several years there has been a renewed interest in the accuracy of a new generation of lattice physics codes. Most of the time these codes are benchmarked against Monte Carlo codes only at beginning of cycle. In this paper a highly heterogeneous BWR lattice depletion benchmark problem is presented. Results of a 40% void depletion using the RACER continuous energy Monte Carlo code are also presented. Complete problem specifications are given so that comparisons with lattice physics codes or other Monte Carlo codes is possible. The RACER calculations were performed with the ENDF/B-V cross section set. Each flux calculation utilized 2.7 million histories resulting in 95% confidence intervals of ∼1 milli-k on the eigenvalue and ∼1% uncertainties on pin-wise power fractions. Timing statistics for the calculation using the vectorized RACER code averaged ∼ 24,000 neutrons/minute on a single processor of a CRAY-C90 computer

  13. MKENO-DAR: a direct angular representation Monte Carlo code for criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving the Monte Carlo code MULTI-KENO, the MKENO-DAR (Direct Angular Representation) code has been developed for criticality safety analysis in detail. A function was added to MULTI-KENO for representing anisotropic scattering strictly. With this function, the scattering angle of neutron is determined not by the average scattering angle μ-bar of the Pl Legendre polynomial but by the random work operation using probability distribution function produced with the higher order Legendre polynomials. This code is avilable for the FACOM-M380 computer. This report is a computer code manual for MKENO-DAR. (author)

  14. Full-core pin-power calculations using Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin wise calculations of core power distribution have been performed for a criticality mock up installation that models a WWER-1000 reactor. Two Monte Carlo codes have been applied for solving of this problem: the MCNP4B code and the KENO-VI code from the SCALE 4.4 system. The codes use different kinds of neutron cross section data: pointwise continuous-energy ENDF/B-VI data and multigroup ENDF/B-V data. Comparisons of calculated results show that the MCNP4B and KENO-VI results are in good agreement. (authors)

  15. Monte Carlo solution of a semi-discrete transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the S∞ method, a hybrid neutron transport method in which Monte Carlo particles traverse discrete space. The goal of any deterministic/stochastic hybrid method is to couple selected characters from each of the methods in hopes of producing a better method. The S∞ method has the features of the lumped, linear-discontinuous (LLD) spatial discretization, yet it has no ray-effects because of the continuous angular variable. They derive the S∞ method for the solid-state, mono-energetic transport equation in one-dimensional slab geometry with isotropic scattering and an isotropic internal source. They demonstrate the viability of the S∞ method by comparing their results favorably to analytic and deterministic results

  16. Diffusion/transport hybrid discrete method for Monte Carlo solution of the neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo method is widely used for solving neutron transport equation. Basically Monte Carlo method treats continuous angle, space and energy. It gives very accurate solution when enough many particle histories are used, but it takes too long computation time. To reduce computation time, discrete Monte Carlo method was proposed. It is called Discrete Transport Monte Carlo (DTMC) method. It uses discrete space but continuous angle in mono energy one dimension problem and uses lump, linear-discontinuous (LLD) equation to make probabilities of leakage, scattering, and absorption. LLD may cause negative angular fluxes in highly scattering problem, so two scatter variance reduction method is applied to DTMC and shows very accurate solution in various problems. In transport Monte Carlo calculation, the particle history does not end for scattering event. So it also takes much computation time in highly scattering problem. To further reduce computation time, Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) method is implemented. DDMC uses diffusion equation to make probabilities and has no scattering events. So DDMC takes very short computation time comparing with DTMC and shows very well-agreed results with cell-centered diffusion results. It is known that diffusion result may not be good in boundaries. So in hybrid method of DTMC and DDMC, boundary regions are calculated by DTMC and the other regions are calculated by DDMC. In this thesis, DTMC, DDMC and hybrid methods and their results of several problems are presented. The results show that DDMC and DTMC are well agreed with deterministic diffusion and transport results, respectively. The hybrid method shows transport-like results in problems where diffusion results are poor. The computation time of hybrid method is between DDMC and DTMC, as expected

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of transport from an electrothermal vaporizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulations were developed to elucidate the time and spatial distribution of analyte during the transport process from an electrothermal vaporizer to an inductively coupled plasma. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was employed to collect experimental data that was compared with the simulated transient signals. Consideration was given to analyte transport as gaseous species as well as aerosol particles. In the case of aerosols, the simulation assumed formation of 5 nm particles and used the Einstein-Stokes equation to estimate the aerosol's diffusion coefficient, which was ca. 1% of the value for free atom diffusion. Desorption conditions for Cu that had been previously elucidated for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry were employed for the release processes from the electrothermal vaporizer. The primary distinguishing feature in the output signal to differentiate between gas and aerosol transport was a pronounced, long lived signal after the transient peak if aerosols were transported. Time and spatial distributions of particles within the transport system are presented. This characteristic was supported by independent atomic absorption measurements using a heated (or unheated) quartz T-tube with electrothermal vaporizer introduction

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of transport from an electrothermal vaporizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, James A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: holcombe@mail.utexas.edu; Ertas, Gulay [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Monte Carlo simulations were developed to elucidate the time and spatial distribution of analyte during the transport process from an electrothermal vaporizer to an inductively coupled plasma. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was employed to collect experimental data that was compared with the simulated transient signals. Consideration was given to analyte transport as gaseous species as well as aerosol particles. In the case of aerosols, the simulation assumed formation of 5 nm particles and used the Einstein-Stokes equation to estimate the aerosol's diffusion coefficient, which was ca. 1% of the value for free atom diffusion. Desorption conditions for Cu that had been previously elucidated for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry were employed for the release processes from the electrothermal vaporizer. The primary distinguishing feature in the output signal to differentiate between gas and aerosol transport was a pronounced, long lived signal after the transient peak if aerosols were transported. Time and spatial distributions of particles within the transport system are presented. This characteristic was supported by independent atomic absorption measurements using a heated (or unheated) quartz T-tube with electrothermal vaporizer introduction.

  19. A Monte Carlo simulation of ion transport at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation for ion transport in hot background gases, which is an alternative way of solving the corresponding Boltzmann equation that determines the distribution function of ions. We consider the limit of low ion densities when the distribution function of the background gas remains unchanged due to collision with ions. Special attention has been paid to properly treating the thermal motion of the host gas particles and their influence on ions, which is very important at low electric fields, when the mean ion energy is comparable to the thermal energy of the host gas. We found the conditional probability distribution of gas velocities that correspond to an ion of specific velocity which collides with a gas particle. Also, we have derived exact analytical formulae for piecewise calculation of the collision frequency integrals. We address the cases when the background gas is monocomponent and when it is a mixture of different gases. The techniques described here are required for Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport and for hybrid models of non-equilibrium plasmas. The range of energies where it is necessary to apply the technique has been defined. The results we obtained are in excellent agreement with the existing ones obtained by complementary methods. Having verified our algorithm, we were able to produce calculations for Ar+ ions in Ar and propose them as a new benchmark for thermal effects. The developed method is widely applicable for solving the Boltzmann equation that appears in many different contexts in physics. (paper)

  20. Core calculation of 1MW PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) using continuous energy method of Monte Carlo MVP code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RTP is a light-water moderated and pool-type TRIGA MARK II reactor with power capacity of 1MWt. It was built in 1979 and attained the first criticality on 28 June 1982. The RTP was designed mainly for neutron activation analysis, small angle neutron scattering, neutron radiography, radioisotope production, education and training purposes. It uses standard TRIGA fuel developed by General Atomic in which the zirconium hydride moderator is homogeneously combined with enriched uranium. It has a cylindrical core with which possibility of locating 127 of fuel elements. Both of the coolant and moderator uses light water system and the reflector is made of high purity graphite. Because of its relatively small power, it uses natural convection for its cooling system. To ensure the integrity of the core, fuel shuffling have been carried out several times. Until now, there were 12 configurations of the core, the most recent change being in July 2006. This paper will describe the RTP core calculation using the Monte Carlo MVP code system. VP is a general multi-purpose Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport calculation in order to have an accurate and fast Monte Carlo simulation of neutron and photon transport problems. The MVP Monte Carlo code calculation is based on the continuous energy method. This code is capable of adopting an accurate physics model, geometry description and variance reduction technique. When compared to the conventional scalar method, this code could achieve higher computation speed by up to a factor of 10 on the vector super-computer. The RTP core has been modelled using cylinder geometry along the z-coordinate geometry with the MVP code system while its material cross section data is calculated beforehand. The JENDL3.3 data library was used in the whole calculation. The objectives of the calculation are to calculate the multiplication factor values (keff), fission density and flux distribution from the tally data. The calculation also

  1. A priori efficiency calculations for Monte Carlo applications in neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a general derivation is given of equations describing the variance of an arbitrary detector response in a Monte Carlo simulation and the average number of collisions a particle will suffer until its history ends. The theory is validated for a simple slab system using the two-direction transport model and for a two-group infinite system, which both allow analytical solutions. Numerical results from the analytical solutions are compared with actual Monte Carlo calculations, showing excellent agreement. These analytical solutions demonstrate the possibilities for optimizing the weight window settings with respect to variance. Using the average number of collisions as a measure for the simulation time a cost function inversely proportional to the usual figure of merit is defined, which allows optimization with respect to overall efficiency of the Monte Carlo calculation. For practical applications it is outlined how the equations for the variance and average number of collisions can be solved using a suitable existing deterministic neutron transport code with adapted number of energy groups and scattering matrices. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Codes Regarding the Calculated Detector Response Function in NDP Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, Hoang Sy Minh; Sun, Gwang Min; Park, Byung Gun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The basis of the NDP is the irradiation of a sample with a thermal or cold neutron beam and the subsequent release of charged particles due to neutron-induced exoergic charged particle reactions. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of elements and release mono-energetic charged particles, e.g. alpha particles or protons, and recoil atoms. Depth profile of the analyzed element can be obtained by making a linear transformation of the measured energy spectrum by using the stopping power of the sample material. A few micrometer of the material can be analyzed nondestructively, and on the order of 10nm depth resolution can be obtained depending on the material type with NDP method. In the NDP method, the one first steps of the analytical process is a channel-energy calibration. This calibration is normally made with the experimental measurement of NIST Standard Reference Material sample (SRM-93a). In this study, some Monte Carlo (MC) codes were tried to calculate the Si detector response function when this detector accounted the energy charges particles emitting from an analytical sample. In addition, these MC codes were also tried to calculate the depth distributions of some light elements ({sup 10}B, {sup 3}He, {sup 6}Li, etc.) in SRM-93a and SRM-2137 samples. These calculated profiles were compared with the experimental profiles and SIMS profiles. In this study, some popular MC neutron transport codes are tried and tested to calculate the detector response function in the NDP method. The simulations were modeled based on the real CN-NDP system which is a part of Cold Neutron Activation Station (CONAS) at HANARO (KAERI). The MC simulations are very successful at predicting the alpha peaks in the measured energy spectrum. The net area difference between the measured and predicted alpha peaks are less than 1%. A possible explanation might be bad cross section data set usage in the MC codes for the transport of low energetic lithium atoms inside the silicon substrate.

  3. Burnup calculations of TR-2 Research Reactor with Monteburns Monte Carlo Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this study, some neutronic calculations of first and second core cycles of 5 MW pool type TR-2 Research Reactor have been performed using Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System MONTEBURNS and the results were compared with the values of experiments and other codes. Time dependent keff distribution and burnup ratios belong to first and second core cycles of TR-2 Research Reactor were compared and quite good consistence in the results were observed. After modeling the first and second core cycles of TR-2 with MCNP5 Monte Carlo code, MCNP5 used in MONTEBURNS code has been parallelized in 8 HP ProLiant BL680C G5 systems with 4 quad-core Intel Xeon E7330 CPU, utilizing the MPI parallel protocol and simulations were performed on the 128 cores Linux parallel computing machine system. The computation time was reduced by parallelization of MONTEBURNS which uses MCNP in many steps. (authors)

  4. SFR whole core burnup calculations with TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS) of the OECD/NEA, an international collaboration benchmark was recently established on the neutronic analysis of four Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) concepts of the Generation- IV nuclear energy systems. As the whole core Monte Carlo depletion calculation is one of the essential challenges of current reactor physics studies, the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code was firstly used in this study to perform whole core 3D neutronic calculations for these four SFR cores. Two medium size (1000 MWt) and two large size (3600 MWt) SFR of GEN-IV systems were analyzed. The medium size SFR concepts are from the Advanced Burner Reactors (ABR). The large size SFR concepts are from the self-breeding reactors. The TRIPOLI-4 depletion calculations were made with MOX and metallic U-Pu-Zr fuels for the ABR cores and with MOX and Carbide (U,Pu)C fuels for the self-breeding cores. The whole core reactor physics parameters calculations were performed for the BOEC and EOEC (Beginning and End of Equilibrium Cycle) conditions. This paper summarizes the TRIPOLI-4 calculation results of Keff, βeff, sodium void worth, Doppler constant, control rod worth, and core power distributions for the BOEC and EOEC conditions. The one-cycle depletion calculation results of the core inventory of U and TRU (Pu, Am, Cm, and Np) are also analyzed, after 328.5 days depletion irradiation for the ABR cores, 410 days for the large MOX core, and 500 days for the large carbide core. (author)

  5. Development of Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculation Methods in the Shift Monte Carlo Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL; Martin, William R [University of Michigan; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Three methods for calculating continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients were developed and implemented into the SHIFT Monte Carlo code within the Scale code package. The methods were used for several simple test problems and were evaluated in terms of speed, accuracy, efficiency, and memory requirements. A promising new method for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was developed and produced accurate sensitivity coefficients with figures of merit that were several orders of magnitude larger than those from existing methods.

  6. QCDMPI - pure QCD Monte Carlo simulation code with MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    QCDMPI is a pure QCD simulation code with MPI calls. QCDMPI is very portable because; - you can simulate any-dimensional QCD, - on any-dimensional partitioning, - on any number of processors, - with rather small working area. Also by this program, you can get two performances, - calculation (link update time) - communication (MB/sec). In this paper, outline of QCDMPI is reported. Comparison of the performances on several parallel machines; AP1000, AP1000+, AP3000, Cenju-3, Paragon, SR2201 and Workstation Cluster, is also reported. (orig.)

  7. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with FLUKA Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Valente, M; Battistoni, G; Botta, F; Pedroli, G; Ferrari, A; Cremonesi, M; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Fasso, A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, FLUKA has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. Methods: FLUKA DPKS have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10-3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy ((89)Sr, (90)Y, (131)I, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (186)Re, and (188)Re). Point isotropic...

  8. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  9. Validation of columnar CsI x-ray detector responses obtained with hybridMANTIS, a CPU-GPU Monte Carlo code for coupled x-ray, electron, and optical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: hybridMANTIS is a Monte Carlo package for modeling indirect x-ray imagers using columnar geometry based on a hybrid concept that maximizes the utilization of available CPU and graphics processing unit processors in a workstation. Methods: The authors compare hybridMANTIS x-ray response simulations to previously published MANTIS and experimental data for four cesium iodide scintillator screens. These screens have a variety of reflective and absorptive surfaces with different thicknesses. The authors analyze hybridMANTIS results in terms of modulation transfer function and calculate the root mean square difference and Swank factors from simulated and experimental results. Results: The comparison suggests that hybridMANTIS better matches the experimental data as compared to MANTIS, especially at high spatial frequencies and for the thicker screens. hybridMANTIS simulations are much faster than MANTIS with speed-ups up to 5260. Conclusions: hybridMANTIS is a useful tool for improved description and optimization of image acquisition stages in medical imaging systems and for modeling the forward problem in iterative reconstruction algorithms.

  10. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications. The important functions of PHITS are an event generator mode for low-energy neutron interaction, beam transport functions, a function for calculating the displacement per atom (DPA), and a microdosimetric tally function. PHITS has been used by more than 1,000 users in various research and development fields, such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research

  11. Comparison of the TEP method for neutral particle transport in the plasma edge with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmission/escape probability (TEP) method for neutral particle transport has recently been introduced and implemented for the calculation of 2-D neutral atom transport in the edge plasma and divertor regions of tokamaks. The results of an evaluation of the accuracy of the approximations made in the calculation of the basic TEP transport parameters are summarized. Comparisons of the TEP and Monte Carlo calculations for model problems using tokamak experimental geometries and for the analysis of measured neutral densities in DIII-D are presented. The TEP calculations are found to agree rather well with Monte Carlo results, for the most part, but the need for a few extensions of the basic TEP transport methodology and for inclusion of molecular effects and a better wall reflection model in the existing code is suggested by the study. (author)

  12. The derivation of Particle Monte Carlo methods for plasma modeling from transport equations

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Savino

    2008-01-01

    We analyze here in some detail, the derivation of the Particle and Monte Carlo methods of plasma simulation, such as Particle in Cell (PIC), Monte Carlo (MC) and Particle in Cell / Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) from formal manipulation of transport equations.

  13. Modeling Monte Carlo of multileaf collimators using the code GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Alex C.H.; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: oliveira.ach@yahoo.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Luciano S.; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: lusoulima@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Radiotherapy uses various techniques and equipment for local treatment of cancer. The equipment most often used in radiotherapy to the patient irradiation is linear accelerator (Linac). Among the many algorithms developed for evaluation of dose distributions in radiotherapy planning, the algorithms based on Monte Carlo (MC) methods have proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy by providing more realistic results. The MC simulations for applications in radiotherapy are divided into two parts. In the first, the simulation of the production of the radiation beam by the Linac is performed and then the phase space is generated. The phase space contains information such as energy, position, direction, etc. of millions of particles (photons, electrons, positrons). In the second part the simulation of the transport of particles (sampled phase space) in certain configurations of irradiation field is performed to assess the dose distribution in the patient (or phantom). Accurate modeling of the Linac head is of particular interest in the calculation of dose distributions for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), where complex intensity distributions are delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC). The objective of this work is to describe a methodology for modeling MC of MLCs using code Geant4. To exemplify this methodology, the Varian Millennium 120-leaf MLC was modeled, whose physical description is available in BEAMnrc Users Manual (20 11). The dosimetric characteristics (i.e., penumbra, leakage, and tongue-and-groove effect) of this MLC were evaluated. The results agreed with data published in the literature concerning the same MLC. (author)

  14. Analysis of the KANT experiment on beryllium using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium is an important material in fusion technology for multiplying neutrons in blankets. However, beryllium nuclear data are differently presented in modern nuclear data evaluations. Recent investigations with the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo simulation of the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) demonstrated that beryllium reaction data are the main source of the calculation uncertainties between ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1. To clarify the calculation uncertainties from data libraries on beryllium, in this study TRIPOLI-4 calculations of the Karlsruhe Neutron Transmission (KANT) experiment have been performed by using ENDF/B-VII.0 and new JEFF-3.1.1 data libraries. The KANT Experiment on beryllium has been used to validate neutron transport codes and nuclear data libraries. An elaborated KANT experiment benchmark has been compiled and published in the NEA/SINBAD database and it has been used as reference in the present work. The neutron multiplication in bulk beryllium assemblies was considered with a central D-T neutron source. Neutron leakage spectra through the 5, 10, and 17 cm thick spherical beryllium shells were calculated and five-group partial leakage multiplications were reported and discussed. In general, improved C/E ratios on neutron leakage multiplications have been obtained. Both ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1 beryllium data libraries of TRIPOLI-4 are acceptable now for fusion neutronics calculations.

  15. Evaluation of scattered radiation from radiographic intensifying screen on dental image contrast using Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most dental imaging is performed by means a imaging system consisting of a film/screen combination. Fluorescent intensifying screens for X-ray films are used in order to reduce the radiation dose. They produce visible light which increases the efficiency of the film. In addition, the primary radiation can be scattered elastically (Rayleigh scattering) and inelastically (Compton scattering) which will degrade the image resolution. Scattered radiation produced in Gd2O2S:Tb intensifying screens was simulated by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code - the EGS4. The magnitude of scattered radiation striking the film is typically quantified using the scatter to primary radiation and the scatter fraction. The angular distribution of the intensity of the scattered radiation (sum of both the scattering effects) was simulated, showing that the ratio of secondary-to-primary radiation incident on the X-ray film is about 5.67% and 3.28 % and the scatter function is about 5.27% and 3.18% for the front and back screen, respectively, over the range from 0 to π rad. (author)

  16. Verification of the spectral history correction method with fully coupled Monte Carlo code BGCore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a new method for accounting for burnup history effects on few-group cross sections was developed and implemented in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D. The method relies on the tracking of the local Pu-239 density which serves as an indicator of burnup spectral history. The validity of the method was demonstrated in PWR and VVER applications. However, the spectrum variation in BWR core is more pronounced due to the stronger coolant density change. Therefore, the purpose of the current work is to further investigate the applicability of the method to BWR analysis. The proposed methodology was verified against recently developed BGCore system, which couples Monte Carlo neutron transport with depletion and thermal hydraulic solvers and thus capable of providing a reference solution for 3D simulations. The results dearly show that neglecting the spectral history effects leads to a very large deviation (e.g. 2000 pcm in reactivity) from fee reference solution. However, a very good agreement between DYN3D and BGCore is observed (on the order of 200 pcm in reactivity), when the. Pu-correction method is applied. (author)

  17. ITS, TIGER System of Coupled Electron Photon Transport by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: ITS permits a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-integrated coupled electron/ photon radiation transport problems with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. 2 - Method of solution: Through a machine-portable utility that emulates the basic features of the CDC UPDATE processor, the user selects one of eight codes for running on a machine of one of four (at least) major vendors. With the ITS-3.0 release the PSR-0245/UPEML package is included to perform these functions. The ease with which this utility is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is maximized by employing the best available cross sections and sampling distributions, and the most complete physical model for describing the production and transport of the electron/ photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. Flexibility of construction permits the codes to be tailored to specific applications and the capabilities of the codes to be extended to more complex applications through update procedures. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - Restrictions and/or limitations for ITS depend upon the local operating system

  18. Comparative study among simulations of an internal monitoring system using different Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational Monte Carlo (MC) codes have been used for simulation of nuclear installations mainly for internal monitoring of workers, the well known as Whole Body Counters (WBC). The main goal of this project was the modeling and simulation of the counting efficiency (CE) of a WBC system using three different MC codes: MCNPX, EGSnrc and VMC in-vivo. The simulations were performed for three different groups of analysts. The results shown differences between the three codes, as well as in the results obtained by the same code and modeled by different analysts. Moreover, all the results were also compared to the experimental results obtained in laboratory for meaning of validation and final comparison. In conclusion, it was possible to detect the influence on the results when the system is modeled by different analysts using the same MC code and in which MC code the results were best suited, when comparing to the experimental data result. (author)

  19. Simulation of the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber currents by different Monte Carlo codes in benchmark gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy photon (over 10 MeV) and neutron beams adopted in radiobiology and radiotherapy always produce mixed neutron/gamma-ray fields. The Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are commonly applied to determine the gamma-ray dose because of its neutron insensitive characteristic. Nowadays, many perturbation corrections for accurate dose estimation and lots of treatment planning systems are based on Monte Carlo technique. The Monte Carlo codes EGSnrc, FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP5, and MCNPX were used to evaluate energy dependent response functions of the Exradin M2 Mg(Ar) ionization chamber to a parallel photon beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV. For the sake of validation, measurements were carefully performed in well-defined (a) primary M-100 X-ray calibration field, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6-MV, and (d) 10-MV therapeutic beams in hospital. At energy region below 100 keV, MCNP5 and MCNPX both had lower responses than other codes. For energies above 1 MeV, the MCNP ITS-mode greatly resembled other three codes and the differences were within 5%. Comparing to the measured currents, MCNP5 and MCNPX using ITS-mode had perfect agreement with the 60Co, and 10-MV beams. But at X-ray energy region, the derivations reached 17%. This work shows us a better insight into the performance of different Monte Carlo codes in photon-electron transport calculation. Regarding the application of the mixed field dosimetry like BNCT, MCNP with ITS-mode is recognized as the most suitable tool by this work.

  20. Icarus: A 2-D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Code for Multi-Processor Computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird[11.1] and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modeled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modeled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates or in a manner similar to continuum modeling. Surface chemistry is modeled with surface reaction probabilities; an optional site density, energy dependent, coverage model is included. Electrons are modeled by either a local charge neutrality assumption or as discrete simulational particles. Ion chemistry is modeled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electro-static fields can either be: externally input, a Langmuir-Tonks model or from a Green's Function (Boundary Element) based Poison Solver. Icarus has been used for subsonic to hypersonic, chemically reacting, and plasma flows. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, post-processing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. All of the software packages are written in standard Fortran

  1. Burnup calculation capability in the PSG2 / Serpent Monte Carlo reactor physics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PSG continuous-energy Monte Carlo reactor physics code has been developed at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland since 2004. The code is mainly intended for group constant generation for coupled reactor simulator calculations and other tasks traditionally handled using deterministic lattices physics codes. The name was recently changed from acronym PSG to 'Serpent', and the capabilities have been extended by implementing built-in burnup calculation routines that enable the code to be used for fuel cycle studies and the modelling of irradiated fuels. This paper presents the methodology used for burnup calculation. Serpent has two fundamentally different options for solving the Bateman depletion equations: 1) the Transmutation Trajectory Analysis method (TTA), based on the analytical solution of linearized depletion chains and 2) the Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method (CRAM), an advanced matrix exponential solution developed at VTT. The first validation results are compared to deterministic CASMO-4E calculations. It is also shown that the overall running time in Monte Carlo burnup calculation can be significantly reduced using specialized calculation techniques, and that the continuous-energy Monte Carlo method is becoming a viable alternative to deterministic assembly burnup codes. (authors)

  2. Applications of FLUKA Monte Carlo code for nuclear and accelerator physics

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Brugger, Markus; Campanella, Mauro; Carboni, Massimo; Empl, Anton; Fasso, Alberto; Gadioli, Ettore; Cerutti, Francesco; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ferrari, Anna; Lantz, Matthias; Mairani, Andrea; Margiotta, M; Morone, Christina; Muraro, Silvia; Parodi, Katerina; Patera, Vincenzo; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Pinsky, Lawrence; Ranft, Johannes; Roesler, Stefan; Rollet, Sofia; Sala, Paola R; Santana, Mario; Sarchiapone, Lucia; Sioli, Maximiliano; Smirnov, George; Sommerer, Florian; Theis, Christian; Trovati, Stefania; Villari, R; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; Vollaire, Joachim; Zapp, Neil

    2011-01-01

    FLUKA is a general purpose Monte Carlo code capable of handling all radiation components from thermal energies (for neutrons) or 1keV (for all other particles) to cosmic ray energies and can be applied in many different fields. Presently the code is maintained on Linux. The validity of the physical models implemented in FLUKA has been benchmarked against a variety of experimental data over a wide energy range, from accelerator data to cosmic ray showers in the Earth atmosphere. FLUKA is widely used for studies related both to basic research and to applications in particle accelerators, radiation protection and dosimetry, including the specific issue of radiation damage in space missions, radiobiology (including radiotherapy) and cosmic ray calculations. After a short description of the main features that make FLUKA valuable for these topics, the present paper summarizes some of the recent applications of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code in the nuclear as well high energy physics. In particular it addresses such top...

  3. Dose conversion coefficients for ICRP110 voxel phantom in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M. C.; Cordeiro, T. P. V.; Silva, A. X.; Souza-Santos, D.; Queiroz-Filho, P. P.; Hunt, J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The reference adult male voxel phantom recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection no. 110 was implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. Geant4 was used to calculate Dose Conversion Coefficients (DCCs) expressed as dose deposited in organs per air kerma for photons, electrons and neutrons in the Annals of the ICRP. In this work the AP and PA irradiation geometries of the ICRP male phantom were simulated for the purpose of benchmarking the Geant4 code. Monoenergetic photons were simulated between 15 keV and 10 MeV and the results were compared with ICRP 110, the VMC Monte Carlo code and the literature data available, presenting a good agreement.

  4. A new Monte Carlo code for absorption simulation of laser-skin tissue interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Afshan Shirkavand; Saeed Sarkar; Marjaneh Hejazi; Leila Ataie-Fashtami; Mohammad Reza Alinaghizadeh

    2007-01-01

    In laser clinical applications, the process of photon absorption and thermal energy diffusion in the target tissue and its surrounding tissue during laser irradiation are crucial. Such information allows the selection of proper operating parameters such as laser power, and exposure time for optimal therapeutic. The Monte Carlo method is a useful tool for studying laser-tissue interaction and simulation of energy absorption in tissue during laser irradiation. We use the principles of this technique and write a new code with MATLAB 6.5, and then validate it against Monte Carlo multi layer (MCML) code. The new code is proved to be with good accuracy. It can be used to calculate the total power bsorbed in the region of interest. This can be combined for heat modelling with other computerized programs.

  5. Application of a Monte-Carlo simulation code for the research and development of self-powered flux detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the Monte-Carlo Simulation Code, ICARES, developed to simulate the actual physical processes that occur inside a Self-Powered Flux Detector (SPED) which is used for flux mapping, control and safety in CANDU-PHWR. in addition, the various current producing mechanisms, electron transport and the calculation of detector sensitivity is briefly described. Moreover, two applications of the code to the development of SPFDs are presented: 1) the first application is to the development of a prompt-neutron sensitive flux-mapping detector using iron on titanium as an emitter material, 2) the second application is to the calculation of the sensitivity of a larger outside diameter lead cable for SPFDs. (Author) 8 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  6. Transport methods: general. 2. Monte Carlo Particle Transport in Media with Exponentially Varying Time-Dependent Cross Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated Monte Carlo schemes for analyzing particle transport through media with exponentially varying time-dependent cross sections. For such media, the cross sections are represented in the form Σ(t) = Σ0 e-at (1) or equivalently as Σ(x) = Σ0 e-bx (2) where b = av and v is the particle speed. For the following discussion, the parameters a and b may be either positive, for exponentially decreasing cross sections, or negative, for exponentially increasing cross sections. For most time-dependent Monte Carlo applications, the time and spatial variations of the cross-section data are handled by means of a stepwise procedure, holding the cross sections constant for each region over a small time interval Δt, performing the Monte Carlo random walk over the interval Δt, updating the cross sections, and then repeating for a series of time intervals. Continuously varying spatial- or time-dependent cross sections can be treated in a rigorous Monte Carlo fashion using delta-tracking, but inefficiencies may arise if the range of cross-section variation is large. In this paper, we present a new method for sampling collision distances directly for cross sections that vary exponentially in space or time. The method is exact and efficient and has direct application to Monte Carlo radiation transport methods. To verify that the probability density function (PDF) is correct and that the random-sampling procedure yields correct results, numerical experiments were performed using a one-dimensional Monte Carlo code. The physical problem consisted of a beam source impinging on a purely absorbing infinite slab, with a slab thickness of 1 cm and Σ0 = 1 cm-1. Monte Carlo calculations with 10 000 particles were run for a range of the exponential parameter b from -5 to +20 cm-1. Two separate Monte Carlo calculations were run for each choice of b, a continuously varying case using the random-sampling procedures described earlier, and a 'conventional' case where the

  7. Application of a Java-based, univel geometry, neutral particle Monte Carlo code to the searchlight problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A univel geometry, neutral particle Monte Carlo transport code, written entirely in the Java programming language, is under development for medical radiotherapy applications. The code uses ENDF-VI based continuous energy cross section data in a flexible XML format. Full neutron-photon coupling, including detailed photon production and photonuclear reactions, is included. Charged particle equilibrium is assumed within the patient model so that detailed transport of electrons produced by photon interactions may be neglected. External beam and internal distributed source descriptions for mixed neutron-photon sources are allowed. Flux and dose tallies are performed on a univel basis. A four-tap, shift-register-sequence random number generator is used. Initial verification and validation testing of the basic neutron transport routines is underway. The searchlight problem was chosen as a suitable first application because of the simplicity of the physical model. Results show excellent agreement with analytic solutions. Computation times for similar numbers of histories are comparable to other neutron MC codes written in C and FORTRAN

  8. The development of depletion program coupled with Monte Carlo computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the development of depletion code for light water reactor coupled with MCNP5 code called the MCDL code (Monte Carlo Depletion for Light Water Reactor). The first order differential depletion system equations of 21 actinide isotopes and 50 fission product isotopes are solved by the Radau IIA Implicit Runge Kutta (IRK) method after receiving neutron flux, reaction rates in one group energy and multiplication factors for fuel pin, fuel assembly or whole reactor core from the calculation results of the MCNP5 code. The calculation for beryllium poisoning and cooling time is also integrated in the code. To verify and validate the MCDL code, high enriched uranium (HEU) and low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies VVR-M2 types and 89 fresh HEU fuel assemblies, 92 LEU fresh fuel assemblies cores of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) have been investigated and compared with the results calculated by the SRAC code and the MCNPREBUS linkage system code. The results show good agreement between calculated data of the MCDL code and reference codes. (author)

  9. SYMTRAN - A Time-dependent Symmetric Tandem Mirror Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-dependent version of the steady-state radial transport model in symmetric tandem mirrors in Ref. [1] has been coded up and first tests performed. Our code, named SYMTRAN, is an adaptation of the earlier SPHERE code for spheromaks, now modified for tandem mirror physics. Motivated by Post's new concept of kinetic stabilization of symmetric mirrors, it is an extension of the earlier TAMRAC rate-equation code omitting radial transport [2], which successfully accounted for experimental results in TMX. The SYMTRAN code differs from the earlier tandem mirror radial transport code TMT in that our code is focused on axisymmetric tandem mirrors and classical diffusion, whereas TMT emphasized non-ambipolar transport in TMX and MFTF-B due to yin-yang plugs and non-symmetric transitions between the plugs and axisymmetric center cell. Both codes exhibit interesting but different non-linear behavior

  10. Incorporation of single elastic scattering in the EGS4 Monte Carlo code system: tests of Moliere theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To avoid prohibitively long computation times, conventional Monte Carlo e-transport algorithms (e.g. EGS4, ETRAN, ITS) employ multiple scattering theories and ''condensed history'' methods to model e- transport. Although highly successful for many calculations, these techniques do not model backscatter very well, particularly for high-Z materials. In an attempt to correct for this shortcoming, we have extended the EGS4 Monte Carlo code to allow for the simulation of single elastic scattering. The single scattering method also allows quantities to be scored in submicrometer dimension geometries where the Moliere multiple scattering theory fails and the Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple scattering equations converge very slowly. Two single scattering schemes have been implemented: (i) Screened Rutherford cross sections which form the basis of Moliere's multiple scattering theory, (ii) Single scattering cross sections based upon phase-shift data. In this work we describe the implementation of single elastic scattering in the EGS4 Monte Carlo code system and employ it to verify the Moliere multiple scattering theory in its range of validity. We demonstrate that the Moliere multiple scattering formalism provides a good description of multiple scattering despite its use of a relatively crude cross section and that it may be employed with semi-quantitative accuracy in the plural scattering regime, where electron step-lengths are so short that only as few as five atoms participate in the angular deflection. However, the remaining differences of the Moliere distributions with the phase-shift data motivate the use of more accurate fundamental data, in particular, for applications involving high-Z elements. (orig.)

  11. Calculation of effective delayed neutron fraction with modified library of Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We propose a new Monte Carlo method to calculate the effective delayed neutron fraction by changing the library. ► We study the stability of our method. When the particles and cycles are sufficiently great, the stability is very good. ► The final result is determined to make the deviation least. ► We verify our method on several benchmarks, and the results are very good. - Abstract: A new Monte Carlo method is proposed to calculate the effective delayed neutron fraction βeff. Based on perturbation theory, βeff is calculated with modified library of Monte Carlo code. To verify the proposed method, calculations are performed on several benchmarks. The error of the method is analyzed and the way to reduce error is proposed. The results are in good agreement with the reference data

  12. DgSMC-B code: A robust and autonomous direct simulation Monte Carlo code for arbitrary geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargaran, H.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the structure of a new Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code that takes advantage of combinatorial geometry (CG) to simulate any rarefied gas flows Medias. The developed code, called DgSMC-B, has been written in FORTRAN90 language with capability of parallel processing using OpenMP framework. The DgSMC-B is capable of handling 3-dimensional (3D) geometries, which is created with first-and second-order surfaces. It performs independent particle tracking for the complex geometry without the intervention of mesh. In addition, it resolves the computational domain boundary and volume computing in border grids using hexahedral mesh. The developed code is robust and self-governing code, which does not use any separate code such as mesh generators. The results of six test cases have been presented to indicate its ability to deal with wide range of benchmark problems with sophisticated geometries such as airfoil NACA 0012. The DgSMC-B code demonstrates its performance and accuracy in a variety of problems. The results are found to be in good agreement with references and experimental data.

  13. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.; Jordan, George C., IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Moses, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking MC particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally gray DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.

  14. Development of a Monte Carlo software to photon transportation in voxel structures using graphic processing units; Desenvolvimento de um software de Monte Carlo para transporte de fotons em estruturas de voxels usando unidades de processamento grafico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, Murillo

    2014-09-01

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo Method (MCM) has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this thesis, the CUBMC code is presented, a GPU-based MC photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in PENELOPE, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the MATERIAL routine, also present in PENELOPE code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. There are two distinct approaches used for transport simulation. The rst of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon ignores the existence of borders and travels in homogeneous fictitious media. The CUBMC code aims to be an alternative of Monte Carlo simulator code that, by using the capability of parallel processing of graphics processing units (GPU), provide high performance simulations in low cost compact machines, and thus can be applied in clinical cases and incorporated in treatment planning systems for radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Hybrid two-dimensional Monte-Carlo electron transport in self-consistent electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics and numerics of the hybrid electron transport code ANTHEM are described. The need for the hybrid modeling of laser generated electron transport is outlined, and a general overview of the hybrid implementation in ANTHEM is provided. ANTHEM treats the background ions and electrons in a laser target as coupled fluid components moving relative to a fixed Eulerian mesh. The laser converts cold electrons to an additional hot electron component which evolves on the mesh as either a third coupled fluid or as a set of Monte Carlo PIC particles. The fluids and particles move in two-dimensions through electric and magnetic fields calculated via the Implicit Moment method. The hot electrons are coupled to the background thermal electrons by Coulomb drag, and both the hot and cold electrons undergo Rutherford scattering against the ion background. Subtleties of the implicit E- and B-field solutions, the coupled hydrodynamics, and large time step Monte Carlo particle scattering are discussed. Sample applications are presented

  16. Evaluation of CASMO-3 and HELIOS for Fuel Assembly Analysis from Monte Carlo Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Song, Jae Seung; Lee, Chung Chan

    2007-05-15

    This report presents a study comparing deterministic lattice physics calculations with Monte Carlo calculations for LWR fuel pin and assembly problems. The study has focused on comparing results from the lattice physics code CASMO-3 and HELIOS against those from the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code McCARD. The comparisons include k{sub inf}, isotopic number densities, and pin power distributions. The CASMO-3 and HELIOS calculations for the k{sub inf}'s of the LWR fuel pin problems show good agreement with McCARD within 956pcm and 658pcm, respectively. For the assembly problems with Gadolinia burnable poison rods, the largest difference between the k{sub inf}'s is 1463pcm with CASMO-3 and 1141pcm with HELIOS. RMS errors for the pin power distributions of CASMO-3 and HELIOS are within 1.3% and 1.5%, respectively.

  17. Shielding evaluation for e-Linac - Inter-comparison of Monte Carlo codes and analytical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of optimum shielding thickness is an important aspect in radiation protection as well as in assessment of cost effectiveness of any upcoming accelerator facility. Analytical calculations for shielding estimates are fast and being frequently used even though they are very approximate. Estimates by Monte Carlo codes, on the other hand is accurate, provided used in a judicious manner, but they are very time consuming and require high end computational hardware. The purpose of this work is to compare the results from various available Monte Carlo codes, such as FLUKA and EGSmc. The estimated output was also compared with the analytical techniques. For the work, an e-Linac facility of 50 MeV electron beam was used and calculations were carried out with 1 mA beam current. (author)

  18. General Monte Carlo reliability simulation code including common mode failures and HARP fault/error-handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, M. E.; Lewis, E. E.; Boehm, F.

    1991-01-01

    A Monte Carlo Fortran computer program was developed that uses two variance reduction techniques for computing system reliability applicable to solving very large highly reliable fault-tolerant systems. The program is consistent with the hybrid automated reliability predictor (HARP) code which employs behavioral decomposition and complex fault-error handling models. This new capability is called MC-HARP which efficiently solves reliability models with non-constant failures rates (Weibull). Common mode failure modeling is also a specialty.

  19. The Serpent Monte Carlo Code: Status, Development and Applications in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Jaakko; Pusa, Maria; Viitanen, Tuomas; Valtavirta, Ville; Kaltiaisenaho, Toni

    2014-06-01

    The Serpent Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup calculation code has been developed at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland since 2004, and is currently used in 100 universities and research organizations around the world. This paper presents the brief history of the project, together with the currently available methods and capabilities and plans for future work. Typical user applications are introduced in the form of a summary review on Serpent-related publications over the past few years.

  20. Dose prediction and process optimization in a gamma sterilization facility using 3-D Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of a gamma sterilizer was built using the ITS/ACCEPT Monte Carlo code and verified through dosimetry. Individual dosimetry measurements in homogeneous material were pooled to represent larger bodies that could be simulated in a reasonable time. With the assumptions and simplifications described, dose predictions were within 2-5% of dosimetry. The model was used to simulate product movement through the sterilizer and to predict information useful for process optimization and facility design

  1. Validation of GEANT4 Monte Carlo Simulation Code for 6 MV Varian Linac Photon Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The head of a clinical linear accelerator based on the manufacturer detailed information is simulated by using GEANT4. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and flatness symmetry (lateral dose profiles) in water phantom were evaluated. Comparisons between experimental and simulated data were carried out for two field sizes; 5 × 5, and 10 ×10 cm2. The obtained results indicated that GEANT4 code is a promising and validated Monte Carlo program for using in radiotherapy applications

  2. Development of continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient calculation methods in the shift Monte Carlo Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, C.; Martin, W. [Univ. of Michigan, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Rearden, B.; Williams, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Reactor and Nuclear Systems Div., Bldg. 5700, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Three methods for calculating continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients were developed and implemented into the Shift Monte Carlo code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used for two small-scale test problems and were evaluated in terms of speed, accuracy, efficiency, and memory requirements. A promising new method for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was developed and produced accurate sensitivity coefficients with figures of merit that were several orders of magnitude larger than those from existing methods. (authors)

  3. ASCOT: redesigned Monte Carlo code for simulations of minority species in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvijoki, Eero; Koskela, Tuomas; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Miettunen, Juho; Sipilä, Seppo; Snicker, Antti; Äkäslompolo, Simppa

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive description of methods for Monte Carlo studies of fast ions and impurity species in tokamak plasmas is presented. The described methods include Hamiltonian orbit-following in particle and guiding center phase space, test particle or guiding center solution of the kinetic equation applying stochastic differential equations in the presence of Coulomb collisions, Neoclassical tearing modes and Alfv\\'en eigenmodes as electromagnetic perturbations relevant for fast ions, together with plasma flow and atomic reactions relevant for impurity studies. Applying the methods, a complete reimplementation of a well-established minority species code is carried out as a response both to the increase in computing power during the last twenty years and to the weakly structured growth of the previous code which has made implementation of additional models impractical. Also, a thorough benchmark between the previous code and the reimplementation is accomplished, showing good agreement between the codes.

  4. Specific Monte Carlo code development for nuclear well-logging tool responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPNL is a specific Monte Carlo computer code that has been developed to simulate a pulsed neutron oil well logging tool and uses implicit capture, Russian roulette and statistical estimation techniques as primary variance reduction methods. The code has been validated by benchmarking against six sets of laboratory test pit data on water, limestone and quartz formations with widely varying sets of borehole and formation conditions. McDNL is a specific Monte Carlo computer code that has been developed to simulate a dual-spaced neutron porosity tool. The low counting yield in the far detector of the tool requires the use of biasing schemes to obtain adequate efficiency. Exponential transform and directional biasing techniques have been applied with remarkable success for this problem, along with source biasing, implicit capture, Russian roulette and statistical estimation techniques. The code has been benchmarked against five sets of laboratory test pit data and found to be valid. Correlated sampling can be optionally used in the code to accurately predict the relative change in the detector response due to small perturbations in the formation porosity. (author)

  5. The Monte Carlo method for shielding calculations analysis by MORSE code of a streaming case in the CAORSO BWR power reactor shielding (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of shielding, the requirement of radiation transport calculations in severe conditions, characterized by irreducible three-dimensional geometries has increased the use of the Monte Carlo method. The latter has proved to be the only rigorous and appropriate calculational method in such conditions. However, further efforts at optimization are still necessary to render the technique practically efficient, despite recent improvements in the Monte Carlo codes, the progress made in the field of computers and the availability of accurate nuclear data. Moreover, the personal experience acquired in the field and the control of sophisticated calculation procedures are of the utmost importance. The aim of the work which has been carried out is the gathering of all the necessary elements and features that would lead to an efficient utilization of the Monte Carlo method used in connection with shielding problems. The study of the general aspects of the method and the exploitation techniques of the MORSE code, which has proved to be one of the most comprehensive of the Monte Carlo codes, lead to a successful analysis of an actual case. In fact, the severe conditions and difficulties met have been overcome using such a stochastic simulation code. Finally, a critical comparison between calculated and high-accuracy experimental results has allowed the final confirmation of the methodology used by us

  6. Current status of high energy nucleon-meson transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Current status of design code of accelerator (NMTC/JAERI code), outline of physical model and evaluation of accuracy of code were reported. To evaluate the nuclear performance of accelerator and strong spallation neutron origin, the nuclear reaction between high energy proton and target nuclide and behaviors of various produced particles are necessary. The nuclear design of spallation neutron system used a calculation code system connected the high energy nucleon{center_dot}meson transport code and the neutron{center_dot}photon transport code. NMTC/JAERI is described by the particle evaporation process under consideration of competition reaction of intranuclear cascade and fission process. Particle transport calculation was carried out for proton, neutron, {pi}- and {mu}-meson. To verify and improve accuracy of high energy nucleon-meson transport code, data of spallation and spallation neutron fragment by the integral experiment were collected. (S.Y.)

  7. Unstructured mesh based multi-physics interface for CFD code coupling in the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an unstructured mesh based multi-physics interface implemented in the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code, for the purpose of coupling the neutronics solution to component-scale thermal hydraulics calculations, such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The work continues the development of a multi-physics coupling scheme, which relies on the separation of state-point information from the geometry input, and the capability to handle temperature and density distributions by a rejection sampling algorithm. The new interface type is demonstrated by a simplified molten-salt reactor test case, using a thermal hydraulics solution provided by the CFD solver in OpenFOAM. (author)

  8. RADTRAN: a computer code to analyze transportation of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code is presented which predicts the environmental impact of any specific scheme of radioactive material transportation. Results are presented in terms of annual latent cancer fatalities and annual early fatility probability resulting from exposure, during normal transportation or transport accidents. The code is developed in a generalized format to permit wide application including normal transportation analysis; consideration of alternatives; and detailed consideration of specific sectors of industry

  9. Introduction to the simulation with MCNP Monte Carlo code and its applications in Medical Physics; Introduccion a la simulacion con el codigo de Monte Carlo MCNP y sus aplicaciones en Fisica Medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parreno Z, F.; Paucar J, R.; Picon C, C. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, San Borja, Lima 41 (Peru)

    1998-12-31

    The simulation by Monte Carlo is tool which Medical Physics counts with it for the development of its research, the interest by this tool is growing, as we may observe in the main scientific journals for the years 1995-1997 where more than 27 % of the papers treat over Monte Carlo and/or its applications in the radiation transport.In the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy we are implementing and making use of the MCNP4 and EGS4 codes. In this work are presented the general features of the Monte Carlo method and its more useful applications in Medical Physics. Likewise, it is made a simulation of the calculation of isodose curves in an interstitial treatment with Ir-192 wires in a mammary gland carcinoma. (Author)

  10. Temperature variance study in Monte-Carlo photon transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study different Monte-Carlo methods for solving radiative transfer problems, and particularly Fleck's Monte-Carlo method. We first give the different time-discretization schemes and the corresponding stability criteria. Then we write the temperature variance as a function of the variances of temperature and absorbed energy at the previous time step. Finally we obtain some stability criteria for the Monte-Carlo method in the stationary case

  11. Large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations with thermal hydraulic feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Method of internal coupling, based on dynamic material distribution, is presented. • The Wielandt shift method is implemented to accelerate Mote Carlo calculations. • The Uniform Fission Site method is introduced for tallies with large numbers of bins. • The stochastic approximation scheme is used to stabilize coupled code convergence. - Abstract: The Monte Carlo method provides the most accurate description of the particle transport problem. The criticality problem is simulated by following the histories of individual particles without approximating the energy, angle or the coordinate dependence. These calculations are usually done using homogeneous thermal hydraulic conditions. This is a very crude approximation in the general case. In this paper, the method of internal coupling between neutron transport and thermal hydraulics is presented. The method is based on dynamic material distribution, where coordinate dependent temperature and density information is supplied on the fly during the transport calculation. This method does not suffer from the deficiencies characteristic of the external coupling via the input files. In latter case, the geometry is split into multiple cells having distinct temperatures and densities to supply the feedback. The possibility to efficiently simulate large scale geometries at pin-by-pin and subchannel level resolution was investigated. The Wielandt shift method for reducing the dominance ratio of the system and accelerating the fission source convergence was implemented. During the coupled iteration a detailed distribution of the fission heat deposition is required by the thermal hydraulics calculation. Providing reasonable statistical uncertainties for tallies having large numbers of bins, is a complicated task. This problem was resolved by applying the Uniform Fission Site method. Previous investigations showed that the convergence of the coupled neutron transport/thermal hydraulics calculation is limited by

  12. GPU - Accelerated Monte Carlo electron transport methods: development and application for radiation dose calculations using 6 GPU cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test-bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. As for photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were simulated. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU (Central Processing Unit)code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6*106 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy. (authors)

  13. Subroutines to Simulate Fission Neutrons for Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Lestone, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Fortran subroutines have been written to simulate the production of fission neutrons from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and 240Pu, and from the thermal neutron induced fission of 239Pu and 235U. The names of these four subroutines are getnv252, getnv240, getnv239, and getnv235, respectively. These subroutines reproduce measured first, second, and third moments of the neutron multiplicity distributions, measured neutron-fission correlation data for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, and meas...

  14. Performance of the improved version of Monte Carlo Code A{sup 3}MCNP for cask shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Yokohama (Japan); Ueki, K. [Tokai Univ., Kanagawa (Japan); Sato, O. [Mitsubishi Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Sjoden, G.E. [Dept. of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Miyake, Y.; Ohmura, M.; Haghighat, A.

    2004-07-01

    A{sup 3}MCNP (Automatic Adjoint Accelerated MCNP) is a revised version of the MCNP Monte Carlo code, that automatically prepares variance reduction parameters for the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) methodology. Using a deterministic ''importance'' (or adjoint) function, CADIS performs source and transport biasing within the weight-window technique. The current version of A{sup 3}MCNP uses the 3-D Sn transport TORT code to determine a 3-D importance function distribution. Based on simulation of several real-life problems, it is demonstrated that A3MCNP provides precise calculation results with a remarkably short computation time by using the proper and objective variance reduction parameters. However, since the first version of A{sup 3}MCNP provided only a point source configuration option for large-scale shielding problems, such as spent-fuel transport casks, a large amount of memory may be necessary to store enough points to properly represent the source. Hence, we have developed an improved version of A{sup 3}MCNP (referred to as A{sup 3}MCNPV) which has a volumetric source configuration option. This paper describes the successful use of A{sup 3}MCNPV for cask neutron and gamma-ray shielding problem.

  15. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). Methods: A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDA programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). Results: An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. Conclusions: The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  16. Fusion neutronics calculational benchmarks for basic nuclear data and transport codes intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four calculational benchmarks have been selected to compare various nuclear data libraries based on both ENDF/B-IV and V, and to compare results from various transport codes. Discrepancies up to 20% in tritium production from 7Li were found and have been attributed mainly to differences in current ENDF/B-IV and V evaluations, while approx.4% is attributed to differences in the group structure of the libraries used. Results from MCNP and VIP Monte Carlo codes are in good agreement, but MORSE calculations show good agreement only for high threshold reactions

  17. Clinical CT-based calculations of dose and positron emitter distributions in proton therapy using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, K.; Ferrari, A.; Sommerer, F.; Paganetti, H.

    2007-07-01

    Clinical investigations on post-irradiation PET/CT (positron emission tomography/computed tomography) imaging for in vivo verification of treatment delivery and, in particular, beam range in proton therapy are underway at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Within this project, we have developed a Monte Carlo framework for CT-based calculation of dose and irradiation-induced positron emitter distributions. Initial proton beam information is provided by a separate Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation modelling the treatment head. Particle transport in the patient is performed in the CT voxel geometry using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The implementation uses a discrete number of different tissue types with composition and mean density deduced from the CT scan. Scaling factors are introduced to account for the continuous Hounsfield unit dependence of the mass density and of the relative stopping power ratio to water used by the treatment planning system (XiO (Computerized Medical Systems Inc.)). Resulting Monte Carlo dose distributions are generally found in good correspondence with calculations of the treatment planning program, except a few cases (e.g. in the presence of air/tissue interfaces). Whereas dose is computed using standard FLUKA utilities, positron emitter distributions are calculated by internally combining proton fluence with experimental and evaluated cross-sections yielding 11C, 15O, 14O, 13N, 38K and 30P. Simulated positron emitter distributions yield PET images in good agreement with measurements. In this paper, we describe in detail the specific implementation of the FLUKA calculation framework, which may be easily adapted to handle arbitrary phase spaces of proton beams delivered by other facilities or include more reaction channels based on additional cross-section data. Further, we demonstrate the effects of different acquisition time regimes (e.g., PET imaging during or after irradiation) on the intensity and spatial distribution of the irradiation

  18. Deep-penetration calculation for the ISIS target station shielding using the MARS Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculation of neutron penetration through a thick shield was performed with a three-dimensional multi-layer technique using the MARS14(02) Monte Carlo code to compare with the experimental shielding data in 1998 at the ISIS spallation neutron source facility. In this calculation, secondary particles from a tantalum target bombarded by 800-MeV protons were transmitted through a bulk shield of approximately 3-m-thick iron and 1-m-thick concrete. To accomplish this deep-penetration calculation with good statistics, the following three techniques were used in this study. First, the geometry of the bulk shield was three-dimensionally divided into several layers of about 50-cm thickness, and a step-by-step calculation was carried out to multiply the number of penetrated particles at the boundaries between the layers. Second, the source particles in the layers were divided into two parts to maintain the statistical balance on the spatial-flux distribution. Third, only high-energy particles above 20 MeV were transported up to approximately 1 m before the region for benchmark calculation. Finally, the energy spectra of neutrons behind the very thick shield were calculated down to the thermal energy with good statistics, and typically agree well within a factor of two with the experimental data over a broad energy range. The 12C(n,2n)11C reaction rates behind the bulk shield were also calculated, which agree with the experimental data typically within 60%. These results are quite impressive in calculation accuracy for deep-penetration problem. In this report, the calculation conditions, geometry and the variance reduction techniques used in the deep-penetration calculation with the MARS14 code are clarified, and several subroutines of MARS14 which were used in our calculation are also given in the appendix. The numerical data of the calculated neutron energy spectra, reaction rates, dose rates and their C/E (Calculation/Experiment) values are also summarized. The

  19. Accuracy assessment of a new Monte Carlo based burnup computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A new burnup code called BUCAL1 was developed. ► BUCAL1 uses the MCNP tallies directly in the calculation of the isotopic inventories. ► Validation of BUCAL1 was done by code to code comparison using VVER-1000 LEU Benchmark Assembly. ► Differences from BM value were found to be ± 600 pcm for k∞ and ±6% for the isotopic compositions. ► The effect on reactivity due to the burnup of Gd isotopes is well reproduced by BUCAL1. - Abstract: This study aims to test for the suitability and accuracy of a new home-made Monte Carlo burnup code, called BUCAL1, by investigating and predicting the neutronic behavior of a “VVER-1000 LEU Assembly Computational Benchmark”, at lattice level. BUCAL1 uses MCNP tally information directly in the computation; this approach allows performing straightforward and accurate calculation without having to use the calculated group fluxes to perform transmutation analysis in a separate code. ENDF/B-VII evaluated nuclear data library was used in these calculations. Processing of the data library is performed using recent updates of NJOY99 system. Code to code comparisons with the reported Nuclear OECD/NEA results are presented and analyzed.

  20. Monte Carlo shielding comparative analysis applied to TRIGA HEU and LEU spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is a comparative study of LEU (low uranium enrichment) and HEU (highly enriched uranium) fuel utilization effects for the shielding analysis during spent fuel transport. A comparison against the measured data for HEU spent fuel, available from the last stage of spent fuel repatriation fulfilled in the summer of 2008, is also presented. All geometrical and material data for the shipping cask were considered according to NAC-LWT Cask approved model. The shielding analysis estimates radiation doses to shipping cask wall surface, and in air at 1 m and 2 m, respectively, from the cask by means of 3-dimensional Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code. Before loading into the shipping cask TRIGA spent fuel source terms and spent fuel parameters have been obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. 60Co radioactivity is important for HEU spent fuel; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is low. For LEU spent fuel 60Co radioactivity is insignificant; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is high. Dose rates for both HEU and LEU fuel contents are below regulatory limits, LEU spent fuel photon dose rates being greater than the HEU ones. The comparison between HEU spent fuel theoretical and measured dose rates in selected measuring points shows a good agreement, the calculated values being greater than the measured ones both to cask wall surface (about 34% relative difference) and in air at 1 m distance from the cask surface (about 15% relative difference). (authors)

  1. Application of general-purpose radiation transport code into study for laser-produced plasma ions acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general-purpose Monte Carlo particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS), which consists of various quantum dynamics models, was used to study laser-driven ion acceleration. Our simulation reasonably predicted not only the laser driven ion's trajectories detected by the monitors but also the radiation shielding of these particles. (author)

  2. R and D on automatic modeling methods for Monte Carlo codes FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FLUKA is a fully integrated particle physics Monte Carlo simulation package. It is necessary to create the geometry models before calculation. However, it is time- consuming and error-prone to describe the geometry models manually. This study developed an automatic modeling method which could automatically convert computer-aided design (CAD) geometry models into FLUKA models. The conversion program was integrated into CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for nuclear and radiation transport simulation (MCAM). Its correctness has been demonstrated. (authors)

  3. A Residual Monte Carlo Method for Spatially Discrete, Angularly Continuous Radiation Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual Monte Carlo provides exponential convergence of statistical error with respect to the number of particle histories. In the past, residual Monte Carlo has been applied to a variety of angularly discrete radiation-transport problems. Here, we apply residual Monte Carlo to spatially discrete, angularly continuous transport. By maintaining angular continuity, our method avoids the deficiencies of angular discretizations, such as ray effects. For planar geometry and step differencing, we use the corresponding integral transport equation to calculate an angularly independent residual from the scalar flux in each stage of residual Monte Carlo. We then demonstrate that the resulting residual Monte Carlo method does indeed converge exponentially to within machine precision of the exact step differenced solution.

  4. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code: NASIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Yan, Congchong; Xie, Wenzhang; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Tung, Chuanjong

    2015-09-01

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway. PMID:25883312

  5. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with nanodosimetry Monte Carlo simulation code: NASIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway (authors)

  6. Parallel Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (ParaGrandMC) Simulation Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, Vesselin I.

    2016-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the Parallel Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (ParaGrandMC) simulation code. This is a highly scalable parallel FORTRAN code for simulating the thermodynamic evolution of metal alloy systems at the atomic level, and predicting the thermodynamic state, phase diagram, chemical composition and mechanical properties. The code is designed to simulate multi-component alloy systems, predict solid-state phase transformations such as austenite-martensite transformations, precipitate formation, recrystallization, capillary effects at interfaces, surface absorption, etc., which can aid the design of novel metallic alloys. While the software is mainly tailored for modeling metal alloys, it can also be used for other types of solid-state systems, and to some degree for liquid or gaseous systems, including multiphase systems forming solid-liquid-gas interfaces.

  7. Contributions at the Tripoli Monte Carlo code qualifying on critical experiences and at neutronic interaction study of fissile units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality studies in nuclear fuel cycle are based on Monte Carlo method. These codes use multigroup cross sections which can verify by experimental configurations or by use of reference codes such Tripoli 2. In this Tripoli 2 code nuclear data are errors attached and asked for experimental studies with critical experiences. This is one of the aim of this thesis. To calculate the keff of interacted fissile units we have used the multigroup Monte Carlo code Moret with convergence problems. A new estimator of reactions rates permit to better approximate the neutrons exchange between units and a new importance function has been tested. 2 annexes

  8. The use of Monte-Carlo codes for treatment planning in external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport is a very powerful technique. There are basically no exact solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Even, the 'straightforward' situation (in radiotherapy) of an electron beam depth-dose distribution in water proves to be too difficult for analytical methods without making gross approximations such as ignoring energy-loss straggling, large-angle single scattering and Bremsstrahlung production. monte Carlo is essential when radiation is transport from one medium into another. As the particle (be it a neutron, photon, electron, proton) crosses the boundary then a new set of interaction cross-sections is simply read in and the simulation continues as though the new medium were infinite until the next boundary is encountered. Radiotherapy involves directing a beam of megavoltage x rays or electrons (occasionally protons) at a very complex object, the human body. Monte Carlo simulation has proved in valuable at many stages of the process of accurately determining the distribution of absorbed dose in the patient. Some of these applications will be reviewed here. (Rogers and al 1990; Andreo 1991; Mackie 1990). (N.C.)

  9. The use of Monte-Carlo codes for treatment planning in external-beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan, E.; Nahum, PhD. [Copenhagen University Hospital, Radiation Physics Dept. (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport is a very powerful technique. There are basically no exact solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Even, the 'straightforward' situation (in radiotherapy) of an electron beam depth-dose distribution in water proves to be too difficult for analytical methods without making gross approximations such as ignoring energy-loss straggling, large-angle single scattering and Bremsstrahlung production. monte Carlo is essential when radiation is transport from one medium into another. As the particle (be it a neutron, photon, electron, proton) crosses the boundary then a new set of interaction cross-sections is simply read in and the simulation continues as though the new medium were infinite until the next boundary is encountered. Radiotherapy involves directing a beam of megavoltage x rays or electrons (occasionally protons) at a very complex object, the human body. Monte Carlo simulation has proved in valuable at many stages of the process of accurately determining the distribution of absorbed dose in the patient. Some of these applications will be reviewed here. (Rogers and al 1990; Andreo 1991; Mackie 1990). (N.C.)

  10. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  11. The electron transport problem sampling by Monte Carlo individual collision technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of electron transport is of most interest in all fields of the modern science. To solve this problem the Monte Carlo sampling has to be used. The electron transport is characterized by a large number of individual interactions. To simulate electron transport the 'condensed history' technique may be used where a large number of collisions are grouped into a single step to be sampled randomly. Another kind of Monte Carlo sampling is the individual collision technique. In comparison with condensed history technique researcher has the incontestable advantages. For example one does not need to give parameters altered by condensed history technique like upper limit for electron energy, resolution, number of sub-steps etc. Also the condensed history technique may lose some very important tracks of electrons because of its limited nature by step parameters of particle movement and due to weakness of algorithms for example energy indexing algorithm. There are no these disadvantages in the individual collision technique. This report presents some sampling algorithms of new version BRAND code where above mentioned technique is used. All information on electrons was taken from Endf-6 files. They are the important part of BRAND. These files have not been processed but directly taken from electron information source. Four kinds of interaction like the elastic interaction, the Bremsstrahlung, the atomic excitation and the atomic electro-ionization were considered. In this report some results of sampling are presented after comparison with analogs. For example the endovascular radiotherapy problem (P2) of QUADOS2002 was presented in comparison with another techniques that are usually used. (authors)

  12. OMEGA, Subcritical and Critical Neutron Transport in General 3-D Geometry by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: OMEGA is a Monte Carlo code for the solution of the stationary neutron transport equation with k-eff as the Eigenvalue. A three-dimensional geometry is permitted consisting of a very general arrangement of three basic shapes (columns with circular, rectangular, or hexagonal cross section with a finite height and different material layers along their axes). The main restriction is that all the basic shapes must have parallel axes. Most real arrangements of fissile material inside and outside a reactor (e.g., in a fuel storage or transport container) can be described without approximation. The main field of application is the estimation of criticality safety. Many years of experience and comparison with reference cases have shown that the code together with the built-in cross section libraries gives reliable results. The following results can be calculated: - the effective multiplication factor k-eff; - the flux distribution; - reaction rates; - spatially and energetically condensed cross sections for later use in a subsequent OMEGA run. A running job may be interrupted and continued later, possibly with an increased number of batches for an improved statistical accuracy. The geometry as well as the k-eff results may be visualized. The use of the code is demonstrated by many illustrating examples. 2 - Method of solution: The Monte Carlo method is used with neutrons starting from an initial source distribution. The histories of a generation (or batch) of neutrons are followed from collision to collision until the histories are terminated by capture, fission, or leakage. For the solution of the Eigenvalue problem, the starting positions of the neutrons for a given generation are determined by the fission points of the preceding generation. The summation of the results starts only after some initial generations when the spatial part of the fission source has converged. At present the code uses the BNAB-78 subgroup library of the

  13. Conversion coefficients for individual monitoring calculated with integrated tiger series, ITS3, Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current basis for conversion coefficients for calibrating individual photon dosimeters in terms of dose equivalents is found in the series of papers by Grosswent. In his calculation the collision kerma inside the phantom is determined by calculation of the energy fluence at the point of interest and the use of the mass energy absorption coefficient. This approximates the local absorbed dose. Other Monte Carlo methods can be sued to provide calculations of the conversion coefficients. Rogers has calculated fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors with the Electron-Gamma Shower Version 3, EGS3, Monte Carlo program and produced results similar to Grosswent's calculations. This paper will report on calculations using the Integrated TIGER Series Version 3, ITS3, code to calculate the conversion coefficients in ICRU Tissue and in PMMA. A complete description of the input parameters to the program is given and comparison to previous results is included

  14. MCT: a Monte Carlo code for time-dependent neutron thermalization problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Monte Carlo simulation of pulse source experiments, the neutron energy spectrum, spatial distribution and total density may be required for a long time after the pulse. If the assemblies are very small, as often occurs in the cases of interest, sophisticated Monte Carlo techniques must be applied which force neutrons to remain in the system during the time interval investigated. In the MCT code a splitting technique has been applied to neutrons exceeding assigned target times, and we have found that this technique compares very favorably with more usual ones, such as the expected leakage probability, giving large gains in computational time and variance. As an example, satisfactory asymptotic thermal spectra with a neutron attenuation of 10-5 were quickly obtained. (U.S.)

  15. Simulation and study on the γ response spectrum of BGO detector by the application of monte carlo code MOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of Monte Carlo method to build spectra library is useful to reduce experiment workload in Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA). The new Monte Carlo Code MOCA was used to simulate the response spectra of BGO detector for gamma rays from 137Cs, 60Co and neutron induced gamma rays from S and Ti. The results were compared with general code MCNP, show that the agreement of MOCA between simulation and experiment is better than MCNP. This research indicates that building spectra library by Monte Carlo method is feasible. (authors)

  16. Calibration and simulation of a HPGe well detector using Monte Carlo computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo methods are often used in simulating physical and mathematical systems. This computer code is a class of computational algorithms that rely on repeated random sampling to compute their results. Because of their reliance on repeated computation of random or pseudo-random numbers, these methods are most suited to calculation by a computer and tend to be used when it is unfeasible or impossible to compute an exact result with a deterministic algorithm. The Monte Carlo method is used to determine a detector's response curves which are difficult to obtain experimentally. It deals with random numbers for the simulation of the decay conditions and angle of incidence at a given energy value, studying, thus, the random behavior of the radiation, providing response and efficiency curves. The MCNP5 computer code provides means to simulate gamma ray detectors and has been used for this work for the 50keV - 2000 keV energy range. The HPGe well detector was simulated with the MCNP5 computer code and compared with experimental data. The dimensions of both dead layer and the transition layer were determined, and the response curve for a particular geometry was then obtained and compared with the experimental results, in order to verify the detector's simulation. Both results were in very good agreement. (author)

  17. Simulation of the plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak with the Monte Carlo code ERO-TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of plasma with the walls has been one of the critical issues in the development of fusion energy research. On the one hand, plasma induced erosion can seriously limit the lifetime of the wall components, while, on the other hand, eroded particles can be transported into the core plasma where they lead to dilution of the fusion plasma and to energy losses due to radiation. Low-Z wall materials induce only small radiation losses in the plasma core but suffer from large physical sputtering rates. Carbon based materials in addition suffer from chemically induced erosion. High-Z wall materials show significantly smaller erosion but lead to large radiation losses. One of the main goals of present plasma-wall studies is to find a special choice of wall materials for steady state plasma scenarios that will provide an optimum with respect to fuel dilution, radiation losses, wall lifetime and fuel inventory in the walls. To obtain a better understanding of the processes and to estimate the plasma-wall interaction behaviour in future fusion devices the 3-D Monte Carlo code ERO-TEXTOR, based originally on the ERO code, has been developed. It models the plasma-wall interaction and transport processes in the vicinity of a surface positioned in the boundary layer of TEXTOR. The main aim is to simulate the erosion and redeposition behaviour of different wall materials under various plasma conditions and to compare this with experimental results. This contribution describes the main features of the ERO-TEXTOR code and gives some examples of simulation calculations to illustrate the application of the code. (author)

  18. Current status of safety analysis code MARS and uncertainty quantification by Monte-Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARS (Multi-dimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety) code has been developed since 1997 for a realistic multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic system analysis of light water reactor transients. The backbones of MARS are the RELAP5/MOD3.2.1.2 and COBRA-TF codes of USNRC. These two codes were consolidated into a single code by integrating the hydrodynamic solution schemes. New multidimensional TH model has been developed and extended to enable integrated coupled TH analysis through code coupling technique, DLL. The motivation for uncertainty quantification of MARS is considered twofold, 1) to provide “best estimate plus uncertainty” analysis for licensing of commercial power reactor with realistic margins, and 2) to provide support to design and/or validation related analysis for research and production reactors. An assessment of the current LBLOCA uncertainty analysis methodology has been done using data from an integral thermal-hydraulic experiment LOFT L2-5. Monte Carlo calculation has been performed and compared with the tolerance level determined by Wilks formula. The calculation has been done within reasonable CPU time on PC cluster system. Monte-Carlo exercise shows that the 95% upper limit value can be obtained well with 95% confidence level by Wilks formula, although we have to endure 5% risk of PCT under-prediction. The result also shows the statistical fluctuation of limit value using Wilks 1st order is as large as PCT uncertainty itself. The main conclusion is that it is desirable to increase the order of Wilks formula to be higher than the second order to get the reliable safety margin of current design feature. (author)

  19. Low-discrepancy point sets in transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    A drawback to Monte Carlo methods of computation is its rate of convergence. There are methods of sampling that have a better error estimate than those using random numbers. This paper gives the result of some preliminary experiments with these sampling methods on two neutron transport problems.

  20. Benchmark test of drift-kinetic and gyrokinetic codes through neoclassical transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two simulation codes that solve the drift-kinetic or gyrokinetic equation in toroidal plasmas are benchmarked by comparing the simulation results of neoclassical transport. The two codes are the drift-kinetic δf Monte Carlo code (FORTEC-3D) and the gyrokinetic full- f Vlasov code (GT5D), both of which solve radially-global, five-dimensional kinetic equation with including the linear Fokker-Planck collision operator. In a tokamak configuration, neoclassical radial heat flux and the force balance relation, which relates the parallel mean flow with radial electric field and temperature gradient, are compared between these two codes, and their results are also compared with the local neoclassical transport theory. It is found that the simulation results of the two codes coincide very well in a wide rage of plasma collisionality parameter ν* = 0.01 - 10 and also agree with the theoretical estimations. The time evolution of radial electric field and particle flux, and the radial profile of the geodesic acoustic mode frequency also coincide very well. These facts guarantee the capability of GT5D to simulate plasma turbulence transport with including proper neoclassical effects of collisional diffusion and equilibrium radial electric field. (author)

  1. HERMES: a Monte Carlo Code for the Propagation of Ultra-High Energy Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    De Domenico, Manlio; Lyberis, Haris; Settimo, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Although the recent experimental efforts to improve the observation of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) above $10^{18}$ eV, the origin and the composition of such particles is still unknown. In this work, we present the novel Monte Carlo code (HERMES) simulating the propagation of UHE nuclei, in the energy range between $10^{16}$ and $10^{22}$ eV, accounting for propagation in the intervening extragalactic and Galactic magnetic fields and nuclear interactions with relic photons of the e...

  2. Sampling-Based Nuclear Data Uncertainty Quantification for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present PhD research is to establish a methodology of nuclear data uncertainty quantification (NDUQ) for MCNPX, the continuous-energy Monte-Carlo (M-C) code. The high fidelity (continuous-energy treatment and flexible geometry modelling) of MCNPX makes it the choice of routine criticality safety calculations at PSI/LRS, but also raises challenges for NDUQ by conventional sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) methods. The methodology developed during this PhD research is fundamentally ...

  3. Simulation of clinical X-ray tube using the Monte Carlo Method - PENELOPE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women. The main strategy to increase the long-term survival of patients with this disease is the early detection of the tumor, and mammography is the most appropriate method for this purpose. Despite the reduction of cancer deaths, there is a big concern about the damage caused by the ionizing radiation to the breast tissue. To evaluate these measures it was modeled a mammography equipment, and obtained the depth spectra using the Monte Carlo method - PENELOPE code. The average energies of the spectra in depth and the half value layer of the mammography output spectrum. (author)

  4. One-, two- and three-dimensional transport codes using multi-group double-differential form cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a group of computer codes to realize the accurate transport calculation by using the multi-group double-differential form cross section. This type of cross section can correctly take account of the energy-angle correlated reaction kinematics. Accordingly, the transport phenomena in materials with highly anisotropic scattering are accurately calculated by using this cross section. They include the following four codes or code systems: PROF-DD : a code system to generate the multi-group double-differential form cross section library by processing basic nuclear data file compiled in the ENDF / B-IV or -V format, ANISN-DD : a one-dimensional transport code based on the discrete ordinate method, DOT-DD : a two-dimensional transport code based on the discrete ordinate method, MORSE-DD : a three-dimensional transport code based on the Monte Carlo method. In addition to these codes, several auxiliary codes have been developed to process calculated results. This report describes the calculation algorithm employed in these codes and how to use them. (author)

  5. MULTI-KENO: a Monte Carlo code for criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modifying the Monte Carlo code KENO-IV, the MULTI-KENO code was developed for criticality safety analysis. The following functions were added to the code; (1) to divide a system into many sub-systems named super boxes where the size of box types in each super box can be selected independently, (2) to output graphical view of a system for examining geometrical input data, (3) to solve fixed source problems, (4) to permit intersection of core boundaries and inner geometries, (5) to output ANISN type neutron balance table. With the above function (1), many cases which had to be applied a general geometry option of KENO-IV, became to be treated as box type geometry. In such a case, input data became simpler and required computer time became shorter than those of KENO-IV. This code is now available for the FACOM-M200 computer and the CDC 6600 computer. This report is a computer code manual for MULTI-KENO. (author)

  6. Organ and effective dose arising from conventional diagnostic x-ray examinations by monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-4C code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulation has been used by many researchers to calculate organ and effective dose of patients arising from conventional X-ray examinations. In this study the radiation transport code, MCNP4C, has been used to perform Monte Carlo simulations to estimate radiation dose delivered to different organs in conventional X-ray examinations. Materials and Methods: In this work we have made use of ORNL mathematical phantoms with few modifications which have been made. The source has been defined as a point source, emitting photons into a solid angle. The X-ray beam was shaped by a collimator to produce a rectangular field at the midline of the phantom. Results: to validate the simulation executed in this study normalized organs doses to unit ESD for hermaphrodite phantom were computed. Our results were compared with corresponding values presented by NRPB. In general organs doses obtained by application of MCNP-4C (present study) and corresponding values presented in NRPB were in good agreement. For further evaluation of our phantom, the values acquired for organ and effective doses by MCNP-4C and ODS-60 were compared. Conclusion: the technique we have developed is capable of estimating organ and effective doses with a better accuracy than dose values obtained by employment of NRPB and ODS-60 technique

  7. PENELOPE, an algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, F.; Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Baro, J.; Sempau, J.

    1996-07-01

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from 1 keV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres, cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm. (Author) 108 refs.

  8. PENELOPE, an algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from 1 keV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres, cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm. (Author) 108 refs

  9. Approche du potentiel effectif pour la simulation Monte-Carlo du transport électronique avec effets de quantification dans les dispositifs MOSFETs

    OpenAIRE

    Jaud, Marie-Anne

    2006-01-01

    Today, the MOSFET transistor reaches nanometric dimensions for which quantum effects cannot be neglected anymore. It is thus necessary to develop models able to precisely describe the physical phenomena of electronic transport, and to account for the impact of these effects on the performances of the nanometric transistors. In this context, this work concerns the introduction of the quantization effects into a semi-classical Monte Carlo code for the simulation of electronic transport in MOSFE...

  10. Development of NRESP98 Monte Carlo codes for the calculation of neutron response functions of neutron detectors. Calculation of the response function of spherical BF3 proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method to calculate the response function of spherical BF3 proportional counter, which is commonly used as neutron dose rate meter and neutron spectrometer with multi moderator system, is developed. As the calculation code for evaluating the response function, the existing code series NRESP, the Monte Carlo code for the calculation of response function of neutron detectors, is selected. However, the application scope of the existing NRESP is restricted, the NRESP98 is tuned as generally applicable code, with expansion of the geometrical condition, the applicable element, etc. The NRESP98 is tested with the response function of the spherical BF3 proportional counter. Including the effect of the distribution of amplification factor, the detailed evaluation of the charged particle transportation and the effect of the statistical distribution, the result of NRESP98 calculation fit the experience within ±10%. (author)

  11. Simulation of density curve for slim borehole using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole logging for formation density has been an important geophysical measurement in oil industry. For calibration of the Gamma Ray nuclear logging tool, numerous rock models of different lithology and densities are necessary. However, the full success of this calibration process is determined by a reliable benchmark, where the complete and precise chemical composition of the standards is necessary. Simulations using the Monte Carlo MCNP have been widely employed in well logging application once it serves as a low-cost substitute for experimental test pits, as well as a means for obtaining data that are difficult to obtain experimentally. Considering this, the purpose of this work is to use the code MCNP to obtain density curves for slim boreholes using Gamma Ray logging tools. For this, a Slim Density Gamma Probe, named TRISONDR, and a 100 mCi Cs-137 gamma source has been modeled with the new version of MCNP code MCNPX. (author)

  12. Simulation of density curve for slim borehole using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu, E-mail: emonteiro@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda, E-mail: scorrea@nuclear.ufrj.b [Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CCMAT/UEZO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Inaya C.B., E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.b [Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (IPRJ/UERJ) Nova Friburgo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico do Rio de Janeiro; Rocha, Paula L.F., E-mail: ferrucio@acd.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia

    2010-07-01

    Borehole logging for formation density has been an important geophysical measurement in oil industry. For calibration of the Gamma Ray nuclear logging tool, numerous rock models of different lithology and densities are necessary. However, the full success of this calibration process is determined by a reliable benchmark, where the complete and precise chemical composition of the standards is necessary. Simulations using the Monte Carlo MCNP have been widely employed in well logging application once it serves as a low-cost substitute for experimental test pits, as well as a means for obtaining data that are difficult to obtain experimentally. Considering this, the purpose of this work is to use the code MCNP to obtain density curves for slim boreholes using Gamma Ray logging tools. For this, a Slim Density Gamma Probe, named TRISOND{sup R}, and a 100 mCi Cs-137 gamma source has been modeled with the new version of MCNP code MCNPX. (author)

  13. An EGS4 Monte Carlo user code for radiation therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An EGS4 Monte Carlo user code (the UCRTP code) with voxel geometry has been developed as a prototype of the dose calculation engine for radiation therapy planning. A series of dose calculations for photon beam irradiation to a simplified heterogenous voxel phantom of a lung cancer patient has shown that significant build-up in lung tumor and build-down in surrounding normal lung tissue region exist due to the heterogeneity of the media and small field size. Most of the heterogeneity correction algorithms employed by the current commercial treatment planning systems are not satisfactory enough to account for the build-up/down. Since the commercial systems may significantly underestimate the dose in normal lung tissues, sufficient verification and quality assurance of the radiation therapy planning is needed especially in the lung cancer treatment. (author)

  14. Preliminary analyses for HTTR's start-up physics tests by Monte Carlo code MVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of start-up physics tests for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been carried out by Monte Carlo code MVP based on continuous energy method. Heterogeneous core structures were modified precisely, such as the fuel compacts, fuel rods, coolant channels, burnable poisons, control rods, control rod insertion holes, reserved shutdown pellet insertion holes, gaps between graphite blocks, etc. Such precise modification of the core structures was difficult with diffusion calculation. From the analytical results, the followings were confirmed; The first criticality will be achieved around 16 fuel columns loaded. The reactivity at the first criticality can be controlled by only one control rod located at the center of the core with other fifteen control rods fully withdrawn. The excess reactivity, reactor shutdown margin and control rod criticality positions have been evaluated. These results were used for planning of the start-up physics tests. This report presents analyses of start-up physics tests for HTTR by MVP code. (author)

  15. Speedup of MCACE, a Monte Carlo code for evaluation of shielding safety, by parallel computer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the accuracy of shielding analysis, we have modified MCACE, a Monte Carlo code for shielding analysis, to be able to execute on a parallel computer. The suitable algorithms for efficient paralleling has been investigated by static and dynamic analyses of the code. This includes a strategy where new units of batches are assigned to the idling cells dynamically during the execution. The efficiency of paralleling has been measured by using a simulator of a parallel computer. It is found that the load factor of all cells reached nearly 100%, and consequently, it can be said that the most effective paralleling has been achieved. The simulator has estimated the effect of paralleling as the speedup of 7.13 times when a sample problem of 8 batches, 400 particles per one batch, is loaded on parallel computer equipped with 8 cells. (author)

  16. Implementation of mathematical phantom of hand and forearm in GEANT4 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the implementation of a hand and forearm Geant4 phantom code, for further evaluation of occupational exposure of ends of the radionuclides decay manipulated during procedures involving the use of injection syringe. The simulation model offered by Geant4 includes a full set of features, with the reconstruction of trajectories, geometries and physical models. For this work, the values calculated in the simulation are compared with the measurements rates by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in physical phantom REMAB®. From the analysis of the data obtained through simulation and experimentation, of the 14 points studied, there was a discrepancy of only 8.2% of kerma values found, and these figures are considered compatible. The geometric phantom implemented in Geant4 Monte Carlo code was validated and can be used later for the evaluation of doses at ends

  17. A parallelization study of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP4 on a distributed memory highly parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP4 has been implemented on the Fujitsu AP1000 distributed memory highly parallel computer. Parallelization techniques developed and studied are reported. A shielding analysis function of the MCNP4 code is parallelized in this study. A technique to map a history to each processor dynamically and to map control process to a certain processor was applied. The efficiency of parallelized code is up to 80% for a typical practical problem with 512 processors. These results demonstrate the advantages of a highly parallel computer to the conventional computers in the field of shielding analysis by Monte Carlo method. (orig.)

  18. Coded aperture coherent scatter imaging for breast cancer detection: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Morris, Robert E.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2016-03-01

    It is known that conventional x-ray imaging provides a maximum contrast between cancerous and healthy fibroglandular breast tissues of 3% based on their linear x-ray attenuation coefficients at 17.5 keV, whereas coherent scatter signal provides a maximum contrast of 19% based on their differential coherent scatter cross sections. Therefore in order to exploit this potential contrast, we seek to evaluate the performance of a coded- aperture coherent scatter imaging system for breast cancer detection and investigate its accuracy using Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations we modeled our experimental system, which consists of a raster-scanned pencil beam of x-rays, a bismuth-tin coded aperture mask comprised of a repeating slit pattern with 2-mm periodicity, and a linear-array of 128 detector pixels with 6.5-keV energy resolution. The breast tissue that was scanned comprised a 3-cm sample taken from a patient-based XCAT breast phantom containing a tomosynthesis- based realistic simulated lesion. The differential coherent scatter cross section was reconstructed at each pixel in the image using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Each pixel in the reconstructed image was then classified as being either air or the type of breast tissue with which its normalized reconstructed differential coherent scatter cross section had the highest correlation coefficient. Comparison of the final tissue classification results with the ground truth image showed that the coded aperture imaging technique has a cancerous pixel detection sensitivity (correct identification of cancerous pixels), specificity (correctly ruling out healthy pixels as not being cancer) and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9% and 92.0%, respectively. Our Monte Carlo evaluation of our experimental coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system shows that it is able to exploit the greater contrast available from coherently scattered x-rays to increase the accuracy of detecting cancerous regions within the breast.

  19. Construction of Monte Carlo operators in collisional transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo approach for investigating the dynamics of quiescent collisional magnetoplasmas is presented, based on the discretization of the gyrokinetic equation. The theory applies to a strongly rotating multispecies plasma, in a toroidally axisymmetric configuration. Expressions of the Monte Carlo collision operators are obtained for general v-space nonorthogonal coordinates systems, in terms of approximate solutions of the discretized gyrokinetic equation. Basic features of the Monte Carlo operators are that they fullfill all the required conservation laws, i.e., linear momentum and kinetic energy conservation, and in addition that they take into account correctly also off-diagonal diffusion coefficients. The present operators are thus potentially useful for describing the dynamics of a multispecies toroidal magnetoplasma. In particular, strict ambipolarity of particle fluxes is ensured automatically in the limit of small departures of the unperturbed particle trajectories from some initial axisymmetric toroidal magnetic surfaces

  20. MORSE-EMP, Monte-Carlo Neutron and Gamma Multigroup Transport with Array Geometry, for PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A - Description of program or function: MORSE-CGA was developed to add the capability of modeling rectangular lattices for nuclear reactor cores or for multi-partitioned structures. It thus enhances the capability of the MORSE code system. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It has been designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems may be obtained in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution is allowed. B - Method of solution: Monte Carlo methods are used to solve the forward and the adjoint transport equations. Quantities of interest are then obtained by summing the contributions over all collisions, and frequently over most of phase space. Standard multigroup cross sections, such as those used in discrete ordinates codes, may be used as input; either CCC-254/ANISN, CCC-42/DTF-IV, or CCC-89/DOT cross section formats are acceptable. Anisotropic scattering is treated for each group-to-group transfer by utilizing a generalized Gaussian quadrature technique. The Morse code is organised into functional modules with simplified interfaces such that new modules may be incorporated with reasonable ease. The modules are (1) random walk, (2) cross section, (3) geometry, (4) analysis, and (5) diagnostic. The MARS module allows the efficient modeling of complex lattice geometries. Computer memory requirements are minimized because fewer body specifications are needed and nesting and repetition of arrays is allowed. While the basic MORSE code assumes the analysis module is user-written, a general analysis package, SAMBO is included. SAMBO handles some

  1. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET dosimeter for electron backscatter using the GEANT4 code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the body of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter in measuring the electron backscatter from lead. The electron backscatter factor (EBF), which is defined as the ratio of dose at the tissue-lead interface to the dose at the same point without the presence of backscatter, was calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using the GEANT4 code. Electron beams with energies of 4, 6, 9, and 12 MeV were used in the simulation. It was found that in the presence of the MOSFET body, the EBFs were underestimated by about 2%-0.9% for electron beam energies of 4-12 MeV, respectively. The trend of the decrease of EBF with an increase of electron energy can be explained by the small MOSFET dosimeter, mainly made of epoxy and silicon, not only attenuated the electron fluence of the electron beam from upstream, but also the electron backscatter generated by the lead underneath the dosimeter. However, this variation of the EBF underestimation is within the same order of the statistical uncertainties as the Monte Carlo simulations, which ranged from 1.3% to 0.8% for the electron energies of 4-12 MeV, due to the small dosimetric volume. Such small EBF deviation is therefore insignificant when the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is taken into account. Corresponding measurements were carried out and uncertainties compared to Monte Carlo results were within +/- 2%. Spectra of energy deposited by the backscattered electrons in dosimetric volumes with and without the lead and MOSFET were determined by Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that in both cases, when the MOSFET body is either present or absent in the simulation, deviations of electron energy spectra with and without the lead decrease with an increase of the electron beam energy. Moreover, the softer spectrum of the backscattered electron when lead is present can result in a reduction of the MOSFET response due to stronger

  3. Simulations of fast ions distribution in stellarators based on coupled Monte Carlo fuelling and orbit codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerical simulation of the dynamics of fast ions coming from neutral beam injection (NBI) heating is an important task in fusion devices, since these particles are used as sources to heat and fuel the plasma and their uncontrolled losses can damage the walls of the reactor. This paper shows a new application that simulates these dynamics on the grid: FastDEP. FastDEP plugs together two Monte Carlo codes used in fusion science, namely FAFNER2 and ISDEP, and add new functionalities. Physically, FAFNER2 provides the fast ion initial state in the device while ISDEP calculates their evolution in time; as a result, the fast ion distribution function in TJ-II stellerator has been estimated, but the code can be used on any other device. In this paper a comparison between the physics of the two NBI injectors in TJ-II is presented, together with the differences between fast ion confinement and the driven momentum in the two cases. The simulations have been obtained using Montera, a framework developed for achieving grid efficient executions of Monte Carlo applications. (paper)

  4. Developments and applications of the geometry conversion tool McCaD for Monte Carlo particle transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCad is a three-dimension (3D) geometry conversion tool that has been developed at KIT to enable the bi-directional conversions between CAD models and the semi-algebraic geometry representation utilized by most Monte Carlo particle transport codes. This paper introduces the recent improvements of core conversion algorithms, as well as the developments of new interfaces. The use of McCad for neutronics applications is illustrated on the examples of some fusion facilities with complicated geometries. The current status of McCad, including its capabilities and limitations, and the future development plans are discussed as well. (author)

  5. Monte Carlo N Particle code - Dose distribution of clinical electron beams in inhomogeneous phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H A Nedaie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron dose distributions calculated using the currently available analytical methods can be associated with large uncertainties. The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for dose calculation in electron beams. Most of the clinical electron beam simulation studies have been performed using non- MCNP [Monte Carlo N Particle] codes. Given the differences between Monte Carlo codes, this work aims to evaluate the accuracy of MCNP4C-simulated electron dose distributions in a homogenous phantom and around inhomogeneities. Different types of phantoms ranging in complexity were used; namely, a homogeneous water phantom and phantoms made of polymethyl methacrylate slabs containing different-sized, low- and high-density inserts of heterogeneous materials. Electron beams with 8 and 15 MeV nominal energy generated by an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator were investigated. Measurements were performed for a 10 cm × 10 cm applicator at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Individual parts of the beam-defining system were introduced into the simulation one at a time in order to show their effect on depth doses. In contrast to the first scattering foil, the secondary scattering foil, X and Y jaws and applicator provide up to 5% of the dose. A 2%/2 mm agreement between MCNP and measurements was found in the homogenous phantom, and in the presence of heterogeneities in the range of 1-3%, being generally within 2% of the measurements for both energies in a "complex" phantom. A full-component simulation is necessary in order to obtain a realistic model of the beam. The MCNP4C results agree well with the measured electron dose distributions.

  6. Development of a 3D neutron transport code and benchmark tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported of NEACRP '3D Neutron Transport Benchmarks' proposed from Osaka UNiversity, and of recent progress in the development of a 3D neutron transport code. Takeda et al. proposed four problems to NEACRP as 3D neutron transport benchmarks, and 22 results from 20 organizations were submitted. A variety of methods have been used, such as the Monte Carlo, Sn, Pn, synthetic, and nodal method. The results for k-eff, control-rod worths, and region-averaged fluxes are summarized with the conclusions that (1) in XYZ geometry the Sn method with n=8 shows a good agreement with the Monte-Carlo method, and gives even better results in some cases, (2) the Pn method has significant spatial mesh effects, and (3) the Sn method is not satisfactory in hexagonal-Z geometry, and improvements in accuracy are desirable. Improvement of a 3D neutron transport code is in progress to resolve the problem in the hexagonal-Z geometry by considering new diamond difference schemes and an improved coarse-mesh method, and also by applying the nodal method. (author)

  7. Basic physical and chemical information needed for development of Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to view track structure analysis as an application of a branch of theoretical physics (i.e., statistical physics and physical kinetics in the language of the Landau school). Monte Carlo methods and transport equation methods represent two major approaches. In either approach, it is of paramount importance to use as input the cross section data that best represent the elementary microscopic processes. Transport analysis based on unrealistic input data must be viewed with caution, because results can be misleading. Work toward establishing the cross section data, which demands a wide scope of knowledge and expertise, is being carried out through extensive international collaborations. In track structure analysis for radiation biology, the need for cross sections for the interactions of electrons with DNA and neighboring protein molecules seems to be especially urgent. Finally, it is important to interpret results of Monte Carlo calculations fully and adequately. To this end, workers should document input data as thoroughly as possible and report their results in detail in many ways. Workers in analytic transport theory are then likely to contribute to the interpretation of the results

  8. Two-dimensional multi-fluid tokamak transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code is presented which describes the time evolution of axisymmetric plasmas of arbitrary cross section in toroidal geometries. Assuming that flux surface shapes change more slowly than plasma parameters, transport can be regarded as proceeding through a sequence of magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. This assumption suggests an algorithm which involves iteration between one-dimensional transport calculations and two-dimensional equilibrium calculations. Numerical results pertaining to the accuracy of the code and the validity of the algorithm are presented

  9. Interfacial and Wall Transport Models for SPACE-CAP Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon Joon; Choo, Yeon Joon; Han, Tae Young; Hwang, Su Hyun; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Tech., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hoon; Ha, Sang Jun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The development project for the domestic design code was launched to be used for the safety and performance analysis of pressurized light water reactors. And CAP (Containment Analysis Package) code has been also developed for the containment safety and performance analysis side by side with SPACE. The CAP code treats three fields (gas, continuous liquid, and dispersed drop) for the assessment of containment specific phenomena, and is featured by its multidimensional assessment capabilities. Thermal hydraulics solver was already developed and now under testing of its stability and soundness. As a next step, interfacial and wall transport models was setup. In order to develop the best model and correlation package for the CAP code, various models currently used in major containment analysis codes, which are GOTHIC, CONTAIN2.0, and CONTEMPT-LT, have been reviewed. The origins of the selected models used in these codes have also been examined to find out if the models have not conflict with a proprietary right. In addition, a literature survey of the recent studies has been performed in order to incorporate the better models for the CAP code. The models and correlations of SPACE were also reviewed. CAP models and correlations are composed of interfacial heat/mass, and momentum transport models, and wall heat/mass, and momentum transport models. This paper discusses on those transport models in the CAP code.

  10. Monali-Rev.1: a Monte Carlo code for analysing fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MONALI-Rev.1 is a multigroup Monte Carlo program developed on ND computers for analysing fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors. This version of the code is flexibly dimensioned so that the allowed size of a problem is limited only by the total data storage required. The code can read multigroup data for various nuclides directly from WIMS multigroup (69/27) cross section sets. Most of the input data, with the exception of cross sections, if needed, are read in free format. The treatment of anisotropy (up to P1 at present) may be in selective mixtures. The input to the geometry module has been simplified. The code has flexibility in the definition of regions. The results calculated by the code include Keff, multigroup leakages and absorptions, group- and region-dependent fluxes. The multigroup leakages are calculated for each outer-most surface. Statistical confidence limits are also assigned to the results. In the end frequency distributions are found for the multiplication factor and optionally a normality test is also performed on the multiplication factors. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs., 2 appendices

  11. PENLINAC: extending the capabilities of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE for the simulation of therapeutic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RodrIguez, M L [Centro Medico Paitilla. Calle 53 y ave Balboa, Paitilla (Panama)], E-mail: milrocas@gmail.com

    2008-09-07

    In this work we present PENLINAC, a code package developed to facilitate the use of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE for the simulation of therapeutic beams, including high-energy electrons, photons and {sup 60}Co beams. The code simplifies the creation of the treatment machine geometry, allowing the modeling of their components from elementary geometric bodies and their further conversion to the quadric functions-based structure handled by PENELOPE. The code is implemented in various subroutines that allow the user to handle several models of radiation sources and phase spaces. The phase spaces are not part of the geometry and can store many variables of the particle in a relatively small data space. The set of subroutines does not alter the PENELOPE algorithms; thus, the main program implemented by the user can maintain its kind-of-particle-independent structure. A support program can handle and analyze the phase spaces to generate, among others, last interaction maps and probability distributions that can be used as sources in simulation. Results from simulations of a Clinac linear accelerator head are presented in order to demonstrate the package capabilities. Dose distributions calculated in a water phantom for a variety of beams of this accelerator showed good agreement with measurements.

  12. Using SERPENT Monte Carlo and Burnup code to model Traveling Wave Reactors - TWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is mainly devoted to the proof-of-principle implementation of the SERPENT code for the simulation of traveling wave reactors. Traveling wave reactors are both fast reactors and nuclear burning wave reactors in which the breeding and burning of nuclear fuel appear almost simultaneously. SERPENT is a neutron transport code whose last official update package is SERPENT 1.1.19 and whose SERPENT 2 version is currently in progress. The investigation of SERPENT 1.1.19 and of SERPENT 2 codes for multiprocessor tasks with long burnup steps was performed. It appears that SERPENT 2 has eliminated parallelization problems efficiently. Methods to remove the influence of the ignition zone were considered, and neutron transport simulations with various fragmentations of the burnup zone were performed. (authors)

  13. Comparison of Transport Codes, HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA, Using 1977 GCR Solar Minimum Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Aumann, Aric R.

    2009-01-01

    The HZETRN deterministic radiation transport code is one of several tools developed to analyze the effects of harmful galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) on mission planning, astronaut shielding and instrumentation. This paper is a comparison study involving the two Monte Carlo transport codes, HETC-HEDS and FLUKA, and the deterministic transport code, HZETRN. Each code is used to transport ions from the 1977 solar minimum GCR spectrum impinging upon a 20 g/cm2 Aluminum slab followed by a 30 g/cm2 water slab. This research is part of a systematic effort of verification and validation to quantify the accuracy of HZETRN and determine areas where it can be improved. Comparisons of dose and dose equivalent values at various depths in the water slab are presented in this report. This is followed by a comparison of the proton fluxes, and the forward, backward and total neutron fluxes at various depths in the water slab. Comparisons of the secondary light ion 2H, 3H, 3He and 4He fluxes are also examined.

  14. NEA organised validation of multi-dimensional transport codes and cross-section sets used presently in reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Task Force of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee performed benchmark calculations to validate two- and three-dimensional transport codes and cross-section sets used for radiation shielding. Based on careful measurements from the VENUS critical facility of SCK/CEN-Mol/Belgium, the Task Force started with two-dimensional benchmark calculations representing the arrangement of VENUS-1, which is a mock-up of the Westinghouse three loop reactor. About 20 different calculations were presented. Several 2D-SN-codes were used including some in-house codes and the Monte Carlo program MCNP-4A. The transport cross-sections were taken from ENDF/B-VI or JEF 2.2 and the dosimetry data mainly from IRDF-90v2. The most challenging task was the validation of the latest versions of three-dimensional transport codes with the complex arrangement of VENUS-3. Approximately 14 independent benchmark calculations were contributed world-wide. Several versions of 3D-SN-codes and the Monte Carlo code MCNP were applied. In conclusion the results of the three-dimensional benchmark (VENUS-3) are in general much closer to the experimental values than for the two-dimensional benchmark (VENUS-1). This shows the inherent deficiencies of two-dimensional transport calculations, due to approximations such as diffusion based axial buckling corrections and improper averaging of source and shielding materials, since real configurations are always three-dimensional. (author)

  15. SU-E-T-578: MCEBRT, A Monte Carlo Code for External Beam Treatment Plan Verifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, O; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Present a new Monte Carlo code (MCEBRT) for patient-specific dose calculations in external beam radiotherapy. The code MLC model is benchmarked and real patient plans are re-calculated using MCEBRT and compared with commercial TPS. Methods: MCEBRT is based on the GEPTS system (Med. Phys. 29 (2002) 835–846). Phase space data generated for Varian linac photon beams (6 – 15 MV) are used as source term. MCEBRT uses a realistic MLC model (tongue and groove, rounded ends). Patient CT and DICOM RT files are used to generate a 3D patient phantom and simulate the treatment configuration (gantry, collimator and couch angles; jaw positions; MLC sequences; MUs). MCEBRT dose distributions and DVHs are compared with those from TPS in absolute way (Gy). Results: Calculations based on the developed MLC model closely matches transmission measurements (pin-point ionization chamber at selected positions and film for lateral dose profile). See Fig.1. Dose calculations for two clinical cases (whole brain irradiation with opposed beams and lung case with eight fields) are carried out and outcomes are compared with the Eclipse AAA algorithm. Good agreement is observed for the brain case (Figs 2-3) except at the surface where MCEBRT dose can be higher by 20%. This is due to better modeling of electron contamination by MCEBRT. For the lung case an overall good agreement (91% gamma index passing rate with 3%/3mm DTA criterion) is observed (Fig.4) but dose in lung can be over-estimated by up to 10% by AAA (Fig.5). CTV and PTV DVHs from TPS and MCEBRT are nevertheless close (Fig.6). Conclusion: A new Monte Carlo code is developed for plan verification. Contrary to phantombased QA measurements, MCEBRT simulate the exact patient geometry and tissue composition. MCEBRT can be used as extra verification layer for plans where surface dose and tissue heterogeneity are an issue.

  16. Investigation of Nuclear Data Libraries with TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo Code for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Brun, E.

    2014-04-01

    The Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor ASTRID is currently under design and development in France. Traditional ECCO/ERANOS fast reactor code system used for ASTRID core design calculations relies on multi-group JEFF-3.1.1 data library. To gauge the use of ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data libraries in the fast reactor applications, two recent OECD/NEA computational benchmarks specified by Argonne National Laboratory were calculated. Using the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code, both ABR-1000 MWth MOX core and metallic (U-Pu) core were investigated. Under two different fast neutron spectra and two data libraries, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1, reactivity impact studies were performed. Using JEFF-3.1.1 library under the BOEC (Beginning of equilibrium cycle) condition, high reactivity effects of 808 ± 17 pcm and 1208 ± 17 pcm were observed for ABR-1000 MOX core and metallic core respectively. To analyze the causes of these differences in reactivity, several TRIPOLI-4 runs using mixed data libraries feature allow us to identify the nuclides and the nuclear data accounting for the major part of the observed reactivity discrepancies.

  17. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations

  18. Spectral history model in DYN3D: Verification against coupled Monte-Carlo thermal-hydraulic code BGCore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pu-239 based spectral history method was tested on 3D BWR single assembly case. • Burnup of a BWR fuel assembly was performed with the nodal code DYN3D. • Reference solution was obtained by coupled Monte-Carlo thermal-hydraulic code BGCore. • The proposed method accurately reproduces moderator density history effect for BWR test case. - Abstract: This research focuses on the verification of a recently developed methodology accounting for spectral history effects in 3D full core nodal simulations. The traditional deterministic core simulation procedure includes two stages: (1) generation of homogenized macroscopic cross section sets and (2) application of these sets to obtain a full 3D core solution with nodal codes. The standard approach adopts the branch methodology in which the branches represent all expected combinations of operational conditions as a function of burnup (main branch). The main branch is produced for constant, usually averaged, operating conditions (e.g. coolant density). As a result, the spectral history effects that associated with coolant density variation are not taken into account properly. Number of methods to solve this problem (such as micro-depletion and spectral indexes) were developed and implemented in modern nodal codes. Recently, we proposed a new and robust method to account for history effects. The methodology was implemented in DYN3D and involves modification of the few-group cross section sets. The method utilizes the local Pu-239 concentration as an indicator of spectral history. The method was verified for PWR and VVER applications. However, the spectrum variation in BWR core is more pronounced due to the stronger coolant density change. The purpose of the current work is investigating the applicability of the method to BWR analysis. The proposed methodology was verified against recently developed BGCore system, which couples Monte Carlo neutron transport with depletion and thermal-hydraulic solvers and

  19. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wollaeger, Ryan T; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M; Jordan, George C; Lamb, Donald Q; Moses, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    We explore the application of Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) to radiation transport in strong fluid outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method of Fleck & Cummings is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking Monte Carlo particles through optically thick materials. The DDMC method of Densmore accelerates an IMC computation where the domain is diffusive. Recently, Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent neutrino transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally grey DDMC method. In this article we rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. The method described is suitable for a large variety of non-mono...

  20. Monte Carlo shielding comparative analysis applied to TRIGA HEU and LEU spent fuel transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margeanu, C. A.; Iorgulis, C. [Reactor Physics, Nuclear Fuel Performances and Nuclear Safety Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, P.O Box 78, Pitesti (Romania); Margeanu, S. [Radiation Protection Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Pitesti (Romania); Barbos, D. [TRIGA Research Reactor Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Pitesti (Romania)

    2009-07-01

    The paper is a comparative study of LEU (low uranium enrichment) and HEU (highly enriched uranium) fuel utilization effects for the shielding analysis during spent fuel transport. A comparison against the measured data for HEU spent fuel, available from the last stage of spent fuel repatriation fulfilled in the summer of 2008, is also presented. All geometrical and material data for the shipping cask were considered according to NAC-LWT Cask approved model. The shielding analysis estimates radiation doses to shipping cask wall surface, and in air at 1 m and 2 m, respectively, from the cask by means of 3-dimensional Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code. Before loading into the shipping cask TRIGA spent fuel source terms and spent fuel parameters have been obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. {sup 60}Co radioactivity is important for HEU spent fuel; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is low. For LEU spent fuel {sup 60}Co radioactivity is insignificant; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is high. Dose rates for both HEU and LEU fuel contents are below regulatory limits, LEU spent fuel photon dose rates being greater than the HEU ones. The comparison between HEU spent fuel theoretical and measured dose rates in selected measuring points shows a good agreement, the calculated values being greater than the measured ones both to cask wall surface (about 34% relative difference) and in air at 1 m distance from the cask surface (about 15% relative difference). (authors)